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Sample records for self-care deficit nursing

  1. Examining Self-Care Behaviors and Their Associated Factors Among Adolescent Girls With Dysmenorrhea: An Application of Orem's Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory.

    PubMed

    Wong, Cho Lee; Ip, Wan Yim; Choi, Kai Chow; Lam, Lai Wah

    2015-05-01

    To test a hypothesized model that examines the relationship between selected basic conditioning factors, self-care agency, and self-care behaviors among adolescent girls with dysmenorrhea using Orem's self-care deficit nursing theory as a framework. This was a predictive correlational study conducted with a total of 531 secondary school girls. Self-care agency, self-care behaviors, and 11 variables that have been theoretically or empirically justified in previous studies as relevant to basic conditioning factors were selected and collected by means of structured questionnaires. Path analyses were performed to test the hypothesized linkages among variables. Path analysis revealed that age and received menstrual education had both direct and indirect effects through self-care agency on self-care behaviors. Mother's and father's educational level, pain intensity, and self-medication used when experiencing dysmenorrhea only affected the self-care behaviors directly. This is the first study that provided information about the relationship between basic conditioning factors, self-care agency, and self-care behaviors among adolescent girls with dysmenorrhea. Knowledge of the factors influencing self-care behaviors in these adolescent girls will assist healthcare professionals in developing effective interventions to promote self-care and ameliorate the adverse impact of this condition. Interventional strategies that aim at promoting self-care behaviors among adolescent girls with dysmenorrhea should strengthen girls' self-care agency and should target those with a younger age, higher pain intensity, mother with a higher educational level, father with a lower educational level, and those who do not take self-medication for dysmenorrhea. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  2. Self-care and HIV/AIDS patients: nursing care systematization.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Joselany Afio; Pagliuca, Lorita Marlena Freitag

    2006-01-01

    This research aimed at systematizing nursing care to HIV/aids patients in view of Orem's Self-care Deficit Nursing Theory, using the convergent-care method and the Self-Care Nursing Process. Subjects were thirteen HIV/AIDS patients attended at a non-governmental organization in Fortaleza/CE, Brazil. We used interview techniques, physical examination, observation and information records, with a structured instrument, addressing requisites related to universal self-care, development and health alterations. Self-care deficits corresponded to nineteen nursing diagnoses, named according to NANDA's Taxonomy II, ten of which were based on the requisites for universal self-care, five on the requisites for self-care related to development and four on the requisites for self-care related to health deviations. In care planning, goals were established and the system and health methods were selected, prioritizing support-education actions in order to engage HIV/aids patients in self-care.

  3. Self-Healing and Self-Care for Nurses.

    PubMed

    Crane, Patricia J; Ward, Suzanne F

    2016-11-01

    The potential effects of self-care techniques to increase nurses' effectiveness and influence positive patient care outcomes have often been underestimated. Today, nurses experience increased stress as a result of more work hours and greater patient loads. Research studies demonstrate the value to an organization and to individuals of educating nurses about self-care. Studies also show that how being aware of individual reaction patterns is vital to learning more effective coping mechanisms. In this article, we discuss the aspects of body, mind, emotions, and spirit as they relate to self-care; present self-care change techniques; and offer some practical self-care exercises. Most self-care skills can be learned and implemented in a short period of time. Nurses are encouraged to experiment with the various techniques to determine the most effective ones for them. Copyright © 2016 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Self-Care in Palliative Care Nursing and Medical Professionals: A Cross-Sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jason; Wand, Timothy; Fraser, Jennifer A

    2017-06-01

    Self-care is an important consideration for palliative care professionals. To date, few details have been recorded about the nature or uptake of self-care practices in the palliative care workforce. As part of a broader mixed methods study, this article reports findings from a national survey of nurses and doctors. The objective of this study was to examine perceptions, education, and practices relating to self-care among palliative care nursing and medical professionals. A cross-sectional survey using REDCap software was conducted between April and May 2015. Perceived importance of self-care, self-care education and planning, and self-care strategies most utilized were explored. Descriptive statistics were calculated and content analysis used to identify domains of self-care. Three hundred seventy-two palliative care nursing and medical professionals practicing in Australia. Most respondents regarded self-care as very important (86%). Some rarely practised self-care and less than half (39%) had received training in self-care. Physical self-care strategies were most commonly reported, followed closely by social self-care and inner self-care. Self-care plans had been used by a small proportion of respondents (6%) and over two-thirds (70%) would consider using self-care plans if training could be provided. Self-care is practised across multiple health related domains, with physical self-care strategies used most frequently. Australian palliative care nurses and doctors recognize the importance of self-care practice, but further education and training are needed to increase their understanding of, and consistency in, using effective self-care strategies. These findings carry implications for professional practice and future research.

  5. Nurses' self-care behaviors related to weight and stress.

    PubMed

    Nahm, Eun-Shim; Warren, Joan; Zhu, Shijun; An, Minjeong; Brown, Jeanine

    2012-01-01

    Considerable research on preventive health care behaviors has been conducted in different segments of the population. Although nurses are the largest group of direct health care providers (3 million), little is known about their preventive health care behaviors. As the average age of nurses working in the United States (US) increases (mean age 47 years), maintaining their health to ensure they can continue to provide optimal health care to others becomes a greater priority. This descriptive online study examined registered nurses' dietary and exercise practices, weight status, stress levels, and preferred preventive health strategies using a sample of nurses recruited from a community-based, urban teaching hospital (n = 183; mean age 47 ± 11.3 years). The majority of participants (72.2%, n = 122) reported a lack of exercise, and more than half (53.8%, n = 91) had an irregular meal pattern. The average body mass index (BMI) was 28.3 ± 6.8, and 59.2% (n = 100) were either overweight (n = 47) or obese (n = 53). BMI had a significant inverse relationship with having a regular meal schedule and the amount of time spent exercising. Participants who reported greater stress had more irregular meal schedules. The most frequently used stress-release method was eating (n = 32), followed by exercise (n = 31). Nurses are fully aware of measures that should be taken for healthy living. Their knowledge, however, has not been well translated into their own self-care. As nursing shortages loom, maintaining the health of the aging nursing workforce is essential to retention. Further research is needed to identify factors that may motivate nurses to better care for themselves and measures that can be implemented by employers to initiate and sustain these preventive health care behaviors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of healing touch training on self-care awareness in nurses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Pegi

    Nursing focuses on supporting clients' health and health behaviors; however, they tend to exhibit unproductive behaviors when it comes to caring for themselves. As nurses' self-neglect can undermine client care, supporting nurses' self-care practices are expected to translate into clients' self-care. Healing Touch (HT) is one option for supporting nurses' self-care, as it is an accepted nursing practice and studies suggest that HT may have beneficial effects for those delivering it. This study examined the impact of a 2-day HT training on awareness of the need for self-care in nurses. HT training was offered as continuing education for 45 nurses at a Veteran's Administration hospital in Long Beach, CA. This mixed-methods study used a pre/post-test design to measure the effects of HT Level 1 training on nurses' self-care self-awareness. Independent samples t-tests and analyses of variance were used to detect whether any significant differences emerged based on participant demographic data. Data were analyzed using paired t-tests to determine whether participants' self-awareness changed over the study period. Effect size for any differences were calculated using Cohen's d. Open-ended responses were reviewed and common themes were identified related to what participants believed they learned and how it affected their care for themselves and their clients. Two increases were found to be significant and of sufficient power when comparing pre- to delayed post-test scores: physical self-care awareness (mean difference = 0.956, t(44) = 5.085, p = .000, r = .61) and professional self-care awareness (mean difference = .955, t(43) = 5.277, p = .000, r = .63). Qualitative findings suggested that changes in their awareness, self-directed practices, and patient care practices are anticipated, evident, and sustained based upon themes across the three tests. Nurses are advised to take a course that teaches specific self-care techniques and strategies and continue practicing

  7. Assessment of an educational intervention on nurses' knowledge and retention of heart failure self-care principles and the Teach Back method.

    PubMed

    Mahramus, Tara; Penoyer, Daleen Aragon; Frewin, Sarah; Chamberlain, Lyne; Wilson, Debra; Sole, Mary Lou

    2014-01-01

    Nurses must have optimum knowledge of heart failure self-care principles to adequately prepare patients for self-care at home. However, study findings demonstrate that nurses have knowledge deficits in self-care concepts for heart failure. A quasi-experimental, repeated measures design was used to assess nurses' knowledge of heart failure self-care before, immediately after, and 3-months following an educational intervention, which also included the Teach Back method. Follow-up reinforcement was provided after the educational intervention. One hundred fifty nurses participated in the study. Significant differences were found between pre-test (65.1%) and post-test (80.6%) scores (p < 0.001). Teach Back proficiency was achieved by 98.3%. Only 61 participants completed the 3-month assessment of knowledge. In this group, mean knowledge scores increased significantly across all three measurements (p < 0.001): 66.5% (pre-test); 82.1% (post-test); 89.5% (follow up post-test). Participation in a comprehensive educational program resulted in increased nurses' knowledge of heart failure self-care principles and the knowledge was sustained and increased over time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Oral Health Self-Care Behavior and Dental Attitudes among Nursing Home Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, R. Constance; Meckstroth, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The need for nursing home care will increase for the next several decades. Rural areas will be impacted in particular, as many older adults live in rural areas. Daily oral infection control changes when a person moves from independent living to institutional living. Oral care to dependent individuals is influenced by many factors. The purpose of this study is to determine the association of oral health self-care behavior with dental attitudes in nursing home personnel in a rural state. A survey was provided to attendees at an oral health conference. Questions were asked to determine dental knowledge, oral health self-care behavior, and dental care attitudes. Of 128 long term care health care facilities’ personnel invited, there were 31 attendees, and 21 of the attendees participated (67.7%). Nursing home personnel had a high level of dental knowledge. Oral health self-care behavior was independently influenced by dental knowledge (β=0.17; p=0.0444) and dental attitudes (β=0.55; p=.0081). Further investigation is needed to determine if oral health self-care attitudes and oral self-care behavior of nursing home personnel are factors in the provision of quality daily oral infection control for dependent nursing home residents living in rural areas. PMID:25349776

  9. Dysmenorrhoea and self-care behaviours among hospital nurses: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Min-Hui; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Hsu, Su-Chen; Liu, I-Ping

    2013-11-01

    To investigate self-care behaviours and its predictors for dysmenorrhoea among hospital nurses. Dysmenorrhoea is an important issue in hospital nurses for its influence on job performance and quality of patient care. Given the difficulties in reorganising work schedule for taking menstrual leave in Taiwan, it is necessary to improve the comfort level of nurses during menstruation. A cross-sectional correlation study using a structured questionnaire. A convenience sampling method was used to select two hospitals in Southern Taiwan, and participants were recruited by random sampling method. Questionnaire used in the study contained personal information, Dysmenorrheic Knowledge Scale, Menstrual Attitude Scale and Dysmenorrheic Self-Care Behavior Scale (DSCBS). Two hundred and ninety-seven participants had experienced dysmenorrhoea in the last six months, with the prevalence rate of 70·7%. Results showed the average age of the participants was 30·3 years, and 252 participants (82·4%) self-perceived they were bothered by dysmenorrhoea. The score of DSCBS was 29·9 (±5·3). The results of stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed the predictors of DSCBS included whether the participants (1) were married, (2) had irregular menstruation, (3) had received health education on dysmenorrhoea, (4) visited doctor for dysmenorrhoea, (5) knew they may take menstrual leave and (6) were identified with menstruation as a natural event. The r(2) was 18·4%. Hospital nurses' self-care behaviour for dysmenorrhoea is suggested to be improved through enhanced peer support and caring. The prevalence rate of dysmenorrhoea among hospital nurses is high. Most of them take analgesics to reduce pain to return to work. We recommend hospitals to provide women-friendly workplace and empowerment activities to improve the self-care ability and comfort level of nurses during menstruation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Nurses and Health-Promoting Behaviors: Knowledge May Not Translate Into Self-Care

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Alyson; Bevans, Margaret; Brooks, Alyssa T.; Gibbons, Susanne; Wallen, Gwenyth R.

    2017-01-01

    Nurses are knowledgeable regarding the importance of health-promoting activities such as healthy eating, physical activity, stress management, sleep hygiene, and maintaining healthy relationships. However, this knowledge may not translate into nurses’ own self-care. Nurses may not follow recommended guidelines for physical activity and proper nutrition. Long hours, work overload, and shift work associated with nursing practice can be stressful and contribute to job dissatisfaction, burnout, and health consequences such as obesity and sleep disturbances. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of research examining nurses’ participation in health-promoting behaviors, including intrinsic and extrinsic factors that may influence nurses’ participation in these activities. This article also provides recommendations for perioperative nurse leaders regarding strategies to incorporate into the nursing workplace to improve the health of the staff nurses by increasing health-promoting behaviors. PMID:28241948

  11. Care for the Caregiver: Evaluation of Mind-Body Self-Care for Accelerated Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Drew, Barbara L; Motter, Tracey; Ross, Ratchneewan; Goliat, Laura M; Sharpnack, Patricia A; Govoni, Amy L; Bozeman, Michelle C; Rababah, Jehad

    2016-01-01

    Stress affects the well-being of both nursing students and the individuals with whom they work. With the theory of cognitive appraisal as a framework for this study, it is proposed that mind-body self-care strategies promote stress management by stabilization of emotions. Outcomes will be a perception of less stress and more mindful engagement with the environment. Objective of the study was to describe an evaluation of student perceived stress and mindfulness to 1-hour per week of class time dedicated to mind-body self-care (yoga, mindful breathing, Reiki, and essential oil therapy). It was a quasi-experimental study; data collection took place at 4 time points. Participants were entry-level accelerated nursing students from 3 US universities: 50 in the treatment group, 64 in the comparison group. Data included health-promoting practices using Health-Promoting Promotion Lifestyle Profile II as a control variable, stress and mindfulness (Perceived Stress Scale [PSS] and Mindful Attention Awareness Scale [MAAS]), and demographic information; analysis using mixed-design repeated-measures analysis of variances. There was a statistically significant interaction between intervention and time on PSS scores, F(3, 264) = 3.95, P = .009, partial η(2) = 0.043, with PSS scores of the intervention group decreasing from baseline to T3 when intervention ended whereas PSS scores of the comparison group increased from baseline. The average scores on the MAAS did not differ significantly. Evaluation of an embedded mind-body self-care module in the first nursing course demonstrated promising improvements in stress management. The findings support the appropriateness of integrating mind-body self-care content into nursing curricula to enhance students' ability to regulate stress.

  12. Exploring the meaning and practice of self-care among palliative care nurses and doctors: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jason; Wand, Timothy; Fraser, Jennifer A

    2018-04-18

    Self-care practice within the palliative care workforce is often discussed, yet seemingly under-researched. While palliative care professionals are required to implement and maintain effective self-care strategies, there appears little evidence to guide them. Moreover, there is an apparent need to clarify the meaning of self-care in palliative care practice. This paper reports qualitative findings within the context of a broader mixed-methods study. The aim of the present study was to explore the meaning and practice of self-care as described by palliative care nurses and doctors. A purposive sample of 24 palliative care nurses and doctors across Australia participated in semi-structured, in-depth interviews. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed prior to inductive qualitative content analysis, supported by QSR NVivo data management software. Three overarching themes emerged from the analysis: (1) A proactive and holistic approach to promoting personal health and wellbeing to support professional care of others; (2) Personalised self-care strategies within professional and non-professional contexts; and (3) Barriers and enablers to self-care practice. The findings of this study provide a detailed account of the context and complexity of effective self-care practice previously lacking in the literature. Self-care is a proactive, holistic, and personalised approach to the promotion of health and wellbeing through a variety of strategies, in both personal and professional settings, to enhance capacity for compassionate care of patients and their families. This research adds an important qualitative perspective and serves to advance knowledge of both the context and effective practice of self-care in the palliative care workforce.

  13. An integrative literature review on nursing interventions aimed at increasing self-care among heart failure patients 1

    PubMed Central

    Boisvert, Sophie; Proulx-Belhumeur, Alexandra; Gonçalves, Natalia; Doré, Michel; Francoeur, Julie; Gallani, Maria Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to analyze and summarize knowledge concerning critical components of interventions that have been proposed and implemented by nurses with the aim of optimizing self-care by heart failure patients. Methods: PubMed and CINAHL were the electronic databases used to search full peer-reviewed papers, presenting descriptions of nursing interventions directed to patients or to patients and their families and designed to optimize self-care. Forty-two studies were included in the final sample (n=4,799 patients). Results: this review pointed to a variety and complexity of nursing interventions. As self-care encompasses several behaviors, interventions targeted an average of 3.6 behaviors. Educational/counselling activities were combined or not with cognitive behavioral strategies, but only about half of the studies used a theoretical background to guide interventions. Clinical assessment and management were frequently associated with self-care interventions, which varied in number of sessions (1 to 30); length of follow-up (2 weeks to 12 months) and endpoints. Conclusions: these findings may be useful to inform nurses about further research in self-care interventions in order to propose the comparison of different modalities of intervention, the use of theoretical background and the establishment of endpoints to evaluate their effectiveness. PMID:26444179

  14. Bridging the Self-care Deficit Gap: Remote Patient Monitoring and the Hospital-at-Home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cafazzo, Joseph A.; Leonard, Kevin; Easty, Anthony C.; Rossos, Peter G.; Chan, Christopher T.

    This study examines the use of a remote patient monitoring intervention to address the challenge of patient self-care in complex hospital-at-home therapies. It was shown that in a home hemodialysis patient group, remote patient monitoring facilitated self-care and was supported by patients and, in particular, family caregivers. This does not come without cost to the patient however, who now has greater personal responsibility and accountability for their health management. Promising results from this study indicate that most patients are willing to assume this cost in exchange for the possibility of improved health outcomes.

  15. The Development of a Nurse-Led Internet-Based Learning and Self-care Program for Cancer Patients With Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression-A Part of U-CARE.

    PubMed

    Hauffman, Anna; Alfonsson, Sven; Mattsson, Susanne; Forslund, Marina; Bill-Axelson, Anna; Nygren, Peter; Johansson, Birgitta

    Having access to information about the disease and being encouraged to participate in self-care activities may reduce anxiety and depression symptoms in cancer patients. Internet-based interventions may be one way to support effective self-care strategies to improve emotional well-being and health-related quality of life. The aim of this study was to describe the development and acceptance of an Internet-based program intended to support cancer patients with anxiety and depression symptoms. A structured collaboration between patients, clinicians, and researchers was used to develop a theory- and evidence-based interactive health communication application (IHCA) based on Orem's self-care deficit nursing theory with influences from Bandura's social learning theory and psychoeducation. The result is an IHCA described as a Nurse-led, Internet-based Learning and Self-care program that helps patients to perform self-care using different types of material in interaction with patients and healthcare staff. The acceptance of the program is consistent with the results of similar studies. Collaboration between patients, clinicians, and researchers seems to be a fruitful approach in the development of an IHCA aiming to support cancer patients' self-care strategies. Well-designed intervention studies are needed to evaluate the effects of the IHCA. This article suggests a theoretical foundation for an IHCA and allows researchers and healthcare providers to take part in the discussion regarding format and content of IHCAs.

  16. Self-care management of sleep disturbances and risk factors for poor sleep among older residents of Taiwanese nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yun-Fang; Wong, Thomas Ks; Ku, Yan-Chiou

    2008-05-01

    To explore self-care management strategies for sleep disturbances and risk factors for poor sleep among older residents of nursing homes in Taiwan. With the deterioration of health that accompanies ageing, sleep quality becomes poorer, making it a significant issue in geriatric care. However, little is known about self-care strategies for management of sleep disturbances among elders worldwide. A cross-sectional design was used. Residents (n = 196) were recruited from nine nursing homes chosen by stratified sampling across Taiwan. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, a self-care management of sleep disturbance questionnaire and a demographic form were used to collect data. The prevalence of poor sleep in these older nursing home residents was 46.4%. Only 48.5% of participants used self-care strategies to manage sleep disturbances. The most frequently used strategy was 'take prescribed medicines'. Self-learning was the main information source for self-care strategies. Logistic regression analysis indicated that having no spouse and a low educational level significantly predicted poor sleep. This study revealed a high prevalence of poor sleep quality among older residents of nursing homes in Taiwan. Older residents' inability to get relief from sleep disturbances may have been because of their limited use of strategies to manage sleep disturbances. As health care providers play an important role in helping older people to manage sleep disturbances in nursing homes, it is crucial to train nursing home staff to perform sleep assessments and provide current knowledge about sleep disturbance management. It is also necessary to pay more attention to the sleep problems of elders without spouses and with little education.

  17. Self Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Beth Israel Heart Disease Diabetes Chronic Pain New Approaches to Chronic Disease Self Assessment Self Care Connections Experiences Research Learning Evaluation Print Email Self Care If you are ...

  18. Lessons from the Homeless: Civil and Uncivil Interactions with Nurses, Self-Care Behaviors, and Barriers to Care.

    PubMed

    Woith, Wendy M; Kerber, Cindy; Astroth, Kim S; Jenkins, Sheryl H

    2017-07-01

    Civility, rooted in social justice, is a fundamental value of nursing. Homeless people are particularly at risk for experiencing uncivil behavior from nurses. The purpose of this study was to explore homeless people's perceptions of their interactions with nurses. In this descriptive, qualitative study, we interviewed 15 homeless adults who described their experiences with nurses. The interview guide, developed by the researchers, consisted of open-ended questions and probes. Transcriptions and field notes were analyzed through thematic analysis. Three major themes emerged: nurses should be civil, self-care behaviors, and barriers to good care. Subthemes included listening, compassion, attentiveness, and judgment as components of civility; where they go for care and who cares for them as self-care behaviors; and lack of money and homeless status as barriers to care. Our findings indicate people who are homeless often perceive nurses to be uncivil and uncaring toward them; furthermore, our participants provide a unique description of healthcare interactions from the perspective of the homeless. These findings can be used as a basis for the development of education interventions for students and practicing nurses to assist them in learning to provide civil and compassionate care for the homeless. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Self-Care for Nurse Leaders in Acute Care Environment Reduces Perceived Stress: A Mixed-Methods Pilot Study Merits Further Investigation.

    PubMed

    Dyess, Susan Mac Leod; Prestia, Angela S; Marquit, Doren-Elyse; Newman, David

    2018-03-01

    Acute care practice settings are stressful. Nurse leaders face stressful demands of numerous competing priorities. Some nurse leaders experience unmanageable stress, but success requires self-care. This article presents a repeated measures intervention design study using mixed methods to investigate a self-care simple meditation practice for nurse leaders. Themes and subthemes emerged in association with the three data collection points: at baseline (pretest), after 6 weeks, and after 12 weeks (posttest) from introduction of the self-care simple meditation practice. An analysis of variance yielded a statistically significant drop in perceived stress at 6 weeks and again at 12 weeks. Conducting future research is merited.

  20. Occupational stress and the importance of self-care and resilience: focus on veterinary nursing.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Ciaran; Campion, Deirdre P

    2017-01-01

    Burnout and compassion fatigue are frequently mentioned in relation to veterinary work. Veterinary nursing is a caring profession and those who seek a career within this field do so because of a natural empathetic desire to care for animals. However it is the individuals who are the most caring and empathetic towards others that will be most at risk of experiencing occupational stress when they are confronted with psychologically demanding workplace roles and working environments. Burnout is considered an 'unintentional end point' for certain individuals who are exposed to chronic stress within their working environment. When suffering burnout, a person may experience emotional exhaustion, may become more cynical or they may have a reduced sense of personal accomplishment in regards to their own work. Signs of burnout can include increased levels of absenteeism at work, or the working standards of that staff member may decline below that of what would normally be expected of them. This could directly impact on patient care in the veterinary practice. Working in a role that places emotional demands on staff, such as a need to show compassion and empathy towards clients who are emotionally distressed, puts staff at risk from experiencing compassion fatigue. Workplace supports may include appropriate debriefing sessions among willing participants, particularly after an emotionally stressful encounter with a client. Taking personal responsibility for care of one's own mental and physical health is just as important as taking care of the patient's health. Personal strategies may include lifestyle changes, adopting a healthier lifestyle, reduction of working hours, and ensuring adequate sleep. Adopting healthy self-care strategies can promote characteristics of "resilience" - personal qualities or traits such as optimism, self-confidence, level headedness, hardiness, and having the ability to be resourceful during times of adversity. All veterinary staff may be better

  1. Torrenting values, feelings, and thoughts—Cyber nursing and virtual self-care in a breast augmentation forum

    PubMed Central

    Martin Salzmann-Erikson, R.N.; Henrik Eriksson, R.N.T.

    2011-01-01

    Earlier research shows that breast augmentation is positively correlated with positive psychological states. The aim of this study was to explore the shared values, feelings, and thoughts within the culture of breast enlargement among women visiting Internet-based forums when considering and/or undergoing esthetic plastic surgery. The study used a netnographic method for gathering and analyzing data. The findings show that the women used the Internet forum to provide emotional support to other women. Through electronic postings, they cared for and nursed each others’ anxiety and feelings throughout the whole process. Apart from the process, another central issue was that the women's relationships were frequently discussed; specifically their relationship to themselves, their environment, and with the surgeons. The findings suggest that Internet forums represent a channel through which posters can share values, feelings, and thoughts from the position of an agent of action as well as from a position as the object of action. These dual positions and the medium endow the women with a virtual nursing competence that would otherwise be unavailable. By introducing the concept of torrenting as a means of sharing important self-care information, the authors provide a concept that can be further explored in relation to post modern self-care strategies within contemporary nursing theories and practice. PMID:22053162

  2. Embodied Learning and Patient Education: From Nurses' Self-Awareness to Patient Self-Caring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, Ann L.

    2012-01-01

    This article is intended as a clear and practical introduction to use of a scientific perspective on embodied learning. It looks to embodied cognition and embodied cognitive science to explore education for self-care. The author presents a neurobiologic understanding of embodied learning to bridge adult education to the science-driven world of…

  3. Educational level and self-care behaviour in patients with heart failure before and after nurse educational intervention.

    PubMed

    González, Beatriz; Lupón, Josep; Domingo, Maria del Mar; Cano, Lucía; Cabanes, Roser; de Antonio, Marta; Arenas, Miquel; Crespo, Eva; Rodríguez, Margarita; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2014-10-01

    Self-care is important for heart failure (HF) management and may be influenced by the patient's educational level. We assessed the relationship of educational level with baseline self-care behaviour and changes one year after a nursing intervention in HF outpatients attending a HF unit. Three hundred and thirty-five HF patients were studied, with a median age of 67 years (P(25-75) 57-75) and a median HF duration of six months (P(25-75) 1-36). HF aetiology was mainly ischaemic heart disease (53.4%). Median ejection fraction was 30% (P(25-75) 24-37%). The functional class was mainly II (66.3%) and III (25.7%). Educational levels were: very low 17.3%; low 62.1%; medium-high 20.6%. Patients were evaluated at the first visit (baseline) and one year after the educational intervention with the nine-item European Heart Failure Self-care Behaviour Scale. Median patient scores differed in the baseline (19 (P(25-75) 15-26) vs. 16 (P(25-75) 13-21) vs. 15 (P(25-75) 12.5-15.5)) and the one-year evaluation (15 (P(25-75) 13-17) vs. 13 (P(25-75) 11-15) vs. 12 (P(25-75) 10-14)) for the three educational levels, respectively, with statistically significant differences between levels (p=0.007 to p<0.001) except between low and medium-high education at one year (p=0.057). In the one-year evaluation, self-care behaviour significantly improved in the three educational groups (p<0.001), with a similar, albeit not statistically significant, magnitude of improvement in all groups. Self-care behaviour at baseline and one year after a nursing intervention was better in patients with a higher education, although the improvement with the intervention was similar irrespective of the educational level. © The European Society of Cardiology 2013.

  4. The Effect of Self-Care Education on Emotional Intelligence of Iranian Nursing Students: A Quasi-experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Goudarzian, Amir Hossein; Nesami, Masoumeh Bagheri; Sedghi, Parisa; Gholami, Mahsan; Faraji, Maryam; Hatkehlouei, Mahdi Babaei

    2018-01-20

    This study aimed to determine the effect of self-care training on emotional intelligence of nursing students. This quasi-experimental study was conducted on nursing students of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2016. The subjects (60 students) that were collected with random sampling method were divided into experimental and control groups, and then, self-care behaviors were taught to the experimental group' students in 12 sessions by using a checklist. The subjects of control group were not taught. Emotional intelligence was measured by using Bradberry and Greaves' standard questionnaire before and after the intervention. Emotional intelligence scores of students in the experimental group showed positive and significant change between before (75.33 ± 7.23) and after (125.70 ± 7.79) of training (P < 0.001). Also t test shows a significant change in control (78.73 ± 6.54) and experimental groups (125.70 ± 7.79), after of training (P < 0.001). It is recommended that special programs be organized in order to improve the emotional intelligence of students that improve the likelihood of their success in life.

  5. Self-Care Posters Serve as a Low-Cost Option for Physical Activity Promotion of Hospital Nurses.

    PubMed

    Raney, Marcella; Van Zanten, Erin

    2018-03-01

    Hospital nurses play an important role in the nation's short- and long-term patient care. At the same time, nurses often experience high levels of occupational stress and participate in low levels of physical activity (PA). The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of self-monitoring and a poster campaign on the PA behaviors of hospital nurses. Motivational and instructional exercise posters were hung in break rooms of experimental units and replaced biweekly for 8 weeks. A total of 26 nurses (control: n = 13; experimental: n = 13) wore accelerometers for 3 workdays pre-, mid-, and postintervention. Participants were provided a step counter at baseline and a PA report at each stage. Moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) and step count (SC) increased pre- to midintervention for control (MVPA: 14.8 ± 7.6%; SC: 19.1 ± 7.8%) and experimental (MVPA: 26.7 ± 18.5%, SC: 17.6 ± 8.3%) participants. Physical activity levels returned to baseline postintervention for control ( p > .05) and increased mid- to postintervention for experimental (MVPA: 16.2 ± 5.2%, SC: 10.7 ± 4.7%, p < .05) participants. In conclusion, a low-cost, self-care poster campaign may increase PA levels of hospital nurses when combined with personalized PA feedback.

  6. The effect of community health nurse home visit on self-care self-efficacy of the elderly living in selected Falavarjan villages in Iran in 2010.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Habibollah; Torkani, Sara; Tavakol, Khosrow

    2013-01-01

    Perceived self-efficacy is a strong predictor for behavior. Considering the importance of health-promoting self-care behaviors in increasing quality of life in the elderly, this study was aimed at defining the effect of nurse home visits on self-care self-efficacy of the elderly in rural areas. This is a pre and post quasi-experimental study conducted on 33 older adults randomly selected from five villages in Falavarjan province in Iran. Intervention program was in the direction of self-care self-efficacy in four domains including nutrition, health practice, physical activity, and well-being in the form of five home visit programs and one group session by a nurse during 6 weeks, and included two different sections of education and nursing interventions administered based on needs assessment and determination of the tasks for the clients and their families. Theoretical framework of this study was supported by Bandura's self-efficacy, Orem's self-care theory, and Pender's revised health promotion model. The data were collected by self-care self-efficacy and demographic information questionnaire before and after the intervention. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and paired t-test. The mean elderly score in the four aforementioned domains increased after the home visit program. A significant difference was seen in the mean total scores of self-care self-efficacy and its subscales by paired t-test before and after intervention (P < 0.001). It was observed that home visit program, integrated with the theories, had a positive influence on improving self-care self-efficacy of the elderly, and was supported by Bandura's theory of self-efficacy suggesting four sources of performance accomplishment, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and emotional arousal. With regard to the importance of self-care behavior in health promotion of the elderly, multifaceted low-cost interventions with the highest effect seem essential.

  7. "Not just a theory": the relationship between Jin Shin Jyutsu® self-care training for nurses and stress, physical health, emotional health, and caring efficacy.

    PubMed

    Lamke, Donna; Catlin, Anita; Mason-Chadd, Michelle

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of training nurses in Jin Shin Jyutsu® self-care methods and to correlate the training with measurement of the nurses' personal and organizational stress and their perceptions of their caring efficacy for patients. A quasi-experimental, pretest, posttest, and 30- to 40-day posttest design was used. In all, 20 participants received three 2-hour Jin Shin Jyutsu self-care training sessions from a certified Jin Shin Jyutsu self-care trainer (who was also a registered nurse). The training took place over a 1-month period, and participants agreed to practice the self-care daily. Two study instruments, one measuring organizational and personal stress and the second measuring caring efficacy, were completed before the first training, after the last training, and 1 month after the trainings had been completed. Analysis of data from the Personal and Organizational Quality Assessment-Revised by paired t tests showed significant increases in positive outlook, gratitude, motivation, calmness, and communication effectiveness and significant decreases in anger, resentfulness, depression, stress symptoms, time pressure, and morale issues. Nurses reported less muscle aches, sleeplessness, and headaches. Analysis of the Coates Caring Efficacy Scale measures showed statistically significant increases in nurses' caring efficacy in areas of serenity in giving care, tuning in to patients, relating to patients, providing culturally congruent care, individualization of patient care, ability to decrease stressful situations, planning for multiple needs, and creativity in care. This small study suggests that Jin Shin Jyutsu self-care may be a valuable tool for nurses, to decrease stress, both emotional and physical, and increase caring efficacy. Administrators may wish to invest in such a program, which may improve quality of care delivered. The Watson caring model, which reminds us that nurses who care for themselves and feel good about

  8. Longitudinal study of stress, self-care, and professional identity among nursing students.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Desiree; Laux, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    This longitudinal study describes the factors associated with the acquisition of a professional identity over the course of prelicensure education among 45 baccalaureate nursing students. At every time point, personal spiritual growth practices and the students' perceptions of their caring abilities predicted sense of fit with the profession. Even as there is a growing emphasis of quality and safety education, caring and spirituality remain central to nurses' professional identities on entry to practice.

  9. The effect of community health nurse home visit on self-care self-efficacy of the elderly living in selected Falavarjan villages in Iran in 2010

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Habibollah; Torkani, Sara; Tavakol, Khosrow

    2013-01-01

    Background: Perceived self-efficacy is a strong predictor for behavior. Considering the importance of health-promoting self-care behaviors in increasing quality of life in the elderly, this study was aimed at defining the effect of nurse home visits on self-care self-efficacy of the elderly in rural areas. Materials and Methods: This is a pre and post quasi-experimental study conducted on 33 older adults randomly selected from five villages in Falavarjan province in Iran. Intervention program was in the direction of self-care self-efficacy in four domains including nutrition, health practice, physical activity, and well-being in the form of five home visit programs and one group session by a nurse during 6 weeks, and included two different sections of education and nursing interventions administered based on needs assessment and determination of the tasks for the clients and their families. Theoretical framework of this study was supported by Bandura's self-efficacy, Orem's self-care theory, and Pender's revised health promotion model. The data were collected by self-care self-efficacy and demographic information questionnaire before and after the intervention. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and paired t-test. Results: The mean elderly score in the four aforementioned domains increased after the home visit program. A significant difference was seen in the mean total scores of self-care self-efficacy and its subscales by paired t-test before and after intervention (P < 0.001). Conclusions: It was observed that home visit program, integrated with the theories, had a positive influence on improving self-care self-efficacy of the elderly, and was supported by Bandura's theory of self-efficacy suggesting four sources of performance accomplishment, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and emotional arousal. With regard to the importance of self-care behavior in health promotion of the elderly, multifaceted low-cost interventions with the highest effect

  10. The impact of discharge plan upon re-admission, satisfaction with nursing care and the ability to self-care for coronary artery bypass graft surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Negarandeh, Reza; Nayeri, Nahid Dehghan; Shirani, Farimah; Janani, Leila

    2012-12-01

    Grafting coronary arteries and post operative recovery has many challenges, which can be ameliorated through continues care and an appropriate discharge plan. Therefore, the current study was undertaken aiming to evaluate the impact of discharge plan on satisfaction with nursing care, ability to self-care, and incidence of re-admission. This is a quasi experimental study involving patients who were due to undergo coronary artery bypass graft in Chamran Hospital in 2010. In the intervention group, the discharge plan was initiated at the time of admission and continued for 2 weeks after discharge by home visit and telephone follow ups. Satisfaction with nursing care was assessed 2 days after discharge, whilst patients' ability for self-care was measured 6 weeks and 3 months post discharge and the incidence of re-admission was determined at the 3 months point. Satisfaction levels with nursing care and the ability to take self-care were higher in intervention group comparing with control group (p < 0.001). There was a significant difference for self-care ability between pre test and post test in both groups but the improvement was more pronounced for the intervention group (p = 0.04). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of re-admission incidence after 3 months (p = 0.15). The results indicate that the discharge plan, as a method of continual care plan, can lead to higher satisfaction levels and enhanced self-care abilities of patients. Such discharge plan can therefore be utilised as an effective method of continuous care for patients who are going to undergo coronary artery bypass graft.

  11. Promoting self-care through symptom management: a theory-based approach for nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Christopher; Kirschner, Michelle; Van Kuiken, Debra; Baas, Linda

    2007-05-01

    To present a theory of illness representation useful in clinical practice along with two case studies as examples of theory implementation. Literature review of relevant theory and associated literature, case studies from clinical practice. An individual asks several questions when experiencing a physical sensation: "Am I sick, stressed, or is this a sign of aging? If I'm sick, is the symptom connected with a disease label?" After asking these questions, the individual develops a cognitive and emotional illness representation that includes the dimensions of identity, cause, consequences, control, and timeline. This representation is guided by personal, cultural, and environmental contexts and determines coping strategies. By assessing the individual's cognitive and emotional representations of the illness, the nurse practitioner (NP) can use the common sense model of illness representation (CSM) to establish interventions and action plans helpful in decreasing distress in the management of symptoms. NPs frequently care for patients who present with very severe symptoms related to their health problem. This becomes a major challenge in effective disease management. Leventhal's CSM can be used as a framework to identify the cognitive and emotional illness representations individuals develop when acute and chronic symptoms are presented. By assessing the individual's cognitive and emotional representations of the illness, the NP will be able to use the CSM to establish interventions and action plans that will be helpful in decreasing the patient's distress in the management of symptoms.

  12. Home visits in brain tumor patient: how nurse and family members cooperate in tumor patient’s family self-care

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhiyue

    2013-01-01

    Purposes We reported the roles and functions of nurses in home visits for brain tumor patients using the family health assessment guide in the study. Methods One patient of brain glioma was chosen as the case illustration. The nurses assessed the patients’ situation, their families and living environment individually. All these factors were analyzed together. Results The nurses then implemented their knowledge and skills to adopt different measures in different conditions, investigated the patients’ health problems and carried out personalized effective actions. Conclusions Nurses should put effort into community nursing to allow patients to live in a safe environment, to satisfy the health needs of human being and their needs for health knowledge, and enhance their self-care abilities. PMID:24385701

  13. Feasibility and acceptability of a nursing intervention with family caregiver on self-care among heart failure patients: a randomized pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Cossette, Sylvie; Belaid, Hayet; Heppell, Sonia; Mailhot, Tanya; Guertin, Marie-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Self-care practices in heart failure (HF) contribute to quality of life, symptom stabilization, and extended life expectancy. However, adherence to practices such as liquid and salt restriction or symptom monitoring require high motivation on a daily basis. The aim was to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and potential effectiveness of a nursing intervention with family caregivers, aimed at improving self-care practice of HF patients. This pilot study involved 32 HF patient-caregiver dyads (16/group) randomized to an experimental (EG) or control group (CG). The intervention, based on the Self-Determination Theory, was designed to enhance patients' autonomy and motivation in self-care practices, by involving their caregivers' support. Five encounters were planned with the EG dyads-two face-to-face during hospitalization and three by telephone after discharge. The feasibility of delivering the protocol was evaluated as well as the acceptability of the intervention. The potential effectiveness of the intervention was assessed based on patient outcomes, including general self-care management and self-care specific to HF, perceived competence to manage HF, autonomous motivation (A-motivation, external extrinsic motivation, internal extrinsic motivation, and intrinsic motivation), and perceived support from the caregiver. Caregiver outcomes included level of support provided to the patient. Despite recruitment challenges, the intervention was feasible, with 12 of the 16 dyads receiving all 5 encounters delivered per protocol. The 4 other dyads received the two hospital encounters, but at least 1 of the 3 post-discharge planned telephone encounters was not feasible because the patients had been re-hospitalized or was deceased. Participant's satisfaction with the intervention was high. Outcomes favoring the EG include self-care specific to HF, internal extrinsic motivation, intrinsic motivation, and caregiver's feeling that they provide a higher level of support

  14. Effect of a supportive-educative nursing intervention on older adults' perceptions of self-care after a stroke.

    PubMed

    Folden, S L

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the effects of an individually focused, guided decision-making intervention on individuals' perception of self-care ability following a stroke. A convenience sample of 68 individuals participating in four stroke rehabilitation programs in southeast Florida participated in the study. A quasi-experimental design using a pretest and a posttest was implemented. Findings indicated the potential effectiveness of this intervention in significantly increasing individuals' perceptions of their self-care ability after a stroke. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.

  15. Nurses' strategies to address self-care aspects related to medication adherence and symptom recognition in heart failure patients: an in-depth look.

    PubMed

    Jaarsma, Tiny; Nikolova-Simons, Mariana; van der Wal, Martje H L

    2012-01-01

    Despite an increasing body of knowledge on self-care in heart failure patients, the need for effective interventions remains. We sought to deepen the understanding of interventions that heart failure nurses use in clinical practice to improve patient adherence to medication and symptom monitoring. A qualitative study with a directed content analysis was performed, using data from a selected sample of Dutch-speaking heart failure nurses who completed booklets with two vignettes involving medication adherence and symptom recognition. Nurses regularly assess and reassess patients before they decide on an intervention. They evaluate basic/factual information and barriers in a patient's behavior, and try to find room for improvement in a patient's behavior. Interventions that heart failure nurses use to improve adherence to medication and symptom monitoring were grouped into the themes of increasing knowledge, increasing motivation, and providing patients with practical tools. Nurses also described using technology-based tools, increased social support, alternative communication, partnership approaches, and coordination of care to improve adherence to medications and symptom monitoring. Despite a strong focus on educational strategies, nurses also reported other strategies to increase patient adherence. Nurses use several strategies to improve patient adherence that are not incorporated into guidelines. These interventions need to be evaluated for further applications in improving heart failure management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Parvalbumin Cell Ablation of NMDA-R1 Causes Increased Resting Network Excitability with Associated Social and Self-Care Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Billingslea, Eddie N; Tatard-Leitman, Valerie M; Anguiano, Jaynie; Jutzeler, Catherine R; Suh, Jimmy; Saunders, John A; Morita, Susumu; Featherstone, Robert E; Ortinski, Pavel I; Gandal, Michael J; Lin, Robert; Liang, Yuling; Gur, Raquel E; Carlson, Gregory C; Hahn, Chang-Gyu; Siegel, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    NMDA-receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction is strongly implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Several convergent lines of evidence suggest that net excitation propagated by impaired NMDAR signaling on GABAergic interneurons may be of particular interest in mediating several aspects of schizophrenia. However, it is unclear which behavioral domains are governed by a net increase of excitation and whether modulating downstream GABAergic signaling can reverse neural and thus behavioral deficits. The current study determines the selective contributions of NMDAR dysfunction on PV-containing interneurons to electrophysiological, cognitive, and negative-symptom-related behavioral phenotypes of schizophrenia using mice with a PVcre-NR1flox-driven ablation of NR1 on PV-containing interneurons. In addition, we assessed the efficacy of one agent that directly modulates GABAergic signaling (baclofen) and one agent that indirectly modifies NMDAR-mediated signaling through antagonism of mGluR5 receptors (2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl) pyridine (MPEP)). The data indicate that loss of NMDAR function on PV interneurons impairs self-care and sociability while increasing N1 latency and baseline gamma power, and reducing induction and maintenance of long-term potentiation. Baclofen normalized baseline gamma power without corresponding effects on behavior. MPEP further increased N1 latency and reduced social behavior in PVcre/NR1+/+ mice. These two indices were negatively correlated before and following MPEP such that as N1 latency increases, sociability decreases. This finding suggests a predictive role for N1 latency with respect to social function. Although previous data suggest that MPEP may be beneficial for core features of autism spectrum disorders, current data suggest that such effects require intact function of NMDAR on PV interneurons. PMID:24525709

  17. Social recovery and the move beyond deficit models of depression: a feminist analysis of mid-life women's self-care practices.

    PubMed

    Fullagar, Simone; O'Brien, Wendy

    2014-09-01

    In Australia, like other advanced liberal democracies, the adoption of a recovery orientation was hailed as a major leap forward in mental health policy and service provision. We argue that this shift in thinking about the meaning of recovery requires further analysis of the gendered dimension of self-identity and relationships with the social world. In this article we focus on how mid-life women constructed meaning about recovery through their everyday practices of self-care within the gendered context of depression. Findings from our qualitative research with 31 mid-life women identified how the recovery process was complicated by relapses into depression, with many women critically questioning the limitations of biomedical treatment options for a more relational understanding of recovery. Participant stories revealed important tacit knowledge about recovery that emphasised the process of realising and recognising capacities and self-knowledge. We identify two central themes through which women's tacit knowledge of this changing relation to self in recovery is made explicit: the disciplined self of normalised recovery, redefining recovery and depression. The findings point to the need to reconsider how both recovery discourses and gendered expectations can complicate women's experiences of moving through depression. We argue for a different conceptualisation of recovery as a social practice through which women realise opportunities to embody different 'beings and doings'. A gendered understanding of what women themselves identify is important to their well-being, can contribute to more effective recovery oriented policies based on capability rather than deficit. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Kidney stones - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... self-care; Nephrolithiasis and self-care; Stones and kidney - self-care; Calcium stones and self-care; Oxalate ... provider or the hospital because you have a kidney stone. You will need to take self-care ...

  19. The impact of shift work on eating patterns and self-care strategies utilised by experienced and inexperienced nurses.

    PubMed

    Gifkins, Jane; Johnston, Amy; Loudoun, Rebecca

    2018-05-08

    For nurses, shift work is a necessity, required to provide 24-h continuous care for patients. Research posits that fatigue amongst shift-working nurses is associated with inadequate and poorly timed sleep and also strongly influenced by the timing, quality and quantity of food consumed. The aim of this investigation was to examine differences and similarities in the food choices and eating patterns of nurses exposed to different lengths of time in shift work, as a means of understanding how nurses can adapt their eating patterns to better manage fatigue and sleep loss. Qualitative methodology was utilised to study and capture in-depth information about nurses' daily working lives. A case study approach allowed for the investigation of nurses with limited and extensive experience of shift work. Increased food craving, caffeine consumption and snacking behaviours during night shifts were described by both groups of nurses, as was the inability to drink enough fluids at work. Meal skipping at work, associated with high workload, was detailed more by experienced nurses. Experienced nurses described shopping and preparing home cooked meals in advance to manage food intake and associated fatigue, contrasting with patterns from inexperienced nurses. Experienced nurses recounted drinking alcohol as a way to rest and recover from shift work, unlike their less inexperienced colleagues. These findings indicate organisational and work place issues such as shift work and rostering influence the food choices and eating patterns of shift-working nurses. Experienced nurses, however, draw on a greater range of strategies around diet and eating patterns to minimise these impacts.

  20. Self-Care for Health in Rural Hispanic Women at Risk for Postpartum Depression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younglee; Dee, Vivien

    2017-01-01

    To determine factors that affect self-care of rural Hispanic women at risk for postpartum depression (PPD). This study was a descriptive cross-sectional design based on the key concepts of Orem's Self-care Deficit Nursing theory. Data were collected from 223 Hispanic postpartum women residing in Mecca, North Shore, and Thermal in California by an interviewer-administered survey. Four instruments were utilized: Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) for PPD, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support for social support, Duke University Religion Index (DUREL) for spirituality, and Self Rated Abilities for Health Practices for self-care. The prevalence of women at risk for PPD was about 43 %. Social support, spirituality, and self-care ability were significantly correlated in women with PPD. Social support was a strong factor in predicting self-care ability for 'Nutrition', 'Psychological well-being', 'Exercise', and 'Responsible Health Practices' in the rural Hispanic women at risk for PPD. The study findings can enable nurses and healthcare professionals to develop effective tailored interventions to assist rural Hispanic women's abilities to perform self-care for health, and in particular, during the postpartum period.

  1. Reflections on nursing practice science: the nature, the structure, and the foundation of nursing sciences.

    PubMed

    Orem, Dorothea E; Taylor, Susan G

    2011-01-01

    In preparation for the self-care deficit nursing theory conference to be held in Ulm, Germany in 2004, Dorothea Orem and I reflected on the development of nursing science. Orem drafted this paper which I edited. The International Orem Society is sharing this paper with Nursing Science Quarterly as presented to the conference as a memorial to Orem and her work.

  2. Genital herpes - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Herpes - genital - self-care; Herpes simplex - genital - self-care; Herpesvirus 2 - self-care; HSV-2 - self-care ... Call your health care provider if you have any of the following: Symptoms of an outbreak that worsen despite medicine and self-care ...

  3. Effect of family nursing therapeutic conversations on health-related quality of life, self-care and depression among outpatients with heart failure: A randomized multi-centre trial.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, Birte; Mahrer-Imhof, Romy; Wagner, Lis; Barington, Torben; Videbæk, Lars; Lauridsen, Jørgen

    2018-03-07

    To evaluate the short-term (3 months) effects of family nursing therapeutic conversations (FNTC) on health-related quality of life, self-care and depression in outpatients with Heart failure (HF). A randomised multi-centre trial was conducted in three Danish HF clinics. The control group (n = 167) received usual care, and the intervention group (n = 180) received FNTCs as supplement to usual care. Primary outcome was clinically significant changes (6 points) in Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ) summary score between groups. Secondary outcomes were changes in self-care behaviour and depression scores. Data were assessed before first consultation and repeated after three months. No statistically significant difference was found in the change of KCCQ, self-care and depression scores between the groups. KCCQ scores of patients in the FNTC group changed clinically significant in seven domains, compared to one domain in the control group, with the highest improvement in self-efficacy, social limitation and symptom burden. FNTC was not superior to standard care of patients with HF regarding health-related quality of life, self-care and depression. Addressing the impact of the disease on the family, might improve self-efficacy, social limitation and symptom burden in patients with heart failure. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Shin splints - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... self-care; Tibial periostitis - self-care; Posterior tibial shin splints - self-care ... Shin splints are an exercise problem. You get shin splints from overloading your leg muscles, tendons or shin ...

  5. Broken toe - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Fractured toe - self-care; Broken bone - toe - self-care; Fracture - toe - self-care; Fracture phalanx - toe ... often treated without surgery and can be taken care of at home. Severe injuries include: Breaks that ...

  6. Allergic rhinitis - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Hay fever - self-care; Seasonal rhinitis - self-care; Allergies - allergic rhinitis - self-care ... in a row. Talk to your child's health care provider before giving your child decongestants. Nasal corticosteroid ...

  7. Vaginitis - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Vulvovaginitis - self-care; Yeast infections - vaginitis ... Creams or suppositories are used to treat yeast infections in the vagina. You can buy most of them without a prescription at drug stores, some grocery stores, and other stores. Treating yourself ...

  8. Viewpoint. Self Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrow, John

    1985-01-01

    Argues that terms like "self care" and "survival skills" may make working parents feel better about having to work, but are linguistic cop-outs that obscure a serious and widespread evasion of social responsibility. (DT)

  9. Differences in foot self-care and lifestyle between men and women with diabetes mellitus 1

    PubMed Central

    Rossaneis, Mariana Angela; Haddad, Maria do Carmo Fernandez Lourenço; Mathias, Thaís Aidar de Freitas; Marcon, Sonia Silva

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to investigate differences with regard to foot self-care and lifestyle between men and women with diabetes mellitus. Method: cross-sectional study conducted in a sample of 1,515 individuals with diabetes mellitus aged 40 years old or older. Poisson regression models were used to identity differences in foot self-care deficit and lifestyle between sexes, adjusting for socioeconomic and clinical characteristics, smoking and alcohol consumption. Results: foot self-care deficit, characterized by not regularly drying between toes; not regularly checking feet; walking barefoot; poor hygiene and inappropriately trimmed nails, was significantly higher among men, though men presented a lower prevalence of feet scaling and use of inappropriate shoes when compared to women. With regard to lifestyle, men presented less healthy habits, such as not adhering to a proper diet and taking laboratory exams to check for lipid profile at the frequency recommended. Conclusion: the nursing team should take into account gender differences concerning foot self-care and lifestyle when implementing educational activities and interventions intended to decrease risk factors for foot ulceration. PMID:27533270

  10. Perspectives on Self-Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Isha D.; Richardson, Tenille A.; Moore, Darren D.; Gambrel, Laura Eubanks; Keeling, Margaret L.

    2010-01-01

    Self-care for clinicians is much needed. To discover ways to implement self-care into our lives, we (four therapists) tried different self-care methods over a span of one to two weeks. After using practices that explored self-care through mindfulness meditation, autohypnosis, music, and spirituality, we wrote about the outcome of these experiences…

  11. Self-Care Behaviors in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Agueda Maria Ruiz Zimmer; Lopes, Camila Takao; Brunori, Evelise Fadini Reis; Swanson, Elizabeth; Moorhead, Sue Ann; Bachion, Maria Márcia; de Barros, Alba Lucia Bottura Leite

    2017-05-18

    To identify self-care behaviors, instruments, techniques, parameters for the assessment of self-care behaviors in people with heart failure, compare these behaviors with the indicators of the Nursing Outcomes Classification outcome, Self Management: Cardiac Disease. Integrative literature review performed in Lilacs, Medline, CINAHL, and Cochrane, including publications from 2009 to 2015. One thousand six hundred ninety-one articles were retrieved from the search, of which 165 were selected for analysis. Ten self-care behaviors and several different assessment instruments, techniques, and parameters were identified. The addition and removal of some indicators are proposed, based on this review. The data provide substrate for the development of conceptual and operational definitions of the indicators, making the outcome more applicable for use in clinical practice. © 2017 NANDA International, Inc.

  12. Premenstrual syndrome - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    PMS - self-care; Premenstrual dysphoric disorder - self-care ... Your health care provider may recommend that you take vitamins or supplements. Vitamin B6, calcium, and magnesium may be recommended. Tryptophan ...

  13. What level of self-care agency in mental illness? The factors affecting self-care agency and self-care agency in patients with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Çiftçi, Bahar; Yıldırım, Naci; Şahin Altun, Özlem; Avşar, Gülçin

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate self-care agency and the factors affecting self-care agency in patients with psychiatric disorders. The population of the study comprised patients diagnosed with mental disorders at the clinics of psychiatry in Erzurum Regional Training and Research Hospital and Atatürk University Research Hospital. Patient information forms and the Self-Care Agency Scale were used to collect the study data. Psychiatric nurse collected the data from the patients face to face. This study determined that the average age of the patients was determined to be 32.19±1.11. The findings indicated that the mean self-care agency level of the patients was 79.3±23.2. It was also found that the differences between sex, educational status, socio-economic status, and self-care agency levels were statistically significant (p<0.05). In conclusion, the patients' self-care agency levels were determined to be mid-level. The findings suggest that people with mental disorders have difficulty identifying their need for self-care. Thus, periodic training programs are necessary to increase self-care levels and further research studies of this type should be done on larger groups. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Developing a supportive-educative program for patients with advanced heart failure within Orem's general theory of nursing.

    PubMed

    Jaarsma, T; Halfens, R; Senten, M; Abu Saad, H H; Dracup, K

    1998-01-01

    Recovery from heart failure and coping with the effects of this serious condition has a major impact on the self-care demand of patients with heart failure. To prevent potential self-care deficits, education and support are important issues in nursing care. The purpose of this article is to describe the development of a supportive-educative program that is designed to enhance self-care abilities of patients with heart failure. To structure nursing care for these patients and their families in a consistent systematized way, Orem's general theory of nursing is used as a frame of reference.

  15. Diabetes Self-Care and the Older Adult

    PubMed Central

    Weinger, Katie; Beverly, Elizabeth A.; Smaldone, Arlene

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is highest in older adults, a population that is increasing. Diabetes self-care is complex with important recommendations for nutrition, physical activity, checking glucose levels, and taking medication. Older adults with diabetes have unique issues which impact self-care. As people age, their health status, support systems, physical and mental abilities, and nutritional requirements change. Furthermore, comorbidities, complications, and polypharmacy complicate diabetes self-care. Depression is also more common among the elderly and may lead to deterioration in self-care behaviors. Because of concerns about cognitive deficits and multiple comorbidities, adults older than 65 years are often excluded from research trials. Thus, little clinical evidence is available and the most appropriate treatment approaches and how to best support older patients’ self-care efforts are unclear. This review summarizes the current literature, research findings, and expert and consensus recommendations with their rationales. PMID:24510969

  16. Cardiac rehabilitation with a nurse case manager (GoHeart) across local and regional health authorities improves risk factors, self-care and psychosocial outcomes. A one-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Vibeke Brogaard; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark, the local and regional health authorities share responsibility for cardiac rehabilitation (CR). The objective was to assess effectiveness of CR across sectors coordinated by a nurse case manager (NCM). A one-year follow-up study. A CR programme (GoHeart) was evaluated in a cohort at Lillebaelt Hospital Vejle, DK from 2010 to 2011. Consecutive patients admitted to CR were included. The inclusion criteria were the event of acute myocardial infarction or stable angina and invasive revascularization (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≥45%). Cardiac risk factors, stratified self-care and self-reported psychosocial factors (SF12 and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)) were assessed at admission (phase IIa), at three months at discharge (phase IIb) and at one-year follow-up (phase III). Intention-to-treat and predefined subgroup analysis on sex was performed. Of 241 patients, 183 (75.9%) were included (mean age 63.8 years). At discharge improvements were found in total-cholesterol (p < 0.001), low density lipoprotein (LDL; p < 0.001), functional capacities (metabolic equivalent of tasks (METS), p < 0.01), self-care management (p < 0.001), Health status Short Form 12 version (SF12; physical; p < 0.001 and mental; p < 0.01) and in depression symptoms (p < 0.01). At one-year follow-up these outcomes were maintained; additionally there was improvement in body mass index (BMI; p < 0.05), and high density lipoprotein (HDL; p < 0.05). There were no sex differences. CR shared between local and regional health authorities led by a NCM (GoHeart) improves risk factors, self-care and psychosocial factors. Further improvements in most variables were at one-year follow-up.

  17. Mental health nurses' and allied health professionals' perceptions of the role of the Occupational Health Service in the management of work-related stress: how do they self-care?

    PubMed

    Gibb, J; Cameron, I M; Hamilton, R; Murphy, E; Naji, S

    2010-11-01

    Higher rates of stress-related sickness are found in health care professionals when compared with other sectors. The annual direct cost of absence to the National Health Service is £1.7 billion. Increased clinical demand, long hours, low staffing and a lack of support from colleagues and management are contributing to absenteeism, somatic complaints and mental health problems. Mental health work is inherently stressful and levels of work stress experienced by mental health nurses are especially high. The study investigated mental health nurses' and allied health professionals' (AHPs) awareness and knowledge of the service provided by the Occupational Health Service (OHS) and identified work-related stress and self-care strategies within these two groups. Nurses and AHP staff employed in mental health services in a Scottish healthboard area were invited to complete an anonymous questionnaire. Results demonstrated that staff found their contact with the OHS to be a positive experience. They considered direct patient care to be less stressful than the organizational constraints they work under, and they reported a lack of support from both their peer groups and management. There should be recognition of the increased stress that hospital-based nurses and AHPs experience. These areas should be scrutinized and reviewed further to support staff within these environments in accordance with organizational objectives. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing.

  18. [TREATMENT OF ATTENTION DEFICIT AND HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER (ADHD): NURSING IMPLICATIONS].

    PubMed

    Luna Delgado, Laura; Moriones Jiménez, Olalla

    2014-09-01

    This review aims to know the role of the nurse in ADHD treatment, identifying the most appropriate therapeutic options between nursing interventions and pharmacological treatment. In ADHD, the role of the nurse is to respond family needs about the effectiveness of medication, behavior modification treatment and other alternatives. There are family interventions of psychoeducation that assist the child in the recovery process. Through the education for health, the nurse should promote the combination of behavioral therapy and pharmacological as the only one able to improve child's quality of life. Nurses have a privileged role due to its experience in education for health; this contributes to being a competent agent that provides families essential information about the disease treatment. Spanish schools are lacking a figure that represent health as a relevant subject in the vital process, hence the need of the school nurse.

  19. A Concept Analysis of Self-Care Based on Islamic Sources.

    PubMed

    Marzband, Rahmatollah; Zakavi, Ali Asghar

    2017-07-01

    This article describes the concept of self-care from Islamic texts. Rodgers' evolutionary model of concept analysis was used in this study. Self-care is a series of responsible activities to God for health promotion, preventive disease and remedy. It encompasses physical, mental, spiritual, and social dimensions. A comprehensive definition of the concept of self-care ensued from a review of Islamic literature. Since the nurses instruct and assist individuals as they engage in self-care, using a comprehensive definition of self-care based on Islamic sources would provide an anchor linking for them as they interact with Muslim patients. © 2015 NANDA International, Inc.

  20. [An evolutionary analysis of the concept of self-care].

    PubMed

    Mailhot, Tanya; Cossette, Sylvie; Alderson, Marie

    2013-03-01

    The nursing community seems to agree on the general meaning of "self-care" as a concept allowing the individual to take care of his health. Yet the terms self-care and other "self-concepts" are often used interchangeably. Since this concept is central to nursing, it appeared crucial to lead an effort to clarify and to deepen the understanding of its development within the field of nursing. The objective of this evolutionary concept analysis was to identify the state of precision or clarity of the concept in the available nursing literature. The identification of attributes, antecedents and consequences has highlighted the characteristics as it has been used by various authors and ultimately provides a basis for further research. After this analysis, it is possible to propose that the concept of self-care refers to an activity initiated, consciously and following learning, which is appropriate to the situation and focused on a goal. Furthermore, this concept is widely used in contexts of long-term illnesses and much less so in contexts of acute diseases. In conclusion, work remains to be done to better differentiate the concept of self-care from other self-concepts when used in situations where a third party is involved in the realization of self-care.

  1. The Effect of Orem's Self-Care Model on Quality of Life in Patients with Migraine: a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudzadeh Zarandi, Fatemeh; Raiesifar, Afsaneh; Ebadi, Abbas

    2016-03-01

    Many aspects of the lives of migraineurs are commonly affected by the condition, including occupational affairs, social and family life, responsibilities and ultimately the quality of life. This study was designed to determine the effect of orem's self-care nursing model on quality of life in patients with a migraine. This study was carried out in Tehran, Iran. According to the pre-post design of the randomized clinical trial, 88 patients were selected. After obtaining approval from the ethics committee of the Baqiyatallah Medical Sciences University's Research Deputy; Patients who signed the informed consent aged 20-55 years and without any more disease or disability affecting the quality of life were selected and randomly assigned to a group. Data collection tools were a demographic questionnaire, general health survey short form (SF36), and Orem cognition form and self-care checklist. Self-care model were held as four 30-45 minutes training sessions based on self-care deficit needs for the experimental group. The quality of life scores was measured in two stages, before and three months after intervention then were compared in both groups. Data were analyzed with statistical software SPSS and use of descriptive analysis tests, Chi-square, Mann-Whitney u and Wilcoxon. The final analysis was performed on 43 experimental and 40 controls. No significant difference was detected in the two groups in terms of demographic variables (P>0.05). All dimensions of quality of life including physical functioning, physical role limitation, body pain, general health, vitality, social functioning and emotional role limitation and mental health in the experimental group showed a significant increase after intervention compared to the control group (P<0.05). It was concluded that performing Orem's self-care nursing model improves function and overall quality of life and reduces the high cost of a migraine and migraine-related disability to individuals and society.

  2. Skin flaps and grafts - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Free flap - self-care; Skin autografting - self-care; Pressure ulcer skin flap self-care; Burns skin flap self- ... skin infection Surgery for skin cancer Venous ulcers , pressure ulcers , or diabetic ulcers that DO NOT heal After ...

  3. Self-care among older people living with chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Raeann G; Jacelon, Cynthia S

    2018-03-24

    The aim of this study was to clarify the concept of self-care among older people living with chronic health conditions. This concept clarification will assist nurses in addressing self-care among older people through research, policy and practice in offering an expanded conceptual model. Several policy influences over the past decade directly relate to the increased importance and economic necessity to require self-directed care for older people living with chronic health conditions to maintain their care at home in the community. A selective review of literature on the concept of self-care included 31 sources. The Norris Concept Clarification method (1982) was used for clarification. The phenomenon is described historically according to its antecedents, attributes and consequences. A proposed definition is provided based on the clarification of this concept. A conceptual model is presented through an ecological framework. Self-care among older people living with chronic conditions is multidimensional and has multilevel influences (individual, community, system levels) and is mediated by the contexts and processes of ageing. Self-care originates along one's life course and is learned. Self-care responses are based on care needs when living with chronic health conditions. Self-care is an individual capacity, disposition and activity older people manifest in living with multiple chronic conditions. These features (capacity, disposition, action) influence one another and are hierarchical and continuous. Research, practice and policies that promote self-care among older people can focus on these features to improve health outcomes and promote new models of care consistent with personal development and chronic care needs in older age. This concept clarification can offer a model to support self-care among older people living with chronic conditions. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Human bites - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000736.htm Human bites - self-care To use the sharing features ... at higher risk for infection. How to Prevent Human Bites Prevent bites by: Teaching young children not ...

