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Sample records for self-gravitating gaseous discs

  1. A viscosity prescription for a self-gravitating accretion disc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, D. N. C.; Pringle, J. E.

    1987-01-01

    A model for treating the transfer of angular momentum within a gaseous differentially rotating disc subject to gravitational instability is discussed in terms of an effective kinematic viscosity. It is assumed that even when matter in the disc is subject to self-gravitation, the instability does not necessarily lead directly to condensation of parts of the disc into self-gravitating bodies. Conditions under which the present model permits a similarity solution are discussed, and it is shown that the general solution tends to the similarity solution at large times.

  2. On the fragmentation boundary in magnetized self-gravitating discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgan, Duncan; Price, Daniel J.; Bonnell, Ian

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the role of magnetic fields in the fragmentation of self-gravitating discs using 3D global ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations performed with the PHANTOM smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. For initially toroidal fields, we find two regimes. In the first, where the cooling time is greater than five times the dynamical time, magnetic fields reduce spiral density wave amplitudes, which in turn suppresses fragmentation. This is the case even if the magnetic pressure is only a 10th of the thermal pressure. The second regime occurs when the cooling time is sufficiently short that magnetic fields cannot halt fragmentation. We find that magnetized discs produce more massive fragments, due to both the additional pressure exerted by the magnetic field and the additional angular momentum transport induced by Maxwell stresses. The fragments are confined to a narrower range of initial semimajor axes than those in unmagnetized discs. The orbital eccentricity and inclination distributions of unmagnetized and magnetized disc fragments are similar. Our results suggest that the fragmentation boundary could be at cooling times a factor of 2 lower than predicted by purely hydrodynamical models.

  3. Self-gravitational Force Calculation of Infinitesimally Thin Gaseous Disks on Nested Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsiang-Hsu; Taam, Ronald E.; Yen, David C. C.

    2016-06-01

    We extend the work of Yen et al. and develop second-order formulae to accommodate a nested grid discretization for the direct self-gravitational force calculation for infinitesimally thin gaseous disks. This approach uses a two-dimensional kernel that is derived for infinitesimally thin disks and is free of artificial boundary conditions. The self-gravitational force calculation is presented in generalized convolution forms for a nested grid configuration. A numerical technique derived from a fast Fourier transform is employed to reduce the computational complexity to be nearly linear. By comparing with analytic potential-density pairs associated with the generalized Maclaurin disks, the extended approach is verified to be of second-order accuracy when using numerical simulations. The proposed method is accurate, computationally fast, and has the potential to be applied to studies of planetary migration and the gaseous morphology of disk galaxies.

  4. Self-similar evolution of self-gravitating viscous accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illenseer, Tobias F.; Duschl, Wolfgang J.

    2015-06-01

    A new one-dimensional, dynamical model is proposed for geometrically thin, self-gravitating viscous accretion discs. The vertically integrated equations are simplified using the slow accretion limit and the monopole approximation with a time-dependent central point mass to account for self-gravity and accretion. It is shown that the system of partial differential equations can be reduced to a single non-linear advection diffusion equation which describes the time evolution of angular velocity. In order to solve the equation, three different turbulent viscosity prescriptions are considered. It is shown that for these parametrizations the differential equation allows for similarity transformations depending only on a single non-dimensional parameter. A detailed analysis of the similarity solutions reveals that this parameter is the initial power-law exponent of the angular velocity distribution at large radii. The radial dependence of the self-similar solutions is in most cases given by broken power laws. At small radii, the rotation law always becomes Keplerian with respect to the current central point mass. In the outer regions, the power-law exponent of the rotation law deviates from the Keplerian value and approaches asymptotically the value determined by the initial condition. It is shown that accretion discs with flatter rotation laws at large radii yield higher accretion rates. The methods are applied to self-gravitating accretion discs in active galactic nuclei. Fully self-gravitating discs are found to evolve faster than nearly Keplerian discs. The implications on supermassive black hole formation and Quasar evolution are discussed.

  5. One-armed spirals in locally isothermal, radially structured self-gravitating discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Min-Kai

    2015-04-01

    We describe a new mechanism that leads to the destabilization of non-axisymmetric waves in astrophysical discs with an imposed radial temperature gradient. This might apply, for example, to the outer parts of protoplanetary discs. We use linear density wave theory to show that non-axisymmetric perturbations generally do not conserve their angular momentum in the presence of a forced temperature gradient. This implies an exchange of angular momentum between linear perturbations and the background disc. In particular, when the disturbance is a low-frequency trailing wave and the disc temperature decreases outwards, this interaction is unstable and leads to the growth of the wave. We demonstrate this phenomenon through numerical hydrodynamic simulations of locally isothermal discs in 2D using the FARGO code and in 3D with the ZEUS-MP and PLUTO codes. We consider radially structured discs with a self-gravitating region which remains stable in the absence of a temperature gradient. However, when a temperature gradient is imposed we observe exponential growth of a one-armed spiral mode (azimuthal wavenumber m = 1) with co-rotation radius outside the bulk of the spiral arm, resulting in a nearly stationary one-armed spiral pattern. The development of this one-armed spiral does not require the movement of the central star, as found in previous studies. Because destabilization by a forced temperature gradient does not explicitly require disc self-gravity, we suggest this mechanism may also affect low-frequency one-armed oscillations in non-self-gravitating discs.

  6. Limits on the location of planetesimal formation in self-gravitating protostellar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, C. J.; Lodato, G.

    2009-09-01

    In this Letter, we show that if planetesimals form in spiral features in self-gravitating discs, as previously suggested by the idealized simulations of Rice et al., then in realistic protostellar discs, this process will be restricted to the outer regions of the disc (i.e. at radii in excess of several tens of au). This restriction relates to the requirement that dust has to be concentrated in spiral features on a time-scale that is less than the (roughly dynamical) lifetime of such features, and that such rapid accumulation requires spiral features whose fractional amplitude is not much less than unity. This in turn requires that the cooling time-scale of the gas is relatively short, which restricts the process to the outer disc. We point out that the efficient conversion of a large fraction of the primordial dust in the disc into planetesimals could rescue this material from the well-known problem of rapid inward migration at an approximate metre-size scale and that in principle the collisional evolution of these objects could help to resupply small dust to the protostellar disc. We also point out the possible implications of this scenario for the location of planetesimal belts inferred in debris discs around main sequence stars, but stress that further dynamical studies are required in order to establish whether the disc retains a memory of the initial site of planetesimal creation.

  7. A modified WKB formulation for linear eigenmodes of a collisionless self-gravitating disc in the epicyclic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulati, Mamta; Saini, Tarun Deep

    2016-07-01

    The short-wave asymptotics (WKB) of spiral density waves in self-gravitating stellar discs is well suited for the study of the dynamics of tightly-wound wavepackets. But the textbook WKB theory is not well adapted to the study of the linear eigenmodes in a collisionless self-gravitating disc because of the transcendental nature of the dispersion relation. We present a modified WKB theory of spiral density waves, for collisionless discs in the epicyclic limit, in which the perturbed gravitational potential is related to the perturbed surface density by the Poisson integral in Kalnaj's logarithmic spiral form. An integral equation is obtained for the surface density perturbation, which is seen to also reduce to the standard WKB dispersion relation. Although our formulation is general and applies to all discs, we present our analysis only for nearly Keplerian, low-mass, self-gravitating discs revolving around massive central objects, and derive an integral equation governing the slow precessional modes of such discs. For a prograde disc, the integral kernel turns out be real and symmetric, implying that all slow modes are stable. We apply the slow mode integral equation to two unperturbed disc profiles, the Jalali-Tremaine annular discs, and the Kuzmin disc. We determine eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for both m = 1 and m = 2 slow modes for these profiles and discuss their properties. Our results compare well with those of Jalali-Tremaine.

  8. Disc-protoplanet interaction. Influence of circumprimary radiative discs on self-gravitating protoplanetary bodies in binary star systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyergyovits, M.; Eggl, S.; Pilat-Lohinger, E.; Theis, Ch.

    2014-06-01

    Context. More than 60 planets have been discovered so far in systems that harbour two stars, some of which have binary semi-major axes as small as 20 au. It is well known that the formation of planets in such systems is strongly influenced by the stellar components, since the protoplanetary disc and the particles within are exposed to the gravitational influence of the binary. However, the question on how self-gravitating protoplanetary bodies affect the evolution of a radiative, circumprimary disc is still open. Aims: We present our 2D hydrodynamical GPU-CPU code and study the interaction of several thousands of self-gravitating particles with a viscous and radiative circumprimary disc within a binary star system. To our knowledge this program is the only one at the moment that is capable to handle this many particles and to calculate their influence on each other and on the disc. Methods: We performed hydrodynamical simulations of a circumstellar disc assuming the binary system to be coplanar. Our grid-based staggered mesh code relies on ideas from ZEUS-2D, where we implemented the FARGO algorithm and an additional energy equation for the radiative cooling according to opacity tables. To treat particle motion we used a parallelised version of the precise Bulirsch - Stoer algorithm. Four models in total where computed taking into account (i) only N-body interaction; (ii) N-body and disc interaction; (iii) the influence of computational parameters (especially smoothing) on N-body interaction; and (iv) the influence of a quiet low-eccentricity disc while running model (ii). The impact velocities were measured at two different time intervals and were compared. Results: We show that the combination of disc- and N-body self-gravity can have a significant influence on the orbit evolution of roughly Moon sized protoplanets. Conclusions: Not only gas drag can alter the orbit of particles, but the gravitational influence of the disc can accomplish this as well. The results

  9. Numerical convergence in self-gravitating disc simulations: initial conditions and edge effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paardekooper, Sijme-Jan; Baruteau, Clément; Meru, Farzana

    2011-09-01

    We study the numerical convergence of hydrodynamical simulations of self-gravitating accretion discs, in which a simple cooling law is balanced by shock heating. It is well known that there exists a critical cooling time-scale for which shock heating can no longer compensate for the energy losses, at which point the disc fragments. The numerical convergence of previous results of this critical cooling time-scale was questioned recently using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). We employ a two-dimensional grid-based code to study this problem and find that for smooth initial conditions, fragmentation is possible for slower cooling as the resolution is increased, in agreement with recent SPH results. We show that this non-convergence is at least partly due to the creation of a special location in the disc, the boundary between the turbulent and the laminar region, when cooling towards a gravito-turbulent state. Converged results appear to be obtained in setups where no such sharp edges appear, and we then find a critical cooling time-scale of ˜4Ω-1, where Ω is the local angular velocity.

  10. Collision velocity of dust grains in self-gravitating protoplanetary discs

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Richard A.; Clarke, Cathie J.

    2016-01-01

    We have conducted the first comprehensive numerical investigation of the relative velocity distribution of dust particles in self-gravitating protoplanetary discs with a view to assessing the viability of planetesimal formation via direct collapse in such environments. The viability depends crucially on the large sizes that are preferentially collected in pressure maxima produced by transient spiral features (Stokes numbers, St ∼ 1); growth to these size scales requires that collision velocities remain low enough that grain growth is not reversed by fragmentation. We show that, for a single-sized dust population, velocity driving by the disc's gravitational perturbations is only effective for St > 3, while coupling to the gas velocity dominates otherwise. We develop a criterion for understanding this result in terms of the stopping distance being of the order of the disc scaleheight. Nevertheless, the relative velocities induced by differential radial drift in multi-sized dust populations are too high to allow the growth of silicate dust particles beyond St ∼ 10− 2 or 10−1 (10 cm to m sizes at 30 au), such Stokes numbers being insufficient to allow concentration of solids in spiral features. However, for icy solids (which may survive collisions up to several 10 m s−1), growth to St ∼ 1 (10 m size) may be possible beyond 30 au from the star. Such objects would be concentrated in spiral features and could potentially produce larger icy planetesimals/comets by gravitational collapse. These planetesimals would acquire moderate eccentricities and remain unmodified over the remaining lifetime of the disc. PMID:27346980

  11. Collision velocity of dust grains in self-gravitating protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Richard A.; Clarke, Cathie J.

    2016-05-01

    We have conducted the first comprehensive numerical investigation of the relative velocity distribution of dust particles in self-gravitating protoplanetary discs with a view to assessing the viability of planetesimal formation via direct collapse in such environments. The viability depends crucially on the large sizes that are preferentially collected in pressure maxima produced by transient spiral features (Stokes numbers, St ˜ 1); growth to these size scales requires that collision velocities remain low enough that grain growth is not reversed by fragmentation. We show that, for a single-sized dust population, velocity driving by the disc's gravitational perturbations is only effective for St > 3, while coupling to the gas velocity dominates otherwise. We develop a criterion for understanding this result in terms of the stopping distance being of the order of the disc scaleheight. Nevertheless, the relative velocities induced by differential radial drift in multi-sized dust populations are too high to allow the growth of silicate dust particles beyond St ˜ 10- 2 or 10-1 (10 cm to m sizes at 30 au), such Stokes numbers being insufficient to allow concentration of solids in spiral features. However, for icy solids (which may survive collisions up to several 10 m s-1), growth to St ˜ 1 (10 m size) may be possible beyond 30 au from the star. Such objects would be concentrated in spiral features and could potentially produce larger icy planetesimals/comets by gravitational collapse. These planetesimals would acquire moderate eccentricities and remain unmodified over the remaining lifetime of the disc.

  12. Vortex and spiral instabilities at gap edges in three-dimensional self-gravitating disc-satellite simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Min-Kai

    2012-11-01

    Numerical simulations of global three-dimensional (3D), self-gravitating discs with a gap opened by an embedded planet are presented. The simulations are customized to examine planetary gap stability. Previous results, obtained by Lin & Papaloizou from 2D disc models, are reproduced in 3D. These include (i) the development of vortices associated with local vortensity minima at gap edges and their merging on dynamical time-scales in weakly self-gravitating discs, (ii) the increased number of vortices as the strength of self-gravity is increased and their resisted merging, and (iii) suppression of the vortex instability and development of global spiral arms associated with local vortensity maxima in massive discs. The vertical structure of these disturbances is examined. In terms of the relative density perturbation, the vortex disturbance has weak vertical dependence when self-gravity is neglected. Vortices become more vertically stratified with increasing self-gravity. This effect is seen even when the unperturbed region around the planet's orbital radius has a Toomre stability parameter ˜10. The spiral modes display significant vertical structure at the gap edge, with the mid-plane density enhancement being several times larger than that near the upper disc boundary. However, for both instabilities the vertical Mach number is typically a few per cent, and on average vertical motions near the gap edge do not dominate horizontal motions.

  13. Coevolution of binaries and circumbinary gaseous discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, David P.; Quinn, Thomas R.

    2017-01-01

    The recent discoveries of circumbinary planets by Kepler raise questions for contemporary planet formation models. Understanding how these planets form requires characterizing their formation environment, the circumbinary protoplanetary disc and how the disc and binary interact and change as a result. The central binary excites resonances in the surrounding protoplanetary disc which drive evolution in both the binary orbital elements and in the disc. To probe how these interactions impact binary eccentricity and disc structure evolution, N-body smooth particle hydrodynamics simulations of gaseous protoplanetary discs surrounding binaries based on Kepler 38 were run for 104 binary periods for several initial binary eccentricities. We find that nearly circular binaries weakly couple to the disc via a parametric instability and excite disc eccentricity growth. Eccentric binaries strongly couple to the disc causing eccentricity growth for both the disc and binary. Discs around sufficiently eccentric binaries which strongly couple to the disc develop an m = 1 spiral wave launched from the 1:3 eccentric outer Lindblad resonance which corresponds to an alignment of gas particle longitude of periastrons. All systems display binary semimajor axis decay due to dissipation from the viscous disc.

  14. On the mechanism of self gravitating Rossby interfacial waves in proto-stellar accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellin-Bergovoy, Ron; Heifetz, Eyal; Umurhan, Orkan M.

    2016-05-01

    The dynamical response of edge waves under the influence of self-gravity is examined in an idealized two-dimensional model of a proto-stellar disc, characterized in steady state as a rotating vertically infinite cylinder of fluid with constant density except for a single density interface at some radius r0. The fluid in basic state is prescribed to rotate with a Keplerian profile $\\Omega_k(r)\\sim r^{-3/2}$ modified by some additional azimuthal sheared flow. A linear analysis shows that there are two azimuthally propagating edge waves, kin to the familiar Rossby waves and surface gravity waves in terrestrial studies, which move opposite to one another with respect to the local basic state rotation rate at the interface. Instability only occurs if the radial pressure gradient is opposite to that of the density jump (unstably stratified) where self-gravity acts as a wave stabilizer irrespective of the stratification of the system. The propagation properties of the waves are discussed in detail in the language of vorticity edge waves. The roles of both Boussinesq and non-Boussinesq effects upon the stability and propagation of these waves with and without the inclusion of self-gravity are then quantified. The dynamics involved with self-gravity non- Boussinesq effect is shown to be a source of vorticity production where there is a jump in the basic state density, in addition, self-gravity also alters the dynamics via the radial main pressure gradient, which is a Boussinesq effect . Further applications of these mechanical insights are presented in the conclusion including the ways in which multiple density jumps or gaps may or may not be stable.

  15. SELF-GRAVITATIONAL FORCE CALCULATION OF SECOND-ORDER ACCURACY FOR INFINITESIMALLY THIN GASEOUS DISKS IN POLAR COORDINATES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsiang-Hsu; Taam, Ronald E.; Yen, David C. C.