  5. Learning Self-Care Skills. Functional Programming for People with Autism: A Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePalma, Valerie; Wheeler, Marci

    Many individuals with autism need systematic, intensive teaching in self-care skills due to deficits in language and attention skills, interfering behaviors, and/or sensory impairments. Teaching self-care skills should occur naturally during daily routines, in all environments. Assessments are done to determine current abilities, strengths, and…

  6. Self-care interventions for the school-aged child with encopresis.

    PubMed

    Vitito, L M

    2000-01-01

    Encopresis, an elimination disorder in children, presents as a challenging problem for gastroenterology nurses working with patients and families confronted with this disorder. This article offers a summary of the literature on encopresis, including pathogenesis, causative factors, early treatment, and clinical interventions focused on self-care. The antecedent factors that facilitate the child's participation in self-care are summarized, along with the intended outcomes of the self-care intervention plan.

  7. Cognition and the compassion deficit: the social psychology of helping behaviour in nursing.

    PubMed

    Paley, John

    2014-10-01

    This paper discusses compassion failure and compassion deficits in health care, using two major reports by Robert Francis in the UK as a point of reference. Francis enquired into events at the Mid Staffordshire Hospital between 2005 and 2009, events that unequivocally warrant the description 'appalling care'. These events prompted an intense national debate, along with proposals for significant changes in the regulation of nursing and nurse education. The circumstances are specific to the UK, but the issues are international. I suggest that social psychology provides numerous hints about the mechanisms that might have been involved at Mid Staffs and about the reasons why outsiders are blind to these mechanisms. However, there have been few references to social psychology in the post-Francis debate (the Francis Report itself makes no reference to it at all). It is an enormously valuable resource, and it has been overlooked. Drawing on the social psychology literature, I express scepticism about the idea that there was a compassion deficit among the Mid Staff nurses - the assumption that the appalling care had something to do with the character, attitudes, and values of nurses - and argue that the Francis Report's emphasis on a 'culture of compassion and caring in nurse recruitment, training and education' is misconceived. It was not a 'failure of compassion' that led to the events in Mid Staffs but an interlocking set of contextual factors that are known to affect social cognition. These factors cannot be corrected or compensated for by teaching ethics, empathy, and compassion to student nurses. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Animal bites - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Bites - animals - self-care ... Most animal bites come from pets. Dog bites are common and most often happen to children. Cat bites are ... which can cause deeper puncture wounds. Most other animal bites are caused by stray or wild animals, ...

  9. Self-care Concept Analysis in Cancer Patients: An Evolutionary Concept Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hasanpour-Dehkordi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Self-care is a frequently used concept in both the theory and the clinical practice of nursing and is considered an element of nursing theory by Orem. The aim of this paper is to identify the core attributes of the self-care concept in cancer patients. We used Rodgers' evolutionary method of concept analysis. The articles published in English language from 1980 to 2015 on nursing and non-nursing disciplines were analyzed. Finally, 85 articles, an MSc thesis, and a PhD thesis were selected, examined, and analyzed in-depth. Two experts checked the process of analysis and monitored and reviewed the articles. The analysis showed that self-care concept is determined by four attributes of education, interaction, self-control, and self-reliance. Three types of antecedents in the present study were client-related (self-efficacy, self-esteem), system-related (adequate sources, social networks, and cultural factors), and healthcare professionals-related (participation). The self-care concept has considerably evolved among patients with chronic diseases, particularly cancer, over the past 35 years, and nurses have managed to enhance their knowledge about self-care remarkably for the clients so that the nurses in healthcare teams have become highly efficient and able to assume the responsibility for self-care teams.

  10. Self-care Concept Analysis in Cancer Patients: An Evolutionary Concept Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hasanpour-Dehkordi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Self-care is a frequently used concept in both the theory and the clinical practice of nursing and is considered an element of nursing theory by Orem. The aim of this paper is to identify the core attributes of the self-care concept in cancer patients. Materials and Methods: We used Rodgers’ evolutionary method of concept analysis. The articles published in English language from 1980 to 2015 on nursing and non-nursing disciplines were analyzed. Finally, 85 articles, an MSc thesis, and a PhD thesis were selected, examined, and analyzed in-depth. Two experts checked the process of analysis and monitored and reviewed the articles. Results: The analysis showed that self-care concept is determined by four attributes of education, interaction, self-control, and self-reliance. Three types of antecedents in the present study were client-related (self-efficacy, self-esteem), system-related (adequate sources, social networks, and cultural factors), and healthcare professionals-related (participation). Conclusion: The self-care concept has considerably evolved among patients with chronic diseases, particularly cancer, over the past 35 years, and nurses have managed to enhance their knowledge about self-care remarkably for the clients so that the nurses in healthcare teams have become highly efficient and able to assume the responsibility for self-care teams. PMID:27803559

  11. Self-care in older adults with heart failure: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Zavertnik, Jean Ellen

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this integrative review were to examine the evidence specific to self-care in older adults, 65 years or older, with heart failure and to indicate best nursing practice interventions for use in this population. Self-care is a complex set of activities involving self-care maintenance and self-care management. Age-related and psychosocial factors impact older patients' ability to engage effectively in self-care practices. Although self-care processes are the focus of the investigation, few studies provide implications specific for the older adult population. Limited research on heart failure self-care in the older adult meets the age criterion of 65 years or older. A comprehensive search of the literature was performed using Medline, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library, as well as an ancestry approach of reference lists of selected studies. Eligible studies were randomized controlled trial, qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method design studies on older adults with heart failure related to self-care for the years 2002-2012. Three themes of self-care were noted in the selected studies: patient-related factors, patient education, and telemonitoring. The patient-related factors identified were barriers to self-care such as age-related symptoms, cognitive factors, and social issues. The interventions promoting self-care were patient education (self-care knowledge) and telemonitoring (augmenting symptom recognition). Patient education tailored to older adults may be beneficial. Telemonitoring is an appropriate self-care enhancement tool for selected older adults. More emphasis needs to be placed on interventions to assist older adults with heart failure in symptom recognition and early notification of healthcare providers. As the population ages, a need for evidence-based care for older adults with heart failure is warranted. Heart failure self-care interventions do not address the special considerations of the older heart failure patient. To determine the

  12. Limitations of self-care in reducing the risk of lymphedema: supportive-educative systems.

    PubMed

    Armer, Jane M; Brooks, Constance W; Stewart, Bob R

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine patient perceptions of limitations related to self-care measures to reduce lymphedema risk following breast cancer surgery. Secondary analysis of survey data from a companion study to a study piloting a behavioral-educational intervention was conducted to examine the specific limitations in performing lymphedema risk-reduction self-care measures. Findings suggest a more comprehensive approach is needed if patients are to engage in self-care actions to reduce lymphedema risk. Understanding the concepts of self-care and personal support interventions that include motivational interviewing can help nurses design supportive-educative care systems that assist patients in overcoming limitations in the estimative, transitional, and productive phases of self-care necessary to reduce lymphedema risk.

  13. Exercise deficit disorder in youth: an emergent health concern for school nurses.

    PubMed

    Faigenbaum, Avery D; Gipson-Jones, Trina L; Myer, Gregory D

    2012-08-01

    Although the benefits of regular physical activity are widely acknowledged, recent findings indicate that a growing number of youth are not as active as they should be. The impact of a sedentary lifestyle during childhood on lifelong pathological processes and associated health care costs have created a need for immediate action to manage, if not prevent, unhealthy behaviors during this vulnerable period of life. The concept of identifying children with exercise deficit disorder early in life and prescribing effective interventions to prevent the cascade of adverse health outcomes later in life is needed to raise public awareness, focus on primary prevention, and impact the collective behaviors of health care providers and public health agencies. School nurses are in a unique position to take advantage of well-child visits as an ideal opportunity to assess physical activity habits and encourage daily participation in play, recess, sports, planned exercise, and physical education.

  14. [Attention deficit disorder with or without hyperactivity. Relationship among nurses, parents and school].

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Raúl García; Sanabria, Sheila García; Ramos, Paula García

    2009-09-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is characterized by a series of behaviors which interfere with the optimal evolutionary development of a child, at the cognitive level as well as in his/her relations with his/her family and integration with other children in his/her age group. An estimated 7% of children have this disorder. 80% of these children will continue to have problems during adolescence while 30 to 65% show symptoms as adults. Correct diagnosis requires, besides an exploration, an interview/s with teachers, family and the child and an evaluation of diverse tests designed for each of the implicated parties. For difficult cases, it is recommended there be a combined evaluation by pediatric, neurologist, child psychiatrist, clinical psychologist or neuropsychologist, and psycho-pedagogue. A multi-modal treatment has proven more effective; this combines pharmacological, psychological and psycho-pedagogical aspects and in this approach, the role of family and educators is fundamental. Primary Health Care Services Protocol contemplates periodical revisions, included in the Program to Attend to Healthy Children, which covers all children and teenagers. The role of nurses in these revisions is quite relevant to develop an exhaustive evaluation which enables collaboration in precocious detection and follow-up for this pathology This article hopes to facilitate this activity to all nurses involved in Primary Health Care, especially in pediatrics.

  15. Nursing and human freedom.

    PubMed

    Risjord, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Debates over how to conceptualize the nursing role were prominent in the nursing literature during the latter part of the twentieth century. There were, broadly, two schools of thought. Writers like Henderson and Orem used the idea of a self-care deficit to understand the nurse as doing for the patient what he or she could not do alone. Later writers found this paternalistic and emphasized the importance of the patient's free will. This essay uses the ideas of positive and negative freedom to explore the differing conceptions of autonomy which are implicit in this debate. The notion of positive freedom has often been criticized as paternalistic, and the criticisms of self-care in the nursing literature echo criticisms from political philosophy. Recent work on relational autonomy and on the relationship between autonomy and identity are used to address these objections. This essay argues for a more nuanced conception of the obligation to support autonomy that includes both positive (freedom to) and negative (freedom from) dimensions. This conception of autonomy provides a moral foundation for conceptualizing nursing in something like Henderson's terms: as involving the duty to expand the patient's capacities. The essay concludes by generalizing the lesson. Respect for autonomy on the part of any health care provider requires both respect for the patient's choices and a commitment to expand the patient's ability to actualize their choices. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Cognitive influences on self-care decision making in persons with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Victoria V; Tkacs, Nancy; Riegel, Barbara

    2007-09-01

    Despite advances in management, heart failure is associated with high rates of hospitalization, poor quality of life, and early death. Education intended to improve patients' abilities to care for themselves is an integral component of disease management programs. True self-care requires that patients make decisions about symptoms, but the cognitive deficits documented in 30% to 50% of the heart failure population may make daily decision making challenging. After describing heart failure self-care as a naturalistic decision making process, we explore cognitive deficits known to exist in persons with heart failure. Problems in heart failure self-care are analyzed in relation to neural alterations associated with heart failure. As a neural process, decision making has been traced to regions of the prefrontal cortex, the same areas that are affected by ischemia, infarction, and hypoxemia in heart failure. Resulting deficits in memory, attention, and executive function may impair the perception and interpretation of early symptoms and reasoning and, thereby, delay early treatment implementation. There is compelling evidence that the neural processes critical to decision making are located in the same structures that are affected by heart failure. Because self-care requires the cognitive ability to learn, perceive, interpret, and respond, research is needed to discern how neural deficits affects these abilities, decision-making, and self-care behaviors.

  17. The impact of deficit reduction on the nursing labour market in Canada: unintended consequences of fiscal reform.

    PubMed

    Vujicic, Marko; Evans, Robert G

    2005-01-01

    Beginning in 1992, governments throughout Canada began reducing expenditures in an effort to eliminate fiscal deficits and reduce their alarmingly high debt burden. As part of this deficit-fighting era, governments reduced hospital expenditure levels quite dramatically. Some of the current problems in the Canadian healthcare system - the recent unrest in the nursing labour market in particular - are often attributed to this hospital downsizing era. This article examines trends in the labour market for registered nurses in Canada during the hospital downsizing period. Of particular interest is the effect of hospital spending reforms on nurse employment levels in hospitals and on the age structure of the nursing workforce. After identifying the trends, the main factors driving the trends are discussed. Results indicate that a decrease in the demand for nursing labour resulted in large staff layoffs during the restructuring period, particularly among the youngest age groups. The evidence does not support the claim that deteriorating wages and working conditions in hospitals led nurses to quit their jobs during the hospital downsizing period.

  18. Educational technologies to encourage (self) care in postpartum women.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Eryjosy Marculino Guerreiro; Sousa, Albertina Antonielly Sydney de; Vasconcelos, Mardênia Gomes Ferreira; Carvalho, Rhanna Emanuela Fontenele Lima de; Oriá, Mônica Oliveira Batista; Rodrigues, Dafne Paiva

    2016-06-01

    to evaluate national and international literature regarding the use of educational technologies to encourage self care in postpartum women. an integrative review of the literature. The articles were collected from the CINAHL, SCOPUS, PubMed, SciELO, LILACS and Cochrane databases; the time period for the articles referred to January/2004 to July/2014; the languages used in the articles were Portuguese, English, Spanish and French; the articles were selected from the following descriptors: postpartum care period, educational technology, nursing and self care. Twenty-seven articles were selected for analysis Results: based on the information found, the scales, counseling and home visits were among the most recommended educational technologies. the technologies promote communication, but are sometimes dependent on computer and internet access, which hinder their use by low-income women.

  19. Self-care program for inpatients in a mental hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Voineskos, G.; Butler, J. A.; Bullock, L. J.; El-Gaaly, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    Summary: A self-care program for selected inpatients in a mental hospital has been developed and has been in operation for more than a year. The 12-bed unit operates without any nursing or other professional staff during the night and weekend. Certain factors, including the mental hospital as an organization, tend to hamper the development of this type of program as well as the progress and growth of other programs in psychiatric hospitals. It is suggested that the much needed progress in the mental hospital would be facilitated by an open-systems approach to its organization. Mental hospitals should consider the introduction of self-care programs for selected patients, mainly in view of their therapeutic potential, but also because of the financial savings such programs offer. PMID:1111874

  20. Supporting self-care in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, Colin J; Campbell, John L

    2007-01-01

    There is both a clear need and a political will to improve self-care in long-term conditions: demand for self-care support interventions is rising. This article discusses current approaches to supporting self-care in primary care, evidence in favour of self-care support, and issues for GPs to consider in planning self-care support systems. In planning care pathways, important choices need to be made about whether to use individual or group-based approaches and what intensity of intervention is appropriate to match patient needs. Investment may also be needed in both health professional competences and practice systems to optimise their ability to support patient self-care. Self-care support is a key approach for the future of UK health care. Practices that are well trained and well organised to support self-care will respond better to the complex challenges of achieving improvements in the outcomes of long-term conditions. PMID:17925140

  1. The Health Deviation of Post-Breast Cancer Lymphedema: Symptom Assessment and Impact on Self-Care Agency.

    PubMed

    Armer, Jane M; Henggeler, Mary H; Brooks, Constance W; Zagar, Eris A; Homan, Sherri; Stewart, Bob R

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cancer among women world-wide, affecting 1 of 8 women during their lifetimes. In the US alone, some 2 million breast cancer survivors comprise 20% of all cancer survivors. Conservatively, it is estimated that some 20-40% of all breast cancer survivors will develop the health deviation of lymphedema or treatment-related limb swelling over their lifetimes. This chronic accumulation of protein-rich fluid predisposes to infection, leads to difficulties in fitting clothing and carrying out activities of daily living, and impacts self-esteem, self-concept, and quality of life. Lymphedema is associated with self-care deficits (SCD) and negatively impacts self-care agency (SCA) and physiological and psychosocial well-being. Objectives of this report are two-fold: (1) to explore four approaches of assessing and diagnosing breast cancer lymphedema, including self-report of symptoms and the impact of health deviations on SCA; and (2) to propose the development of a clinical research program for lymphedema based on the concepts of Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory (SCDNT). Anthropometric and symptom data from a National-Institutes-of-Health-funded prospective longitudinal study were examined using survival analysis to compare four definitions of lymphedema over 24 months post-breast cancer surgery among 140 of 300 participants (all who had passed the 24-month measurement). The four definitions included differences of 200 ml, 10% volume, and 2 cm circumference between pre-op baseline and/or contralateral limbs, and symptom self-report of limb heaviness and swelling. Symptoms, SCA, and SCD were assessed by interviews using a validated tool. Estimates of lymphedema occurrence varied by definition and time since surgery. The 2 cm girth change provided the highest estimation of lymphedema (82% at 24 months), followed by 200 ml volume change (57% at 24 months). The 10% limb volume change converged with symptom report of heaviness and swelling at 24 months

  2. A motivational counseling approach to improving heart failure self-care: mechanisms of effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Riegel, Barbara; Dickson, Victoria V; Hoke, Linda; McMahon, Janet P; Reis, Brendali F; Sayers, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Self-care is an integral component of successful heart failure (HF) management. Engaging patients in self-care can be challenging. Fifteen patients with HF enrolled during hospitalization received a motivational intervention designed to improve HF self-care. A mixed method, pretest posttest design was used to evaluate the proportion of patients in whom the intervention was beneficial and the mechanism of effectiveness. Participants received, on average, 3.0 +/- 1.5 home visits (median 3, mode 3, range 1-6) over a three-month period from an advanced practice nurse trained in motivational interviewing and family counseling. Quantitative and qualitative data were used to judge individual patients in whom the intervention produced a clinically significant improvement in HF self-care. Audiotaped intervention sessions were analyzed using qualitative methods to assess the mechanism of intervention effectiveness. Congruence between quantitative and qualitative judgments of improved self-care revealed that 71.4% of participants improved in self-care after receiving the intervention. Analysis of transcribed intervention sessions revealed themes of 1) communication (reflective listening, empathy); 2) making it fit (acknowledging cultural beliefs, overcoming barriers and constraints, negotiating an action plan); and, 3) bridging the transition from hospital to home (providing information, building skills, activating support resources). An intervention that incorporates the core elements of motivational interviewing may be effective in improving HF self-care, but further research is needed.

  3. Depressive symptoms effect on self care behavior during the first month after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Niakan, Maryam; Paryad, Ezzat; Kazemnezhad Leili, Ehsan; Sheikholeslami, Farzane

    2015-01-26

    To determine the effect of severity of depression symptoms on self care behavior in 15th and 30th day after myocardial infarction (MI). Gathering data for this cross sectional study was done by Beck depression and self care behavior questionnaires in a heart especial hospital in Rasht in north of Iran .Sample size was 132 after MI patients and data collected from June 2011 to January 2012. Scores of depression symptoms in 15th and 30th day after MI and score of self care behavior in these days had significant difference (P<0.0001) .Spearman test showed self care behavior had significant relationship with depression symptoms (P<0.0001). GEE model also showed with control of socio demographic and illness related factors, depression symptoms can decrease self care behavior scores (P<0.001). Severity of depression symptoms increase in 15th to 30th day after MI .This issue can affect on self care behavior. This issue is emphasized on nurses' notice to plan suitable self care program for these patients.

  4. Urinary tract infection in women - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    UTI - self-care; Cystitis - self-care; Bladder infection - self-care ... BATHING AND HYGIENE To prevent future urinary tract infections, you ... make infections more likely. Change your pad each time you ...

  5. Enhancing Supportive-Educative Nursing Systems to Reduce Risk of Post-Breast Cancer Lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Armer, Jane M; Shook, Robin P; Schneider, Melanie K; Brooks, Constance W; Peterson, Julie; Stewart, Bob R

    2009-10-01

    This study describes the use of data regarding self-care agency to enhance a supportive-educative nursing system for breast cancer survivors to reduce the risk of developing lymphedema post surgery. Impetus for this study came from the analysis of participant feedback from a parent study (Lance Armstrong Foundation pilot study) that sought to plan an educational program for nurses that will improve their supportive-educative nursing system when working with breast cancer survivors. The goal is to enable these women to reduce the risk of lymphedema post surgery. The parent study examined a bundled behavioral-educative intervention, which included standard lymphedema education coupled with Modified Manual Lymph Drainage (MMLD) to reduce the risk of developing lymphedema in newly-diagnosed breast cancer survivors. Based upon the feedback received from the parent study, the research team recognized that many of the participants were not fully following the recommendations of the intervention protocol. In order for nurses to help patients develop self-care agency (SCA) (Orem, 2001) to engage in actions that addressed the self-care requisites associated with post-breast cancer surgery, these nurses needed to refine their intervention skills. Prior to the development of a program for the nurses, the research team conducted a study to explore the state of power related to SCA of the study participants. The information obtained from this was then used in the development of an educational program for bundled intervention. Both motivational interviewing (Miller & Rollnick, 2002) and solution-focused therapy (Berg & DeJong, 1996) were incorporated into the educational program for the research nurse team to strengthen and improve supportive-educative nursing systems. Supportive-educative systems of care that integrate self-care deficit nursing theory, motivational interviewing, and solution-focused therapy can assist patients to develop and sustain self-care agency.

  6. Enhancing Supportive-Educative Nursing Systems to Reduce Risk of Post-Breast Cancer Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Armer, Jane M.; Shook, Robin P.; Schneider, Melanie K; Brooks, Constance W.; Peterson, Julie; Stewart, Bob R

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the use of data regarding self-care agency to enhance a supportive-educative nursing system for breast cancer survivors to reduce the risk of developing lymphedema post surgery. Impetus for this study came from the analysis of participant feedback from a parent study (Lance Armstrong Foundation pilot study) that sought to plan an educational program for nurses that will improve their supportive-educative nursing system when working with breast cancer survivors. The goal is to enable these women to reduce the risk of lymphedema post surgery. The parent study examined a bundled behavioral-educative intervention, which included standard lymphedema education coupled with Modified Manual Lymph Drainage (MMLD) to reduce the risk of developing lymphedema in newly-diagnosed breast cancer survivors. Based upon the feedback received from the parent study, the research team recognized that many of the participants were not fully following the recommendations of the intervention protocol. In order for nurses to help patients develop self-care agency (SCA) (Orem, 2001) to engage in actions that addressed the self-care requisites associated with post-breast cancer surgery, these nurses needed to refine their intervention skills. Prior to the development of a program for the nurses, the research team conducted a study to explore the state of power related to SCA of the study participants. The information obtained from this was then used in the development of an educational program for bundled intervention. Both motivational interviewing (Miller & Rollnick, 2002) and solution-focused therapy (Berg & DeJong, 1996) were incorporated into the educational program for the research nurse team to strengthen and improve supportive-educative nursing systems. Supportive-educative systems of care that integrate self-care deficit nursing theory, motivational interviewing, and solution-focused therapy can assist patients to develop and sustain self-care agency. PMID

  7. Self-Care Motivation Among Patients With Heart Failure: A Qualitative Study Based on Orem's Theory.

    PubMed

    Abotalebidariasari, Ghasem; Memarian, Robabe; Vanaki, Zohreh; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan; Naderi, Nasim

    2016-11-01

    Initiating and adhering to self-care activities necessitate self-care motivation. This study was undertaken in Iran to explore self-care motivation among patients with heart failure (HF). This qualitative study was done in 2014 and 2015. Study participants were patients with HF and their family members who were purposively selected from Shaheed Rajaei Cardiovascular, Medical and Research Center, Tehran, Iran. The study data were collected from December 2014 to May 2015 by doing in-depth semistructured face-to-face interviews and were analyzed via the directed content analysis approach. Eleven primary codes were generated which reflected motivations for self-care among patients with HF in the Iranian sociocultural context. To enhance the clarity of the findings, these primarily codes were summarized and grouped into 7 subcategories including fear of death and love of life, returning to previous physical health status and preventing or alleviating symptoms, understanding the value of self-care behaviors and trusting them, having the desire for remaining independent, relying on God, reassuring and supporting family members, and preventing family members from feeling irritation. The findings of this study indicate that patients with HF have different motivations for doing self-care activities. Fear of death, love of life, wish to return to previous health status, and prevention or alleviation of HF symptoms were the participants' strongest motivations for self-care. Understanding the motivations for self-care among patients with HF, based a holistic approach and evidence-based practice, can help nurses and physicians develop motivational programs for promoting self-care behaviors.

  8. Nerve damage from diabetes - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000326.htm Nerve damage from diabetes - self-care To use the ... or at other unusual times. Treating and Preventing Nerve Damage from Diabetes Treating diabetic neuropathy can make ...

  9. High blood sugar - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... High blood glucose - self care; Diabetes - high blood sugar ... Symptoms of high blood sugar can include: Being very thirsty or having a dry mouth Having blurry vision Having dry skin Feeling weak or tired ...

  10. Neck pain or spasms -- self care

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000802.htm Neck pain or spasms - self care To use the sharing ... strengthening exercises and how to do them. Preventing Neck Pain If you work at a computer or a ...

  11. Self-care and mothering in African American women with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Shambley-Ebron, Donna Z; Boyle, Joyceen S

    2006-02-01

    African American women are the most rapidly growing group of people in the United States diagnosed with HIV/AIDS. The purpose of this study was to explore experiences of self-care and mothering among African American women with HIV/AIDS. It is important to recognize how culture affects illness management, childrearing, and daily living to design culturally appropriate nursing interventions for African American women. Critical ethnography was used to study 10 African American mothers from the rural Southeast who were HIV positive and mothered children who were HIV positive. Domains derived from the research were disabling relationships, strong mothering, and redefining self-care. The cultural theme was creating a life of meaning. African American mothers with HIV/AIDS in the rural Southeast used culturally specific self-care and mothering strategies reflective of cultural traditions. This study acknowledges strengths of African American women and generates theory that will enhance nursing care to this population.

  12. Self-care practices of Malaysian adults with diabetes and sub-optimal glycaemic control.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ming Yeong; Magarey, Judy

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the self-care practices of Malaysian adults with diabetes and sub-optimal glycaemic control. Using a one-to-one interviewing approach, data were collected from 126 diabetic adults from four settings. A 75-item questionnaire was used to assess diabetes-related knowledge and self-care practices regarding, diet, medication, physical activity and self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG). Most subjects had received advice on the importance of self-care in the management of their diabetes and recognised its importance. Sixty-seven subjects (53%) scored below 50% in their diabetes-related knowledge. Subjects who consumed more meals per day (80%), or who did not include their regular sweetened food intakes in their daily meal plan (80%), or who were inactive in daily life (54%), had higher mean fasting blood glucose levels (p=0.04). Subjects with medication non-adherence (46%) also tended to have higher fasting blood glucose levels. Only 15% of the subjects practiced SMBG. Predictors of knowledge deficit and poor self-care were low level of education (p = <0.01), older subjects (p=0.04) and Type 2 diabetes subjects on oral anti-hyperglycaemic medication (p = <0.01). There were diabetes-related knowledge deficits and inadequate self-care practices among the majority of diabetic patients with sub-optimal glycaemic control. This study should contribute to the development of effective education strategies to promote health for adults with sub-optimal diabetes control.

  13. Attention and memory deficits in breast cancer survivors: implications for nursing practice and research.

    PubMed

    Frank, Jennifer Sandson; Vance, David E; Jukkala, Angela; Meneses, Karen M

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer survivors (BCSs) commonly report deficits in attention and memory, cognitive functions crucial for daily optimal functioning. Perceived deficits are reported before, during, and after adjuvant therapy and affect quality of life throughout survivorship. Deficits of attention and memory are particularly disruptive for BCSs working or attending school who report that subtle impairment diminishes their confidence and their performance at all levels of occupation. Chemotherapy and endocrine therapy contribute to attention and memory deficits, but research findings have not fully established the extent or timing of that influence. Fortunately, potential interventions for attention and memory deficits in BCSs are promising. These include cognitive remediation therapies aimed at training for specific areas of deficit, cognitive behavioral therapies aimed at developing compensatory strategies for areas of deficit, complementary therapies, and pharmacologic therapies.

  14. Effect of self-care education on the quality of life in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shahsavari, Hooman; Matory, Pegah; Zare, Zahra; Taleghani, Fariba; Kaji, Mohammad Akbari

    2015-01-01

    Context: Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Iranian women. Although survival rate of breast cancer patients has been increased some distresses affect the patients’ quality of life negatively. the effectiveness of self-care education, particularly in the sociocultural context of Iran, has not been adequately investigated. Aims: This study aims at evaluating the effectiveness of nurse-led self-care education program on quality of life in this patients. Settings and Design: A controlled trial as pretest and posttest design was conducted in Sayyed-Al-Shohada Hospital in Isfahan in 2012. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with breast cancer were assigned to either the nurse-led self-care education program (n = 30), or to routine care (n = 30). Quality of life was measured at the time of recruitment and also 3 months after the intervention by the instrument of the National Medical Center and Beckman Research Institute. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed by SPSS (version 16) software using T-independent, T-paired and χ2, and Fisher's exact tests. Results: The intervention group had significantly greater improvements in quality of life status (P < 0.05). Furthermore, self-care education caused a significant increase in the quality of life score related to physical (P = 0.00), psychological (P = 0.00), social (P = 0.00), and emotional (P = 0.00) dimensions. Conclusions: Quality of life in patients with breast cancer can be improved by participating in a nurse-led self-care education program. It is suggested that self-care education to be added to the routine nursing care delivered to these patients. PMID:27462612

  15. Factors that affect self-care behaviour of female high school students with dysmenorrhoea: a cluster sampling study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Fang; Chuang, Mei-hua

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that affect the self-care behaviour of female high school students with dysmenorrhoea. This cross-sectional study utilized a questionnaire-based survey to understand the self-care behaviour of female high school students dysmenorrhoeal, along with the factors that affect this behaviour. A cluster random sampling method was adopted and questionnaires were used for data collection. Study participants experienced a moderate level of discomfort from dysmenorrhoea, and perceived dysmenorrhoea as serious. This investigation finds that cues to action raised perceived susceptibility to dysmenorrhoea and the perceived effectiveness of self-care behaviour and, therefore, increased the adoption of self-care behaviour. Hence, school nurses should offer female high school students numerous resources to apply correct self-care behaviour. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. The effect of a supportive educational intervention developed based on the Orem's self-care theory on the self-care ability of patients with myocardial infarction: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mohammadpour, Ali; Rahmati Sharghi, Narjes; Khosravan, Shahla; Alami, Ali; Akhond, Majid

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a supportive educational intervention developed based on the Orem's self-care theory on the self-care ability of patients with myocardial infarction. Patients with cardiovascular disease suffer from the lack of knowledge about the disease and consequently are not able to fulfil their own self-care needs. This was a randomised controlled trial conducted in 2012. We recruited a random sample of 66 patients with myocardial infarction who had been recently discharged from coronary care unit. The study setting was two university hospitals located in Khorasan, Iran. Patients were randomly allocated to either the experimental or the control groups. Patients in the experimental group received education, support, and counselling while patients in the control group received no intervention. We employed a demographic questionnaire and the Myocardial Infarction Self-Care Ability Questionnaire for data collection and spss version 16.00 for data analysis. After the study, patients in the experimental group had higher levels of self-care knowledge, motivation and skills compared to the prestudy readings and the control group. The supportive educational intervention developed based on the Orem's self-care theory can improve nonhospitalised patients' self-care ability and positively affect public health outcomes. Consequently, using the developed programme for providing follow-up care to nonhospitalised patients is recommended. Having the ability to develop caring systems based on the nursing theories is a prerequisite to standard nursing practice. Identifying patients' educational needs is a fundamental prerequisite to patient education. Our findings revealed that the supportive educational intervention developed based on the Orem's self-care theory can help health care providers identify and fulfil patients' self-care needs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Helping Your Child Learn Self-Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Linda; Corte, Suzanne Della

    1987-01-01

    Practical advice for parents of handicapped children is the focus of this issue on self-care skills including self-feeding, dressing, and personal hygiene. Ten initial tips for teaching skills to children include constant repetition, modeling, and keeping verbal instruction to a minimum. The section on self-feeding addresses the topics of…

  18. College Student Self-Care Diary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Jerrold S.; Dintiman, George B.

    The purpose of this docoment is to help college students maintain health by keeping a weekly diary of health related behaviors including diet, exercise, and stress levels. In addition each weekly entry presents a self-care tip for health improvement. Discussions of the college student and health, health and lifestyle, instructions on use of the…

  19. An Educational Intervention to Evaluate Nurses' Knowledge of Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Sundel, Siobhan; Ea, Emerson E

    2018-07-01

    Nurses are the main providers of patient education in inpatient and outpatient settings. Unfortunately, nurses may lack knowledge of chronic medical conditions, such as heart failure. The purpose of this one-group pretest-posttest intervention was to determine the effectiveness of teaching intervention on nurses' knowledge of heart failure self-care principles in an ambulatory care setting. The sample consisted of 40 staff nurses in ambulatory care. Nurse participants received a focused education intervention based on knowledge deficits revealed in the pretest and were then resurveyed within 30 days. Nurses were evaluated using the valid and reliable 20-item Nurses Knowledge of Heart Failure Education Principles Survey tool. The results of this project demonstrated that an education intervention on heart failure self-care principles improved nurses' knowledge of heart failure in an ambulatory care setting, which was statistically significant (p < .05). Results suggest that a teaching intervention could improve knowledge of heart failure, which could lead to better patient education and could reduce patient readmission for heart failure. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2018;49(7):315-321. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Diabetes Management and Self-Care Education for Hospitalized Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leak, Ashley; Davis, Ellen D.; Houchin, Laura B.; Mabrey, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    Managing diabetes can be a daunting task for patients with cancer. Empowerment-based diabetes education and motivational interviewing are complementary approaches. Oncology nurses may feel unprepared to teach patients and their families about self-care for diabetes, but they provide individualized information on symptom management of cancer throughout hospitalization and at discharge. The essential self-care issues include food, exercise, medication, blood glucose monitoring, prevention, recognition and treatment of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, and when and how to get additional medical and educational support. This patient-centered model of diabetes education differs from the older “compliance” model that covers many universal rules for all patients, which are predetermined by the nurse. Informing nurses about their role in care of patients with cancer and diabetes is critical. PMID:19349267

  1. Assessing the use of the NANDA-International nursing diagnoses at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile Ife, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Olaogun, Adenike; Oginni, Monisola; Oyedeji, Tinuke Abimbola; Nnahiwe, Blessing; Olatubi, Idowu

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the use of the NANDA-I nursing diagnoses in a Nigerian hospital. A multi-stage sampling method was used to select seven wards and 67 nursing process booklets from the Medical, Surgical, Orthopedic, and Mental Health Units of the hospital. A total of 154 nursing diagnoses were made: 50.7% were made within the first 48 hours of admission, while 35.8% were made on reassessments. The most frequently used nursing diagnoses were self-care deficit, pain, and anxiety. The NANDA-I nursing diagnoses are in use in Nigeria, adding support to the global use of the NANDA-I taxonomy, but findings also suggest a need for an assessment framework informed by nursing. Nurses in Nigeria would benefit from training programs organized by NANDA-I and national institutions to further refine their use of the nursing process. © 2011, The Authors. International Journal of Nursing Terminologies and Classifications © 2011, NANDA International.

  2. [The evolution of the concept of self-care in the healthcare system: a narrative literature review].

    PubMed

    Lommi, Marzia; Matarese, Maria; Alvaro, Rosaria; Piredda, Michela; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2015-01-01

    To identify and analyze the definitions of self-care in the healthcare system in the evolution over time as well as to identify the key actors of self-care. We conducted a narrative review of the literature on the definition of self-care in the CINAHL, PubMed and ILISI databases. The searches ranged from the first year included in each database until May 2013. In addition, a secondary analysis was performed on the references of articles selected to identify additional data sources. The self-care definitions were grouped according to decades and examined in their evolution. The first self-care definitions date back to the seventies, but only in the eighties self-care has been seen as a key resource for healthcare systems. In the nineties, care activities previously considered the exclusive domain of the health professions were included in this concept; and finally over the 2000s the role of health professionals in self-care is highlighted, extending the self-care activities to the psychological, social and spiritual dimensions. Self-care activities can be carried out directly by the person upon himself, delegated to others, or performed on others. The review has showed the large body of literature published in different disciplinary and cultural fields, which has led to the proliferation of definitions and interpretations of self-care. Italy has taken part in a marginal way to the international debate. It would be useful that also Italian nurses did research to describe and understand.

  3. Self-care among healthcare social workers: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Miller, J Jay; Lianekhammy, Joann; Pope, Natalie; Lee, Jacquelyn; Grise-Owens, Erlene

    2017-01-01

    Despite growing interest in self-care, few studies have explicitly examined the self-care practices of healthcare social workers. This exploratory study investigated self-care among practitioners (N = 138) in one southeastern state. Overall, data suggest that healthcare social workers only moderately engaged in self-care. Additionally, analyses revealed significant differences in self-care practices by financial stability, overall health, and licensure status, respectively. Interestingly, perceived health status and current financial situation were significant predictors for overall self-care practices. After a brief review of the literature, this narrative will explicate findings, elucidate discussion points, identify salient implications, and conclude with areas for future research.

  4. Ongoing ostomy self-care challenges of long-term rectal cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Bulkley, Joanna E; McMullen, Carmit K; Grant, Marcia; Wendel, Christopher; Hornbrook, Mark C; Krouse, Robert S

    2018-05-29

    Surgical treatment for rectal cancer (RC) can result in an intestinal ostomy that requires lifelong adaptation and investment of physical, cognitive, and financial resources. However, little is known about the extent of ongoing challenges related to ostomy self-care among long-term RC survivors. We analyzed the prevalence of self-reported ostomy self-care challenges and the physical and environmental factors that can support or undermine ostomy self-care. We mailed surveys to long-term (≥ 5 years post-diagnosis) RC survivors, including 177 adults with ostomies who were members of integrated health systems in northern California, Oregon, and Washington State. Potential participants were identified through tumor registries. Data were also extracted from electronic health records. The response rate was 65%. The majority of respondents were male (67%), and the mean age was 75 years. Sixty-three percent of respondents reported at least one ostomy self-care challenge. The most common challenges were leakage or skin problems around the ostomy and needing to change the pouching system too frequently. Twenty-two percent reported difficulty caring for their ostomy. Younger age and higher BMI were consistently related to ostomy self-care challenges. The majority of RC survivors reported ostomy-related self-care challenges, and 31% experienced problems across multiple domains of ostomy self-care. In addition, most survivors reported significant physical challenges that could lead to ostomy-related disability. Although the participants surveyed had access to ostomy care nurses, the care gaps we found suggest that additional work is needed to understand barriers to ostomy care, reduce unmet needs, and improve well-being among this group.

  5. Development and evaluation of a self-care assessment inventory for workers.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Eiko; Shiihara, Yasufumi; Ando, Michiyo

    2013-06-01

    To develop and evaluate a self-care assessment inventory for workers (SCAI-W). A study using a self-care assessment inventory for workers consisting of 27 self-care items, the Japanese version of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Japanese version of the University of Wales Institute of Science and Technology Mood Adjective Checklist (JUMACL) was conducted. These questionnaires were distributed to 2297 workers. There were 893 valid responses (39.9%, 584 men and 309 women, mean age 37.2±10.2 years). Three primary and eight secondary factors were established for the conceptual structure of self-care and validated by structural equation modeling. "Positive attitude" comprised the secondary factors, "hope" and "sense of fulfillment", and was influenced by another secondary factor, "social support". "Positive attitude" contributed to "attitude toward health". "Attitude toward health" comprised the secondary factors, "care about one's health" and "correction of bad habits". "Attitude toward health" influenced a primary factor, "everyday behavior", comprised of "wakefulness", "eating in moderation", and "lack of self-control". The primary factors "positive attitude" and "everyday behavior" influenced the BDI scores. A multiple regression analysis indicated that JUMACL subscale scores (energetic arousal and tense arousal), demographic data (living alone, sex, and age) and health-related data (exercise, smoking, body mass index, drinking more than three alcoholic drinks/day, and gambling) predicted the scores of the self-care assessment inventory for workers. This assessment inventory could be a useful measure of workers' self-care because it establishes a relationship between psychological and behavioral concepts that are important for health promotion. © 2012 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2012 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  6. Self-Care Strategies among Chinese Adolescent Girls with Dysmenorrhea: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Cho Lee; Ip, Wan Yim; Lam, Lai Wah

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about how Chinese adolescent girls manage dysmenorrhea. This study aims to explore self-care strategies among Chinese adolescent girls with dysmenorrhea. The study uses a mixed methods design with two phases: a cross-sectional survey in phase I and semistructured interviews in phase II. This paper reports phase II. In line with the phase I findings, 28 adolescent girls with different characteristics (high or low levels of self-care behavior and pain intensity, who did or did not self-medicate, and who had or had not received menstrual education) were recruited for interviews. Content analysis was used for data analysis. Four categories emerged from the data: lifestyle changes, symptom management, communicating dysmenorrhea with others, and seeking medical advice. Girls selected their diets carefully and reduced physical activity during menstruation to avoid aggravating symptoms. Heat therapy commonly was employed for symptom management. A few girls self-medicated to obtain immediate relief from pain, but the majority expressed reservations about using medication because they worried about dependence and side effects. Some girls communicated dysmenorrhea with their family and friends, but the majority did not seek medical advice. The present study showed that girls employed various self-care strategies for dysmenorrhea, including some strategies stemming from traditional Chinese medicine. The findings revealed menstrual etiquette among Chinese adolescent girls with dysmenorrhea, and demonstrated that self-medication was not part of most girls' self-care. Understanding the self-care strategies of these girls is important, as it can help nurses develop a culturally-specific intervention to promote self-care among adolescent girls with dysmenorrhea. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Symptom monitoring and self-care practices among Filipino cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Williams, Phoebe D; Balabagno, Araceli O; Manahan, Lydia; Piamjariyakul, Ubolrat; Ranallo, Lori; Laurente, Cecilia M; Cajucom, Loyda; Guela, Daisy; Kimbrough, Mercedita; Williams, Arthur R

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess patient-reported symptoms and self-care methods used during cancer treatments, using checklists. A descriptive study was performed at the cancer institute of a national medical center in Manila on 100 patients undergoing combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy, n = 37, or chemotherapy alone, n = 63. Instruments used were (a) 25-item patient-reported Therapy-Related Symptoms Checklist (TRSC), (b) Self-care Methods (with the 25 TRSC items) tool, (c) Karnofsky Scale, (d) Demographic form, and (e) Health form. The TRSC (Philippine version) Cronbach alpha = .83. The TRSC scores inversely, significantly correlated with nurse-rated Karnofsky measure of functional status (r = -0.45; P < .001)-all evidences of internal consistency reliability, construct, and concurrent validity; similar findings were found in Midwestern United States and 2 other Asian settings. Compared with those receiving chemotherapy alone, patients who had combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy reported more symptoms with greater severity on several TRSC subscales. Self-care methods most used were in 2 categories: (a) diet/nutrition/lifestyle change (eg, modify food/eating habits; eat vegetables and fruits (papaya); use nutritional supplements; have naps, rest, sleep) to manage eating, oropharynx, nausea, and fatigue subscale symptoms; and (b) mind/body control (eg, prayer, praying the rosary, music) to relieve fatigue subscale, other symptoms. The TRSC (Philippine version) and Self-care Methods assess patient-reported symptoms and patients' self-care use. Oncology symptom management is enhanced by a valid clinical assessment tool.

  8. Predictors of Better Self-Care in Patients with Heart Failure after Six Months of Follow-Up Home Visits

    PubMed Central

    Trojahn, Melina Maria; Ruschel, Karen Brasil; Nogueira de Souza, Emiliane; Mussi, Cláudia Motta; Naomi Hirakata, Vânia; Nogueira Mello Lopes, Alexandra; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the predictors of better self-care behavior in patients with heart failure (HF) in a home visiting program. This is a longitudinal study nested in a randomized controlled trial (ISRCTN01213862) in which the home-based educational intervention consisted of a six-month followup that included four home visits by a nurse, interspersed with four telephone calls. The self-care score was measured at baseline and at six months using the Brazilian version of the European Heart Failure Self-Care Behaviour Scale. The associations included eight variables: age, sex, schooling, having received the intervention, social support, income, comorbidities, and symptom severity. A simple linear regression model was developed using significant variables (P ≤ 0.20), followed by a multivariate model to determine the predictors of better self-care. One hundred eighty-eight patients completed the study. A better self-care behavior was associated with patients who received intervention (P < 0.001), had more years of schooling (P = 0.016), and had more comorbidities (P = 0.008). Having received the intervention (P < 0.001) and having a greater number of comorbidities (P = 0.038) were predictors of better self-care. In the multivariate regression model, being in the intervention group and having more comorbidities were a predictor of better self-care. PMID:24083023

  9. Complementary Self-Care Strategies for Healthy Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Sondra

    1993-01-01

    Focuses on alternative self-care practices in terms of collaboration with the primary care physician and individual exploration of self-care practices such as acupuncture, meditation, and nutrition counseling. (JOW)

  10. Foot health and self-care activities of older people in home care.

    PubMed

    Stolt, Minna; Suhonen, Riitta; Puukka, Pauli; Viitanen, Matti; Voutilainen, Päivi; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2012-11-01

    To assess the foot health of older people and their self-care activities in home care. The ultimate goal is to prevent foot problems in older people and to develop the assessment skills of nurses working in home care. Foot health problems are one reason why older people seek home care services. These problems are prevalent in older people, and they can impair performance of daily activities and threaten functional ability. However, studies in this field have concentrated on foot problems related to specific diseases. Non-disease-related research on foot health from the preventative perspective is lacking. A descriptive explorative design was used. The foot health of older people was assessed by visiting home nurses with the Foot Health Assessment Instrument, and older people's foot self-care activities were evaluated with the Foot Self-Care Activities Structured Interview in 2010. The data were analysed statistically. Older people in home care have multiple foot health problems. The most prevalent problems were oedema, dry skin, thickened and discoloured toenails and hallux valgus. Caring for one's feet was a problem for many older people. Older people's foot health needs to be assessed regularly to recognise foot health and self-care problems. Health care professionals have a vital role in preventing, recognising and caring for foot health in older people. The foot health of older people needs to be improved by supporting older people in foot self-care and developing preventive nursing interventions. Regular foot health assessments and their documentation are crucial in preventing serious foot problems in older people. Moreover, multiprofessional collaboration is important to promote foot health in older people. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Teaching Counselors Self-Care through Mindfulness Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newsome, Sandy; Christopher, John Chambers; Dahlen, Penny; Christopher, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    Few counseling programs directly address the importance of self-care in reducing stress and burnout in their curricula. A course entitled Mind/Body Medicine and the Art of Self-Care was created to address personal and professional growth opportunities through self-care and mindfulness practices (meditation, yoga, gong, and conscious relaxation…

  12. Diabetes - low blood sugar - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor right away. Talk to Your Doctor or Nurse If you use insulin and your blood sugar ... frequently or consistently low, ask your doctor or nurse if you: Are injecting your insulin the right ...

  13. A program of symptom management for improving self-care for patients with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Piao-Yi; Kuo, Benjamin Ing-Tiau; Chen, Yi-Ming; Wu, Shiow-Ing; Lin, Li-Chan

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a symptom management program on self-care of medication side effects among AIDS/HIV-positive patients. Sixty-seven patients from a sexually transmitted disease control center, a medical center, and a Catholic AIDS support group in Taipei were randomly assigned to three groups: one-on-one teaching, group teaching, and a control group. All subjects in each teaching group attended a 60- or 90-minute program on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) side effect self-care education and skill training once per week for 3 weeks; subjects also underwent counseling by telephone. A medication side effect self-care knowledge questionnaire, Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), and unscheduled hospital visits were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the symptom management program. The results revealed there were significant differences in mean difference of knowledge and unscheduled hospital visits between baseline and post-testing at 3 months for symptom management in the two groups. The mean difference of the self-esteem scale was not significant between the two groups. In summary, the symptom management program effectively increased the ability of AIDS/HIV-positive patients to self-care for medication side effects. We recommend that this program be applied in the clinical nursing practice.

  14. Women's reported self-care behaviors during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, J W; Aber, C S; Cannan, A; Coppinger, C M; Rafferty, K O

    1998-01-01

    Responsibility for self-care is the purview of the pregnant woman. Her self-care behaviors are influenced by her quest for a healthy pregnancy and by her health care providers and social network. Our purpose in this descriptive ex post facto study was to examine women's reported self-care behaviors during pregnancy. The 100 women in the study sample reported engaging in self-care behaviors that were both positive and negative. More than half of the women reported activities to keep healthy that included walking or jogging, 48 changed their diets, 25 reported working out, exercising, and/or mediating. Of the 32 women experiencing a medical problem with their pregnancies, none reported engaging in behaviors to keep healthy. Assessing reported self-care behaviors early in pregnancy might help identify women who can benefit from advice about self-care strategies to increase their chances of healthy outcomes.

  15. Caries-preventive self-care for children. Consistent oral health messages to the public?

    PubMed

    Løken, S Y; Wang, N J; Wigen, T I

    2017-05-01

    Recommendations regarding caries-preventive self-care for children are provided by several health authorities. To investigate recommendations given to the public regarding children's caries-preventive self-care by Norwegian dentists, dental hygienists, dental nurses and public health nurses. Questionnaires were sent by e-mail and answered by 808 of 1132 persons who provide oral preventive promotion to children in dental services and health centres. The preventive advice was obtained through questions about the preferred preventive methods, fluoride recommendations and sources of knowledge on which the personnel based the advice about caries prevention in children. The responses were analysed using logistic regression. The majority (59-71%) in all professions judged oral hygiene education to be the most important caries-preventive method. Most personnel (84-98%) recommended all children to use fluoride toothpaste, and half of all personnel (53%) recommended fluoride lozenges for 50% or more of children. Multivariate analysis showed that dental nurses recommended lozenges to more children than dentists (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.7-3.7), while health nurses recommended lozenges to fewer children than dentists (OR 0.5, 95% CI 0.3-0.8). The most important source of knowledge reported by dental personnel was professional education, while health nurses relied on information from dental personnel. Health professions' recommendations regarding caries-preventive self-care for children were mainly similar, although variation existed both between and within professions. Collaboration between professions and awareness of the evidence base for preventive oral care may improve the consistency of information given by health professionals to the public. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Phenomenological perspectives on self-care in aging.

    PubMed

    Söderhamn, Olle

    2013-01-01

    Self-care is a central concept in health care and may be considered as a means to maintain, restore, and improve one's health and well-being. When performed effectively, self-care contributes not only to human functioning but also to human structural integrity and human development (ie, to a dynamic and holistic state of health). Self-care as a clinical concept is relevant for health care professionals, and it should be meaningful to investigate it at a philosophical level and to further elaborate upon this concept. The aim of this article is to discuss and elaborate upon a phenomenological perspective on self-care in aging that is relevant for the health sciences. Self-care may be preliminarily regarded as a fundamental perspective for the conscious older individual, and as a way of being in the world with both the objective body and with the lived body. The lived body is the personal center of perception and the field of action, and it is also the center of self-care. The potentiality or ability for self-care activity and self-care activity itself are structures given to perception, with self-care ability as an integral part of the lived body. The actualization of self-care ability comes about through a certain meaning, which can be regarded as an important driving force. It is constituted by communication, a healthy lifestyle, and by building meaning and socializing. Successful self-care involves having contacts with the health care system, being conscious of a sound lifestyle, being physically and mentally active, being engaged, having social contacts with family and others, as well as being satisfied, positive, and being able to look forward. One fundamental cornerstone is serenity on behalf of the individual. Self-care can facilitate transitions, and it may also be an outcome of transitions.

  17. Phenomenological perspectives on self-care in aging

    PubMed Central

    Söderhamn, Olle

    2013-01-01

    Self-care is a central concept in health care and may be considered as a means to maintain, restore, and improve one’s health and well-being. When performed effectively, self-care contributes not only to human functioning but also to human structural integrity and human development (ie, to a dynamic and holistic state of health). Self-care as a clinical concept is relevant for health care professionals, and it should be meaningful to investigate it at a philosophical level and to further elaborate upon this concept. The aim of this article is to discuss and elaborate upon a phenomenological perspective on self-care in aging that is relevant for the health sciences. Self-care may be preliminarily regarded as a fundamental perspective for the conscious older individual, and as a way of being in the world with both the objective body and with the lived body. The lived body is the personal center of perception and the field of action, and it is also the center of self-care. The potentiality or ability for self-care activity and self-care activity itself are structures given to perception, with self-care ability as an integral part of the lived body. The actualization of self-care ability comes about through a certain meaning, which can be regarded as an important driving force. It is constituted by communication, a healthy lifestyle, and by building meaning and socializing. Successful self-care involves having contacts with the health care system, being conscious of a sound lifestyle, being physically and mentally active, being engaged, having social contacts with family and others, as well as being satisfied, positive, and being able to look forward. One fundamental cornerstone is serenity on behalf of the individual. Self-care can facilitate transitions, and it may also be an outcome of transitions. PMID:23807842

  18. Differences in foot self-care and lifestyle between men and women with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rossaneis, Mariana Angela; Haddad, Maria do Carmo Fernandez Lourenço; Mathias, Thaís Aidar de Freitas; Marcon, Sonia Silva

    2016-08-15

    to investigate differences with regard to foot self-care and lifestyle between men and women with diabetes mellitus. cross-sectional study conducted in a sample of 1,515 individuals with diabetes mellitus aged 40 years old or older. Poisson regression models were used to identity differences in foot self-care deficit and lifestyle between sexes, adjusting for socioeconomic and clinical characteristics, smoking and alcohol consumption. foot self-care deficit, characterized by not regularly drying between toes; not regularly checking feet; walking barefoot; poor hygiene and inappropriately trimmed nails, was significantly higher among men, though men presented a lower prevalence of feet scaling and use of inappropriate shoes when compared to women. With regard to lifestyle, men presented less healthy habits, such as not adhering to a proper diet and taking laboratory exams to check for lipid profile at the frequency recommended. the nursing team should take into account gender differences concerning foot self-care and lifestyle when implementing educational activities and interventions intended to decrease risk factors for foot ulceration. investigar as diferenças no autocuidado com os pés e no estilo de vida entre mulheres e homens diabéticos. estudo transversal realizado com uma amostra de 1.515 diabéticos com 40 anos ou mais. Foram utilizados modelos de regressão de Poisson para identificar diferenças entre os sexos na prevalência de déficit de autocuidado com os pés e no estilo de vida, ajustando-se por características socioeconômicas, clínicas, tabagismo e alcoolismo. a prevalência de déficit de autocuidado com os pés, caracterizada por baixa frequência de secagem dos espaços interdigitais; da não avaliação periódica dos pés; do hábito de andar descalço; de higiene insatisfatória e corte inadequado de unhas foi significativamente maior entre os homens. Contudo, eles apresentaram menor prevalência na prática de escaldar os pés e no uso

  19. The Practice of Self-Care among Counseling Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayorga, Mary G.; Devries, Sabina R.; Wardle, Elizabeth Ann

    2015-01-01

    Self-care behavior is recognized as an important component for the helping professional who practices in the field of counseling or who is training to become a helping professional. Occupational stress and burnout in the field of counseling is of great concern. This study examined the practice of self-care among master level counseling students to…

  20. Communication Strategies for Improving Diabetics' Self-Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryor, Burt; Mengel, Marvin C.

    1987-01-01

    Focuses on various levels of diabetic patients' involvement in the care of their disease and effects of these levels on how closely they later followed self-care programs. Suggests that by participating in group discussions about excuses for not following a self-care regimen, and offering solutions to counter those excuses, diabetic patients…

  1. Systematic review of measurement properties of self-reported instruments for evaluating self-care in adults.

    PubMed

    Matarese, Maria; Lommi, Marzia; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2017-06-01

    The aims of this study were as follows: to identify instruments developed to assess self-care in healthy adults; to determine the theory on which they were based; their validity and reliability properties and to synthesize the evidence on their measurement properties. Many instruments have been developed to assess self-care in many different populations and conditions. Clinicians and researchers should select the most appropriate self-care instrument based on the knowledge of their measurement properties. Systematic review of measurement instruments according to the protocol recommended by the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) panel. PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO, Scopus and CINAHL databases were searched from inception to December 2015. Studies testing measurement properties of self-report instruments assessing self-care in healthy adults, published in the English language and in peer review journals were selected. Two reviewers independently appraised the methodological quality of the studies with the COSMIN checklist and the quality of results using specific quality criteria. Twenty-six articles were included in the review testing the measurement properties of nine instruments. Seven instruments were based on Orem's Self-care theory. Not all the measurement properties were evaluated for the identified instruments. No self-care instrument showed strong evidence supporting the evaluated measurement properties. Despite the development of several instruments to assess self-care in the adult population, no instrument can be fully recommended to clinical nurses and researchers. Further studies of high methodological quality are needed to confirm the measurement properties of these instruments. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. [Evaluation of a self-care leaflet].

    PubMed

    Lystad, N; Heian, F

    1989-01-20

    A self care leaflet of 50 pages was distributed in Tingvoll, a municipality with 3,500 inhabitants. The leaflet gives advice about self treatment and prevention of common health problems, and guidelines for contacting the health services. In surveys conducted just before and 10 months after the distribution, we documented -- how the leaflet was accepted and used --changes in knowledge about the health problems mentioned in the leaflet. The leaflet was well accepted. It was characterized as easy to read and to use. 10 months after distribution to read and to use. 10 months after distribution 90% found it within five minutes. 63% used the leaflet when they had a health problem. 90% of those using the leaflet felt more sure that they acted correctly after consulting it, and 60% changed their mind about consulting a general practitioner. We consider the level of knowledge about health problems to be low. The evaluation showed increased knowledge in all groups, except for persons "responsible for caring for elderly relatives". The increase was most marked for "men" and for "persons with health education".

  3. Taking good care of myself: a qualitative study on self-care behavior among Chinese persons with a permanent colostomy.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hui; Songwathana, Praneed; Isaramalai, Sang-arun; Wang, Qingxi

    2014-12-01

    In Chinese culture, as a possible consequence of Confucianism, caring for the sick is considered a moral obligation of family members, while self-care is only the basis of fulfilling filial piety. This qualitative study aims to explore the self-care behavior among persons with a permanent colostomy in a Chinese cultural context of emphasizing the role of family caregiving. Data from in-depth interviews with seven Chinese adults at a university hospital in southwest China were analyzed using content analysis. Informants' self-care behavior was characterized by "taking good care of myself," which underlined individuals' efforts to manage colostomy-related impacts involving: (i) taking care of my colostomy with a proper degree of independence; (ii) taking care of my life by dealing with limitations; (iii) taking care of my mood in a positive way. Findings revealed that informants' self-care behavior was linked to their Confucian beliefs in family obligations, and also influenced by a happy-go-lucky outlook of life, a likely product of Taoism. The information is useful for nurses to design a culturally appropriate care plan to improve self-care behavior and proper family caregiving. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Health literacy, self-efficacy, and self-care behaviors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bohanny, Walton; Wu, Shu-Fang Vivienne; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Yeh, Shu-Hui; Tsay, Shiow-Luan; Wang, Tsae-Jyy

    2013-09-01

    The study purpose was to explore the relationships among health literacy, self-efficacy, and self-care behaviors of patients with type 2 diabetes. A cross-sectional study with a descriptive correlational design was conducted. Patients (N = 150) with type 2 diabetes were recruited from diabetes clinics in the Marshall Islands. Levels of health literacy, self-efficacy, and self-care behaviors were assessed by a questionnaire. Health literacy, receiving diabetes education, and employment status together explained 11.8% of the variance in self-efficacy (F((3,147)) = 7.58, p < .001). Patients who had higher health literacy, received more diabetes-related education, were currently employed and had better self-efficacy. Self-efficacy and marital status together explained 16.7% of the variance in self-care behaviors (F((2,148)) = 15.96, p < .001). Patients who had higher self-efficacy and who were married had better self-care behaviors. Strategies are needed to incorporate the concept of self-efficacy in the design of diabetes education to promote patients' self-care behaviors, with an emphasis on dealing with hyper- or hypoglycemia, following the diet plan, and checking blood sugar levels as recommended. Diabetes education material that requires a lower literacy level may be needed for older or unemployed adult populations. ©2013 The Author(s) ©2013 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  5. Relationships of Factors Affecting Self-care Compliance in Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients Following Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun Suk; Hwang, Seon Young; Jeong, Myung Ho; Lee, Eun Sook

    2013-12-01

    This study was conducted to identify direct and indirect factors influencing self-care compliance in patients with first acute coronary syndrome through examining the relationship among multidimensional factors. Outpatients who made hospital visits to receive a follow-up care at more than 6 months after percutaneous coronary intervention were recruited at a national university hospital in Korea. Data of 430 participants were collected through self-administered questionnaires and analyzed using AMOS version 7.0. The fitness of the hypothetical model and the degree of significance of direct and indirect paths were analyzed. Three paths were found to have a significant effect on self-care compliance in the modified model. Social support indirectly influenced self-care compliance through enhancing self-efficacy, reducing anxiety and increasing perceived benefit. In addition, social support and body function indirectly influenced self-care compliance through reducing depression which affected self-efficacy. Self-efficacy was the most influential factor and played an important role as a mediating variable. Results of this study suggest that nurses' counselling and education as a form of social support should be encouraged to enhance self-efficacy and self-care compliance among outpatients during follow-up care after percutaneous coronary intervention. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Psychometric Properties of the Dietary Salt Reduction Self-Care Behavior Scale.

    PubMed

    Srikan, Pratsani; Phillips, Kenneth D

    2014-07-01

    Valid, reliable, and culturally-specific scales to measure salt reduction self-care behavior in older adults are needed. The purpose of this study was to develop the Dietary Salt Reduction Self-Care Behavior Scale (DSR-SCB) for use in hypertensive older adults with Orem's self-care deficit theory as a base. Exploratory factor analysis, Rasch modeling, and reliability were performed on data from 242 older Thai adults. Nine items loaded on one factor (factor loadings = 0.63 to 0.79) and accounted for 52.28% of the variance (Eigenvalue = 4.71). The Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin method of sampling adequacy was 0.89, and the Bartlett's test showed significance (χ 2 ( df =36 ) = 916.48, p < 0.0001). Infit and outfit mean squares ranged from 0.81 to 1.25, while infit and outfit standardized mean squares were located at ±2. Cronbach's alpha was 0.88. The 9-item DSR-SCB is a short and reliable scale. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Self-care for the caregiver.

    PubMed

    Radziewicz, R M

    2001-12-01

    Palliative care nurses can face unique stressors and compassion fatigue working in their field. Working with the dying and their families, communicating with other health care professionals, and handling ethical issues are often sources of stress in palliative care. The biochemistry and theory of stress are discussed. Various strategies to cope with caregiver stress are explained.

  8. Telehomecare Communication and Self-Care in Chronic Conditions: Moving Towards a Shared Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Kimberly; Chamoff, Breanna

    2012-01-01

    Background Remote telemonitoring of patients’ vital signs is a rapidly increasing practice. While methods of communication in remote electronic monitoring differ from those in traditional home health care, the understanding shared by the nurse, patient, and family members remains the same: patients’ self-care behaviors affect exacerbations of chronic health conditions. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between communication and information integration into the daily lives of patients with chronic illnesses and offer best practice recommendations for telehomecare nurses. Methods The original study utilized the Social Relations Model to examine relationships within 43 triads composed of patients with chronic conditions, home helpers and their nurse (THN) involved in telehomecare at three Veterans Health Administrations. This secondary descriptive and correlational analysis compared 43 patients’ and 9 THNs’ ratings of themselves and each other on communication (frequency, timeliness and understanding) and the use of patients’ daily telemonitored information. Results There was almost no correlation between patients’ perception of THNs’ communication (frequency [r = .05], timeliness [r = .09] and understandability [r = .03]) and patients’ integration of information into daily health practices. However, significant correlations were found between the THNs’ perception of patients’ communication frequency and timeliness, and integration, (p = .02), (p < .001) respectively. Conclusions This study suggests that frequent phone communication may lead the remote THN to believe patients are integrating blood pressure, weight and other information into daily self-care behaviors, when in fact the patient reports that they are not. The influence of a halo effect on the THN may cloud an accurate perception of what is actually occurring. Remote communication may require more attention to THNs educating patients about shared understandings

  9. Telehomecare communication and self-care in chronic conditions: moving toward a shared understanding.

    PubMed

    Shea, Kimberly; Chamoff, Breanna

    2012-04-01

    Remote telemonitoring of patients' vital signs is a rapidly increasing practice. Although methods of communication in remote electronic monitoring differ from those in traditional home health care, the understanding shared by the nurse, patient, and family members remains the same: patients' self-care behaviors affect exacerbations of chronic health conditions. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between communication and information integration into the daily lives of patients with chronic illnesses and offer best practice recommendations for telehomecare nurses (THN). The original study used the Social Relations Model to examine relationships within 43 triads composed of patients with chronic conditions, home helpers, and their nurse involved in telehomecare at three Veterans Health Administration sites. This secondary descriptive and correlational analysis compared 43 patients' and nine THNs' ratings of themselves and each other on communication (frequency, timeliness, and understanding) and the use of patients' daily telemonitored information. There was almost no correlation between patients' perception of THNs' communication (frequency [r=0.05], timeliness [r=0.09], and understandability [r=0.03]) and patients' integration of information into daily health practices. However, significant correlations were found between the THNs' perception of patients' communication frequency and timeliness, and integration, (p=0.02; p<0.001) respectively. This study suggests that frequent phone communication may lead the remote THN to believe patients are integrating blood pressure, weight, and other information into daily self-care behaviors, when in fact the patient reports that they are not. The influence of a halo effect on the THN may cloud an accurate perception of what is actually occurring. Remote communication may require more attention to THNs educating patients about shared understandings when using telemonitoring. Best practices for THN should

  10. An HIV self-care symptom management intervention for African American mothers.

    PubMed

    Miles, Margaret Shandor; Holditch-Davis, Diane; Eron, Joseph; Black, Beth Perry; Pedersen, Cort; Harris, Donna A

    2003-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has become a serious health problem for low-income African American women in their childbearing years. Interventions that help them cope with feelings about having HIV and increase their understanding of HIV as a chronic disease in which self-care practices, regular health visits, and medications can improve the quality of life can lead to better health outcomes. This study aimed to determine the efficacy of an HIV self-care symptom management intervention for emotional distress and perceptions of health among low-income African American mothers with HIV. Women caregivers of young children were randomly assigned to self-care symptom management intervention or usual care. The intervention, based on a conceptual model related to HIV in African American women, involved six home visits by registered nurses. A baseline pretest and two posttests were conducted with the mothers in both groups. Emotional distress was assessed as depressive symptoms, affective state, stigma, and worry about HIV. Health, self-reported by the mothers, included the number of infections and aspects of health-related quality of life (i.e., perception of health, physical function, energy, health distress, and role function). Regarding emotional distress, the mothers in the experimental group reported fewer feelings of stigma than the mothers in the control group. Outcome assessments of health indicated that the mothers in the experimental group reported higher physical function scores than the control mothers. Within group analysis over time showed a reduction in negative affective state (depression/dejection and tension/anxiety) and stigma as well as infections in the intervention group mothers, whereas a decline in physical and role function was found in the control group. The HIV symptom management intervention has potential as a case management or clinical intervention model for use by public health nurses visiting the home or by advanced practice

  11. Outpatient Clinic for Health Education: Contribution to Self-Management and Self-Care for People With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Camila de Souza; Oliveira, Ana Paula Dias de; Lopes, Juliana de Lima; Bachion, Maria Márcia; Herdman, T Heather; Moorhead, Sue A; Barros, Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite de

    2016-01-01

    To report the experience of an outpatient nursing education clinic caring for people with chronic heart failure. In this service, qualified "listening," recreational educational actions about the disease and its treatment are conducted, based on the interventions from the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC), as well as the evaluation of self-care behaviors with the outcomes from the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC). This article describes the practice of health education activities and the use of NANDA-I-NIC-NOC in a nursing clinic. The outpatient clinic supports client learning about the treatment of disease and stimulates self-control of health behaviors. This experience report will guide nurses in the establishment of outpatient nursing education clinics for different populations of patients with chronic health conditions. © 2015 NANDA International, Inc.