    2015-11-15

    Investigating the evolution of disk galaxies and the dynamics of proto-stellar disks can involve the use of both a hydrodynamical and a Poisson solver. These systems are usually approximated as infinitesimally thin disks using two-dimensional Cartesian or polar coordinates. In Cartesian coordinates, the calculations of the hydrodynamics and self-gravitational forces are relatively straightforward for attaining second-order accuracy. However, in polar coordinates, a second-order calculation of self-gravitational forces is required for matching the second-order accuracy of hydrodynamical schemes. We present a direct algorithm for calculating self-gravitational forces with second-order accuracy without artificial boundary conditions. The Poisson integral in polar coordinates is expressed in a convolution form and the corresponding numerical complexity is nearly linear using a fast Fourier transform. Examples with analytic solutions are used to verify that the truncated error of this algorithm is of second order. The kernel integral around the singularity is applied to modify the particle method. The use of a softening length is avoided and the accuracy of the particle method is significantly improved.

  16. Self-gravitational Force Calculation of Second-order Accuracy for Infinitesimally Thin Gaseous Disks in Polar Coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsiang-Hsu; Yen, David C. C.; Taam, Ronald E.

    2015-11-01

    Investigating the evolution of disk galaxies and the dynamics of proto-stellar disks can involve the use of both a hydrodynamical and a Poisson solver. These systems are usually approximated as infinitesimally thin disks using two-dimensional Cartesian or polar coordinates. In Cartesian coordinates, the calculations of the hydrodynamics and self-gravitational forces are relatively straightforward for attaining second-order accuracy. However, in polar coordinates, a second-order calculation of self-gravitational forces is required for matching the second-order accuracy of hydrodynamical schemes. We present a direct algorithm for calculating self-gravitational forces with second-order accuracy without artificial boundary conditions. The Poisson integral in polar coordinates is expressed in a convolution form and the corresponding numerical complexity is nearly linear using a fast Fourier transform. Examples with analytic solutions are used to verify that the truncated error of this algorithm is of second order. The kernel integral around the singularity is applied to modify the particle method. The use of a softening length is avoided and the accuracy of the particle method is significantly improved.

  17. Giant cyclones in gaseous discs of spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, A. M.; Khoruzhii, O. V.; Polyachenko, E.; Zasov, A. V.; Sil'chenko, O. K.; Afanas'ev, V. L.; Dodonov, S. N.; Moiseev, A. V.

    1999-12-01

    We report the detection of giant cyclonic vortices in the gaseous disc of the spiral galaxy NGC 3631 in the reference frame rotating with the spiral pattern. A presence of such structures was predicted by the authors for galaxies, where the radial gradient of the perturbed velocity exceeds that of the rotational velocity. This situation really takes place in NGC 3631.

  18. Self-gravitating skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayón-Beato, Eloy; Canfora, Fabrizio; Zanelli, Jorge

    2016-05-01

    A self-gravitating Skyrmion is an analytic and globally regular solution of the Einstein-Skyrme system with nonvanishing topological charge. The spacetime is the direct product R × S3 and the Skyrmion is the self-gravitating generalization of the static hedgehog solution of Manton and Ruback. This solution can be promoted to a dynamical one in which the spacetime is a cosmology of the Bianchi type-IX and, through an analytic continuation, it can also be turned into a transversable asymptotically AdS Lorentzian wormhole. The stress-energy of this wormhole satisfies physically realistic energy conditions and the only “exotic matter” required by it is a negative cosmological constant.

  19. The pseudo-photosphere model for the continuum emission of gaseous discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, R. G.; Carciofi, A. C.; Bjorkman, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the continuum emission of viscous decretion discs around Be stars in this paper. The results obtained from non-LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) radiative transfer models show two regimes in the disc surface brightness profile: an inner optically thick region, which behaves as a pseudo-photosphere with a wavelength-dependent size, and an optically thin tenuous outer part, which contributes with about a third of the total flux. The isophotal shape of the surface brightness is well described by elliptical contours with an axial ratio b/a = cos i for inclinations i < 75°. Based on these properties, a semi-analytical model was developed to describe the continuum emission of gaseous discs. It provides fluxes and spectral slopes at the infrared within an accuracy of 10 and 5 per cent, respectively, when compared to the numerical results. The model indicates that the infrared spectral slope is mainly determined by both the density radial slope and the disc flaring exponent, being practically independent of disc inclination and base density. As a first application, the density structure of 15 Be stars was investigated, based on the infrared flux excess, and the results compared to previous determinations in the literature. Our results indicate that the decretion rates are in the range of 10-12-10-9 M⊙ yr-1, which is at least two orders of magnitude smaller than the previous outflowing disc model predictions.

  20. Collapse in self-gravitating turbulent fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Daniel W.; Chang, Philip; Murray, Norman W.; Pittman, John

    2017-02-01

    Motivated by the non-linear star formation efficiency found in recent numerical simulations by a number of workers, we perform high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations of star formation in self-gravitating turbulently driven gas. As we follow the collapse of this gas, we find that the character of the flow changes at two radii, the disc radius rd and the radius r*, where the enclosed gas mass exceeds the stellar mass. Accretion starts at large scales and works inwards. In line with recent analytical work, we find that the density evolves to a fixed attractor, ρ(r, t) → ρ(r), for rd < r < r*; mass flows through this structure on to a sporadically gravitationally unstable disc and from thence on to the star. In the bulk of the simulation box, we find that the random motions vT ∼ rp with p ∼ 0.5 are in agreement with Larson's size-linewidth relation. In the vicinity of massive star-forming regions, we find p ∼ 0.2-0.3, as seen in observations. For r < r*, vT increases inwards, with p = -1/2. Finally, we find that the total stellar mass M*(t) ∼ t2 is in line with previous numerical and analytic work that suggests a non-linear rate of star formation.

  1. Classifying self-gravitating radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyeong-Chan

    2017-02-01

    We study a static system of self-gravitating radiations confined in a sphere by using numerical and analytical calculations. Because of the scaling symmetry of radiations, most of the main properties of a solution can be represented as a segment of a solution curve on a plane of two-dimensional scale invariant variables. We define an "approximate horizon" (AH) from the analogy with an apparent horizon. Any solution curve contains a unique point that corresponds to the AH. A given solution is uniquely labeled by three parameters representing the solution curve, the size of the AH, and the sphere size, which are an alternative to the data at the outer boundary. Various geometrical properties including the existence of an AH and the behaviors around the center can be identified from the parameters. We additionally present an analytic solution of the radiations on the verge of forming a black hole. Analytic formulas for the central mass of the naked singularity are given.

  2. Protostellar collapse in a self-gravitating sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee; Boss, Alan; Calvet, Nuria; Whitney, Barbara

    1994-01-01

    We present preliminary calculations of protostellar cloud collapse starting from an isothermal, self-gravitating gaseous layer in hydrostatic equilibrium. This gravitationally unstable layer collapses into a flattened or toroidal density distribution, even in the absence of rotation or magnetic fields. We suggest that the flat infalling envelope recently observed in HL Tau by Hayashi et al.is the result of collapse from an initially nonspherical layer. We also speculate that the later evolution of such a flattened, collapsing envelope can produce a structure similar to the 'flared disk' invoked by Kenyon and Hartmann to explain the infrared excesses of many T Tauri stars.

  3. Self-gravitating system made of axions

    SciTech Connect

    Barranco, J.; Bernal, A.

    2011-02-15

    We show that the inclusion of an axionlike effective potential in the construction of a self-gravitating system of scalar fields decreases its compactness when the value of the self-interaction coupling constant is increased. By including the current values for the axion mass m and decay constant f{sub a}, we have computed the mass and the radius for self-gravitating systems made of axion particles. It is found that such objects will have asteroid size masses and radii of a few meters, thus a self-gravitating system made of axions could play the role of scalar mini-MACHOs and mimic a cold dark matter model for the galactic halo.

  4. Effective geometries in self-gravitating polytropes

    SciTech Connect

    Bini, D.; Cherubini, C.; Filippi, S.

    2008-09-15

    Perturbations of a perfect barotropic and irrotational Newtonian self-gravitating fluid are studied using a generalization of the so-called 'effective geometry' formalism. The case of polytropic spherical stars, as described by the Lane-Emden equation, is studied in detail in the known cases of existing explicit solutions. The present formulation gives a natural scenario in which the acoustic analogy has relevance for both stellar and galactic dynamics.

  5. Dynamical evolution of the young stellar disc in the Galactic centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šubr, Ladislav; Haas, Jaroslav

    2012-07-01

    Origin of several hundreds of young stars in within the distance lesssim 1pc from the Galactic supermassive black hole still represents an open problem of contemporary astrophysics. In this contribution we further investigate the model which assumes their formation in situ via fragmentation of a self-gravitating gaseous disc. We show that currently observed configuration of the system of young stars can be obtained as an outcome of a dynamical evolution of a single, initially very thin stellar disc. Our model assumes the long-term evolution of the stellar disc to be determined by gravitational influence of a distant molecular torus (CND) and mutual resonances of stellar orbits within the disc.

  6. Electrically Charged Matter in Permanent Rotation around Magnetized Black Holes: A Toy Model for Self-gravitating Fluid Tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trova, A.; Karas, V.; Slaný, P.; Kovář, J.

    2016-09-01

    We present an analytical approach for the equilibrium of a self-gravitating charged fluid embedded in a spherical gravitational and dipolar magnetic fields produced by a central mass. Our scheme is proposed, as a toy model, in the context of gaseous/dusty tori surrounding supermassive black holes in galactic nuclei. While the central black hole dominates the gravitational field and remains electrically neutral, the surrounding material has a non-negligible self-gravitational effect on the torus structure. By charging mechanisms it also acquires non-zero electric charge density, so the two influences need to be taken into account to achieve a self-consistent picture. Using our approach we discuss the impact of self-gravity, represented by the term {d}{{t}} (ratio of the torus total mass to the mass of the central body), on the conditions for existence of the equilibrium and the morphology and typology of the tori. By comparison with a previous work without self-gravity, we show that the conditions can be different. Although the main aim of the present paper is to discuss a framework for the classification of electrically charged, magnetized, self-gravitating tori, we also mention potential astrophysical applications to vertically stratified fluid configurations.

  7. Massive and modified gravity as self-gravitating media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros, Guillermo; Comelli, Denis; Pilo, Luigi

    2016-12-01

    We study the effective field theory that describes the low-energy physics of self-gravitating media. The field content consists of four derivatively coupled scalar fields that can be identified with the internal comoving coordinates of the medium. Imposing SO(3) internal spatial invariance, the theory describes supersolids. Stronger symmetry requirements lead to superfluids, solids and perfect fluids, at lowest order in derivatives. In the unitary gauge, massive gravity emerges, being thus the result of a continuous medium propagating in spacetime. Our results can be used to explore systematically the effects and signatures of modifying gravity consistently at large distances. The dark sector is then described as a self-gravitating medium with dynamical and thermodynamic properties dictated by internal symmetries. These results indicate that the divide between dark energy and modified gravity, at large distance scales, is simply a gauge choice.

  8. VISCOSITY IN PLANETARY RINGS WITH SPINNING SELF-GRAVITATING PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, Yuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji; Daisaka, Hiroshi

    2012-05-15

    Using local N-body simulation, we examine viscosity in self-gravitating planetary rings. We investigate the dependence of viscosity on various parameters in detail, including the effects of particle surface friction. In the case of self-gravitating rings with low optical depth, viscosity is determined by particle random velocity. Inclusion of surface friction slightly reduces both random velocity and viscosity when particle random velocity is determined by inelastic collisions, while surface friction slightly increases viscosity when gravitational encounters play a major role in particle velocity evolution, so that viscous heating balances with increased energy dissipation at collisions due to surface friction. We find that including surface friction changes viscosity in dilute rings up to a factor of about two. In the case of self-gravitating dense rings, viscosity is significantly increased due to the effects of gravitational wakes, and we find that varying restitution coefficients also change viscosity in such dense rings by a factor of about two. We confirm that our numerical results for viscosity in dense rings with gravitational wakes can be well approximated by a semianalytic expression that is consistent with a previously obtained formula. However, we find that this formula seems to overestimate viscosity in dense rings far from the central planet, where temporary gravitational aggregates form. We derive semianalytic expressions that reproduce our numerical results well for the entire range of examined parameters.

  9. Power distributions for self-gravitating astrophysical systems based on nonextensive Tsallis kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnichenko, A. V.

    2017-03-01

    The long-time development of self-gravitating gaseous astrophysical systems (in particular, the evolution of the protoplanet accretion disk) is mainly determined by relatively fast processes of the collision relaxation of particles. However, slower dynamical processes related to force (Newton or Coulomb) interactions between particles should be included (as q-collisions) in the nonextensive kinetic theory as well. In the present paper, we propose a procedure to include the Newton self-gravity potential and the centrifugal potential in the near-equilibrium power-like q-distribution in the phase space, obtained (in the framework of nonextensive statistics) by means of the modified Boltzmann equation averaged with respect to an unnormalized distribution. We show that if the power distribution satisfies the stationary q-kinetic equation, then the said equation imposes clear restrictions on the character of the long-term force field and on the possible dependence of hydrodynamic parameters of the coordinates: it determines those parameters uniquely. We provide a thermodynamic stability criterion for the equilibrium of the nonextensive system. The results allow us to simulate the evolution of gaseous astrophysical systems (in particular, the gravitational stability of rotating protoplanet accretion disks) more adequately.

  10. Dynamics of self-gravitating dust clouds in astrophysical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Eliasson, B.; Avinash, K.; Shukla, P. K.

    2008-09-07

    Due to the gravitational force, clouds of dust and gas in the interstellar medium can contract and form stars and planet systems. We here show that if the dust grains are electrically charged then the self-gravitation can be balanced by the ion pressure, and the collapse can be halted. In this case, the dust cloud may form soft dust planets, having the weight of a small moon or satellite, but a radius larger than of our Sun. There exist a critical mass beyond which the dust cloud collapses and forms a solid planet.

  11. Hedgehog ansatz and its generalization for self-gravitating Skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfora, Fabrizio; Maeda, Hideki

    2013-04-01

    The hedgehog ansatz for spherically symmetric spacetimes in self-gravitating nonlinear sigma models and Skyrme models is revisited and its generalization for nonspherically symmetric spacetimes is proposed. The key idea behind our construction is that, even if the matter fields depend on the Killing coordinates in a nontrivial way, the corresponding energy-momentum tensor can still be compatible with spacetime symmetries. Our generalized hedgehog ansatz reduces the Skyrme equations to coupled differential equations for two scalar fields together with several constraint equations between them. Some particular field configurations satisfying those constraints are presented in several physically important spacetimes, including stationary and axisymmetric spacetimes. Incidentally, new exact solutions are obtained under the standard hedgehog ansatz, one of which represents a global monopole inside a black hole with the Skyrme effect.

  12. Polymer quantization of a self-gravitating thin shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziprick, Jonathan; Gegenberg, Jack; Kunstatter, Gabor

    2016-11-01

    We study the quantum mechanics of self-gravitating thin shell collapse by solving the polymerized Wheeler-DeWitt equation. We obtain the energy spectrum and solve the time-dependent equation using numerics. In contradistinction to the continuum theory, we are able to consistently quantize the theory for super-Planckian black holes, and find two choices of boundary conditions which conserve energy and probability, as opposed to one in the continuum theory. Another feature unique to the polymer theory is the existence of negative energy stationary states that disappear from the spectrum as the polymer scale goes to 0. In both theories the probability density is positive semidefinite only for the space of positive energy stationary states. Dynamically, we find that an initial Gaussian probability density develops regions of negative probability as the wave packet approaches R =0 and bounces. This implies that the bouncing state is a sum of both positive and negative eigenstates.

  13. Nonlinear wave breaking in self-gravitating viscoelastic quantum fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Aniruddha; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar; Bhar, Radhaballav; Khan, Manoranjan

    2017-02-01

    The stability of a viscoelastic self-gravitating quantum fluid has been studied. Symmetry breaking instability of solitary wave has been observed through 'viscosity modified Ostrovsky equation' in weak gravity limit. In presence of strong gravitational field, the solitary wave breaks into shock waves. Response to a Gaussian perturbation, the system produces quasi-periodic short waves, which in terns predicts the existence of gravito-acoustic quasi-periodic short waves in lower solar corona region. Stability analysis of this dynamical system predicts gravity has the most prominent effect on the phase portraits, therefore, on the stability of the system. The non-existence of chaotic solution has also been observed at long wavelength perturbation through index value theorem.

  14. Assisted inspirals of stellar mass black holes embedded in AGN discs: solving the `final au problem'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Nicholas C.; Metzger, Brian D.; Haiman, Zoltán

    2017-01-01

    We explore the evolution of stellar mass black hole binaries (BHBs) which are formed in the self-gravitating discs of active galactic nuclei (AGN). Hardening due to three-body scattering and gaseous drag are effective mechanisms that reduce the semimajor axis of a BHB to radii where gravitational waves take over, on time-scales shorter than the typical lifetime of the AGN disc. Taking observationally motivated assumptions for the rate of star formation in AGN discs, we find a rate of disc-induced BHB mergers (R ˜ 3 yr^{-1} Gpc^{-3}, but with large uncertainties) that is comparable with existing estimates of the field rate of BHB mergers, and the approximate BHB merger rate implied by the recent Advanced LIGO detection of GW150914. BHBs formed thorough this channel will frequently be associated with luminous AGN, which are relatively rare within the sky error regions of future gravitational wave detector arrays. This channel could also possess a (potentially transient) electromagnetic counterpart due to super-Eddington accretion on to the stellar mass black hole following the merger.

  15. How the presence of a gas giant affects the formation of mean-motion resonances between two low-mass planets in a locally isothermal gaseous disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podlewska-Gaca, E.; Szuszkiewicz, E.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we investigate the possibility of a migration-induced resonance locking in systems containing three planets, namely an Earth analogue (1 M⊕), a super-Earth (4 M⊕) and a gas giant (one Jupiter mass). The planets have been listed in order of increasing orbital periods. All three bodies are embedded in a locally isothermal gaseous disc and orbit around a solar mass star. We are interested in answering the following questions: will the low-mass planets form the same resonant structures with each other in the vicinity of the gas giant as in the case when the gas giant is absent? More in general, how will the presence of the gas giant affect the evolution of the two low-mass planets? When there is no gas giant in the system, it has been already shown that if the two low-mass planets undergo a convergent differential migration, they will capture each other in a mean-motion resonance. For the choices of disc parameters and planet masses made in this paper, the formation of the 5:4 resonance in the absence of the Jupiter has been observed in a previous investigation and confirmed here. In this work we add a gas giant on the most external orbit of the system in such a way that its differential migration is convergent with the low-mass planets. We show that the result of this set-up is the speeding up of the migration of the super-Earth and, after that, all three planets become locked in a triple mean-motion resonance. However, this resonance is not maintained due to the low-mass planet eccentricity excitation, a fact that leads to close encounters between planets and eventually to the ejection from the internal orbits of one or both low-mass planets. We have observed that the ejected low-mass planets can leave the system, fall into a star or become the external planet relative to the gas giant. In our simulations the latter situation has been observed for the super-Earth. It follows from the results presented here that the presence of a Jupiter-like planet

  16. The chemical evolution of self-gravitating primordial disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleicher, Dominik R. G.; Bovino, Stefano; Latif, Muhammad A.; Ferrara, Andrea; Grassi, Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    Numerical simulations show the formation of self-gravitating primordial disks during the assembly of the first structures in the Universe, in particular, during the formation of Population III and supermassive stars. Their subsequent evolution is expected to be crucial in determining the mass scale of the first cosmological objects, which depends on the temperature of the gas and dominant cooling mechanism. Here, we derive a one-zone framework to explore the chemical evolution of these disks and show that viscous heating leads to the collisional dissociation of an initially molecular gas. The effect is relevant on scales of 10 AU (1000 AU) for a central mass of 10 M⊙ (104 M⊙) at an accretion rate of 10-1 M⊙ yr-1, and provides a substantial heat input to stabilize the disk. If the gas is initially atomic, it remains atomic during the further evolution and the effect of viscous heating is less significant. The additional thermal support is particularly relevant for the formation of very massive objects, such as the progenitors of the first supermassive black holes. The stabilizing impact of viscous heating thus alleviates the need for strong radiation background as a means of keeping the gas atomic.

  17. Critical exact solutions for self-gravitating Dirac fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianci, Roberto; Fabbri, Luca; Vignolo, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    We consider the Einstein-Dirac field equations describing a self-gravitating massive neutrino, looking for axially symmetric exact solutions; in the search of general solutions, we find some that are specific and which have critical features, such as the fact that the space-time curvature turns out to be flat and the spinor field gives rise to a vanishing bi-linear scalar overline{ψ }ψ =0 with non-vanishing bi-linear pseudo-scalar ioverline{ψ }γ ^5ψ not =0: because in quantum-field theory general computational methods are built on plane-wave solutions, for which the bi-linear pseudo-scalar vanishes while the bi-linear scalar does not vanish, then the solutions we found cannot be treated with the usual machinery of quantum-field theory. This means that for the Einstein-Dirac system there exist admissible solutions which nevertheless cannot be quantized with the common prescriptions; we regard this situation as yet another issue of tension between Einstein gravity and quantum principles. Possible ways to quench this tension can be seen either in enlarging the validity of quantum-field theory or by restricting the space of the solutions of the Einstein-Dirac system of field equations.

  18. Solitary waves in a self-gravitating opposite polarity dust-plasma medium

    SciTech Connect

    Mamun, A. A.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2015-10-15

    A more general and realistic dusty plasma model, namely, self-gravitating opposite polarity dust-plasma system (containing inertial positive and negative dust, and inertialess ions and electrons following Maxwellian distribution) is considered. The possibility for the formation of solitary electrostatic and self-gravitational potential structures in such a dust-plasma system is thoroughly examined. The standard reductive perturbation method, which is valid for small but finite amplitude solitary structures, is employed. The parametric regimes for the existence of solitary electrostatic and self-gravitational potential structures, and their basic properties (viz., polarity, amplitude, width, and speed) are found to be significantly modified by the combined effects of positively charged dust component and self-gravitational field. The applications of the present investigation in different space dusty plasma environments and laboratory dusty plasma devices are briefly discussed.

  19. Velocity Anisotropy in Self-gravitating Molecular Clouds. I. Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Frank; Ji, Weiguang; Li, Hua-bai

    2017-02-01

    The complex interplay between turbulence, magnetic fields, and self-gravity leads to the formation of molecular clouds out of the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). One avenue of studying this interplay is by analyzing statistical features derived from observations, where the interpretation of these features is greatly facilitated by comparisons with numerical simulations. Here we focus on the statistical anisotropy present in synthetic maps of velocity centroid data, which we derive from three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a turbulent, magnetized, self-gravitating patch of ISM. We study how the orientation and magnitude of the velocity anisotropy correlate with the magnetic field and with the structures generated by gravitational collapse. Motivated by recent observational constraints, our simulations focus on the supersonic (sonic Mach number { M }≈ 2{--}17) but sub- to trans-alfvénic (alfvénic Mach number {{ M }}{{A}}≈ 0.2{--}1.2) turbulence regime, and we consider clouds that are barely to mildly magnetically supercritical (mass-to-flux ratio equal to once or twice the critical value). Additionally we explore the impact of the turbulence driving mechanism (solenoidal or compressive) on the velocity anisotropy. While we confirm previous findings that the velocity anisotropy generally aligns well with the plane-of-sky magnetic field, our inclusion of the effects of self-gravity reveals that in regions of higher column density, the velocity anisotropy may be destroyed or even reoriented to align with the gravitationally formed structures. We provide evidence that this effect is not necessarily due to the increase of {{ M }}{{A}} inside the high-density regions.

  20. Bose and Fermi gases in the early Universe with self-gravitational effect

    SciTech Connect

    Niu Yuezhen; Huang Junwu; Ma Boqiang

    2011-03-15

    We study the self-gravitational effect on the equation of state (EoS) of Bose and Fermi gases in thermal equilibrium at the end of reheating, the period after quark-hadron transition and before big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). After introducing new grand canonical partition functions based on the work of Uhlenbeck and Gropper, we notice some interesting features of the newly developed EoSs with distinct behaviors of relativistic and nonrelativistic gases under self-gravity. The usual negligence of the self-gravitational effect when solving the background expansion of the early Universe is justified with numerical results, showing the magnitude of the self-gravitational modification of the state constant to be less than O(10{sup -78}). This helps us to clarify the background thermal evolution of the primordial patch. Such clarification is crucial in testing gravity theories, evaluating inflation models and determining element abundances in BBN.

  1. Hydrodynamic vortices in the gaseous disks of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, V. A.; Zhelezniak, O. A.

    1989-08-01

    A two-dimensional gas stream with a velocity field vx proportional to y is considered which is assumed to be stationary with respect to a rotating coordinate system. This stream can serve as a model of the local kinematic of a galactic gaseous disk. It is shown the local uniform stream cannot develop into a soliton if self-gravitation, dissipation, and the nonuniformity of the vortex are neglected.

  2. Semidegenerate Self-Gravitating System of Fermion as Dark Matter on Galaxies i: Universality Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, Bernardo M. O.; Argüelles, Carlos; Ruffini, Remo; Siutsou, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    We present a unified model for galactic Dark Matter (DM) halos as well as galactic DM central cores (alternatively to the central Supermassive Black Hole scenario), based on systems of self-gravitating fermions at finite temperatures. This work will deal mainly with the halo part, leaving the core description to another part of this proceedings...

  3. On the Properties of the Geometry of Spacetime for Distributions of Self-Gravitating Extreme Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krechet, V. G.; Oshurko, V. B.; Rodichev, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    Within the framework of the general theory of relativity, we investigate all possible astrophysical and geometrical effects induced by self-gravitating extreme matter in the form of ideal fluids with limiting and superlimiting equations of state or in the form of strongly nonlinear physical fields. Attention is directed to the possibility of the formation of wormholes and other unusual astrophysical objects.

  4. Characteristics of the surface plasma wave in a self-gravitating magnetized dusty plasma slab

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-11-15

    The dispersion properties of surface dust ion-acoustic waves in a self-gravitating magnetized dusty plasma slab are investigated. The dispersion relation is derived by using the low-frequency magnetized dusty dielectric function and the surface wave dispersion integral for the slab geometry. We find that the self-gravitating effect suppresses the frequency of surface dust ion-acoustic wave for the symmetric mode in the long wavelength regime, whereas it hardly changes the frequency for the anti-symmetric mode. As the slab thickness and the wave number increase, the surface wave frequency slowly decreases for the symmetric mode but increases significantly for the anti-symmetric mode. The influence of external magnetic field is also investigated in the case of symmetric mode. We find that the strength of the magnetic field enhances the frequency of the symmetric-mode of the surface plasma wave. The increase of magnetic field reduces the self-gravitational effect and thus the self-gravitating collapse may be suppressed and the stability of dusty objects in space is enhanced.

  5. Statistical mechanics of the self-gravitating gas: I. Thermodynamic limit and phase diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vega, H. J.; Sánchez, N.

    2002-03-01

    We provide a complete picture to the self-gravitating non-relativistic gas at thermal equilibrium using Monte Carlo simulations, analytic mean field methods (MF) and low density expansions. The system is shown to possess an infinite volume limit in the grand canonical (GCE), canonical (CE) and microcanonical (MCE) ensembles when /(N,V)-->∞, keeping N/V1/3 fixed. We compute the equation of state (we do not assume it as is customary), as well as the energy, free energy, entropy, chemical potential, specific heats, compressibilities and speed of sound; we analyze their properties, signs and singularities. All physical quantities turn out to depend on a single variable η≡Gm2NV1/3T that is kept fixed in the /N-->∞ and /V-->∞ limit. The system is in a gaseous phase for η<ηT and collapses into a dense object for η>ηT in the CE with the pressure becoming large and negative. At η~=ηT the isothermal compressibility diverges. This gravitational phase transition is associated to the Jeans' instability. Our Monte Carlo simulations yield ηT~=1.515. /PV/[NT]=f(η) and all physical magnitudes exhibit a square root branch point at η=ηC>ηT. The values of ηT and ηC change by a few percent with the geometry for large /N: for spherical symmetry and /N=∞ (MF), we find ηC=1.561764... while the Monte Carlo simulations for cubic geometry yields ηC~=1.540. In mean field and spherical symmetry cV diverges as (ηC-η)-1/2 for η↑ηC while cP and κT diverge as (η0-η)-1 for η↑η0=1.51024.... The function /f(η) has a second Riemann sheet which is only physically realized in the MCE. In the MCE, the collapse phase transition takes place in this second sheet near ηMC=1.26 and the pressure and temperature are larger in the collapsed phase than in the gaseous phase. Both collapse phase transitions (in the CE and in the MCE) are of zeroth order since the Gibbs free energy has a jump at the transitions. The MF equation of state in a sphere, /f(η), obeys a

  6. The role of disc self-gravity in circumbinary planet systems - I. Disc structure and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutter, Matthew M.; Pierens, Arnaud; Nelson, Richard P.

    2017-03-01

    We present the results of two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of self-gravitating circumbinary discs around binaries whose parameters match those of the circumbinary planet-hosting systems Kepler-16, Kepler-34 and Kepler-35. Previous work has shown that non-self-gravitating discs in these systems form an eccentric precessing inner cavity due to tidal truncation by the binary, and planets which form at large radii migrate until stalling at this cavity. Whilst this scenario appears to provide a natural explanation for the observed orbital locations of the circumbinary planets, previous simulations have failed to match the observed planet orbital parameters. The aim of this work is to examine the role of self-gravity in modifying circumbinary disc structure as a function of disc mass, prior to considering the evolution of embedded circumbinary planets. In agreement with previous work, we find that for disc masses between one and five times the minimum mass solar nebula (MMSN), disc self-gravity affects modest changes in the structure and evolution of circumbinary discs. Increasing the disc mass to 10 or 20 MMSN leads to two dramatic changes in disc structure. First, the scale of the inner cavity shrinks substantially, bringing its outer edge closer to the binary. Secondly, in addition to the eccentric inner cavity, additional precessing eccentric ring-like features develop in the outer regions of the discs. If planet formation starts early in the disc lifetime, these changes will have a significant impact on the formation and evolution of planets and precursor material.

  7. Jeans instability of self gravitating partially ionized Hall plasma with radiative heat loss functions and porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaothekar, Sachin; Chhajlani, R. K.

    2013-06-01

    The Jeans instability of partially ionized self gravitating plasma is discussed to investigate the effect of the Hall current, radiative heat-loss function, thermal conductivity, collision frequency of neutrals, porosity, finite electrical resistivity and viscosity for the formation of stars in HI and HII regions. The standard Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) set of equations is used for the present configuration with radiative heat-loss function and thermal conductivity. A general dispersion relation is obtained from perturbation equations using the normal mode analysis method. We find that the Jeans condition of self-gravitational instability is modified due to the presence of neutral particle, radiative heat-loss functions and thermal conductivity. Presence of Hall current, porosity and collision frequency have no effect on Jeans criterion.

  8. Modified Jeans instability in Lorentzian dusty self-gravitating plasmas with Lennard-Jones potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Y. Z.; Chen, H.; Liu, S. Q.

    2014-11-01

    The Jeans instability in self-gravitating plasma with Kappa distributed dust grains is investigated basing on assumption that the mutual interaction among dust grains is governed by Lennard-Jones potential. It is shown that the presence of additional suprathermal particles has significant effects on the range of unstable modes and growth rate of Jeans instability. Compared with Maxwellian scenario, suprathermality stabilized the Jeans instability.

  9. Effective geometry of the n=1 uniformly rotating self-gravitating polytrope

    SciTech Connect

    Bini, D.; Cherubini, C.; Filippi, S.; Geralico, A.

    2010-08-15

    The ''effective geometry'' formalism is used to study the perturbations of a perfect barotropic Newtonian self-gravitating rotating and compressible fluid coupled with gravitational backreaction. The case of a uniformly rotating polytrope with index n=1 is investigated, due to its analytical tractability. Special attention is devoted to the geometrical properties of the underlying background acoustic metric, focusing, in particular, on null geodesics as well as on the analog light cone structure.

  10. Modified Jeans instability in Lorentzian dusty self-gravitating plasmas with Lennard-Jones potential

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Y. Z. Chen, H. Liu, S. Q.

    2014-11-15

    The Jeans instability in self-gravitating plasma with Kappa distributed dust grains is investigated basing on assumption that the mutual interaction among dust grains is governed by Lennard-Jones potential. It is shown that the presence of additional suprathermal particles has significant effects on the range of unstable modes and growth rate of Jeans instability. Compared with Maxwellian scenario, suprathermality stabilized the Jeans instability.

  11. Long-range correlations in self-gravitating N-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, D.; Pfenniger, D.

    2002-04-01

    Observed self-gravitating systems reveal often fragmented, non-equilibrium structures that feature characteristic long-range correlations. However, models accounting for non-linear structure growth are not always consistent with observations and a better understanding of self-gravitating N-body systems appears necessary. Because unstable gravitating systems are sensitive to non-gravitational perturbations, we study the effect of different dissipative factors as well as different small and large scale boundary conditions on idealized N-body systems. We find, in the interval of negative specific heat, equilibrium properties differing from theoretical predictions made for gravo-thermal systems, substantiating the importance of microscopic physics and the lack of consistent theoretical tools to describe self-gravitating gas. Also, in the interval of negative specific heat, yet outside of equilibrium, unforced systems fragment and establish transient long-range correlations. The strength of these correlations depends on the degree of granularity, which shows that the mass and force resolution should be coherent. Finally, persistent correlations appear in model systems subject to an energy flow.

  12. Newtonian self-gravitating system in a relativistic huge void universe model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Ryusuke; Nakao, Ken-ichi; Yoo, Chul-Moon

    2016-12-01

    We consider a test of the Copernican Principle through observations of the large-scale structures, and for this purpose we study the self-gravitating system in a relativistic huge void universe model which does not invoke the Copernican Principle. If we focus on the the weakly self-gravitating and slowly evolving system whose spatial extent is much smaller than the scale of the cosmological horizon in the homogeneous and isotropic background universe model, the cosmological Newtonian approximation is available. Also in the huge void universe model, the same kind of approximation as the cosmological Newtonian approximation is available for the analysis of the perturbations contained in a region whose spatial size is much smaller than the scale of the huge void: the effects of the huge void are taken into account in a perturbative manner by using the Fermi-normal coordinates. By using this approximation, we derive the equations of motion for the weakly self-gravitating perturbations whose elements have relative velocities much smaller than the speed of light, and show the derived equations can be significantly different from those in the homogeneous and isotropic universe model, due to the anisotropic volume expansion in the huge void. We linearize the derived equations of motion and solve them. The solutions show that the behaviors of linear density perturbations are very different from those in the homogeneous and isotropic universe model.