  12. The Self-care Educational Intervention for Patients With Heart Failure: A Study Protocol.

    PubMed

    Boyde, Mary; Peters, Robyn; Hwang, Rita; Korczyk, Dariusz; Ha, Tina; New, Nicole

    A variety of educational interventions have been implemented to assist patients with heart failure (HF) to maintain their own health, develop self-care behaviors, and decrease readmissions. The most effective approach to education has yet to be established. The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of a multimedia educational intervention for patients with HF in reducing hospital readmissions. Secondary outcomes include changes in knowledge and self-care behaviors. A randomized controlled trial in a large tertiary referral hospital in Australia has recruited 200 patients and will follow them for 12 months. Patients diagnosed with HF have been randomly allocated 1:1 to either usual education or a multimedia educational intervention. Framed by the principles of adult learning, this individualized intervention was delivered face to face by a specialized HF nurse, with a targeted educational assessment and subsequent development of an educational plan. The multimedia approach combined viewing a DVD and verbal discussion supported by a written manual. The teach-back strategy at the conclusion of the intervention evaluated the patient's learning through 5 key questions about self-management of HF. Readmissions are assessed at 28 days, 3 months, and 12 months. Knowledge and self-care behavior are assessed at baseline, 3 months, and 12 months. This study evaluates the effectiveness of a targeted multimedia educational intervention. Study results may inform the design of in-hospital education for HF patients.

  13. Connecting Patients to mHealth Applications to Enhance Self-care Management.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Meghan K

    2015-09-01

    Smartphone use and the desire to use mHealth are growing in the population of patients who most commonly use home healthcare (HHC) services, a population with chronic conditions and complex healthcare management needs. HHC nurses are positioned to connect HHC patients with mHealth Apps to access health-related information, engage in interactive monitoring, and manage self-care activities. The challenge of finding reputable Apps is discussed and resources are presented to overcome this challenge at the business orindividual level.

  14. Adult Diabetic Patients’ Self-Care Levels, Attitudes, and Perceptions Following an Education Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    hospital. Diabetes care, 1981, 4,. 487-489. Graber, A. L., Christman, B. G., Alogna, M, T., & Davidson, J. K. Evaluation of diabetes patient - education programs...L. Why patient education ? An elookate thow doatientwt diabeter elts c:j~inlHat Nurs ngOulo, 1979, 27, 71-75 7-11. Leie .(E..Idviulzn.hea.• atrt-ne...Salzer, J. E. Classes to improve diabetic self-care. American Journal of Nursing, 1975, 75, 1324-1326. Svtall, D. A patient education program. American

  15. The impact of a multidisciplinary self-care management program on quality of life, self-care, adherence to anti-hypertensive therapy, glycemic control, and renal function in diabetic kidney disease: A Cross-over Study Protocol.

    PubMed

    Helou, Nancy; Talhouedec, Dominique; Shaha, Maya; Zanchi, Anne

    2016-07-19

    Diabetic kidney disease, a global health issue, remains associated with high morbidity and mortality. Previous research has shown that multidisciplinary management of chronic disease can improve patient outcomes. The effect of multidisciplinary self-care management on quality of life and renal function of patients with diabetic kidney disease has not yet been well established. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of a multidisciplinary self-care management program on quality of life, self-care behavior, adherence to anti-hypertensive treatment, glycemic control, and renal function of adults with diabetic kidney disease. A uniform balanced cross-over design is used, with the objective to recruit 40 adult participants with diabetic kidney disease, from public and private out-patient settings in French speaking Switzerland. Participants are randomized in equal number into four study arms. Each participant receives usual care alternating with the multidisciplinary self- care management program. Each treatment period lasts three months and is repeated twice at different time intervals over 12 months depending on the cross-over arm. The multidisciplinary self-care management program is led by an advanced practice nurse and adds nursing and dietary consultations and follow-ups, to the habitual management provided by the general practitioner, the nephrologist and the diabetologist. Data is collected every three months for 12 months. Quality of life is measured using the Audit of Diabetes-Dependent Quality of Life scale, patient self-care behavior is assessed using the Revised Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities, and adherence to anti-hypertensive therapy is evaluated using the Medication Events Monitoring System. Blood glucose control is measured by the glycated hemoglobin levels and renal function by serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio. Data will be analyzed using STATA version 14. The cross

  16. Enhancing self-care, adjustment and engagement through mobile phones in youth with HIV.

    PubMed

    John, M E; Samson-Akpan, P E; Etowa, J B; Akpabio, I I; John, E E

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of mobile phones in enhancing self-care, adjustment and engagement in non-disclosed youth living with HIV. Youth aged 15-24 years represent 42% of new HIV infections globally. Youth who are aware of their HIV status generally do not disclose it or utilize HIV-related facilities because of fear of stigma. They rely on the Internet for health maintenance information and access formal care only when immune-compromised and in crisis. This study shows how non-disclosed youth living with HIV can be reached and engaged for self-management and adjustment through mobile phone. One-group pre-test/post-test experimental design was used. Mobile phones were used to give information, motivation and counselling to 19 purposively recruited non-disclosed youth with HIV in Calabar, South-South Nigeria. Psychological adjustment scale, modified self-care capacity scale and patient activation measure were used to collect data. Data were analysed using PASW 18.0. Scores on self-care capacity, psychological adjustment and engagement increased significantly at post-test. HIV-related visits to health facilities did not improve significantly even at 6 months. Participants still preferred to consult healthcare providers for counselling through mobile phone. Mobile phone-based interventions are low cost, convenient, ensure privacy and are suitable for youth. Such remote health counselling enhances self-management and positive living. Mobile phones enhance self-care, psychological adjustment and engagement in non-disclosed youth living with HIV, and can be used to increase care coverage. Findings underline the importance of policies to increase access by locating, counselling and engaging HIV-infected youth in care. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  17. Role of the Lebanese family caregivers in cardiac self-care: a collective approach.

    PubMed

    Dumit, Nuhad Y; Abboud, Sarah; Massouh, Angela; Magilvy, Joan K

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore perceptions of cardiac self-care among Lebanese family caregivers of cardiac patients. The specific aims were to describe the cultural context of cardiac care-giving in Lebanon and to explore the roles of family caregivers in enhancing self-care practices in patients with cardiac diseases. The role of family caregivers in Lebanon, a country in the Middle East, is assumed to extend beyond care-giving to making decisions on behalf of the patient and assuming responsibility for patient care. To date, there has been no study done to empirically validate this impression. The design of the study is qualitative descriptive that used semi-structured individual interviews with family caregivers of Lebanese cardiac patients. Thirteen family caregivers of cardiac patients were recruited from a referral medical centre in Lebanon. The participants were designated by their patients and interviewed in a place of their choice. One overarching and three themes emerged from data analysis describing roles of family care givers in cardiac self-care. The overarching theme was: Family caregivers of Lebanese cardiac patients were unfamiliar with the term, concept and meaning of Self-Care. The moral and emotional duty to care for the family member stemmed from obligation and responsibility towards patients (theme I). Interdependent care (theme II) between cardiac patients and their families emerged as a significant cultural role. Family members play multiple supportive roles in care-giving namely emotional, informational and instrumental role (theme III). In this study, family caregiver role is shown to be based in the sense of obligation and duty towards the sick family member who collectively provide different types of supportive care. Nurses have to give significant importance to the family caregiver role as an integral part of any culturally sensitive patient/family intervention. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Effectiveness of a brief self-care support intervention for pulmonary rehabilitation among the elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Korea.

    PubMed

    Song, Hee-Young; Yong, Suk Joong; Hur, Hea Kung

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed effects of a brief self-care support intervention (SCSI) to promote health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and self-care adherence among elderly patients with COPD in Korea. A single-blinded, randomized pre-/posttest design A total of 40 participants were consecutively recruited from eligible patients admitted with an exacerbation of COPD to a department of pulmonology at a university hospital. Twenty participants were randomly divided into two groups: an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group received an SCSI utilizing a motivational interview. All participants were assessed with peak expiratory flow rate and 6-minute walking distance test, and answered Saint George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) and a questionnaire on self-care adherence at pre-intervention and 2 months postintervention. After the intervention, SGRQ scores for symptom, activity, impact, and total were significantly lower and self-care adherence scores of medication and exercise were significantly higher in the experimental group. This study confirmed the short-tem effectiveness of a nurse-led self-management intervention for pulmonary rehabilitation on quality of life and self-care adherence among elderly patients with COPD. Further studies are warranted to verify effective strategies to improve exercise capacity for this population. Our findings suggest a brief intervention for rehabilitation nursing with more retainable, feasible, and cost-effective strategies to enhance self-management among the elderly patients with COPD. © 2013 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  19. Is home health technology adequate for proactive self-care?

    PubMed

    Horwitz, C M; Mueller, M; Wiley, D; Tentler, A; Bocko, M; Chen, L; Leibovici, A; Quinn, J; Shar, A; Pentland, A P

    2008-01-01

    To understand whether home health technology in the market and in development can satisfy the needs of patients and their non-professional caregivers for proactive support in managing health and chronic conditions in the home. A panel of clinical providers and technology researchers was assembled to examine whether home health technology addresses consumer-defined requirements for self-care devices. A lexicon of home care and self-care technology terms was then created. A global survey of home health technology for patients with heart disease and dementia was conducted. The 254 items identified were categorized by conditions treated, primary user, function, and purpose. A focus group of patients and caregivers was convened to describe their expectations of self-care technology. Items identified in the database were then assessed for these attributes. Patients and family caregivers indicated a need for intelligent self-care technology which supports early diagnosis of health changes, intervention enablement, and improvement of communication quality among patients and the health care system. Of these, only intervention enablement was commonly found in the home health technology items identified. An opportunity exists to meet consumer self-care needs through increased research and development in intelligent self-care technology.

  20. Development of the Professional Self-Care Scale.

    PubMed

    Dorociak, Katherine E; Rupert, Patricia A; Bryant, Fred B; Zahniser, Evan

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased emphasis on the importance of self-care for psychologists and other mental health professionals. With the growth of positive psychology and preventive medicine, self-care is an emerging topic, promulgated as a means of avoiding the adverse effects of stress and promoting professional functioning and well-being. However, the research on self-care is limited because of the lack of an empirically based, psychometrically sound measure of this construct. Thus, the purpose of this project was to develop a measure of professional self-care. Professional psychologists were the focus of study, with the goal being to develop a measure that can be used in this population and similar groups of professionals. Based on expert feedback and a preliminary study of 422 licensed psychologists in Illinois, a 5-factor, 21-item scale was created. Factor analysis identified the following self-care factors: Professional Support, Professional Development, Life Balance, Cognitive Awareness, and Daily Balance. Preliminary analyses provided initial support for the validity of the 5 factors. A follow-up study was conducted with a second sample of clinical psychologists. The 5-factor structure provided a good fit to the data with the second sample. Thus, based on factor analysis and validity data, a 5-factor, 21-item Professional Self-Care Scale was established for further study and use in future research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. [Community resources prescription for self-care improvement in chronic illnesses. Clinical case management in Primary Health Care].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vico-Díaz de Rada, Lucía; González-Suárez, Miriam; Duarte-Clíments, Gonzalo; Brito-Brito, Pedro Ruymán

    2014-01-01

    A case is presented of a 52 year-old male seen in a Primary Care nursing clinic for a type 2 diabetes mellitus metabolic control. The frequency of the visits increased due to perceived difficulties caused by changing the medical treatment. A focused interview was conducted under functional health patterns framework. The patient was unable to write or read, had not worked for the last 25 years, and expressed a lack of control over his self-care. An action plan was prepared, prioritizing Ineffective Health Maintenance, Powerlessness, and Impaired Social Interaction NANDA-I nursing diagnoses. The goals were set at improving knowledge and control over his disease and participating in leisure activities. To achieve these, the social health resources in the area were contacted, and agreed that the patient could attend activities that could improve his self-care and his quality of life. An improvement in his diabetes control was observed in the following evaluations, with an increase in his level of knowledge and self-care. The Primary Health care nurse should consider available community resources by using a comprehensive approach to chronic diseases for their therapeutic benefit and management, especially in those patients with adverse sociocultural conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Self-Care Activation, Social Support, and Self-Care Behaviors among Women Living with Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckie, Theresa M.; Campbell, Susan M.; Schneider, Yukari Takata; Macario, Everly

    2017-01-01

    Background: Three million U.S. women live with heart failure (HF). Purpose: This study investigated relationships among self-care activation, social support, and self-care behaviors of women living with HF. Methods: A 52-item web-based survey was completed by 246 women living with HF. Results: Women reported a mean body mass index (BMI) of 30.8 ±…

  3. Level of anxiety versus self-care in the preoperative and postoperative periods of total laryngectomy patients 1

    PubMed Central

    Almonacid, Clara Inés Flórez; Ramos, Alfredo Jurado; Rodríguez-Borrego, María-Aurora

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: estimate the prevalence of anxiety in laryngectomy patients in the pre and postoperative periods and its relation with the self-care level. Method: observational research of 40 patients with stage IV laryngeal cancer. Three observations took place: in the preoperative phase, at seven and at 14 days after the surgery; between June 2010 and December 2012. Two self-care levels were defined: self-sufficient and needing help for activities of daily living and treatment-related activities. To assess the anxiety levels, Zigmond's hospital anxiety scale (1983) was used. Results: in the preoperative and postoperative phases, the patients presented high levels of anxiety. Concerning self-care, on average, self-sufficient patients presented lower levels of anxiety than patients who needed help to accomplish activities of daily living and activities deriving from the surgery, without significant differences. Conclusion: anxiety is present at all times in laryngectomy patients and the reduction of the self-care deficit seems to decrease it, without putting a permanent end to it. PMID:27305181

  4. Implementation of nursing conceptual models: observations of a multi-site research team.

    PubMed

    Shea, H; Rogers, M; Ross, E; Tucker, D; Fitch, M; Smith, I

    1989-01-01

    The general acceptance by nursing of the nursing process as the methodology of practice enabled nurses to have a common grounding for practice, research and theory development in the 1970s. It has become clear, however, that the nursing process is just that--a process. What is sorely needed is the nursing content for that process and consequently in the past 10 years nursing theorists have further developed their particular conceptual models (CM). Three major teaching hospitals in Toronto have instituted a conceptual model (CM) of nursing as a basis of nursing practice. Mount Sinai Hospital has adopted Roy's adaptation model; Sunnybrook Medical Centre, Kings's goal attainment model; and Toronto General Hospital, Orem's self-care deficit theory model. All of these hospitals are affiliated through a series of cross appointments with the Faculty of Nursing at the University of Toronto. Two community hospitals, Mississauga and Scarborough General, have also adopted Orem's model and are related to the University through educational, community and interest groups. A group of researchers from these hospitals and the University of Toronto have proposed a collaborative project to determine what impact using a conceptual model will make on nursing practice. Discussions among the participants of this research group indicate that there are observations associated with instituting conceptual models that can be identified early in the process of implementation. These observations may be of assistance to others contemplating the implementation of conceptually based practice in their institution.

  5. Instruments to assess self-care among healthy children: A systematic review of measurement properties.

    PubMed

    Urpí-Fernández, Ana-María; Zabaleta-Del-Olmo, Edurne; Montes-Hidalgo, Javier; Tomás-Sábado, Joaquín; Roldán-Merino, Juan-Francisco; Lluch-Canut, María-Teresa

    2017-12-01

    To identify, critically appraise and summarize the measurement properties of instruments to assess self-care in healthy children. Assessing self-care is a proper consideration for nursing practice and nursing research. No systematic review summarizes instruments of measurement validated in healthy children. Psychometric review in accordance with the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) panel. MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Web of Science and Open Grey were searched from their inception to December 2016. Validation studies with a healthy child population were included. Search was not restricted by language. Two reviewers independently assessed the methodological quality of included studies using the COSMIN checklist. Eleven studies were included in the review assessing the measurement properties of ten instruments. There was a maximum of two studies per instrument. None of the studies evaluated the properties of test-retest reliability, measurement error, criterion validity and responsiveness. Internal consistency and structural validity were rated as "excellent" or "good" in four studies. Four studies were rated as "excellent" in content validity. Cross-cultural validity was rated as "poor" in the two studies (three instruments) which cultural adaptation was carried out. The evidence available does not allow firm conclusions about the instruments identified in terms of reliability and validity. Future research should focus on generate evidence about a wider range of measurement properties of these instruments using a rigorous methodology, as well as instrument testing on different countries and child population. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. [Participative action research; self-care education for the mature adult, a dialogic and empowered process].

    PubMed

    Sanchez Gomez, Sheila; Medina Moya, José Luis; Mendoza Pérez de Mendiguren, Beatriz; Ugarte Arena, Ana Isabel; Martínez de Albéniz Arriaran, Mercedes

    2015-11-01

    Explore and transform dialogic-reflexive learning processes oriented to self-care, capacitation, empowerment and health promotion for "mature-adult" collective. Participative action research on a qualitative and sociocritic approach. Data generation methods are SITE: Field work focuses on the development of the educational program "Care is in your hands" that takes place in two villages (Primary Care. Comarca Araba). Through a theoretical sampling involved people who are in a "mature-adult" life stage and three nurses with extensive experience in development health education programs. Participant observation where health education sessions are recorded in video and group reflection on action. To triangulate the data, have been made in-depth interviews with 4 participants. Carried out a content and discourse analysis. Participant and nurses' Previous Frameworks, and these last ones' discourses as well, reveal a current technical rationality (unidirectional, informative,.) yet in practice that perpetuates the role of passive recipient of care. Educational keys constructed from a viewpoint of Dialogic Learning emerge as elements that facilitate overcoming these previous frames limitations. Finally, Reflective Learning launched, has provided advance in professional knowledge and improve health education. Dialogical learning emerges as key to the training and empowerment, where we have seen how practical-reflexive, and not technical, rationality is meanly useful confronting ambiguous and complex situations of self-care practice and education. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. 'Implementation deficit' and 'street-level bureaucracy': policy, practice and change in the development of community nursing issues.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Ann; While, Alison

    2005-01-01

    The present paper examines the mechanisms by which health and social care policies put forward by the Government may be translated into community nursing practice. Data from a research project on community nurse case managers were re-examined in the light of two classic theories often cited by policy analysts (i.e. implementation theory and 'street-level bureaucracy'). It was found that the extent to which nurses adopted the case management role, and the model of choice, depended on four major interrelated variables, namely: (1) the clarity of policy guidance; (2) the extent to which it coincided with professional (nursing) values; (3) local practices and policies; and (4) the personal vision of the community nurse. It is argued that this framework may have wider relevance, and this was tested out in two ways. First, major change in one of these variables (Government policy) over time was analysed for its effect on case management practice via the remaining variables. Secondly, an unrelated, but policy-initiated, nursing issue (nurse prescribing) was briefly examined in the light of the framework. It is suggested that this framework may be of some use when considering the likely practice response to policy-related changes in community nursing.

  8. Being Yourself and Thinking About the Future in People With Motor Neuron Disease: A Grounded Theory of Self-care Processes.

    PubMed

    Bassola, Barbara; Sansone, Valeria Ada; Lusignani, Maura

    2018-06-01

    Self-care is a crucial aspect in the management of people with motor neuron disease (MND). Nurses and healthcare professionals must know the processes used by patients in performing self-care to identify problems and help them. Decision-making processes, self-understanding, and political and social support influence the self-care process in chronic diseases. Little is known about the self-care process in MND. The aim of this study was to gain insight on the self-care processes in people with MND. A grounded theory method was chosen for this study. Data from interviews were gathered, and a simultaneous comparative analysis was conducted to identify categories and codes. Twenty-one people with spinal muscular atrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis participated in the study. Five categories were identified as grounded in the data. The process starts from "being yourself in the care," and it develops thanks to "growing and changing" and with a "thinking about the future" approach. "Family role" and "you and who helps you" categories affect the process itself. The self-care process in people with MND is not seen in a daily perspective but changes with the evolution of the disease. For the growing patients with MND, changing, accepting and controlling the disease while deciding autonomously are the foundations of the process.

  9. Self-care confidence may be more important than cognition to influence self-care behaviors in adults with heart failure: Testing a mediation model.

    PubMed

    Vellone, Ercole; Pancani, Luca; Greco, Andrea; Steca, Patrizia; Riegel, Barbara

    2016-08-01

    Cognitive impairment can reduce the self-care abilities of heart failure patients. Theory and preliminary evidence suggest that self-care confidence may mediate the relationship between cognition and self-care, but further study is needed to validate this finding. The aim of this study was to test the mediating role of self-care confidence between specific cognitive domains and heart failure self-care. Secondary analysis of data from a descriptive study. Three out-patient sites in Pennsylvania and Delaware, USA. A sample of 280 adults with chronic heart failure, 62 years old on average and mostly male (64.3%). Data on heart failure self-care and self-care confidence were collected with the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index 6.2. Data on cognition were collected by trained research assistants using a neuropsychological test battery measuring simple and complex attention, processing speed, working memory, and short-term memory. Sociodemographic data were collected by self-report. Clinical information was abstracted from the medical record. Mediation analysis was performed with structural equation modeling and indirect effects were evaluated with bootstrapping. Most participants had at least 1 impaired cognitive domain. In mediation models, self-care confidence consistently influenced self-care and totally mediated the relationship between simple attention and self-care and between working memory and self-care (comparative fit index range: .929-.968; root mean squared error of approximation range: .032-.052). Except for short-term memory, which had a direct effect on self-care maintenance, the other cognitive domains were unrelated to self-care. Self-care confidence appears to be an important factor influencing heart failure self-care even in patients with impaired cognition. As few studies have successfully improved cognition, interventions addressing confidence should be considered as a way to improve self-care in this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All

  10. Self-efficacy and self-care behavior of Malaysian patients with type 2 diabetes: a cross sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Sharoni, Siti Khuzaimah Ahmad; Wu, Shu-Fang Vivienne

    2012-03-01

    This study investigated the association between self-efficacy and self-care behavior to determine the degree of self-efficacy and to examine differences in self-efficacy according to patient variables, including state of health, of Malaysian patients with type 2 diabetes. The sample comprised 388 patients (respondents). We collected the data from December 2010 to February 2011. We found a significant positive relationship between self-efficacy and self-care behavior (r(s) = 0.481, P < 0.001). The degree of self-efficacy was moderately high (mean = 7.570). We found significant differences between self-efficacy and education level (Wilk's Lambda = 0.918, F[12, 1008] = 2.779, P < 0.05), duration of diabetes (Wilk's Lambda = 0.954, F[8, 736] = 2.264, P < 0.05), other chronic conditions (Wilk's Lambda = 0.967, F[4, 383] = 3.304, P < 0.05) and diabetic complications (Wilk's Lambda = 0.963, F[4, 383] = 3.653, P < 0.05). Self-efficacy can be used as a model to understand self-care behavior. Individualized nursing interventions based on self-efficacy theory should be utilized in high risk diabetic patients so as to assist and improve self-care behavior. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Predictors of basic self-care and intermediate self-care functional disabilities among older adults in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Amegbor, Prince M; Kuuire, Vincent Z; Robertson, Hamish; Kuffuor, Oscar A

    2018-04-12

    The number of older adults in Ghana is growing rapidly. Associated with this growth, is the rise in age-related chronic diseases such as cardiovascular and musculoskeletal conditions. However, there is limited knowledge in the Ghanaian context on the effect of chronic diseases on functional disabilities among older adults. In this study, we examine the association between chronic diseases, socioeconomic status, and functional disabilities. Data from 4107 Ghanaian older adults (persons aged 50 years and above) who participated in the World Health Organization's Global Ageing and Adult Health survey (SAGE-Wave 1) were used to fit random effect multivariate logistic and complementary log-log regression. Stroke was significantly associated with difficulty in performing both basic self-care functions and intermediate self-care functions. Hypertension and arthritis, on the other hand, were associated with basic self-care functional disability only. Socioeconomically vulnerable groups such as females, those with less education and low-incomes were more likely to have functional disabilities associated with basic self-care and intermediate self-care activities. In order to reduce functional disabilities among older persons in Ghana, efforts should be aimed at reducing chronic conditions as well as improving socioeconomic status. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A self-care plan for hospice workers.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sally Hill

    2005-01-01

    Caring for dying patients and their families is a fulfilling, enriching, and meaningful experience. It can also be extremely stressful. Maintaining the balance between the output and input of energy in a caregiver's professional and personal life is an ongoing process. Clinical staff members often formulate plans of care for patients. To prevent worker burnout, hospice caregivers must develop a plan of self-care to balance their own needs with the needs of their patients. The goal of this article is to provide an overview of ways for hospice caregivers to relieve stress and develop an individualized self-care plan within the context of their work.

  13. [Nutritional self-care promotion in community-dwelling older people: a protocol of mixed method research].

    PubMed

    Raffaele, Barbara; Matarese, Maria; Piredda, Michela; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2016-01-01

    To describe a research protocol designed to promote nutritional self-care in older people. The aims of the research are: a) to evaluate the effectiveness of a nutritional education intervention in changing knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors; b) to describe the nutritional self-care ability and activities; c) to identify the promoting factors and barriers that influence the changes in nutritional knowledge, behaviors and attitudes in home-dwelling older people. Sequential explanatory mixed method design. The study will enroll 50 people aged 65 years and over. In the first quantitative phase, a pre-test and post-test design will be used to deliver a nutritional intervention aimed to change knowledge, behaviors and attitudes toward nutrition. Using the quantitative study results, the qualitative study phase will be conducted by interviews in sub-groups of older people. In a third phase, the quantitative and qualitative study results will be integrated. Quantitative data will be analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics and qualitative data will be analyzed through content analysis. The study will provide new knowledge on nutritional self-care in home-dwelling older adults and the factors promoting nutritional self-care. Nutritional self-care promotion is of pivotal importance for the nursing care provided to home-dwelling older people. Educational programs aimed at the maintenance of proper nutrition in the older adults may reduce malnutrition and the related diseases. Nutrition educational programs should be based on knowledge derived from research to tailor individualized nutritional interventions and to realize effective educational programs.

  14. Developing a Stoma Acceptance Questionnaire to improve motivation to adhere to enterostoma self-care.

    PubMed

    Bagnasco, A; Watson, R; Zanini, M; Catania, G; Aleo, G; Sasso, L

    2017-06-01

    In stoma care, patient education is often weak in terms of improving patients' level of acceptance of living with a stoma. Self-care educational interventions in enterostomal patients, which according to Orem's Theory should take into account these patients' specific needs, require instruments that measure patients' stoma acceptance to improve motivation based on the resumption of activities they used to carry out before having a stoma. The aim of the study was to develop an instrument that measures the level of stoma acceptance to improve motivation to adhere to enterostoma self-care. Aspects that improve stoma acceptance and consequently motivation to adhere to enterostoma self-care were identified through 10 focus groups. In the focus groups, the motivation indicators were grouped, categorised and results entered into a Stoma Acceptance Questionnaire (SAQ). The SAQ was then piloted with 104 enterostomal patients from three general hospitals. To assess the construct validity of the SAQ, Mokken Scaling was used to explore the latent structure of the SAQ. Mokken scaling is a non-parametric method that falls under the umbrella of methods described as item response theories (IRT). The theme "Living with a stoma"; "Autonomy"; "Support"; "Ability to deal with stoma", plus a common underlying theme: "Stoma acceptance" were dissussed by the Focus Groups. The experts identified the items of the (SAQ) through these themes. Mokken Scaling identified the "resumption of enterostomal patients' normal activities" as a measure of stoma acceptance, thus confirming the construct validity of the SAQ. The tool proposed affords a pioneering example of how this gap can be bridged. Indeed, the SAQ could enable nurses adopting a standardized approach for the assessment of enterostomal patients' motivation to resume their normal activities and identify needs linked to this. The SAQ could also be used to measure the effectiveness of psychosocial and educational interventions aimed at

  15. Self-care confidence may be the key: A cross-sectional study on the association between cognition and self-care behaviors in adults with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Vellone, Ercole; Fida, Roberta; D'Agostino, Fabio; Mottola, Antonella; Juarez-Vela, Raul; Alvaro, Rosaria; Riegel, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Self-care, a key element of heart failure care, is challenging for patients with impaired cognition. Mechanisms through which cognitive impairment affects self-care are not currently well defined but evidence from other patient populations suggests that self-efficacy, or task-specific confidence, mediates the relationship between cognitive functioning and patient behaviors such as self-care. The aim of this study was to test the mediating role of self-care confidence in the relationship between cognition and self-care behaviors. A secondary analysis of data from a cross-sectional study. Outpatient heart failure clinics in 28 Italian provinces. 628 Italian heart failure patients. We used the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index v.6.2 to measure self-care maintenance, self-care management, and self-care confidence. Cognition was assessed with the Mini Mental State Examination. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data. Participants were 73 years old on average (SD=11), mostly (58%) male and mostly (77%) in New York Heart Association functional classes II and III. The mediation model showed excellent fit (comparative fit index=1.0; root mean square error of approximation=0.02): Self-care confidence totally mediated the relationship between cognition and self-care maintenance and management. Cognition affects self-care behaviors indirectly, through self-care confidence. Interventions aimed at improving self-care confidence may improve self-care, even in heart failure patients with impaired cognition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nursing diagnoses in elderly residents of a nursing home: a case in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Güler, Elem Kocaçal; Eşer, Ismet; Khorshid, Leyla; Yücel, Sebnem Çinar

    2012-01-01

    There are limited studies on nursing diagnoses of the elderly living in nursing homes worldwide. This study aimed to define the most frequent nursing diagnoses in the elderly residents of a nursing home elder care and rehabilitation center. Seventy-four elderly individuals were included in the study. Data were collected using the "Elderly Individual's Introduction Form" between April 2007 to August 2007. The content of the form was based on a guide to gerontologic assessment, and Gordon's Functional Health Patterns. The nursing diagnoses (NANDA-I Taxonomy II) were identified by the 2 researchers separately according to the defining characteristics and the risk factors. The consistency between the nursing diagnoses defined by the 2 researchers was evaluated using Cohen's kappa (κ). There was an 84.7% agreement about nursing diagnoses defined by the 2 researchers separately. The weighted kappa consistency analyses showed there was an adequate level of consistency (κ = 0.710), and the findings were significant (p < 0.0001). The most frequent diagnoses were ineffective role performance (86.5%), ineffective health maintenance (81.2%), risk for falls (77%), and impaired physical mobility (73%). The diagnosis of ineffective role performance was more frequent in patients with dementia (x(2) =10.993, df = 1, p = 0.001). There was a very significant relationship between dementia and the diagnosis of impaired verbal communication (x(2) = 32.718, df = 1, p = 0.0001). The relationship between mobility disorder and self-care deficit was also significant (x(2) = 19.411, df = 1, p = 0.0001). To improve quality in patient care, nurses should use nursing diagnoses with a systematic assessment and should help the elderly in health promotion or use of the maximum current potential. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Peer Collaboration: A Model to Support Counsellor Self-Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Constance A.; Phelan, Anne M.

    2007-01-01

    In the context of a larger case study on how continuous learning in the workplace could be achieved through the implementation of peer collaboration, the process of how counsellors engaged in self-care within a large health care organization became clearer. This article is based on data derived from a qualitative analysis of nine transcribed…

  18. Developing Self-Care Practices in a Trauma Treatment Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Patricia J.; Simmelink-McCleary, Jennifer; Im, Hyojin; Becher, Emily; Crook-Lyon, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development of self-care practices of social work students who were part of a larger study of students' experiences in a graduate course on the treatment of trauma. Consensual qualitative research methods were used to analyze 17 participant journals submitted at 4 times during the course. Findings indicated that…

  19. When Teacher Self-Care Is Not Enough

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Jeffrey

    2018-01-01

    Teachers who work with students who have mental illnesses face day-to-day challenges and high burnout rates. In this article, Jeffrey Benson argues that messages about teacher self-care and resiliency are not enough. Instead, the structures must change--by way of clinical consultations, mentorships, and in-school support systems--to best serve…

  20. Implementing Internet-Based Self-Care Programs in Primary Care: Qualitative Analysis of Determinants of Practice for Patients and Providers.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Eric; Burrone, Laura; Perez, Elliottnell; Martino, Steve; Rowe, Michael

    2018-05-18

    Access to evidence-based interventions for common mental health conditions is limited due to geographic distance, scheduling, stigma, and provider availability. Internet-based self-care programs may mitigate these barriers. However, little is known about internet-based self-care program implementation in US health care systems. The objective of this study was to identify determinants of practice for internet-based self-care program use in primary care by eliciting provider and administrator perspectives on internet-based self-care program implementation. The objective was explored through qualitative analysis of semistructured interviews with primary care providers and administrators from the Veterans Health Administration. Participants were identified using a reputation-based snowball design. Interviews focused on identifying determinants of practice for the use of internet-based self-care programs at the point of care in Veterans Health Administration primary care. Qualitative analysis of transcripts was performed using thematic coding. A total of 20 physicians, psychologists, social workers, and nurses participated in interviews. Among this group, internet-based self-care program use was relatively low, but support for the platform was assessed as relatively high. Themes were organized into determinants active at patient and provider levels. Perceived patient-level determinants included literacy, age, internet access, patient expectations, internet-based self-care program fit with patient experiences, interest and motivation, and face-to-face human contact. Perceived provider-level determinants included familiarity with internet-based self-care programs, changes to traditional care delivery, face-to-face human contact, competing demands, and age. This exploration of perspectives on internet-based self-care program implementation among Veterans Health Administration providers and administrators revealed key determinants of practice, which can be used to develop

  1. Perspectives of health and self-care among older persons-To be implemented in an interactive information and communication technology-platform.

    PubMed

    Göransson, Carina; Wengström, Yvonne; Ziegert, Kristina; Langius-Eklöf, Ann; Eriksson, Irene; Kihlgren, Annica; Blomberg, Karin

    2017-12-01

    To acquire knowledge regarding the contents to be implemented in an interactive information and communication technology-platform perceived to be relevant to health and self-care among older persons based on the literature, healthcare professionals and the older persons themselves. The growing ageing population places demands on the healthcare system to promote healthy ageing and to strengthen the older person's self-care ability. This requires innovative approaches to facilitate communication between the older person and healthcare professionals, and to increase the older person's participation in their care. An information and communication technology-platform could be used for this purpose, but the content needs to be relevant to both the older persons and the healthcare professionals. Descriptive qualitative design. This study was based on three samplings: a scoping review of the literature (n = 20 articles), interviews with healthcare professionals (n = 5) and a secondary analysis of interviews with older persons (n = 8) and nursing assistants (n = 7). The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Four areas were identified to be of relevance to older persons' perceived health: frame of mind, having relationships and social activities, physical ability and concerns, and maintaining self-care. Self-care was described in the literature and by the healthcare professionals more than by the older persons. The results show a concordance in the data samplings that give a clear indication of the areas relevant to older persons' health and self-care that can be integrated in an interactive information and communication technology-platform for use in regular daily care assessments. Descriptions of self-care were limited indicating a possible gap in knowledge that requires further research. Areas relevant to older persons' health and self-care could be used for regular assessment to support and promote healthy ageing. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The Effect of Orem’s Self-Care Model on Fatigue in Patients With Multiple Sclerosis: A Single Blind Randomized Clinical Trial Study

    PubMed Central

    Afrasiabifar, Ardashir; Mehri, Zahra; Javad Sadat, Saied; Ghaffarian Shirazi, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Orem’s self-care model is a nursing model that was introduced with the purpose of improving the self-care of individuals, especially patients suffering from chronic diseases. Objectives To determining the effect of Orem’s self-care model on fatigue in multiple sclerosis patients. Patients and Methods This research involved a clinical trial. Sixty-three multiple sclerosis patients at the vice-chancellor in treatment affairs of Yasuj University of Medical Sciences were selected based on nonrandom sampling, but they were allocated to the two groups based on random allocation. In the intervention group, Orem’s model was applied during six sessions of 45 - 60 minutes in length, and the process continued for 1 month. The data were collected 1 week before and 7 weeks after the end of the intervention using the Orem’s self-care model-based assessment form and fatigue severity scale, the validity and reliability of which have been Results Before the intervention, 11.11% of the participants had a good knowledge of self-care. In addition, self-care willingness and skills were observed in 76.19% and 4.76% of participants, respectively. The mean difference in fatigue reduced significantly in the intervention group after the intervention (P < 0.05). After the intervention, a statistically significant difference was observed in the mean difference of fatigue between the two groups (P < 0.05). Conclusions Orem’s self-care model is significantly effective in reducing the fatigue of multiple sclerosis patients. PMID:27781119

  3. The prediction of self-care behaviors in end-stage renal disease patients using Leventhal's Self-Regulatory Model.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Susan M; Jardine, Alan G; Millar, Keith

    2008-08-01

    To assess the utility of Leventhal's Self-Regulatory Model (SRM) to predict self-care behavior with regard to dietary, medication, and fluid regimes in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. In a prospective study, ESRD patients treated via hospital-based haemodialysis (N=73) were screened for cognitive deficits and completed questionnaires that enquired about illness perceptions, coping strategies, knowledge of kidney disease, and psychological distress at Time 1. Physiological proxy measures of self-care behaviors regarding diet (serum potassium levels), fluid intake (mean and standard deviation of interdialytic weight gain), and medication (serum phosphate levels) regimes were collected 3 weeks later at Time 2. Illness representations (emotional and timeline perceptions) predicted self-care behaviors with regard to diet and medication. Emotion-focused coping strategies predicted higher levels of variation in adherence to fluid restrictions. Younger males were less likely to adhere to the fluid restrictions. The SRM has predictive utility. Psychological interventions should focus on alleviating disease-specific distress and challenging erroneous timeline perceptions in order to increase adherence to dietary and medication regimes in ESRD patients. A more specific measure of coping for ESRD is required to clarify the role of coping strategies in this population. Younger, male patients should be targeted for extra support with fluid restrictions.

  4. What "Dr. Mom" ordered: a community-based exploratory study of parental self-care responses to children's ADHD symptoms.

    PubMed

    Bussing, Regina; E Koro-Ljungberg, Mirka; Williamson, Pamela; Gary, Faye A; Wilson Garvan, Cynthia

    2006-08-01

    Little is known about family initiated self-care interventions in response to symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and how self-care may co-exist with professional treatments. This paper explores parental self-care strategies for children with hyperactivity or attention problems, and examines factors and domains that influence their use from the mixed method perspective. As part of a longitudinal cohort study of ADHD detection and service use, caregivers of a representative US community sample of 266 children at high risk for ADHD completed a questionnaire that assessed five self-care strategies (behavior modification, coping, diet, over-the-counter medication use and religious practices), and made open-ended inquiry about discipline changes in response to behavioral concerns. Questionnaire responses were analyzed using logistic regression approaches. Open-ended answers were open coded; secondary analysis followed Spradley's model of domain analysis. Quantitative findings showed that behavior modification was the most commonly tried self-care strategy, followed by coping, diet, and religious practices. Over-the-counter trial was least common. The parents of professionally treated children were more likely to have employed behavior modification, coping strategies and over-the-counter medications than the parents of untreated children. Two-thirds of parents had changed their disciplinary action within three domains that were identified through qualitative analysis, including changes related to (a) the prevention of disciplinary problems (e.g., sustain eye contact, activation, consistency, clear instructions), (b) the solution of disciplinary problems (e.g., time-outs; privilege removal), and (c) parental coping associated with disciplinary problems (e.g., control own emotions, become less judgmental and more tolerant, and develop more appropriate expectations). These findings suggest that self-care strategies are commonly employed and appear

  5. Life on Facebook: self-care in renal transplantation patients.

    PubMed

    Roso, Camila Castro; Kruse, Maria Henriqueta Luce

    2017-07-06

    To analyze self-care in renal transplantation patients. Qualitative research, inspired in the post-structuralism. The empirical material was composed by the posts of a Facebook group of Renal Transplantation Patients, collected from February to May of 2016, totaling 53 posts from 35 participants. The research data were analyzed under the perspective of cultural analysis, using theories derived from Foucault. Self-care in renal transplantation patients was identified by the preoccupation with themselves and others, habits and lifestyles, restrictions and limitations that the disease imposes, such as lessons, ways of living and lifestyles after the procedure. This experience forces people that have been submitted to renal transplantation to reflect on the lifestyle they follow. The group also stimulates adhesion to treatment.

  6. Interventions to address deficits of pharmacological pain management in nursing home residents--A cluster-randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Könner, F; Budnick, A; Kuhnert, R; Wulff, I; Kalinowski, S; Martus, P; Dräger, D; Kreutz, R

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of interventions for general practitioners and nursing home staff to improve pain severity and appropriateness of pain medication in nursing home residents (NHR). This cluster-randomized controlled trial was conducted in six nursing homes in the intervention and control group, respectively. Pain management was analysed before (T0) and after (T1, T2) an educational intervention in 239 NHR, aged ≥65 years, without moderate or severe cognitive impairment. Primary and secondary outcomes were average pain severity and appropriateness of pain medication as determined with the Numeric Rating Scale and Pain Medication Appropriateness Scale (PMASD ), respectively. At T0, 72.2% and 73.7% of NHR (mean age 83 years) reported pain (average pain severity 2.4) in the intervention and control group, respectively. The PMASD at T0 was 53.9 in the intervention group and 60.8 in the control group (p = 0.12), while 20.6% compared to 6.9% (p = 0.009) received no pain medication in the two groups. At T2, non-significant improvements in the average pain severity (1.59) and PMASD (61.07) were observed in the intervention group. Moreover, the mean individual PMASD increased by 8.09 (p = 0.03) and the proportion of NHR without pain medication decreased by 50% (p = 0.03) in the intervention group. No appreciable changes were found in the control group at T2. NHR exhibited a high prevalence of pain with overall low severity, while a high proportion of individuals received inappropriate pain medications. Both findings were not significantly improved by the intervention, although some aspects of drug treatment were meaningful improved. © 2015 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  7. Role of community pharmacists in patients’ self-care and self-medication

    PubMed Central

    Rutter, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This review highlights the growing prominence of self-care and explores the contribution of community pharmacy. Firstly, background to self-care is discussed, followed by placing self-care in context with regard to the general public and accessing community pharmacy. From this perspective the contribution community pharmacy currently makes is assessed, paying particular attention to the factors that negatively impact on the ability of community pharmacy to facilitate self-care. PMID:29354520

  8. Do Perceptions of Empowerment Affect Glycemic Control and Self-Care Among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Melba Sheila; Karkada, Subrahmanya Nairy; Hanrahan, Nancy P.; Venkatesaperumal, Ramesh; Amirtharaj, Anandhi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Arab adult with T2DM is understudied with less known facts about the perception of empowerment and its relationship with self-care and glycemic control. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which perception of empowerment by Arab adults living with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) was associated with better glycemic control and self-care management. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was led among 300 Arab adults living in Oman with T2DM in an outpatient diabetes clinic. The Diabetes Empowerment Scale (DES), glycosylated haemaglobin (HbA1c) and Body mass index was assessed. The DES was found to be valid and reliable for the population. ANOVA, Regression analysis, and Structural equation modeling was used for analysis. Results: The composite score and three subscales of DES were a significant and strong predictor of good glycemic control among Omani adults with T2DM (p<0.001). Age, education, duration of DM, prior DM education program and medications were significantly associated with DES. Conclusion: Diabetes nurse educators engaged in the care of adults with T2DM should assess self-empowerment and tailor interventions to increase empowerment for better glycemic control. Patient empowerment plays an essential role in maintaining self-care behaviours and HbA1c. PMID:26156908

  9. Do Perceptions of Empowerment Affect Glycemic Control and Self-Care Among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes?

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Melba Sheila; Karkada, Subrahmanya Nairy; Hanrahan, Nancy P; Venkatesaperumal, Ramesh; Amirtharaj, Anandhi

    2015-02-24

    The Arab adult with T2DM is understudied with less known facts about the perception of empowerment and its relationship with self-care and glycemic control. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which perception of empowerment by Arab adults living with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) was associated with better glycemic control and self-care management. A cross-sectional descriptive study was led among 300 Arab adults living in Oman with T2DM in an outpatient diabetes clinic. The Diabetes Empowerment Scale (DES), glycosylated haemaglobin (HbA1c) and Body mass index was assessed. The DES was found to be valid and reliable for the population. ANOVA, Regression analysis, and Structural equation modeling was used for analysis. The composite score and three subscales of DES were a significant and strong predictor of good glycemic control among Omani adults with T2DM (p<0.001). Age, education, duration of DM, prior DM education program and medications were significantly associated with DES. Diabetes nurse educators engaged in the care of adults with T2DM should assess self-empowerment and tailor interventions to increase empowerment for better glycemic control. Patient empowerment plays an essential role in maintaining self-care behaviours and HbA1c.

  10. Effect of systematic menstrual health education on dysmenorrheic female adolescents' knowledge, attitudes, and self-care behavior.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Miin-Huey; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Yang, Yi-Hsin

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of systematic health education on female adolescents' knowledge of dysmenorrhea, menstrual attitudes, and dysmenorrhea-related self-care behaviors. Through the research process, a dysmenorrheal self-care pamphlet for female adolescents was developed. The study used a quasi-experimental intervention with a nonequivalent-control group design. Three vocational nursing schools were requested to participate in this study: one was assigned to the experimental group and two were assigned to the control group. Female students who had experienced dysmenorrheic cramps two or more times during the last 6 months since the interview were recruited for the study. There were 218 subjects randomly assigned to an experimental group, and 237 subjects to a control group. Intervention consisted of a three-session health education program in which the experimental group was split up into six smaller groups. Data were collected before, 2 weeks after, and 4 months after the intervention. Results revealed a significant increase in the experimental group members' dysmenorrhea-related knowledge and self-care behavior, but not in their attitudes. The findings of this study can serve as a guide to healthcare providers who want to design an effective systematic menstrual health education program for female adolescents.

  11. Academic and Behavioral Characteristics of Young Adolescents in Self-Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shumow, Lee; Smith, Thomas J.; Smith, M. Cecil

    2009-01-01

    This study examines characteristics of young adolescents who experience self-care, associations between self-care and academic achievement, and whether associations of self-care with academic adjustment vary by child, family, or community characteristics. Using data from the nationally representative 1999 National Household Education Survey,…

  12. Effects of a hospital-based education programme on self-care behaviour, care dependency and quality of life in patients with heart failure--a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Köberich, Stefan; Lohrmann, Christa; Mittag, Oskar; Dassen, Theo

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of a nurse-led, hospital-based heart failure specific education session with a three-month telephone follow-up on self-care behaviour, care dependency and quality of life for patients with chronic heart failure. Patient education in patients with heart failure is able to promote heart failure-specific self-care, to reduce mortality, morbidity and rehospitalisation rates and to enhance quality of life, especially if heart failure education is embedded in a multidisciplinary approach. Evidence of the effect of a nurse-led self-care education, quality of life and care dependency in addition to standard medical treatment in Germany is lacking. Nonblinded, prospective, single-centre, randomised controlled trial. Sixty-four patients were allocated either to the intervention group or to the control group. Patients in the intervention group received education about heart failure self-care with a consecutive telephone follow-up over three months in addition to standard medical treatment. Patients in the control group received standard medical treatment only. Data of 110 patients (58 in the intervention group and 52 in the control group) with a mean age of 62 years and mean left ventricular ejection fraction of 28·2% could be analysed. Self-care education had a significant influence on overall heart failure self-care but not on quality of life and care dependency. A single education session with a consecutive telephone follow-up is able to improve overall self-care behaviours but not quality of life. Care dependency was not influenced by the education session. The easy to implement and short educational intervention has a positive effect on self-care behaviour for patients with heart failure. However, there was no effect on quality of life and care dependency. To improve quality of life and to influence care dependency, different measures have to be applied. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Holistic nursing as a specialty: holistic nursing - scope and standards of practice.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Carla

    2007-06-01

    This article describes the Holistic Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice. It defines holistic nursing, its five core values, and its practice standards. These include holistic philosophy, theory, and ethics; holistic caring process; holistic communication, therapeutic environment, and cultural diversity; holistic education and research; and holistic nurse self-care. Educational preparation for holistic nursing and settings in which holistic nurses practice are also explored.

  14. Self-Care Behaviors of African Americans Living with Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Woda, Aimee; Haglund, Kristin; Belknap, Ruth Ann; Sebern, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    African Americans have a higher risk of developing heart failure (HF) than persons from other ethnic groups. Once diagnosed, they have lower rates of HF self-care and poorer health outcomes. Promoting engagement in HF self-care is amenable to change and represents an important way to improve the health of African Americans with HF. This study used a community-based participatory action research methodology called photovoice to explore the practice of HF self-care among low-income, urban, community dwelling African Americans. Using the photovoice methodology, themes emerged regarding self-care management and self-care maintenance.

  15. Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arlton, Donna

    1977-01-01

    Persons desiring to prepare themselves as nurses represent a highly varied group. This article discusses the educational routes and employment opportunities available to Hispanic students. The names and addresses of three organizations which are supportive at the national and local level to Hispanic students and short biographies of three notable…

  16. Relationship between person's health beliefs and diabetes self-care management regimen.

    PubMed

    Albargawi, Moudi; Snethen, Julia; Al Gannass, Abdulaziz; Kelber, Sheryl

    2017-12-01

    To examine the relationship between the health beliefs of Saudi adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and their adherence to daily diabetes self-care management regimen. A secondary aim was to examine the health beliefs of adults with a diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) and participants without a DFU. Descriptive correlational design with a convenience sample of 30 participants. Participants were recruited for this pilot study from an outpatient clinic at King Abdulaziz Medical City in Riyadh. The participants completed self-reported questionnaires about their health beliefs, daily diabetes self-care management regimen, and demographic characteristics. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was used to test the interaction effects. Participants who reported having a high internal health locus of control (IHLoC) and a high level of self-efficacy (SE) adhered well to their foot care regimen (P = .038). The more the participants believed that God controls their health, and the higher their SE, the greater the participant's adherence to their medication regimen (P = .035). The stronger the participant's belief that following their diabetes treatment regimen will lead to good outcomes, the greater the participant's adherence to their dietary regimen for those with a low IHLoC (P = .015). Participants with a high SE and reported that their doctor is able to help them control their diabetes were more likely to follow their dietary regimen (P = .048). Participants with a DFU reported having additional health conditions besides T2DM (P = .018) and had less than a college education (P = .015). Although participants with a DFU reported that they were responsible for their diabetes (P = .21), they stated that God manages their diabetes (P = .29), and the disease can be controlled based on luck (P = .10). Participants' beliefs were found to influence their daily self-care management regimen. Further studies are needed using a larger sample. Copyright © 2017

  17. The self-care for people initiative: the outcome evaluation.

    PubMed

    White, Alan; South, Jane; Bagnall, Anne-Marie; Forshaw, Mark; Spoor, Chris; Marchant, Paul; Witty, Karl

    2012-10-01

    To determine the effects of a community-based training programme in self-care on the lay population. Self Care is recognised as being a cornerstone of the populations health, but to date there have been few large-scale studies of its effectiveness on the general public. This paper reports on an evaluation of a self-care skills training course delivered in small group sessions within workplace and parent and toddler group settings to a lay population. A quasi-experimental longitudinal study of 12-month duration was conducted in three intervention primary care trusts (PCTs) and two similar comparison PCTs in England. The sample comprised 1568 self-selecting participants: 868 received the intervention and 700 did not. No changes were seen in usage of General Practitioner services, the primary outcome, however, statistical analysis suggested that being in the intervention group may be associated with increased use of out-of-hours and secondary care services. At six months' follow-up small but statistically significant positive effects of being in the intervention group were seen on self-esteem, well-being and anxiety scores. At 12 months' follow-up small but statistically significant positive effects of being in the intervention group were also seen on recovery locus of control, health literacy and self-esteem scores, and on knowledge of adult cough. The clinical significance of these very small changes is unclear. The training programme had a small but positive effect, which was still evident at 12 months, on individuals' knowledge and confidence levels with regard to managing their own health, but did not lead to reductions in health service use.

  18. Current Trends in Electronic Medication Reminders for Self Care.

    PubMed

    Fang, Kerry Y; Maeder, Anthony J; Bjering, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Poor adherence to medication can lead to negative health outcomes and increased financial burdens. We present a literature review on electronic medication reminders used for medication adherence in self care settings, to identify current and possible future trends. A structured PubMed search based on extracted MeSH terms provided a total of 45 publications which were identified as most relevant. Three main categories of electronic solutions were identified: mobile phone reminders, in-home electronic reminder devices, and portable reminder devices.

  19. The influence of easy-to-read pamphlets about self-care management of radiation side effects on patients' knowledge.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Feleta L; Mood, Darlene; Nordstrom, Cheryl K

    2010-11-01

    To test patients' knowledge of side effects after they review six easy-to-read pamphlets on radiation side effects. Nonexperimental. Urban radiation oncology clinic. 47 patients receiving radiation treatment. The Knowledge of Radiation Side Effects Test was administered. Patient literacy and knowledge level. The self-report of highest grade completed in school was 10th grade; however, the actual reading level was 4th-6th grade. Scores for each knowledge test increased with literacy level, with statistically significant correlations for pamphlets on fatigue, skin problems for women, and skin problems for men. Participants who read at the 4th-6th-grade level scored higher than expected. Although the pamphlets were deemed easy to read, patients who had the lowest reading levels still had difficulty understanding them. In addition to written patient information, oncology nurses should use innovative teaching strategies to improve patient understanding and self-care behaviors. A need exists for continued nursing inquiry that will focus on self-care behaviors to manage radiation side effects, particularly for patients with low literacy.

  20. Effectiveness of Self-Care Education on the Enhancement of the Self-Esteem of Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Poorgholami, Farzad; Javadpour, Shohreh; Saadatmand, Vahid; Jahromi, Marzieh Kargar

    2015-06-12

    The assessment of self-esteem in hemodialysis people is becoming increasingly important and necessary. Low self-esteem as a problem in patients undergoing hemodialysis decreases adherence to treatment. The researcher intends to carry out a study in order to investigate the effect of self-care education on enhancement of the self-esteem of patients undergoing hemodialysis in Iran. This is a quasi-experimental study. The subjects of the study who were selected based on purposive sampling method consisted of 50 patients with advanced chronic renal disease treated with hemodialysis. Before the intervention, two questionnaires were completed by patients. There was no intervention in the control group and the patients received only routine care in the hospital. In the experimental group, the hemodialysis patients received 5 consecutive one-hour training sessions by the researcher. Then the Rosenberg scale was filled out by the patients 2 month later. According to the results, Paired t-test showed a significant difference between the mean self-esteem score in both groups before and after intervention. Increasing the knowledge and awareness of hemodialysis patients must constitute a cornerstone of therapy and an integral part of nursing responsibilities. Nurses should educate the patients about self-care behaviors and remind them of the dangerous complications of abandoning these.

  1. Factors Related to Self-Care in Heart Failure Patients According to the Middle-Range Theory of Self-Care of Chronic Illness: a Literature Update.

    PubMed

    Jaarsma, Tiny; Cameron, Jan; Riegel, Barbara; Stromberg, Anna

    2017-04-01

    As described in the theory of self-care in chronic illness, there is a wide range of factors that can influence self-care behavior. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the recent heart failure literature on these related factors in order to provide an overview on which factors might be suitable to be considered to make self-care interventions more successful. Recent studies in heart failure patients confirm that factors described in the theory of self-care of chronic illness are relevant for heart failure patients. Experiences and skills, motivation, habits, cultural beliefs and values, functional and cognitive abilities, confidence, and support and access to care are all important to consider when developing or improving interventions for patients with heart failure and their families. Additional personal and contextual factors that might influence self-care need to be explored and included in future studies and theory development efforts.

  2. Patients' Perspectives on Factors that Influence Diabetes Self-Care.

    PubMed

    Shakibazadeh, E; Larijani, B; Shojaeezadeh, D; Rashidian, A; Forouzanfar, Mh; Bartholomew, Lk

    2011-12-01

    Although diabetes mellitus is of high concern in Iran, and the level of control is unacceptable, few qualitative studies have been carried out to reflect the experiences of patients on the barriers and motivators to self-care. This study aimed to explore a culturally based experience of Iranian diabetic patients regarding the personal and environmental barriers to and facilitating factors for diabetes self-care. Six focus groups were conducted among type 2 diabetic patients in the Charity Foundation for Special Diseases' diabetes clinic. Purposeful sampling was used. Newly diagnosed patients (less than six months) and all type 1 diabetic patients were excluded. Three focus groups were held on for each sex. A total of 43 patients participated in the study. Frame-work analysis was used to extract the themes from the data. DATA ANALYSIS SHOWED FIVE MAIN BARRIERS: physical barriers (such as physical effects of diabetes); psychological barriers (such as health beliefs); educational barriers (such as lack of knowledge about diabetes); social barriers (such as group pressure); and care system barriers (such as service availability). Along with the barriers, there were some motivators that the participants mentioned as a stimuli to control their diabetes. They include beliefs about diabetes, perceived responsibility for family, religious beliefs, and the views of significant others. Culturally based interventions are needed to improve diabetes care management in Iran. In addition to personal factors, diabetes health educators should pay attention to the environmental factors when they develop programs.

  3. Factors associated with self-care agency in patients after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Saeidzadeh, Seyedehtanaz; Darvishpoor Kakhki, Ali; Abed Saeedi, Jila

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the factors associated with self-care agency in postpercutaneous coronary intervention patients. Patients after percutaneous coronary intervention need to perform self-care to reduce the side effects and increase the quality of life. Self-care agency is considered to be an important factor in guaranteeing self-care actions. In this descriptive study a total number of 300 postpercutaneous coronary intervention patients participated. Data were collected from the four hospitals affiliated with Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences in Iran between February-May 2015. The data were gathered using demographic and basic conditioning factors questionnaire and appraisal of self-care agency scale. Data analysis was performed by anova and t-test. The mean age of the participants was 62·10 ± (8·14), which included 52·7% men and 47·3% women. Most patients (72%) had good level of self-care agency. Self-care agency had higher level in married and higher income patients. Self-care agency is influenced by economic and marital situation. Identifying factors associated with self-care agency can help healthcare professionals to consider these factors in self-care planning. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Illness beliefs predict self-care behaviours in patients with diabetic foot ulcers: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Vedhara, Kavita; Dawe, Karen; Wetherell, Mark A; Miles, Jeremy N V; Cullum, Nicky; Dayan, Colin; Drake, Nicola; Price, Patricia; Tarlton, John; Weinman, John; Day, Andrew; Campbell, Rona

    2014-10-01

    Patients' illness beliefs are known to be influential determinants of self-care behaviours in many chronic conditions. In a prospective observational study we examined their role in predicting foot self-care behaviours in patients with diabetic foot ulcers. Patients (n=169) were recruited from outpatient podiatry clinics. Clinical and demographic factors, illness beliefs and foot self-care behaviours were assessed as baseline (week 0). Foot self-care behaviours were assessed again 6, 12 and 24 weeks later. Linear regressions examined the contribution of beliefs at baseline to subsequent foot self-care behaviours, controlling for past behaviour (i.e., foot self-care at baseline) and clinical and demographic factors that may affect foot self-care (i.e., age and ulcer size). Our models accounted for between 42 and 58% of the variance in foot self-care behaviours. Even after controlling for past foot-care behaviours, age and ulcer size; patients' beliefs regarding the symptoms associated with ulceration, their understanding of ulceration and their perceived personal control over ulceration emerged as independent determinants of foot self-care. Patients' beliefs are important determinants of foot-care practices. They may, therefore, also be influential in determining ulcer outcomes. Interventions aimed at modifying illness beliefs may offer a means for promoting self-care and improving ulcer outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Burnout syndrome in nurses working in palliative care units: An analysis of associated factors.

    PubMed

    Rizo-Baeza, Mercedes; Mendiola-Infante, Susana Virginia; Sepehri, Armina; Palazón-Bru, Antonio; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco; Cortés-Castell, Ernesto

    2018-01-01

    To analyse the association between psychological, labour and demographic factors and burnout in palliative care nursing. There is a lack of published research evaluating burnout in palliative care nursing. This observational cross-sectional study involved 185 palliative care nurses in Mexico. The primary variables were burnout defined by its three dimensions (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment). As secondary variables, psychological, labour and demographic factors were considered. A binary logistic regression model was constructed to determine factors associated with burnout. A total of 69 nurses experienced high emotional exhaustion (37.3%), 65 had high depersonalization (35.1%) and 70 had low personal performance (37.8%). A higher proportion of burnout was found in the participants who were single parents, working >8 hr per day, with a medium/high workload, a lack of a high professional quality of life and a self-care deficit. Our multivariate models were very accurate in explaining burnout in palliative care nurses. These models must be externally validated to predict burnout and prevent future complications of the syndrome accurately. Nurses who present the factors found should be the focus of interventions to reduce work stress. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. A literature review on self-care of chronic illness: definition, assessment and related outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ausili, Davide; Masotto, Matteo; Dall'Ora, Chiara; Salvini, Lorena; Di Mauro, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Chronic illnesses care represents a challenging issue for people well-being and future health systems' sustainability. Promotion of self-care is considered a key point for chronically ill patients' care. The aim of this literature was to explore: how self-care of chronic illness has been theoretically defined; how self-care can be assessed in clinical and research settings; what associations exist between self-care and health outcomes of chronically ill patients. A wide range of definitions and terminologies related to self-care of chronic illness has been found in the literature. Although some common elements useful to explain the concept of self-care have been identified, the physical, cognitive, emotional and social processes underlying self-care remain controversial and poorly defined. Valid and reliable disease-specific assessment tools have been developed and used in a growing number of studies; however, the lack of utilization of standardized instruments in clinical practice has been referred by many authors. Significant correlations between self-care of chronic illness and outcome measures e.g. general health status, quality of life and healthcare costs, are reported by a limited number of studies. Supporting patient self-care is recognized as a crucial factor in chronic illness care. A deeper analysis of variables and processes influencing self-care could help for a full description of the phenomenon. A systematic evaluation of self-care in health professionals' everyday clinical practice is strongly recommended. The development of general non-disease-specific assessment tools could facilitate the evaluation of complex patients, especially those with multiple co-morbidities. Although self-care has been recognized as a vital intermediate outcome, further large-scale studies clarifying the association between self-care and patients' and health systems' outcomes are needed.

  7. Care of self - care by other - care of other: the meaning of self-care from research, practice, policy and industry perspectives.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Christina M; Harrison, Margaret B; Lysaght, Rosemary; Lamb, Marianne; Graham, Ian D; Oakley, Patricia

    2011-03-01

    Currently, no single definition of self-care is broadly accepted in the literature. Definitions vary as to (i) who engages in self-care behaviour; (ii) what motivates self-care behaviours; and (iii) the extent to which healthcare professionals are involved. Perspectives of self-care differ between healthcare professionals and the general public, and between healthcare professionals in different disciplines and different roles. As different professions view self-care within their own domain of practice, we are left with a multitude of explanations and descriptions. This variety of conceptualisations does impact and complicate research on self-care. As part of a larger enquiry focused on the clarification of this complex concept, this study provides a content analysis of documented definitions of self-care, and a summary of the evolution of the definition of self-care over time. To examine the diversity of definitions of self-care from the perspectives of research, practice, policy and industry, and to identify themes or trends in the evolution of the definition of self-care over time. The search strategy was designed in consultation with a library scientist to find both published and unpublished papers. A three-step search strategy was used to locate the literature. The databases searched included CINAHL, Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO, AMED, Cochrane Library, Scirus and Mednar. The definition of self-care was extracted from each paper included in the study. Using an inductive process, a content analysis was performed identifying common terms and phrases from the definitions. The definitions were then divided into four decades, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and 2000s, and the evolution of the definition of self-care was examined. In this study we sought to clarify the concept of self-care by examining in detail the definition of self-care. Content analysis of 139 definitions identified seven components of the definition and a range of terms that were applicable to each component

  8. The Situation-Specific Theory of Heart Failure Self-Care: Revised and Updated.

    PubMed

    Riegel, Barbara; Dickson, Victoria Vaughan; Faulkner, Kenneth M

    2016-01-01

    Since the situation-specific theory of heart failure (HF) self-care was published in 2008, we have learned much about how and why patients with HF take care of themselves. This knowledge was used to revise and update the theory. The purpose of this article was to describe the revised, updated situation-specific theory of HF self-care. Three major revisions were made to the existing theory: (1) a new theoretical concept reflecting the process of symptom perception was added; (2) each self-care process now involves both autonomous and consultative elements; and (3) a closer link between the self-care processes and the naturalistic decision-making process is described. In the revised theory, HF self-care is defined as a naturalistic decision-making process with person, problem, and environmental factors that influence the everyday decisions made by patients and the self-care actions taken. The first self-care process, maintenance, captures those behaviors typically referred to as treatment adherence. The second self-care process, symptom perception, involves body listening, monitoring signs, as well as recognition, interpretation, and labeling of symptoms. The third self-care process, management, is the response to symptoms when they occur. A total of 5 assumptions and 8 testable propositions are specified in this revised theory. Prior research illustrates that all 3 self-care processes (ie, maintenance, symptom perception, and management) are integral to self-care. Further research is greatly needed to identify how best to help patients become experts in HF self-care.

  9. Elective Self-Care Course Emphasizing Critical Reasoning Principles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To create, implement, and assess a self-directed online course based on 3 critical reasoning principles to develop pharmacy students’ skills in literature appraisal, content, metacognition, and assessment. Design. Students completed 3 assignments for the course: compile a literature appraisal on a healthcare topic; plan learning objectives and meta-cognitive skills for a learning module; and create a case-based online lesson with multi-structured feedback. Assessment. An online exit survey evaluated students’ perceptions regarding development of ACE (agency, collaboration, expertise) principles and preparation for competency. Students reported acquisition of ACE principles and noted improvements in their learning approaches, sense of responsibility for individual and community learning, skills, and confidence. Conclusions. An online elective course in self-care addressed practice standards for patient safety, maintenance of competency, and interprofessional education by emphasizing critical reasoning skills. PMID:22171110

  10. Student Perceptions of and Confidence in Self-Care Course Concepts Using Team-based Learning.

    PubMed

    Frame, Tracy R; Gryka, Rebecca; Kiersma, Mary E; Todt, Abby L; Cailor, Stephanie M; Chen, Aleda M H

    2016-04-25

    Objective. To evaluate changes in student perceptions of and confidence in self-care concepts after completing a team-based learning (TBL) self-care course. Methods. Team-based learning was used at two universities in first professional year, semester-long self-care courses. Two instruments were created and administered before and after the semester. The instruments were designed to assess changes in student perceptions of self-care using the theory of planned behavior (TPB) domains and confidence in learning self-care concepts using Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory. Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to evaluate pre/post changes, and Mann Whitney U tests were used to evaluate university differences. Results. Fifty-three Cedarville University and 58 Manchester University students completed both instruments (100% and 92% response rates, respectively). Student self-care perceptions with TPB decreased significantly on nine of 13 items for Cedarville and decreased for one of 13 items for Manchester. Student confidence in self-care concepts improved significantly on all questions for both universities. Conclusion. Data indicate TBL self-care courses were effective in improving student confidence about self-care concepts. Establishing students' skill sets prior to entering the profession is beneficial because pharmacists will use self-directed learning to expand their knowledge and adapt to problem-solving situations.

  11. Predictors of heart failure self-care in patients who screened positive for mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Davis, Karen K; Himmelfarb, Cheryl R Dennison; Szanton, Sarah L; Hayat, Matthew J; Allen, Jerilyn K

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with cognitive impairment, which could negatively affect a patient's abilities to carry out self-care, potentially resulting in higher hospital readmission rates. Factors associated with self-care in patients experiencing mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are not known. This descriptive correlation study aimed to assess levels of HF self-care and knowledge and to determine the predictors of self-care in HF patients who screen positive for MCI. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment was used to screen for MCI. In 125 patients with MCI hospitalized with HF, self-care (Self-care of Heart Failure Index) and HF knowledge (Dutch Heart Failure Knowledge Scale) were assessed. We used multiple regression analysis to test a model of variables hypothesized to predict self-care maintenance, management, and confidence. Mean (SD) HF knowledge scores (11.24 [1.84]) were above the level considered to be adequate (defined as >10). Mean (SD) scores for self-care maintenance (63.57 [19.12]), management (68.35 [20.24]), and confidence (64.99 [16.06]) were consistent with inadequate self-care (defined as scores <70). In multivariate analysis, HF knowledge, race, greater disease severity, and social support explained 22% of the variance in self-care maintenance (P < .001); age, education level, and greater disease severity explained 19% of the variance in self-care management (P < .001); and younger age and higher social support explained 20% of the variance in self-care confidence scores (P < .001). Blacks, on average, scored significantly lower in self-care maintenance (P = .03). In this sample, patients who screened positive for MCI, on average, had adequate HF knowledge yet inadequate self-care scores. These models show the influence of modifiable and nonmodifiable predictors for patients who screened positive for MCI across the domains of self-care. Health professionals should consider screening for MCI and identifying interventions that address HF

  12. Re-designing Orem's Self-care Theory for Patients with Chronic Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Hasanpour-Dehkordi, Ali; Mohammadi, Nooredin; Nikbakht-Nasrabadi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis is an inflammatory disease which has many adverse effects on patients' life because of its chronic nature. Since Orem's theory of self-care is a grounded theory, the concepts and applications of this theory in patients with chronic hepatitis who have special needs may lead to some challenges. The purpose of this study was to explore self-care in patients with chronic hepatitis. A directed content analysis was used in this qualitative study. Participants were recruited from a metropolitan area. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews. The verbatim transcripts of the participants' interviews were analyzed according to directed content analysis. In this study, four themes, suggested by Orem, were drawn from the data according to directed content analysis. The codes generated from the data were classified into concepts and then the concepts were assigned into these four themes. These themes were needs in the matrix of time and place, self-care agency, need for change in self-care and consequences of hepatitis. The use of Orem's self-care theory cannot meet the need for self-care in hepatitis patients because these patients have vital sexual, respect and belonging, physical, economical, and psychological-behavioral needs, and lack adequate knowledge about self-care. Consequently, the specific self-care model developed in this study helps health professionals identify self-care activities in patients with chronic hepatitis.

  13. Student Perceptions of and Confidence in Self-Care Course Concepts Using Team-based Learning

    PubMed Central

    Gryka, Rebecca; Kiersma, Mary E.; Todt, Abby L.; Cailor, Stephanie M.; Chen, Aleda M. H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate changes in student perceptions of and confidence in self-care concepts after completing a team-based learning (TBL) self-care course. Methods. Team-based learning was used at two universities in first professional year, semester-long self-care courses. Two instruments were created and administered before and after the semester. The instruments were designed to assess changes in student perceptions of self-care using the theory of planned behavior (TPB) domains and confidence in learning self-care concepts using Bandura’s Social Cognitive Theory. Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to evaluate pre/post changes, and Mann Whitney U tests were used to evaluate university differences. Results. Fifty-three Cedarville University and 58 Manchester University students completed both instruments (100% and 92% response rates, respectively). Student self-care perceptions with TPB decreased significantly on nine of 13 items for Cedarville and decreased for one of 13 items for Manchester. Student confidence in self-care concepts improved significantly on all questions for both universities. Conclusion. Data indicate TBL self-care courses were effective in improving student confidence about self-care concepts. Establishing students’ skill sets prior to entering the profession is beneficial because pharmacists will use self-directed learning to expand their knowledge and adapt to problem-solving situations. PMID:27170817

  14. Beyond the realist turn: a socio-material analysis of heart failure self-care.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Allan; Kinsella, Elizabeth Anne; Goldszmidt, Mark; Harkness, Karen; Strachan, Patricia; Lingard, Lorelei

    2018-01-01

    For patients living with chronic illnesses, self-care has been linked with positive outcomes such as decreased hospitalisation, longer lifespan, and improved quality of life. However, despite calls for more and better self-care interventions, behaviour change trials have repeatedly fallen short on demonstrating effectiveness. The literature on heart failure (HF) stands as a case in point, and a growing body of HF studies advocate realist approaches to self-care research and policymaking. We label this trend the 'realist turn' in HF self-care. Realist evaluation and realist interventions emphasise that the relationship between self-care interventions and positive health outcomes is not fixed, but contingent on social context. This paper argues socio-materiality offers a productive framework to expand on the idea of social context in realist accounts of HF self-care. This study draws on 10 interviews as well as researcher reflections from a larger study exploring health care teams for patients with advanced HF. Leveraging insights from actor-network theory (ANT), this study provides two rich narratives about the contextual factors that influence HF self-care. These descriptions portray not self-care contexts but self-care assemblages, which we discuss in light of socio-materiality. © 2018 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  15. Cognition and Health Literacy in Older Adults' Recall of Self-Care Information.

    PubMed

    Chin, Jessie; Madison, Anna; Gao, Xuefei; Graumlich, James F; Conner-Garcia, Thembi; Murray, Michael D; Stine-Morrow, Elizabeth A L; Morrow, Daniel G

    2017-04-01

    Health literacy is associated with health outcomes presumably because it influences the understanding of information needed for self-care. However, little is known about the language comprehension mechanisms that underpin health literacy. We explored the relationship between a commonly used measure of health literacy (Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults [STOFHLA]) and comprehension of health information among 145 older adults. Results showed that performance on the STOFHLA was associated with recall of health information. Consistent with the Process-Knowledge Model of Health Literacy, mediation analysis showed that both processing capacity and knowledge mediated the association between health literacy and recall of health information. In addition, knowledge moderated the effects of processing capacity limits, such that processing capacity was less likely to be associated with recall for older adults with higher levels of knowledge. These findings suggest that knowledge contributes to health literacy and can compensate for deficits in processing capacity to support comprehension of health information among older adults. The implications of these findings for improving patient education materials for older adults with inadequate health literacy are discussed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Cognition and Health Literacy in Older Adults’ Recall of Self-Care Information

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Anna; Gao, Xuefei; Graumlich, James F.; Conner-Garcia, Thembi; Murray, Michael D.; Stine-Morrow, Elizabeth A. L.; Morrow, Daniel G.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Purpose of the Study: Health literacy is associated with health outcomes presumably because it influences the understanding of information needed for self-care. However, little is known about the language comprehension mechanisms that underpin health literacy. Design and Methods: We explored the relationship between a commonly used measure of health literacy (Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults [STOFHLA]) and comprehension of health information among 145 older adults. Results: Results showed that performance on the STOFHLA was associated with recall of health information. Consistent with the Process-Knowledge Model of Health Literacy, mediation analysis showed that both processing capacity and knowledge mediated the association between health literacy and recall of health information. In addition, knowledge moderated the effects of processing capacity limits, such that processing capacity was less likely to be associated with recall for older adults with higher levels of knowledge. Implications: These findings suggest that knowledge contributes to health literacy and can compensate for deficits in processing capacity to support comprehension of health information among older adults. The implications of these findings for improving patient education materials for older adults with inadequate health literacy are discussed. PMID:26209450

  17. The Impact of Cognitive Impairment in Dementia on Self-Care Domains in Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Search and Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Santos, Tamsin; Lovell, Janaka; Shiell, Kerrie; Johnson, Marilyn; Ibrahim, Joseph E

    2018-04-29

    Self-management is integral to effective chronic disease management. Cognitive impairments (CogImp) associated with dementia have not previously been reviewed in diabetes mellitus (DM) self-care. (i) Whether CogImp associated with dementia impact self-care. (ii) Whether specific CogImp affects key DM self-care processes. A systematic literature search with a narrative review was conducted according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. This review examined studies published from January, 2000 to February, 2016 describing the relationship between cognition and DM self-care domains in community dwelling older adults with dementia/CogImp. Eight studies met inclusion criteria. Decrements in all self-care domains were associated with CogImp. Problem solving was related to reduced disease knowledge (OR 0.87, 95% CI=0.49-1.55), resulting in poorer glycemic control. Decision-making impairments manifested as difficulties in adjusting insulin doses, leading to more hospital admissions. People without CogImp were better able to find/utilize resources by adhering to recommended management (OR 1.03, 95% CI=1.02-1.05). A lack of interaction with health care providers was demonstrated through reduced receipt of important routine investigation including eye examinations (ARR=0.85, 95% CI=0.85-0.86), HbA1c testing (ARR=0.96, 95% CI=0.96-0.97) and LDL-C testing (ARR=0.91, 95% CI=0.901-0.914). People without CogImp had better clinic attendance (OR 2.17, 95% CI=1.30-3.70). Action taking deficits were apparent through less self-testing of blood sugar levels (20.2% vs 24.4%, p=0.1) resulting in poorer glycemic control, self-care and more frequent micro/macrovascular complications. Persons with diabetes and CogImp, particularly in domains of learning, memory and executive function, were significantly impaired in all self-care tasks. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Construct validity of the Heart Failure Screening Tool (Heart-FaST) to identify heart failure patients at risk of poor self-care: Rasch analysis.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Nicholas A; Ski, Chantal F; McEvedy, Samantha M; Thompson, David R; Cameron, Jan

    2018-02-14

    The aim of this study was to psychometrically evaluate the Heart Failure Screening Tool (Heart-FaST) via: (1) examination of internal construct validity; (2) testing of scale function in accordance with design; and (3) recommendation for change/s, if items are not well adjusted, to improve psychometric credential. Self-care is vital to the management of heart failure. The Heart-FaST may provide a prospective assessment of risk, regarding the likelihood that patients with heart failure will engage in self-care. Psychometric validation of the Heart-FaST using Rasch analysis. The Heart-FaST was administered to 135 patients (median age = 68, IQR = 59-78 years; 105 males) enrolled in a multidisciplinary heart failure management program. The Heart-FaST is a nurse-administered tool for screening patients with HF at risk of poor self-care. A Rasch analysis of responses was conducted which tested data against Rasch model expectations, including whether items serve as unbiased, non-redundant indicators of risk and measure a single construct and that rating scales operate as intended. The results showed that data met Rasch model expectations after rescoring or deleting items due to poor discrimination, disordered thresholds, differential item functioning, or response dependence. There was no evidence of multidimensionality which supports the use of total scores from Heart-FaST as indicators of risk. Aggregate scores from this modified screening tool rank heart failure patients according to their "risk of poor self-care" demonstrating that the Heart-FaST items constitute a meaningful scale to identify heart failure patients at risk of poor engagement in heart failure self-care. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Effectiveness of a School- and Community-based Academic Asthma Health Education Program on Use of Effective Asthma Self-care Behaviors in Older School-age Students

    PubMed Central

    Kintner, Eileen K.; Cook, Gwendolyn; Marti, C. Nathan; Allen, April; Stoddard, Debbie; Harmon, Phyllis; Gomes, Melissa; Meeder, Linda; Van Egeren, Laurie A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of SHARP, an academic asthma health education and counseling program, on fostering use of effective asthma self-care behaviors. Design and Methods This was a phase III, two-group, cluster randomized, single-blinded, longitudinal design guided the study. Caregivers of 205 fourth- and fifth-grade students completed the asthma health behaviors survey at pre-intervention and 1, 12, and 24 months post-intervention. Analysis involved multilevel modeling. Results All students demonstrated improvement in episode management, risk-reduction/prevention, and health promotion behaviors; SHARP students demonstrated increased improvement in episode management and risk-reduction/prevention behaviors. Practice Implications Working with schoolteachers, nurses can improve use of effective asthma self-care behaviors. PMID:25443867

  20. Self-care coping strategies in people with diabetes: a qualitative exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Margaret M; Bradley, Colin P; O'Sullivan, Tony; Perry, Ivan J

    2009-01-01

    Background The management of diabetes self-care is largely the responsibility of the patient. With more emphasis on the prevention of complications, adherence to diabetes self-care regimens can be difficult. Diabetes self-care requires the patient to make many dietary and lifestyle changes. This study will explore patient perceptions of diabetes self-care, with particular reference to the burden of self-care and coping strategies among patients. Methods A maximum variation sample of 17 patients was selected from GP practices and diabetes clinics in Ireland to include patients with types 1 and 2 diabetes, various self-care regimens, and a range of diabetes complications. Data were collected by in-depth interviews; which were tape-recorded and transcribed. The transcripts were analysed using open and axial coding procedures to identify main categories, and were reviewed by an independent corroborator. Discussion of the results is made in the theoretical context of the health belief, health value, self-efficacy, and locus of control frameworks. Results Patients' perceptions of their self-care varied on a spectrum, displaying differences in self-care responsibilities such as competence with dietary planning, testing blood sugar and regular exercise. Three patient types could be distinguished, which were labeled: "proactive manager," a patient who independently monitors blood glucose and adjusts his/her self-care regime to maintain metabolic control; "passive follower," a patient who follows his/her prescribed self-care regime, but does not react autonomously to changes in metabolic control; and "nonconformist," a patient who does not follow most of his/her prescribed self-care regimen. Conclusion Patients have different diabetes self-care coping strategies which are influenced by their self-care health value and consequently may affect their diet and exercise choices, frequency of blood glucose monitoring, and compliance with prescribed medication regimens. Particular

  1. Antecedents of self-care in adults with congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Nancy; Dunbar, Sandra B; Butler, Javed; Higgins, Melinda; Book, Wendy; Reilly, Carolyn

    2015-12-15

    Adults with congenital heart defects (ACHD) face long-term complications related to prior surgery, abnormal anatomy, and acquired cardiovascular conditions. Although self-care is an important part of chronic illness management, few studies have explored self-care in the ACHD population. The purpose of this study is to describe self-care and its antecedents in the ACHD population. Persons with moderate or severe ACHD (N=132) were recruited from a single ACHD center. Self-care (health maintenance behaviors, monitoring and management of symptoms), and potential antecedents including sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, ACHD knowledge, behavioral characteristics (depressive symptoms and self-efficacy), and family-related factors (parental overprotection and perceived family support) were collected via self-report and chart review. Multiple regression was used to identify antecedents of self-care maintenance, monitoring, and management. Only 44.7%, 27.3%, and 23.3% of participants performed adequate levels of self-care maintenance, monitoring and management, respectively. In multiple regression analysis, self-efficacy, education, gender, perceived family support, and comorbidities explained 25% of the variance in self-care maintenance (R(2)=.248, F(5, 123)=9.44, p<.001). Age, depressive symptoms, self-efficacy, and NYHA Class explained 23% of the variance in self-care monitoring (R(2)=.232, F(2, 124)=10.66, p<.001). Self-efficacy and NYHA Class explained 9% of the variance in self-care management (R(2)=.094, F(2, 80)=5.27, p=.007). Low levels of self-care are common among persons with ACHD. Multiple factors, including modifiable factors of self-efficacy, depressive symptoms, and perceived family support, are associated with self-care and should be considered in designing future interventions to improve outcomes in the ACHD population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Antecedents of Self-Care in Adults with Congenital Heart Defects

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Nancy; Dunbar, Sandra B.; Butler, Javed; Higgins, Melinda; Book, Wendy; Reilly, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Background Adults with congenital heart defects (ACHD) face long-term complications related to prior surgery, abnormal anatomy, and acquired cardiovascular conditions. Although self-care is an important part of chronic illness management, few studies have explored self-care in the ACHD population. The purpose of this study is to describe self-care and its antecedents in the ACHD population. Methods Persons with moderate or severe ACHD (N=132) were recruited from a single ACHD center. Self-care (health maintenance behaviors, monitoring and management of symptoms), and potential antecedents including sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, ACHD knowledge, behavioral characteristics (depressive symptoms and self-efficacy), and family-related factors (parental overprotection and perceived family support) were collected via self-report and chart review. Multiple regression was used to identify antecedents of self-care maintenance, monitoring, and management. Results Only 44.7%, 27.3%, and 23.3% of participants performed adequate levels of self-care maintenance, monitoring and management, respectively. In multiple regression analysis, self-efficacy, education, gender, perceived family support, and comorbidities explained 25% of the variance in self-care maintenance (R2=.248, F(5, 123)=9.44, p<.001). Age, depressive symptoms, self-efficacy, and NYHA Class explained 23% of the variance in self-care monitoring (R2=.232, F(2, 124)=10.66, p<.001). Self-efficacy and NYHA Class explained 9% of the variance in self-care management (R2=.094, F(2, 80)=5.27, p=.007). Conclusions Low levels of self-care are common among persons with ACHD. Multiple factors, including modifiable factors of self-efficacy, depressive symptoms, and perceived family support, are associated with self-care and should be considered in designing future interventions to improve outcomes in the ACHD population. PMID:26340127

  3. The most common nursing diagnosis among adults/seniors hospitalised with cancer: integrative review.

    PubMed

    Jomar, Rafael Tavares; de Souza Bispo, Vitória Régia

    2014-01-01

    The nursing process, with emphasis on the diagnosis phase, is essential to oncology hospital services due to a high frequency of physical and psychological problems that compromise the quality of life of patients undergoing cancer treatment. The goal of this study was to identify, according to NANDA International, the most common nursing diagnosis among adults/seniors with cancer who are hospitalised. This study is an integrative review of the literature completed in 2013 using five electronic databases, resulting in the selection and analysis of nine articles. This review identified the following eight actual diagnoses and two risk diagnoses that are more common among hospitalised adults/seniors with cancer: anxiety, deficient knowledge, constipation, self-care deficit for bathing/hygiene, body image disturbance, acute/chronic pain, fear, disturbed sleep pattern, risk of infection, and risk of deficient fluid volume. The heterogeneity of the studies used in this review may not have allowed the identification of all the common nursing diagnoses in the practice of oncology nursing in hospitals. However, even though the results are not based on the highest possible level of scientific evidence, their correlation to clinical practice can contribute to the enhancement of the nursing process in oncology services provided by hospitals.

  4. The most common nursing diagnosis among adults/seniors hospitalised with cancer: integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Jomar, Rafael Tavares; de Souza Bispo, Vitória Régia

    2014-01-01

    The nursing process, with emphasis on the diagnosis phase, is essential to oncology hospital services due to a high frequency of physical and psychological problems that compromise the quality of life of patients undergoing cancer treatment. The goal of this study was to identify, according to NANDA International, the most common nursing diagnosis among adults/seniors with cancer who are hospitalised. This study is an integrative review of the literature completed in 2013 using five electronic databases, resulting in the selection and analysis of nine articles. This review identified the following eight actual diagnoses and two risk diagnoses that are more common among hospitalised adults/seniors with cancer: anxiety, deficient knowledge, constipation, self-care deficit for bathing/hygiene, body image disturbance, acute/chronic pain, fear, disturbed sleep pattern, risk of infection, and risk of deficient fluid volume. The heterogeneity of the studies used in this review may not have allowed the identification of all the common nursing diagnoses in the practice of oncology nursing in hospitals. However, even though the results are not based on the highest possible level of scientific evidence, their correlation to clinical practice can contribute to the enhancement of the nursing process in oncology services provided by hospitals. PMID:25228918

  5. Managing Mental Health Problems in Everyday Life: Drug Treatment Client's Self-Care Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Martin; Treloar, Carla

    2008-01-01

    Little is understood about the self-care activities undertaken by drug treatment clients. Using data from a qualitative study of drug treatment and mental health we identify the self-care practices of drug treatment clients diagnosed with anxiety and depression. Seventy-seven participants were interviewed in four sites across Australia.…

  6. Translation and validation of the Self-care of Heart Failure Index into Persian.

    PubMed

    Siabani, Soraya; Leeder, Stephen R; Davidson, Patricia M; Najafi, Farid; Hamzeh, Behrooz; Solimani, Akram; Siahbani, Sara; Driscoll, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a common burdensome health problem worldwide. Self-care improves outcomes in patients with CHF. The Self-care of Heart Failure Index (SCHFI) is a well-known scale for assessing self-care. A reliable, valid, and culturally acceptable instrument is needed to develop and test self-care interventions in Iran. We sought to translate and validate the Persian version of SCHFI v 6.2 (pSCHFI). We translated the SCHFI into Persian (pSCHFI) using standardized methods. The reliability was evaluated by assessing Cronbach's α coefficient. Expert opinion, discussion with patients, and confirmatory factor analysis were used to assess face validity, content validity, and construct validity, respectively. The analysis, using 184 participants, showed acceptable internal consistency and construct validity for the 3 subscales of pSCHFI-self-care maintenance, self-care management, and self-care self-confidence. The pSCHFI is a valid instrument with an acceptable reliability for evaluating self-care in Persian patients with heart failure.

  7. Making self-care a priority for women at risk of breast cancer-related lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Radina, M Elise; Armer, Jane M; Stewart, Bob R

    2014-05-01

    Estimates suggest that between 41% and 94% of breast cancer survivors may develop the chronic condition of secondary lymphedema at some point during their lifetimes. Self-care is critical for effective lymphedema management and risk-reduction. At the same time, women in general have been characterized as engaging in self-sacrificing behaviors in which they choose other-care over self-care. This study explored the self-care experiences of women with breast cancer within the contexts of complex and demanding familial and work-related responsibilities. Participants (N=14) were enrolled in a behavioral-educational intervention aimed at lymphedema risk-reduction. This feminist family theory-informed secondary analysis of qualitative data focused on women's familial roles and the balance or lack of balance between self-sacrifice and self-care. Findings included participants' struggles with time management and prioritizing self-care over care of others as well as making a commitment to self-care. Findings have implications for patient and family-level education and research with regard to gender role-based barriers to self-care and self-care within complex social contexts.

  8. Effects of Programmed Teaching Errors on Acquisition and Durability of Self-Care Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, Maeve G.; Karsten, Amanda M.

    2017-01-01

    This investigation sheds light on necessary and sufficient conditions to establish self-care behavior chains among people with developmental disabilities. First, a descriptive assessment (DA) identified the types of teaching errors that occurred during self-care instruction. Second, the relative effects of three teaching errors observed during the…

  9. Self-Care of Older Black Adults in a South African Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrandt, Eugenie; Robertson, Barbara

    1995-01-01

    Descriptive data from 309 South Africans aged 60 and older showed that self-care skills and health practices are a mixture of Western and traditional thinking. A health education and screening project was designed to empower older adults in self-care. (SK)

  10. Music Therapists' Self-Care: Examining the Effectiveness of Educational Preparation for Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hearns, Maureen C.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effectiveness of undergraduate academic and clinical training programs for music therapy in addressing the subject of personal growth, as it relates to the development of critical self-awareness and self-care strategies. The study further attempted to identify which self-care strategies are being used…

  11. Childhood Adversity and Self-Care Education for Undergraduate Social Work and Human Services Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcomb, Michelle; Burton, Judith; Edwards, Niki

    2017-01-01

    Many students pursuing social work and human services courses have experienced adverse childhoods. This article focuses on their learning about self-care, an important skill for future practice. Interviews with 20 undergraduate students with a history of childhood adversity found unmet needs both for conceptualizing self-care and developing…

  12. How Do Cognitive Function and Knowledge Affect Heart Failure Self-Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Victoria Vaughan; Lee, Christopher S.; Riegel, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive patient education, few heart failure (HF) patients master self-care. Impaired cognitive function may explain why patient education is ineffective. A concurrent triangulation mixed methods design was used to explore how knowledge and cognitive function influence HF self-care. A total of 41 adults with HF participated in interviews…

  13. Preparing Kids for Self-Care. Strong Families: Competent Kids. Family Workshop Leader's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince William Cooperative Extension Service, Manassas, VA.

    A program called Strong Families: Competent Kids was developed in response to the growing number of latchkey kids. The goals of the program are to help parents determine when their children are ready for self-care and to provide children with skills to manage self-care safely and confidently. It does not advocate that children should be left in…

  14. Social Work Students and Self-Care: A Model Assignment for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Sharon E.; Bledsoe, Linda K.; Perry, Armon R.; Robinson, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    The literature reveals scant research on self-care practices among social work students; yet self-care is vital as students prepare to be practitioners who are not only effective in working with all aspects of the clients' total selves, but who are themselves healthy. They are not prepared to be good practitioners unless they have first learned to…

  15. Women's self-perception and self-care practice: implications for health care delivery.

    PubMed

    Mendias, E P; Clark, M C; Guevara, E B

    2001-01-01

    Mexican American women experience unique health care needs related to integration of Mexican and American cultures. To learn how to better promote self-care practices and service utilization in women of Mexican origin living in Texas, researchers used a qualitative approach to interview a convenience sample of 11 low-income women attending a health clinic. Researchers collected narrative data about the women's perceptions of health, wellness, and self-care. Using the matrix approach described by Miles and Huberman, we organized findings around women's roles, including participants' descriptions of themselves, their health and wellness awareness, self-care practices for health/illness and wellness/nonwellness, barriers to self-care, origin of self-care practices, and perceptions of life control. Implications for health planning and service delivery are presented.

  16. Assessment of self-care and medication adherence in individuals with mental health conditions.

    PubMed

    Bible, Lisa J; Casper, Kristin A; Seifert, Jennifer L; Porter, Kyle A

    This descriptive study explored whether patients with mental health conditions engage in personal medicine (self-care activities) as part of their treatment regimen. Personal medicine is patient-identified and -initiated activities of self-care that can improve mental health through various means, including physical activity, social engagement, and spiritual connectedness. The purpose of this study was to explore patient engagement in personal medicine within an underserved population and to evaluate the impact self-care might have on self-reported medication use and adherence and patient perception of mental health control. Cross-sectional study design with a face-to-face verbally administered survey assessing medication adherence, engagement in self-care activities, perception of self-care, and mental health control. The study site was a nonprofit charitable pharmacy in an urban setting. The pharmacy provides medications and pharmacy services at no charge, including disease state education, point-of-care testing, and medication therapy management. Study participants included those who fill medications for mental health conditions and who are age 18 years and older. Main outcomes included engagement in self-care and self-reported medication adherence. Additional measures included stratification of dimensions of self-care, perception of mental health control, and patient knowledge of community resources. Overall, 81.7% of participants engaged in activities of self-care, with 98.3% recognizing self-care as important to improving and maintaining their mental health. Greater self-reported adherence rates and mental health control were seen with patients who participate in self-care. Participants who identify and engage in personal medicine recognize its value and are willing to incorporate it into their treatment regimen. As accessible and trusted health care providers, pharmacists can encourage patients to identify and use personal medicine to aid in the improvement

  17. Predictors of successful heart failure self-care maintenance in the first three months after hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Chriss, Patricia M; Sheposh, John; Carlson, Beverly; Riegel, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to replicate a prior study of predictors of self-care in heart failure (HF). A non-experimental, correlational replication study retested a model of 7 variables: social support, symptom severity, comorbidity, education, age, gender, and income; the last variable, income, was tested in the prior study but was excluded in this study because of missing data. The model was tested at baseline and 3 months after hospitalization. Participants were enrolled from 2 hospitals in southern California. A convenience sample of 66 patients with chronic HF were studied. The sample was elderly, primarily female, and educated at the high school level or above. Approximately half of the patients had systolic HF, and most were functionally compromised. Outcome measure Self-care maintenance, a component of self-care, was measured with the maintenance subscale of the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index. At baseline, the model was significant (F = 2.61, df = 7.58, P = .02) and explained 14.8% of the variance in HF self-care. Significant predictors of self-care were higher age and male gender. Three months later, when baseline self-care maintenance scores were controlled in the analysis, the model explained 45.3% of the variance in HF self-care. Most of the variance was explained by the baseline self-care score, but male gender and low comorbidity added an additional 6% of the variance (F = 6.9, df = 9.56, P < .0001). Elderly men and those with fewer comorbid illnesses were most successful at HF self-care.

  18. [Heart failure in primary care: Attitudes, knowledge and self-care].

    PubMed

    Salvadó-Hernández, Cristina; Cosculluela-Torres, Pilar; Blanes-Monllor, Carmen; Parellada-Esquius, Neus; Méndez-Galeano, Carmen; Maroto-Villanova, Neus; García-Cerdán, Rosa Maria; Núñez-Manrique, M Pilar; Barrio-Ruiz, Carmen; Salvador-González, Betlem

    2018-04-01

    To determine the attitudes, knowledge, and self-care practices in patients with heart failure (HF) in Primary Care, as well as to identify factors associated with better self-care. Cross-sectional and multicentre study. Primary Care. Subjects over 18 years old with HF diagnosis, attended in 10 Primary Health Care Centres in the Metropolitan Area of Barcelona. Self-care was measured using the European Heart Failure Self-Care Behaviour Scale. Sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, tests on attitudes (Self-efficacy Managing Chronic Disease Scale), knowledge (Patient Knowledge Questionnaire), level of autonomy (Barthel), and anxiety and depression screening (Goldberg Test), were also gathered in an interview. A multivariate mixed model stratified by centre was used to analyse the adjusted association of covariates with self-care. A total of 295 subjects (77.6%) agreed to participate, with a mean age of 75.6 years (SD: 11), 56.6% women, and 62% with no primary education. The mean self-care score was 28.65 (SD: 8.22), with 25% of patients scoring lower than 21 points. In the final stratified multivariate model (n=282; R 2 conditional=0.3382), better self-care was associated with higher knowledge (coefficient, 95% confidence interval: -1.37; -1.85 to -0.90), and coronary heart disease diagnosis (-2.41; -4.36: -0.46). Self-care was moderate. The correlation of better self-care with higher knowledge highlights the opportunity to implement strategies to improve self-care, which should consider the characteristics of heart failure patients attended in Primary Care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Experiences of health-promoting self-care in people living with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, Susann; Bergman, Stefan; Arvidsson, Barbro; Fridlund, Bengt; Tops, Anita Bengtsson

    2011-06-01

    This paper is a report of a study that explores and describes the meaning of the phenomenon of health-promoting self-care as experienced by people living with rheumatic diseases. People with rheumatic diseases estimate health status as low and health belief and health status influence self-care behaviours. Several self-care behaviours are used in the efforts to mitigate the diseases. The study had a descriptive phenomenological approach based on a reflective life-world perspective. Data were gathered in 2007 by unstructured open-ended interviews with 12 individuals living with rheumatic diseases. The meaning of health-promoting self-care as experienced by people living with rheumatic diseases was that self-care takes place against a background of continual hope and belief to influence health in positive ways. Self-care was a way of life and implied being ready to understand and respond to signals from the body. Three inter-related constituents elucidated their experiences: dialogue, power struggle and choice. Self-care was experienced as dialogues with the body and with the immediate environment. In order to respond to signals from the body, power struggles were required to be entered into when fighting the diseases. Choices were required to be made and things that were beneficial for the body were prioritized. In this study, the meaning of health-promoting self-care as experienced by people living with rheumatic diseases was that self-care was a way of life. This meant to be ready to understand and respond to signals from the body. Self-care required dialogues, power struggles and choices. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Virtual coach technology for supporting self-care.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dan; Liu, Hsin-Yi; Cooper, Rosemarie; Cooper, Rory A; Smailagic, Asim; Siewiorek, Dan

    2010-02-01

    "Virtual Coach" refers to a coaching program or device aiming to guide users through tasks for the purpose of prompting positive behavior or assisting with learning new skills. This article reviews virtual coach interventions with the purpose of guiding rehabilitation professionals to comprehend more effectively the essential components of such interventions, the underlying technologies and their integration, and example applications. A design space of virtual coach interventions including self-monitoring, context awareness, interface modality, and coaching strategies were identified and discussed to address when, how, and what coaching messages to deliver in an automated and intelligent way. Example applications that address various health-related issues also are provided to illustrate how a virtual coach intervention is developed and evaluated. Finally, the article provides some insight into addressing key challenges and opportunities in designing and implementing virtual coach interventions. It is expected that more virtual coach interventions will be developed in the field of rehabilitation to support self-care and prevent secondary conditions in individuals with disabilities.

  1. Does Smoking Hamper Oral Self-Care Among Dental Professionals?

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Hadi; Khami, Mohammad Reza; Virtanen, Jorma I; Vehkalahti, Miira M

    2015-05-01

    Smoking may impact oral self-care (OSC). This study aimed to analyze the role of smoking in OSC among Iranian dental health professionals. The cross-sectional data were collected at two annual dental meetings and seven randomly selected dental schools in Iran. A total of 1,459 respondents composed of 967 general dental practitioners (GDPs), 229 dental educators (DE), and 263 senior dental students (DS) anonymously completed a self-administered questionnaire inquiring about smoking status and OSC. Thirty percent of the male and 12% of the female dental health professionals reported smoking tobacco. There was no difference between their professional status. Women reported better OSC than did men, but only 26% of the women and 17% of the men followed the three most important recommendations for OSC. Smoking was associated with infrequent tooth brushing and flossing, irregular use of fluoride containing toothpaste, consumption of sugary snacks and weak adherence to the recommended OSC guidelines. Dental health education should place more emphasis on smoking counseling and cessation among dental health professionals.

  2. Living Arrangements Modify the Relationship Between Depressive Symptoms and Self-care in Patients With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Suk; Lennie, Terry A; Yoon, Ju Young; Wu, Jia-Rong; Moser, Debra K

    Depressive symptoms hinder heart failure patients' engagement in self-care. As social support helps improve self-care and decrease depressive symptoms, it is possible that social support buffers the negative impact of depressive symptoms on self-care. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of living arrangements as an indicator of social support on the relationship between depressive symptoms and self-care in heart failure patients. Stable heart failure patients (N = 206) completed the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 to measure depressive symptoms. Self-care (maintenance, management, and confidence) was measured with the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index. Path analyses were used to examine associations among depressive symptoms and the self-care constructs by living arrangements. Depressive symptoms had a direct effect on self-care maintenance and management (standardized β = -0.362 and -0.351, respectively), but not on self-care confidence in patients living alone. Depressive symptoms had no direct or indirect effect on any of the 3 self-care constructs in patients living with someone. Depressive symptoms had negative effects on self-care in patients living alone, but were not related to self-care in patients living with someone. Our results suggest that negative effects of depressive symptoms on self-care are buffered by social support.

  3. Depressive Symptoms Effect on Self Care Behavior During the First Month After Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Niakan, Maryam; Paryad, Ezzat; Leili, Ehsan Kazemnezhad; Sheikholeslami, Farzane

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To determine the effect of severity of depression symptoms on self care behavior in 15th and 30th day after myocardial infarction (MI). Materials and Methods: Gathering data for this cross sectional study was done by Beck depression and self care behavior questionnaires in a heart especial hospital in Rasht in north of Iran. Sample size was 132 after MI patients and data collected from June 2011 to January 2012. Results: Scores of depression symptoms in 15th and 30th day after MI and score of self care behavior in these days had significant difference (P<0.0001). Spearman test showed self care behavior had significant relationship with depression symptoms (P<0.0001). GEE model also showed with control of socio demographic and illness related factors, depression symptoms can decrease self care behavior scores (P<0.001). Conclusion: Severity of depression symptoms increase in 15th to 30th day after MI. This issue can affect on self care behavior. This issue is emphasized on nurses’ notice to plan suitable self care program for these patients. PMID:25946944

  4. Self-Care Practices among Diabetes Patients in Addis Ababa: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Tewahido, Dagmawit; Berhane, Yemane

    2017-01-01

    Background Self-care practices that include self-monitoring of blood sugar level, diet management, physical exercise, adherence to medications, and foot care are the cornerstones of diabetes management. However, very little is known about self-care in developing countries where the prevalence of diabetes is increasing. Objective The objective of this study was to describe self-care practices among individuals with type II diabetes in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods A qualitative method was used to gather data from type II diabetes patients. Patients were recruited from the outpatient diabetes clinics of two public hospitals in Addis Ababa. Data were collected using a semi structured interview guide. A thematic analysis approach was used to process the data. Results Overall self-care practices were not adequate. Most patients reported irregular self-monitoring of blood sugar. Dietary and physical exercise recommendations were inadequately practiced by most of the participants. Most patients better adhered to medication prescriptions. Patients generally lack proper information/knowledge regarding the importance of self-care and how it should be implemented. Based on reported behavior we identified three main categories of patients; which are those ‘endeavor to be compliant’, ‘confused’ and ‘negligent’. Conclusion Diabetes patients largely depend on prescribed medications to control their blood sugar level. The importance of proper self-care practices for effective management of diabetes is not adequately emphasized in diabetes care centers and patients lack sufficient knowledge for proper self-care. PMID:28045992

  5. Hypertension and Diabetes Self-care Activities: A Hospital Based Pilot Survey in Benin City, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Egbi, O G; Ofili, A N; Oviasu, E

    2015-06-01

    The burden of hypertension and diabetes is on the increase globally with its attendant complications. Although self-care activities are critical to the successful management of both conditions, there are only a few reports on such activities, especially in this part of the world. This pilot study was therefore undertaken to assess the self-care activities among hypertensive and diabetic patients in Benin City. Hypertensive and diabetic patients were consecutively recruited from the out- patient department of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital. The questionnaires were developed based on past assessment scales such as the Hypertension Self-Care Activity Level Effects (H-SCALE) and the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Assessment (SDSCA) for hypertensive and diabetic participants respectively. A total of 85(32 hypertensive, 24 diabetic and 29 co-morbid hypertensive diabetic) participants completed the study. Only 14 (16.5%) subjects had good self-care practice, 39 (45.9%) had fair practice while poor self-care practice was found in 32 (37.6%) subjects. Adherence to medications, clinic adherence, use of self-monitoring devices, regular exercising and dietician contact were generally low. However, only a relatively few subjects smoked tobacco or took significant alcohol. The health-related self-care practice among the patients was generally not good. There was no significant difference in the overall level of self-care among hypertensive, diabetic patients or those with co-morbid conditions. There is need for more aggressive health education aimed at improving the current health-related self-care habits among these patients.

  6. Self-Care in the Classroom for Children with Chronic Illness: A Case Study of a Student with Cystic Fibrosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Julie Elizabeth Jonson

    1994-01-01

    Describes the essential self-care of an eight-year old second-grade student. This study illustrates a school counselor's use of a multimodal, behavioral intervention to increase the level of self-care in the classroom. Relevant reinforcements, individual and group counseling, and peer support, resulted in improved self-care. (RJM)

  7. Family Caregiver Contribution to Self-care of Heart Failure: An Application of the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuxia; Zou, Huijing; Zhang, Yanting; Fang, Wenjie; Fan, Xiuzhen

    Adherence to self-care behaviors improves outcomes of patients with heart failure (HF). Caregivers play an important role in contributing to self-care. We aimed to explore the relationships among HF knowledge, perceived control, social support, and family caregiver contribution to self-care of HF, based on the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model. Two hundred forty-seven dyads of eligible patients with HF and family caregivers were recruited from a general hospital in China. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data obtained with the Caregiver Contribution to Self-care of Heart Failure Index, the Heart Failure Knowledge Test, the Control Attitudes Scale, and the Social Support Rating Scale. In this model, caregiver contribution to self-care maintenance was positively affected by perceived control (β = .148, P = .015) and caregiver confidence in contribution to self-care (β = .293, P < .001). Caregiver contribution to self-care management was positively affected by HF knowledge (β = .270, P < .001), perceived control (β = .140, P = .007), social support (β = .123, P = .019), caregiver confidence in contribution to self-care (β = .328, P < .001), and caregiver contribution to self-care maintenance (β = .148, P = .006). Caregiver confidence in contribution to self-care was positively affected by HF knowledge (β = .334, P < .001). Heart failure knowledge, perceived control, and social support facilitated family caregiver contribution to self-care of HF. Targeted interventions that consider these variables may effectively improve family caregiver contributions to self-care.

  8. The use of touch to enhance nursing care of older person in long-term mental health care facilities.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, M; Timmins, F

    2004-10-01

    The self-care deficits experienced by older clients in long-term mental health settings, because of cognitive impairment, are likely to impact upon the clients' higher-order needs. The practice of nursing the elderly involves a lot of personal contact, during the delivery of fundamental physical care. While physiological and safety needs are crucial to clients in long-term settings, higher-order needs need also to be addressed. From the clients' perspective nurse's use of touch provides comfort, warmth and security, although there is a dearth of empirical evidence of these benefits. This paper explores the nurse's use of touch, the impact of touch and the experiences of touch on the older person in long-term settings. Because of the dearth of research in the use of touch with elderly clients in long-term care mental health facilities, a review of the literature was performed on the topic. This revealed that touch by nurses is frequently associated with routine tasks within nursing, and is less likely to be a caring touch intervention. Recommendations include further research on the topic and caution with widespread adoption of caring touch as an intervention.

  9. Socio-demographic and clinical determinants of self-care in adults with type 2 diabetes: a multicentre observational study.

    PubMed

    Ausili, Davide; Rossi, Emanuela; Rebora, Paola; Luciani, Michela; Tonoli, Luca; Ballerini, Enrico; Androni, Silvia; Vellone, Ercole; Riegel, Barbara; Di Mauro, Stefania

    2018-04-05

    To describe self-care as defined by the Middle Range Theory of Self-Care of Chronic Illness and to identify clinical and socio-demographic determinants in a T2DM population. A multicentre observational cross-sectional study was conducted involving 540 adults with a confirmed diagnosis of T2DM from six outpatient diabetes services in Italy. Socio-demographic and clinical data were collected from medical records. The Self-Care of Diabetes Inventory (SCODI) was used to measure self-care maintenance, monitoring, management, and confidence dimensions. For each separate scale, scores were standardized 0-100 with higher SCODI scores indicating better self-care; a score ≥ 70 is adequate. Multiple quantile regression models were performed to identify determinants of each self-care dimension. Self-care maintenance (median = 81.3) and self-care confidence (median = 79.5) were adequate in most of the subjects. Self-care monitoring was adequate in only half of the sample (median = 70.6). Self-care management was poor (median = 59.4). Lower self-care maintenance was associated with lower self-care confidence (p < 0.001). Lower self-care monitoring was associated with being male (p < 0.001), having lower self-care confidence (p < 001), and having diabetes for < 10 years (p < 0.001). Lower self-care management was associated with being male (p = 0.002), being older (p = 0.005), having a low income (p = 0.030), being employed (p = 0.008), having missed diabetes education in the last year (p = 0.002), and lower self-care confidence (p < 0.0001). Lower self-care confidence was associated with having diabetes for < 10 years (p = 0.008), and having at least one comorbid condition (p = 0.006). Determinants of self-care maintenance, monitoring, management and confidence include both clinical and socio-demographic variables. Modifiable determinants such as self-care confidence and diabetes self-care management

  10. Neighborhood crime and self-care: risks for aggression and lower academic performance.

    PubMed

    Lord, Heather; Mahoney, Joseph L

    2007-11-01

    This longitudinal study evaluated associations among official rates of neighborhood crime, academic performance, and aggression in a sample of 581 children in 1st-3rd grade (6.3-10.6 years old). It was hypothesized that the influence of crime depends on children's unsupervised exposure to the neighborhood context through self-care. Average weekly hours in self-care were trichotomized into low (0-3), moderate (4-9), and high (10-15). Moderate and high amounts of self-care were linked to increased aggression and decreased academic performance for children from high-crime areas (11,230 crimes per 100,000 persons) but not average-crime areas, when the authors controlled for neighborhood, family, and child covariates. In high-crime areas, academic outcomes were more favorable when self-care occurred in combination with after-school program participation. (c) 2007 APA.

  11. Orem's Self-Care Model With Trauma Patients: A Quasi-Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Khatiban, Mahnaz; Shirani, Fatemeh; Oshvandi, Khodayar; Soltanian, Ali Reza; Ebrahimian, Ramin

    2018-07-01

    To examine if the application of Orem's self-care model could improve self-care knowledge, attitudes, practices, and respiratory conditions of trauma patients with chest tubes, a quasi-experimental study was conducted. The participants were assigned to two groups-namely, Orem's model and routine care. Although the patients' self-care knowledge, attitudes, and practices were improved in both groups over the course of 3 days since the initial assessments, there was a greater degree of improvement in the experimental group than that in the control group. However, there were no differences in the improvement of the chest parameters between the two groups. Orem's model was effective in improving self-care in patients with chest tube.

  12. Describing Self-Care Self-Efficacy: Definition, Measurement, Outcomes, and Implications.

    PubMed

    Eller, Lucille S; Lev, Elise L; Yuan, Changrong; Watkins, Ann Vreeland

    2018-01-01

    The pragmatic utility method of concept analysis was used to explore the usefulness of the concept self-care self-efficacy. Empirical studies across disciplines published between 1996 and 2015 were used as data. A data matrix was developed. Analytical questions and responses were derived from the data to understand patterns, develop new knowledge and achieve synthesis. Usefulness of the concept is contingent on how it is defined and measured. Self-care self-efficacy is associated with performance of self-care activities and positive health outcomes in diverse populations. Research can guide development of targeted interventions to increase patients' self-care self-efficacy, thus reducing costs, and assisting people to achieve optimal health. © 2016 NANDA International, Inc.

  13. Testing the Theory of Self-care Management for sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Jenerette, Coretta M; Murdaugh, Carolyn

    2008-08-01

    Factors predicting health outcomes in persons with sickle cell disease (SCD) were investigated within the framework of the theory of self-care management for SCD, which proposes that vulnerability factors negatively affect health care outcomes and self-care management resources and positively mediate the relationship between vulnerability factors and health care outcomes. A cross-sectional descriptive design was used to test the model with a sample of 232 African American adults with SCD. Results supported the negative effect of vulnerability factors on health outcomes. The overall model was supported, however, self-care management resources did not mediate the relationship between vulnerability and health care outcomes. The findings provide support for interventions to increase self-care management resources to improve health care outcomes. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  14. Unsupervised self-care predicts conduct problems: The moderating roles of hostile aggression and gender.

    PubMed

    Atherton, Olivia E; Schofield, Thomas J; Sitka, Angela; Conger, Rand D; Robins, Richard W

    2016-04-01

    Despite widespread speculation about the detrimental effect of unsupervised self-care on adolescent outcomes, little is known about which children are particularly prone to problem behaviors when left at home without adult supervision. The present research used data from a longitudinal study of 674 Mexican-origin children residing in the United States to examine the prospective effect of unsupervised self-care on conduct problems, and the moderating roles of hostile aggression and gender. Results showed that unsupervised self-care was related to increases over time in conduct problems such as lying, stealing, and bullying. However, unsupervised self-care only led to conduct problems for boys and for children with an aggressive temperament. The main and interactive effects held for both mother-reported and observational-rated hostile aggression and after controlling for potential confounds. Copyright © 2016 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Potential Benefits of Companion Animals for Self-Care Children. Reviews of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, D. Terry; McKenry, Patrick C.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the potential benefits of having pets for self-care children. Researchers suggest that companion animals can lower blood pressure, show up high on a list of children's helpers and indirectly increase feelings of safety. (RJC)

  16. Effects of Mobile Phone Usage in Supporting Leg Lymphedema Self-care

    PubMed Central

    Okutsu, Ayako; Koiyabashi, Kikuyo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to implement self-care support for leg lymphedema patients using mobile phones and to investigate the effects thereof. Patients and Methods: A total of 30 patients with lymphedema following female genital cancer surgery (stages I to II) who were referred from a nearby gynecologist were randomly divided into groups for routine self-care support (control group) and mobile telephone-assisted support (intervention group) and received the self-care support appropriate to their group. The (total) circumference of the leg with edema, FACT-G (cancer patient QOL), MHP (mental health status), and self-care self-assessment were comparatively investigated at three months after the initial interview. Results: No significant reduction in the (total) circumferences of legs with edema was confirmed in either the control or intervention group. The intervention group was significantly better than the control group in terms of the activity circumstances and FACT-G mental status at three months after the initial interview. The intervention group was also significantly better in psychological, social, and physical items in the MHP. The intervention group was significantly better than the control group in terms of circumstances of self-care implementation at three months after the initial interview. Additionally, comparison of the circumstances of implementation for different aspects of self-care content showed that the intervention group was significantly better at selecting shoes, observing edema, moisturizing, self-drainage, wearing compression garments, and implementing bandaging. Conclusion: Compared with routine self-care support, mobile telephone-assisted support is suggested to be effective for leg lymphedema patients’ QOL and mental health status as well as their self-care behaviors. PMID:25648778

  17. Activation and Self-Efficacy in a Randomized Trial of a Depression Self-Care Intervention.

    PubMed

    McCusker, Jane; Lambert, Sylvie D; Cole, Martin G; Ciampi, Antonio; Strumpf, Erin; Freeman, Ellen E; Belzile, Eric

    2016-12-01

    In a sample of primary care participants with chronic physical conditions and comorbid depressive symptoms: to describe the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of activation and self-efficacy with demographic, physical and mental health status, health behaviors, depression self-care, health care utilization, and use of self-care tools; and to examine the effects of a depression self-care coaching intervention on these two outcomes. Design/Study Setting. A secondary analysis of activation and self-efficacy data collected as part of a randomized trial to compare the effects of a telephone-based coached depression self-care intervention with a noncoached intervention. Activation (Patient Activation Measure) was measured at baseline and 6 months. Depression self-care self-efficacy was assessed at baseline, at 3 months, and at 6 months. In multivariable cross-sectional analyses (n = 215), activation and/or self-efficacy were associated with language, birthplace, better physical and mental health, individual exercise, specialist visits, and antidepressant nonuse. In longitudinal analyses (n = 158), an increase in activation was associated with increased medication adherence; an increase in self-efficacy was associated with use of cognitive self-care strategies and increases in social and solitary activities. There were significant improvements from baseline to 6 months in activation and self-efficacy scores both among coached and noncoached groups. The self-care coaching intervention did not affect 6-month activation or self-efficacy but was associated with quicker improvement in self-efficacy. Overall, the results for activation and self-efficacy were similar, although self-efficacy correlated more consistently than activation with depression-specific behaviors and was responsive to a depression self-care coaching intervention. © 2016 Society for Public Health Education.

  18. Health Care Autonomy in Children with Chronic Conditions: Implications for Self Care and Family Management

    PubMed Central

    Beacham, Barbara L.; Deatrick, Janet A.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Health care autonomy typically occurs during late adolescence but health care providers and families often expect children with chronic health conditions to master self-care earlier. Few studies have examined the development of health care autonomy as it pertains to self-care and family management. This review will link the three concepts and discuss implications for families and health care providers. Case studies are provided as exemplars to highlight areas where intervention and research is needed. PMID:23659815

  19. Use of social adaptability index to explain self-care and diabetes outcomes.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jennifer A; Walker, Rebekah J; Smalls, Brittany L; Egede, Leonard E

    2017-06-20

    To examine whether the social adaptability index (SAI) alone or components of the index provide a better explanatory model for self-care and diabetes outcomes. Six hundred fifteen patients were recruited from two primary care settings. A series of multiple linear regression models were run to assess (1) associations between the SAI and diabetes self-care/outcomes, and (2) associations between individual SAI indicator variables and diabetes self-care/outcomes. Separate models were run for each self-care behavior and outcome. Two models were run for each dependent variable to compare associations with the SAI and components of the index. The SAI has a significant association with the mental component of quality of life (0.23, p < 0.01). In adjusted analyses, the SAI score did not have a significant association with any of the self-care behaviors. Individual components from the index had significant associations between self-care and multiple SAI indicator variables. Significant associations also exist between outcomes and the individual SAI indicators for education and employment. In this population, the SAI has low explanatory power and few significant associations with diabetes self-care/outcomes. While the use of a composite index to predict outcomes within a diabetes population would have high utility, particularly for clinical settings, this SAI lacks statistical and clinical significance in a representative diabetes population. Based on these results, the index does not provide a good model fit and masks the relationship of individual components to diabetes self-care and outcomes. These findings suggest that five items alone are not adequate to explain or predict outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes.

  20. Predictors of Self-care among the Elderly with Diabetes Type 2: Using Social Cognitive Theory.

    PubMed

    Borhaninejad, Vahidreza; Iranpour, Abedin; Shati, Mohsen; Tahami, Ahmad Naghibzadeh; Yousefzadeh, Gholamrezan; Fadayevatan, Reza

    Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases among the elderly and is also a very serious health problem. Adopting theory-based self-care behaviors is an effective means in managing such diseases. This study aimed to determine the predictors of diabetes self-care in the elderly in Kerman based on a social cognitive theory. In this cross-sectional study, 384 elderly diabetic patients who had referred to health screening centers in Kerman were chosen via cluster sampling. To collect information about self-care and its predictors, Toobert Glasgow's diabetes self-efficacy scale as well as a questionnaire was used which was based on social cognitive theory constructs. The validity and reliability of the questionnaire was confirmed. The data were analyzed using Pearson correlation and linear regression analysis in SPSS software 17. Among the subjects, 67.37% (252) had poor self-care ability; 29.14% (109) had average ability, and 3.40% (13) enjoyed a proper level of self- care ability. There was a significant relationship between the constructs of the social cognitive theory (knowledge, self- efficacy, social support, outcome expectations, outcome expectancy and self-regulation) and the self-care score. Furthermore, the mentioned constructs could predict 0.47% of the variance of the self-care behaviors. self-care behaviors in this study were poor. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an educational intervention based on cognitive theory constructs with the goal of properly managing diabetes in the elderly patients. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Depression, distress and self-efficacy: The impact on diabetes self-care practices.

    PubMed

    Devarajooh, Cassidy; Chinna, Karuthan

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing in Malaysia, and people with diabetes have been reported to suffer from depression and diabetes distress which influences their self-efficacy in performing diabetes self-care practices. This interviewer administered, cross sectional study, conducted in the district of Hulu Selangor, Malaysia, involving 371 randomly selected patients with type 2 diabetes, recruited from 6 health clinics, aimed to examine a conceptual model regarding the association between depression, diabetes distress and self-efficacy with diabetes self-care practices using the partial least square approach of structural equation modeling. In this study, diabetes self-care practices were similar regardless of sex, age group, ethnicity, education level, diabetes complications or type of diabetes medication. This study found that self-efficacy had a direct effect on diabetes self-care practice (path coefficient = 0.438, p<0.001). Self-care was not directly affected by depression and diabetes distress, but indirectly by depression (path coefficient = -0.115, p<0.01) and diabetes distress (path coefficient = -0.122, p<0.001) via self-efficacy. In conclusion, to improve self-care practices, effort must be focused on enhancing self-efficacy levels, while not forgetting to deal with depression and diabetes distress, especially among those with poorer levels of self-efficacy.

  2. Multimedia psychoeducational interventions to support patient self-care in degenerative conditions: A realist review.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Peter; Scott, David; Reid, Joanne; Porter, Sam

    2015-10-01

    Multimedia interventions are increasingly used to deliver information in order to promote self-care among patients with degenerative conditions. We carried out a realist review of the literature to investigate how the characteristics of multimedia psychoeducational interventions combine with the contexts in which they are introduced to help or hinder their effectiveness in supporting self-care for patients with degenerative conditions. Electronic databases (Medline, Science Direct, PSYCHinfo, EBSCO, and Embase) were searched in order to identify papers containing information on multimedia psychoeducational interventions. Using a realist review approach, we reviewed all relevant studies to identify theories that explained how the interventions work. Ten papers were included in the review. All interventions sought to promote self-care behaviors among participants. We examined the development and content of the multimedia interventions and the impact of patient motivation and of the organizational context of implementation. We judged seven studies to be methodologically weak. All completed studies showed small effects in favor of the intervention. Multimedia interventions may provide high-quality information in an accessible format, with the potential to promote self-care among patients with degenerative conditions, if the patient perceives the information as important and develops confidence about self-care. The evidence base is weak, so that research is needed to investigate effective modes of delivery at different resource levels. We recommend that developers consider how an intervention will reduce uncertainty and increase confidence in self-care, as well as the impact of the context in which it will be employed.

  3. Determinants of Self-Care in Diabetic Patients Based on Health Belief Model

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani-Tafti, Abbasali; Mahmoodabad, Seyed Saeed Mazloomy; Morowatisharifabad, Mohammad Ali; Ardakani, Mohammad Afkhami; Rezaeipandari, Hassan; Lotfi, Mohammad Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to determine self-care predictors in diabetic patients based on health belief model. Materials and Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted on 110 diabetic patients referred to health service centers in Ardakan city, Yazd, Iran. The data was collected by a questionnaire including perceived benefits, barriers, severity, susceptibility, self-efficacy, social support, self-care behaviors and demographic variables. Results: Regularly medicine use (mean= 6.48 times per week) and shoes checking (mean= 1.17 times per week) were reported as the highest and the lowest self-care behaviors respectively. Health belief model constructs including perceived benefits, barriers, severity, susceptibility, self-efficacy and social support predicted 33.5% of the observed variance of self-care behaviors. Perceived susceptibility and self-efficacy had positive effect on self-care behavior; whereas perceived barrier’s has negative effect. Self-efficacy, perceived susceptibility and barriers were most powerful predictor respectively. Conclusion: The findings approved the efficiency of health belief model in prediction of self-care behaviors among diabetic patients. The findings realized the health belief model structure; therefore, it can be used as a framework for designing and implementing educational interventions in diabetes control plans. PMID:26156902

  4. Self-care of patients with diabetes mellitus cared for at an emergency service in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Baquedano, Irasema Romero; dos Santos, Manoel Antônio; Martins, Tatiane Aparecida; Zanetti, Maria Lúcia

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the self-care ability of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and relates it to sociodemographic and clinical variables. The study included 251 patients who were cared for by an emergency service in Mexico, in 2007. Data were obtained through structured interviews held at participants' households, through a form, a questionnaire and the Self-Care Ability Scale. Descriptive and correlation statistics were used for data analysis. The results show that 83 (33.5%) individuals displayed good self-care ability and 168 (66.5%) individuals displayed regular ability. A directly proportional correlation was found between self-care ability and schooling (r=0.124; p<0.05), as well as a negative correlation for religion (rs=-0.435; p<0.05) and duration of disease evolution (r=-0.667; p<0.05). The conclusion is that most of the individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus displayed regular ability for self-care. Self-care ability is related to multiple variables that should be taken into account by health professionals when suggesting educational programs.

  5. Relationship between Depression and Self-care in Iranian Patients with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzian, Amir Hossein; Nesami, Masoumeh Bagheri; Zamani, Fatemeh; Nasiri, Ameneh; Beik, Sima

    2017-01-01

    Background: The current cross-sectional study was carried out to determine relationships between self-care and depression in patients with cancer. Materials and Methods: From October to December, 2015, 380 patients with cancer admitted to the associated university’s medical sciences hospitals (Sari, Iran), were entered into the study using non random sampling (accessible sampling). Data were collected by demographic questionnaire, Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) and a Self-care Questionnaire. Results: Males (48.4±13±39; CI95: 46.4-50.4) were older than females (45.3±18.4; CI95:42.8-47.9). Spearman correlation analysis results showed that there was a significant negative correlation between self-care and depression (r= -0.134, P<0.05) and also a significant inverse relationship between physical (r= -0.166, P=0.001), psychological (r= -0.207, P<0.001) and emotional self-care (r= -0.179, P<0.001) with depression. Conclusions: It appears that self-care measures such as training of physical exercises, promotion of physical self-care, holding counseling sessions and psychotherapy can reduce depression levels. PMID:28240016

  6. Depression, distress and self-efficacy: The impact on diabetes self-care practices

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing in Malaysia, and people with diabetes have been reported to suffer from depression and diabetes distress which influences their self-efficacy in performing diabetes self-care practices. This interviewer administered, cross sectional study, conducted in the district of Hulu Selangor, Malaysia, involving 371 randomly selected patients with type 2 diabetes, recruited from 6 health clinics, aimed to examine a conceptual model regarding the association between depression, diabetes distress and self-efficacy with diabetes self-care practices using the partial least square approach of structural equation modeling. In this study, diabetes self-care practices were similar regardless of sex, age group, ethnicity, education level, diabetes complications or type of diabetes medication. This study found that self-efficacy had a direct effect on diabetes self-care practice (path coefficient = 0.438, p<0.001). Self-care was not directly affected by depression and diabetes distress, but indirectly by depression (path coefficient = -0.115, p<0.01) and diabetes distress (path coefficient = -0.122, p<0.001) via self-efficacy. In conclusion, to improve self-care practices, effort must be focused on enhancing self-efficacy levels, while not forgetting to deal with depression and diabetes distress, especially among those with poorer levels of self-efficacy. PMID:28362861

  7. Self-care and depression in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Holzapfel, Nicole; Löwe, Bernd; Wild, Beate; Schellberg, Dieter; Zugck, Christian; Remppis, Andrew; Katus, Hugo A; Haass, Markus; Rauch, Bernhard; Jünger, Jana; Herzog, Wolfgang; Müller-Tasch, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Although chronic heart failure (CHF) is often complicated by comorbid depression and poor self-care, little is known about their specific association in patients with CHF. To investigate self-care behavior among patients with CHF with different degrees of depression severity. A total of 287 patients with documented CHF, New York Heart Association functional class II to IV, completed the European Heart Failure Self-Care Behavior Scale. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM (SCID) IV served as the criterion standard for the presence of a depressive disorder. Analyses of covariance and linear regression analyses revealed that patients with CHF with minor depression reported significantly lower levels of self-care than patients with major depression (P = .003) and nondepressed patients (P = .014). In addition to minor depression, age (P < or = .001), multimorbidity (P = .01), left ventricular ejection fraction (P = .001), and family status (P = .01) were determinants of self-care. Our results demonstrate that patients with CHF with minor depression and not major depression are at higher risk for poor self-care and its resulting consequences, such as symptom deterioration and frequent hospitalization.