  13. Dust acoustic double layers in a magnetized dusty self-gravitating plasma with superthermal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabetkar, Akbar; Dorranian, Davoud

    2016-08-01

    Our prime objective of this paper is to examine the parametric regimes for the existence and polarity of dust acoustic double layers (DADLs) and its solitary structures arising from a magnetized self-gravitating opposite polarity dust-plasma (OPDP) model. The constituents of the OPDP model are two species of positively and negatively charged dust grains, Maxwellian electrons and kappa distributed ions. Contributions of gravitational force only on dust grains are taken into account. For weakly nonlinear analysis, the multiple time scale technique has been used to construct the extended Korteweg-de Vries (E-KdV) and modified Korteweg-de Vries (M-KdV) equations. They pinpoint the evolution of DADLs and solitary structures associated with dust acoustic (DA) mode, respectively. The relevant configurational parameters in our study include the superthermality of ions (κ), obliqueness of propagation (θ), ion concentration (δi), static magnetic field B0 (via ω c p , ω c n ), and self-gravitational field (via γ), as well as the density (μ0), charge (α), and mass (β) ratio of positive to negative dust species. The proposed OPDP model permits positive and negative double layer polarities, while higher order nonlinear equation dictates us only positive polarity solitary structures. The main modification due to an increase in self-gravitational field (via γ) is an enhancement in the spatial width of double layers, yet leaving their amplitude, phase speed, and polarity practically unaffected. With enhanced superthermality and other intrinsic parameters in OPDP model, there is an opposite trend in both amplitude and width of double layers, while the amplitude and the width of solitary waves (via M-KdV equation) undergo the identical behaviors. In particular, the amplitude of solitary waves manifests monotonic behavior for permissible range of obliqueness θ, whereas this scenario is acceptable to only width of double layers. The results are discussed in the context of

  14. Global gravito-electrostatic fluctuations in self-gravitating spherical non-uniform charged dust clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, P. K.; Borah, B.

    2016-04-01

    We formulate exact non-local linear analysis for identification and characterization of the global collective gravito-electrostatic eigenmodes, discrete oscillations and associated instabilities in interstellar charged dust molecular cloud (DMC) sphere with mass-radius above the stability critical values on the astrophysical fluid scales of space and time. The realistic relevant zeroth-order effects, hitherto remaining unaccounted for, are concurrently included. It avoids using any kind of the Jeansian swindles against usual viewpoint. Armed with the modified Fourier plane-wave method, the dispersion relations (eigenvalues) and amplitude-variations (eigenfunctions) of the relevant perturbations about the inhomogenous equilibrium are procedurally derived and analyzed together with numerical illustrations. It is seen that the entire cloud supports spectrally heterogeneous mixture of the Jeans ( gravitational) and electrostatic ( acoustic) modes, coupled via quasi-linear discrete oscillations of mixed pattern. The lowest-order non-rigid diffused cloud surface boundary (CSB), sourced by active gravito-electrostatic interplay, is the most unstable interfacial plasma layer. Three distinct and spatio-spectrally isolated classes of global eigenmodes—dispersive, non-dispersive and hybrid types—are keyed together with idiosyncratic prolific features. Dispersive features are prominent in the ultra-high k-regime (acoustic) with modified form due to self-gravitational condensation of the Jeans modes; whereas, non-dispersive characteristics in the ultra-low k-regime (gravitational) dominated by the Jeans waves; where, k = 2π/ λ is the angular wave number of the fluctuations on the Jeans scale. We further demonstrate that the grain-charge (grain-mass) plays destabilizing (stabilizing) influential role for the electrostatic fluctuations, but stabilizing (destabilizing) role for the self-gravitational counterparts. The results can be useful to realize diverse complex global

  15. Super computers in astrophysics and High Performance simulations of self-gravitating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R.; Di Matteo, P.; Miocchi, P.

    The modern study of the dynamics of stellar systems requires the use of high-performance computers. Indeed, an accurate modelization of the structure and evolution of self-gravitating systems like planetary systems, open clusters, globular clusters and galaxies imply the evaluation of body-body interaction over the whole size of the structure, a task that is computationally very expensive, in particular when it is performed over long intervals of time. In this report we give a concise overview of the main problems of stellar systems simulations and present some exciting results we obtained about the interaction of globular clusters with the parent galaxy.

  16. General Relativity Without General Relativity: Self-Gravitating Systems and Effective Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Donato; Cherubini, Christian; Filippi, Simonetta; Geralico, Andrea

    Perturbations of Newtonian self-gravitating barotropic perfect fluid systems can be studied via an extension of the "effective geometry" formalism. The case of polytropic spherical stars described by the Lane-Emden equation has been studied in the past in the known cases of existing explicit solutions relevant for both stellar and galactic dynamics. Applications of the formalism in the case of rotating configurations found via William's "matching method" and possible generalizations are here discussed. The present formulation represents another natural scenario, in addition with the usual one of quantum condensates in laboratories, in which the acoustic analogy has physical relevance.

  17. Entropy principle and complementary second law of thermodynamics for self-gravitating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ping; Kang, Dong-Biao

    2010-08-01

    The statistical mechanics of isolated collisionless self-gravitating systems is a long-held puzzle, which has not been successfully resolved for nearly 50years. In this work, we employ a phenomenological entropy form of ideal gas, first proposed by White & Narayan, to revisit this issue. By calculating the first-order variation of the entropy, subject to the usual mass- and energy-conservation constraints, we obtain an entropy stationary equation. Incorporated with the Jeans equation, and by specifying some functional form for the anisotropy parameter β, we numerically solve the two equations, and demonstrate that the velocity anisotropy parameter plays an important role in attaining a density profile that is finite in mass, energy and spatial extent. If incorporated again with some empirical density profile from simulations, our theoretical predictions of the anisotropy parameter, and the radial pseudo-phase-space density ρ/σ3r in the outer non-gravitationally degenerate region of the dark matter halo, agree rather well with the simulation data, and the predictions are also acceptable in the middle weak-degenerate region of the dark halo. The disagreements occur just in the inner strong-degenerate region because of the neglect of gravitational degeneracy. As far as we know, our results may be the first theoretical predictions based on the entropy principle that can partially match the empirical data. The second-order variational calculus reveals the seemingly paradoxical but actually complementary consequence that the equilibrium state of self-gravitating systems is the global minimum entropy state for the whole system under long-range violent relaxation, but simultaneously the local maximum entropy state for every and any small part of the system under short-range two-body relaxation and Landau damping. This minimum-maximum entropy duality means that the standard second law of thermodynamics needs to be re-expressed or generalized for self-gravitating systems

  18. Self-Gravitating System of Semidegenerated Fermions as Central Objects and Dark Matter Halos in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, Bernardo M. O.; Argüelles, Carlos R.; Ruffini, Remo

    2013-01-01

    We propose a unified model for dark matter haloes and central galactic objects as a self-gravitating system of semidegenerated fermions in thermal equilibrium. We consider spherical symmetry and then we solve the equations of gravitational equilibrium using the Fermi integrals in a dimensionless manner, obtaining the density profile and velocity curve. We also obtain scaling laws for the observables of the system and show that, for a wide range of our parameters, our model is consistent with the so called universality of the surface density of dark matter.

  19. Energy landscape and phase transitions in the self-gravitating ring model.

    PubMed

    Nardini, Cesare; Casetti, Lapo

    2009-12-01

    We apply a recently proposed criterion for the existence of phase transitions, which is based on the properties of the saddles of the energy landscape, to a simplified model of a system with gravitational interactions referred to as the self-gravitating ring model. We show analytically that the criterion correctly singles out the phase transition between a homogeneous and a clustered phase and also suggests the presence of another phase transition not previously known. On the basis of the properties of the energy landscape we conjecture on the nature of the latter transition.

  20. Analytic self-gravitating Skyrmions, cosmological bounces and AdS wormholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayón-Beato, Eloy; Canfora, Fabrizio; Zanelli, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    We present a self-gravitating, analytic and globally regular Skyrmion solution of the Einstein-Skyrme system with winding number w = ± 1, in presence of a cosmological constant. The static spacetime metric is the direct product R ×S3 and the Skyrmion is the self-gravitating generalization of the static hedgehog solution of Manton and Ruback with unit topological charge. This solution can be promoted to a dynamical one in which the spacetime is a cosmology of the Bianchi type-IX with time-dependent scale and squashing coefficients. Remarkably, the Skyrme equations are still identically satisfied for all values of these parameters. Thus, the complete set of field equations for the Einstein-Skyrme-Λ system in the topological sector reduces to a pair of coupled, autonomous, nonlinear differential equations for the scale factor and a squashing coefficient. These equations admit analytic bouncing cosmological solutions in which the universe contracts to a minimum non-vanishing size, and then expands. A non-trivial byproduct of this solution is that a minor modification of the construction gives rise to a family of stationary, regular configurations in General Relativity with negative cosmological constant supported by an SU (2) nonlinear sigma model. These solutions represent traversable AdS wormholes with NUT parameter in which the only "exotic matter" required for their construction is a negative cosmological constant.

  1. Approximations for the free evolution of self-gravitating quantum particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Großardt, André

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of the center-of-mass wave function for a mesoscopic particle according to the Schrödinger-Newton equation can be approximated by a harmonic potential if the wave function is narrow compared to the size of the mesoscopic particle. It was noticed by Colin et al. [Phys. Rev. A 93, 062102 (2016).], 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.062102 that, in the regime where self-gravitational effects are weak, intermediate and wider wave functions may be approximated by a harmonic potential as well but with a width-dependent coupling, leading to a time evolution that is determined only by a differential equation for the width of a Gaussian wave function as a single parameter. Such an approximation results in considerably less computational effort in order to predict the self-gravitational effects on the wave-function dynamics. Here, we provide an alternative approach to this kind of approximation, including a rigorous derivation of the equations of motion for an initially Gaussian wave packet under the assumption that its shape is conserved. Our result deviates to some degree from the result by Colin et al. [Phys. Rev. A 93, 062102 (2016).], 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.062102, specifically in the limit of wide wave functions.

  2. Vortices and spirals at gap edges in 3D self-gravitating disk-planet simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M.

    2012-12-01

    Numerical simulations of global 3D self-gravitating protoplanetary disks with a gap opened by an embedded planet are presented. The simulations are customised to examine planetary gap stability. Previous results, obtained by Lin & Papaloizou from 2D disk models, are reproduced in 3D. These include (i) the development of vortices associated with local potential vorticity minima at gap edges and their merging on dynamical timescales in weakly self-gravitating disks, (ii) the increased number of vortices as the strength of self-gravity is increased and their resisted merging, and (iii) suppression of the vortex instability and development of global spiral arms associated with local potential vorticity maxima in massive disks. The vertical structure of these disturbances are examined. In terms of the relative density perturbation, the vortex disturbance has weak vertical dependence when self-gravity is neglected. Vortices become more stratified with increasing self-gravity. This effect is seen even when the unperturbed region around the planet's orbital radius has a Toomre stability parameter ~ 10. The spiral modes display significant vertical structure at the gap edge, with the midplane density enhancement being several times larger than that near the upper disk boundary. However, for both instabilities the vertical Mach number is small, and on average vertical motions near the gap edge do not dominate over horizontal motions.

  3. Geometry of the energy landscape of the self-gravitating ring.

    PubMed

    Monechi, Bernardo; Casetti, Lapo

    2012-10-01

    We study the global geometry of the energy landscape of a simple model of a self-gravitating system, the self-gravitating ring (SGR). This is done by endowing the configuration space with a metric such that the dynamical trajectories are identified with geodesics. The average curvature and curvature fluctuations of the energy landscape are computed by means of Monte Carlo simulations and, when possible, of a mean-field method, showing that these global geometric quantities provide a clear geometric characterization of the collapse phase transition occurring in the SGR as the transition from a flat landscape at high energies to a landscape with mainly positive but fluctuating curvature in the collapsed phase. Moreover, curvature fluctuations show a maximum in correspondence with the energy of a possible further transition, occurring at lower energies than the collapsed one, whose existence had been previously conjectured on the basis of a local analysis of the energy landscape and whose effect on the usual thermodynamic quantities, if any, is extremely weak. We also estimate the largest Lyapunov exponent λ of the SGR using the geometric observables. The geometric estimate always gives the correct order of magnitude of λ and is also quantitatively correct at small energy densities and, in the limit N→∞, in the whole homogeneous phase.

  4. A computer software system for the generation of global ocean tides including self-gravitation and crustal loading effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    A computer software system is described which computes global numerical solutions of the integro-differential Laplace tidal equations, including dissipation terms and ocean loading and self-gravitation effects, for arbitrary diurnal and semidiurnal tidal constituents. The integration algorithm features a successive approximation scheme for the integro-differential system, with time stepping forward differences in the time variable and central differences in spatial variables. Solutions for M2, S2, N2, K2, K1, O1, P1 tidal constituents neglecting the effects of ocean loading and self-gravitation and a converged M2, solution including ocean loading and self-gravitation effects are presented in the form of cotidal and corange maps.

  5. Gaseous detonations

    SciTech Connect

    Nettleton, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Focusing predominantly on safety problems in handling combustible gas or dust mixtures with air or oxygen, the book is a reference on gaseous detonations. Topics covered include: unidimensional models, structure of detonation fronts, and interaction of a detonation with confinement.

  6. Equilibrium statistical mechanics for self-gravitating systems: local ergodicity and extended Boltzmann-Gibbs/White-Narayan statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ping

    2012-01-01

    The long-standing puzzle surrounding the statistical mechanics of self-gravitating systems has not yet been solved successfully. We formulate a systematic theoretical framework of entropy-based statistical mechanics for spherically symmetric collisionless self-gravitating systems. We use an approach that is very different from that of the conventional statistical mechanics of short-range interaction systems. We demonstrate that the equilibrium states of self-gravitating systems consist of both mechanical and statistical equilibria, with the former characterized by a series of velocity-moment equations and the latter by statistical equilibrium equations, which should be derived from the entropy principle. The velocity-moment equations of all orders are derived from the steady-state collisionless Boltzmann equation. We point out that the ergodicity is invalid for the whole self-gravitating system, but it can be re-established locally. Based on the local ergodicity, using Fermi-Dirac-like statistics, with the non-degenerate condition and the spatial independence of the local microstates, we rederive the Boltzmann-Gibbs entropy. This is consistent with the validity of the collisionless Boltzmann equation, and should be the correct entropy form for collisionless self-gravitating systems. Apart from the usual constraints of mass and energy conservation, we demonstrate that the series of moment or virialization equations must be included as additional constraints on the entropy functional when performing the variational calculus; this is an extension to the original prescription by White & Narayan. Any possible velocity distribution can be produced by the statistical-mechanical approach that we have developed with the extended Boltzmann-Gibbs/White-Narayan statistics. Finally, we discuss the questions of negative specific heat and ensemble inequivalence for self-gravitating systems.

  7. Long-term evolution of stellar self-gravitating systems away from thermal equilibrium: connection with nonextensive statistics.

    PubMed

    Taruya, Atsushi; Sakagami, Masa-aki

    2003-05-09

    With particular attention to the recently postulated introduction of a nonextensive generalization of Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics, we study the long-term stellar dynamical evolution of self-gravitating systems on time scales much longer than the two-body relaxation time. In a self-gravitating N-body system confined in an adiabatic wall, we show that the quasiequilibrium sequence arising from the Tsallis entropy, so-called stellar polytropes, plays an important role in characterizing the transient states away from the Boltzmann-Gibbs equilibrium state.

  8. Density fluctuation dynamics in a dissipative self-gravitating dilute gas revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, A. R.; García-Perciante, A. L.

    2016-11-01

    The analysis of the behavior of density fluctuations in a dissipative self gravitating gas in the linear regime is revisited. A factorization for the dispersion relation given by approximate roots is proposed, which is analogous to the one introduced in the case without gravitational field. The threshold for the onset of a gravitational instability, namely Jeans wavenumber, is found to be unaltered by the presence of thermal and viscous dissipation. However, the behavior of damped modes does not correspond to the usual Rayleigh-Brillouin spectrum when the gravitational field is taken into account. Additional to the usual central Rayleigh peak and Brillouin doublet, both corrected due to the presence of the field, non-Lorentizan terms are included in the structure factor. These terms are larger in the presence of the gravitational field and may lead in principle to relevant differences in the general properties of the spectrum. The possible mathematical origin of these modifications is briefly discussed.

  9. The production of turbulence by gravitational instabilities in self-gravitating differentially rotating disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, R.

    1994-06-01

    Interstellar molecular clouds can collapse under their selfgravity. As numerical calculations have shown, the process of collapse mostly leads to differentially rotating self-gravitating disks without any central condensation. Our calculation shows that these disks are mostly gravitational unstable and can build up turbulent motion by these instabilities. From the conditions of gravitational instabilities we calculate the dispersion relation and determine the most unstable wavelength. The mean turbulent velocity and the mixing length are calculated from these wavelengths. Turbulent viscosity which results from the turbulent motion determine the angular momentum transportation out of the disk and therefore the time scale of mass concentration of the whole disk. The source of turbulent energy in this case is the gravitational energy in the rotating disk.

  10. Statistical thermodynamics for a self-gravitating fluid of rotating particles

    SciTech Connect

    Escamilla, L.; Torres-Arenas, J.; Benavides, A. L.

    2013-07-23

    Systems with long-range interactions (those which decay at large distances as r{sup -l}, with l≥d, where d is the dimensionality of the considered space), like gravitational or charged ones, present difficulties when treated by conventional statistical mechanics perturbation methods. In this work a self-gravitating fluid of rotating spherical particles is considered. The corresponding inter-particle potential model is a long-ranged one and was obtained from the application of the Newtonian limit to the Kerr metric. This potential has been expressed as a finite sum of hard-core Yukawa potentials. This new potential mimics the original long-ranged one and can be treated with conventional statistical mechanics methods. The first-order mean spherical approximation is applied to this potential to obtain the thermodynamic response functions.