  8. Social support and self-care activities among the elderly patients with diabetes in Kelantan.

    PubMed

    Ahmad Sharoni, S K; Shdaifat, E A; Mohd Abd Majid, H A; Shohor, N A; Ahmad, F; Zakaria, Z

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is common among the elderly and can significantly affect their lives including the issues related with social support and diabetic self-care activities. The objective of this study was to examine the social support and self-care activities among the elderly patients with diabetes. A survey involving 200 patients was conducted from March 2013 to May 2013 in three hospitals in Kelantan. Data were obtained through self-administered questionnaires and clinical characteristics were acquired from the patients' records. The scores for social support (mean = 19.26; SD = 2.63) and self-care activities (mean = 14.83; SD = 4.92) were moderate. Higher social support was associated with high levels of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting blood sugar (FBS) level, the duration of diabetes and a decrease in body mass index (BMI) (p<0.05). It was observed that the patients with low educational, Hb1Ac and FBS level, with other chronic diseases and who have had diabetes for some time had low self-care activities (p<0.05). There was a significant negative relationship between an increase in social support and decrease in self-care activity (p<0.05). Healthcare providers, family and friends have to strengthen their relationship with the elderly patients with diabetes to provide more social support and promote the compliance with diabetic self-care activities to improve clinical outcomes.

  9. Brief report: self-care behaviors of children with type 1 diabetes living in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Streisand, Randi; Respess, Deedrah; Overstreet, Stacy; Gonzalez de Pijem, Lilliam; Chen, Ru San; Holmes, Clarissa

    2002-12-01

    To examine self-care behaviors among children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes living in Puerto Rico, to determine the relationship between self-care and demographic variables, and to investigate the utility of the 24-hour recall interview within a Hispanic population. Forty-one children (M age = 12.6 years) with type 1 diabetes, and their mothers, were administered the 24-hour recall interview on three separate occasions to assess diabetes-related self-care behaviors. Children reported self-care behaviors that included daily administration of an average of two insulin injections and two blood glucose tests, and consumption of 5.5 meals a day comprised of 52% carbohydrates and 29% fat. Younger age, female gender, longer illness duration, and better metabolic control were associated with higher rates of several self-care behaviors. Data provide a first look at self-care behaviors of children with type 1 diabetes living in Puerto Rico and suggest the utility of the 24-hour recall interview within this population.

  10. Construct validity of the Chinese version of the Self-care of Heart Failure Index determined using structural equation modeling.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiaofeng; Dennison Himmelfarb, Cheryl R; Li, Zheng; Zhang, Jian; Lv, Rong; Guo, Jinyu

    2015-01-01

    The Self-care of Heart Failure Index (SCHFI) is an empirically tested instrument for measuring the self-care of patients with heart failure. The aim of this study was to develop a simplified Chinese version of the SCHFI and provide evidence for its construct validity. A total of 182 Chinese with heart failure were surveyed. A 2-step structural equation modeling procedure was applied to test construct validity. Factor analysis showed 3 factors explaining 43% of the variance. Structural equation model confirmed that self-care maintenance, self-care management, and self-care confidence are indeed indicators of self-care, and self-care confidence was a positive and equally strong predictor of self-care maintenance and self-care management. Moreover, self-care scores were correlated with the Partners in Health Scale, indicating satisfactory concurrent validity. The Chinese version of the SCHFI is a theory-based instrument for assessing self-care of Chinese patients with heart failure.

  11. Self-Care for Older People (SCOPE): a cluster randomized controlled trial of self-care training and health outcomes in low-income elderly in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chan, Angelique; Matchar, David B; Tsao, Mary Ann; Harding, Susana; Chiu, Chi-Tsun; Tay, Bryan; Raman, Prassanna; Pietryla, Zachary; Klein, Mara K; Haldane, Victoria Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Population aging is associated with a higher prevalence of chronic health conditions. Previous studies have shown that older persons, specifically those with chronic conditions, often lack sufficient knowledge about their condition and thus frequently have poor self-care skills. Efforts to increase general health screenings and improve access to chronic condition management resources are hampered by a lack of disease and health awareness. Self-Care for Older People (SCOPE) study, a cluster randomized controlled trial in Singapore, was designed to evaluate the impact of a self-care program for chronic disease awareness and management of specific health measures and quality of life of older people over eighteen months. SCOPE provided self-care education targeted at older people with low income and low education in order to improve health-related knowledge. A total of 378 low-income older people with no or minimal disability, defined as having difficulty in one or more activities of daily living (ADL), were recruited from senior activity centers. The measurements taken included self-reported health conditions, health and disease knowledge questions, and biomarkers (HbA1c, blood pressure, peak expiratory flow, lipid panel, albumin, and creatinine). SCOPE was also designed to provide information for policy makers on chronic disease burden and healthcare facility utilization among community-dwelling older adults. NCT01672177. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Exploring the activity profile of health care assistants and nurses in home nursing.

    PubMed

    De Vliegher, Kristel; Aertgeerts, Bert; Declercq, Anja; Moons, Philip

    2015-12-01

    Are home nurses (also known as community nurses) ready for their changing role in primary care? A quantitative study was performed in home nursing in Flanders, Belgium, to explore the activity profile of home nurses and health care assistants, using the 24-hour recall instrument for home nursing. Seven dates were determined, covering each day of the week and the weekend, on which data collection would take place. All the home nurses and health care assistants from the participating organisations across Flanders were invited to participate in the study. All data were measured at nominal level. A total of 2478 home nurses and 277 health care assistants registered 336 128 (47 977 patients) and 36 905 (4558 patients) activities, respectively. Home nurses and health care assistants mainly perform 'self-care facilitation' activities in combination with 'psychosocial care' activities. Health care assistants also support home nurses in the 'selfcare facilitation' of patients who do not have a specific nursing indication.

  13. Effect of self - care education on quality of life in patients with primary hypertension: comparing lecture and educational package.

    PubMed

    Aghajani, Mohamad; Mirbagher Ajorpaz, Neda; Kafaei Atrian, Mahbube; Raofi, Zahra; Abedi, Fatemeh; Naeimi Vartoni, Sajad; Soleimani, Akbar

    2013-12-01

    Hypertension is a dangerous risk factor for public health. It profoundly affects the patients' quality of life. However, there is lack of agreement on the best method for self-care management in patients with hypertension. This study was conducted to compare the effect of lecture and educational pamphlets on quality of life (QOL) in patients with primary hypertension. A quasi-experimental study was performed on 90 patients with chronic primary hypertension referred to two outpatient clinics in Kashan city. Patients were randomly divided into three groups including lecture group, educational package group, and control group. The participants' quality of life was measured using the SF-36 questionnaire at the beginning of the study, and two months later. Data was analyzed using ANOVA and Chi-Square tests. No significant differences were observed between the three groups for demographics characteristics and QOL before the intervention except for marital status. Mean scores of QOL dimensions of the intervention groups were increased at the end of the study, except for the dimension of bodily pain. Tukey post-Hoc test showed that except for general health, the two intervention groups were not significantly different in other dimensions, and significant differences were observed between the control group and the two intervention groups (P < 0.05). At start and the end of the study, the mean differences in the general health dimension in three groups were 2.25 ± 0.1, 0.07 ± 0.01, and -1.70 ± 0.01 respectively. There were significant differences among groups (P = 0.04). Lecture and educational package can both improve some dimensions of the QOL in patients with hypertension. However, as pamphlets are cheap and easy to use, this method may be used as an effective method for self-care education in health care settings in Iran, where the system is faced with nursing shortage.

  14. Family involvement is helpful and harmful to patients’ self-care and glycemic control

    PubMed Central

    Mayberry, Lindsay Satterwhite; Osborn, Chandra Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We assessed the relationships between supportive and obstructive family behaviors and patients’ diabetes self-care activities and HbA1C, and potential interaction effects and differences by demographic characteristics. Methods In a cross-sectional study, 192 adults with type 2 diabetes completed the Diabetes Family Behavior Checklist-II, the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities, and a glycemic control (HbA1C) test. Results Participants reported similar rates of supportive and obstructive behaviors that were positively correlated (rho=0.61, p<.001). In adjusted analyses, supportive family behaviors were associated with adherence to different self-care behaviors (β=0.20–0.50, p<.05), whereas obstructive family behaviors were associated with less adherence to self-care behaviors (β=−0.28–−0.39, p<.01) and worse HbA1C (β=0.18, p<.05). Supportive behaviors protected against the detrimental effect of obstructive behaviors on HbA1C (interaction β=−0.22, p<.001). Non-Whites reported more supportive and obstructive behaviors than Whites, but race did not affect the relationships between family behaviors and self-care or HbA1C. Conclusion Involving family members in patients’ diabetes management may compromise patients’ self-care and glycemic control unless family members are taught to avoid obstructive behaviors. Practice Implications Our findings endorse interventions that help family members develop actionable plans to support patients’ self-care and train them to communicate productively about diabetes management. PMID:25282327

  15. Family involvement is helpful and harmful to patients' self-care and glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Mayberry, Lindsay Satterwhite; Osborn, Chandra Y

    2014-12-01

    We assessed the relationships between supportive and obstructive family behaviors and patients' diabetes self-care activities and HbA1C, and potential interaction effects and differences by demographic characteristics. In a cross-sectional study, 192 adults with type 2 diabetes completed the Diabetes Family Behavior Checklist-II, the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities, and a glycemic control (HbA1C) test. Participants reported similar rates of supportive and obstructive behaviors that were positively correlated (rho=0.61, p<0.001). In adjusted analyses, supportive family behaviors were associated with adherence to different self-care behaviors (β=0.20 to 0.50, p<0.05), whereas obstructive family behaviors were associated with less adherence to self-care behaviors (β=-0.28 to -0.39, p<0.01) and worse HbA1C (β=0.18, p<0.05). Supportive behaviors protected against the detrimental effect of obstructive behaviors on HbA1C (interaction β=-0.22, p<0.001). Non-Whites reported more supportive and obstructive behaviors than Whites, but race did not affect the relationships between family behaviors and self-care or HbA1C. Involving family members in patients' diabetes management may impede patients' self-care and compromise their glycemic control unless family members are taught to avoid obstructive behaviors. Our findings endorse interventions that help family members develop actionable plans to support patients' self-care and train them to communicate productively about diabetes management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cross-cultural Adaptation of the Self-care of Hypertension Inventory Into Brazilian Portuguese.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Luana Claudia Jacoby; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane; Ávila, Christiane Whast; Beltrami Moreira, Leila; Dickson, Victoria Vaughan; Riegel, Barbara

    Lifestyle changes and treatment adherence still constitute a challenge to healthcare providers involved in the care of persons with hypertension. The lack of validated instruments measuring the ability of hypertensive patients to manage their disease has slowed research progress in this area. The Self-care of Hypertension Inventory, originally developed in the United States, consists of 23 items divided across 3 scales: Self-care Maintenance, Self-care Management, and Self-care Confidence. These scales measure how well patients with hypertension adhere to treatment and manage elevated blood pressure, as well as their confidence in their ability to perform self-care. A rigorous cross-cultural adaptation and validation process is required before this instrument can be used in other countries. The aims of this study were to translate the Self-care of Hypertension Inventory into Brazilian Portuguese with cross-cultural adaptation and to evaluate interobserver reliability and temporal stability. This methodological study involved forward translation, synthesis of forward translations, back-translation, synthesis of back-translations, expert committee review, and pretesting. Interobserver agreement and the temporal stability of the scales were assessed. The expert committee proposed semantic and cultural modifications to some items and the addition of guidance statements to facilitate administration of the scale. Interobserver analysis demonstrated substantial agreement. Analysis of temporal stability showed near-perfect agreement. Cross-cultural adaptation of the Self-care of Hypertension Inventory successfully produced a Portuguese-language version of the instrument for further evaluation of psychometric properties. Once that step is completed, the scale can be used in Brazil.

  17. Motivational techniques to improve self-care in hemophilia: the need to support autonomy in children.

    PubMed

    Bérubé, Sarah; Mouillard, Florine; Amesse, Claudine; Sultan, Serge

    2016-01-11

    In pediatric hemophilia, caregivers are facing unique challenges to adherence and self-care in children and adolescents with hemophilia. Hemophilia treatment requires adequate prophylaxis and on-demand treatment, as well as a clear behavioral strategy to limit risk-taking in terms of physical exercise and diet. Medication adherence rates of hemophilia patients have been reported to decrease during late childhood and adolescence. In the developing child, moving safely from parent-care to self-care is one of the greatest challenges of integrative care within this domain. There is a clear need for initiatives designed to increase an individual's motivation for treatment and self-care activities. Among motivational approaches, the self-determination perspective offers a useful framework to explain how the transition to self-care can be facilitated. We discuss how motivation regarding hemophilia treatment may be increased through parental autonomy support and we offer examples of applied communication techniques to facilitate autonomy-supportive caregiving. Although it has not yet been tested in the context of hemophilia, these communication techniques could potentially help caregivers promote adherence and self-care in children. Confronted by unique challenges to adherence and self-care, caregivers of children with hemophilia should move from an exclusive focus on illness-management education to an integrative strategy, including motivation-enhancing communication. The self-determination perspective provides important proximal objectives (e.g. autonomy support) to maintain optimal adherence in adolescents as they move from parent-care to self-care. Future research initiatives should address the practice of these communication techniques and evaluate them in the context of hemophilia.

  18. Self-care behavior of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Bandar Abbas in 2015.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Fatemeh; Abedini, Sedigheh; Mohseni, Shokrollah

    2017-11-01

    Diabetes self-care helps to control the blood sugar which, in turn, results in a better state of health. However, more than 50% of diabetic patients do not have self-care capabilities. To determine type 2 diabetes self-care capabilities among patients visiting a Bandar Abbas diabetes clinic in 2016. The present descriptive-analytical research was of a cross-sectional type. The sample was comprised of 120 patients afflicted with type 2 diabetes, who had been selected through the simple randomized sampling method. The data collection instrument was a questionnaire comprised of two sections: demographic information, and a summary of patients' diabetes self-care activities. A 7-point Likert scale was used for the rating. The final score would be interpreted as any of the three levels: good (acceptable) (75-100), moderate (50-74) and poor (below 50). The data entered SPSS version 18.0 for the required statistical analyses. The mean age of the sample was 51.88±10.12 years. Of the 120 subjects, 86 were female (71.7%) and 34 were male (28.3%). The findings revealed that the self-care capability of 83 subjects (69.2%) was poor; capability of 28 subjects was moderate (23.3%) and the same score of good/acceptable in 9 subjects (7.5%). The results of the present research indicate that a large number of diabetic patients have a poor self-care capability. Due to the key role of such activities in a diabetic patient's life, it is suggested to include educational programs to increase the level of self-care capabilities among these patients.

  19. Self-care strategies for emotional distress among young adults in Catalonia: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Martorell-Poveda, Maria-Antonia; Martinez-Hernáez, Angel; Carceller-Maicas, Natalia; Correa-Urquiza, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Emotional distress is common in adolescence, and self-care strategies are frequently preferred to address it. The aim of this article is to analyze the self-care strategies among adolescents and young people diagnosed with depression or with self-perceived depressive distress in Catalonia using a qualitative design. We analyzed the self-care strategies of 105 young people (17-21 years of age) in Catalonia who had participated in a national survey on adolescents. The sample was divided into thirds, with 37 who had a previous diagnosis of depression, 33 who had self-perceived emotional distress, and 35 controls. The participants' narratives on self-care strategies for emotional distress were elicited through in-depth semi-structured interviews. The data were managed using ATLAS-Ti 6.5 software18. We applied hermeneutic theory and the ethnographic method to analyze the interviews. The ten self-care strategies identified in the analysis were grouped into four areas covering the various pathways the young people followed according to whether they had a diagnosis of depression or their depressive distress was self-perceived. The young people feel responsible for their emotional distress and consider that they are capable of resolving it through their own resources. Their strategies ranged from their individuality to sociability expressed through their relationships with others, membership of groups or other self-care strategies (relaxation, meditation, naturopathy, etc.). The study results highlight the importance of sensitivity in considering young people's self-care strategies as another option in the care of emotional distress.

  20. Food insecurity is associated with diabetes self-care behaviours and glycaemic control.

    PubMed

    Heerman, W J; Wallston, K A; Osborn, C Y; Bian, A; Schlundt, D G; Barto, S D; Rothman, R L

    2016-06-01

    Food insecurity is the 'limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods'. Our objective was to examine the association between food insecurity, diabetes self-care and glycaemic control. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from adult patients with Type 2 diabetes who were enrolled in a randomized trial evaluating a health literacy-focused diabetes intervention in safety net primary care clinics in middle Tennessee. Food insecurity was assessed with three items from the U.S. Household Food Security Survey. Diabetes self-care behaviours were assessed with the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Scale, Personal Diabetes Questionnaire and Adherence to Refills and Medication Scale. Glycaemic control was assessed with HbA1c . The sample consisted of 401 participants, 73% of whom reported some level of food insecurity. Food insecurity was significantly associated with self-care behaviours including less adherence to a general diet [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) 0.9, P = 0.02], less physical activity (AOR 0.9, P = 0.04) and with a greater occurrence of medication non-adherence (AOR 1.2, P = 0.002) and calorie restriction (AOR 1.1, P = 0.02). Food insecurity was also associated with worse glycaemic control (adjusted β = 0.1, P = 0.03). None of the self-care behaviours were significantly associated with HbA1c , limiting the ability to test for self-care as a mechanism linking food insecurity to glycaemic control. There was a high rate of food insecurity in a sample of patients with Type 2 diabetes who were of low socio-economic status. Food insecurity was associated with less adherence to recommended self-care behaviours and worse glycaemic control. © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  1. Self-care and quality of life of heart failure patients at a multidisciplinary heart function clinic.

    PubMed

    Seto, Emily; Leonard, Kevin J; Cafazzo, Joseph A; Masino, Caterina; Barnsley, Jan; Ross, Heather J

    2011-01-01

    Multidisciplinary heart function clinics aim to improve self-care through patient education and to provide clinical management. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the self-care and quality of life of patients attending a multidisciplinary heart function clinic and to explore the relationship between self-care and quality of life. One hundred outpatients attending a multidisciplinary heart function clinic were asked to complete a questionnaire. The questionnaire included the Self-care of Heart Failure Index (SCHFI) and the Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire, which were used to assess self-care behavior and quality of life, respectively. Self-care practices and perceived barriers were also assessed through semistructured interviews with each patient. : The returned questionnaires (n = 94) were used to compute the following SCHFI maintenance, management, and confidence scores: 60.8 (SD, 19.3), 62.0 (SD, 20.7), and 55.9 (SD, 19.7), respectively. Higher SCHFI scores indicate better self-care. None of the self-care dimensions reached the self-care adequacy cut point of 70. The average score on the Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire was 49.9 (SD, 25.4), indicating a moderate health-related quality of life. Lower ejection fraction, older age, and better quality of life were associated with better self-care. Determinants of better quality of life were older age, better functional capacity, higher self-care confidence, and fewer comorbidities. The patient interviews revealed that better quality of life is associated with higher self-care confidence and barriers to self-care caused anxiety to the patients. The self-care barriers were found to include lack of self-care education, financial constraints, lack of perceived benefit, and low self-efficacy. Patients attending a large multidisciplinary Canadian heart failure clinic do not perform adequate self-care as measured with the SCHFI and report only a moderate quality of life

  2. Evaluation of internet-based technology for supporting self-care: problems encountered by patients and caregivers when using self-care applications.

    PubMed

    Nijland, Nicol; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia; Boer, Henk; Steehouder, Michaël F; Seydel, Erwin R

    2008-05-15

    Prior studies have shown that many patients are interested in Internet-based technology that enables them to control their own care. As a result, innovative eHealth services are evolving rapidly, including self-assessment tools and secure patient-caregiver email communication. It is interesting to explore how these technologies can be used for supporting self-care. The aim of this study was to determine user-centered criteria for successful application of Internet-based technology used in primary care for supporting self-care. We conducted scenario-based tests combined with in-depth interviews among 14 caregivers and 14 patients/consumers to describe the use of various self-care applications and the accompanying user problems. We focused on the user-friendliness of the applications, the quality of care provided by the applications, and the implementation of the applications in practice. Problems with the user-friendliness of the self-care applications concerned inadequate navigation structures and search options and lack of feedback features. Patients want to retrieve health information with as little effort as possible; however, the navigation and search functionalities of the applications appeared incapable of handling patients' health complaints efficiently. Among caregivers, the lack of feedback and documentation possibilities caused inconvenience. Caregivers wanted to know how patients acted on their advice, but the applications did not offer an adequate feedback feature. Quality of care problems were mainly related to insufficient tailoring of information to patients' needs and to efficiency problems. Patients expected personalized advice to control their state of health, but the applications failed to deliver this. Language (semantics) also appeared as an obstacle to providing appropriate and useful self-care advice. Caregivers doubted the reliability of the computer-generated information and the efficiency and effectiveness of secure email consultation

  3. Evaluation of Internet-Based Technology for Supporting Self-Care: Problems Encountered by Patients and Caregivers When Using Self-Care Applications

    PubMed Central

    van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia; Boer, Henk; Steehouder, Michaël F; Seydel, Erwin R

    2008-01-01

    Background Prior studies have shown that many patients are interested in Internet-based technology that enables them to control their own care. As a result, innovative eHealth services are evolving rapidly, including self-assessment tools and secure patient-caregiver email communication. It is interesting to explore how these technologies can be used for supporting self-care. Objective The aim of this study was to determine user-centered criteria for successful application of Internet-based technology used in primary care for supporting self-care. Methods We conducted scenario-based tests combined with in-depth interviews among 14 caregivers and 14 patients/consumers to describe the use of various self-care applications and the accompanying user problems. We focused on the user-friendliness of the applications, the quality of care provided by the applications, and the implementation of the applications in practice. Results Problems with the user-friendliness of the self-care applications concerned inadequate navigation structures and search options and lack of feedback features. Patients want to retrieve health information with as little effort as possible; however, the navigation and search functionalities of the applications appeared incapable of handling patients’ health complaints efficiently. Among caregivers, the lack of feedback and documentation possibilities caused inconvenience. Caregivers wanted to know how patients acted on their advice, but the applications did not offer an adequate feedback feature. Quality of care problems were mainly related to insufficient tailoring of information to patients’ needs and to efficiency problems. Patients expected personalized advice to control their state of health, but the applications failed to deliver this. Language (semantics) also appeared as an obstacle to providing appropriate and useful self-care advice. Caregivers doubted the reliability of the computer-generated information and the efficiency and

  4. Applications of and Barriers to Holistic Self-Care in a Low-Income, High-Risk Obstetric Population.

    PubMed

    Rhoades, Katherine; Telliard, Sarah; Thomas, Tiffany Stanfill; Barkin, Jennifer L

    We examined 1) women's perceptions regarding self-care, 2) applications of self-care, and 3) barriers to practicing effective self-care. Four focus groups were conducted in a low-income, pregnant population. Focus group recruitment and discussions took place at a large medical center in a medically underserved area of central Georgia. Thirty-two adult pregnant women attending a high-risk obstetric clinic were included. Data related to holistic self-care were identified and grouped into one of three categories: women's valuations of self-care, applications of self-care, and barriers to self-care. The results were synthesized and compared to results from a study of postpartum women in which the same analytic framework for examining self-care practice was applied. Although women tended to understand the importance of self-care, they had difficulty practicing all forms of self-care on a regular basis owing to financial constraints, limited family support, health complications due to their high-risk obstetric status, external commitments, and childcare and household responsibilities. Applications of self-care were typically inexpensive and mainly required time rather than money. Socioeconomic status seems to influence the specific applications of and barriers to self-care. Health care providers should be aware of existing low-cost resources in the community that may assist prospective and new mothers in tending to their own emotional and physical needs. Providers should also discuss the importance of self-care with women during the perinatal period. Efforts should be made to educate school administrators regarding the impact of spontaneous requests for money for school activities, supplies, and field trips on the family budget. Copyright © 2016 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of tailored educational intervention to improve self-care maintenance and quality of life in postmenopausal osteoporotic women after a fragility fracture: the Guardian Angel® study.

    PubMed

    Basilici Zannetti, Emanuela; D'Agostino, Fabio; Cittadini, Noemi; Feola, Maurizio; Pennini, Annalisa; Rao, Cecilia; Vellone, Ercole; Tarantino, Umberto; Alvaro, Rosaria

    2017-01-01

    Osteoporosis has a significant impact on affected patients. Healthcare providers should encourage postmenopausal women to improve self-care maintenance behaviors and quality of life following a fragility fracture. The aims of this study were to a) develop two new instruments for measuring, respectively, self-care maintenance and quality of life, in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis; b) evaluate the effectiveness of a tailored educational intervention to improve self-care maintenance and quality of life after a fragility fracture in postmenopausal women. For the first aim, a cross-sectional study will be performed; for the second aim, a multicenter, quasi-experimental, interventional design will be used. A convenience sample of postmenopausal women admitted to 44 hospitals in Italy with a diagnosis of bone fragility fracture will be enrolled and surveyed at 7, 30, 60 and 180 days after discharge. Trained nurses will conduct the educational intervention. The new instruments will allow the measurement of self-care and quality of life in postmenopausal women following a fragility fracture. Through tailored educational interventions, women can be helped to take their medications correctly, adopt a healthy lifestyle, reduce the occurrence of bone fractures, and have a better quality of life.

  6. Correlate of self-care and self-neglect among community-dwelling older adults

    PubMed Central

    Mardan, Homa; Hamid, TengkuAizan; Redzuan, Ma’rof; Ibrahim, Rahimah

    2014-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of self-neglect among the elderly is expected to rise with a rapid increase in the growth of the older population. However, self-neglect in the elderly and the factors related to it are not fully understood due to the limited research in the area, lack of consensus in the definition of the concept, and limited instrumentation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between selected socio-demographic factors on self-care and self-neglect among older persons living in the community. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey design with cluster sampling was adopted for the study. Data were gathered from 201 older persons aged 60 years and over in the state of Selangor, Malaysia, through face-to-face interviews in their homes with a team of trained enumerators. A new instrument was developed to measure self-neglect. Results: The internal consistency of the new instrument showed a reliability of 0.90. A significant bivariate relationship was noted between self-care and self-neglect. The socio-demographic factors were also reported between self-care and self-neglect. Conclusions: The new instrument of elder self-neglect (ESN) could be used to measure self-neglect in a community dwelling. The need to increase the self-care skills and the capacity of self-care among older adults is crucial in order to reduce self-neglect and enhance their well-being. PMID:25949256

  7. Self-caring of women with osteoarthritis living at different levels of independence.

    PubMed

    Baird, Carol L; Schmeiser, Donna; Yehle, Karen T

    2003-08-01

    Successful management of chronic conditions such as osteoarthritis (OA) may improve health and quality of life and foster independence. Health professionals need to understand what women do to manage their OA by self-caring in order to support the improvement of health in older adults. A descriptive study of difficulties of living with and self-caring of OA was conducted. Sixty women over 65 years old who lived in homes in the community, in assisted living (AL) apartments, and in long-term care (LTC) facilities participated in interviews. Data were the reports of symptoms and self-caring behaviors. Descriptive, Kendall tau-b and tau-c, and chi-square analyses revealed that there were similarities and differences among the women. All of the women used a variety of self-caring techniques. Differences included that community-residing women reported more often that they had pain, moved too slowly, and had sleep disturbances. Community-residing women reported more negative emotions, while reporting significantly more often that they used a wide range of positive coping methods. By anticipating severe physical and functional problems of living with OA and difficulties in self-caring, health care providers may help women maintain an independent lifestyle.

  8. Religious Practices and Self-Care in Iranian Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Saeide; Rezaei, Mahboubeh; Sajadi, Mahbobeh; Ajorpaz, Neda Mirbagher; Koenig, Harold G

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to examine the relationship between religious practices and self-care of patients with type 2 diabetes. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted on 154 diabetic patients who were referred to two general teaching hospitals in Qom City (Iran). Data were collected using demographic questionnaire, private and public religious practices, and summary of diabetes self-care activities questionnaires. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and statistical tests including independent t test, and Pearson correlation coefficient. Significant positive correlations were observed between religious practices and self-care activities in diabetic patients (p < 0.05). Significant positive correlations were also found between some religious practices and self-care activities subscales (p < 0.05). Healthcare providers should be aware of the role that religion plays in the lives of diabetic patients and be able to take religious factors into account when developing care plans. Doing so will enhance a more patient-centered approach and thereby support patients in their role as self-care decision-makers.

  9. Measuring Self-Care in Persons With Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Xu, Jiayun; Zhao, Weigang; Han, Hae-Ra

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review examines the characteristics and psychometric properties of the instruments used to assess self-care behaviors among persons with type 2 diabetes. Electronic databases were searched for relevant studies published in English within the past 20 years. Thirty different instruments were identified in 75 articles: 18 original instruments on type 2 diabetes mellitus self-care, 8 translated or revised version, and 4 not specific but relevant to diabetes. Twenty-one instruments were multidimensional and addressed multiple dimensions of self-care behavior. Nine were unidimensional: three focusing exclusively on medication taking, three on diet, one on physical activity, one on self-monitoring of blood glucose, and one on oral care. Most instruments (22 of 30) were developed during the last decade. Only 10 were repeated more than once. Nineteen of the 30 instruments reported both reliability and validity information but with varying degrees of rigor. In conclusion, most instruments used to measure self-care were relatively new and had been applied to only a limited number of studies with incomplete psychometric profiles. Rigorous psychometric testing, operational definition of self-care, and sufficient explanation of scoring need to be considered for further instrument development. PMID:26130465

  10. The relationship between self-efficacy and diabetic foot self-care.

    PubMed

    Wendling, Stacey; Beadle, Vera

    2015-03-01

    Research has shown that the ongoing rate of diabetes-related amputations remains significant despite the existence of prevention methods and that amputation in most cases can be prevented. The purpose of the study was to assess the relationship between the level of self-efficacy and performance of foot self-care in those with diabetes as they relate to the prevention of lower extremity amputation (LEA). A descriptive correlational study was conducted using the theoretical framework of Bandura's social cognitive theory. The Foot Care Confidence Scale (FCCS) and the Nottingham Assessment of Functional Footcare (NAFF) survey instruments were distributed to individuals over 18 years old with diabetes Type 1 and 2 in the lower peninsula of Michigan ( N  = 223). No significant correlation was identified between the level of self-efficacy and performance of foot self-care behaviors. Statistical significance was found between foot self-care behaviors and gender with males scoring higher than females. This study adds to the body of knowledge regarding self-efficacy and diabetic foot self-care behaviors. Further research is needed to explore the relationship of gender, diabetes education attendance, and foot self-care behaviors as influencing factors in LEA prevention.

  11. The Relationship between Religious Coping and Self-Care Behaviors in Iranian Medical Students.

    PubMed

    Sharif Nia, Hamid; Pahlevan Sharif, Saeed; Goudarzian, Amir Hossein; Allen, Kelly A; Jamali, Saman; Heydari Gorji, Mohammad Ali

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, researchers have identified that coping strategies are an important contributor to an individual's life satisfaction and ability to manage stress. The positive relationship between religious copings, specifically, with physical and mental health has also been identified in some studies. Spirituality and religion have been discussed rigorously in research, but very few studies exist on religious coping. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between religious coping methods (i.e., positive and negative religious coping) and self-care behaviors in Iranian medical students. This study used a cross-sectional design of 335 randomly selected students from Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Iran. A data collection tool comprised of the standard questionnaire of religious coping methods and questionnaire of self-care behaviors assessment was utilized. Data were analyzed using a two-sample t test assuming equal variances. Adjusted linear regression was used to evaluate the independent association of religious copings with self-care. Adjusted linear regression model indicated an independent significant association between positive (b = 4.616, 95% CI 4.234-4.999) and negative (b = -3.726, 95% CI -4.311 to -3.141) religious coping with self-care behaviors. Findings showed a linear relationship between religious coping and self-care behaviors. Further research with larger sample sizes in diverse populations is recommended.

  12. Correlate of self-care and self-neglect among community-dwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Mardan, Homa; Hamid, TengkuAizan; Redzuan, Ma'rof; Ibrahim, Rahimah

    2014-02-01

    The prevalence of self-neglect among the elderly is expected to rise with a rapid increase in the growth of the older population. However, self-neglect in the elderly and the factors related to it are not fully understood due to the limited research in the area, lack of consensus in the definition of the concept, and limited instrumentation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between selected socio-demographic factors on self-care and self-neglect among older persons living in the community. A cross-sectional survey design with cluster sampling was adopted for the study. Data were gathered from 201 older persons aged 60 years and over in the state of Selangor, Malaysia, through face-to-face interviews in their homes with a team of trained enumerators. A new instrument was developed to measure self-neglect. The internal consistency of the new instrument showed a reliability of 0.90. A significant bivariate relationship was noted between self-care and self-neglect. The socio-demographic factors were also reported between self-care and self-neglect. The new instrument of elder self-neglect (ESN) could be used to measure self-neglect in a community dwelling. The need to increase the self-care skills and the capacity of self-care among older adults is crucial in order to reduce self-neglect and enhance their well-being.

  13. The importance of health belief models in determining self-care behaviour in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Harvey, J N; Lawson, V L

    2009-01-01

    Patients' self-care behaviours have a major role in diabetes management. Diabetes education provides the required knowledge, but despite this, self-care is often suboptimal. The degree to which patients follow advice as regards the various self-care behaviours is determined by their health beliefs (Illness Representations or Personal Models) of diabetes. Psychometric studies have tried to categorize and measure the beliefs about illness that influence patients to adhere to treatment recommendations in diabetes. Various models have been proposed to explain the relationship between beliefs and behaviour. Leventhal's Self-Regulatory Model, which takes account of the emotional as well as the objective rational response to illness, currently seems to offer the best system for identifying the determinants of patient self-care behaviour. A review of interventions indicates those based on psychological theory offer professionals the best chance of maximizing their patients' contribution to diabetes self-management and achieving improved outcomes, both glycaemic and psychosocial. Studies designed specifically to modify illness representations are now being undertaken. This brief review aims to summarize developments in this area of psychological theory over the last 20 years and the implications for promoting better self-care behaviour in diabetes.

  14. Self-care resources and activity as predictors of quality of life in persons after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Baas, Linda S

    2004-01-01

    An ex post facto correlational study was conducted to examine predictors of quality of life in persons 3 to 6 months after a myocardial infarction. Self-care resources, self-care knowledge (needs), activity level, and selected demographic variables were examined as predictor variables. A convenience sample of 86 subjects with a mean age of 61 years, was recruited for participation in this study. The study that explained 35% of the variance in quality of life included self-care resources available, activity level, and self-care needs. Modeling and Role Modeling Paradigm provided a useful explanation of how self-care resources and self-care knowledge can be applied to persons recovering from myocardial infarction.

  15. Integration of Problem-based Learning and Innovative Technology Into a Self-Care Course

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To assess the integration of problem-based learning and technology into a self-care course. Design. Problem-based learning (PBL) activities were developed and implemented in place of lectures in a self-care course. Students used technology, such as computer-generated virtual patients and iPads, during the PBL sessions. Assessments. Students’ scores on post-case quizzes were higher than on pre-case quizzes used to assess baseline knowledge. Student satisfaction with problem-based learning and the use of technology in the course remained consistent throughout the semester. Conclusion. Integrating problem-based learning and technology into a self-care course enabled students to become active learners. PMID:23966730

  16. The use of medicinal plants in self-care in the Agonlin region of Benin.

    PubMed

    Allabi, Aurel Constant; Busia, Kofi; Ekanmian, Vital; Bakiono, Fidèle

    2011-01-07

    To investigate the extent and type of medicinal plants used in self-care by the inhabitants of the Agonlin community in the Republic of Benin. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to interview a total of one thousand mothers. The prevalence rate of the use of herbal medicines in self-care was found to be 51.04%. One hundred and fourteen (114) plant species belonging to 69 families were reported, each with their local names, medicinal use, and parts used. Of all the indications of the identified plants, fever, headache, abdominal pain, and vomiting were the most frequently reported, with malaria treatment recording the highest usage of plant remedies (22%). The plant part most frequently used was the leaves. This study showed that self-care using medicinal plants is a major part of health care in the Agonlin area. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Integration of problem-based learning and innovative technology into a self-care course.

    PubMed

    McFalls, Marsha

    2013-08-12

    To assess the integration of problem-based learning and technology into a self-care course. Problem-based learning (PBL) activities were developed and implemented in place of lectures in a self-care course. Students used technology, such as computer-generated virtual patients and iPads, during the PBL sessions. Students' scores on post-case quizzes were higher than on pre-case quizzes used to assess baseline knowledge. Student satisfaction with problem-based learning and the use of technology in the course remained consistent throughout the semester. Integrating problem-based learning and technology into a self-care course enabled students to become active learners.

  18. Caring for oneself to care for others: physicians and their self-care

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Reilly, Sandra; Morrison, Laura J.; Carey, Elise; Bernacki, Rachelle; O'Neill, Lynn; Kapo, Jennifer; Periyakoil, Vyjeyanthi S.; Thomas, Jane deLima

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that clinicians experience distress and grief in response to their patients' suffering. Oncologists and palliative care specialists are no exception since they commonly experience patient loss and are often affected by unprocessed grief. These emotions can compromise clinicians' personal well-being, since unexamined emotions may lead to burnout, moral distress, compassion fatigue, and poor clinical decisions which adversely affect patient care. One approach to mitigate this harm is self-care, defined as a cadre of activities performed independently by an individual to promote and maintain personal well-being throughout life. This article emphasizes the importance of having a self-care and self-awareness plan when caring for patients with life-limiting cancer and discusses validated methods to increase self-care, enhance self-awareness and improve patient care. PMID:23967495

  19. Researcher Self-Care in Emotionally Demanding Research: A Proposed Conceptual Framework.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Smita; Cavallaro, Liz

    2018-03-01

    Researchers are emotionally and psychologically affected by emotionally demanding research that demands a tremendous amount of mental, emotional, or physical energy and potentially affects or depletes the researcher's well-being. Little attention has been given to preparing doctoral students and novice researchers engaged in such studies. Four possible types of emotionally demanding research experiences are presented: sensitive issues, personal trauma previously experienced, experience of traumatic life events during research, and unexpected events that arise during research in what was previously not identified as a sensitive issue. The need for self-care is highly relevant to each type, despite their different impacts on researcher well-being. This conceptual article furthers conversation in the field about how researchers and educators can address the need for self-care to prepare novice researchers and proposes a conceptual framework for researcher self-care in emotionally demanding research, with an aim for future empirical study.

  20. Perspectives on barriers and facilitators to self-care in Lebanese cardiac patients: A qualitative descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Dumit, Nuhad Yazbik; Noureddine, Samar Nayef; Magilvy, Joan Kathy

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Cardiac self-care practices are essential for managing cardiac illness and improving quality of life. However, these practices may be affected by factors that may hinder or facilitate self-care especially in countries that experience political and economic instabilities. The purpose of this study was to explore self-care practices among Lebanese cardiac patients. Another aim was to reveal factors that might influence these self-care practices. This is a qualitative descriptive study. Participants were recruited from a referral medical center in Beirut, Lebanon and interviews took place in their homes. Purposive sample of 15 adult participants, seven females and eight males, diagnosed with coronary artery disease at least a year ago and not in critical condition recruited from the cardiology clinics of the medical center. Data were collected through semi-structured audio-recorded interviews that took place in their places of residents. Three themes emerged from the data: I. The behaviors of cardiac patients demonstrated selected self-care practices; II. Patients identified barriers to self-care reflective of the Lebanese political and socio-economic situation; and, III. Patients described facilitators to self-care consistent with the Lebanese socio-cultural values and norms. The most common self-care practices included taking medications and eating properly. Participants emphasized avoiding stress and being upset as a self-protective measure for cardiac health. Health care costs, family responsibilities, psychological factors and the country's political situation impeded self-care practices whereas family support facilitated them. Lebanese patients reported select self-care practices in dealing with their cardiac illness. Barriers and facilitators to their self-care behaviors reflected the Lebanese context and culture. Thus health care providers must assess their patients' practices within their

  1. Illness Beliefs in End Stage Renal Disease and Associations with Self-Care Modality Choice

    PubMed Central

    Jayanti, Anuradha; Foden, Philip; Wearden, Alison; Mitra, Sandip

    2016-01-01

    Background Interest in self-care haemodialysis (HD) has increased because it improves patients’clinical and quality-of-life outcomes. Patients who undertake self-management for haemodialysis may hold illness beliefs differently to those choosing institutional care at the time of making the modality choice or moulded by their illness and dialysis treatment experience. Illness perceptions amongst predialysis patients and in those undertaking fully-assisted and self-care haemodialysis are being investigated in a combined cross-sectional and longitudinal study. Study Design The study data are derived from the BASIC-HHD study, a multicentre observational study on factors influencing home haemodialysis uptake. 535 patients were enrolled into three groups: Predialysis CKD-5 group, prevalent ‘in-centre’ HD and self-care HD groups (93% at home). We explore illness perceptions in the cross-sectional analyses of the three study groups, using the revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R). Predialysis patients’ illness beliefs were reassessed prospectively, typically between 4 and 12 months after dialysis commencement. Results Illness belief subscales are significantly different between in-centre and self-care HD groups. In a step-wise hierarchical regression analysis, after adjustment for age, education, marital status, diabetes, dialysis vintage, depression, anxiety scores, and IPQ-R subscales, personal control (p = 0.01) and illness coherence (p = 0.04) are significantly higher in the self-care HD group. In the predialysis group, no significant associations were found between illness representations and modality choices. In prospectively observed predialysis group, scores for personal control, treatment control, timeline cyclical and emotional representations reduced significantly after commencing dialysis and increased significantly for illness coherence. Conclusions Illness beliefs differ between hospital and self-care haemodialysis patients. Patient

  2. Self-Care and All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Kessing, Dionne; Denollet, Johan; Widdershoven, Jos; Kupper, Nina

    2016-03-01

    This study examined the association of self-care with all-cause mortality in a cohort of patients with chronic heart failure (HF). Although self-care is crucial to maintain health in patients with chronic HF, studies examining an association with clinical outcomes are scarce. Consecutive patients with chronic HF (n = 559, mean age 66.3 ± 9.5 years, 78% men) completed the 9-item European Heart Failure Self-care Behaviour scale. Our endpoint was all-cause mortality. Associations between self-care and all-cause mortality were assessed with Kaplan-Meier analyses and multivariable Cox regression accounting for standard sociodemographic and clinical covariates, psychological distress, and self-rated health. After a median follow-up of 5.5 ± 2.4 years (range 16 weeks to 9.9 years), 221 deaths (40%) from any cause were recorded. There was no evidence of a mortality benefit in patients high over those low in global self-care (p = 0.71). In post hoc analyses, low self-reported sodium intake was associated with increased mortality (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.47; 95% confidence interval: 1.10 to 1.96; p = 0.01). Other significant predictors of mortality were: male sex, lack of a partner, New York Heart Association functional class III to IV, and increasing comorbid conditions. Global self-care was not associated with long-term mortality whereas low self-reported sodium intake independently predicted increased all-cause mortality beyond parameters of disease severity. Replication of findings is needed as well as studies examining the correspondence of subjectively and objectively measured sodium intake and its effects on long-term prognosis in patients with chronic HF. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of patients' education on foot self-care status in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Kafaie, Parichehr; Noorbala, Mohamad Taghi; Soheilikhah, Sedigheh; Rashidi, Maryam

    2012-12-01

    Skin problems caused by neuropathy and antipathy are common manifestations of diabetes. The most serious about such problem is the diabetic foot, which may lead to eventual ulceration and amputation, and will decrease a patient's quality of life dramatically. The aim of this study is to assess the level of foot self-care and foot conditions in diabetic patients, and to demonstrate the role of self-care education in diabetic foot care. A total of 80 diabetic patients were included in the study, all of whom had referred to "Yazd Diabetic Research Center." The levels of their foot self-care were recorded in pre-test questionnaires, and then all of the patients were visited and educated by a Dermatologist for their foot self-care on a monthly basis, after which their post-test results were recorded through a second administration of the same questionnaire. Eventually, data from the pre and post-test questionnaires were analyzed to identify the possible effects of education. A total of 80 diabetic patients (34 males, 46 females) with a mean average age of 53.53 ± 10.19 and mean average duration of diabetes 12.42 ± 6.73 years were assessed. A significant increase in foot self-care through education was observed (baseline 27.06 ± 8.77, vs. post education 43.12 ± 8.77; P = 0.0001). After education, foot and nail lesions improved completely in 84% and 62.8%. Moreover, 77.8% of patients had suitable shoes and 79.6% had suitable socks. Our findings showed that foot self-care education could improve knowledge and performance of patients about various foot problems, and was significantly important in preventing ulcers.

  4. An online self-care education program to support patients after total laryngectomy: feasibility and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Cnossen, Ingrid C; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Eerenstein, Simone E J; Jansen, Femke; Witte, Birgit I; Lacko, Martin; Hardillo, José A; Honings, Jimmie; Halmos, Gyorgy B; Goedhart-Schwandt, Noortje L Q; de Bree, Remco; Leemans, C René; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of an online self-care education program supporting early rehabilitation of patients after total laryngectomy (TLPs) and factors associated with satisfaction. Health care professionals (HCPs) were invited to participate and to recruit TLPs. TLPs were informed on the self-care education program "In Tune without Cords" (ITwC) after which they gained access. A study specific survey was used (at baseline T0 and postintervention T1) on TLPs' uptake. Usage, satisfaction (general impression, willingness to use, user-friendliness, satisfaction with self-care advice and strategies, Net Promoter Score (NPS)), sociodemographic, and clinical factors were analyzed. HCPs of 6 out of 9 centers (67% uptake rate) agreed to participate and recruited TLPs. In total, 55 of 75 TLPs returned informed consent and the baseline T0 survey and were provided access to ITwC (73% uptake rate). Thirty-eight of these 55 TLPs used ITwC and completed the T1 survey (69% usage rate). Most (66%) TLPs were satisfied (i.e., score ≥7 (scale 1-10) on 4 survey items) with the self-care education program (mean score 7.2, SD 1.1). NPS was positive (+5). Satisfaction with the self-care education program was significantly associated with (higher) educational level and health literacy skills (P = .004, P = .038, respectively). No significant association was found with gender, age, marital status, employment status, Internet use, Internet literacy, treatment modality, time since total laryngectomy, and quality of life. The online self-care education program ITwC supporting early rehabilitation was feasible in clinical practice. In general, TLPs were satisfied with the program.

  5. Engaging Patients in Online Self-Care Technologies for Chronic Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Picton, Peter; Wiljer, David; Urowitz, Sara; Cafazzo, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    A common perception is that the use of Internet-based self-care systems is best suited for a younger, tech-proficient population, and that these systems will increase the burden on patients with complex chronic conditions. The study stratified patients with diabetes into three regimens of use of an Internet-based diabetes self-care portal. Results show that patients were more likely to adhere to a diurnal regimen than a variable regimen, and older patients, over the age of 60, were more adherent than younger patients, regardless of regimen. This suggests that common misconceptions should be reconsidered when prescribing Internet-based interventions for patients with chronic illness.

  6. Pharmacist intervention in patient selection of nonprescription and self-care products.

    PubMed

    Schimmelfing, John Taylor; Brookhart, Andrea L; Fountain, K Michele Brown; Goode, Jean-Venable Kelly R

    To evaluate the potential outcomes of pharmacist intervention on patient selection of nonprescription and self-care products and to evaluate patient confidence and satisfaction with the assistance of the pharmacist. A prospective, convenience sample study was conducted at 3 locations of a national supermarket chain pharmacy in the Charlottesville, Virginia, area over 4 months. Patients were recruited for the study if they approached the pharmacy counter and requested assistance with nonprescription and self-care product selection or if the investigating pharmacists approached the patient in the self-care aisles. Men and nonpregnant women age 18 years and older were included in the study. Patients self-selected into the study by agreeing to participate in the study intervention and answering questions relating to their experience with the pharmacist consultation. The study intervention was the pharmacist consultation with the patient to assess the self-care complaint and to make an appropriate recommendation. Forty-two patients participated, the mean (±SD) age was 57 ± 20.8 years, and 62% of patients were female. Sixty percent of patients had used pharmacist help in the past in selecting nonprescription and self-care products. There were 87 total potential outcomes, and a mean of 2.1 potential outcomes per patient. The most potential common outcomes were reduced drug cost, avoided physician visit, corrected product use, and avoided a new prescription. Mean patient confidence (±SD) was 4.38 ± 0.96. Mean patient satisfaction was 4.98. Every patient (100%) stated that they would be more willing to ask for pharmacist help in the future with self-care product selection. The mean encounter time was 6 minutes. Pharmacists' active involvement in patient self-care consultation may help patients to select the most effective and safe product and improve patient outcomes. Patients are highly satisfied with pharmacists' help with the selection of nonprescription and self-care

  7. Health care autonomy in children with chronic conditions: implications for self-care and family management.

    PubMed

    Beacham, Barbara L; Deatrick, Janet A

    2013-06-01

    Health care autonomy typically occurs during late adolescence but health care providers and families often expect children with chronic health conditions to master self-care earlier. Few studies have examined the development of health care autonomy as it pertains to self-care and family management. This review links the 3 concepts and discusses the implications for families and health care providers. Case studies are provided as exemplars to highlight areas where intervention and research is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Self-care agency in systemic lupus erythematosus and its associated factors: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Xie, Xia; Song, Yuqing; Nie, Anliu; Chen, Hong

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the level of self-care agency and explore its associated factors in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this cross-sectional study, all patients were from a tertiary general hospital between July and October 2016 in Southwest China. The self-care agency was assessed using the Exercise of Self-care Agency Scale. Other variables were measured by the Visual Analog Scale, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000, the physical component summary, and mental component summary of the 36-item Short Form Health Survey. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to explore the associated factors of self-care agency. A total of 123 patients were recruited. The mean score of Exercise of Self-care Agency Scale was 86.29. In univariate analysis, self-care agency of patients differed in regard to gender, work status, educational level, household income monthly per capita, and disease activity ( P <0.05). Additionally, higher body mass index, higher level of fatigue, and worse mental health were found in patients with lower self-care agency ( P <0.05). The stepwise multivariate regression analysis showed that male gender ( P =0.001), lower educational level ( P =0.003), lower household income monthly per capita ( P <0.001), and worse mental health ( P <0.001) could predict lower self-care agency. Patients with SLE had a middle level of self-care agency, suggesting that there is still much scope for improvement. The lower level of self-care agency was associated with male gender, lower educational level, lower household income monthly per capita, and worse mental health. Therefore, health care providers should develop targeted and comprehensive interventions to enhance self-care agency in patients with SLE.

  9. What Do Medical Students Do for Self-Care? A Student-Centered Approach to Well-Being.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Erin E; Omorodion, Aisha M; Nmecha, Dennis; Winseman, Jeffrey S; Mason, Hyacinth R C

    2017-01-01

    Phenomenon: Despite the promotion of medical student health and wellness through recent program and curricular changes, research continues to show that medical education is associated with decreased well-being in medical students. Although many institutions have sought to more effectively assess and improve self-care in medical students, no self-care initiatives have been designed using the explicit perspectives of students themselves. Using concept mapping methodology, the research team created a student-generated taxonomy of self-care behaviors taken from a national sample of medical students in response to a brainstorming prompt. The research team examined how students' conceptualizations of self-care may be organized into a framework suitable for use in programming and curricular change in medical education. Ten clusters of self-care activities were identified: nourishment, hygiene, intellectual and creative health, physical activity, spiritual care, balance and relaxation, time for loved ones, big picture goals, pleasure and outside activities, and hobbies. Using results of the two-dimensional scaling analysis, students' individual self-care behaviors were organized within two orthogonal dimensions of self-care activities. Insights: This concept map of student-identified self-care activities provides a starting point for better understanding and ultimately improving medical student self-care. Students' brainstormed responses fit within a framework of varying levels of social engagement and physical-psychological health that included a wide range of solitary, social, physical, and mental health behaviors. As students' preferred self-care practices did not often include programmatic activities, medical educators may benefit from consulting this map as they plan new approaches to student self-care and in counseling individual students searching for more effective ways to ease the burdens of medical school.

  10. Directly observed treatment short course (DOTS) appears to have reduced the self-care role of the-pulmonary tuberculosis patient: evidence from a correlational study between personal health beliefs (PHB) and self-care practices (SCP).

    PubMed

    Gundani, Hv; Watyoka, H; Nyathi, C; Charumbira, A P

    2010-01-01

    To examine the relationship between personal health beliefs and self-care practices among 69 PTB patients aged 25 to 65 years at a tuberculosis clinic in Zimbabwe, in order to determine the role patients can play in self-care. Analysis of collected demographic data, personal health beliefs (PH B) and self-care practices (SCP) of PTB patients. Gwanda Provincial Hospital (GPH) Tuberculosis Clinic. PTB patients in the (GPH) register who were taking treatment. Key components of the study included administration of an interview schedule to 69 PTB patients on treatment, and the analysis and comparison of personal health beliefs and self-care practices. Scores of personal health beliefs, self-care practices, perceived self-efficacy, perceived threats, and cost-benefit analysis. Sixty- nine PTB patients with a median age of 38, screened during the month of March, 2009, showed a weak positive Pearson's correlational coefficient of (R2=0.177), indicating that personal health beliefs may have some influence on self-care practices. The regression analysis showed an association of 3.1%, thus health beliefs are responsible for self-care undertaken by 3.1 in a 100 PTB patients. Directly Observed Treatment Short Course (DOTS) seems to have reduced the self-care practice of PTS patients. It seems the PTB patient has a potential role to play in the management of his own treatment.

  11. [Job burnout and contributing factors for nurses].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Wang, Zhi-ming; Wang, Mian-zhen; Lan, Ya-jia; Wu, Si-ying

    2006-07-01

    To investigate the degree of job burnout and contributing factors for nurses. A total of 495 nurses from three provincial hospitals were randomly selected. The MBI-GS, EPQ-RSC and OSI-R were administered to measure job burnout, personality traits and occupational stress, respectively. The medical and surgical nurses had significant greater scores of job burnout than others (P < 0.05). The poorer educational background was correlated with lower professional efficacy. The younger nurses had stronger feeling of job burnout. The scores of job burnout changed with different personality traits. The main contributing variables to exhaustion were overload, sense of responsibility, role insufficient and self-care (P < 0.05). The main contributing variables to cynicism were role insufficiency, role boundary, sense of responsibility and self-care (P < 0.05). The main contributing variables to professional inefficacy were role insufficiency, social support and rational/cognitive coping (P < 0.05). Job burnout for nurses can be prevented by reducing or keeping moderate professional duties and responsibility, making clearer job descriptions, promoting leisure activities, and enhancing self-care capabilities.

  12. Technology-based self-care methods of improving antiretroviral adherence: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Parya; Johnson, Mallory O

    2011-01-01

    As HIV infection has shifted to a chronic condition, self-care practices have emerged as an important topic for HIV-positive individuals in maintaining an optimal level of health. Self-care refers to activities that patients undertake to maintain and improve health, such as strategies to achieve and maintain high levels of antiretroviral adherence. Technology-based methods are increasingly used to enhance antiretroviral adherence; therefore, we systematically reviewed the literature to examine technology-based self-care methods that HIV-positive individuals utilize to improve adherence. Seven electronic databases were searched from 1/1/1980 through 12/31/2010. We included quantitative and qualitative studies. Among quantitative studies, the primary outcomes included ARV adherence, viral load, and CD4+ cell count and secondary outcomes consisted of quality of life, adverse effects, and feasibility/acceptability data. For qualitative/descriptive studies, interview themes, reports of use, and perceptions of use were summarized. Thirty-six publications were included (24 quantitative and 12 qualitative/descriptive). Studies with exclusive utilization of medication reminder devices demonstrated less evidence of enhancing adherence in comparison to multi-component methods. This systematic review offers support for self-care technology-based approaches that may result in improved antiretroviral adherence. There was a clear pattern of results that favored individually-tailored, multi-function technologies, which allowed for periodic communication with health care providers rather than sole reliance on electronic reminder devices.

  13. The Implications of Self-Creation and Self-Care in Higher Education: A Transdisciplinary Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Lesley A.

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation explores and connects the concepts of self-creation and self-care as a means to better address the evolving needs of students seeking to actualize themselves in and beyond higher education. These needs include helping students manage change, and other issues such as stress, anxiety, substance abuse, and physical health…

  14. Self-Efficacy, Planning and Action Control in an Oral Self-Care Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Guangyu; Sun, Caiyun; Knoll, Nina; Hamilton, Kyra; Schwarzer, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate a theory-guided intervention on oral self-care and examine the possible mechanisms among self-regulatory factors, two brief intervention arms were compared, an information-based education treatment and a self-regulation treatment focusing on planning and action control. Young adults (N = 284; aged 18-29 years) were assessed at baseline…

  15. A Behavioral Approach to Improving Self-Care Skills in OBS Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEvoy, Cathy L.; Patterson, Roger L.

    Traditionally, the treatment of geriatric patients suffering from Organic Brain Syndrome (OBS) has been characterized by non-therapeutic custodial care. To determine whether elderly clients with dementia can benefit from self-care skill training, and to compare their progress with clients without OBS, 30 clients of the Residential Aging Program in…

  16. Experiences of Burnout, Self-Care, and Recovery of Female University Counsellors in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yii-Nii

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the burnout, self-care, and recovery experiences of female university counsellors working at a university counselling centre in Taiwan. The 9 participants had an average age of 42.44 years and had worked at the centre for an average of 11.3 years. A qualitative method of phenomenology with in-depth…

  17. A Program Design To Motivate Individuals with SCI for Self-Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scotzin, Martha

    The report compares a skin care education program with a standard rehabilitation program to determine whether the program improved the self care motivations of spinal cord injury (SCI) paraplegic and quadriplegic inpatients (N=42). Study findings suggest that the skin care educational program was successful in changing patients' thinking about…

  18. Compassion Fatigue Risk and Self-Care Practices among Residential Treatment Center Childcare Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastwood, Callum D.; Ecklund, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    Exploration of the presence of risk for compassion fatigue among residential childcare workers (RCW) at residential treatment facilities and the relationship between self-care practices and compassion fatigue were explored. Using the Professional Quality of Life Survey (ProQOL-R III) to assess compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion…

  19. Evaluation of a Behavioral Self-Care Intervention for Public Health Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Marney A.; Mayer, Margaret; Vanderlind, W. Michael; Allswede, Dana

    2018-01-01

    Background: Postgraduate education is recognized as a time of intense stress. Rates of anxiety and depression are elevated among graduate students, and longitudinal studies have documented increases in clinical symptoms over the course of training. Purpose: The current study was to evaluate whether an academically sponsored self-care intervention…

  20. When College Students Look after Themselves: Self-Care Practices and Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Jemma; Bradley, Graham L.; O'Callaghan, Frances V.

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown that psychological well-being is positively associated with student engagement, persistence, and performance. To learn more about the behaviors that underlie well-being, 206 (predominantly female) university students completed measures of well-being and six self-care practices. Four such practices (mindful acceptance, seeking…

  1. Activation and Self-Efficacy in a Randomized Trial of a Depression Self-Care Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCusker, Jane; Lambert, Sylvie D.; Cole, Martin G.; Ciampi, Antonio; Strumpf, Erin; Freeman, Ellen E.; Belzile, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: In a sample of primary care participants with chronic physical conditions and comorbid depressive symptoms: to describe the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of activation and self-efficacy with demographic, physical and mental health status, health behaviors, depression self-care, health care utilization, and use of…

  2. Adherence to Self-Care Interventions for Depression or Anxiety: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Russell; McCusker, Jane; Sewitch, Maida

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to synthesise and describe adherence to intervention in published studies of supported self-care for depression or anxiety, and to identify participant characteristics associated with higher adherence. Methods: We searched the databases EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PSYCINFO for the period from January…

  3. Parent and Adolescent Distribution of Responsibility for Diabetes Self-care: Links to Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Kerry A.; Siminerio, Linda; Escobar, Oscar; Becker, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine the relation of adolescent and parent responsibility distribution for diabetes self-care to psychological and physical health. Methods We interviewed children (mean age 12 years) annually for 3 years and asked parents to complete a questionnaire. Both reported how diabetes self-care was distributed in the family. Amount of responsibility held by the child only, the parent only, and shared between child and parent was calculated. Psychological distress, competence, and diabetes outcomes were assessed at each wave. Results In both cross-sectional and longitudinal (lagged) analyses, multilevel modeling showed that shared responsibility was consistently associated with better psychological health, good self-care behavior, and good metabolic control, whereas child and parent responsibility were not. In some cases, links of shared responsibility to health outcomes were stronger among older adolescents. Conclusions These findings highlight the importance of shared responsibility for diabetes self-care through early to middle adolescence. PMID:17848390

  4. Self-Care through Self-Compassion: A Balm for Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coaston, Susannah C.

    2017-01-01

    Counselors are routinely exposed to painful situations and overwhelming emotions that can, over time, result in burnout. Although counselors routinely promote self-care, many struggle to practice such wellness regularly, putting themselves at increased risk for burning out. Compassion is essential to the helper's role, as it allows counselors to…

  5. Self Care Resource Corner: Its Impact on Appropriate Health Service Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClaran, Diane M.; Breakey, Robin Sarris

    In an effort to intervene before students enter the medical care system at the University of Michigan, a Self Care Resource Corner and accompanying materials were developed and implemented. The objective was to encourage students to view themselves as the primary decision makers for health-related conditions before seeking care from clinicians.…

  6. Support and Self-Care: Professional Reflections of Six New Zealand High School Counsellors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Yvonne A.; Payne, Monica A.

    2008-01-01

    In many Western societies there is increasing demand for counselling; in turn, heightened levels of support needs have been identified for counsellors themselves. Despite calls for practitioners to adopt a more proactive approach to self-care, research suggests many still pay insufficient attention to alleviating on-the-job stress or achieving…

  7. [Factors related to self-care in diabetes mellitus patients attended at emergency service in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Baquedano, Irasema Romero; dos Santos, Manoel Antônio; Teixeira, Carla Regina de Souza; Martins, Tatiane Aparecida; Zanetti, Maria Lúcia

    2010-12-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the self-care ability of individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus and to relate this capacity with some sociodemographic and clinical variables. Participants were 251 patients who attended the Emergency Service at the Mérida Regional Hospital in Yucatán, Mexico, in 2006. Data were obtained through directed home interviews, using a form, a questionnaire and the Self-Care Capacity Scale. Descriptive and correlation statistics were used for data analysis. The results showed 83 (33.5%) subjects with good and 168 (66.5%) subjects with regular ability. A directly proportional correlation was found between self-care ability and years of study (r = 0.124; p < 0.05), as well as a negative correlation for religion (rs = -0.435; p < 0.05) and evolution time of the disease (r = -0.667; p < 0.05). These variables should be taken into account to promote self-care for diabetes patients, and further research needs to be developed with a focus on other variables involved in the behavior adopted to benefit their health.

  8. Pathfinders: A Self-Care and Health Education Program for Older Widows and Widowers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caserta, Michael S.; Lund, Dale A.; Rice, Sarah Jane

    1999-01-01

    Describes a research-based self-care health education program for recently widowed people. Program aims to provide a foundation of knowledge, motivation, and encouragement to initiate positive behavioral changes, and to establish a support network. Preliminary analysis suggests the program is achieving many of the intended outcomes. (Author/JDM)

  9. Self-Care and the Qualitative Researcher: When Collecting Data Can Break Your Heart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rager, Kathleen B.

    2005-01-01

    Conducting qualitative research on topics that are emotionally laden can have a powerful impact on the researcher. Recent literature addresses the essential nature of the emotional connection that must be part of the qualitative research process. However, for the most part, it neglects the issue of self-care strategies for the researcher that are…

  10. Health, self-care and the offshore workforce - opportunities for behaviour change interventions, an epidemiological survey.

    PubMed

    Gibson Smith, Kathrine; Paudyal, Vibhu; Klein, Susan; Stewart, Derek

    2018-05-01

    The high risk nature of offshore work and inherent occupational hazards necessitate that offshore workers engage in behaviours that promote health and wellbeing. The survey aimed to assess offshore workers' health, self-care, quality of life and mental wellbeing, and to identify associated areas requiring behaviour change. Offshore workers attending a course at a training facility in Scotland were invited to complete a questionnaire comprising 11 validated measures of health, self-care, quality of life and mental wellbeing. A total of 352 offshore workers responded (completion rate 45.4%). Almost three-quarters were identified as overweight/obese (n=236, 74.4%). Median scores for SF-8 quality of life (physical=56.1, interquartile range (IQR)=4.8; mental=54.7, IQR=8.1) and Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing scales were positive (52.0, IQR=9.0). The largest proportion of participants' scores across alcohol use (n=187, 53.4%) and sleep quality (n=229, 67.0%) domains were categorised as negative. The median number of self-care domains for which offshore workers scored negatively was 3 (IQR=2.0). There are key areas relating to the health, quality of life, mental wellbeing and self-care of the offshore workforce that warrant addressing.