  11. General proof of the entropy principle for self-gravitating fluid in f ( R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiongjun; Guo, Minyong; Jing, Jiliang

    2016-08-01

    The discussions on the connection between gravity and thermodynamics attract much attention recently. We consider a static self-gravitating perfect fluid system in f ( R) gravity, which is an important theory could explain the accelerated expansion of the universe. We first show that the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation of f ( R) theories can be obtained by thermodynamical method in spherical symmetric spacetime. Then we prove that the maximum entropy principle is also valid for f ( R) gravity in general static spacetimes beyond spherical symmetry. The result shows that if the constraint equation is satisfied and the temperature of fluid obeys Tolmans law, the extrema of total entropy implies other components of gravitational equations. Conversely, if f ( R) gravitational equation hold, the total entropy of the fluid should be extremum. Our work suggests a general and solid connection between f ( R) gravity and thermodynamics.

  12. Nada: A new code for studying self-gravitating tori around black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Montero, Pedro J.; Font, Jose A.; Shibata, Masaru

    2008-09-15

    We present a new two-dimensional numerical code called Nada designed to solve the full Einstein equations coupled to the general relativistic hydrodynamics equations. The code is mainly intended for studies of self-gravitating accretion disks (or tori) around black holes, although it is also suitable for regular spacetimes. Concerning technical aspects the Einstein equations are formulated and solved in the code using a formulation of the standard 3+1 Arnowitt-Deser-Misner canonical formalism system, the so-called Baumgarte-Shapiro Shibata-Nakamura approach. A key feature of the code is that derivative terms in the spacetime evolution equations are computed using a fourth-order centered finite difference approximation in conjunction with the Cartoon method to impose the axisymmetry condition under Cartesian coordinates (the choice in Nada), and the puncture/moving puncture approach to carry out black hole evolutions. Correspondingly, the general relativistic hydrodynamics equations are written in flux-conservative form and solved with high-resolution, shock-capturing schemes. We perform and discuss a number of tests to assess the accuracy and expected convergence of the code, namely, (single) black hole evolutions, shock tubes, and evolutions of both spherical and rotating relativistic stars in equilibrium, the gravitational collapse of a spherical relativistic star leading to the formation of a black hole. In addition, paving the way for specific applications of the code, we also present results from fully general relativistic numerical simulations of a system formed by a black hole surrounded by a self-gravitating torus in equilibrium.

  13. Postglacial isostatic adjustment in a self-gravitating spherical earth with power-law rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Patrick; Wang, Hansheng

    2008-10-01

    Since microphysics cannot say definitively whether the rheology of the mantle is linear or non-linear, the aim of this paper is to constrain mantle rheology from observations related to the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) process—namely relative sea-levels (RSLs), land uplift rate from GPS and gravity-rate-of-change from GRACE. We consider three earth model types that can have power-law rheology ( n = 3 or 4) in the upper mantle, the lower mantle or throughout the mantle. For each model type, a range of A parameter in the creep law will be explored and the predicted GIA responses will be compared to the observations to see which value of A has the potential to explain all the data simultaneously. The coupled Laplace finite-element (CLFE) method is used to calculate the response of a 3D spherical self-gravitating viscoelastic Earth to forcing by the ICE-4G ice history model with ocean loads in self-gravitating oceans. Results show that ice thickness in Laurentide needs to increase significantly or delayed by 2 ka, otherwise the predicted uplift rate, gravity rate-of-change and the amplitude of the RSL for sites inside the ice margin of Laurentide are too low to be able to explain the observations. However, the ice thickness elsewhere outside Laurentide needs to be slightly modified in order to explain the global RSL data outside Laurentide. If the ice model is modified in this way, then the results of this paper indicate that models with power-law rheology in the lower mantle (with A ˜ 10 -35 Pa -3 s -1 for n = 3) have the highest potential to simultaneously explain all the observed RSL, uplift rate and gravity rate-of-change data than the other model types.

  14. Secular resonant dressed orbital diffusion - I. Method and WKB limit for tepid discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouvry, Jean-Baptiste; Pichon, Christophe; Prunet, Simon

    2015-05-01

    The equation describing the secular diffusion of a self-gravitating collisionless system induced by an exterior perturbation is derived while assuming that the time-scale corresponding to secular evolution is much larger than that corresponding to the natural frequencies of the system. Its two-dimensional formulation for a tepid galactic disc is also derived using the epicyclic approximation. Its Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) limit is found while assuming that only tightly wound transient spirals are sustained by the disc. It yields a simple quadrature for the diffusion coefficients which provides a straightforward understanding of the loci of maximal diffusion within the disc.

  15. Instability of a uniformly collapsing cloud of classical and quantum self-gravitating Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2011-03-01

    We study the growth of perturbations in a uniformly collapsing cloud of self-gravitating Brownian particles. This problem shares analogies with the formation of large-scale structures in a universe experiencing a “big-crunch” or with the formation of stars in a molecular cloud experiencing gravitational collapse. Starting from the barotropic Smoluchowski-Poisson system, we derive a new equation describing the evolution of the density contrast in the comoving (collapsing) frame. This equation can serve as a prototype to study the process of self-organization in complex media with structureless initial conditions. We solve this equation analytically in the linear regime and compare the results with those obtained by using the “Jeans swindle” in a static medium. The stability criteria, as well as the laws for the time evolution of the perturbations, differ. The Jeans criterion is expressed in terms of a critical wavelength λJ while our criterion is expressed in terms of a critical polytropic index γ4/3. In a static background, the system is stable for λ<λJ and unstable for λ>λJ. In a collapsing cloud, the system is stable for γ>γ4/3 and unstable for γ<γ4/3. If γ=γ4/3, it is stable for λ<λJ and unstable for λ>λJ. We also study the fragmentation process in the nonlinear regime. We determine the growth of the skewness, the long-wavelength tail of the power spectrum and find a self-similar solution to the nonlinear equations valid for large times. Finally, we consider dissipative self-gravitating Bose-Einstein condensates with short-range interactions and show that, in a strong friction limit, the dissipative Gross-Pitaevskii-Poisson system is equivalent to the quantum barotropic Smoluchowski-Poisson system. This yields new types of nonlinear mean-field Fokker-Planck equations, including quantum effects.

  16. The Structure and Stability of Selected, 2-D Self-Gravitating Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andalib, Saied W.

    1998-12-01

    Models of radially and vertically extended self-gravitating disks orbiting around a central point mass are relevant to the dynamics of astrophysical systems and are thought to be common in many galaxies. The gravity driven instabilities in these accretion disks are now believed to be a possible mechanism for star formation via disk fragmentation (Shu, Adams, & Lizano 1987, Adams, Rudin & Shu 1989; Christodoulou 1995). We quantify these regions of instability using a simple toroidal model of an accretion disk. We choose the two-dimensional axisymmetric, incompressible slender disks to examine and map out these principal modes of gravity driven instabilities. Through stability analyses and numerical simulations we have found that only the gravity driven 'intermediate' modes (see Goodman and Narayan 1988) are important in all self-gravitating accretion disks with small or moderate axis ratios. The P-mode instability found by Papalaizou and Pringle (1983) is unlikely to play a role in the dynamics of realistic disk systems. Next, we extend the existing numerical methods for constructing equilibrium structures to include nonaxisymmetric systems. We have developed a new computational technique to obtain two-dimensional, nonaxisymmetric, compressible systems with nontrivial internal motions. We have constructed two types of two-dimensional configurations: infinite cylinders and infinitesimally thin disks. The infinite cylinders have been primarily restricted to elliptic-like boundaries but the disks have exhibited much more flexibility in their geometries. At smaller axis ratios, they become dumbbells or loosely coupled binaries. The topology and dynamics of the flow is governed by the presence of vortices and stagnation points. In our simulation it is shown that there are equilibrium configurations that can only exist in the presence of internal differential motions and not in uniformly rotating models. This indicates that in general, the equilibrium structures of these

  17. Observational Diagnostics of Self-gravitating MHD Turbulence in Giant Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Collins, David C.; Lazarian, Alex

    2015-07-01

    We study the observable signatures of self-gravitating magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) turbulence by applying the probability density functions (PDFs) and the spatial density power spectrum to synthetic column density maps. We find that there exists three characterizable stages of the evolution of the collapsing cloud which we term “early,” “intermediate,” and “advanced.” At early times, i.e., t\\lt 0.15{t}{ff}, the column density has a power spectral slope similar to nongravitating supersonic turbulence and a lognormal distribution. At an intermediate stage, i.e., 0.15{t}{ff}\\lt t≤slant 0.35{t}{ff}, there exist signatures of the first cores in the shallower PDF and power spectrum power-law slopes. The column density PDF power-law tails at these times have line of sight averaged slopes ranging from -2.5 to -1.5 with shallower values belonging to simulations with lower magnetic field strength. The density power spectrum slope becomes shallow and can be characterized by P(k)={A}1{k}{β 2}{e}-k/{kc}, where A1 describes the amplitude, {k}{β 2} describes the classical power-law behavior, and the scale kc characterizes the turn over from turbulence dominated to self-gravity dominated. At advanced stages of collapse, i.e., ≈ t\\gt 0.35{t}{ff}, the power spectral slope is positive valued, and a dramatic increase is observed in the PDF moments and the Tsallis incremental PDF parameters, which gives rise to deviations between PDF-sonic Mach number relations. Finally, we show that the imprint of gravity on the density power spectrum can be replicated in non-gravitating turbulence by introducing a delta-function with amplitude equivalent to the maximum valued point in a given self-gravitating map. We find that the turbulence power spectrum restored through spatial filtering of the high density material.

  18. Microcanonical Monte Carlo study of one dimensional self-gravitating lattice gas models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciel, Joao Marcos; Amato, Marco Antônio; da Rocha Filho, Tarcisio Marciano; Figueiredo, Annibal D.

    2017-03-01

    In this study we present a microcanonical Monte Carlo investigation of one dimensional (1 - d) self-gravitating toy models. We study the effect of hard-core potentials and compare to the results obtained with softening parameters and also the effect of the topology on these systems. In order to study the effect of the topology in the system we introduce a model with the symmetry of motion in a line instead of a circle, which we denominate as 1 /r model. The hard-core particle potential introduces the effect of the size of particles and, consequently, the effect of the density of the system that is redefined in terms of the packing fraction of the system. The latter plays a role similar to the softening parameter ɛ in the softened particles' case. In the case of low packing fractions both models with hard-core particles show a behavior that keeps the intrinsic properties of the three dimensional gravitational systems such as negative heat capacity. For higher values of the packing fraction the ring model behaves as the potential for the standard cosine Hamiltonian Mean Field model while for the 1 /r model it is similar to the one-dimensional systems. In the present paper we intend to show that a further simplification level is possible by introducing the lattice-gas counterpart of such models, where a drastic simplification of the microscopic state is obtained by considering a local average of the exact N-body dynamics.

  19. On the equilibrium of heated self-gravitating masses - Cooling by conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerche, I.; Low, B. C.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation is given of the equilibrium states available to a self-gravitating mass of gas, cooling by conduction, and being heated at a rate proportional to the local gas density. The plane geometry situation is shown to be reducible to quadratures for the pressure, density, temperature, and gravitational potential. For a constant thermal conductivity it is shown that the gas density has either a central maximum or a central minimum, depending on the ratio of the thermal conductivity to a parameter taken to be a measure of the rate of heating. For a thermal conductivity which is a positive power of the temperature, it is shown that the gas density always has a central minimum and a maximum at the outer boundary of the configuration. For cylindrical and spherical geometrical configurations the same general properties are obtained. The physical origin of this behavior is discussed, and it is suggested that these exploratory calculations provide an effect which may not only aid in understanding thin filamentary structure observed in supernova remnants, but also help to assuage the difficulties of producing maser activity in the interior regions of 'cocoon' protostars.

  20. Criterion for the dynamical stability of a non-adiabatic spherical self-gravitating body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1999-04-01

    Why do stars and planets maintain their dynamical stability over cosmically long periods of time? The standard answer is that the first generalized adiabatic exponent of their material, Gamma_1, exceeds the value 4/3. Yet it has never been rigorously demonstrated (except for the simple one-zone model) that non-adiabatic effects do not modify this result at some level. Many authors, in fact, have suggested the probable need for a non-adiabatic correction to the square of the radial adiabatic eigenfrequency, sigma^2, which ostensibly governs dynamical stability in the more general case where Gamma_1 varies throughout a fully distributed self-gravitating spherical body. Here, a carefully controlled series of numerical experiments based on linear and non-linear hydrodynamical models of highly non-adiabatic spherically symmetric stellar envelopes (mimicking the envelopes of luminous blue variables) confirms, quite generally, that the purely adiabatic criterion sigma^2>0 does in fact determine dynamical stability. An accurate approximation to this criterion is further shown to be that the volumetric pressure-weighted average of Gamma_1 must exceed 4/3. These results, which concern only radial stability, verify the theoretical basis of the more sophisticated models for luminous blue variables that were constructed by the author and C.-w. Chin, but they do not support the objections to these models raised by W. Glatzel and M. Kiriakidis.

  1. Tests of the universality of free fall for strongly self-gravitating bodies with radio pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, Paulo C. C.; Kramer, Michael; Wex, Norbert

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we review tests of the strong equivalence principle (SEP) derived from pulsar-white dwarf binary data. The extreme difference in the binding energy between both components and the precise measurement of the orbital motion provided by pulsar timing allow the only current precision SEP tests for strongly self-gravitating bodies. We start by highlighting why such tests are conceptually important. We then review previous work where limits on SEP violation are obtained with an ensemble of wide binary systems with small eccentricity orbits. Then, we propose a new SEP violation test based on the measurement of the variation of the orbital eccentricity (ė). This new method has the following advantages: (a) unlike previous methods it is not based on probabilistic considerations, (b) it can make a direct detection of SEP violation and (c) the measurement of ė is not contaminated by any known external effects, which implies that this SEP test is only restricted by the measurement precision of ė. In the final part of the review, we conceptually compare the SEP test with the test for dipolar radiation damping, a phenomenon closely related to SEP violation, and speculate on future prospects by new types of tests in globular clusters and future triple systems.

  2. Stable and Unstable Equilibria of Uniformly Rotating Self-Gravitating Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolucci, Daniele

    2012-12-01

    The equilibrium configurations of self-gravitating uniformly rotating isothermal cylinders in contact with a heat bath and their stability is studied by recently derived analytical techniques. The known critical temperature Tc obtained by Katz and Lynden-Bell is found to be a stability threshold with respect to axially symmetric perturbations. We provide the almost explicit expression of negative specific heat solutions whose densities are sharply concentrated either near the symmetry axis or near some off-axis filaments as T-> Tc-. The critical angular frequency observed numerically in literature is found to be the threshold value for the existence of these off-axis filaments. This is in striking contrast with the static case analyzed by Katz and Lynden-Bell where equilibrium configurations are found only if T > Tc and no negative specific heat equilibria exists at all. Metastability of the free energy's relative maximizers for T ≤ Tc is also discussed. Those off-axis configurations were predicted in the study of negative temperature states for guiding-centre plasmas and vortex systems.

  3. Self-gravitating phase transitions: Point particles, black holes and strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Norma G.

    2006-04-01

    We compute the quantum string entropy S(m,j) of the microscopic string states of mass m and spin j in two physically relevant backgrounds: Kerr (rotating) black holes and de Sitter (dS) space time. We find a new formula for the quantum gravitational entropy S(M,J), as a function of the usual Bekenstein Hawking entropy Ssem(0)(M,J). We compute the quantum string emission by a black hole in de Sitter space time (bhdS). In all the following cases: (i) strings with the highest spin, and (ii) in dS space time, (iii) quantum rotating black holes, (iv) quantum dS regime, (v) late bhdS evaporation, we find a new gravitational phase transition with a common distinctive universal feature: a square root branch point singularity in any space time dimensions. This is the same behavior as for the thermal self-gravitating gas of point particles (de Vega Sanchez transition), thus describing a new universality class. To cite this article: N.G. Sanchez, C. R. Physique 7 (2006).

  4. Spectral-infinite-element Simulations of Self-gravitating Seismic Wave Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharti, H. N.; Tromp, J.

    2015-12-01

    Gravitational perturbations induced by particle motions are governed by the Poisson/Laplace equation, whosedomain includes all of space. Due to its unbounded nature, obtaining an accurate numerical solution is verychallenging. Consequently, gravitational perturbations are generally ignored in simulations of global seismicwave propagation, and only the unperturbed equilibrium gravitational field is taken into account. This so-called"Cowling approximation" is justified for relatively short-period waves (periods less than 250 s), but is invalidfor free-oscillation seismology. Existing methods are usually based on spherical harmonic expansions. Mostmethods are either limited to spherically symmetric models or have to rely on costly iterative implementationprocedures. We propose a spectral-infinite-element method to solve wave propagation in a self-gravitating Earthmodel. The spectral-infinite-element method combines the spectral-element method with the infinite-elementmethod. Spectral elements are used to capture the internal field, and infinite elements are used to represent theexternal field. To solve the weak form of the Poisson/Laplace equation, we employ Gauss-Legendre-Lobattoquadrature in spectral elements. In infinite elements, Gauss-Radau quadrature is used in the radial directionwhereas Gauss-Legendre-Lobatto quadrature is used in the lateral directions. Infinite elements naturally integratewith spectral elements, thereby avoiding an iterative implementation. We demonstrate the accuracy of themethod by comparing our results with a spherical harmonics method. The new method empowers us to tackleseveral problems in long-period seismology accurately and efficiently.

  5. A mixed method Poisson solver for three-dimensional self-gravitating astrophysical fluid dynamical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Comer; Jones, Jim

    1993-01-01

    A key ingredient in the simulation of self-gravitating astrophysical fluid dynamical systems is the gravitational potential and its gradient. This paper focuses on the development of a mixed method multigrid solver of the Poisson equation formulated so that both the potential and the Cartesian components of its gradient are self-consistently and accurately generated. The method achieves this goal by formulating the problem as a system of four equations for the gravitational potential and the three Cartesian components of the gradient and solves them using a distributed relaxation technique combined with conventional full multigrid V-cycles. The method is described, some tests are presented, and the accuracy of the method is assessed. We also describe how the method has been incorporated into our three-dimensional hydrodynamics code and give an example of an application to the collision of two stars. We end with some remarks about the future developments of the method and some of the applications in which it will be used in astrophysics.