  11. Basic need status and health-promoting self-care behavior in adults.

    PubMed

    Acton, G J; Malathum, P

    2000-11-01

    Health-promoting self-care behavior emphasizing positive lifestyle practices may improve the health and quality of life of adults. One variable that may influence health-related decisions is the status of basic needs as described by Maslow. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among basic need satisfaction, health-promoting self-care behavior, and selected demographic variables in a sample of community-dwelling adults. A convenience sample of 84 community-dwelling adults was recruited to complete the Basic Need Satisfaction Inventory, the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II, and demographic information. Results of the study indicated that self-actualization, physical, and love/belonging need satisfaction accounted for 64% of the variance in health-promoting self-care behavior. The findings of this study are consistent with Maslow's theory of human motivation and suggest that persons who are more fulfilled and content with themselves and their lives, have physical need satisfaction, and have positive connections with others may be able to make better decisions regarding positive health-promoting self-care behaviors.

  12. Self-Care Knowledge of Hypertension Prevention and Control among Women in Contemporary Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asmah, Emmanuel Ekow; Orkoh, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Background: There has been a growing body of literature on hypertension in many countries, but nonavailability of data hampered empirical research on this issue in Ghana. Purpose: This article presents new and nationally representative household survey evidence on determinants and benefits of self-care knowledge of hypertension prevention and…

  13. Measures of Self-Care Independence for Children with Osteochondrodysplasia: A Clinimetric Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ireland, Penelope; Johnston, Leanne M.

    2012-01-01

    This systematic review evaluates the validity, reliability, and clinical utility of outcome measures used to assess self-care skills among children with congenital musculoskeletal conditions and assesses the applicability of these measures for children with osteochondrodysplasia aged 0-12 years. Electronic databases were searched to identify…

  14. Self-Care Management among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in East Jerusalem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daoud, Nihaya; Osman, Amira; Hart, Trevor A.; Berry, Elliott M.; Adler, Bella

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Little research exists on diabetes self-care management (DSCM) in Arab populations. We examined the contribution of health belief constructs, socioeconomic position (SEP) and clinical factors (glycated haemoglobin [HbA1C] level, type of diabetes treatments, and receiving professional guidance) to DSCM among Arab patients in East…

  15. Reflexivity and Self-Care for Creative Facilitators: Stepping outside the Circle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffatt, Amanda; Ryan, Mary; Barton, Georgina

    2016-01-01

    Those who work with others to explore new and creative ways of thinking about community and organizational participation, ways of engaging with others, individual well-being and creative solutions to problems, have a significant role in a cohesive society. Creative forms of learning can stimulate reflexive practices of self-care and lead to…

  16. 'I've put diabetes completely on the shelf till the mental stuff is in place'. How patients with doctor-assessed impaired self-care perceive disease, self-care, and support from general practitioners. A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Mads Aage Toft; Guassora, Ann Dorrit; Arreskov, Anne Beiter; Waldorff, Frans Boch; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2018-06-22

    This paper investigated patients' experiences of disease and self-care as well as perceptions of the general practitioner's role in supporting patients with impaired self-care ability. Qualitative interviews with 13 patients with type 2 diabetes, concurrent chronic diseases, and impaired self-care ability assessed by a general practitioner. We analyzed our data using systematic text condensation. The shifting perspectives model of chronic illness formed the theoretical background for the study. Although most patients experienced challenges in adhering to recommended self-care activities, many had developed additional, personal self-care routines that increased wellbeing. Some patients were conscious of self-care trade-offs, including patients with concurrent mental disorders who were much more attentive to their mental disorder than their somatic diseases. Patients' perspectives on diseases could shift over time and were dominated by emotional considerations such as insisting on leading a normal life or struggling with limitations caused by disease. Most patients found support in the ongoing relationship with the same general practitioner, who was valued as a companion or appreciated as a trustworthy health informant. Patient experiences of self-care may collide with what general practitioners find appropriate in a medical regimen. Health professionals should be aware of patients' prominent and shifting considerations about the emotional aspects of disease. Patients valued the general practitioner's role in self-care support, primarily through the long-term doctor-patient relationship. Therefore, relational continuity should be prioritized in chronic care, especially for patients with impaired self-care ability who often have a highly complex disease burden and situational context. Key points   Little is known about the perspectives of disease and self-care in patients with a doctor-assessed impaired ability of self-care.   • Although patients knew the

  17. Gender differences in functional disability and self-care among seniors in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Tareque, Md Ismail; Tiedt, Andrew D; Islam, Towfiqua Mahfuza; Begum, Sharifa; Saito, Yasuhiko

    2017-08-08

    Disability among older adults is a public health concern. To date there are no in-depth and comprehensive analyses on older adults' disabilities in Bangladesh. This study investigated gender differences in the prevalence of disability and the socio-demographic factors associated with disability among older adults in Bangladesh. This research used a sample of 4176 elderly males and females aged 60 years and over from a nationally representative data set- Bangladesh's 2010 Household Income and Expenditure Survey. The study used both household level and individual level data and applied a wealth index, which was constructed based on household assets using principal component analysis. The Washington Group's short set of questions on disability were used to measure disability. Chi-square tests and ordinal logistic regression models were fit. Forty-two percent of older had some form of functional disability, including 5% of elderly with severe/extreme functional disability. Seven percent of older adults had a self-care disability, including 3% of elderly with a severe/extreme form of self-care disability. Elderly females suffered from all the studied disabilities, including functional and self-care disabilities in higher percentages, and had higher odds ratios of having both functional disability and self-care disability compared to elderly males. The study also identified some significant factors affecting functional disability and self-care disability, namely age, having a chronic condition, wealth status and place of residence, including divisional differences. Programs aimed at reducing functional disability among seniors, particularly elderly females, should be granted the highest priority in Bangladesh.

  18. Cancer treatment, symptom monitoring, and self-care in adults: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Phoebe Dauz; Piamjariyakul, Ubolrat; Ducey, Kathleen; Badura, Jody; Boltz, Kristin D; Olberding, Karmen; Wingate, Anita; Williams, Arthur R

    2006-01-01

    A descriptive study was conducted on self-reported symptoms and self-care by 37 adults receiving chemotherapy primarily for leukemia, lymphomas, or breast cancer or radiation therapy for head and neck or lung cancers. The Therapy-Related Symptom Checklist and demographic and interview forms on self-care for identified symptoms were used. Severe symptoms on the Therapy-Related Symptom Checklist subscales fatigue, eating, nausea, pain, numbness in fingers/toes, hair loss, and constipation were reported by patients on chemotherapy. Those on radiation therapy reported severe symptoms on the eating, fatigue, skin changes, oropharynx, and constipation subscales.Self-care strategies were in the following categories, using complementary medicine as framework: diet/nutrition/lifestyle change (eg, use of nutritional supplements; modifications of food and of eating habits; naps, sleep, and rest); mind/body control (eg, relaxation methods, prayer, music, attending granddaughter's sports events); biologic treatments (vitamins); herbal treatments (green mint tea); and ethnomedicine (lime juice and garlic). The first category was predominantly used by patients in both treatment types. Medications were prescribed also to help control symptoms (eg, pain and nausea). Symptom monitoring and self-care for symptoms identified may be facilitated by the Therapy-Related Symptom Checklist; based on reported symptom severity, care providers may prioritize interventions. A larger study needs to be done on (a) the use of the Therapy-Related Symptom Checklist as a clinical tool to assess symptoms that oncology patients experience during therapy; (b) whether care providers, based on patient-reported symptom severity, can prioritize interventions--and how this influences the efficiency of care; (c) the self-care strategies used by patients on chemotherapy or radiation therapy or both; and (d) how useful these strategies are in alleviating symptoms.

  19. Illness perception, diabetes knowledge and self-care practices among type-2 diabetes patients: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Kugbey, Nuworza; Oppong Asante, Kwaku; Adulai, Korkor

    2017-08-10

    Self-care practices among persons living with type-2 diabetes are very crucial in diabetes manages as poor self-care results in complications. However, little research exists within the Ghanaian context. This study examined whether type-2 diabetes patients' illness perception and diabetes knowledge significantly predict diabetes self-care practices. A cross-sectional survey design was employed and a total of 160 participants (45 males and 115 females) were sampled from a general hospital in Accra. A self-administered questionnaire measuring illness perception, diabetes knowledge and diabetes self-care practices as well as demographic checklist were used collect data. Results showed that illness perception and diabetes knowledge significantly predicted overall diabetes self-care practices. Analysis of domain specific self-care practices showed that patients' diet was significantly predicted by illness perception and diabetes knowledge. Exercise was significantly predicted by only illness perception while blood sugar testing and diabetes foot-care were significantly predicted by diabetes knowledge. Cognitive and emotional representation of diabetes and diabetes knowledge are key determinants of patients' diabetes self-care practices. It is therefore important that appropriate psychosocial interventions are developed to help patients' adherence to recommended self-care practices.

  20. Young People's Participation in the Development of a Self-Care Intervention--A Multi-Site Formative Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kime, Nicola; McKenna, Jim; Webster, Liz

    2013-01-01

    The poor outcomes of young people with chronic health conditions indicate that current services and self-care programmes are not meeting the needs of young people. How young people self-manage their condition impacts on long-term health outcomes, but there is little published evidence that details the development of self-care programmes and their…

  1. Barriers to self-care in women of reproductive age with HIV/AIDS in Iran: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Oskouie, Fatemeh; Kashefi, Farzaneh; Rafii, Forough; Gouya, Mohammad Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Although increasing attention is paid to HIV/AIDS, patients with HIV still experience several barriers to self-care. These barriers have been previously identified in small quantitative studies on women with HIV, but qualitative studies are required to clarify barriers to self-care. We conducted our study using the grounded theory methodological approach. A total of 28 women with HIV and their family members, were interviewed. The data were analyzed with the Corbin and Strauss method (1998). The key barriers to self-care in women with HIV/AIDS included social stigma, addiction, psychological problems, medication side-effects and financial problems. Women with HIV/AIDS face several barriers to self-care. Therefore, when designing self-care models for these women, social and financial barriers should be identified. Mental health treatment should also be incorporated into such models and patients' access to health care services should be facilitated.

  2. Stimulating Healthy Aging with a Model Nurse-Managed Free Clinic in a Senior Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Ruth H.

    As part of a Geriatric Education and Health Management program, a model nurse-managed free clinic has been established at an urban senior center by faculty and students of the University of New Mexico College of Nursing. Funded by a 3-year grant from the Department of Health and Human Services, the weekly clinic is based on Orem's self-care theory…

  3. Improving support for heart failure patients: a systematic review to understand patients' perspectives on self-care.

    PubMed

    Spaling, Melisa A; Currie, Kay; Strachan, Patricia H; Harkness, Karen; Clark, Alexander M

    2015-11-01

    This systematic review aimed to generate patient-focussed recommendations to enhance support of heart failure self-care by examining patients' experiences, perspectives and self-care behaviours. Despite increased recognition of the importance of heart failure self-care, patients' knowledge and practices around this self-care and interventions to improve it are inconsistent. Consequently, current guidelines focus on what the domains of heart failure self-care are, more so than the ways to improve this care. Systematic review and qualitative interpretive synthesis. A systematic, comprehensive and detailed search of 11 databases was conducted until March, 2012 for papers published 1995-2012: 37 studies were included (1343 patients, 75 caregivers, 63 health care professionals) that contained a qualitative research component and data on adult patients' heart failure self-care. This interpretive synthesis used a recognized approach consisting of a multi-stage analytic process; in addition, the included studies underwent quality appraisal. Findings indicate that while patients could often recall health professionals' self-care advice, they were unable to integrate this knowledge into daily life. Attempts to manage HF were based on how patients 'felt' rather than clinical indicators of worsening symptoms. Self-efficacy and learning from past management experiences facilitated favourable outcomes - these enabled patients and caregivers to adeptly apply self-care strategies into daily activities. Addressing common but basic knowledge misconceptions regarding the domains of HF self-care is insufficient to increase effective HF self-care; this should be supplemented with strategies with patients and family members to promote self-efficacy, learning and adaptation/application of recommendations to daily life. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Barriers and facilitators to self-care in chronic heart failure: a meta-synthesis of qualitative studies.

    PubMed

    Siabani, Soraya; Leeder, Stephen R; Davidson, Patricia M

    2013-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a costly condition that places large demands on self-care. Failure to adhere with self-care recommendations is common and associated with frequent hospitalization. Understanding the factors that enable or inhibit self-care is essential in developing effective health care interventions. This qualitative review was conducted to address the research question, "What are the barriers and facilitators to self-care among patients with CHF?" Electronic databases including Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, Scopus and Google scholar were searched. Articles were included if they were peer reviewed (1995 to 2012), in English language and investigated at least one contextual or individual factor impacting on self-care in CHF patients > 18years. The criteria defined by Kuper et al. including clarity and appropriateness of sampling, data collection and data analysis were used to appraise the quality of articles. Twenty-three articles met the inclusion criteria. Factors impacting on self-care were included factors related to symptoms of CHF and the self-care process; factors related to personal characteristics; and factors related to environment and self-care system. Important factors such as socioeconomic situation and education level have not been explored extensively and there were minimal data on the influence of age, gender, self-confidence and duration of disease. Although there is an emerging literature, further research is required to address the barriers and facilitators to self-care in patients with CHF in order to provide an appropriate guide for intervention strategies to improve self-care in CHF.

  5. Nurse strategies for optimising patient participation in nursing care.

    PubMed

    Sahlsten, Monika J M; Larsson, Inga E; Sjöström, Björn; Plos, Kaety A E

    2009-09-01

    THE STUDY'S RATIONALE: Patient participation is an essential factor in nursing care and medical treatment and a legal right in many countries. Despite this, patients have experienced insufficient participation, inattention and neglect regarding their problems and may respond with dependence, passivity or taciturnity. Accordingly, nurses strategies for optimising patient participation in nursing care is an important question for the nursing profession. The aim was to explore Registered Nurses' strategies to stimulate and optimise patient participation in nursing care. The objective was to identify ward nurses' supporting practices. A qualitative research approach was applied. Three focus groups with experienced Registered Nurses providing inpatient somatic care (n = 16) were carried out. These nurses were recruited from three hospitals in West Sweden. The data were analysed using content analysis technique. The ethics of scientific work was adhered to. According to national Swedish legislation, no formal permit from an ethics committee was required. The participants gave informed consent after verbal and written information. Nurse strategies for optimising patient participation in nursing care were identified as three categories: 'Building close co-operation', 'Getting to know the person' and 'Reinforcing self-care capacity' and their 10 subcategories. The strategies point to a process of emancipation of the patient's potential by finding his/her own inherent knowledge, values, motivation and goals and linking these to actions. Nurses need to strive for guiding the patient towards attaining meaningful experiences, discoveries, learning and development. The strategies are important and useful to balance the asymmetry in the nurse-patient relationship in daily nursing practice and also in quality assurance to evaluate and improve patient participation and in education. However, further verification of the findings is recommended by means of replication or other

  6. [The effects of a diabetic educational program for coping with problem situation on self-efficacy, self care behaviors, coping and glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Ko, Choun Hee; Gu, Mee Ock

    2004-12-01

    This study was conducted to develop and to test the effects of an educational program for coping with problem situations as a nursing intervention in the diabetic patient. A non-equivalent control group pretest-posttest design was used in this study. Data were collected from January to March, 2002. The subjects of the study consisted of 31 diabetic patients(experimental group: 17 patients, control group: 14 patients). The intervention of an educational program for coping with problem situations was applied to the experimental group for 4 weeks (total 8 hours). Data were collected before the educational program, immediately after and 1 months later and were analyzed with repeated measures ANOVA, t-test, and paired t-test. 1. There was a significant difference in self efficacy between the experimental and control groups (F=13.793, p=0.001). 2. There was a significant difference in self care behavior between the experimental and control groups (F=4.583, p=0.041). 3. There was a significant difference in coping behavior of the problem situation between the experimental and control groups (F=62.018, p=0.000). There was a significant difference according to experimental stages (F=4.546, p=0.015) and interaction between education and experimental stages (F=12.039, p=0.000). 4. There was a significant difference in glycemic control between the experimental and control groups (t=-3.112, p=0.004). These results support that a diabetic educational program for coping with problem situations is effective in promoting and maintaining self efficacy, self care behavior, problem coping behaviors and in improving glycemic control. Thus this program can be recommended as an effective nursing intervention of in-depth education for diabetic patient.

  7. How general practitioners perceive and assess self-care in patients with multiple chronic conditions: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Mads Aage Toft; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Waldorff, Frans Boch; Guassora, Ann Dorrit

    2017-12-22

    It is not known how general practitioners (GPs) perceive the concept of self-care and how they assess self-care ability in patients with multiple chronic conditions. As a part of the strategy to improve the care of people living with chronic conditions, disease management programs in Denmark require GPs and other health care workers to assess and support patients' self-care ability. The aim of the present study was to explore GPs' perceptions and assessment of self-care ability in patients with multiple chronic conditions who have difficulty following a given treatment. A qualitative study conducted through in-depth, semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of 12 GPs in rural areas of Denmark with economically disadvantaged populations. The interviews involved 36 complex patient cases selected by the GPs themselves. Our analysis followed the principles of systematic text condensation. Most GPs in our study had a health-related perception of self-care, but some had a broader perception encompassing the situational context of the patient's life. The GPs' assessments of patients' self-care ability were based on information from the ongoing and often long-term relationships with the patients. GPs identified four major factors that influenced patients' self-care ability, which accumulated and fluctuated over time: multimorbidity, cognitive resources, material resources, and the patients' social contexts. The GPs in this study had dual perceptions of self-care, related to both the chronic health conditions and to the broader situational contexts of their patients' lives. GPs' assessments of self-care ability depended largely on their experiences from the doctor-patient relationship, and they emphasized that the factors affecting self-care ability were highly dynamic over the patient's lifetime. However, these findings might be resisted by the Danish disease management programs, which tend to have a static and more narrow, health-related view of patient self-care

  8. Attitudes and awareness of web-based self-care resources in the military: a preliminary survey study.

    PubMed

    Luxton, David D; Armstrong, Christina M; Fantelli, Emily E; Thomas, Elissa K

    2011-09-01

    Web-based self-care resources have a number of potential benefits for military service members (SMs) and their families such as convenience, anonymity, and immediate 24/7 access to useful information. There is limited data available, however, regarding SM and military healthcare provider use of online self-care resources. Our goal with this study was to conduct a preliminary survey assessment of self-care Web site awareness, general attitudes about use, and usage behaviors of Web-based self-care resources among SMs and military healthcare providers. Results show that the majority of SMs and providers use the Internet often, use Internet self-care resources, and are willing to use additional Web-based resources and capabilities. SMs and providers also indicated a preference for Web-based self-care resources as adjunct tools to face-to-face/in-person care. Data from this preliminary study are useful for informing additional research and best practices for integrating Web-based self-care for the military community.

  9. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN SELF-CARE BEHAVIORS AND SELF-ESTEEM OF RURAL ELDERLIES; NECESSITY OF HEALTH PROMOTION

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Goudarzian, Amir Hossein; Mirani, Hesam; Jouybari, Sina Sabourian; Nasiri, Davoud

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Changes in the modern medical science caused significant reduction of mortality and every day increase of the elderly in the world. According to prevalence of physical and mental problems in elderly, it is necessary to take some actions. Self care in one of the best way to improve elderly health and life satisfaction that seems have a relation to self-esteem. Methods: This descriptive and analytical study was performed on 180 elderly in rural areas of the Sari city. Elderly selected by multi-stage randomize sampling method. Data were gathered by using standard questionnaires of self-care and Rosenberg self-esteem. Data were analyzed by Spearman and Pearson’s correlation using SPSS software (V16). Findings: The mean±SD of the ages of the elderly were 66.85±7.661. The score of self-care varies between 99 to 155 and most of them (66.7%) had good level of self-care. Also, most of elderly (52.2%) had high level of self-esteem. Also there was a significant relationship, between self-care and self-esteem (P<0.001, r=0.426). Conclusion: According to significant relationship between self-care and self-esteem of elderly, by the planning for improving the self care of elderly, can increase their health and significantly reduce from physical and mental complications. PMID:27047266

  10. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN SELF-CARE BEHAVIORS AND SELF-ESTEEM OF RURAL ELDERLIES; NECESSITY OF HEALTH PROMOTION.

    PubMed

    Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Goudarzian, Amir Hossein; Mirani, Hesam; Jouybari, Sina Sabourian; Nasiri, Davoud

    2016-02-01

    Changes in the modern medical science caused significant reduction of mortality and every day increase of the elderly in the world. According to prevalence of physical and mental problems in elderly, it is necessary to take some actions. Self care in one of the best way to improve elderly health and life satisfaction that seems have a relation to self-esteem. This descriptive and analytical study was performed on 180 elderly in rural areas of the Sari city. Elderly selected by multi-stage randomize sampling method. Data were gathered by using standard questionnaires of self-care and Rosenberg self-esteem. Data were analyzed by Spearman and Pearson's correlation using SPSS software (V16). The mean±SD of the ages of the elderly were 66.85±7.661. The score of self-care varies between 99 to 155 and most of them (66.7%) had good level of self-care. Also, most of elderly (52.2%) had high level of self-esteem. Also there was a significant relationship, between self-care and self-esteem (P<0.001, r=0.426). According to significant relationship between self-care and self-esteem of elderly, by the planning for improving the self care of elderly, can increase their health and significantly reduce from physical and mental complications.

  11. The self-care behavior inventory: a model for behavioral instrument development.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, J; Sliepcevich, E M

    1985-09-01

    The Self-Care Behavior (SCB) Inventory was developed as part of a long-term study of self-care practices of persons who have multiple sclerosis (MS) in Denmark. The universe of behaviors regarding the physical, social, emotional, environmental, and spiritual aspects of coping with the illness was ascertained by informal and formal interviews. Respondents were asked not only what behavior was performed, but also who performed it, how it was performed, why, when, and where it was performed, and where the knowledge to perform the behavior in this manner was acquired, such as a lay-referral network, physician, social worker, spouse, or media. The inventory went through a series of drafts and pre-tests, resulting in a final version that met criteria for validity and reliability. The model presented for the development of the SCB Inventory can be useful for designing behavioral inventories and assessment tools for other chronic conditions such as arthritis, epilepsy, and diabetes.

  12. Factors influencing self-care behaviors of African Americans with heart failure: a photovoice project.

    PubMed

    Woda, Aimee; Belknap, Ruth Ann; Haglund, Kristin; Sebern, Margaret; Lawrence, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the influences of heart failure (HF) self-care among low income, African Americans. Compared to all other racial groups, African Americans have the highest risk of developing HF, coupled with high mortality and morbidity rates. Using the photovoice method, participants related important lifestyle factors through photography. The participants and researcher met for reflection and discussion 2 h per week for six weeks. Four themes emerged: family support gives me the push I need, social interaction lifts me up, improving my mind to lift depression can improve my heart, and it is important but challenging to follow the HF diet. The findings from this study may assist policy makers, health care professionals, patients, and support systems in understanding the complexity of engaging in HF self-care. This understanding may lead to the development of appropriate patient-centered assessments and interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Use of and interest in mobile health for diabetes self-care in vulnerable populations.

    PubMed

    Humble, James R; Tolley, Elizabeth A; Krukowski, Rebecca A; Womack, Catherine R; Motley, Todd S; Bailey, James E

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to assess use of and interest in mobile health (mHealth) technology and in-person services for diabetes self-care in vulnerable populations. We delivered a self-administered cross-sectional survey. Participants were recruited at two primary care practices (P1 and P2) with P1 located in a medically underserved area and P2 in an affluent suburb. Two-sample t-tests and chi-square tests were used with p < 0.05 significant. In addition, a secondary analysis was performed to analyse differences in use and interest in mHealth by age. Of 75 eligible patients, 60 completed the survey (80% response rate). P1 patients had significantly higher interest in three of five categories of in-person diabetes support services, one of four categories of health-related text messages (TM), and three of eight categories of mHealth applications (p < 0.05). Smartphone users reported higher interest in TM (p = 0.004) and mHealth applications for diabetes self-care (p = 0.004). Younger patients were more likely to have a smartphone (p < 0.006), use the Internet (p < 0.0012), use smartphone applications (p < 0.0004), and to be interested in using applications to manage their diabetes (p < 0.004). This study shows substantial patient interest in TM and mHealth applications for diabetes self-care and suggests that patients in underserved areas may have particularly high interest in using mHealth solutions in primary care. Younger patients and smartphone users were more likely to be interested in using applications to manage their diabetes. As more patients use smartphones, interest in using mHealth to support patient self-care and strengthen primary care infrastructure will continue to grow. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. The Effect of a Self-Care Education Program on a Military Medical Beneficiary Population.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-01

    care was a topic generating heated debate between the two main candidates. George Bush repeatedly stressed that individuals must accept more personal...Defining the role of self-care is important when linking it to health care. Some writers have stressed the importance of providing health care concepts...further stressing that: An intensified health education system must be designed to educate and encourage the American people to change behavior

  15. Validation of theoretical pathway between discrimination, diabetes self-care and glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Aprill Z; Walker, Rebekah J; Campbell, Jennifer A; Egede, Leonard E

    2016-07-01

    This study examined the mechanisms through which discrimination influences diabetes self-care and glycemic control in patients with diabetes by using structured equation modeling. 615 patients were recruited from two adult primary care clinics in the southeastern United States. Measures were based on a theoretical model and included perceived discrimination, social support, social cohesion, and perceived stress. Structured equation modeling examined the relationship with diabetes self-care and glycemic control. The final model (chi2(211)=328.82, p<0.0001, R(2)=0.99, RMSEA=0.03 and CFI=0.98) shows that higher stress is directly significantly related to a decreased self-care (r=-0.59, p <0.001) and increased HbA1c (r=0.27, p<0.05). There was no significant direct association between discrimination, social support or social cohesion, and glycemic control or self-care. There was, however, a direct significant association between increased discrimination (r=0.46, p<0.001), decreased social support (r=-0.34, p<0.001), increased social cohesion (r=0.14, p<0.05) and increased stress. These results support the hypothesized pathway of discrimination on health outcomes, showing both a direct and indirect influence through stress on HbA1c in adults with diabetes. Understanding the pathways through which discrimination influences diabetes outcomes is important for providing more comprehensive and effective care. These results suggest future interventions targeting patients with diabetes should take discrimination-induced stress into account. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The importance of self-care for fatigue amongst patients undergoing chemotherapy for primary cancer.

    PubMed

    O' Regan, Patricia; Hegarty, Josephine

    2017-06-01

    To measure Cancer Related Fatigue (CRF), and explore fatigue self-care strategies used to ameliorate CRF amongst patients undergoing chemotherapy for primary cancer. A consecutive sample of patients (n = 362) undergoing chemotherapy with a primary diagnosis of breast, colorectal, Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cancers were recruited. A mixed methods design was utilised. The study questionnaires included: the Piper Fatigue Scale-Revised and a researcher developed fatigue Self-Care Survey. The mean total fatigue score was 4.9 (SD = 2.2); the highest mean subscale score occurred in the affective meaning dimension (M = 5.4, SD = 2.9). The mean number of strategies used at least "occasionally" was 14.8, (SD = 3.42, range = 5-24). The most frequently used self-care strategies were: "Receiving support from family and friends" (66.6%); "having a healthy diet" (57.1%); "taking part in hobbies or distraction activities" (42.9%); "spending time chatting with friends"(37.3%); "adjusting mood and being more positive" (36.3%) and "resting and taking it easy" (33.8%). The self-care strategies of socializing (OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.47-0.930, p = 0.016) and exercise (OR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.57-0.93, p = 0.012) were associated with decreased odds of developing CRF. Four categories emerged following analysis of qualitative data, these included: rest and relaxation, physical activity, psychological well-being, and supportive care. CRF is a debilitating, complex phenomenon, therefore multiple CRF strategies should be used for the optimum management of CRF including exercise and socializing. Health care professionals have an important role in promoting the use of evidence based fatigue management strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Smartphone Application Significantly Improved Diabetes Self-Care Activities with High User Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu Jin; Byun, Jong Kyu; Park, So Young; Hong, Soo Min; Chin, Sang Ouk; Chon, Suk; Oh, Seungjoon; Woo, Jeong-taek; Kim, Sung Woon; Kim, Young Seol

    2015-01-01

    Background We developed for the first time a smartphone application designed for diabetes self-management in Korea and registered a patent for the relevant algorithm. We also investigated the user satisfaction with the application and the change in diabetes related self-care activities after using the application. Methods We conducted a questionnaire survey on volunteers with diabetes who were using the application. Ninety subjects responded to the questionnaire between June 2012 and March 2013. A modified version of the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA) was used in this study. Results The survey results exhibited a mean subject age of 44.0 years old, and males accounted for 78.9% of the subjects. Fifty percent of the subjects had diabetes for less than 3 years. The majority of respondents experienced positive changes in their clinical course after using the application (83.1%) and were satisfied with the structure and completeness of the application (86.7%). Additionally, the respondents' answers indicated that the application was easy to use (96.7%) and recommendable to others (97.7%) and that they would continue using the application to manage their diabetes (96.7%). After using the Diabetes Notepad application, diabetes related self-care activities assessed by SDSCA displayed statistically significant improvements (P<0.05), except for the number of days of drinking. Conclusion This smartphone-based application can be a useful tool leading to positive changes in diabetes related self-care activities and increase user satisfaction. PMID:26124991

  18. Self-care Improvement After a Pharmaceutical Intervention in Elderly Type 2 Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Nascimentoa, Tania; Braz, Nídia; Gomes, Eurico; Fernandez-Arche, Angeles; De La Puerta, Rocio

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus involves long-term complications that affect diabetic patients' quality of life. The best way to prevent these complications is that patients achieve good metabolic control. In order to reach this goal, patients are requested to acquire daily behaviours (self-care). Such behaviours are sometimes hard to adhere, because they require changes in habits acquired over time. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the improvement on self-care after a pharmaceutical intervention on home regime patients. We performed a controlled experimental comparative study with a follow up of 6 months, on 87 patients, randomized in control group (n=43) and intervention group (n=44). We accessed sociodemographic and clinical data (glycaemic profile), as well as adherence to drug therapy and self-assessed care (before/after). In the intervention group, mean age was 74.2±5.4 years, and the median time of T2DM diagnosis was 14.7±8.5 years. At the end of study, the decrease in fasting blood glucose was higher in the intervention group patients than that observed in the control group (50.2mg/dL), with statistically significant difference (p<0.05), as well as the decrease verified in HbA1c. In self-care adherence, alterations in the levels of adherence of the general nutrition and physical exercise dimensions became evident, with an increase in the number of days of adherence. On medication adherence statistically significant alterations (p<0.05) were also recorded. We can conclude that an individualized pharmaceutical intervention can improve self-care behaviours, as well as medication adherence, contributing to better metabolic control.

  19. Emotional distress is associated with poor self care in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ogbera, Anthonia; Adeyemi-Doro, Adekunle

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate possible clinical and psychosocial variables that influence diabetes self-care management in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 150 individuals with T2DM who had had diabetes for at least 6 months were recruited to this cross-sectional study. Levels of self-care and psychosocial status were determined using the Self-Care Inventory (SCI) and Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) scale. The PAID scores were calculated using a five-point Likert scale with options ranging from 0 (not a problem) to 4 (serious problem). Data were evaluated using non-parametric and parametric tests as appropriate. The mean age of the study participants was 69.97 ± 8.68 years. Cronbach's α for SCI and PAID scores was 0.85 and 0.98, respectively. People with poor glycemic control had significantly higher mean (±SD) total PAID scores than individuals with good glycemic control (29.5 ± 30.9 vs 16.7 ± 26.9, respectively; P = 0.012). There was a significant relationship between PAID scores and glycemic control (r = 0.2; P = 0.012). The present study demonstrates that psychosocial factors directly influence glycemic control and diabetes self-care habits. In addition, diabetes-specific distress in study population was unrelated to the duration of diabetes, the age of the patients and anthropometric indices. © 2011 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Relationship between perceived social support and self-care behavior in type 2 diabetics: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Mohebi, Siamak; Parham, Mahmoud; Sharifirad, Gholamreza; Gharlipour, Zabihollah; Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl; Rajati, Fatemeh

    2018-01-01

    Social support is one of the most effective factors on the diabetic self-care. This study aimed to assess social support and its relationship to self-care in type 2 diabetic patients in Qom, Iran. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 325 diabetics attending the Diabetes Mellitus Association. Patients who meet inclusion and exclusion criteria were selected using random sampling method. Data were collected by the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, with hemoglobin A 1 C test. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and independent t -test, analysis of variance, Pearson correlation, and linear regression test, using 0.05 as the critical significance level, provided by SPSS software. The mean and standard deviation of self-care and social support scores were 4.31 ± 2.7 and 50.32 ± 11.09, respectively. The mean level of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA 1 C) of patients was 7.54. There was a significant difference between mean score of self-care behaviors and social support according to gender and marital status ( P < 0.05). The regression analysis showed that disease duration was the only variable which had a significant effect on the level of HbA 1 C ( P < 0.001). Pearson correlation coefficient indicated that self-care and social support significantly correlated ( r = 0.489, P > 0.001) and also predictive power of social support was 0.28. Self-care was significantly better in diabetics with HbA 1 C ≤7%. Patients who had higher HbA 1 C felt less, but not significant, social support. This study indicated the relationship between social support and self-care behaviors in type 2 diabetic patients. Interventions that focus on improving the social support and self-care of diabetic control may be more effective in improving glycemic control.

  1. Heart Failure Self-care Within the Context of Patient and Informal Caregiver Dyadic Engagement: A Mixed Methods Study.

    PubMed

    Buck, Harleah G; Hupcey, Judith; Wang, Hsiao-Lan; Fradley, Michael; Donovan, Kristine A; Watach, Alexa

    Recent heart failure (HF) patient and informal caregiver (eg, dyadic) studies have either examined self-care from a qualitative or quantitative perspective. To date, the 2 types of data have not been integrated. The aim of this study was to understand HF self-care within the context of dyadic engagement. This was a cross-sectional, mixed methods (quantitative/qualitative) study. Heart failure self-care was measured with the Self-care of Heart Failure Index (v.6) dichotomized to adequate (≥70) or inadequate (<69). Dyadic symptom management type was assessed with the Dyadic Symptom Management Type scale. Interviews regarding self-care were conducted with both dyad members present. Content analytic techniques were used. Data were integrated using an information matrix and triangulated using Creswell and Plano Clark's methods. Of the 27 dyads, HF participants were 56% men, with a mean age of 77 years. Caregivers were 74% women, with a mean age of 66 years, representing spouses (n = 14) and adult children (n = 7). Quantitatively, few dyads scored as adequate (≥70) in self-care; the qualitative data described the impact of adequacy on the dyads' behavior. Dyads who scored higher, individually or both, on self-care self-efficacy and self-care management were less likely to change from their life course pattern. Either the patient or dyad continued to handle all self-care as they always had, rather than trying new strategies or reaching out for help as the patient's condition deteriorated. Our data suggest links that should be explored between dyadic adequacy and response to patients' symptoms. Future studies should assess dyadic adequacy longitudinally and examine its relationship to event-free survival and health services cost.

  2. The Effect of Self-Care Education on Emotional Intelligence and HbA1c level in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Tavakol Moghadam, Salma; Najafi, Seyed Saeed; Yektatalab, Shahrzad

    2018-01-01

    The role of Emotional Intelligence (EI) in glycemic control in type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM) has not been fully understood. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of self-care education on EI and hemoglobin glycosylated (HbA1c) in patients with type 2 diabetes. In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 48 patients with type 2 DM referred to Shahid Motahari Diabetes Center in 2015 were divided into an intervention and a control group using block randomization. The study data were collected using Bar-On questionnaire and blood testing immediately and two months after the intervention. The educational content was presented to the intervention group through 1-1:30-hour sessions held once a week for 8 continuous weeks. The control group, however, only received the clinic's routine cares. The results showed a significant difference in the mean level of HbA1c in the intervention group before and two months after the intervention (P=0.003). However, this difference was not significant in the control group. Moreover, the mean of EI was higher in the intervention group compared to the control group (P=0.08). Self-care education improved the HbA1c level and EI among the patients with type 2 DM. Therefore, it is recommended that health care providers, specially nurses, should train the diabetic patients for self-care, which can lead to better glycemic control. Trial Registration Number: IRCT201408188505N7.

  3. Self-care behaviors of Filipino-American adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Deovina N; Jordan, James L

    2010-01-01

    To examine the diabetes self-care behaviors of Filipino-American (FA) adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). The Summary of Diabetes Self Care Activities-Revised and Expanded measure was administered to 192 (74 males and 118 females) FA adult immigrants with type 2 DM. Older FAs (> or =65 years), females, those who were older when they immigrated, and participants diagnosed with type 2 DM longer were more likely to follow recommended medication regimens. Younger FAs (<65 years) and participants diagnosed with type 2 DM for shorter duration of time were less likely to perform blood glucose testing. Most FAs reported following their eating plans; however, those who lived in the United States (US) longer followed healthful eating plans. Likewise, females reported eating five or more servings of fruits and/or vegetables daily. Moreover, older FAs reported evenly spacing carbohydrate intake everyday. Furthermore, older participants, those with less education, participants who were older when they immigrated, and those older when diagnosed with type 2 DM ate fewer foods high in fats. As to physical activity, FA males and participants with higher education exercised more frequently. Younger FAs were less likely to perform optimum type 2 DM self-care behaviors pertaining to diet, medication taking, and blood glucose testing compared to their older counterparts. This finding suggests an increased risk for type 2 DM comorbidities and/or complications in younger FAs, which may require more intensive treatments in later years. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. [Innovative care and self-care strategies for people with chronic diseases in Latin America].

    PubMed

    Sapag, Jaime C; Lange, Ilta; Campos, Solange; Piette, John D

    2010-01-01

    To identify innovative strategies for improved care and self-care of patients with chronic diseases (CD) in Latin America and to explore interest in creating a Latin American network of professionals in this field. A descriptive study based on a survey of key experts with recognized national or regional leadership in CD patient care. The 25-question questionnaire sought information on their experiences with care and self-care initiatives for CD patients, descriptions of successful initiatives, the perceived ability of countries to innovate in this area, their interest in participating in a network of Latin American professionals in this field, and more. Content analysis was performed to develop recommendations for the Region. Responses were obtained from 17 (37.8%) of the 45 experts approached; 82.4% confirmed their knowledge of of involvement with an innovative initiative related to the subject. Initial development does exist in each of the three innovative strategy types: peer care, informal caregivers, and telenursing, the latter being the least explored. There is real interest in forming a Latin American network that focuses on development of innovative self-care strategies for CD patients. Support for a joint network is promising. Priorities are building skills in this area and developing innovative proposals for improved CD patient care in the Region. Innovative measures should be complementary and adapted to the specific context of each scenario.

  5. Psychometric Properties of the Arabic Version of the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Instrument.

    PubMed

    Sukkarieh-Haraty, Ola; Howard, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Translation of instruments needs to ensure equivalence between the source and the target language to establish the psychometric properties of the translated version. The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Arabic version of the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA) instrument. The 12-item English version of the SDSCA was translated into Arabic using back translation on a sample of 140 Lebanese participants with Type 2 diabetes. Construct validity was measured using exploratory factor analysis with varimax rotation. Multitrait scaling analysis was used to test for item convergent and discriminant validity based on item-scale correlations. Conceptual and content validity were examined by an expert panel in diabetes. Internal consistency reliability R was assessed using interitem correlations. The average interitem correlation for the four subscales ranged between--.05 for Diet and .66 for Glucose Testing. Factor analysis identified four factors which accounted for 60% of the variance. The preliminary results of Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities-Arabic Version (SDSCA-Ar) are comparable to the psychometric properties the original SDSCA. SDSCA-Ar is a valid measure of diabetes self-care in Lebanese patients with diabetes.

  6. Accessibility of mHealth Self-Care Apps for Individuals with Spina Bifida

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Daihua X.; Parmanto, Bambang; Dicianno, Brad E.; Pramana, Gede

    2015-01-01

    As the smartphone becomes ubiquitous, mobile health is becoming a viable technology to empower individuals to engage in preventive self-care. An innovative mobile health system called iMHere (Internet Mobile Health and Rehabilitation) has been developed at the University of Pittsburgh to support self-care and adherence to self-care regimens for individuals with spina bifida and other complex conditions who are vulnerable to secondary complications. The goal of this study was to explore the accessibility of iMHere apps for individuals with spina bifida. Six participants were asked to perform tasks in a lab environment. Though all of the participants were satisfied with the iMHere apps and would use them again in the future, their needs and preferences to access and use iMHere apps differed. Personalization that provides the ability for a participant to modify the appearance of content, such as the size of the icons and the color of text, could be an ideal solution to address potential issues and barriers to accessibility. The importance of personalization—and potential strategies—for accessibility are discussed. PMID:26755902

  7. Social factors and barriers to self-care adherence in Hispanic men and women with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mansyur, Carol L; Rustveld, Luis O; Nash, Susan G; Jibaja-Weiss, Maria L

    2015-06-01

    To explore quantitatively the extent to which social support, social norms and barriers are associated with self-efficacy and self-care adherence in Hispanic patients with diabetes and the extent to which these differ for men and women. Baseline survey data were collected from 248 low-SES, Hispanic men and women who were participants in a randomized controlled trial of a culturally targeted intervention for diabetes management. Student's t, Pearson correlations and multiple regression were used to analyze the data. Compared to men, women were less likely to receive support, faced more barriers, reported less self-efficacy and had lower levels of self-care adherence. Perceived support was consistently correlated with better self-efficacy in women but not men, even though men reported higher levels of support. The lack of adequate support seems to be a fundamental barrier for Hispanic women with diabetes. Health care providers should be sensitive to sociocultural influences in Hispanic groups that may facilitate men's self-care adherence, but could potentially hamper women's efforts. Interventions designed for Hispanics should augment women's support needs and address culture and social factors that may differentially impact the ability of men and women to manage their diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical and socio-demographic determinants of self-care behaviours in patients with heart failure and diabetes mellitus: A multicentre cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Ausili, Davide; Rebora, Paola; Di Mauro, Stefania; Riegel, Barbara; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Paturzo, Marco; Alvaro, Rosaria; Vellone, Ercole

    2016-11-01

    Self-care is vital for patients with heart failure to maintain health and quality of life, and it is even more vital for those who are also affected by diabetes mellitus, since they are at higher risk of worse outcomes. The literature is unclear on the influence of diabetes on heart failure self-care as well as on the influence of socio-demographic and clinical factors on self-care. (1) To compare self-care maintenance, self-care management and self-care confidence of patients with heart failure and diabetes versus those heart failure patients without diabetes; (2) to estimate if the presence of diabetes influences self-care maintenance, self-care management and self-care confidence of heart failure patients; (3) to identify socio-demographic and clinical determinants of self-care maintenance, self-care management and self-care confidence in patients with heart failure and diabetes. Secondary analysis of data from a multicentre cross-sectional study. Outpatient clinics from 29 Italian provinces. 1192 adults with confirmed diagnosis of heart failure. Socio-demographic and clinical data were abstracted from patients' medical records. Self-care maintenance, self-care management and self-care confidence were measured with the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index Version 6.2; each scale has a standardized score from 0 to 100, where a score <70 indicates inadequate self-care. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed. Of 1192 heart failure patients, 379 (31.8%) had diabetes. In these 379, heart failure self-care behaviours were suboptimal (means range from 53.2 to 55.6). No statistically significant differences were found in any of the three self-care measures in heart failure patients with and without diabetes. The presence of diabetes did not influence self-care maintenance (p=0.12), self-care management (p=0.21) or self-care confidence (p=0.51). Age (p=0.04), number of medications (p=0.01), presence of a caregiver (p=0.04), family income (p=0.009) and self-care

  9. A study of the relationship between self-care, compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, and burnout among hospice professionals.

    PubMed

    Alkema, Karen; Linton, Jeremy M; Davies, Randall

    2008-01-01

    Hospice care professionals (HCPs) experience a large number of stressors in their work settings. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between self-care, compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction among HCPs. Thirty-seven HCPs were surveyed regarding their levels of compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, and burnout. Respondents also reported the types of self-care activities in which they took part. Results indicated a relationship between self-care strategies and lower levels of burnout and compassion fatigue, and higher levels of compassion satisfaction. Several suggestions are offered for continued research and practice in the hospice care field.

  10. The effectiveness of group visits for patients with heart failure on knowledge, quality of life, self-care, and readmissions: a systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Slyer, Jason T; Ferrara, Lucille R

    .The process of the group visit was first developed in 1991 by Dr. John C. Scott at the Kaiser Permanente system in Colorado, United States. Dr. Scott and a nurse held monthly group visits lasting 60 minutes with a group of 15 to 20 patients to manage their complex medical conditions. The group visit model can vary across settings, including from 6-20 patients over a 1-2 hour period with varying times devoted to education and discussion of health concerns. The group visit typically incorporates a one-on-one physical examination with a physician or nurse practitioner in conjunction with a group discussion and medical management. Group visits have shown to be beneficial in improving patient outcomes for conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, and other chronic illness.The goal of group visits for patients with HF is to increase patient knowledge and self-care abilities, while improving self-efficacy. Self-care incorporates the decision making process a patient undergoes when deciding on a course of action to maintain stability as a result of a change in symptoms. Improved self-care can improve symptoms, which will likely result in an increase in quality of life and a reduction in hospitalizations related to decompensation. Quality of life (QOL) refers to a patient's perception of the impact of a health condition and treatment on the patient's health status and can be measured with valid and reliable tools such as the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ) or the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ). Self-care abilities can be measured using an instrument such as the Self-Care Heart Failure Index (SCHFI). HF knowledge can be measured using an instrument such as the Atlanta Heart Failure Knowledge Test. Group visits can be used to continue to optimize medication therapy while providing a forum for knowledge acquisition and fostering support.A search of the Cochrane Library of Systematic Reviews, the Joanna Briggs Library of Systematic Reviews

  11. Self-Care for the Prevention and Management of Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Riegel, Barbara; Moser, Debra K; Buck, Harleah G; Dickson, Victoria Vaughan; Dunbar, Sandra B; Lee, Christopher S; Lennie, Terry A; Lindenfeld, JoAnn; Mitchell, Judith E; Treat-Jacobson, Diane J; Webber, David E

    2017-08-31

    Self-care is defined as a naturalistic decision-making process addressing both the prevention and management of chronic illness, with core elements of self-care maintenance, self-care monitoring, and self-care management. In this scientific statement, we describe the importance of self-care in the American Heart Association mission and vision of building healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. The evidence supporting specific self-care behaviors such as diet and exercise, barriers to self-care, and the effectiveness of self-care in improving outcomes is reviewed, as is the evidence supporting various individual, family-based, and community-based approaches to improving self-care. Although there are many nuances to the relationships between self-care and outcomes, there is strong evidence that self-care is effective in achieving the goals of the treatment plan and cannot be ignored. As such, greater emphasis should be placed on self-care in evidence-based guidelines. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  12. Randomised clinical trial: yoga vs written self-care advice for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Cramer, H; Schäfer, M; Schöls, M; Köcke, J; Elsenbruch, S; Lauche, R; Engler, H; Dobos, G; Langhorst, J

    2017-06-01

    Perceived stress seems to be a risk factor for exacerbation of ulcerative colitis. Yoga has been shown to reduce perceived stress. To assess the efficacy and safety of yoga for improving quality of life in patients with ulcerative colitis. A total of 77 patients (75% women; 45.5 ± 11.9 years) with ulcerative colitis in clinical remission but impaired quality of life were randomly assigned to yoga (12 supervised weekly sessions of 90 min; n = 39) or written self-care advice (n = 38). Primary outcome was disease-specific quality of life (Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire). Secondary outcomes included disease activity (Rachmilewitz clinical activity index) and safety. Outcomes were assessed at weeks 12 and 24 by blinded outcome assessors. The yoga group had significantly higher disease-specific quality of life compared to the self-care group after 12 weeks (Δ = 14.6; 95% confidence interval=2.6-26.7; P = 0.018) and after 24 weeks (Δ = 16.4; 95% confidence interval=2.5-30.3; P = 0.022). Twenty-one and 12 patients in the yoga group and in the self-care group, respectively, reached a clinical relevant increase in quality of life at week 12 (P = 0.048); and 27 and 17 patients at week 24 (P = 0.030). Disease activity was lower in the yoga group compared to the self-care group after 24 weeks (Δ = -1.2; 95% confidence interval=-0.1-[-2.3]; P = 0.029). Three and one patient in the yoga group and in the self-care group, respectively, experienced serious adverse events (P = 0.317); and seven and eight patients experienced nonserious adverse events (P = 0.731). Yoga can be considered as a safe and effective ancillary intervention for patients with ulcerative colitis and impaired quality of life. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02043600. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Sore throat: effective communication delivers improved diagnosis, enhanced self-care and more rational use of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, A W; Bell, J; Sessa, A; Duerden, M; Altiner, A

    2013-11-01

    confidence in self-care and encourage them to accept the self-limiting character of the illness - important steps towards improving antibiotic stewardship in acute throat infections. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Helping nurses cope with grief and compassion fatigue: an educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Houck, Dereen

    2014-08-01

    Oncology nurses may experience intense physical and emotional exhaustion, identified in the literature as symptoms of cumulative grief and compassion fatigue, with significant consequences for both nurses and organizations. The first step in preventing these consequences is recognition. Organizations should provide nurses with resources including education, counseling, and opportunities to grieve. Nurses need to learn the importance of work-life balance, self-care strategies, and communication skills. Using recommendations from the literature, an educational intervention was designed with the purpose of providing nurses with knowledge, skills, and resources to practice effective self-care and recognize when assistance is needed. The program's objective was to help nurses develop the coping skills and inner resources necessary to maintain their emotional and physical health.

  15. Beyond the classroom: nurse leader preparation and practices.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Formal academic education and experience as a nurse are established preparation for the chief nurse executive (CNE) or upcoming nurse leaders. This article proposes that the nurse leader must build on these fundamentals through self-discipline, lifelong learning, and practice. Three critical ingredients are discussed to guide the nurse leader on a life/career for the CNE and the nurse leader at every level. These include fostering relationships, feeding intellectual curiosity, and engaging in self-care practices. These indispensable ingredients of the successful nurse leader serve as an augmentation to formal education and experience for the nurse aspiring to reach the CNE level and beyond as well as for the current CNE mentoring future leaders.

  16. Microaggressions, diabetes distress, and self-care behaviors in a sample of American Indian adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sittner, Kelley J; Greenfield, Brenna L; Walls, Melissa L

    2018-02-01

    American Indian/Alaska Native people experience the highest age-adjusted prevalence of type 2 diabetes of any racial group in the United States, as well as high rates of related health problems. Chronic stressors such as perceived discrimination are important contributors to these persistent health disparities. The current study used structural equation modeling to examine the relationships between racial microaggressions, diabetes distress, and self-care behaviors (diet and exercise) in a sample of 192 American Indians with type 2 diabetes from the northern United States. We found that microaggressions was positively associated with diabetes distress and that microaggressions had an indirect link to self-care via diabetes distress. Diabetes distress is an important mechanism linking microaggressions to self-care behaviors, which are critical to successful disease management and the reduction of complications. The amelioration of diabetes distress could improve self-care even in the presence of pervasive, chronic social stressors such as microaggressions.

  17. Gender differences in and factors related to self-care behaviors: a cross-sectional, correlational study of patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Heo, Seongkum; Moser, Debra K; Lennie, Terry A; Riegel, Barbara; Chung, Misook L

    2008-12-01

    Although self-care may reduce exacerbations of heart failure, reported rates of effective self-care in patients with heart failure are low. Modifiable factors, including psychosocial status, knowledge, and physical factors, are thought to influence heart failure self-care, but little is known about their combined impact on self-care. The objective of this study was to identify factors related to self-care behaviors in patients with heart failure. A cross-sectional, correlational study design was used. One hundred twenty-two patients (77 men and 45 women, mean age 60+/-12 years old, 66% New York Heart Association functional class III/IV) were recruited from the outpatient clinics of an academic medical center and two community hospitals. Data on self-care behaviors (Self-Care of Heart Failure Index), depressive symptoms, perceived control, self-care confidence, knowledge, functional status, and social support were collected. Factors related to self-care were examined using hierarchical multiple regression. Mean self-care behavior scores were less than 70 indicating the majority of men and women with HF did not consistently engage in self-care behaviors. Higher self-care confidence and perceived control and better heart failure management knowledge were associated with better self-care (r2=.25, p<.001). Higher perceived control and better knowledge were related to better self-care behaviors in men (r2=.18, p=.001), while higher self-care confidence and poorer functional status were related to better self-care behaviors in women (r2=.35, p<.001). This study demonstrates the substantial impact of modifiable factors such as confidence in one's self-care abilities, perceived control, and knowledge on self-care behaviors. This study demonstrates that there are gender differences in factors affecting self-care, even though at baseline men and women have similar knowledge levels, physical, psychological, and behavioral status. Effective interventions focusing on modifiable

  18. The influence of country of origin on engagement in self-care behaviours following heart surgery: a descriptive correlational study.

    PubMed

    Fredericks, Suzanne

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an individual's country of origin influenced performance of self-care behaviours after heart surgery. Patients are required to perform self-care behaviours following cardiovascular surgery. Usual care encompasses a patient education initiative that addresses self-care behaviour performance. Within Canada, current heart surgery patient education efforts have been designed and evaluated using homogenous samples that self-identify their country of origin as England, Ireland or Scotland. However, approximately 42·6% of Canadian cardiovascular surgical patients self-identify their country of origin as India or China. Thus, current cardiovascular surgery patient education initiatives may not be applicable to all patients undergoing heart surgery, which may result in decreased patient outcomes such as performance of self-care behaviours. This descriptive study. A convenience sample of 90 patients who underwent heart surgery at one of two university-affiliated teaching hospitals, representing individuals of diverse backgrounds. Point-biserial correlational analysis was conducted to determine the relationship between country of origin and performance of self-care behaviours. Findings indicate individuals who self-identified their country of origin as England or Ireland were associated with a higher score on the number of self-care behaviours performed (p < 0·05) than individuals who self-identified other countries of origin. Self-care behaviours were taught using patient education materials that were designed based on feedback obtained from individuals whose country of origin was England or Ireland. This study provides preliminary evidence to suggest country of origin influences the amount of self-care behaviours individuals will perform. Patient education initiatives should incorporate the values, beliefs, attitudes and customs reflective of an individual's country of origin to enhance the likelihood of producing desired

  19. The patient work system: An analysis of self-care performance barriers among elderly heart failure patients and their informal caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Richard J.; Schubert, Christiane C.; Mickelson, Robin S.

    2014-01-01

    Human factors and ergonomics approaches have been successfully applied to study and improve the work performance of healthcare professionals. However, there has been relatively little work in “patient-engaged human factors,” or the application of human factors to the health-related work of patients and other nonprofessionals. This study applied a foundational human factors tool, the systems model, to investigate the barriers to self-care performance among chronically ill elderly patients and their informal (family) caregivers. A Patient Work System model was developed to guide the collection and analysis of interviews, surveys, and observations of patients with heart failure (n=30) and their informal caregivers (n=14). Iterative analyses revealed the nature and prevalence of self-care barriers across components of the Patient Work System. Person-related barriers were common and stemmed from patients’ biomedical conditions, limitations, knowledge deficits, preferences, and perceptions as well as the characteristics of informal caregivers and healthcare professionals. Task barriers were also highly prevalent and included task difficulty, timing, complexity, ambiguity, conflict, and undesirable consequences. Tool barriers were related to both availability and access of tools and technologies and their design, usability, and impact. Context barriers were found across three domains—physical-spatial, social-cultural, and organizational—and multiple “spaces” such as “at home,” “on the go,” and “in the community.” Barriers often stemmed not from single factors but from the interaction of several work system components. Study findings suggest the need to further explore multiple actors, context, and interactions in the patient work system during research and intervention design, as well as the need to develop new models and measures for studying patient and family work. PMID:25479983

  20. The patient work system: an analysis of self-care performance barriers among elderly heart failure patients and their informal caregivers.

    PubMed

    Holden, Richard J; Schubert, Christiane C; Mickelson, Robin S

    2015-03-01

    Human factors and ergonomics approaches have been successfully applied to study and improve the work performance of healthcare professionals. However, there has been relatively little work in "patient-engaged human factors," or the application of human factors to the health-related work of patients and other nonprofessionals. This study applied a foundational human factors tool, the systems model, to investigate the barriers to self-care performance among chronically ill elderly patients and their informal (family) caregivers. A Patient Work System model was developed to guide the collection and analysis of interviews, surveys, and observations of patients with heart failure (n = 30) and their informal caregivers (n = 14). Iterative analyses revealed the nature and prevalence of self-care barriers across components of the Patient Work System. Person-related barriers were common and stemmed from patients' biomedical conditions, limitations, knowledge deficits, preferences, and perceptions as well as the characteristics of informal caregivers and healthcare professionals. Task barriers were also highly prevalent and included task difficulty, timing, complexity, ambiguity, conflict, and undesirable consequences. Tool barriers were related to both availability and access of tools and technologies and their design, usability, and impact. Context barriers were found across three domains-physical-spatial, social-cultural, and organizational-and multiple "spaces" such as "at home," "on the go," and "in the community." Barriers often stemmed not from single factors but from the interaction of several work system components. Study findings suggest the need to further explore multiple actors, contexts, and interactions in the patient work system during research and intervention design, as well as the need to develop new models and measures for studying patient and family work. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Self-care behaviour for minor symptoms: can Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Use help us to understand it?

    PubMed

    Porteous, Terry; Wyke, Sally; Hannaford, Philip; Bond, Christine

    2015-02-01

    To explore whether Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Use can aid understanding of self-care behaviour and inform development of interventions to promote self-care for minor illness. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 24 Scottish participants about their experience and management of minor symptoms normally associated with analgesic use. Synthesised data from the interviews were mapped onto the Behavioral Model. All factors identified as influencing decisions about how to manage the symptoms discussed, mapped onto at least one domain of Andersen's model. Individual characteristics including beliefs, need factors and available resources were associated with health behaviour, including self-care. Outcomes such as perceived health status and consumer satisfaction from previous experience of managing symptoms also appeared to feed back into health behaviour. The Behavioral Model seems relevant to self-care as well as formal health services. Additional work is needed to explore applicability of the Behavioral Model to different types of symptoms, different modalities of self-care and in countries with different health care systems. Future quantitative studies should establish the relative importance of factors influencing the actions people take to manage minor symptoms to inform future interventions aimed at optimising self-care behaviour. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  2. Building skill in heart failure self-care among community dwelling older adults: results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Victoria Vaughan; Melkus, Gail D'Eramo; Katz, Stuart; Levine-Wong, Alissa; Dillworth, Judy; Cleland, Charles M; Riegel, Barbara

    2014-08-01

    Most of the day-to-day care for heart failure (HF) is done by the patient at home and requires skill in self-care. In this randomized controlled trial (RCT) we tested the efficacy of a community-based skill-building intervention on HF self-care, knowledge and health-related quality of life (HRQL) at 1- and 3-months. An ethnically diverse sample (n=75) of patients with HF (53% female; 32% Hispanic, 27% Black; mean age 69.9±10 years) was randomized to the intervention group (IG) or a wait-list control group (CG). The protocol intervention focused on tactical and situational HF self-care skill development delivered by lay health educators in community senior centers. Data were analyzed using mixed (between-within subjects) ANOVA. There was a significant improvement in self-care maintenance [F(2,47)=3.42, p=.04, (Cohen's f=.38)], self-care management [F(2,41)=4.10, p=.02, (Cohen's f=.45) and HF knowledge [F(2,53)=8.00, p=.001 (Cohen's f=.54)] in the IG compared to the CG. The skill-building intervention improved self-care and knowledge but not HRQL in this community-dwelling sample. Delivering an intervention in a community setting using lay health educators provides an alternative to clinic- or home-based teaching that may be useful across diverse populations and geographically varied settings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Do health literacy and patient empowerment affect self-care behaviour? A survey study among Turkish patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Eyüboğlu, Ezgi; Schulz, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess the impact of health literacy and patient empowerment on diabetes self-care behaviour in patients in metropolitan Turkish diabetes centres. The conceptual background is provided by the psychological health empowerment model, which holds that health literacy without patient empowerment comes down to wasting health resources, while empowerment without health literacy can lead to dangerous or suboptimal health behaviour. Design, setting and participants A cross-sectional study was conducted with 167 patients over the age of 18 from one of two diabetes clinics in a major Turkish City. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to eligible outpatients who had an appointment in one of the clinics. Health literacy was measured by a newly translated Turkish version of the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA) and the Chew self-report scale. Patient empowerment was measured by a 12-item scale based on Spreitzer's conceptualisation of psychological empowerment in the workplace. Self-care behaviour was measured by the Self-care behaviours were measured by the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Measure (SDSCA). Level of diabetes knowledge was measured by Diabetes Knowledge Test. Results Two subscales of empowerment, impact and self-determination, predicted self-reported frequency of self-care behaviours. Neither health literacy nor diabetes knowledge had an effect on self-care behaviours. Conclusions Health literacy might be more effective in clinical decisions while empowerment might exert a stronger influence on habitual health behaviours. PMID:26975936

  4. Patient autonomy-centered self-care checklist reduces hospital readmissions after ileostomy creation.

    PubMed

    Hardiman, Karin M; Reames, Christina D; McLeod, Marshall C; Regenbogen, Scott E

    2016-11-01

    Patients who undergo a colorectal operation that includes a new ileostomy incur high rates of readmission. Ostomates face a steep learning curve to master the skills and knowledge needed for success at home. We designed and implemented a patient-centered checklist promoting independence and validating self-care knowledge and care skills and evaluated its effect on readmissions after ileostomy creation. On a single inpatient unit, new ileostomy patients were taught and evaluated using a novel postoperative self-care checklist, while perioperative care for ostomates remained unchanged elsewhere in the institution. In a retrospective cohort including all consecutive ileostomy patients from 2 years before (period 1) and 1 year after (period 2) the checklist implementation, we identified univariable predictors of readmission within 30 days of discharge and used a multivariable, difference-in-differences approach to compare trends in readmission between the intervention and control units. Of the 430 patients in the study period, there were 116 with readmissions (26%). Readmitted patients had significantly greater all patient refined diagnosis related group weights (3.6 vs 3.3, P = .006) and longer initial duration of stay (13.3 vs 11.3 days, P = .006), and they were more likely to be emergency admissions (49% vs 38%, P = .04). The readmission rate on the intervention unit decreased from 28% in period 1 to 20% in period 2. The logistic regression-based difference-in-differences approach revealed that implementation of the checklist was an independent negative predictor of readmission (P = .04). Implementation of a patient-centered, self-care-oriented postoperative education checklist was associated with significantly reduced odds of readmission after ileostomy creation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The psychometric testing of the diabetes health promotion self-care scale.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruey-Hsia; Lin, Li-Ying; Cheng, Chung-Ping; Hsu, Min-Tao; Kao, Chia-Chan

    2012-06-01

    Health-promoting behavior is an important strategy to maintain and enhance health of patients with Type 2 diabetes. Few instruments have been developed to measure health promotion self-care behavior of patients with Type 2 diabetes. Developing and psychometric testing of the Chinese version of the Diabetes Health Promotion Self-Care Scale (DHPSC) for patients with Type 2 diabetes. Four hundred and eighty-nine patients with Type 2 diabetes were recruited from endocrine clinics in four hospitals in Kaohsiung City in southern Taiwan. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to assess the construct validity of the scale. Correlations between the DHPSC and the satisfaction subscale of Diabetes Quality of Life, Diabetes Empowerment Scale, and HbA1c were calculated to evaluate concurrent validity. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were used to assess the reliability of the scale. The study was conducted in 2007 and 2008. A proposed second-order factor model with seven subscales and 26 items fit the data well. The seven subscales were interpersonal relationships, diet, blood glucose self-monitoring, personal health responsibility, exercise, adherence to the recommended regimens, and foot care. The DHPSC statistically significantly correlated with the satisfaction subscale of Diabetes Quality of Life and the Diabetes Empowerment Scale. HbA1c only statistically significantly correlated with the subscale of health responsibility. Reliability was supported by acceptable Cronbach's alpha (range, .78-.94) and test-retest reliability (range, .76-.95). The DHPSC has satisfactory reliability and validity. Healthcare providers can use the DHPSC to comprehensively assess the health promotion self-care behaviors of patients with Type 2 diabetes.

  6. The Diabetes Symptom Self-Care Inventory: development and psychometric testing with Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    García, Alexandra A

    2011-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes is prevalent throughout the world. In previous studies of Mexican Americans with type 2 diabetes, 95%-97% of those sampled reported having symptoms they believe were caused by diabetes and most self-treated their symptoms. To more accurately capture Mexican Americans' symptom prevalence and their self-treatments, the Diabetes Symptom Self-Care Inventory (DSSCI) was adapted from the Diabetes Self-Care Instrument. This article describes the modification process used to perfect the DSSCI for use in improving self-care among people with type 2 diabetes. This instrumentation study used qualitative and quantitative methods. The study was completed in four phases that used focus groups, cognitive interviews, and survey administration. Four convenience samples were drawn from community-dwelling Mexican American adults, aged 25-75 years, with type 2 diabetes in an urban area and a rural location in Texas. Phase I: Seven focus groups (n=45) generated data for revising items. Phase II: Cognitive interviews with 16 participants were used to evaluate four revisions of the questionnaire. Phase III: Surveys were administered to 81 participants. Total number of symptoms on the DSSCI correlated with scores on the Centers for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale (r=0.65, P<0.001), Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised Diabetes Symptom subscale (r=0.57, P<0.001), and Audit of Diabetes-Dependent Quality of Life scale (r=-0.42, P<0.001). Minor revisions followed. Phase IV: Test-retest stability was demonstrated (n=44). The DSSCI is a culturally relevant, sound measure of Mexican Americans' diabetes symptoms and the actions they take to address them. Copyright © 2011 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Diabetes Symptom Self-Care Inventory: Development and Psychometric Testing with Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    García, Alexandra A.