  6. MASS AND MAGNETIC DISTRIBUTIONS IN SELF-GRAVITATING SUPER-ALFVENIC TURBULENCE WITH ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, David C.; Norman, Michael L.; Padoan, Paolo; Xu Hao

    2011-04-10

    In this work, we present the mass and magnetic distributions found in a recent adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamic simulation of supersonic, super-Alfvenic, self-gravitating turbulence. Power-law tails are found in both mass density and magnetic field probability density functions, with P({rho}) {proportional_to} {rho}{sup -1.6} and P(B) {proportional_to} B{sup -2.7}. A power-law relationship is also found between magnetic field strength and density, with B {proportional_to} {rho}{sup 0.5}, throughout the collapsing gas. The mass distribution of gravitationally bound cores is shown to be in excellent agreement with recent observation of prestellar cores. The mass-to-flux distribution of cores is also found to be in excellent agreement with recent Zeeman splitting measurements. We also compare the relationship between velocity dispersion and density to the same cores, and find an increasing relationship between the two, with {sigma} {proportional_to} n{sup 0.25}, also in agreement with the observations. We then estimate the potential effects of ambipolar diffusion in our cores and find that due to the weakness of the magnetic field in our simulation, the inclusion of ambipolar diffusion in our simulation will not cause significant alterations of the flow dynamics.

  7. Static configurations and nonlinear waves in rotating nonuniform self-gravitating fluids.

    PubMed

    Nekrasov, A K

    2006-02-01

    The equilibrium states and low-frequency waves in rotating nonuniform self-gravitating fluids are studied. The effect of a central object is included. Two-dimensional static configurations accounting for self-gravity, external gravity, and nonuniform rotation are considered for three models connecting the pressure with the mass density: thermodynamic equilibrium, polytropic pressure, and constant mass density. Explicit analytical solutions for equilibrium have been found in some cases. The low-frequency waves arising due to the vertical and horizontal fluid inhomogeneities are considered in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The relationship between the background pressure and mass density is supposed to be arbitrary in the wave analysis. It is shown that the waves considered can be unstable in the cases of polytropic pressure and constant mass density. The additional nonlinear term proportional to the product of the pressure and mass density perturbations, which is usually omitted, is kept in our nonlinear equations. There have been found conditions for this term to be important. Stationary nonlinear wave equations having solutions in the form of coherent vortex structures are obtained in a general form. The importance of involving real static configurations in the consideration of wave perturbations is emphasized.

  8. A computer software system for the generation of global ocean tides including self-gravitation and crustal loading effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    A computer software system is described which computes global numerical solutions of the integro-differential Laplace tidal equations, including dissipation terms and ocean loading and self-gravitation effects, for arbitrary diurnal and semidiurnal tidal constituents. The integration algorithm features a successive approximation scheme for the integro-differential system, with time stepping forward differences in the time variable and central differences in spatial variables.

  9. Modal analysis of gravitational instabilities in nearly Keplerian, counter-rotating collisionless discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulati, Mamta; Saini, Tarun Deep

    2017-02-01

    We present a modal analysis of instabilities of counter-rotating, self-gravitating collisionless stellar discs, using the recently introduced modified WKB formulation of spiral density waves for collisionless systems by Gulati & Saini. The discs are assumed to be axisymmetric and in coplanar orbits around a massive object at the common centre of the discs. The mass in both discs is assumed to be much smaller than the mass of the central object. For each disc, the disc particles are assumed to be in near circular orbits. The two discs are coupled to each other gravitationally. The perturbed dynamics of the discs evolves on the order of the precession time-scale of the discs, which is much longer than the Keplerian time-scale. We present results for the azimuthal wavenumber m = 1 and 2, for the full range of disc mass ratio between the prograde and retrograde discs. The eigenspectra are in general complex, therefore all eigenmodes are unstable. Eigenfunctions are radially more compact for m = 1 as compared to m = 2. Pattern speed of eigenmodes is always prograde with respect to the more massive disc. The growth rate of unstable modes increases with increasing mass fraction in the retrograde disc, and decreases with m; therefore, m = 1 instability is likely to play the dominant role in the dynamics of such systems.

  10. Structure formation through self-gravitational instability in degenerate and non-degenerate anisotropic magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prerana

    2017-04-01

    The self-gravitational instability is examined for non-degenerate and degenerate magnetized plasma. In the case of non-degenerate collisionless magnetized plasma the pressure is considered as anisotropic while in the case of degenerate situations it is taken as isotropic. The effect of finite Larmor radius correction of non-degenerate ions and viscous dissipation is taken into account in both the cases. Firstly in non-degenerate anisotropic plasma the conventional magnetohydrodynamic model is used to construct basic set of equations within the framework of modified Chew-Goldberger and Low theory. Secondly, in the case of degenerate isotropic plasma, which is considered to be composed of degenerate electrons and non-degenerate ions, the model equations are constructed using quantum magneto hydrodynamic model. The dynamics of degenerate particles are governed by Bohm and exchange potentials. The general dispersion relations are derived for both degenerate and non-degenerate situations separately using linearized perturbation equations. The results are discussed analytically and numerically for various modes of propagation. In case of non degenerate strongly magnetized plasma the effects of stress tensor anisotropy dominate over the influence of FLR effects while the FLR effects prevail in the weak magnetic field region. In case of isotropic degenerate plasma the implications of exchange parameter on the Jeans mass have been estimated and it is found that the increase in exchange parameter increases the limit of Jeans mass. The Jeans length and Jeans mass have been estimated for the white dwarf stars as LJ ≈ 2.1 × 10^{11} m and MJ ≈ 5 × 10^{39} kg respectively assist the existence of super Chandrasekhar white dwarfs.

  11. Critical dynamics of self-gravitating Langevin particles and bacterial populations.

    PubMed

    Sire, Clément; Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2008-12-01

    We study the critical dynamics of the generalized Smoluchowski-Poisson system (for self-gravitating Langevin particles) or generalized Keller-Segel model (for the chemotaxis of bacterial populations). These models [P. H. Chavanis and C. Sire, Phys. Rev. E 69, 016116 (2004)] are based on generalized stochastic processes leading to the Tsallis statistics. The equilibrium states correspond to polytropic configurations with index n similar to polytropic stars in astrophysics. At the critical index n_{3}=d(d-2) (where d>or=2 is the dimension of space), there exists a critical temperature Theta_{c} (for a given mass) or a critical mass M_{c} (for a given temperature). For Theta>Theta_{c} or MM_{c} the system collapses and forms, in a finite time, a Dirac peak containing a finite fraction M_{c} of the total mass surrounded by a halo. We study these regimes numerically and, when possible, analytically by looking for self-similar or pseudo-self-similar solutions. This study extends the critical dynamics of the ordinary Smoluchowski-Poisson system and Keller-Segel model in d=2 corresponding to isothermal configurations with n_{3}-->+infinity . We also stress the analogy between the limiting mass of white dwarf stars (Chandrasekhar's limit) and the critical mass of bacterial populations in the generalized Keller-Segel model of chemotaxis.

  12. Core and filament formation in magnetized, self-gravitating isothermal layers

    SciTech Connect

    Van Loo, Sven; Keto, Eric; Zhang, Qizhou

    2014-07-01

    We examine the role of the gravitational instability in an isothermal, self-gravitating layer threaded by magnetic fields on the formation of filaments and dense cores. Using a numerical simulation, we follow the non-linear evolution of a perturbed equilibrium layer. The linear evolution of such a layer is described in the analytic work of Nagai et al. We find that filaments and dense cores form simultaneously. Depending on the initial magnetic field, the resulting filaments form either a spiderweb-like network (for weak magnetic fields) or a network of parallel filaments aligned perpendicular to the magnetic field lines (for strong magnetic fields). Although the filaments are radially collapsing, the density profile of their central region (up to the thermal scale height) can be approximated by a hydrodynamical equilibrium density structure. Thus, the magnetic field does not play a significant role in setting the density distribution of the filaments. The density distribution outside of the central region deviates from the equilibrium. The radial column density distribution is then flatter than the expected power law of r {sup –4} and similar to filament profiles observed with Herschel. Our results do not explain the near constant filament width of ∼0.1pc. However, our model does not include turbulent motions. It is expected that the accretion-driven amplification of these turbulent motions provides additional support within the filaments against gravitational collapse. Finally, we interpret the filamentary network of the massive star forming complex G14.225-0.506 in terms of the gravitational instability model and find that the properties of the complex are consistent with being formed out of an unstable layer threaded by a strong, parallel magnetic field.

  13. Gaseous Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Maxim

    Since long time, the compelling scientific goals of future high-energy physics experiments were a driving factor in the development of advanced detector technologies. A true innovation in detector instrumentation concepts came in 1968, with the development of a fully parallel readout for a large array of sensing elements - the Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC), which earned Georges Charpak a Nobel prize in physics in 1992. Since that time radiation detection and imaging with fast gaseous detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volumes with low mass budget, have been playing an important role in many fields of physics. Advances in photolithography and microprocessing techniques in the chip industry during the past decade triggered a major transition in the field of gas detectors from wire structures to Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) concepts, revolutionizing cell-size limitations for many gas detector applications. The high radiation resistance and excellent spatial and time resolution make them an invaluable tool to confront future detector challenges at the next generation of colliders. The design of the new micro-pattern devices appears suitable for industrial production. Novel structures where MPGDs are directly coupled to the CMOS pixel readout represent an exciting field allowing timing and charge measurements as well as precise spatial information in 3D. Originally developed for the high-energy physics, MPGD applications have expanded to nuclear physics, photon detection, astroparticle and neutrino physics, neutron detection, and medical imaging.

  14. Modeling gravitational instabilities in self-gravitating protoplanetary disks with adaptive mesh refinement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenberg, Tim; Schleicher, Dominik R. G.

    2015-07-01

    The astonishing diversity in the observed planetary population requires theoretical efforts and advances in planet formation theories. The use of numerical approaches provides a method to tackle the weaknesses of current models and is an important tool to close gaps in poorly constrained areas such as the rapid formation of giant planets in highly evolved systems. So far, most numerical approaches make use of Lagrangian-based smoothed-particle hydrodynamics techniques or grid-based 2D axisymmetric simulations. We present a new global disk setup to model the first stages of giant planet formation via gravitational instabilities (GI) in 3D with the block-structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) hydrodynamics code enzo. With this setup, we explore the potential impact of AMR techniques on the fragmentation and clumping due to large-scale instabilities using different AMR configurations. Additionally, we seek to derive general resolution criteria for global simulations of self-gravitating disks of variable extent. We run a grid of simulations with varying AMR settings, including runs with a static grid for comparison. Additionally, we study the effects of varying the disk radius. The physical settings involve disks with Rdisk = 10,100 and 300 AU, with a mass of Mdisk ≈ 0.05 M⊙ and a central object of subsolar mass (M⋆ = 0.646 M⊙). To validate our thermodynamical approach we include a set of simulations with a dynamically stable profile (Qinit = 3) and similar grid parameters. The development of fragmentation and the buildup of distinct clumps in the disk is strongly dependent on the chosen AMR grid settings. By combining our findings from the resolution and parameter studies we find a general lower limit criterion to be able to resolve GI induced fragmentation features and distinct clumps, which induce turbulence in the disk and seed giant planet formation. Irrespective of the physical extension of the disk, topologically disconnected clump features are only

  15. Explaining the density profile of self-gravitating systems by statistical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dong-Biao

    A self-gravitating system usually shows a quasi-universal density profile, such as the NFW profile of a simulated dark matter halo, the flat rotation curve of a spiral galaxy, the Sérsic profile of an elliptical galaxy, the King profile of a globular cluster and the exponential law of the stellar disk. It will be interesting if all of the above can be obtained from first principles. Based on the original work of White & Narayan (1987), we propose that if the self-bounded system is divided into infinite infinitesimal subsystems, the entropy of each subsystem can be maximized, but the whole system's gravity may just play the role of the wall, which may not increase the whole system's entropy S t , and finally S t may be the minimum among all of the locally maximized entropies (He & Kang 2010). For spherical systems with isotropic velocity dispersion, the form of the equation of state will be a hybrid of isothermal and adiabatic (Kang & He 2011). Hence this density profile can be approximated by a truncated isothermal sphere, which means that the total mass must be finite and our results can be consistent with observations (Kang & He 2011b). Our method requires that the mass and energy should be conserved, so we only compare our results with simulations of mild relaxation (i.e. the virial ratio is close to -1) of dissipationless collapse (Kang 2014), and the fitting also is well. The capacity can be calculated and is found not to be always negative as in previous works, and combining with calculations of the second order variation of the entropy, we find that the thermodynamical stability still can be true (Kang 2012) if the temperature tends to be zero. However, the cusp in the center of dark matter halos can not be explained, and more works will continue. The above work can be generalized to study the radial distribution of the disk (Kang 2015). The energy constraint automatically disappears in our variation, because angular momentum is much more important than

  16. Double-disc gate valve

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, Seth J.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to an improvement in a conventional double-disc gate valve having a vertically movable gate assembly including a wedge, spreaders slidably engaged therewtih, a valve disc carried by the spreaders. When the gate assembly is lowered to a selected point in the valve casing, the valve discs are moved transversely outward to close inlet and outlet ports in the casing. The valve includes hold-down means for guiding the disc-and-spreader assemblies as they are moved transversely outward and inward. If such valves are operated at relatively high differential pressures, they sometimes jam during opening. Such jamming has been a problem for many years in gate valves used in gaseous diffusion plants for the separtion of uranium isotopes. The invention is based on the finding that the above-mentioned jamming results when the outlet disc tilts about its horizontal axis in a certain way during opening of the valve. In accordance with the invention, tilting of the outlet disc is maintained at a tolerable value by providing the disc with a rigid downwardly extending member and by providing the casing with a stop for limiting inward arcuate movement of the member to a preselected value during opening of the valve.

  17. Collapse of a self-gravitating Bose-Einstein condensate with attractive self-interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2016-10-01

    We study the collapse of a self-gravitating Bose-Einstein condensate with attractive self-interaction. Equilibrium states in which the gravitational attraction and the attraction due to the self-interaction are counterbalanced by the quantum pressure (Heisenberg's uncertainty principle) exist only below a maximum mass Mmax=1.012 ℏ/√{G m |as| } where as<0 is the scattering length of the bosons and m is their mass [P. H. Chavanis, Phys. Rev. D 84, 043531 (2011)]. For M >Mmax the system is expected to collapse and form a black hole. We study the collapse dynamics by making a Gaussian ansatz for the wave function and reducing the problem to the study of the motion of a particle in an effective potential. We find that the collapse time scales as (M /Mmax-1 )-1 /4 for M →Mmax+ and as M-1 /2 for M ≫Mmax. Other analytical results are given above and below the critical point corresponding to a saddle-node bifurcation. We apply our results to QCD axions with mass m =10-4 eV /c2 and scattering length as=-5.8 ×10-53 m for which Mmax=6.5 ×10-14M⊙ and R =3.3 ×10-4R⊙. We confirm our previous claim that bosons with attractive self-interaction, such as QCD axions, may form low mass stars (axion stars or dark matter stars) but cannot form dark matter halos of relevant mass and size. These mini axion stars could be the constituents of dark matter. They can collapse into mini black holes of mass ˜10-14M⊙ in a few hours. In that case, dark matter halos would be made of mini black holes. We also apply our results to ultralight axions with mass m =1.93 ×10-20 eV /c2 and scattering length as=-8.29 ×10-60 fm for which Mmax=0.39 ×1 06M⊙ and R =33 pc . These ultralight axions could cluster into dark matter halos. Axionic dark matter halos with attractive self-interaction can collapse into supermassive black holes of mass ˜1 06M⊙ (similar to those reported at the center of galaxies) in about one million years. We point out the limitations of the Gaussian ansatz to

  18. Investigation of cryogenic rupture disc design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keough, J. B.; Oldland, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rupture disc designs of both the active (command actuated) and passive (pressure ruptured) types were evaluated for performance characteristics at cryogenic temperatures and for capability to operate in a variety of cryogens, including gaseous and liquid fluorine. The test results, coupled with information from literature and industry searches, were used to establish a statement of design criteria and recommended practices for application of rupture discs to cryogenic rocket propellant feed and vent systems.

  19. Structure of radiation-dominated gravitoturbulent quasar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadmehri, Mohsen; Khajenabi, Fazeleh; Dib, Sami

    2017-02-01

    Self-gravitating accretion discs in a gravitoturbulent state, including radiation and gas pressures, are studied using a set of new analytical solutions. While the Toomre parameter of the disc remains close to its critical value for the onset of gravitational instability, the dimensionless stress parameter is uniquely determined from the thermal energy reservoir of the disc and its cooling rate. Our solutions are applicable to the accretion discs with dynamically important radiation pressure such as that in the quasars discs. We show that physical quantities of a gravitoturbulent disc in the presence of radiation are significantly modified compared to solutions with only gas pressure. We show that the dimensionless stress parameter is an increasing function of the radial distance so that its steepness strongly depends on the accretion rate. In a disc without radiation its slope is 4.5; however, we show that in the presence of radiation, it varies between 2 and 4.5 depending on the accretion rate and the central mass. As for the surface density, we find a shallower profile with an exponent -2 in a disc with sub-Eddington accretion rate compared to a similar disc, but without radiation, where its surface density slope is -3 independent of the accretion rate. We then investigate gravitational stability of the disc when the stress parameter reaches to its critical value. In order to self-consistently determine the fragmentation boundary, however, it is shown that the critical value of the stress parameter is a power-law function of the ratio of gas pressure and the total pressure and its exponent is around 1.7. We also estimate the maximum mass of the central black hole using our analytical solutions.