    2010-01-01

    Context Type 2 diabetes is prevalent throughout the world. In previous studies of Mexican Americans with type 2 diabetes, 95-97% of those sampled reported having symptoms they believe were caused by diabetes and most self-treated their symptoms. To more accurately capture Mexican Americans’ symptom prevalence and their self-treatments, the Diabetes Symptom Self-Care Instrument (DSSCI) was adapted from the Diabetes Self-Care Instrument. Objectives This paper describes the modification process used to perfect the DSSCI for use in improving self-care among people with Type 2 diabetes. Methods This instrumentation study used qualitative and quantitative methods. The study was completed in four phases that used focus groups, cognitive interviews, and survey administration. Four convenience samples were drawn from community-based Mexican American adults, aged 25-75, with type 2 diabetes in an urban area and a rural location in Texas. Results Phase I: Seven focus groups (n=45) generated data for revising items. Phase II: Cognitive interviews with 16 participants were used to evaluate four revisions of the questionnaire. Phase III: Surveys were administered to 81 participants. Total number of symptoms on the DSSCI correlated with scores on the Centers for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale (r=.65, p < .001), Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised Diabetes symptom subscale (r=.57, p < .001), and Audit of Diabetes-Dependent Quality of Life scale (r= -.42, p < .001). Minor revisions followed. Phase IV: Test-retest stability was demonstrated (n = 44). Conclusion The DSSCI is a culturally-relevant, sound measure of Mexican Americans’ diabetes symptoms and the actions they take to address them. PMID:21276705

  8. A brief intervention changing oral self-care, self-efficacy, and self-monitoring.

    PubMed

    Schwarzer, Ralf; Antoniuk, Agata; Gholami, Maryam

    2015-02-01

    The roles of self-efficacy and self-monitoring as proximal predictors of dental flossing frequency are studied in the context of an oral health intervention. A study among 287 university students, aged 19 to 26 years, compared an intervention group that received a brief self-regulatory treatment, with a passive and an active control group. Dental flossing, self-efficacy, and self-monitoring were assessed at baseline and 3 weeks later. The intervention led to an increase in dental flossing regardless of experimental condition. However, treatment-specific gains were documented for self-efficacy and self-monitoring. Moreover, changes in the latter two served as mediators in a path model, linking the intervention with subsequent dental flossing and yielding significant indirect effects. Self-efficacy and self-monitoring play a mediating role in facilitating dental flossing. Interventions that aim at an improvement in oral self-care should consider using these constructs. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? The adoption and maintenance of oral self-care can be facilitated by a number of social-cognitive variables. Interventions that include planning, action control, or self-efficacy components have been shown to improve dental flossing. In one recent study on flossing in adolescent girls, planning intervention effects were mediated by self-efficacy. What does this study add? Self-monitoring is associated with better oral self-care. A 10-min intervention improves self-efficacy and self-monitoring. Self-efficacy and self-monitoring operate as mediators between treatment and flossing. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  9. Regulatory focus and adherence to self-care behaviors among adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Avraham, Rinat; Van Dijk, Dina; Simon-Tuval, Tzahit

    2016-09-01

    The aims of this study were, first, to test the association between regulatory focus of adults with type 2 diabetes and their adherence to two types of self-care behaviors - lifestyle change (e.g. physical activity and diet) and medical care regimens (blood-glucose monitoring, foot care and medication usage). Second, to explore whether a fit between the message framing and patients' regulatory focus would improve their intentions to adhere specifically when the type of behavior fits the patients' regulatory focus as well. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 130 adults with type 2 diabetes who were hospitalized in an academic medical center. The patients completed a set of questionnaires that included their diabetes self-care activities, regulatory focus, self-esteem and demographic, socioeconomic and clinical data. In addition, participants were exposed to either a gain-framed or a loss-framed message, and were then asked to indicate their intention to improve adherence to self-care behaviors. A multivariable linear regression model revealed that promoters reported higher adherence to lifestyle change behaviors than preventers did (B = .60, p = .028). However, no effect of regulatory focus on adherence to medical care regimens was found (B = .46, p = .114). In addition, preventers reported higher intentions to adhere to medical care behaviors when the message framing was congruent with prevention focus (B = 1.16, p = .023). However, promoters did not report higher intentions to adhere to lifestyle behaviors when the message framing was congruent with promotion focus (B = -.16, p = .765). These findings justify the need to develop tailor-made interventions that are adjusted to both patients' regulatory focus and type of health behavior.

  10. Socio-economic inequalities in health, habits and self-care during pregnancy in Spain.

    PubMed

    Larrañaga, Isabel; Santa-Marina, Loreto; Begiristain, Haizea; Machón, Mónica; Vrijheid, Martine; Casas, Maribel; Tardón, Adonina; Fernández-Somoano, Ana; Llop, Sabrina; Rodriguez-Bernal, Clara L; Fernandez, Mariana F

    2013-09-01

    Socioeconomic disadvantage can be harmful for mother's health and can influence child's health long term. The aim of this study is to analyse social inequalities between pregnant women from four INMA (INfancia y Medio Ambiente) cohorts. The analysis included 2,607 pregnant women recruited between 2004 and 2008 from four INMA cohorts. Data on maternal characteristics were collected through two questionnaires completed in the first and third trimester of pregnancy. The relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and maternal health, dietary intake, lifestyle habits and self-care related variables was modelled using logistic regression analysis. 33.5 % of women had a university level of education and 47 % had high occupational class. Women with higher SES reported healthier habits, fewer complications during pregnancy, better weight gain control and attended more prenatal appointments than women with lower SES. The risk of sedentary behaviour and passive smoking was higher among women with a lower level of education (OR = 1.7, 95 % CI 1.3-2.2 and OR = 1.6, 95 % CI 1.2-2.3, respectively) and with less skilled occupations (OR = 1.7, 95 % CI 1.4-2.0 and OR = 1.2, 95 % CI 1.0-1.5, respectively). Although both SES indicators-occupation and education-act as social determinants of diet, occupation was a more powerful determinant than education. For other lifestyle and self-caring variables, education was a more powerful predictor than occupation. Social inequalities were observed in health, habits and self-care during pregnancy. Proper care during pregnancy requires the control of common clinical variables and the knowledge of socioeconomic conditions of the pregnant women.

  11. Development of the outcome expectancy scale for self-care among periodontal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Kakudate, Naoki; Morita, Manabu; Fukuhara, Shunichi; Sugai, Makoto; Nagayama, Masato; Isogai, Emiko; Kawanami, Masamitsu; Chiba, Itsuo

    2011-12-01

    The theory of self-efficacy states that specific efficacy expectations affect behaviour. Two types of efficacy expectations are described within the theory. Self-efficacy expectations are the beliefs in the capacity to perform a specific behaviour. Outcome expectations are the beliefs that carrying out a specific behaviour will lead to a desired outcome. To develop and examine the reliability and validity of an outcome expectancy scale for self-care (OESS) among periodontal disease patients. A 34-item scale was tested on 101 patients at a dental clinic. Accuracy was improved by item analysis, and internal consistency and test-retest stability were investigated. Concurrent validity was tested by examining associations of the OESS score with the self-efficacy scale for self-care (SESS) score and plaque index score. Construct validity was examined by comparing OESS scores between periodontal patients at initial visit (group 1) and those continuing maintenance care (group 2). Item analysis identified 13 items for the OESS. Factor analysis extracted three factors: social-, oral- and self-evaluative outcome expectancy. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the OESS was 0.90. A significant association was observed between test and retest scores, and between the OESS and SESS and plaque index scores. Further, group 2 had a significantly higher mean OESS score than group 1. We developed a 13-item OESS with high reliability and validity which may be used to assess outcome expectancy for self-care. A patient's psychological condition with regard to behaviour and affective status can be accurately evaluated using the OESS with SESS. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. What are the highly important and desirable patient engagement actions for self-care as perceived by individuals living in the southern United States?

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Pierson, James Marcus

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory survey study aimed to identify patient engagement actions that are the most frequently named as being highly important (top 30 by importance) or ones that they want to do (top 30 by desire) for community-dwelling adult patients living in the southern United States. Items not making the list of the top 30 by ability were also identified. Patient engagement is still an ambiguous term among population health and health care professionals in the United States as we lack a clear understanding of what it entails. This 2015-2016 study used convenience sampling to recruit subjects in a university's student health service department and in eight senior centers. Two hundred and fifty adult patients older than 18 years in the Upper Cumberland region of Tennessee participated in the study (82% response rate). A 57-item inventory, "The Patient Action Inventory for Self-Care," was developed and used to ascertain patients' self-designated preferences and capabilities in order to understand their needs for education and support. Respondents included 159 (63.6%) women, 62 (24.8%) men, and 29 (11.6%) who did not indicate their gender. Combining the list of the top 30 importance items and the list of the top 30 desired items yielded a list of 35 items; noteworthy is the fact that the list of the top 30 ability actions contained nine items that were not found in a previously mentioned list of 35 high-ranking importance and desired items. This study validated the necessity of analyzing patient engagement actions by importance, desirability, and ability to accomplish it. These three levels are distinct from each other. Nurses may use future versions of the inventory to assist patients in identifying self-care actions to engage in. Use of the inventory will demonstrate respect for patients' preferences and may thus improve engagement.

  13. Pronounced impairment of everyday skills and self-care in posterior cortical atrophy.

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, Timothy J; Yong, Keir X X; Foxe, David; Hodges, John; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2015-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by progressive visual dysfunction and parietal, occipital, and occipitotemporal atrophy. The aim of this study was to compare the impact of PCA and typical Alzheimer's disease (tAD) on everyday functional abilities and neuropsychiatric status. The Cambridge Behavioural Inventory-Revised was given to carers of 32 PCA and 71 tAD patients. PCA patients showed significantly greater impairment in everyday skills and self-care while the tAD group showed greater impairment in aspects of memory and orientation, and motivation. We suggest that PCA poses specific challenges for those caring for people affected by the condition.

  14. Introducing sensitive issues and self-care strategies to first year midwifery students.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Allison M; Wight, Raechel; Watts, Nicole; Catling, Christine

    2018-06-01

    first year midwifery students learn early in semester about situations in midwifery where a high level of emotion is expressed, such as taking a sexual history, being faced with the body image changes of pregnancy and working with women in the extreme pain of labour. Commencing students usually have not had exposure to the realities of studying and working in midwifery, and often have an idealised view of midwifery that may lead to attrition from the course. We aimed to equip students with personal and professional tools to discuss sensitive issues in midwifery and promote self-care through the development of two workshops. The first workshop focussed on sensitive issues in midwifery and the second on self-care strategies. quantitative and qualitative data were collected pre and post workshops using a survey. the workshops were developed at one university in New South Wales, Australia. Beginning first year midwifery students MEASUREMENTS: feeling more comfortable, confident and knowledgeable was measured using a paired t-test from the responses on a pre and post workshop survey. Content analysis was performed on the qualitative survey responses. there were significant increases in the students feeling more comfortable to discuss sensitive issues in midwifery following the first workshop. They found meeting new people, respecting opinions, normalizing confronting topics to be valuable and useful. The second workshop found significant differences in being more confident and knowledgeable to access and try new self-care strategies in both their personal and professional life. Students discussed learning to be more mindful in order to prepare for stressful situations. They became aware of their feeling and thoughts when under stress and said they would practice techniques including meditation. the workshops assisted the students to develop peer support, self-care strategies and coping mechanisms when faced with the intimate and sometimes confronting nature of midwifery

  15. A Health Collaborative Network Focus on Self-care Processes in Personal Assistant Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Fuente, Ma Victoria; Ros, Lorenzo

    Public health is oriented to the management of an adequate health atmosphere which acts directly on health, as well as health education work and the supervision of environmental health threats. The work presented in this paper aims to reduce inequality, and give disabled people the tools to be integrated more effectively, reducing social exclusion, removing obstacles and barriers, and facilitating mobility and the use of technology. The work is planned to design a special healthcare collaborative network as the best solution for addressing the needs of the disabled self-care and health care community through the creation and implementation of an interconnected, electronic information infrastructure and adoption of open data standards.

  16. Construction and validation of the Self-care Assessment Instrument for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Simonize Cunha Barreto de; Zanetti, Maria Lúcia; Sawada, Namie Okino; Barreto, Ikaro Daniel de Carvalho; Andrade, Joseilze Santos de; Otero, Liudmila Miyar

    2017-06-05

    to construct and validate the contents of the Self-care Assessment instrument for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. methodological study, based on Orem's General Theory of Nursing. The empirical categories and the items of the instrument were elucidated through a focus group. The content validation process was performed by seven specialists and the semantic analysis by 14 patients. The Content Validity Indices of the items, ≥0.78, and of the scale, ≥0.90, were considered excellent. the instrument contains 131 items in six dimensions corresponding to the health deviation self-care requisites. Regarding the maintenance, a Content Validity Index of 0.98 was obtained for the full set of items, and, regarding the relevance, Content Validity Indices ≥0.80 were obtained for the majority of the assessed psychometric criteria. the instrument showed evidence of content validity. construir e validar o conteúdo do instrumento Avaliação do Autocuidado para pacientes com diabetes mellitus tipo 2. estudo metodológico, fundamentado na Teoria Geral de Enfermagem de Orem. As categorias empíricas e os itens do instrumento foram elucidados por meio de grupo focal. O processo de validação de conteúdo foi realizado por sete especialistas e a análise semântica por 14 pacientes. Foram considerados como excelente Índice de Validade de Conteúdo dos itens ≥ 0,78 e da escala ≥ 0,90. o instrumento contém seis dimensões correspondentes aos requisitos de autocuidado para o desvio da saúde, desmembradas em 131 itens. Quanto à permanência, obteve-se para o conjunto total de itens Índice de Validade de Conteúdo de 0,98, e quanto à adequação Índice de Validade de Conteúdo ≥ 0,80 para maioria dos critérios psicométricos avaliados. o instrumento mostrou evidências de validade de conteúdo. construir y validar el contenido del instrumento Evaluación del Autocuidado para pacientes con diabetes mellitus tipo 2. estudio metodológico, fundamentado en la Teor

  17. Measuring Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Quality of Care: Discharge Self-Care Functional Status Quality Measure.

    PubMed

    Pardasaney, Poonam K; Deutsch, Anne; Iriondo-Perez, Jeniffer; Ingber, Melvin J; McMullen, Tara

    2018-06-01

    To describe the calculation and psychometric properties of the discharge self-care functional status quality measure implemented in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' (CMS) Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility (IRF) Quality Reporting Program on October 1, 2016. Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) patients from 38 IRFs that participated in the CMS Post-Acute Care Payment Reform Demonstration were included in this cohort study. Data came from the Continuity Assessment Record and Evaluation Item Set, IRF-Patient Assessment Instrument, and Medicare claims. For each patient, we calculated an expected discharge self-care score, risk-adjusted for demographic and baseline clinical characteristics. The performance score of each IRF equaled the percentage of patient stays where the observed discharge self-care score met or exceeded the expected score. We assessed the measure's discriminatory ability across IRFs and reliability. IRFs. Medicare FFS patients aged ≥21 years (N=4769). Not applicable. Facility-level discharge self-care quality measure performance score. A total of 4769 patient stays were included; 57% of stays were in women, and 12.1% were in patients aged <65 years. Stroke was the most common diagnosis (21.8%). The mean±SD performance score was 55.1%±16.6% (range, 25.8%-100%). About 54% of IRFs had scores significantly different from the percentage of stays that met or exceeded the expected discharge self-care score in the overall demonstration sample. The quality measure showed strong reliability, with intraclass correlation coefficients of .91. The discharge self-care quality measure showed strong discriminatory ability and reliability, representing an important initial step in evaluation of IRF self-care outcomes. A wide range in performance scores suggested a gap in quality of care across IRFs. Future work should include testing the measure with nationwide data from all IRFs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Metabolic control, self-care behaviors, and parenting in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: a correlational study.

    PubMed

    Greene, Maia Stoker; Mandleco, Barbara; Roper, Susanne Olsen; Marshall, Elaine S; Dyches, Tina

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to explore relationships among metabolic control, self-care behaviors, and parenting in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Twenty-nine adolescents (mean age, 14.1 years) and their parents participated. Metabolic control was determined by an average of 4 A1C values taken prior to study enrollment; self-care behaviors were measured with a 12-item self-report questionnaire; parenting style was evaluated using the Parenting Practices Report. The mean for A1C values was 8.5%; the mean for overall self-care behaviors was 4.93 (5 = usually). Participants rated themselves highest on the self-care behaviors of giving insulin shots when indicated and adjusting insulin when eating a lot. They ranked themselves lowest on eating a low-fat diet and testing urine for ketones. Parents tended to be more authoritative in their approaches to parenting than either authoritarian or permissive. A significant relationship was found between authoritative mothering and adolescent self-care behaviors and metabolic control. Regression analyses controlling for age and length of time with diabetes confirmed the significance of these relationships. Authoritative fathering positively correlated with the self-care behaviors of monitoring blood glucose, taking insulin, and not skipping meals. A relationship was also noted between permissive parenting by mothers/fathers and poorer metabolic outcomes. However, the permissive parenting correlations did not remain significant when controlling for age and length of time with diabetes. Clinicians may help prevent declining participation in self-care behaviors and metabolic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes by working with parents, particularly mothers, and encouraging authoritative parenting.

  19. Family member accompaniment to routine medical visits is associated with better self-care in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Cené, Crystal W; Haymore, Laura Beth; Lin, Feng-Chang; Laux, Jeffrey; Jones, Christine Delong; Wu, Jia-Rong; DeWalt, Darren; Pignone, Mike; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2015-03-01

    To examine the association between frequency of family member accompaniment to medical visits and heart failure (HF) self-care maintenance and management and to determine whether associations are mediated through satisfaction with provider communication. Cross-sectional survey of 150 HF patients seen in outpatient clinics. HF self-care maintenance and management were assessed using the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index. Satisfaction with provider communication was assessed using a single question originally included in the American Board of Internal Medicine Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire. Frequency of family member accompaniment to visits was assessed using a single-item question. We performed regression analyses to examine associations between frequency of accompaniment and outcomes. Mediation analysis was conducted using MacKinnon's criteria. Overall, 61% reported accompaniment by family members to some/most/every visit. Accompaniment to some/most/every visit was associated with higher self-care maintenance (β = 6.4, SE 2.5; p = 0.01) and management (β = 12.7, SE 4.9; p = 0.01) scores. Satisfaction with provider communication may mediate the association between greater frequency of accompaniment to visits and self-care maintenance (1.092; p = 0.06) and self-care management (1.428; p = 0.13). Accompaniment to medical visits is associated with better HF self-care maintenance and management, and this effect may be mediated through satisfaction with provider communication. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  20. Scope of information communications technology in the health of diabetes patients in poor rural zones of panama through holistic, interactive, and persuasive model to facilitate self-care of diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Lombardo, Miguel; Jipsion, Armando; Alvarez, Humberto; Ruiz, Ernestina Mensalva; Mora, Elena Villalba

    2010-09-01

    In Latin America, public health systems that manage and warrant the health of the population lack mechanisms and technological capabilities that enable them to accept and adopt initiatives focused to guide, look after, and improve the quality of life of millions of patients with diabetes who need attention and special care. However, the proposal presented here for a holistic, interactive, and persuasive model to facilitate self-care of diabetes patients (hiPAPD) is the first proposal in Panama, Central America, and the Caribbean Region to develop and implement information communications technology (ICT) platforms for the care of patients with chronic diseases such as diabetes. The process of experimentation was initiated with an agreement with all the staff of the project to comply with the international biomedical studies stipulations, having as reference the Declaration of Helsinki of the World Medical Association (Recommendations to Guide to Doctors in Biomedical Research on People). After several months of evaluation and ongoing work the study obtained successful validation of the hiPAPD model. The project had the support of 107 patients with diabetes, their families, friends, doctors, nurses and nursing assistants, and social groups in rural communities. Finally, the project contributed to society with a highly innovative ICT environment that facilitates self-care of diabetes patients without financial resources and health. A timely health treatment at a decisive moment may be the difference in care for patients. Through the validation process conducted in this research initiative, it was demonstrated that the hiPAPD model, from the perspective of the patient with diabetes, relatives, friends, health workforce (nurses and nursing assistants), doctors, and societal contexts, allowed the improvement of the quality of life of patients with diabetes in poor rural zones of Panama.

  1. Self-care and Subjectivity among Mexican Diabetes Patients in the United States.

    PubMed

    Seligman, Rebecca; Mendenhall, Emily; Valdovinos, Maria D; Fernandez, Alicia; Jacobs, Elizabeth A

    2015-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes is considered a public health crisis, particularly among people of Mexican descent in the United States. Clinical approaches to diabetes management increasingly emphasize self-care, which places responsibility for illness on individuals and mandates self-regulation. Using narrative and free-list data from a two-phase study of low-income first- and second-generation Mexican immigrants living with diabetes, we present evidence that self-care among our participants involves emotion regulation as well as maintenance of and care for family. These findings suggest, in turn, that the ideology of selfhood on which these practices are based does not correspond with the ideology of selfhood cultivated in the U.S. clinical sphere. Divergence between these ideologies may lead to self-conflict for patients and the experience of moral blame. We argue that our participants use their explanations of diabetes causality and control as a form of self-making, which both resists such blame and asserts an alternative form of selfhood that may align more closely with the values held by our Mexican-American participants. © 2014 by the American Anthropological Association.

  2. Self-care behaviors of adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Greece.

    PubMed

    Chourdakis, Michael; Kontogiannis, Vasileios; Malachas, Konstantinos; Pliakas, Triantafyllos; Kritis, Aristidis

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine self-care behaviors of adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus living in the Metropolitan Area of Thessaloniki in Northern Greece. The Summary of Diabetes Self-Care behaviors measurement was administered to 215 patients, out of which 177 were eligible to participate (87 males). Patients, aged 30 years or more, were recruited through a university hospital day-clinic. Older patients (>65 years), as well as those with "higher educational level" did not distribute their daily carbohydrate intake equally. Nevertheless, they were more likely to adapt to their physician's recommendations regarding medication and to regularly perform suggested blood glucose checking. Exercise patterns were more often found for higher educated, earlier diagnosed males. Younger patients were less likely to follow their healthcare professional's recommendations, regarding diet, medication intake, blood glucose checking, foot care and exercise compared to older patients. These results pose a higher risk for complications and morbidity in younger patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, who most possibly will require intensive treatment in the future.

  3. The diabetes online community: Older adults supporting self-care through peer health.

    PubMed

    Litchman, Michelle L; Rothwell, Erin; Edelman, Linda S

    2018-03-01

    The use of the diabetes online community (DOC) is growing across all age groups. The aim of this exploratory study was to describe why older adults participated in the DOC, and how DOC users interacted with their healthcare providers. Telephone interviews (N=20) were conducted with older adult DOC users (born between 1946 and 1964) living in the United States. Interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis adhering to rigor and reproducibility standards. Themes that emerged from the data related to DOC participation included: information to improve self-care, emotional support, belonging to a community, validation of information, cause for concern and interaction with healthcare providers. Participants used the DOC for day to day diabetes management advice and healthcare providers for medical information and care. Participants highly valued the DOC and regarded their participation as a way to increase knowledge to improve self-care and reciprocate emotional support with others for diabetes management. The DOC filled gaps in knowledge and support participants were not able to get elsewhere. The DOC serves as an important source of information and support for individuals with diabetes and may be a cost-effective strategy to augment standard diabetes care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Self-Care-Based Treatment Using Ordinary Elastic Bandages for Venous Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Suehiro, Kotaro; Morikage, Noriyasu; Harada, Takasuke; Samura, Makoto; Takeuchi, Yuriko; Mizoguchi, Takahiro; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2017-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to study venous leg ulcer (VLU) healing and recurrence rates of VLU using a self-care-based treatment strategy. Methods: The study included 36 patients (43 legs) who visited our clinic between April 2009 and June 2015 because of non-healing VLUs and who had been treated by us for more than a year (until June 2016). Patients or their caregivers were first provided instructions for performing the “no-intentional-stretch” bandaging technique using ordinary elastic bandages. Wounds were cleansed with tepid water daily, and bandages were re-applied by patients or their caregivers; this was continued until VLUs were healed. Compression was discontinued after healing, but was restarted if persistent swelling and/or dermatitis was noticed on their legs. Results: The median ulcer size was 6.5 cm2 (range, 1–105 cm2). The median number of clinic visits until healing was six (range, 3–35). The 6- and 12-month healing rates were 67% and 86%, respectively. Twenty (44%) legs required compression therapy after VLU healing. The cumulative recurrence-free rate at 60 months was 86%. Conclusion: Reasonable healing and recurrence rates were achieved by applying a self-care-based VLU treatment strategy. PMID:29147163

  5. Low-income Euro-American mothers' perceptions of health and self-care practices.

    PubMed

    Mendias, Elnora P; Clark, Michele C; Guevara, Edilma B; Svrcek, Claire Y

    2011-01-01

    Health promotion activities may decrease preventable diseases and health system overuse. This study examined how low-income Euro-American mothers described their health/wellness, self-care practices (SCP), and SCP benefits, barriers, and interpersonal influences (norms, modeling, and social support) affecting their SCP. This descriptive qualitative study used a convenience sample of 10 low-income, English-speaking mothers, 25-43 years old, seeking women's/children's health services at a large urban Texas health clinic. Data were collected via face-to-face interviews, using a standardized semistructured interview guide; data were analyzed using Miles and Huberman's qualitative research methods. All participants primarily described themselves positively and as mothers and workers. Most viewed health and wellness as distinct but typically included physical and emotional well-being. Mothers valued health and SCP for personal and family reasons. All identified SCP benefits. Most identified SCP barriers. Women viewed themselves as vital to family function and well-being, learned SCP primarily from parents during childhood, and described limited support for SCP. The results provide a better understanding of participants' self-care decision making and are useful in designing appropriate clinical health promotions. Reducing health inequities in low-income women requires further study of the underlying causes and development of effective policies and measures to address them. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Appraisal of Self-Care Agency Scale - Revised 1

    PubMed Central

    Stacciarini, Thaís Santos Guerra; Pace, Ana Emilia

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to analyze the factor structure of the Appraisal of Self-Care Agency Scale-Revised (ASAS-R), adapted for Brazil. Method: methodological study conducted with 150 individuals with diabetes mellitus cared for by the Family Health Strategy, most of whom are elderly with low educational levels. The test of the hypothesis concerning the confirmatory factor composition of the ASAS-R was performed using latent variables structural equations. Results: the model’s goodness-of-fit indexes were satisfactory (χ2 = 259.19; χ2/g.l = 2.97, p < 0.001; GFI = 0.85; RMR = 0.07; RMSEA = 0.09); the factor loads were greater than 0.40; and most item-to-factor-correlations presented moderate to strong magnitude (0.34 to 0.58); total alpha value was 0.74, while the alpha of the three factors were 0.69, 0.38 and 0.69, respectively. Conclusion: the scale’s factor structure presented satisfactory validity and reliability results, with the exception of one factor. Application of this scale to samples of the general population is desirable in order to strengthen analyses of internal consistency and the dimensionality of the factor structure. This study is expected to contribute to further studies addressing the self-care agency construct and the development of the ASAS-R. PMID:28146182

  7. An active learning complementary and alternative medicine session in a self-care therapeutics class.

    PubMed

    Mattison, Melissa J; Nemec, Eric C

    2014-09-15

    To provide an interactive, non-supplement based complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) session in a self-care therapeutics class and to evaluate the effect of the session on pharmacy students' perceptions and knowledge of CAM. Second professional year pharmacy students enrolled in a required 3-credit course titled Self-Care Therapeutics participated in an active learning session on CAM. Students physically engaged in 5 separate active learning CAM sessions including massage therapy, Tai Chi, yoga, progressive muscle relaxation, and Reiki. Students were assessed on both knowledge and perception of CAM. Concept mastery was assessed using a written examination and individual readiness assurance tests (iRAT) and team readiness assurance tests (tRAT). Perception of CAM was measured using both a presession and a postsession survey. Participating in an intensive, active learning CAM session provided an opportunity to increase students' knowledge of CAM and an effective strategy for providing the learner with the experience to better envision incorporation into patient therapies.

  8. The Holistic, Interactive and Persuasive Model to Facilitate Self-care of Patients with Diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas-Lombard, Miguel; Jipsion, Armando; Vejarano, Rafael; Camargo, Ismael; Álvarez, Humberto; Mora, Elena Villalba; Menasalva Ruíz, Ernestina

    The patient, in his multiple facets of citizen and user of services of health, needs to acquire during, and later in his majority of age, favorable conditions of health to accentuate his quality of life and it is the responsibility of the health organizations to initiate the process of support for that patient during the process of mature life. The provision of services of health and the relation doctor-patient are undergoing important changes in the entire world, forced to a large extent by the indefensibility of the system itself. Nevertheless decision making requires previous information and, what more the necessity itself of being informed requires having a “culture” of health that generates pro activity and the capacity of searching for instruments that facilitate the awareness of the suffering and the self-care of the same. Therefore it is necessary to put into effect a ICT model (hiPAPD) that has the objective of causing Interaction, Motivation and Persuasion towards the surroundings of the diabetic Patient facilitating his self-care. As a result the patient himself individually manages his services through devices and AmI Systems (Ambient Intelligent).

  9. Self care programs and multiple sclerosis: physical therapeutics treatment - literature review.

    PubMed

    Demaille-Wlodyka, S; Donze, C; Givron, P; Gallien, P

    2011-03-01

    To clarify the therapeutic education program impact with multiple sclerosis patients, literature review. Highlight contents and efficacy. A non-systematic review on Medline, PubMed and Cochrane library databases from 1966 to 2010 using the following keywords: "multiple sclerosis", "self-care", "self-management" and specific symptoms keywords. Clinical trials and randomized clinical trials, as well as literature reviews published in English, French and German will be analyzed. Counseling is a part of the non-pharmacological management of chronic illnesses such as multiple sclerosis. Symptoms' diversity and the different clinical forms limit standardized programs of self-care management, applicable to patients. In the literature review, counseling programs have often low metrology. A behavior change with patients and medical staff could exist. To empower the patient, to reduce symptoms' impact and to improve treatment access are the aims of educational therapy. Therapeutic education program for multiple sclerosis patients could progress with their standardization and assessment, for each sign. To promote the educational therapy of multiple sclerosis patients, a specific training for medical staff, as specific financing are necessary. 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Self-Efficacy and Blood Pressure Self-Care Behaviors in Patients on Chronic Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Kauric-Klein, Zorica; Peters, Rosalind M; Yarandi, Hossein N

    2017-07-01

    This study examined the effects of an educative, self-regulation intervention on blood pressure self-efficacy, self-care outcomes, and blood pressure control in adults receiving hemodialysis. Simple randomization was done at the hemodialysis unit level. One hundred eighteen participants were randomized to usual care ( n = 59) or intervention group ( n = 59). The intervention group received blood pressure education sessions and 12 weeks of individual counseling on self-regulation of blood pressure, fluid, and salt intake. There was no significant increase in self-efficacy scores within ( F = .55, p = .46) or between groups at 12 weeks ( F = 2.76, p = .10). Although the intervention was not successful, results from the total sample ( N = 118) revealed that self-efficacy was significantly related to a number of self-care outcomes including decreased salt intake, lower interdialytic weight gain, increased adherence to blood pressure medications, and fewer missed hemodialysis appointments. Increased blood pressure self-efficacy was also associated with lower diastolic blood pressure.

  11. Relationship between perceived social support and self-care behavior in type 2 diabetics: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Mohebi, Siamak; Parham, Mahmoud; Sharifirad, Gholamreza; Gharlipour, Zabihollah; Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl; Rajati, Fatemeh

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Social support is one of the most effective factors on the diabetic self-care. This study aimed to assess social support and its relationship to self-care in type 2 diabetic patients in Qom, Iran. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 325 diabetics attending the Diabetes Mellitus Association. METHODS: Patients who meet inclusion and exclusion criteria were selected using random sampling method. Data were collected by the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, with hemoglobin A1C test. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and independent t-test, analysis of variance, Pearson correlation, and linear regression test, using 0.05 as the critical significance level, provided by SPSS software. RESULTS: The mean and standard deviation of self-care and social support scores were 4.31 ± 2.7 and 50.32 ± 11.09, respectively. The mean level of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) of patients was 7.54. There was a significant difference between mean score of self-care behaviors and social support according to gender and marital status (P < 0.05). The regression analysis showed that disease duration was the only variable which had a significant effect on the level of HbA1C (P < 0.001). Pearson correlation coefficient indicated that self-care and social support significantly correlated (r = 0.489, P > 0.001) and also predictive power of social support was 0.28. Self-care was significantly better in diabetics with HbA1C ≤7%. Patients who had higher HbA1C felt less, but not significant, social support. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicated the relationship between social support and self-care behaviors in type 2 diabetic patients. Interventions that focus on improving the social support and self-care of diabetic control may be more effective in improving glycemic control. PMID:29693029

  12. Longitudinal testing of the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills model of self-care among adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Sophie; Coulombe, Simon; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Côté, José; Lespérance, François; Chiasson, Jean-Louis; Bherer, Louis; Lambert, Jean; Houle, Janie

    2016-11-01

    The study's aim was to test prospective associations between information, motivation, and behavioral skills (IMB model) and self-care behaviors (diet, exercise, and blood glucose testing) among patients with type 2 diabetes. 295 participants were surveyed one (T1), six (T2), and 12 (T3) months after a diabetes course. Cross-lagged panel analyses were performed to test unidirectional and bidirectional relationships between IMB model variables and self-care behaviors. Blood-glucose testing at T1 was positively related to information at T2, which in turn was positively related to blood-glucose testing at T3. Controlled motivation at T1 was positively related to exercise at T2. Autonomous motivation at T2 was positively associated with exercise at T3. There was a positive bidirectional relationship across time between behavioral skills and general diet. Patterns of prospective associations between IMB model variables and diabetes self-care depend on the self-care behavior considered. This model offers an interesting framework for examining how diabetes self-care behaviors evolve. Diabetes education programs should provide information about current health status and promote experiential learning to help patients realize the impact of their behaviors on glycemic control; should foster autonomous motivation for long-term change; and should build on patients' strengths and skills. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Validation of an Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills model of diabetes self-care (IMB-DSC).

    PubMed

    Osborn, Chandra Y; Egede, Leonard E

    2010-04-01

    Comprehensive behavior change frameworks are needed to provide guidance for the design, implementation, and evaluation of diabetes self-care programs in diverse populations. We applied the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) model, a well-validated, comprehensive health behavior change framework, to diabetes self-care. Patients with diabetes were recruited from an outpatient clinic. Information gathered pertained to demographics, diabetes knowledge (information); diabetes fatalism (personal motivation); social support (social motivation); and diabetes self-care (behavior). Hemoglobin A1C values were extracted from the patient medical record. Structural equation models tested the IMB framework. More diabetes knowledge (r=0.22 p<0.05), less fatalistic attitudes (r=-0.20, p<0.05), and more social support (r=0.27, p<0.01) were independent, direct predictors of diabetes self-care behavior; and through behavior, were related to glycemic control (r=-0.20, p<0.05). Consistent with the IMB model, having more information (more diabetes knowledge), personal motivation (less fatalistic attitudes), and social motivation (more social support) was associated with behavior; and behavior was the sole predictor of glycemic control. The IMB model is an appropriate, comprehensive health behavior change framework for diabetes self-care. The findings indicate that in addition to knowledge, diabetes education programs should target personal and social motivation to effect behavior change. 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Randomized study of the effect of video education on heart failure healthcare utilization, symptoms, and self-care behaviors.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nancy M; Buchsbaum, Robin; Li, Jianbo

    2007-12-01

    Adherence to self-care behaviors improves heart failure (HF) morbidity and life quality. We examined short-term impact of video education (VE) in addition to standard education (SE) on HF healthcare utilization and self-care behavior adherence. One hundred and twelve hospitalized patients were randomly assigned to SE (n=53) or SE plus VE (n=59). Differences between groups were analyzed in patients who underwent 3-month follow-up (39 SE and 37 VE patients). Mean age was 60+/-14 years; mean HF length was 57 months. Three-month healthcare utilization was similar between groups but VE patients needed less extra diuretic dosing (P<0.02), received more HF literature (P<0.03), and had less healthcare team telephone communication (P<0.04). VE patients had greater sign/symptom reduction (P<0.04); especially related to edema (P<0.01) and fatigue (P<0.01) and initiated more actions for edema (P<0.05) and dyspnea (with exercise or rest, both P<0.01). Overall, VE patients had a higher mean self-care behavior score (P<0.01), reflecting greater self-care adherence. Video education prompts self-care behavior adherence to control worsening signs/symptoms of volume overload. During 3-month follow-up, utilization of most healthcare resources was unchanged. VE is a useful adjunct to in-person education.

  15. The Cultural Meaning of Cardiac Illness and Self-Care Among Lebanese Patients With Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Dumit, Nuhad Yazbik; Magilvy, Joan Kathy; Afifi, Rima

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac disease is the leading cause of death in Lebanon, accounting for 22% to 26% of total deaths in the country. A thorough understanding of perceptions of cardiac illness and related self-care management is critical to the development of secondary prevention programs that are specific to the Lebanese culture. To explore the cultural perceptions of cardiac illness and the associated meaning of self-care among Lebanese patients. Using a qualitative descriptive method, semistructured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 15 Lebanese cardiac patients recruited from a medical center in Beirut, Lebanon. The qualitative descriptive analysis yielded one overarching and two other themes describing perceptions of cardiac illness and self-care within the Lebanese cultural context. The overarching cultural theme was, "Lebanese cardiac patients were unfamiliar with the term concept and meaning of self-care." Lebanese cardiac patients thanked God and accepted their fate (Theme I). The participants considered their cardiac incident a life or death warning (Theme II). Health care providers need to consider patients' cultural perception of illness while planning and evaluating cardiac self-care programs. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Evaluation of a smartphone application for self-care performance of patients with chronic hepatitis B: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jae Hee

    2016-11-01

    To verify the usefulness of a smartphone application (App) for facilitating self-care in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). CHB is a global health problem, and patients with CHB need to routinely perform self-care. Health-related smartphone apps could help users self-manage their disease. Fifty-three CHB patients were assessed in this randomized controlled before-and-after experimental study. The patients were randomly and equally assigned to groups that did (n=26) or did not (n=27) use the smartphone app for 12weeks. The experimental and control groups were analyzed for differences in disease knowledge, self-efficacy, and self-care before and after use of the smartphone app. After intervention, patients who used the app displayed significantly increased disease knowledge compared with the control group (p=.015). Self-efficacy and self-care also significantly increased in the experimental group (p=0.006 and 0.001, respectively). The smartphone app can be useful for increasing self-care in CHB patients. App: application, CHB: chronic hepatitis B, CVI: content validity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Symptoms and self-care following pancreaticoduodenectomy: Perspectives from patients and healthcare professionals - Foundation for an interactive ICT application.

    PubMed

    Gustavell, Tina; Sundberg, Kay; Frank, Catharina; Wengström, Yvonne; Browall, Maria; Segersvärd, Ralf; Langius-Eklöf, Ann

    2017-02-01

    Poor prognosis and a problematic recovery period after pancreaticoduodenectomy means that patients may benefit from early detection of symptoms and support for self-management. Interactive Information and Communication Technology tools can be used for this purpose, but the content needs to be relevant to patients as well as healthcare professionals. To facilitate development of the content of an application for this purpose, the aim of this study was to explore common symptoms and self-care in the first six months after pancreaticoduodenectomy, as identified by patients and healthcare professionals. Data were collected through individual interviews with patients (n = 14), along with two focus group interviews and one individual interview with healthcare professionals (n = 10). Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Common symptoms after surgery were those related to eating, bowel function and emotional wellbeing, along with fatigue and pain. Some self-care activities and advice were mentioned in the interviews. The patients often experienced a lack of advice on self-care at discharge. The results render knowledge of the symptoms it is important to be aware of and to assess regularly after pancreaticoduodenectomy. The results also contribute to knowledge about specific self-care related to these symptoms, even though it was not extensively described, and further research is needed to define evidence-based self-care advice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The impact of barriers and self-efficacy on self-care behaviors in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Aljasem, L I; Peyrot, M; Wissow, L; Rubin, R R

    2001-01-01

    This cross-sectional, correlational study examined the relationships of diabetes-specific treatment barriers and self-efficacy with self-care behaviors. A total of 309 people with type 2 diabetes participated in this study. All of the factors were assessed by self-report questionnaires. Self-care behaviors included exercise, diet, skipping medication, testing blood for glucose, adjusting insulin to avoid or correct hyperglycemia, and adjusting diet to avoid or correct hypoglycemia. Perceived barriers to carrying out self-care behaviors were associated with worse diet and exercise behavior. Greater self-efficacy predicted more frequent blood glucose testing, less frequent skipping of medication and binge eating, and closer adherence to an ideal diet. Nontraditional dimensions of self-efficacy were associated with worse self-care. Self-efficacy explained 4% to 10% of the variance in diabetes self-care behaviors beyond that accounted for by patient characteristics and health beliefs about barriers. The findings of this study provided support for Rosenstock's proposal that a person's self-perceived capability to carry out a behavior should be incorporated into an expanded health belief model.

  19. Implementation of the AMEDD (Army Medical Department) Standards of Nursing Practice: An Evaluation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-29

    Self -Care Deficit (Specify level: Feeding, Bathing/ Hygiene, Dressing/grooming, Toileting K Self -Concept, Alteration In: Body Image, Self - Esteem , Role...Performance, Personal Identity K Self -Concept, Disturbance in G Self -Dressing-Grooming Deficit (Specify Level) G Self - Esteem Disturbance G Self -Feeding...were conceptualized as working documents providing the foundation for the profession’s self -monitoring (M. Phaneuf, M. Wandelt, 1974). The next step

  20. Low literacy self-care management patient education for a multi-lingual heart failure population: Results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Victoria Vaughan; Chyun, Deborah; Caridi, Cristina; Gregory, Jill K; Katz, Stuart

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to test the impact of language-free, low literacy self-care management patient education materials in an ethnically diverse multilingual heart failure (HF) population. A one group pre-test-post-test design measured changes in self-care, knowledge and health-related quality of life (HRQL) after a 1 month intervention using language-free, low literacy self-care management patient education materials and delivered by a health educator. The ethnically diverse sample (n=21) was predominately male (72%), 48% Black, 42% Hispanic, and 28% marginal/inadequate literacy. There were significant improvements in self-care and knowledge but not HRQL. Language-free, low literacy self-care patient education may facilitate improved self-care and knowledge in diverse populations who are at risk for poor HF outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Depression, self-esteem, diabetes care and self-care behaviors among middle-aged and older Mexicans.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Hernandez, Maricruz

    2014-07-01

    Examine the associations of depression and self-esteem on self-care activities and care received among Mexicans with diabetes. Using data from the Mexican Nutrition and Health Survey 2012, logistic regression models were fit to test the associations between each self-care activity and diabetes care, and self-esteem and depression. People with low self-esteem were less likely to follow a diet, but no other associations were found. Contrary to what was expected, there were no relationships between depression and quality of care received or self-care behaviors. Current findings support the importance of looking at mental health and emotional state among older adults with diabetes. Future studies should explore the relationship between different psychological barriers to proper diabetes management. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Depression, self-esteem, diabetes care and self-care behaviors among middle-aged and older Mexicans☆

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Hernandez, Maricruz

    2016-01-01

    Aims Examine the associations of depression and self-esteem on self-care activities and care received among Mexicans with diabetes. Methods Using data from the Mexican Nutrition and Health Survey 2012, logistic regression models were fit to test the associations between each self-care activity and diabetes care, and self-esteem and depression. Results People with low self-esteem were less likely to follow a diet, but no other associations were found. Contrary to what was expected, there were no relationships between depression and quality of care received or self-care behaviors. Conclusion Current findings support the importance of looking at mental health and emotional state among older adults with diabetes. Future studies should explore the relationship between different psychological barriers to proper diabetes management. PMID:24846446

  3. The effects of mirror therapy with tasks on upper extremity function and self-care in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Youngju; Chang, Moonyoung; Kim, Kyeong-Mi; An, Duk-Hyun

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of mirror therapy with tasks on upper extremity unction and self-care in stroke patients. [Subjects] Thirty participants were randomly assigned to either an experimental group (n=15) or a control group (n=15). [Methods] Subjects in the experimental group received mirror therapy with tasks, and those in the control group received a sham therapy; both therapies were administered, five times per week for six weeks. The main outcome measures were the Manual Function Test for the paralyzed upper limb and the Functional Independence Measure for self-care performance. [Results] The experimental group had more significant gains in change scores compared with the control group after the intervention. [Conclusion] We consider mirror therapy with tasks to be an effective form of intervention for upper extremity function and self-care in stroke patients.

  4. Why self-care is key to providing high-quality care to others.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Jo; Hayes, Sally

    2017-06-22

    Jo McCormick, Consultant Nurse and Associate Director of Nursing, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Joanna.McCormick@belfasttrust.hscni.net , and Sally Hayes, Director of Strategy, Planning and Resources at the Open University, share their insights from undertaking a Florence Nightingale Leadership Scholarship.

  5. Determinants of Heart Failure Self-Care Maintenance and Management in Patients and Caregivers: A Dyadic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bidwell, Julie T.; Vellone, Ercole; Lyons, Karen S.; D’Agostino, Fabio; Riegel, Barbara; Vela, Raúl Juárez; Hiatt, Shirin O.; Alvaro, Rosaria; Lee, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    Disease self-management is a critical component of maintaining clinical stability for patients with chronic illness. This is particularly evident in the context of heart failure (HF), which is the leading cause of hospitalization for older adults. HF self- management, commonly known as HF self-care, is often performed with the support of informal caregivers. However, little is known about how HF dyads manage the patient’s care together. The purpose of this study was to identify determinants of patient and caregiver contributions to HF self-care maintenance (i.e., daily adherence and symptom monitoring) and management (i.e., appropriate recognition & response to symptoms), utilizing an approach that controls for dyadic interdependence. This was a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data from 364 Italian HF patients and caregivers. Multilevel modeling was used to identify determinants of HF self-care within patient-caregiver dyads. Patients were 76.2 (SD=10.7) years, a slight majority (56.9%) was male, while caregivers were 57.4 (SD=14.6) years, and fewer than half (48.1%) were male. Most caregivers were adult children (48.4%) or spouses (32.7%) of patients. Both patients and caregivers reported low levels of HF maintenance and management behaviors. Several significant individual and dyadic determinants of self-care maintenance and self-care management were identified, including gender, quality of life, comorbid burden, impaired ADLs, cognition, hospitalizations, HF duration, relationship type, relationship quality, and social support. These comprehensive dyadic models assist in elucidating the complex nature of patient-caregiver relationships and their influence on HF self-care, leading to more effective ways to intervene and maximize outcomes. PMID:26355702

  6. Family Partner Intervention Influences Self-Care Confidence and Treatment Self-Regulation in Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Stamp, Kelly D.; Dunbar, Sandra B.; Clark, Patricia C.; Reilly, Carolyn M.; Gary, Rebecca A.; Higgins, Melinda; Ryan, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart failure self-care requires confidence in one’s ability and motivation to perform a recommended behavior. Most self-care occurs within a family context, yet little is known about the influence of family on heart failure self-care or motivating factors. Aims To examine the association of family functioning and the self-care antecedents of confidence and motivation among heart failure participants and determine if a family partnership intervention would promote higher levels of perceived confidence and treatment self-regulation (motivation) at four and eight months compared to patient-family education or usual care groups. Methods Heart failure patients (N = 117) and a family member were randomized to a family partnership intervention, patient-family education or usual care groups. Measures of patient’s perceived family functioning, confidence, motivation for medications and following a low-sodium diet were analyzed. Data were collected at baseline, four and eight months. Results Family functioning was related to self-care confidence for diet (p=.02) and autonomous motivation for adhering to their medications (p=.05 and diet p=0.2). The family partnership intervention group significantly improved confidence (p=.05) and motivation (medications (p=.004; diet p=.012) at four months whereas patient-family education group and usual care did not change. Conclusion Perceived confidence and motivation for self-care was enhanced by family partnership intervention, regardless of family functioning. Poor family functioning at baseline contributed to lower confidence. Family functioning should be assessed to guide tailored family-patient interventions for better outcomes. PMID:25673525

  7. Predicting health-promoting self-care behaviors in people with pre-diabetes by applying Bandura social learning theory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Fang; Wang, Ruey-Hsia; Hung, Shu-Ling

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to apply Bandura social learning theory in a model for identifying personal and environmental factors that predict health-promoting self-care behaviors in people with pre-diabetes. The theoretical basis of health-promoting self-care behaviors must be examined to obtain evidence-based knowledge that can help improve the effectiveness of pre-diabetes care. However, such behaviors are rarely studied in people with pre-diabetes. This quantitative, cross-sectional survey study was performed in a convenience sample of two hospitals in southern Taiwan. Two hundred people diagnosed with pre-diabetes at a single health examination center were recruited. A questionnaire survey was performed to collect data regarding personal factors (i.e., participant characteristics, pre-diabetes knowledge, and self-efficacy) and data regarding environmental factors (i.e., social support and perceptions of empowerment process) that may have associations with health-promoting self-care behaviors in people with pre-diabetes. Multiple linear regression showed that the factors that had the largest influence on the practice of health-promoting self-care behaviors were self-efficacy, diabetes history, perceptions of empowerment process, and pre-diabetes knowledge. These factors explained 59.3% of the variance in health-promoting self-care behaviors. To prevent the development of diabetes in people with pre-diabetes, healthcare professionals should consider both the personal and the environmental factors identified in this study when assessing health promoting self-care behaviors in patients with pre-diabetes and when selecting the appropriate interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fine motor and self-care milestones for individuals with Down syndrome using a Retrospective Chart Review.

    PubMed

    Frank, K; Esbensen, A J

    2015-08-01

    Developmental milestone markers for fine motor and self-care skills among children with Down syndrome (DS) are either minimal, anecdotal or out-of date. Our goal was to produce normative expectations for the development of fine motor and self-care milestones specific to children with DS. A cross-sectional retrospective chart review was completed on 274 children with DS seen at a specialty clinic that ranged in age from 4 months to 18 years. Specific skills were assessed at occupational therapy assessments as either present or absent, including fine motor, handwriting, scissor usage, self-feeding and clothing management. Fine motor milestones describing when 10-30% ('early achievers') and 75-95% ('representative achievement') of children with DS had mastered each skill were developed based upon descriptive review. As the fine motor and self-care skills advanced in complexity, the range of ages for documented skill acquisition was observed to increase. Age ranges for the mastery of fine motor developmental milestones for early and representative achievement were developed based upon descriptive analysis of cross-sectional retrospective clinical chart reviews. That the age range for mastering fine motor and self-care skills broadens as children with DS get older is in agreement with what is identified in the DS behavioural phenotype with regard to variable motor skills overall. These fine motor and self-care developmental milestone markers contribute to the field by informing parents, caregivers and healthcare providers of potential fine motor and self-care outcomes and describing normative development for children with DS. © 2014 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Determinants of Heart Failure Self-Care Maintenance and Management in Patients and Caregivers: A Dyadic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bidwell, Julie T; Vellone, Ercole; Lyons, Karen S; D'Agostino, Fabio; Riegel, Barbara; Juárez-Vela, Raúl; Hiatt, Shirin O; Alvaro, Rosaria; Lee, Christopher S

    2015-10-01

    Disease self-management is a critical component of maintaining clinical stability for patients with chronic illness. This is particularly evident in the context of heart failure (HF), which is the leading cause of hospitalization for older adults. HF self-management, commonly known as HF self-care, is often performed with the support of informal caregivers. However, little is known about how a HF dyad manages the patient's care together. The purpose of this study was to identify determinants of patient and caregiver contributions to HF self-care maintenance (daily adherence and symptom monitoring) and management (appropriate recognition and response to symptoms), utilizing an approach that controls for dyadic interdependence. This was a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data from 364 dyads of Italian HF patients and caregivers. Multilevel modeling was used to identify determinants of HF self-care within patient-caregiver dyads. Patients averaged 76.2 (SD = 10.7) years old, and a slight majority (56.9%) was male, whereas caregivers averaged 57.4 (SD = 14.6) years old, and about half (48.1%) were male. Most caregivers were adult children (48.4%) or spouses (32.7%) of patients. Both patients and caregivers reported low levels of HF maintenance and management behaviors. Significant individual and dyadic determinants of self-care maintenance and self-care management included gender, quality of life, comorbid burden, impaired ADLs, cognition, hospitalizations, HF duration, relationship type, relationship quality, and social support. These comprehensive dyadic models assist in elucidating the complex nature of patient-caregiver relationships and their influence on HF self-care, leading to more effective ways to intervene and optimize outcomes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Time cost of diabetes: Development of a questionnaire to assess time spent on diabetes self-care.

    PubMed

    Chernyak, Nadja; Jülich, Fabian; Kasperidus, Julia; Stephan, Astrid; Begun, Alexander; Kaltheuner, Matthias; Icks, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Methods to measure patient time spent on health-related activities are currently not well elaborated or standardized. The purpose of this study was to develop a recall questionnaire measuring patient time devoted to diabetes self-care and to examine its feasibility and validity under field conditions. The initial questionnaire was developed on the basis of instruments frequently used to assess self-care behavior in patients with diabetes, evaluated in two focus groups with patients with type 2 diabetes (N=15) and tested in a random sample of patients with type 2 diabetes (N=178). To assess the validity of the questionnaire, four hypotheses about expected differences in self-care time across various patient sub-groups were tested. The final questionnaire includes thirteen items estimating time spent on regular diabetes-related activities undertaken in the previous seven days. 78% of respondents completed the questionnaire without item non-response or other evident problems. As hypothesized, respondents receiving insulin treatment, those with poor self-rated health and those with diabetes-related emotional distress (PAID-5 score ≥8) reported spending more time on diabetes self-care than the rest of the sample. Contrary to our assumption, no differences in time spent on diabetes self-care between employed and retired individuals were detected by the questionnaire. The recall questionnaire measuring patient time devoted to a broad range of regular diabetes self-care activities was developed and its feasibility was proved under field conditions. Ideally, the questionnaire should be further validated within a variety of populations. Exploration of the convergent validity between the recall method and prospective diary may be also useful. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Validation of an information-motivation-behavioral skills model of self-care among Chinese adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junling; Wang, Jingli; Zhu, Yaocheng; Yu, Jinming

    2013-02-04

    Self-care is a crucial component of diabetes management. But comprehensive behavior change frameworks are needed to provide guidance for the design, implementation, and evaluation of diabetes self-care programs in diverse populations. We tested the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) model in a sample of Chinese adults with Type 2 diabetes. A cross-sectional study of 222 Chinese adults with type 2 diabetes was conducted in a primary care center. We collected information on demographics, provider-patient communication (knowledge), social support (motivation), self-efficacy (behavioral skills), and diabetes self-care (behavior). The values of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) were also obtained. Measured variable path analyses were used to the IMB framework. Provider-patient communication (β = 0.12, p = .037), and social support (β = 0.19, p = .007) and self-efficacy (β = 0.41, p < .001) were independent, direct predictors of diabetes self-care behavior. Diabetes self-care behaviors had a direct effect on TC/HDL-C (β = -0.31, p < .001) and LDL-C/HDL-C (β = -0.30, p < .001). Consistent with the IMB model, having better provider-patient communication, having social support, and having higher self-efficacy was associated with performing diabetes self-care behaviors; and these behaviors were directly linked to lipid control. The findings indicate that diabetes education programs should including strategies enhancing patients' knowledge, motivation and behavioral skills to effect behavior change.

  12. Self-management intervention to improve self-care and quality of life in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Tung, Heng-Hsin; Lin, Chun-Yu; Chen, Kuei-Ying; Chang, Chien-Jung; Lin, Yu-Ping; Chou, Cheng-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Self-management intervention is a good method to improve self-care ability, as such, to promote quality of life. However, the research focused on self-management intervention in heart failure patients in Taiwan is very limited. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to test the effectiveness of self-management intervention in patients with heart failure in Taiwan and examine the relationship between self-care ability and quality of life. A quasi-experimental design was used in this study with convenience sampling. Of the 82 subjects participating in this study, 40 of them chose to join the experimental (self-management intervention plus usual care) and 42 of them chose to join control (usual care) group. Three questionnaires were used to collect the data, which were the demographic questionnaire, the self-care questionnaire (Self-Care of HF Index V 6), and the quality of life questionnaire (Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire). To examine the effectiveness of the intervention, self-care ability and quality of life were measured, using a pretest, 1- and 2-month follow-up assessment. Generalized estimation equations (GEE) were used to compare changes over time among groups for outcomes to ensure the effectiveness of the intervention. This study confirmed the effectiveness of the self-management intervention. The clinical provider should increase the awareness of the importance of self-management skills and self-care ability especially for heart failure patients. The designated disease-specific self-management patient book and individualize intervention should be dispensing and implementing. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Unmet Needs for Social Support and Effects on Diabetes Self-care Activities in Korean Americans With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Youngshin; Song, Hee-Jung; Han, Hae-Ra; Park, So-Youn; Nam, Soohyun; Kim, Miyong T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was (1) to characterize the primary sources of social support and the extent of unmet needs for support (defined as the gap between social support needs and the receipt of social support) in a sample of Korean Americans (KAs) with type 2 diabetes and (2) to examine the effect of unmet needs for support on their self-care activities. Methods Baseline data obtained from a community-based intervention trial were used for this study of 83 middle-aged KAs with type 2 diabetes. Study design and data analysis were guided by social cognitive theory. The key variables were dictated the order of the variables in multivariate regression analysis. Results Our findings indicated that for diabetic KAs, the primary source of social support differed according to gender. Unmet needs for support were significantly associated with self-care activities, but the amount of support needs and of social support received were not. Multivariate analysis also confirmed that unmet needs for social support are a significant strong predictor of inadequate type 2 diabetes self-care activities, after controlling for other covariates. The hierarchical regression model explained about 30% of total variance in self-care activities. Conclusions The findings highlight the importance of considering unmet needs for social support when addressing self-care activities in type 2 diabetes patients. Future interventions should focus on filling gaps in social support and tailoring approaches according to key determinants, such as gender or education level, to improve self-care activities in the context of type 2 diabetes care. PMID:22222514

  14. The Arts as a Medium for Care and Self-Care in Dementia: Arguments and Evidence.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Justine

    2018-06-01

    The growing prevalence of dementia, combined with an absence of effective pharmacological treatments, highlights the potential of psychosocial interventions to alleviate the effects of dementia and enhance quality of life. With reference to a manifesto from the researcher network Interdem, this paper shows how arts activities correspond to its definition of psycho-social care. It presents key dimensions that help to define different arts activities in this context, and illustrates the arts with reference to three major approaches that can be viewed online; visual art, music and dance. It goes on to discuss the features of each of these arts activities, and to present relevant evidence from systematic reviews on the arts in dementia in general. Developing the analysis into a template for differentiating arts interventions in dementia, the paper goes on to discuss implications for future research and for the uptake of the arts by people with dementia as a means to self-care.

  15. Empowering Older Patients to Engage in Self Care: Designing an Interactive Robotic Device

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Priyadarshi; Warren, Jim; Day, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To develop and test an interactive robot mounted computing device to support medication management as an example of a complex self-care task in older adults. Method: A Grounded Theory (GT), Participatory Design (PD) approach was used within three Action Research (AR) cycles to understand design requirements and test the design configuration addressing the unique task requirements. Results: At the end of the first cycle a conceptual framework was evolved. The second cycle informed architecture and interface design. By the end of third cycle residents successfully interacted with the dialogue system and were generally satisfied with the robot. The results informed further refinement of the prototype. Conclusion: An interactive, touch screen based, robot-mounted information tool can be developed to support healthcare needs of older people. Qualitative methods such as the hybrid GT-PD-AR approach may be particularly helpful for innovating and articulating design requirements in challenging situations. PMID:22195203

  16. Active Learning through a Debate Series in a First-Year Pharmacy Self-Care Course

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Christine; Danison, Ryan; Lewis, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the usefulness of formal debates in the pharmacy classroom as a way to learn course material and as a tool for developing competency in essential skills including critical thinking, communication, public speaking, research methods, and teamwork. Design. Debates were incorporated into a self-care course, where students were assigned different debate topics focused on controversial issues. Quantitative analysis was completed to assess debate style learning, knowledge about the subjects presented, and the impact on necessary skills. Assessment. Quizzes given before and after debates showed up to a 36% improvement in grades and up to a 31% change in opinions on the topic. Students assessed themselves as more competent in the skill sets at the completion of the debate series. Conclusion. Incorporation of debates into didactic style courses offers students an opportunity to improve upon skills that will help them succeed as pharmacists. PMID:25861106

  17. Active learning through a debate series in a first-year pharmacy self-care course.

    PubMed

    Lampkin, Stacie J; Collins, Christine; Danison, Ryan; Lewis, Michelle

    2015-03-25

    To evaluate the usefulness of formal debates in the pharmacy classroom as a way to learn course material and as a tool for developing competency in essential skills including critical thinking, communication, public speaking, research methods, and teamwork. Debates were incorporated into a self-care course, where students were assigned different debate topics focused on controversial issues. Quantitative analysis was completed to assess debate style learning, knowledge about the subjects presented, and the impact on necessary skills. Quizzes given before and after debates showed up to a 36% improvement in grades and up to a 31% change in opinions on the topic. Students assessed themselves as more competent in the skill sets at the completion of the debate series. Incorporation of debates into didactic style courses offers students an opportunity to improve upon skills that will help them succeed as pharmacists.

  18. Riding the dragon: enhancing resilient leadership and sensible self-care in the healthcare executive.

    PubMed

    Wicks, Robert J; Buck, Tina C

    2013-01-01

    With challenges in the healthcare system growing, strengthened leader and organizational resilience is often overlooked as a factor that can support staff morale and sustain performance improvement and quality. Here we examine resilience-building practices related to self-awareness, alone time, mindfulness, and a healthy perspective. A key aspect of management resilience is weighing the costs and benefits to the executive personally and to the organization if the warning signals of impairment are left untended. To that end, we propose a leader self-care protocol, which even the busy healthcare executive can find time to undertake. Ifimplemented, the protocol will allow leaders to lessen their vulnerability to burnout and help teammates whose resilience may be stretched thin. Finally, we present healthy coping skills for daily stressors and for the sudden and overwhelming situations that can negatively affect resilience.

  19. Non-invasive Self-Care Anemia Detection during Pregnancy Using a Smartphone Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggraeni, M. D.; Fatoni, A.

    2017-02-01

    Indonesian maternal mortality rate is the highest in South East Asia. Postpartum hemorrhage is the major causes of maternal mortality in Indonesia. Anemia during pregnancy contributes significantly to postpartum hemorrhage. Early detection of anemia during pregnancy may save mothers from maternal death. This research aim to develop a non-invasive self-care anemia detection based on the palpebral color observation and using a smartphone camera. The color intensity (Red, Green, and Blue) was then measured using a Colorgrab software (Loomatix) and analyzed compared to the hemoglobin concentration of the samples, measured using standard Spectrophotometer method. The result showed that the red color intensity had a high correlation (R2=0.814) with a linear regression of y=14.486x + 50.228. This preliminary study may be used as anemia early detection which more objective compared to visual assessment usually performed.

  20. Empowering older patients to engage in self care: designing an interactive robotic device.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Priyadarshi; Warren, Jim; Day, Karen

    2011-01-01

    To develop and test an interactive robot mounted computing device to support medication management as an example of a complex self-care task in older adults. A Grounded Theory (GT), Participatory Design (PD) approach was used within three Action Research (AR) cycles to understand design requirements and test the design configuration addressing the unique task requirements. At the end of the first cycle a conceptual framework was evolved. The second cycle informed architecture and interface design. By the end of third cycle residents successfully interacted with the dialogue system and were generally satisfied with the robot. The results informed further refinement of the prototype. An interactive, touch screen based, robot-mounted information tool can be developed to support healthcare needs of older people. Qualitative methods such as the hybrid GT-PD-AR approach may be particularly helpful for innovating and articulating design requirements in challenging situations.

  1. Self-care of elderly people after the diagnosis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Graciela Machado de; Leite, Marinês Tambara; Hildebrandt, Leila Mariza; Oliveski, Cinthia Cristina; Beuter, Margrid

    2018-01-01

    to characterize the seropositive elderly for the Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) in their socio-demographic aspects; to understand how the elderly take care of themselves from the diagnosis of HIV/AIDS. Qualitative, descriptive, exploratory research conducted at a Voluntary Counseling and Testing Center with 10 elderly people receiving treatment for HIV/AIDS. The data were analyzed according to the content analysis. Data show the elderly people's lack of knowledge about HIV/AIDS transmission, the experience of being elderly and having HIV/AIDS, caring for oneself and life after diagnosis of HIV/AIDS in their daily lives. Final considerations: The diagnosis of HIV/AIDS seropositivity in the elderly generates a blend of feelings and fears that lead to food changes, adherence to treatment and the renunciation of daily and social habits, manifested as ways of self-care.

  2. The effect of education through motivational interviewing compared with conventional education on self-care behaviors in heart failure patients with depression.

    PubMed

    Navidian, Ali; Mobaraki, Hajar; Shakiba, Mansour

    2017-08-01

    To determine the effect of education based on motivational interviewing on self-care behaviors in heart failure patients with depression. In this study, 82 patients suffering from heart failure whose depression had been confirmed were selected and divided into two groups. The Self-Care Heart Failure Index was utilized to evaluate self-care behavior. The intervention group received four sessions of self-care behavior education based on the principles of motivational interviewing, and the control group received four sessions of conventional education on self-care behavior. At 8 weeks after finishing the interventions, the self-care behaviors of both groups were evaluated. Data were analyzed using paired and independent t-tests, Chi-square, and analysis of covariance, as appropriate. The average increase in the overall scores and the scores on the three sub-scales of self-care behavior (maintenance, management, and confidence) of the heart failure patients with depression were significantly higher after education based on motivational interviewing than after conventional self-care education (p<0.05). Motivational interviewing had a significant positive effect on self-care behaviors in patients with heart failure and depression. Due to the effectiveness of the MI, using motivational interviewing for education in depressed HF patients is recommended. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. What are the combined effects of negative emotions and illness cognitions on self-care in people with type 2 diabetes? A longitudinal structural equation model.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Joanna L; Bundy, Christine; Coventry, Peter; Dickens, Chris; Wood, Alex; Reeves, David

    2016-07-01

    To explore whether negative emotions mediate the effect of diabetes cognitions on diabetes self-care and conversely whether diabetes cognitions mediate the effect of negative emotions on diabetes self-care. Longitudinal observational study in adults with type 2 diabetes. Self-reported depression and anxiety (Diabetes Wellbeing Questionnaire), cognitions (Illness Perceptions Questionnaire-Revised; Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire), and diabetes self-care (Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Scale) were completed at baseline and six months. Analyses used structural equation modelling. Baseline medication concerns were associated with elevated symptoms of depression and anxiety at follow-up, but emotions did not mediate medication concern's effect on diabetes self-care. Baseline depression and anxiety symptoms were associated with specific diabetes cognitions over time, but these cognition domains did not mediate emotion's effect on diabetes self-care. Personal control remained independent of emotions and was associated with diabetes self-care over time. Negative emotions did not act directly or alongside cognitions to influence diabetes self-care. The reciprocal relationship between diabetes cognitions and emotions suggests cognitive restructuring, in addition to other mood management intervention techniques would likely improve the emotional wellbeing of adults with type 2 diabetes. Likewise, personal control beliefs are likely important intervention targets for improving self-care.

  4. The meaning of self-care in persons with cervical spinal cord injury in Japan: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Professionals in Japan tend to regard the individual contexts of persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) as the cause of their passive participation in self-care activities or self-management. However, the meaning of self-care involves variables that interrelate with sociocultural factors. Thus, it is necessary to uncover its meaning in the perceptions of persons with cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) in order not only to implement better rehabilitation but also to understand the sociocultural constraints that determine the injured person’s attitudes to self-care and long-term health outcomes. Methods Semi-structured interviews with 29 CSCI participants from fourteen municipalities of Osaka, Hyogo, and Ehime prefectures were conducted. Participants contributed diverse perspectives on rehabilitation, lay-professional and family relationships, health promotion, and body conceptions. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using the grounded theory approach to inter-relate categories and to develop theoretical constructions. Results Four main themes emerged from the data: rehabilitation for independence in ADLs; detachment from the body and self; embodiment; and self-management. From the participants’ point of view, rehabilitation programs in Japan aim at improving body functions for ADL performance, but provide little health education. These rehabilitation values might hinder some participants from developing self-esteem for their bodies. Moreover, socially-shaped family caregivers’ active engagement in the participants’ self-care allowed many participants to entirely rely on them for care. Through embodiment, participants found that self-care was not merely a means of independence in ADLs but also of self-management to enhance health and well-being, requiring collaborative relationships with caregivers. Conclusion Personal factors such as low motivation for self-care might be in part a reflection of social expectations of dependence for

  5. Longitudinal motivational predictors of dietary self-care and diabetes control in adults with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nouwen, Arie; Ford, Teri; Balan, Andreea Teodora; Twisk, Jos; Ruggiero, Laurie; White, David

    2011-11-01

    This prospective study examined relationships between constructs from social-cognitive theory (Bandura, 1986) and self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985; Deci & Ryan, 1991) and the diabetes outcomes of dietary self-care and diabetes control. Longitudinal data were collected from 237 people newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes who filled in questionnaires on dietary self-care, and motivational factors derived from social-cognitive theory and self-determination theory. Blood samples were taken to assess diabetes control (HbA1c). Repeated measurements were taken every 3-4 months for a total of five time points over 18 months. Predictor measures included autonomy support, autonomous and controlled motivation, amotivation, dietary self-efficacy, positive and negative outcome expectancies for dietary self-care and self-evaluation. Age, sex, BMI, and diabetes knowledge were included as control measures. Using Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) analyses two models were tested: a standard model reflecting longitudinal associations between absolute values of predicted and outcome variables; and a change model examining motivational predictors of changes over time in diabetes outcomes of dietary self-care and diabetes control (HbA1c). Dietary self-care was longitudinally associated with self-efficacy, self-evaluation (the strongest predictor) autonomy support and autonomous motivation, but not with controlled motivation or outcome expectancies. Changes in dietary self-care were predicted by changes in self-efficacy, self-evaluation, and controlled motivation but not by changes in autonomous motivation or autonomy support. Negative outcome expectancies regarding diet were longitudinally associated with HbA1c, and changes in negative outcome expectancies predicted changes in HbA1c. However, there were indications that dietary self-care predicted changes in HbA1c. The results indicate that autonomy support, self-efficacy and, in particular, self-evaluation are key

  6. Mobile Health Apps to Facilitate Self-Care: A Qualitative Study of User Experiences.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kevin; Burford, Oksana; Emmerton, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    Consumers are living longer, creating more pressure on the health system and increasing their requirement for self-care of chronic conditions. Despite rapidly-increasing numbers of mobile health applications ('apps') for consumers' self-care, there is a paucity of research into consumer engagement with electronic self-monitoring. This paper presents a qualitative exploration of how health consumers use apps for health monitoring, their perceived benefits from use of health apps, and suggestions for improvement of health apps. 'Health app' was defined as any commercially-available health or fitness app with capacity for self-monitoring. English-speaking consumers aged 18 years and older using any health app for self-monitoring were recruited for interview from the metropolitan area of Perth, Australia. The semi-structured interview guide comprised questions based on the Technology Acceptance Model, Health Information Technology Acceptance Model, and the Mobile Application Rating Scale, and is the only study to do so. These models also facilitated deductive thematic analysis of interview transcripts. Implicit and explicit responses not aligned to these models were analyzed inductively. Twenty-two consumers (15 female, seven male) participated, 13 of whom were aged 26-35 years. Eighteen participants reported on apps used on iPhones. Apps were used to monitor diabetes, asthma, depression, celiac disease, blood pressure, chronic migraine, pain management, menstrual cycle irregularity, and fitness. Most were used approximately weekly for several minutes per session, and prior to meeting initial milestones, with significantly decreased usage thereafter. Deductive and inductive thematic analysis reduced the data to four dominant themes: engagement in use of the app; technical functionality of the app; ease of use and design features; and management of consumers' data. The semi-structured interviews provided insight into usage, benefits and challenges of health monitoring

  7. Analyzing Short Message Services Application Effect on Diabetic Patients' Self-caring.

    PubMed

    Naghibi, Seyed Abolhassan; Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Zhyanifard, Akram; Jafari Makrani, Zoreh; Yazdani Cherati, Jamshid

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is the most prevalent metabolic disease with a growing spread rate in word wide. Short message service (SMS) is of the most common public communication networks, which have brought about a broad spectrum of applications like social, cultural and service products in the late decade. The objective of this research is, the investigate of using SMS on diabetes patients self-caring. In an interventional study, 228 diabetes patients have been selected from a community charity. With using of random sampling method, they were divided into two groups of 114 subjects as the control and case. The case group was sent messages reminding them about sports, caring foot, taking insulin and oral tablet for 4 weeks via mobile phone. After 4 weeks, a posttest questionnaire was completed. The data analysis was performed using a descriptive statistic, Chi-square, independent t-test, and paired t-test. There are not significant differences between case and control groups before intervention by studied dependent variables (P > 0.05). Performance score mean of taking care of foot, sport and taking oral tablet and insulin in case group before intervention were 29.90, 10, 11.16 and 3.75 respectively and after intervention were 20.11, 41.36, 13.09 and 4.90, respectively. Furthermore, the performance scores mean difference after intervention, taking care of foot (P < 0.001), sport (P < 0.001), taking oral tablet (P = 0.020) was meaningful in case and control groups. Regarding the study results on using cell phone, to utilize virtual training methods is recommended as an appropriate procedure for different health care, self-caring and follow-up training plans for various groups in society, especially diabetic and chronic patients.

  8. Associations between barriers to self-care and diabetes complications among patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sina, Maryam; Graffy, Jonathan; Simmons, David

    2018-07-01

    To determine which barriers to care are associated with type 2 diabetes complications in an area in rural East England. 3649 individuals with type 2 diabetes from 62 general practices were contacted via postal invitation which included a 33 item Barriers-to-Diabetes-Care Survey. Barriers were grouped into five priori major categories: educational, physical, psychological, psychosocial, and systems. The associations of reported barriers, both individually and as a group, with self-reported complications were assessed using logistic regression. 39.5% of participants had self-reported diabetes complications. Physical health barriers (OR = 3.3; 95%CI: 2.7, 4.0), systems barriers (OR = 1.6; 95%CI: 1.3, 2.0) and psychological barriers (OR = 1.3 (95%CI: 1.1, 1.5) were associated with diabetes complications. In subcategories, presence of comorbidities (OR = 4.8; 95%CI: 3.9, 5.9), financial difficulties (OR = 1.7; 95%CI: 1.3, 2.1), absence of services (OR = 2.0; 95%CI: 1.4, 3.0), feeling others should bear more financial responsibility for their care (OR = 1.6 (95%CI: 1.1, 2.1), no access to diabetes service (OR = 1.3; 95%CI: 1.1, 1.5), feeling worried about their diabetes (OR = 1.5; 95%CI: 1.2, 2.0) and lack of readiness to exercise (OR = 1.4; 95%CI: 1.2, 1.7) were associated with diabetes complications. Barriers to self-care are significantly more common among those with, than those without, diabetes complications. Systematic identification and management of different barriers to self-care could help personalise care for those with diabetes related complications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Mindfulness in nursing: an evolutionary concept analysis.

    PubMed

    White, Lacie

    2014-02-01

    To report an analysis of the concept of mindfulness. Mindfulness is an emerging concept in health care that has significant implications for a variety of clinical populations. Nursing uses this concept in limited ways, and subsequently requires conceptual clarity to further identify its significance, use and applications in nursing. Mindfulness was explored using Rodgers evolutionary method of concept analysis. For this analysis, a sample of 59 English theoretical and research-based articles from the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature database were obtained. The search was conducted between all-inclusive years of the database, 1981-2012. Data were analysed with particular focus on the attributes, antecedents, consequences, references and related terms that arose in relation to mindfulness in the nursing literature. The analysis found five intricately connected attributes: mindfulness is a transformative process where one develops an increasing ability to 'experience being present', with 'acceptance', 'attention' and 'awareness'. Antecedents, attributes and consequences appeared to inform and strengthen one another over time. Mindfulness is a significant concept for the discipline of nursing with practical applications for nurse well-being, the development and sustainability of therapeutic nursing qualities and holistic health promotion. It is imperative that nurse well-being and self-care become a more prominent focus in nursing research and education. Further development of the concept of mindfulness could support this focus, particularly through rigorous qualitative methodologies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. New Nursing Faculty and Incivility: Applying Mindfulness-Based Strategies.

    PubMed

    Green, Cheryl

    Workplace incivility remains a problem within the nursing profession. As nurse leaders, we must recognize and not ignore the complexity of cultures that have adapted incivility into the work environment. Nursing education is a discipline that requires collaborative team work, independent drive, and commitment. New nursing faculty experiencing incivility can use mindfulness-based meditation approaches to cope with uncivil behaviors experienced within the workplace. Nurse educators applying the concepts of mindfulness can learn how to provide themselves self-care by reducing stress, as enhanced daily awareness of peace and calm are incorporated into their lifestyle. Mindfulness provides a realization that control can only be given to other persons when an individual allows or accepts another's negative behaviors. Awareness of the value and importance of oneself can assist the nurse educator experiencing incivility to maintain his or her emotional, physical, and spiritual health despite the volatility of the work environment.

  11. The Effect of Self-Care Education on Emotional Intelligence and HbA1c level in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tavakol Moghadam, Salma; Najafi, Seyed Saeed; Yektatalab, Shahrzad

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The role of Emotional Intelligence (EI) in glycemic control in type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM) has not been fully understood. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of self-care education on EI and hemoglobin glycosylated (HbA1c) in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 48 patients with type 2 DM referred to Shahid Motahari Diabetes Center in 2015 were divided into an intervention and a control group using block randomization. The study data were collected using Bar-On questionnaire and blood testing immediately and two months after the intervention. The educational content was presented to the intervention group through 1-1:30-hour sessions held once a week for 8 continuous weeks. The control group, however, only received the clinic’s routine cares. Results: The results showed a significant difference in the mean level of HbA1c in the intervention group before and two months after the intervention (P=0.003). However, this difference was not significant in the control group. Moreover, the mean of EI was higher in the intervention group compared to the control group (P=0.08). Conclusion: Self-care education improved the HbA1c level and EI among the patients with type 2 DM. Therefore, it is recommended that health care providers, specially nurses, should train the diabetic patients for self-care, which can lead to better glycemic control. Trial Registration Number: IRCT201408188505N7 PMID:29344534

  12. Informing the development of services supporting self-care for severe, long term mental health conditions: a mixed method study of community based mental health initiatives in England

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Supporting self-care is being explored across health care systems internationally as an approach to improving care for long term conditions in the context of ageing populations and economic constraint. UK health policy advocates a range of approaches to supporting self-care, including the application of generic self-management type programmes across conditions. Within mental health, the scope of self-care remains poorly conceptualised and the existing evidence base for supporting self-care is correspondingly disparate. This paper aims to inform the development of support for self-care in mental health by considering how generic self-care policy guidance is implemented in the context of services supporting people with severe, long term mental health problems. Methods A mixed method study was undertaken comprising standardised psychosocial measures, questionnaires about health service use and qualitative interviews with 120 new referrals to three contrasting community based initiatives supporting self-care for severe, long term mental health problems, repeated nine months later. A framework approach was taken to qualitative analysis, an exploratory statistical analysis sought to identify possible associations between a range of independent variables and self-care outcomes, and a narrative synthesis brought these analyses together. Results Participants reported improvement in self-care outcomes (e.g. greater empowerment; less use of Accident and Emergency services). These changes were not associated with level of engagement with self-care support. Level of engagement was associated with positive collaboration with support staff. Qualitative data described the value of different models of supporting self-care and considered challenges. Synthesis of analyses suggested that timing support for self-care, giving service users control over when and how they accessed support, quality of service user-staff relationships and decision making around medication are

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    MedlinePlus

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Nursing Supplies Page Content Article Body Throughout most of ... budget. (Nursing equipment also makes wonderful baby gifts.) Nursing Bras A well-made nursing bra that comfortably ...

  14. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Nursing Homes Basic Facts & Information Nursing homes have changed ... guide care in nursing homes. Who lives in nursing homes? Almost half of all people who live ...

  15. Creating and sustaining peace within for the journey of nursing leadership.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cynthia J; Bishop, Mary; Bar, Bonnie B

    2013-01-01

    Peace within self or an inner calmness may be created and sustained by caring for self at a deep level, committing to an inner journey, and by dedication to maintaining a practice of self-care. Suggestions for creating and sustaining peace within self, using the model "Listen, Envision and Take Action" (LET or allow), are explored as a guide to support and maintain an inner journey. The authors describe how a peaceful presence may guide the journey of nursing leadership. Along the path of self-care focused on the inner journey, the nursing leader may experience enhanced health, self-knowledge, resilience, and a transformation of relationships personally and professionally. As nursing leaders' role model care for self in the workplace, the organization may experience an increase in nurse satisfaction.

  16. Spiritual and Religious Beliefs and Practices, and Social Support's Relationship to Diabetes Self-Care Activities in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Yashika J.; Quinn, Lauretta T.; Ruggiero, Laurie; Quinn, Michael T.; Choi, Young-Ku

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship among spiritual and religious beliefs and practices, social support, and diabetes self-care activities in African Americans with type 2 diabetes, hypothesizing that there would be a positive association. Method This cohort study used a cross-sectional design that focused on baseline data from a larger randomized control trial. Diabetes self-care activities (Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities; SDSCA) and sociodemographic characteristics were assessed, in addition to spiritual and religious beliefs and practices and social support using the Systems of Belief Inventory (SBI) subscale I (beliefs and practices) and subscale II (social support). Results There were 132 participants: most were female, middle-aged, obese, single, high school-educated, and not employed. Using Pearson correlation matrices, there were significant relationships between spiritual and religious beliefs and practices and general diet. Additional significant relationships were found for social support with general diet, specific diet, and foot care. Using multiple linear regression, social support was a significant predictor for general diet, specific diet, and foot care. Gender was a significant predictor for specific diet, and income was a significant predictor for blood glucose testing. Conclusions The findings of this study highlight the importance of spiritual and religious beliefs and practices and social support in diabetes self-care activities. Future research should focus on determining how providers integrate patients' beliefs and practices and social support into clinical practice and include those in behavior change interventions. PMID:23411653

  17. Influence of psychosocial factors on self-care behaviors and glycemic control in Turkish patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cosansu, Gulhan; Erdogan, Semra

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the direct and indirect effects of psychosocial factors on self-care behavior and glycemic control in Turkish patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The study used a cross-sectional questionnaire survey design (N = 350). Data were collected using the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Scale and the Multidimensional Diabetes Questionnaire. The relationship between the study variables was analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficient and structural equation modeling. Self-efficacy was associated with social support, outcome expectancies, perceived interference, educational level, and self-care and A1C. According to the structural equation model, self-efficacy was the predictor variable that influenced both self-care and glycemic control. Self-efficacy in achieving desired health outcomes was found to play a central role in Turkish patients. Although interventions are planned and implemented to achieve and maintain self-management in individuals with diabetes, strengthening psychosocial factors, particularly self-efficacy, may contribute to adjustment to disease and good glycemic control in the long term.

  18. [Relationship between the users' contact time in educational programs on diabetes mellitus and self-care skills and knowledge].

    PubMed

    Maia, Mariana Almeida; Reis, Ilka Afonso; Torres, Heloísa de Carvalho

    2016-02-01

    Check the relationship between the users' contact time in educational programs and self-care and knowledge variables in diabetes mellitus. A longitudinal study with a quantitative approach with the participation, in the initial phase, of 263 users linked to Basic Health Units in Belo Horizonte, Brazil during the years 2012 and 2013. The data were collected with respect to the total contact time of the users' participation in the educational program as regards knowledge and self-care in acquired diabetes mellitus. The data were analyzed using the Student t-test for comparison of means, considering a 0.05 significance level. The final sample included 151 users. The analysis showed that the improvement in self-care scores was statistically higher during an educational intervention of eight hours or more (p-value <0.05). In relation to the scores for knowledge, there was a statistically significant improvement at the end of the educational program. It was not possible to identify a value for the contact time from which there was an increase in mean scores for the ability of knowledge. To improve the effectiveness of the promotion of skills related to knowledge and self-care in diabetes mellitus, it is necessary to consider the contact time as a relevant factor of the educational program.

  19. The Development of an ICF-Oriented, Adaptive Physician Assessment Instrument of Mobility, Self-care, and Domestic Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Erik; Fleitz, Annette

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was development and psychometric testing of an adaptive, International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF)-oriented questionnaire to be processed by the rehabilitation physician that aids in assessing mobility, self-care, and domestic life (Moses-Physician). The intent is to develop a physician…

  20. Testing Self-Efficacy as a Pathway that Supports Self-Care among Family Caregivers in a Psychoeducational Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savundranayagam, Marie Y.; Brintnall-Peterson, Mary

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which a psychoeducational intervention supports family-centered care by influencing health risk and self-care behaviors of caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer's disease (N = 325). Moreover, this study investigated the extent to which changes in self-efficacy explained changes in health risk and self-care…

  1. The Use of Self-Care Agency To Meet the Need for Solitude and Social Interaction by Chronically Ill Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Margaret A.

    This study examined the effect of chronic illness on the individual's ability to meet his or her need for solitude and for social interaction by exploring how chronically ill individuals used their own ability (self-care agency) to meet these needs. Subjects were 90 chronically ill older persons, 30 of whom were living at home, 30 who lived in a…

  2. More Than Needles: The Importance of Explanations and Self-Care Advice in Treating Primary Dysmenorrhea with Acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Armour, Michael; Dahlen, Hannah G; Smith, Caroline A

    2016-01-01

    Background. Primary dysmenorrhea is a common gynaecological condition. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) acupuncturists commonly treat primary dysmenorrhea and dispense specific self-care advice for this condition. The impact of self-care advice on primary dysmenorrhea is unknown. Methods. 19 TCM acupuncture practitioners from New Zealand or Australia and 12 New Zealand women who had recently undergone acupuncture treatment for primary dysmenorrhea as part of a randomised controlled trial participated in this qualitative, pragmatic study. Focus groups and semistructured interviews were used to collect data. These were recorded, transcribed, and analysed using thematic analysis. Results. The overarching theme was that an acupuncture treatment consisted of "more than needles" for both practitioners and participants. Practitioners and participants both discussed the partnership they engaged in during treatment, based on openness and trust. Women felt that the TCM self-care advice was related to positive outcomes for their dysmenorrhea and increased their feelings of control over their menstrual symptoms. Conclusions. Most of the women in this study found improved symptom control and reduced pain. A contributing factor for these improvements may be an increased internal health locus of control and an increase in self-efficacy resulting from the self-care advice given during the clinical trial.

  3. Self-care Education Needs in Gestational Diabetes Tailored to the Iranian Culture: A Qualitative Content Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kolivand, Mitra; Keramat, Afsaneh; Rahimi, MehrAli; Motaghi, Zahra; Shariati, Mohammad; Emamian, MohammadHassan

    2018-01-01

    Gestational diabetes is one of the most common health problems in pregnancy that requires participation through self-care to reduce the maternal and neonatal complications. The present study aimed to determine the needs of women as an essential first step to formulate a self-care guide fitting the Iranian culture. The present qualitative study was conducted through interviews with 13 diabetic pregnant women and 10 care providers using semi-structured questionnaires in several cities of Iran in 2016. Further, the data analysis was performed using conventional content analysis. In addition, purposive sampling was performed at the diabetes clinic of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Imam Reza Hospital, and health centers across Kermanshah, Shahroud, and Tehran. In the present qualitative content analysis study, four themes were identified: awareness and ability (knowing diabetes, mothers training and empowerment, continuity and quality, information resources), lifestyle (healthy diet, physical activity), mental health (counseling, interaction, spirituality, and religion), and supportive family (the husband's unique role, the psychological atmosphere at home). The present study highlighted main aspects of self-care educational/supportive needs, specifically in the domains of lifestyle, awareness and capability, mental health, and family. The results of our analysis highlighted the needs that can be useful for developing comprehensive self-care educational programs, with a higher focus on physical activity, mental health, the role of the family, and the use of religious interests.

  4. Refugee-Teacher-Train-Refugee-Teacher Intervention Research in Malaysia: Promoting Classroom Management and Teacher Self-Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Colleen R.; Gosnell, Nicole M.; Ng, Wai Sheng; Ong, Edward

    2018-01-01

    Given the current refugee crisis, the development of sustainable postconflict refugee education systems and supports is essential. The present study reports Resilient Refugee Education (RRE) intervention effects on refugee teacher confidence and knowledge of classroom management, in addition to refugee teacher self-care in Malaysia. We compared…

  5. Gender and Health Lifestyle: An In-Depth Exploration of Self-Care Activities in Later Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Stoller, Eleanor Palo; Brewer-Lowry, A. Nichol; Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate similarities and differences in the self-care domain of health lifestyle among older, rural-dwelling women and men. Method: Qualitative analysis of in-depth interview data from 62 community-dwelling older (M = 74.3 years) African and European American women and men. Results: Both older women and men rely heavily on…

  6. Self-Care Practices of Female Peer Support Specialists with Co-Occurring Mood and Substance Use Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wohlert, Beverly A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand the self-care practices of female peer support specialists (PSS) with co-occurring mood and substance use disorders. The researcher took a qualitative grounded theory approach conducting in-depth semi-structured interviews with ten women employed at peer-run agencies in Maricopa County, Arizona.…

  7. Usability of an Adaptive Computer Assistant that Improves Self-care and Health Literacy of Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Blanson Henkemans, O. A.; Rogers, W. A.; Fisk, A. D.; Neerincx, M. A.; Lindenberg, J.; van der Mast, C. A. P. G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives We developed an adaptive computer assistant for the supervision of diabetics’ self-care, to support limiting illness and need for acute treatment, and improve health literacy. This assistant monitors self-care activities logged in the patient’s electronic diary. Accordingly, it provides context-aware feedback. The objective was to evaluate whether older adults in general can make use of the computer assistant and to compare an adaptive computer assistant with a fixed one, concerning its usability and contribution to health literacy. Methods We conducted a laboratory experiment in the Georgia Tech Aware Home wherein 28 older adults participated in a usability evaluation of the computer assistant, while engaged in scenarios reflecting normal and health-critical situations. We evaluated the assistant on effectiveness, efficiency, satisfaction, and educational value. Finally, we studied the moderating effects of the subjects’ personal characteristics. Results Logging self-care tasks and receiving feedback from the computer assistant enhanced the subjects’ knowledge of diabetes. The adaptive assistant was more effective in dealing with normal and health-critical situations, and, generally, it led to more time efficiency. Subjects’ personal characteristics had substantial effects on the effectiveness and efficiency of the two computer assistants. Conclusions Older adults were able to use the adaptive computer assistant. In addition, it had a positive effect on the development of health literacy. The assistant has the potential to support older diabetics’ self care while maintaining quality of life. PMID:18213433

  8. More Than Needles: The Importance of Explanations and Self-Care Advice in Treating Primary Dysmenorrhea with Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Primary dysmenorrhea is a common gynaecological condition. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) acupuncturists commonly treat primary dysmenorrhea and dispense specific self-care advice for this condition. The impact of self-care advice on primary dysmenorrhea is unknown. Methods. 19 TCM acupuncture practitioners from New Zealand or Australia and 12 New Zealand women who had recently undergone acupuncture treatment for primary dysmenorrhea as part of a randomised controlled trial participated in this qualitative, pragmatic study. Focus groups and semistructured interviews were used to collect data. These were recorded, transcribed, and analysed using thematic analysis. Results. The overarching theme was that an acupuncture treatment consisted of “more than needles” for both practitioners and participants. Practitioners and participants both discussed the partnership they engaged in during treatment, based on openness and trust. Women felt that the TCM self-care advice was related to positive outcomes for their dysmenorrhea and increased their feelings of control over their menstrual symptoms. Conclusions. Most of the women in this study found improved symptom control and reduced pain. A contributing factor for these improvements may be an increased internal health locus of control and an increase in self-efficacy resulting from the self-care advice given during the clinical trial. PMID:27242909

  9. Increasing Independence in Self-Care Tasks for Children with Autism Using Self-Operated Auditory Prompts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mays, Nicole McGaha; Heflin, L. Juane

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of self-operated auditory prompting systems (SOAPs) on independent self-care task completion of elementary-school-aged children with autism and intellectual disabilities. Prerecorded verbal prompts on a student-operated tape recorder were employed to facilitate independence in washing hands and…

  10. Work-related factors associated with self-care and psychological health among people with type 2 diabetes in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sato, Miho; Yamazaki, Yoshihiko

    2012-12-01

    This study on individuals with type 2 diabetes living in Japan aimed to examine work-related factors that influence self-care and psychological health among people. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 121 working adults with type 2 diabetes. A self-report questionnaire assessed demographics, work characteristics, self-disclosure of diabetes, support in the workplace, work-related difficulties due to diabetes, and workplace conformity. Dietary self-care, exercise, depression, and emotional distress were also evaluated. The results indicated statistically significant influence of working night shifts, self-disclosure of diabetes, and workplace conformity on dietary self-care. Work-related difficulties due to diabetes had negative effects on depression and emotional distress, and job control and support in the workplace were found to be correlated with emotional distress. These findings suggest that work-related factors have an impact on some forms of self-care activities and psychological health and that it is important to increase understanding of these issues and provide appropriate support for workers through education and counseling and adjustments in the workplace. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. A Competency-Based Approach to Teaching Professional Self-Care: An Ethical Consideration for Social Work Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newell, Jason M.; Nelson-Gardell, Debra

    2014-01-01

    Incorporating material on professional self-care into social work course content is valuable to the education of neophyte social work practitioners. This article presents a review of the literature on professional burnout, secondary traumatic stress, and compassion fatigue, including the risk factors associated with the experience of these…

  12. From Cues to Action: Information Seeking and Exercise Self-Care among Older Adults Managing Chronic Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Pak Hei Benedito; Wister, Andrew V.

    2005-01-01

    Drawing from the health belief model, cues to action have been theorized to influence health behaviours; however, few studies have examined these constructs explicitly. This study investigated the relationship between information cues to action and exercise self-care. It was hypothesized that reading about illness information, knowing about…

  13. Effectiveness of Parent and Therapist Collaboration Program (PTCP) for Teaching Self-Care and Domestic Skills to Individuals with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavkaytar, Atilla; Pollard, Elena

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and determine the effectiveness of a Parent and Therapist Collaboration Program for teaching self care and domestic skills to individuals with autism with varying educational needs, age, and severity of disability. Three individuals with autism, one habilitation provider, and three parents participated in…

  14. Role of motivation in the relationship between depression, self-care, and glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Egede, Leonard E; Osborn, Chandra Y

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism by which depression influences health outcomes in persons with diabetes is uncertain. The purpose of this study was to test whether depression is related to self-care behavior via social motivation and indirectly related to glycemic control via self-care behavior. Patients with diabetes were recruited from an outpatient clinic. Information gathered pertained to demographics, depression, and diabetes knowledge (information); diabetes fatalism (personal motivation); social support (social motivation); and diabetes self-care (behavior). Hemoglobin A1C values were extracted from the patient medical record. Structural equation models tested the predicted pathways. Higher levels of depressive symptoms were significantly related to having less social support and decreased performance of diabetes self-care behavior. In addition, when depressive symptoms were included in the model, fatalistic attitudes were no longer associated with behavioral performance. Among adults with diabetes, depression impedes the adoption of effective self-management behaviors (including physical activity, appropriate dietary behavior, foot care, and appropriate self-monitoring of blood glucose behavior) through a decrease in social motivation.

  15. Teaching Note--Teaching Self-Care and Wellness as a Professional Practice Skill: A Curricular Case Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grise-Owens, Erlene; Miller, Justin; Escobar-Ratliff, Laura; George, Nicole

    2018-01-01

    Educating for human rights and justice requires attention to the well-being of those being prepared to pursue these aims. This article describes an MSW program's implementation of teaching self-care as a core practice skill. This curricular innovation stems from the increasing literature documenting the deleterious effects of burnout in…

  16. “We have become doctors for ourselves”: motives for malaria self-care among adults in southeastern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prompt and appropriate treatment of malaria with effective medicines remains necessary if malaria control goals are to be achieved. The theoretical concepts from self-care and the health belief model were used to examine the motivations for malaria self-care among the adult population. Methods A qualitative study was conducted through eight focus group discussions with adult community members to explore their general opinions, views and perceptions of malaria and of its treatments. These groups were followed by 15 in-depth interviews of participants with a recent malaria experience to allow for an in-depth exploration of their self-care practices. The analysis followed principles of grounded theory and was conducted using Nvivo 9 qualitative data management software. Results The self-treatment of malaria at home was found to be a common practice among the study participants. The majority of the participants practiced self-medication with a painkiller as an initial response. The persistence and the worsening of the disease symptoms prompted participants to consider other self-care options. Perceptions that many malaria symptoms are suggestive of other conditions motivated participants to self-refer for malaria test. The accessibility of private laboratory facilities and drug shops motivated their use for malaria tests and for obtaining anti-malarial medicines, respectively. Self-treatment with anti-malarial monotherapy was common, motivated by their perceived effectiveness and availability. The perceived barriers to using the recommended combination treatment, artemether-lumefantrine, were related to the possible side-effects and to uncertainty about their effectiveness, and these doubts motivated some participants to consider self-medication with local herbs. Several factors were mentioned as motivating people for self-care practices. These included poor patient provider relationship, unavailability of medicine and the costs associated with accessing

  17. American Nurses Association Nursing World

    MedlinePlus

    ... ANA » My ANA » Shop » ANA Nursing Knowledge Center Nursing Insider News 10/13/2017 American Nurses Association ... 17 ANA Enterprise CEO Weston Announces Resignation More Nursing Insider News Upcoming Events 10/17/2017 - 10/ ...

  18. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    MedlinePlus

    ... nurses, or APNs) have a master's degree in nursing (MS or MSN) and board certification in their ... Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) and through local hospitals or nursing schools. Also, many doctors share office space with ...

  19. Dysmenorrhea and self-care strategies in Iranian female students: a regression modeling of pain severity and underlying factors.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Fariba; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Mohseni Bandpei, Mohammad Ali

    2016-07-18

    Dysmenorrhea is the most common gynecologic condition experienced by menstruating women and has significant medical and psychosocial impacts. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and the problems related to menstruation, self-care strategies and their relations with pain severity in female students of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. This cross sectional study was carried out among 197 unmarried and healthy female medical students during April 2013 to July 2013. A standardized questionnaire was given to participants to complete, which included questions about demographic information, prevalence and severity of pain, self-care strategies and its effectiveness. The prevalence of dysmenorrhea was 98.4% (95% confidence interval=97.6%-99.2%). Almost 76% (149) of students reported limitation of daily activities. The most common method for relief pain were: taking analgesics (64.3%), rest (61.9%), taking herbal medicine (11.7%), and applying hot compress on area of pain (22.3%). Obtaining information about self-care strategies offered from family and friends 79 (41%) were more common than scientific articles 56 (28.7%) and the Internet 43 (22%). Significant relations were observed between self-care strategies' scales and pain severity. The results indicated that dysmenorrhea was highly prevalent among female medical students and is a major problem affecting their life. A variety of treatments is available for dysmenorrhea but most of the participants did not seek medical advice and they used self-care strategies. However, further studies focusing on health education and routine screening for menstrual problems are recommended.

  20. Vulnerable Women’s Self-Care Needs in Knowledge, Attitude and Practice Concerning Sexually Transmitted Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Alimohammadi, Nasrollah; Baghersad, Zahra; Boroumandfar, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vulnerable women are prone to sexually transmitted diseases (STD) due to their special conditions and poor knowledge about these diseases in the society. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine the vulnerable women’s self-care needs in knowledge, attitude and practice concerning STD. Methods: This is a cross-sectional-descriptive study conducted in 2014. The data collection was carried out using a self-administered structured questionnaire. 120 vulnerable women referring to centers affiliated to health and well-being center in Isfahan participated in this study. They were selected through proportional rationing sampling and filled out a researcher developed questionnaire containing information on personal characteristics, self-care knowledge, attitude, and practice needs toward the STD. The data were analyzed using statistical methods including Spearman & Pearson correlation co-efficient, independent t-test and ANOVA. All analyses were carried out using SPSS, 20. Results: Based on the results, most of the subjects mentioned that their priorities of self-care needs in domains of knowledge, attitude and practice were “familiarization with the types and contamination ways of sexually transmitted diseases” (57.9%); “diagnosis of STD only makes us anxious” (24.8), and “the method of washing the genital area before and after intercourse” 41.3%), respectively. There was a significant association among marital status, education, history of addiction, and self-care needs in domains of knowledge, attitude and practice (P<0.05). Conclusion: Results showed that vulnerable women not only knew their need about STD, but also paid attention to their attitude and practice needs toward STD. Therefore, educational programs should be designed and administrated by the experts, based on vulnerable women’s self-care needs concerning their knowledge, attitude and practice to prevent and control STD in vulnerable individuals. PMID:27382588

  1. The Caregiver Contribution to Heart Failure Self-Care (CACHS): Further Psychometric Testing of a Novel Instrument.

    PubMed

    Buck, Harleah G; Harkness, Karen; Ali, Muhammad Usman; Carroll, Sandra L; Kryworuchko, Jennifer; McGillion, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Caregivers (CGs) contribute important assistance with heart failure (HF) self-care, including daily maintenance, symptom monitoring, and management. Until CGs' contributions to self-care can be quantified, it is impossible to characterize it, account for its impact on patient outcomes, or perform meaningful cost analyses. The purpose of this study was to conduct psychometric testing and item reduction on the recently developed 34-item Caregiver Contribution to Heart Failure Self-care (CACHS) instrument using classical and item response theory methods. Fifty CGs (mean age 63 years ±12.84; 70% female) recruited from a HF clinic completed the CACHS in 2014 and results evaluated using classical test theory and item response theory. Items would be deleted for low (<.05) or high (>.95) endorsement, low (<.3) or high (>.7) corrected item-total correlations, significant pairwise correlation coefficients, floor or ceiling effects, relatively low latent trait and item information function levels (<1.5 and p > .5), and differential item functioning. After analysis, 14 items were excluded, resulting in a 20-item instrument (self-care maintenance eight items; monitoring seven items; and management five items). Most items demonstrated moderate to high discrimination (median 2.13, minimum .77, maximum 5.05), and appropriate item difficulty (-2.7 to 1.4). Internal consistency reliability was excellent (Cronbach α = .94, average inter-item correlation = .41) with no ceiling effects. The newly developed 20-item version of the CACHS is supported by rigorous instrument development and represents a novel instrument to measure CGs' contribution to HF self-care. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Oral health knowledge, attitude, and self-care practices among pharmacists in Riyadh, Riyadh Province, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Baseer, Mohammad Abdual; Mehkari, Mohammed Aleemullah; Al-Marek, Fahad AbdulMohsen Fahad; Bajahzar, Omar Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Identifying and addressing gaps in the oral health knowledge, attitude, and practices of pharmacists is important before they can be considered as a member of the oral health promotion team. The aim of this study was to determine the prevailing oral health knowledge, attitude, and self-care practices among a sample of pharmacists from Riyadh, Riyadh Province, Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study involving 200 pharmacists working in community- and hospital-based pharmacies was conducted using a structured, self-administered, close-ended questionnaire. The responses were collected and descriptive statistics of the mean scores of knowledge, attitude, and self-care practices were calculated. Mann–Whitney U and Kruskal–Wallis tests were performed to compare the different groups. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used to assess the association among knowledge–attitude, knowledge–practice, and attitude–practice. Results: Overall, the mean scores of oral health knowledge, attitude, and self-care practices were found to be 5.27 ± 1.05, 3.89 ± 0.83, and 2.1 ± 0.61, respectively. Male non-Saudi pharmacists working in chain pharmacies, having 11–15 years of experience with a Master's degree qualification showed significantly higher mean knowledge and practices scores as compared to their counterparts. Spearman's correlation tests revealed a significant positive correlation of knowledge–practice (r = 0.262, P < 0.01), whereas knowledge–attitude (r = -0.149, P < 0.05) as well as attitudes–practices (r = -0.196, P < 0.01) were negatively correlated. Conclusion: Pharmacists exhibited an average knowledge, negative attitude, and inadequate self-care practices toward oral health. However, increasing oral health knowledge can have profound improvement in oral self-care practices. PMID:27114953

  3. Oral health knowledge, attitude, and self-care practices among pharmacists in Riyadh, Riyadh Province, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Baseer, Mohammad Abdual; Mehkari, Mohammed Aleemullah; Al-Marek, Fahad AbdulMohsen Fahad; Bajahzar, Omar Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Identifying and addressing gaps in the oral health knowledge, attitude, and practices of pharmacists is important before they can be considered as a member of the oral health promotion team. The aim of this study was to determine the prevailing oral health knowledge, attitude, and self-care practices among a sample of pharmacists from Riyadh, Riyadh Province, Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional study involving 200 pharmacists working in community- and hospital-based pharmacies was conducted using a structured, self-administered, close-ended questionnaire. The responses were collected and descriptive statistics of the mean scores of knowledge, attitude, and self-care practices were calculated. Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests were performed to compare the different groups. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used to assess the association among knowledge-attitude, knowledge-practice, and attitude-practice. Overall, the mean scores of oral health knowledge, attitude, and self-care practices were found to be 5.27 ± 1.05, 3.89 ± 0.83, and 2.1 ± 0.61, respectively. Male non-Saudi pharmacists working in chain pharmacies, having 11-15 years of experience with a Master's degree qualification showed significantly higher mean knowledge and practices scores as compared to their counterparts. Spearman's correlation tests revealed a significant positive correlation of knowledge-practice (r = 0.262, P < 0.01), whereas knowledge-attitude (r = -0.149, P < 0.05) as well as attitudes-practices (r = -0.196, P < 0.01) were negatively correlated. Pharmacists exhibited an average knowledge, negative attitude, and inadequate self-care practices toward oral health. However, increasing oral health knowledge can have profound improvement in oral self-care practices.

  4. Nutritional self-care among a group of older home-living people in rural Southern Norway

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Bjørg; Söderhamn, Ulrika

    2015-01-01

    Background Older home-living people are an at-risk group for undernutrition, particularly those who are living alone. Lack of knowledge about healthy dietary habits, altered taste sensation, and declined health status are shown to be some of the factors related to undernutrition. The aims of this study were to explore how a small group of older people in Southern Norway perceived their nutritional self-care. Methods An exploratory qualitative approach, combined with a simple self-report questionnaire, was used. Five persons living in rural areas in Southern Norway, who in a former study were screened and found to be at risk for undernutrition, participated. Qualitative data assessed by means of individual self-care talks in the persons’ own homes were analyzed using directed content analysis. A simple self-report questionnaire containing demographic variables, two health-related questions, and the Nutritional Form For the Elderly (NUFFE-NO) instrument was filled out at baseline and 6 months after the self-care talks. Results The qualitative data showed that the participants had adequate knowledge about healthy and nutritious diets. They were aware of and motivated to adapt their diet to their current state of health and to perform the necessary actions to maintain an optimal nutritional status and nutritional self-care. Conclusion Older people living at home are a diverse group. However, this study showed that they may have sufficient knowledge, willingness, and ability to perform nutritional self-care, even if they live alone and have several chronic illnesses and impaired health. PMID:25670905

  5. Self-care activities and glycated haemoglobin in Iranian patients with type 2 diabetes: can coping styles and social support have a buffering role?

    PubMed

    Shayeghian, Zeinab; Aguilar-Vafaie, Maria E; Besharat, Mohammad Ali; Amiri, Parisa; Parvin, Mahmoud; Gillani, Kobra Roohi; Hassanabadi, Hamidreza

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes self-care is a key element in the overall management of diabetes. However, the importance of psychosocial factors for successful disease management is under investigated. This study aimed at exploring the role of coping styles and social support in the relationship between self-care activities and glycated haemoglobin in patients with type 2 diabetes. One hundred adults (60% female, aged 40-70 years) with type 2 diabetes completed questionnaires assessing self-care activities, coping styles and social support. In addition, a blood test was performed to obtain glycated haemoglobin levels. Result showed significant relationships of glycated haemoglobin with self-care activities, coping styles and social support. Regression analysis indicated that social support had a moderating role on the relationship between self-care activities and glycated haemoglobin, such that, at very high levels of social support the association, between Self-Care and HbA1c disappears. Findings indicate that health care providers, within the context of the Iranian social and cultural situation, should pay more attention to psychosocial factors when addressing self-care activities. Delineation of the role of coping styles and social support might be useful for identifying patients in need of particular counselling and support for improving self-care activities and HbA1c levels.

  6. Pathways of empowerment perceptions, health literacy, self-efficacy, and self-care behaviors to glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yau-Jiunn; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Wang, Ruey-Hsia; Lin, Kun-Der; Lee, Yu-Li; Wang, Yi-Hsien

    2016-02-01

    To validate a hypothesized model exploring the influencing pathways of empowerment perceptions, health literacy, self-efficacy, and self-care behaviors to glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Overall, 295 patients with T2DM were recruited from five endocrine clinics in Taiwan through convenience sampling. Data regarding personal characteristics, empowerment perceptions, health literacy, self-efficacy, self-care behaviors, and HbA1c levels were collected. A structural equation modeling was used to validate the hypothesized model. Significant direct pathways were determined from empowerment perceptions to health literacy, from health literacy to self-efficacy, from self-efficacy to self-care behaviors, and from self-care behaviors to HbA1c levels. The empowerment perceptions and health literacy relatively influenced self-efficacy and self-care behaviors. Self-efficacy and self-care behaviors relatively influenced glycemic control in patients with T2DM. Modifying self-care behaviors have been demonstrated to be the most essential for improving glycemic control. To improve self-care behaviors, healthcare providers should target improving self-efficacy, and enhancing health literacy can be considered to be a potential strategy for improving self-efficacy. To enhance health literacy, healthcare providers could use an empowerment approach rather than an authoritative approach that emphasizes patient compliance in managing patients with T2DM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Questions and Answers about School-Age Children in Self-Care: A Sloan Work and Family Research Network Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloan Work and Family Research Network, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Sloan Work and Family Research Network has prepared Fact Sheets that provide statistical answers to some important questions about work-family and work-life issues. This Fact Sheet includes statistics about Children in Self-Care, and answers the following questions about school-age children in self-care: (1) How many school-age children are in…

  8. Mobile Health Apps to Facilitate Self-Care: A Qualitative Study of User Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kevin; Burford, Oksana; Emmerton, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    Objective Consumers are living longer, creating more pressure on the health system and increasing their requirement for self-care of chronic conditions. Despite rapidly-increasing numbers of mobile health applications (‘apps’) for consumers’ self-care, there is a paucity of research into consumer engagement with electronic self-monitoring. This paper presents a qualitative exploration of how health consumers use apps for health monitoring, their perceived benefits from use of health apps, and suggestions for improvement of health apps. Materials and Methods ‘Health app’ was defined as any commercially-available health or fitness app with capacity for self-monitoring. English-speaking consumers aged 18 years and older using any health app for self-monitoring were recruited for interview from the metropolitan area of Perth, Australia. The semi-structured interview guide comprised questions based on the Technology Acceptance Model, Health Information Technology Acceptance Model, and the Mobile Application Rating Scale, and is the only study to do so. These models also facilitated deductive thematic analysis of interview transcripts. Implicit and explicit responses not aligned to these models were analyzed inductively. Results Twenty-two consumers (15 female, seven male) participated, 13 of whom were aged 26–35 years. Eighteen participants reported on apps used on iPhones. Apps were used to monitor diabetes, asthma, depression, celiac disease, blood pressure, chronic migraine, pain management, menstrual cycle irregularity, and fitness. Most were used approximately weekly for several minutes per session, and prior to meeting initial milestones, with significantly decreased usage thereafter. Deductive and inductive thematic analysis reduced the data to four dominant themes: engagement in use of the app; technical functionality of the app; ease of use and design features; and management of consumers’ data. Conclusions The semi-structured interviews provided

  9. A pilot study of yoga as self-care for arthritis in minority communities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background While arthritis is the most common cause of disability, non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics experience worse arthritis impact despite having the same or lower prevalence of arthritis compared to non-Hispanic whites. People with arthritis who exercise regularly have less pain, more energy, and improved sleep, yet arthritis is one of the most common reasons for limiting physical activity. Mind-body interventions, such as yoga, that teach stress management along with physical activity may be well suited for investigation in both osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Yoga users are predominantly white, female, and college educated. There are few studies that examine yoga in minority populations; none address arthritis. This paper presents a study protocol examining the feasibility and acceptability of providing yoga to an urban, minority population with arthritis. Methods/design In this ongoing pilot study, a convenience sample of 20 minority adults diagnosed with either osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis undergo an 8-week program of yoga classes. It is believed that by attending yoga classes designed for patients with arthritis, with racially concordant instructors; acceptability of yoga as an adjunct to standard arthritis treatment and self-care will be enhanced. Self-care is defined as adopting behaviors that improve physical and mental well-being. This concept is quantified through collecting patient-reported outcome measures related to spiritual growth, health responsibility, interpersonal relations, and stress management. Additional measures collected during this study include: physical function, anxiety/depression, fatigue, sleep disturbance, social roles, and pain; as well as baseline demographic and clinical data. Field notes, quantitative and qualitative data regarding feasibility and acceptability are also collected. Acceptability is determined by response/retention rates, positive qualitative data, and continuing yoga practice after three

  10. A pilot study of yoga as self-care for arthritis in minority communities.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Kimberly R; Ward, Michael M; Haaz, Steffany; Velummylum, Sinthujah; Fike, Alice; Acevedo, Ana T; Tataw-Ayuketah, Gladys; Dietz, Laura; Mittleman, Barbara B; Wallen, Gwenyth R

    2013-04-02

    While arthritis is the most common cause of disability, non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics experience worse arthritis impact despite having the same or lower prevalence of arthritis compared to non-Hispanic whites. People with arthritis who exercise regularly have less pain, more energy, and improved sleep, yet arthritis is one of the most common reasons for limiting physical activity. Mind-body interventions, such as yoga, that teach stress management along with physical activity may be well suited for investigation in both osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Yoga users are predominantly white, female, and college educated. There are few studies that examine yoga in minority populations; none address arthritis. This paper presents a study protocol examining the feasibility and acceptability of providing yoga to an urban, minority population with arthritis. In this ongoing pilot study, a convenience sample of 20 minority adults diagnosed with either osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis undergo an 8-week program of yoga classes. It is believed that by attending yoga classes designed for patients with arthritis, with racially concordant instructors; acceptability of yoga as an adjunct to standard arthritis treatment and self-care will be enhanced. Self-care is defined as adopting behaviors that improve physical and mental well-being. This concept is quantified through collecting patient-reported outcome measures related to spiritual growth, health responsibility, interpersonal relations, and stress management. Additional measures collected during this study include: physical function, anxiety/depression, fatigue, sleep disturbance, social roles, and pain; as well as baseline demographic and clinical data. Field notes, quantitative and qualitative data regarding feasibility and acceptability are also collected. Acceptability is determined by response/retention rates, positive qualitative data, and continuing yoga practice after three months. There are a number

  11. A qualitative study exploring community pharmacists' awareness of, and contribution to, self-care support in the management of long-term conditions in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Ogunbayo, Oladapo J; Schafheutle, Ellen I; Cutts, Christopher; Noyce, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Self-care support refers to activities aimed at educating, training and empowering patients with skills and ability to manage [and monitor] their long-term conditions (LTCs). While self-care support by health care professionals has emerged as a distinct concept in the management of LTCs, evidence of community pharmacy's contribution is sparse. The aim was to explore community pharmacy's contribution to self-care support of LTCs. The objectives were to explore how community pharmacists conceptualize self-care support of LTCs and how they operationalize the core elements of this in their practice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with community pharmacists in England (n = 12) and Scotland (n = 12). A framework consisting of the core elements of self-care support (information and advice; skills training and support; technology; support networks; and collaborative care planning) was developed from the literature and was used to structure the interviews and analysis. Analysis was done thematically using the interpretative phenomenological analysis technique. The three main themes that emerged were conceptualization; operationalization of the core elements; and barriers to providing self-care support. Participants conceptualized self-care of LTCs as patients taking responsibility for their own health, performing activities that improved their LTCs and that enabled them to become more independent in managing their LTCs. Their views on self-care support did not reflect this conceptual understanding but was described primarily as providing patients with information and advice rather than actively supporting them. Participants' views of operationalizing the core elements of self-care support was found to be medicines focused, opportunistic and dependent on the services they provided, rather than being patient-centered and proactive. The barriers to providing self-care support of LTCs in community pharmacy were described as priority accorded to dispensing activities

  12. [Nursing personnel downsizing in a teaching hospital].

    PubMed

    Fakih, Flávio Trevisan; Carmagnani, Maria Isabel Sampaio; Cunha, Isabel Cristina Kowal Olm

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to adjust the downsizing of nursing personnel in a teaching hospital to the resolution of Federal Nursing Council no. 293/2004. The classification of patients in levels of complexity care was done and the required time for the nurse care also was verified. The present number of employees was compared to the measured one. The outcomes showed the levels of patients'care complexity is on intermediate care (42%), and the required time to the nurse care was greater on intensive care patients (42%). The present staff has a deficit of 205 nurses and an exceding of 284 professionals of techinical college level.

  13. Brief encounters: what do primary care professionals contribute to peoples' self-care support network for long-term conditions? A mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Anne; Vassilev, Ivaylo; Brooks, Helen; Kennedy, Anne; Blickem, Christian

    2016-02-17

    Primary care professionals are presumed to play a central role in delivering long-term condition management. However the value of their contribution relative to other sources of support in the life worlds of patients has been less acknowledged. Here we explore the value of primary care professionals in people's personal communities of support for long-term condition management. A mixed methods survey with nested qualitative study designed to identify relationships and social network member's (SNM) contributions to the support work of managing a long-term condition conducted in 2010 in the North West of England. Through engagement with a concentric circles diagram three hundred participants identified 2544 network members who contributed to illness management. The results demonstrated how primary care professionals are involved relative to others in ongoing self-care management. Primary care professionals constituted 15.5 % of overall network members involved in chronic illness work. Their contribution was identified as being related to illness specific work providing less in terms of emotional work than close family members or pets and little to everyday work. The qualitative accounts suggested that primary care professionals are valued mainly for access to medication and nurses for informational and monitoring activities. Overall primary care is perceived as providing less input in terms of extended self-management support than the current literature on policy and practice suggests. Thus primary care professionals can be described as providing 'minimally provided support'. This sense of a 'minimally' provided input reinforces limited expectations and value about what primary care professionals can provide in terms of support for long-term condition management. Primary care was perceived as having an essential but limited role in making a contribution to support work for long-term conditions. This coalesces with evidence of a restricted capacity of primary care to

  14. Should We Care About Adolescents Who Care for Themselves? What We've Learned and What We Need to Know About Youth in Self-Care.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Joseph L; Parente, Maria E

    2009-12-01

    This article provides an overview of existing research on the prevalence and predictors of adolescent self-care and on the consequences associated with it. Self-care, in which the young are left unsupervised during out-of-school hours, is a common experience for millions of American youth, and existing studies suggest that this arrangement may represent a risk for the development of behavior problems. However, the behavior problems associated with self-care depend on both individual and environmental factors and are most likely to develop when self-care (1) occurs out of the home, (2) involves permissive parenting and/or low parental monitoring, (3) takes place in neighborhoods with high levels of crime and disorganization, (4) involves adolescents with preexisting behavioral problems, and (5) represents an intensive and persistent arrangement. Following our survey of current research on self-care, we offer recommendations regarding future research and policy.

  15. Stress Levels of Nurses in Oncology Outpatient Units.

    PubMed

    Ko, Woonhwa; Kiser-Larson, Norma

    2016-04-01

    Oncology nursing is often a source of substantial stress for nurses. Many nurses, particularly novice nurses, have inadequate preparation to care for patients at the end of life and their families. Unless nurses prevent or manage work-related stress by using effective coping strategies, oncology nursing staff will continue to suffer from burnout and compassion fatigue. The purpose of this article is to identify stress levels and stressful factors of nurses working in oncology outpatient units and to explore coping behaviors for work-related stress of oncology staff nurses in outpatient units. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used to identify stress levels and stressful factors for outpatient oncology nurses, investigate differences in stress levels among nurses' demographic characteristics, and explore coping behaviors of the nurses. Study participants (N = 40) included RNs and licensed practical nurses who completed the Nursing Stress Scale, three open-ended questions, and a demographic questionnaire. The highest sources of stress were workload and patient death and dying. Demographic variables of age and work experience in nursing showed a significant positive relationship to work-related stress scores. The three most frequently used coping behaviors were verbalizing, exercising or relaxing, and taking time for self. Continuing education programs on stress management are highly recommended. Outpatient oncology nurses should be nurtured and supported through tailored interventions at multiple levels to help them find effective coping strategies and develop self-care competencies. Although younger and less experienced nurses had lower mean stress scores than older and more experienced nurses, the continuing education programs and tailored interventions would be helpful for all oncology nursing staff.

  16. A new-graduate program: empowering the novice nurse.

    PubMed

    Cheeks, Patricia; Dunn, Pamela S

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare organizations struggle to find efficient and effective strategies to facilitate the transition of a new graduate into the staff nurse role. The authors have developed a retreat program aimed at assisting new graduates during this transitional period. The goal of the program is for new graduates to emerge with feelings of self-efficacy and empowerment. The authors present an overview of the program, which emphasizes self-care, analytical thinking, conflict resolution, and interpersonal communication skills.

  17. Communication competence, self-care behaviors and glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Parchman, Michael L; Flannagan, Dorothy; Ferrer, Robert L; Matamoras, Mike

    2009-10-01

    To examine the relationship between physician communication competence and A1c control among Hispanics and non-Hispanics seen in primary care practices. Observational. Direct observation and audio-recording of patient-physician encounters by 155 Hispanic and non-Hispanic white patients seen by 40 physicians in 20 different primary care clinics. Audio-recordings were transcribed and coded to derive an overall communication competence score for the physician. An exit survey was administered to each patient to assess self-care activities and their medical record was abstracted for the most recent glycosylated hemoglobin (A1c) level. Higher levels of communication competence were associated with lower levels of A1c for Hispanics, but not non-Hispanic white patients. Although communication competence was associated with better self-reported diet behaviors, diet was not associated with A1c control. Across all patients, higher levels of communication competence were associated with improved A1c control after controlling for age, ethnicity and diet adherence. Physician's communication competence may be more important for promoting clinical success in disadvantaged patients. Acquisition of communication competence skills may be an important component in interventions to eliminate Hispanic disparities in glucose control. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Appraisal of Self-Care Agency Scale - Revised.

    PubMed

    Stacciarini, Thaís Santos Guerra; Pace, Ana Emilia

    2017-01-30

    to analyze the factor structure of the Appraisal of Self-Care Agency Scale-Revised (ASAS-R), adapted for Brazil. methodological study conducted with 150 individuals with diabetes mellitus cared for by the Family Health Strategy, most of whom are elderly with low educational levels. The test of the hypothesis concerning the confirmatory factor composition of the ASAS-R was performed using latent variables structural equations. the model's goodness-of-fit indexes were satisfactory (χ2 = 259.19; χ2/g.l = 2.97, p < 0.001; GFI = 0.85; RMR = 0.07; RMSEA = 0.09); the factor loads were greater than 0.40; and most item-to-factor-correlations presented moderate to strong magnitude (0.34 to 0.58); total alpha value was 0.74, while the alpha of the three factors were 0.69, 0.38 and 0.69, respectively. the scale's factor structure presented satisfactory validity and reliability results, with the exception of one factor. Application of this scale to samples of the general population is desirable in order to strengthen analyses of internal consistency and the dimensionality of the factor structure. This study is expected to contribute to further studies addressing the self-care agency construct and the development of the ASAS-R. analisar a estrutura fatorial da escala de avaliação da capacidade de autocuidado, Appraisal of Self Care Agency Scale-Revised (ASAS-R), adaptada no Brasil. estudo metodológico conduzido em 150 usuários com diabetes mellitus, maioria idosos e com baixa escolaridade, em seguimento na Estratégia Saúde da Família. O teste de hipótese da composição fatorial confirmatória da escala ASAS-R foi realizado via modelo de equações estruturais para variáveis latentes. os valores dos índices de ajuste do modelo foram satisfatórios (χ2 de 259,19; χ2/g.l de 2,97, p < 0,001; GFI = 0,85; RMR = 0,07; RMSEA = 0,09), as cargas fatoriais foram superiores a 0,40, maioria das correlações item e fator foi de moderada a forte magnitude (0,34 a 0,58) e os

  19. Consumer Health Informatics: Promoting Patient Self-care Management of Illnesses and Health.

    PubMed

    Jung, Minsoo

    Consumer health informatics (CHI) is propelling important changes for medical providers and the lives of patients through information and communications technology. Independently, medical consumers seek, collect, and use health information for decision making. However, when constructing a CHI-based medical platform, high technology must be applied in a fully understandable and usable format for both health care providers and consumers. This study examines the present status of CHI and its effect on medical consumers. For the development of CHI, we discuss the need for tailored health communications and capacity building with chronic patients at the medical center. First, empowerment is a key characteristic needed for medical consumer health care management. However, promoting patient self-care management of illnesses and health is necessary to create conjugation where cooperation with medical service providers is possible. Also, establishing a health care delivery system that will support cooperation is necessary. Second, tailored health communications can uniquely construct the health information of patients, which prevents unnecessary or excessive information from leading patients to confused and inappropriate decisions. Ultimately, through the present environment of health communication, the innovation of a consumer health care information system has become the tide of the times and the positive effect of improved health can be expected.

  20. Self-care as a professional imperative: physician burnout, depression, and suicide.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Catherine M; Flanagan, Ellen M

    2017-02-01

    Burnout has been identified in approximately half of all practicing physicians, including anesthesiologists. In this narrative review, the relationship between burnout, depression, and suicide is explored, with particular attention to the anesthesiologist. Throughout this review, we highlight our professional imperative regarding this epidemic. The authors searched the existing English language literature via PubMed from 1986 until present using the search terms physician burnout, depression, and suicide, with particular attention to studies regarding anesthesiologists and strategies to address these problems. Burnout and depression have increased among physicians, while the rate of suicide has remained relatively the same. There are many factors associated with burnout and depression as well as many causes. Certain individual factors include sex, amount of social support, and mental health history. Systems factors that play a role in burnout and depression include work compression, demands of electronic health records, production pressure, and lack of control over one's professional life. Medical license applications include questions that reinforce the stigma of psychological stresses and discourage physicians from seeking appropriate care. The concept of physician well-being is multidimensional and includes factors related to each physician as an individual as well as to the working environment. Anesthesiologists must actively engage in self-care. Anesthesiology practices and healthcare organizations should evaluate the balance between demands they place on physicians and the resources provided to sustain an engaged, productive, and satisfied physician workforce. National efforts must be rallied to support physicians seeking help for physical and psychological health problems.

  1. Disclosure, accommodations and self-care at work among adolescents with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Sally; McDougall, Carolyn; Sanford, Robyn

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore whether adolescents with disabilities disclose their condition and what types of accommodations are requested at work. In-depth, qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 adolescents with a physical and/or mobility-related disability. We also reviewed their self- and staff assessments completed throughout an employment training program in which they took part. The findings show that most youth were able to disclose their conditions and recognize some of their limitations in performing tasks at work. Youth requested physical accommodations, more time to complete tasks and cognitive accommodations. Youth also performed several self-care tasks to manage their disability at work including personal care, pain management and fatigue. Within the context of this employment training program, youth were able to disclose their condition to their employer, ask for accommodations and manage their disability in the workplace. Educators and clinicians should: Assist youth in understanding whether, when and how to disclose their disability to their potential employer. Help youth to understand what accommodations are available to them in the workplace and how to access them, to help them to perform their job effectively. Coach youth on how to manage their disability in a work context, especially with regard to personal care, pain management and fatigue. Encourage and facilitate participation in experience-based opportunities to practice disclosure, requesting accommodations and self-management.

  2. Internet-based patient self-care: the next generation of health care delivery.

    PubMed

    Forkner-Dunn, June

    2003-01-01

    The United States health care system is an outdated model in need of fundamental change. As part of this change, the system must explore and take advantage of the potential benefits of the "e-revolution," a phenomenon that includes everyday use of the Internet by the general public. During 2002, an estimated 100 million Americans will have obtained information--including health information--from the Web as a basis for making decisions. The Internet is thus an influential force; and, as such, this medium could have a revolutionary role in retooling the trillion-dollar United States health care industry to improve patient self-management, patient satisfaction, and health outcomes. As a group, physicians use the Internet more than do many other sectors of the general adult population. However, physicians have not received sufficient information to convince them that they can provide higher-quality care by using the Internet; indeed, few studies have assessed the Internet's value for improving patients' medical self-management and health behavior, as well as their clinical outcomes and relationships with health care practitioners. New e-technology formats introduced to the growing consumer movement will drive the next generation of self-care by allowing patients to manage their own health conveniently and proficiently.

  3. Does patient empowerment predict self-care behavior and glycosylated hemoglobin in chinese patients with type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengnan; Hsue, Cunyi; Lou, Qingqing

    2015-05-01

    Patient empowerment is playing an increasingly important role in diabetes and related disorders. This study evaluated the correlations among patient empowerment, self-care behavior, and glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes in mainland China. We conducted a multicenter cross-sectional study. Eight hundred eighty-five patients who sought care at hospitals in Nanjing, Changsha, Yunnan, and Chongqing, China, were enrolled. Structured questionnaires and medical records provided the data. The instruments included a demographic and clinical questionnaire, the Diabetes Empowerment Scale-Short Form, and the Chinese version of the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Scale. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was used as a measure of glycemic control. The data analyses are presented as proportions, means (±SD), β, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Multilinear regressions were used to examine the correlations among the scores of patient empowerment, self-care behavior, and HbA1c values. Linear regression revealed that patient empowerment was a stat