  20. Standing on the shoulders of giants. Trojan Earths and vortex trapping in low mass self-gravitating protoplanetary disks of gas and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyra, W.; Johansen, A.; Klahr, H.; Piskunov, N.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Centimeter and meter-sized solid particles in protoplanetary disks are trapped within long-lived, high-pressure regions, creating opportunities for collapse into planetesimals and planetary embryos. Aims: We aim to study the effect of the high-pressure regions generated in the gaseous disks by a giant planet perturber. These regions consist of gas retained in tadpole orbits around the stable Lagrangian points as a gap is carved, and the Rossby vortices launched at the edges of the gap. Methods: We performed global simulations of the dynamics of gas and solids in a low mass non-magnetized self-gravitating thin protoplanetary disk. We employed the Pencil code to solve the Eulerian hydro equations, tracing the solids with a large number of Lagrangian particles, usually 100 000. To compute the gravitational potential of the swarm of solids, we solved the Poisson equation using particle-mesh methods with multiple fast Fourier transforms. Results: Huge particle concentrations are seen in the Lagrangian points of the giant planet, as well as in the vortices they induce at the edges of the carved gaps. For 1 cm to 10 cm radii, gravitational collapse occurs in the Lagrangian points in less than 200 orbits. For 5 cm particles, a 2M⊕ planet is formed. For 10 cm, the final maximum collapsed mass is around 3M⊕. The collapse of the 1 cm particles is indirect, following the timescale of gas depletion from the tadpole orbits. Vortices are excited at the edges of the gap, primarily trapping particles of 30 cm radii. The rocky planet that is formed is as massive as 17M⊕, constituting a Super-Earth. Collapse does not occur for 40 cm onwards. By using multiple particle species, we find that gas drag modifies the streamlines in the tadpole region around the classical L4 and L5 points. As a result, particles of different radii have their stable points shifted to different locations. Collapse therefore takes longer and produces planets of lower mass. Three super-Earths are

  1. MASSIVE BLACK HOLE PAIRS IN CLUMPY, SELF-GRAVITATING CIRCUMNUCLEAR DISKS: STOCHASTIC ORBITAL DECAY

    SciTech Connect

    Fiacconi, Davide; Mayer, Lucio; Roškar, Rok; Colpi, Monica

    2013-11-01

    We study the dynamics of massive black hole pairs in clumpy gaseous circumnuclear disks. We track the orbital decay of the light, secondary black hole M {sub .2} orbiting around the more massive primary at the center of the disk, using N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations. We find that the gravitational interaction of M {sub .2} with massive clumps M {sub cl} erratically perturbs the otherwise smooth orbital decay. In close encounters with massive clumps, gravitational slingshots can kick the secondary black hole out of the disk plane. The black hole moving on an inclined orbit then experiences the weaker dynamical friction of the stellar background, resulting in a longer orbital decay timescale. Interactions between clumps can also favor orbital decay when the black hole is captured by a massive clump that is segregating toward the center of the disk. The stochastic behavior of the black hole orbit emerges mainly when the ratio M {sub .2}/M {sub cl} falls below unity, with decay timescales ranging from ∼1 to ∼50 Myr. This suggests that describing the cold clumpy phase of the interstellar medium in self-consistent simulations of galaxy mergers, albeit so far neglected, is important to predict the black hole dynamics in galaxy merger remnants.

  2. THE STRUCTURE OF A SELF-GRAVITATING PROTOPLANETARY DISK AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR DIRECT IMAGING OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, Takayuki

    2011-09-20

    We consider the effects of self-gravity on the hydrostatic balance in the vertical direction of a gaseous disk and discuss the possible signature of the self-gravity that may be captured by direct imaging observations of protoplanetary disks in the future. In this paper, we consider a vertically isothermal disk in order to isolate the effects of self-gravity. The specific disk model we consider in this paper is the one with a radial surface density gap, at which the Toomre's Q-parameter of the disk varies rapidly in the radial direction. We calculate the vertical structure of the disk including the effects of self-gravity. We then calculate the scattered light and the dust thermal emission. We find that if the disk is massive enough and the effects of self-gravity come into play, a weak bump-like structure at the gap edge appears in the near-infrared (NIR) scattered light, while no such bump-like structure is seen in the submillimeter (sub-mm) dust continuum image. The appearance of the bump is caused by the variation of the height of the surface in the NIR wavelength. If such a bump-like feature is detected in future direct imaging observations, combined with sub-mm observations, it will give us useful information about the physical states of the disk.

  3. Spiral-driven accretion in protoplanetary discs. II. Self-similar solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennebelle, Patrick; Lesur, Geoffroy; Fromang, Sébastien

    2016-05-01

    Context. Accretion discs are ubiquitous in the Universe, and it is crucial to understand how angular momentum and mass are radially transported in these objects. Aims: Here, we study the role played by non-linear spiral patterns within hydrodynamical and non-self-gravitating accretion discs assuming that external disturbances such as infall onto the disc may trigger them. Methods: To do so, we computed self-similar solutions that describe discs in which a spiral wave propagates. These solutions present shocks and critical sonic points that were analyzed. Results: We calculated the wave structure for all allowed temperatures and for several spiral shocks. In particular, we inferred the angle of the spiral pattern, the stress it exerts on the disc, and the associated flux of mass and angular momentum as a function of temperature. We quantified the rate of angular momentum transport by means of the dimensionless α parameter. For the thickest disc we considered (corresponding to h/r values of about one-third), we found values of α as high as 0.1 that scaled with the temperature T such that α ∝ T3 / 2 ∝ (h/r)3. The spiral angle scales with the temperature as arctan(r/h). Conclusions: These solutions suggests that perturbations occurring at disc outer boundaries, such as perturbations due to infall motions, can propagate deep inside the disc and therefore should not be ignored, even when considering small radii.

  4. Exact analytical solution of the collapse of self-gravitating Brownian particles and bacterial populations at zero temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri; Sire, Clément

    2011-03-01

    We provide an exact analytical solution of the collapse dynamics of self-gravitating Brownian particles and bacterial populations at zero temperature. These systems are described by the Smoluchowski-Poisson system or Keller-Segel model in which the diffusion term is neglected. As a result, the dynamics is purely deterministic. A cold system undergoes a gravitational collapse, leading to a finite-time singularity: The central density increases and becomes infinite in a finite time tcoll. The evolution continues in the postcollapse regime. A Dirac peak emerges, grows, and finally captures all the mass in a finite time tend, while the central density excluding the Dirac peak progressively decreases. Close to the collapse time, the pre- and postcollapse evolutions are self-similar. Interestingly, if one starts from a parabolic density profile, one obtains an exact analytical solution that describes the whole collapse dynamics, from the initial time to the end, and accounts for non-self-similar corrections that were neglected in previous works. Our results have possible application in different areas including astrophysics, chemotaxis, colloids, and nanoscience.

  5. ON THE MINIMAL ACCURACY REQUIRED FOR SIMULATING SELF-GRAVITATING SYSTEMS BY MEANS OF DIRECT N-BODY METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Portegies Zwart, Simon; Boekholt, Tjarda

    2014-04-10

    The conservation of energy, linear momentum, and angular momentum are important drivers of our physical understanding of the evolution of the universe. These quantities are also conserved in Newton's laws of motion under gravity. Numerical integration of the associated equations of motion is extremely challenging, in particular due to the steady growth of numerical errors (by round-off and discrete time-stepping and the exponential divergence between two nearby solutions. As a result, numerical solutions to the general N-body problem are intrinsically questionable. Using brute force integrations to arbitrary numerical precision we demonstrate empirically that ensembles of different realizations of resonant three-body interactions produce statistically indistinguishable results. Although individual solutions using common integration methods are notoriously unreliable, we conjecture that an ensemble of approximate three-body solutions accurately represents an ensemble of true solutions, so long as the energy during integration is conserved to better than 1/10. We therefore provide an independent confirmation that previous work on self-gravitating systems can actually be trusted, irrespective of the intrinsically chaotic nature of the N-body problem.

  6. Disruption patterns of rotating self-gravitating aggregates: A survey on angle of friction and tensile strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Paul; Scheeres, Daniel J.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a study, through the use of a SSDEM simulation code, of the possible disruption patterns and mechanisms of self-gravitating aggregates that are spun-up to the point of disruption. We do this survey by systematically changing the angle of friction and tensile stress of the aggregates. It is observed that the amount of deformation that takes place before disruption, as well as its onset, is directly related to the angle of friction. On the other hand, the change in tensile strength allows us to clearly observe a continuous transition from losing surface material to larger scale fission at higher spin rates before disruption, but in no case do we observe surface flow. These results are also compared to other simulation results and the observations of asteroids P/2013 R3, P/2013 P5, 1950 DA, 1999 KW4 and Geographos. Additionally, we propose modifications to previously discussed mechanisms for the formation of binary asteroids and asteroid pairs.

  7. Virial theorem and dynamical evolution of self-gravitating Brownian particles in an unbounded domain. I. Overdamped models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri; Sire, Clément

    2006-06-01

    We derive the virial theorem appropriate to the generalized Smoluchowski-Poisson (GSP) system describing self-gravitating Brownian particles in an overdamped limit. We extend previous works by considering the case of an unbounded domain and an arbitrary equation of state. We use the virial theorem to study the diffusion (evaporation) of an isothermal Brownian gas above the critical temperature Tc in dimension d=2 and show how the effective diffusion coefficient and the Einstein relation are modified by self-gravity. We also study the collapse at T=Tc and show that the central density increases logarithmically with time instead of exponentially in a bounded domain. Finally, for d>2 , we show that the evaporation of the system is essentially a pure diffusion slightly slowed down by self-gravity. We also study the linear dynamical stability of stationary solutions of the GSP system representing isolated clusters of particles and investigate the influence of the equation of state and of the dimension of space on the dynamical stability of the system.

  8. Post-seismic relaxation following the great 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake on a compressible self-gravitating Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.; Burgmann, R.; Banerjee, P.

    2006-01-01

    he Mw ??? 9.0 2004 December 26 Sumatra-Andaman and Mw =8.7 2005 March 28 Nias earthquakes, which collectively ruptured approximately 1800 km of the Andaman and Sunda subduction zones, are expected to be followed by vigorous viscoelastic relaxation involving both the upper and lower mantle. Because of these large spatial dimensions it is desirable to fully account for gravitational coupling effects in the relaxation process. We present a stable method of computing relaxation of a spherically-stratified, compressible and self-gravitating viscoelastic Earth following an impulsive moment release event. The solution is cast in terms of a spherical harmonic expansion of viscoelastic normal modes. For simple layered viscoelastic models, which include a low-viscosity oceanic asthenosphere, we predict substantial post-seismic effects over a region several 100s of km wide surrounding the eastern Indian Ocean. We compare observed GPS time-series from ten regional sites (mostly in Thailand and Indonesia), beginning in 2004 December, with synthetic time-series that include the coseismic and post-seismic effects of the 2004 December 26 and 2005 March 28 earthquakes. A viscosity structure involving a biviscous (Burgers body) rheology in the asthenosphere explains the pattern and amplitude of post-seismic offsets remarkably well. ?? 2006 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2006 RAS.

  9. Kinetic and Structural Evolution of Self-gravitating, Magnetized Clouds: 2.5-dimensional Simulations of Decaying Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostriker, Eve C.; Gammie, Charles F.; Stone, James M.

    1999-03-01

    The molecular component of the Galaxy is comprised of turbulent, magnetized clouds, many of which are self-gravitating and form stars. To develop an understanding of how these clouds' kinetic and structural evolution may depend on their level of turbulence, mean magnetization, and degree of self-gravity, we perform a survey of direct numerical MHD simulations in which three parameters are independently varied. Our simulations consist of solutions to the time-dependent MHD equations on a two-dimensional grid with periodic boundary conditions; an additional ``half'' dimension is also incorporated as dependent variables in the third Cartesian direction. Two of our survey parameters, the mean magnetization parameter β≡c2sound/v2Alfven and the Jeans number nJ≡Lcloud/LJeans, allow us to model clouds that either meet or fail conditions for magneto-Jeans stability and magnetic criticality. Our third survey parameter, the sonic Mach number M≡σvelocity/csound, allows us to initiate turbulence of either sub- or super-Alfvénic amplitude; we employ an isothermal equation of state throughout. We evaluate the times for each cloud model to become gravitationally bound and measure each model's kinetic energy loss over the fluid-flow crossing time. We compare the evolution of density and magnetic field structural morphology and quantify the differences in the density contrast generated by internal stresses for models of differing mean magnetization. We find that the values of β and nJ, but not the initial Mach number M, determine the time for cloud gravitational binding and collapse: for mean cloud density nH2=100 cm-3, unmagnetized models collapse after ~5 Myr, and magnetically supercritical models generally collapse after 5-10 Myr (although the smallest magneto-Jeans stable clouds survive gravitational collapse until t~15 Myr), while magnetically subcritical clouds remain uncollapsed over the entire simulations; these cloud collapse times scale with the mean density as

  10. Self-gravitating compressible Maxwell Earth models: the role of the self compression and the compositional initial density gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambiotti, G.

    2009-04-01

    We analyse a new class of self-gravitating Maxwell Earth models that takes the compressibility into account both at the initial state of hydrostatic equilibrium and during the deformations. By resorting to the Correspondence Principle we derive the analytical solution for a particular model with an inviscid core, a Darwin law density profile in the mantle and a continuous compositional initial density gradient. It allows to gain deep insight into the global dynamics of the Earth showing that the compressional stratification is responsible only for stable modes, namely the C0 and M0 buoyancy modes, the D-modes and the transient modes, while the compositional stratification triggers new transient modes and a denumerably set of buoyancy modes, of which the RT-modes are a particular case. We show that the model is unstable only when the square of the Brunt-Väiäsala frequency is positive and the solely unstable modes are the new compositional ones. By resorting to a numerical algorithm we extend our analysis to more general self-compressed compressible models with specific Darwin law density profiles in each layer and a compositional initial density gradient describing the density contrasts at the main Earth interfaces. We show that no buoyancy modes are due to the continuous variation of the initial density but they arise because of the density contrasts while the D-modes are substitute by a non-modal contribution always associated with the compressional relaxation times. Such results shed light on the role of the compositional stratification on the relaxation processes and allow us to deal with the issue of the Earth stability in a more consistent way compared to the past. Besides this they are relevant to model the Post-Glacial rebound and the post seismic deformations.

  11. Self-gravitating rotating anisotropic pressure plasma in presence of Hall current and electrical resistivity using generalized polytrope laws

    SciTech Connect

    Prajapati, R. P.; Chhajlani, R. K.; Soni, G. D.

    2008-06-15

    The effects of uniform rotation, finite electrical resistivity, electron inertia, and Hall current on the self-gravitational instability of anisotropic pressure plasma with generalized polytrope laws have been studied. A general dispersion relation is obtained with the help of the relevant linearized perturbed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations incorporating the relevant contributions of various effects of the problem using the method of normal mode analysis. The general dispersion relation is further reduced for the special cases of rotation; i.e., parallel and perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field. The longitudinal and transverse modes of propagation are discussed separately for investigation of condition of instability. The effects of rotation, Hall current, finite electron inertia, and polytropic indices are discussed on the gravitational, ''firehose,'' and ''mirror'' instabilities. The numerical calculations have been performed to obtain the dependence of the growth rate of the gravitational unstable mode on the various physical parameters involved. The finite electrical resistivity, rotation, and Hall current have a stabilizing influence on the growth rate of the unstable mode of wave propagation. The finite electrical resistivity removes the effect of magnetic field and polytropic index from the condition of instability in the transverse mode of propagation for both the cases of rotation. It is also found that the Jeans criterion of gravitational instability depends upon rotation, electron inertia, and polytropic indices. In the case of transverse mode of propagation with the axis of rotation parallel to the magnetic field, it is observed that the region of instability and the value of the critical Jeans wavenumber are larger for the Chew-Goldberger-Low set of equations in comparison with the MHD set of equations. The stability of the system is discussed by applying Routh-Hurwitz criterion. The inclusion of rotation or Hall current or both

  12. The Global Nonlinear Stability of Minkowski Space for Self-gravitating Massive Fields. The Wave-Klein-Gordon Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeFloch, Philippe G.; Ma, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The Hyperboloidal Foliation Method (introduced by the authors in 2014) is extended here and applied to the Einstein equations of general relativity. Specifically, we establish the nonlinear stability of Minkowski spacetime for self-gravitating massive scalar fields, while existing methods only apply to massless scalar fields. First of all, by analyzing the structure of the Einstein equations in wave coordinates, we exhibit a nonlinear wave-Klein-Gordon model defined on a curved background, which is the focus of the present paper. For this model, we prove here the existence of global-in-time solutions to the Cauchy problem, when the initial data have sufficiently small Sobolev norms. A major difficulty comes from the fact that the class of conformal Killing fields of Minkowski space is significantly reduced in the presence of a massive scalar field, since the scaling vector field is not conformal Killing for the Klein-Gordon operator. Our method relies on the foliation (of the interior of the light cone) of Minkowski spacetime by hyperboloidal hypersurfaces and uses Lorentz-invariant energy norms. We introduce a frame of vector fields adapted to the hyperboloidal foliation and we establish several key properties: Sobolev and Hardy-type inequalities on hyperboloids, as well as sup-norm estimates, which correspond to the sharp time decay for the wave and the Klein-Gordon equations. These estimates allow us to control interaction terms associated with the curved geometry and the massive field by distinguishing between two levels of regularity and energy growth and by a successive use of our key estimates in order to close a bootstrap argument.

  13. Thermodynamics of gravitational clustering phenomena: N-body self-gravitating gas on the sphere {{{S}}^{3}}\\subset {{{R}}^{4}}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tello-Ortiz, F.; Velazquez, L.

    2016-10-01

    This work is devoted to the thermodynamics of gravitational clustering, a collective phenomenon with a great relevance in the N-body cosmological problem. We study a classical self-gravitating gas of identical non-relativistic particles defined on the sphere {{{S}}3}\\subset {{{R}}4} by considering gravitational interaction that corresponds to this geometric space. The analysis is performed within microcanonical description of an isolated Hamiltonian system by combining continuum approximation and the steepest descend method. According to numerical solution of resulting equations, the gravitational clustering can be associated with two microcanonical phase transitions. A first phase transition with a continuous character is associated with breakdown of SO(4) symmetry of this model. The second one is the gravitational collapse, whose continuous or discontinuous character crucially depends on the regularization of short-range divergence of gravitation potential. We also derive the thermodynamic limit of this model system, the astrophysical counterpart of the Gibbs-Duhem relation, the order parameters that characterize its phase transitions and the equation of state. Other interesting behavior is the existence of states with negative heat capacities, which appear when the effects of gravitation turn dominant for energies sufficiently low. Finally, we comment on the relevance of some of these results in the study of astrophysical and cosmological situations. Special interest deserves the gravitational modification of the equation of state due to the local inhomogeneities of matter distribution. Although this feature is systematically neglected in studies about universe expansion, the same one is able to mimic an effect that is attributed to the dark energy: a negative pressure.

  14. Gaseous Structures and Mass Drift in Spiral Galaxies: Effects of Arm Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Kim, W.-T.

    2015-10-01

    Stellar spiral arms in disk galaxies play an important role in the formation of gaseous substructures such as gaseous feathers as well as mass inflows/outflows in the radial direction. We study nonlinear responses of self-gravitating gas to an imposed stellar spiral potential in galactic disks with differing arm strength and pattern speed. We find that the extent and shapes of gaseous arms as well as the radial mass drift rate depend rather sensitively on the arm pattern speed. Quasi-steady spiral shocks can exist only when the normal Mach number is small. The pitch angle of gaseous arms is usually smaller than that of stellar arms. The mass drift rate to the central region is in the range of ˜0.05-3.0M⊙yr-1 , with larger values corresponding to stronger and/or slower-rotating arms. Using a normal-mode linear stability analysis together with nonlinear simulations, we show that wiggle instability of spiral shocks is due to the accumulation of potential vorticity at a perturbed shock front, rather than Kelvin-Helmholtz instability as previously suggested.

  15. Solid and Gaseous Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Hyman; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This review covers methods of sampling, analyzing, and testing coal, coke, and coal-derived solids and methods for the chemical, physical, and instrumental analyses of gaseous fuels. The review covers from October 1986, to September 1988. (MVL)

  16. Secular resonant dressed orbital diffusion - II. Application to an isolated self-similar tepid galactic disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouvry, Jean-Baptiste; Pichon, Christophe

    2015-05-01

    The main orbital signatures of the secular evolution of an isolated self-gravitating stellar Mestel disc are recovered using a dressed Fokker-Planck formalism in angle-action variables. The shot-noise-driven formation of narrow ridges of resonant orbits is recovered in the WKB limit of tightly wound transient spirals, for a tepid Toomre-stable tapered disc. The relative effect of the bulge, the halo, the disc temperature and the spectral properties of the shot noise are investigated in turn. For such galactic discs all elements seem to impact the locus and direction of the ridge. For instance, when the halo mass is decreased, we observe a transition between a regime of heating in the inner regions of the disc through the inner Lindblad resonance to a regime of radial migration of quasi-circular orbits via the corotation resonance in the outer part of the disc. The dressed secular formalism captures both the nature of collisionless systems (via their natural frequencies and susceptibility), and their nurture via the structure of the external perturbing power spectrum. Hence it provides the ideal framework in which to study their long-term evolution.

  17. Redundant disc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barack, W. N.; Domas, P. A.; Beekman, S. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A rotatable disc is described that consists of parallel plates tightly joined together for rotation about a hub. Each plate is provided with several angularly projecting spaced lands. The lands of each plate are interposed in alternating relationship between the lands of the next adjacent plate. In this manner, circumferential displacement of adjacent sectors in any one plate is prevented in the event that a crack develops. Each plate is redundantly sized so that, in event of structural failure of one plate, the remaining plates support a proportionate share of the load of the failed plate. The plates are prevented from separating laterally through the inclusion of generally radially extending splines which are inserted to interlock cooperating, circumferentially adjacent lands.

  18. Runaway accretion of metals from compact discs of debris on to white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2011-09-01

    It was recently proposed that metal-rich white dwarfs (WDs) accrete their metals from compact discs of debris found to exist around more than a dozen of them. At the same time, elemental abundances measured in atmospheres of some WDs imply vigorous metal accretion at rates up to 1011 g s-1, far in excess of what can be supplied solely by Poynting-Robertson drag acting on such discs of debris. To explain this observation we propose a model, in which rapid transport of metals from the disc on to the WD naturally results from interaction between this particulate disc and a spatially coexisting disc of metallic gas. The latter is fed by evaporation of debris particles at the sublimation radius located at several tens of WD radii. Because of pressure support the gaseous disc orbits the WD slower than the particulate disc. Resultant azimuthal drift between them at speed ≲1 m s-1 causes aerodynamic drag on the disc of solids and drives inward migration of its constituent particles. Upon reaching the sublimation radius, particles evaporate, enhancing the density of the metallic gaseous disc and leading to positive feedback. Under favourable circumstances (low viscosity in the disc of metallic gas and efficient aerodynamic coupling between the discs) a system evolves in a runaway fashion, destroying the discs of debris on time-scale of ˜105 yr, and giving rise to high metal accretion rates up to ? g s-1, in agreement with observations.

  19. Gaseous wire detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    1997-08-01

    This article represents a series of three lectures describing topics needed to understand the design of typical gaseous wire detectors used in large high energy physics experiments; including the electrostatic design, drift of electrons in the electric and magnetic field, the avalanche, signal creation, limits on the position accuracy as well as some problems one encounters in practical operations.

  20. Spirals, gaps, cavities, gapities: What do planets do in discs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crida, A.

    2016-12-01

    In this presentation, part of the "Observations of discs" workshop, I address the theoretical point of view of planet-disc interactions. In section 2, I will review the physics of spirals, and explain why the inner and the outer wake created by a planet in a gaseous keplerian disc look very different, but their shape is independant of the mass of the planet and almost only depends on the aspect ratio of the disc. In the third section, I discuss the axisymmetric features (gaps and cavities), and how they differ in the gas or the dust component. However, to start with, some clarification of the nomenclature seems to be required, as observers and theorists may have a different idea of what a gap is. The definition of a "gapity" may help to clarify the situation of pre-transitional discs.

  1. Star Formation in Self-gravitating Disks in Active Galactic Nuclei. II. Episodic Formation of Broad-line Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Min; Du, Pu; Baldwin, Jack A.; Ge, Jun-Qiang; Hu, Chen; Ferland, Gary J.

    2012-02-01

    This is the second in a series of papers discussing the process and effects of star formation in the self-gravitating disk around the supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We have previously suggested that warm skins are formed above the star-forming (SF) disk through the diffusion of warm gas driven by supernova explosions. Here we study the evolution of the warm skins when they are exposed to the powerful radiation from the inner part of the accretion disk. The skins initially are heated to the Compton temperature, forming a Compton atmosphere (CAS) whose subsequent evolution is divided into four phases. Phase I is the duration of pure accumulation supplied by the SF disk. During phase II clouds begin to form due to line cooling and sink to the SF disk. Phase III is a period of preventing clouds from sinking to the SF disk through dynamic interaction between clouds and the CAS because of the CAS overdensity driven by continuous injection of warm gas from the SF disk. Finally, phase IV is an inevitable collapse of the entire CAS through line cooling. This CAS evolution drives the episodic appearance of broad-line regions (BLRs). We follow the formation of cold clouds through the thermal instability of the CAS during phases II and III, using linear analysis. Since the clouds are produced inside the CAS, the initial spatial distribution of newly formed clouds and angular momentum naturally follow the CAS dynamics, producing a flattened disk of clouds. The number of clouds in phases II and III can be estimated, as well as the filling factor of clouds in the BLR. Since the cooling function depends on the metallicity, the metallicity gradients that originate in the SF disk give rise to different properties of clouds in different radial regions. We find from the instability analysis that clouds have column density N H <~ 1022 cm-2 in the metal-rich regions whereas they have N H >~ 1022 cm-2 in the metal-poor regions. The metal-rich clouds compose

  2. Apparent quasar disc sizes in the "bird's nest" paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolmasov, P.

    2017-04-01

    Context. Quasar microlensing effects make it possible to measure the accretion disc sizes around distant supermassive black holes that are still well beyond the spatial resolution of contemporary instrumentation. The sizes measured with this technique appear inconsistent with the standard accretion disc model. Not only are the measured accretion disc sizes larger, but their dependence on wavelength is in most cases completely different from the predictions of the standard model. Aims: We suggest that these discrepancies may arise not from non-standard accretion disc structure or systematic errors, as it was proposed before, but rather from scattering and reprocession of the radiation of the disc. In particular, the matter falling from the gaseous torus and presumably feeding the accretion disc may at certain distances become ionized and produce an extended halo that is free from colour gradients. Methods: A simple analytical model is proposed assuming that a geometrically thick translucent inflow acts as a scattering mirror changing the apparent spatial properties of the disc. This inflow may be also identified with the broad line region or its inner parts. Results: Such a model is able to explain the basic properties of the apparent disc sizes, primarily their large values and their shallow dependence on wavelength. The only condition required is to scatter a significant portion of the luminosity of the disc. This can easily be fulfilled if the scattering inflow has a large geometrical thickness and clumpy structure.

  3. Protostellar disc formation enabled by removal of small dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bo; Caselli, Paola; Li, Zhi-Yun; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien; Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2016-08-01

    It has been shown that a realistic level of magnetization of dense molecular cloud cores can suppress the formation of a rotationally supported disc (RSD) through catastrophic magnetic braking in the axisymmetric ideal MHD limit. In this study, we present conditions for the formation of RSDs through non-ideal MHD effects computed self-consistently from an equilibrium chemical network. We find that removing from the standard MRN distribution the large population of very small grains (VSGs) of ˜ 10 Å to few 100 Å that dominate the coupling of the bulk neutral matter to the magnetic field increases the ambipolar diffusivity by ˜ 1-2 orders of magnitude at densities below 1010/cm-3. The enhanced ambipolar diffusion (AD) in the envelope reduces the amount of magnetic flux dragged by the collapse into the circumstellar disc-forming region. Therefore, magnetic braking is weakened and more angular momentum can be retained. With continuous high angular momentum inflow, RSDs of tens of au are able to form, survive, and even grow in size, depending on other parameters including cosmic ray ionization rate, magnetic field strength, and rotation speed. Some discs become self-gravitating and evolve into rings in our 2D (axisymmetric) simulations, which have the potential to fragment into (close) multiple systems in 3D. We conclude that disc formation in magnetized cores is highly sensitive to chemistry, especially to grain sizes. A moderate grain coagulation/growth to remove the large population of VSGs, either in the prestellar phase or during free-fall collapse, can greatly promote AD and help formation of tens of au RSDs.

  4. Gaseous diffusion system

    DOEpatents

    Garrett, George A.; Shacter, John

    1978-01-01

    1. A gaseous diffusion system comprising a plurality of diffusers connected in cascade to form a series of stages, each of said diffusers having a porous partition dividing it into a high pressure chamber and a low pressure chamber, and means for combining a portion of the enriched gas from a succeeding stage with a portion of the enriched gas from the low pressure chamber of each stage and feeding it into one extremity of the high pressure chamber thereof.

  5. GASEOUS DISPOSAL PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Ryan, R.F.; Thomasson, F.R.; Hicks, J.H.

    1963-01-22

    A method is described of removing gaseous radioactive Xe and Kr from water containing O. The method consists in stripping the gases from the water stream by means of H flowing countercurrently to the stream. The gases are then heated in a deoxo bed to remove O. The carrier gas is next cooled and passed over a charcoal adsorbent bed maintained at a temperature of about --280 deg F to remove the Xe and Kr. (AEC)

  6. Flares in gamma-ray bursts: disc fragmentation and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osso, Simone; Perna, Rosalba; Tanaka, Takamitsu L.; Margutti, Raffaella

    2017-02-01

    Flaring activity following gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), observed in both long and short GRBs, signals a long-term activity of the central engine. However, its production mechanism has remained elusive. Here, we develop a quantitative model of the idea proposed by Perna et al. of a disc whose outer regions fragment due to the onset of gravitational instability. The self-gravitating clumps migrate through the disc and begin to evolve viscously when tidal and shearing torques break them apart. Our model consists of two ingredients: theoretical bolometric flare light curves whose shape (width, skewness) is largely insensitive to the model parameters, and a spectral correction to match the bandpass of the available observations, that is calibrated using the observed spectra of the flares. This simple model reproduces, with excellent agreement, the empirical statistical properties of the flares as measured by their width-to-arrival time ratio and skewness (ratio between decay and rise time). We present model fits to the observed light curves of two well-monitored flares, GRB 060418 and GRB 060904B. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first quantitative model able to reproduce the flare light curves and explain their global statistical properties.

  7. Turbine disc sealing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2013-03-05

    A disc seal assembly for use in a turbine engine. The disc seal assembly includes a plurality of outwardly extending sealing flange members that define a plurality of fluid pockets. The sealing flange members define a labyrinth flow path therebetween to limit leakage between a hot gas path and a disc cavity in the turbine engine.

  8. Nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic waves in self-gravitating dusty plasma consisting of non-isothermal two-temperature electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S. N.; Chatterjee, A.; Paul, Indrani

    2017-01-01

    Nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic waves in self-gravitating multicomponent dusty plasma consisting of positive ions, non-isothermal two-temperature electrons and negatively charged dust particles with fluctuating charges and drifting ions has been studied using the reductive perturbation method. It has been shown that nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic waves in gravitating dusty plasma is described by an uncoupled third order partial differential equation which is a modified form of Korteweg-deVries equation, in contraries to the coupled nonlinear equations obtained by earlier authors. Quasi-soliton solution for the ion-acoustic solitary wave has been obtained from this uncoupled nonlinear equation. Effects of non-isothermal two-temperature electrons, gravity, dust charge fluctuation and drift motion of ions on the ion-acoustic solitary waves have been discussed.

  9. Bell's theorem, the measurement problem, Newton's self-gravitation and its connections to violations of the discrete symmetries C, P, T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesmayr, Beatrix C.

    2015-07-01

    About 50 years ago John St. Bell published his famous Bell theorem that initiated a new field in physics. This contribution discusses how discrete symmetries relate to the big open questions of quantum mechanics, in particular: (i) how correlations stronger than those predicted by theories sharing randomness (Bell's theorem) relate to the violation of the CP symmetry and the P symmetry; and its relation to the security of quantum cryptography, (ii) how the measurement problem (“why do we observe no tables in superposition?”) can be polled in weakly decaying systems, (iii) how strongly and weakly interacting quantum systems are affected by Newton's self gravitation. These presented preliminary results show that the meson-antimeson systems and the hyperon- antihyperon systems are a unique laboratory to tackle deep fundamental questions and to contribute to the understand what impact the violation of discrete symmetries has.

  10. Gaseous Fuel Injection Modeling using a Gaseous Sphere Injection Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Hessel, R P; Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L

    2006-03-06

    The growing interest in gaseous fuels (hydrogen and natural gas) for internal combustion engines calls for the development of computer models for simulation of gaseous fuel injection, air entrainment and the ensuing combustion. This paper introduces a new method for modeling the injection and air entrainment processes for gaseous fuels. The model uses a gaseous sphere injection methodology, similar to liquid droplet in injection techniques used for liquid fuel injection. In this paper, the model concept is introduced and model results are compared with correctly- and under-expanded experimental data.

  11. GASEOUS SCINTILLATION COUNTER

    DOEpatents

    Eggler, C.; Huddleston, C.M.

    1959-04-28

    A gaseous excitation counter for detecting the presence amd measuring the energy of subatomic particles and electromagnetic radiation is described. The counter includes a gas-tight chamber filled with an elemental gas capable of producing ultra-violet excitation quanta when irradiated with subatomic particles and electromagnetic radiation. The gas has less than one in a thousand parts ultra-violet absorbing contamination. When nuclear radiation ps present the ultra-violet light produced by the gas strikes a fluorescent material within the counter, responsive to produce visible excitation quanta, and photo-sensitive counting means detect the visible emission.

  12. Effect of Gas Accretion Disc Profile on Orbital Parameters of the Accreted Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukirgaliyev, Bekdaulet T.; Panamarev, Taras P.; Naurzbaeva, Aisha Zh.; Kalambay, Mukhagali T.; Makukov, Maxim A.; Vilkoviskij, Emmanuil Y.; Omarov, Chingis T.; Berczik, Peter; Just, Andreas; Spurzem, Rainer

    2016-10-01

    The results of studies of the effect of the gas disk and its profile on the dynamics of active galactic nuclei are presented. The study was conducted with a numerical model of galactic nucleus based on phiGRAPE+GPU comprising three subsystems - a central supermassive black hole, gaseous accretion disc, and compact stellar cluster. The evolution of the compact stellar cluster is modeled with direct integration (N-body simulation), while the black hole and gaseous disc are represented phenomenologically: the black hole is introduced as an external potential (fixed in space but variable in time due to black hole mass growth), and the gaseous disc is introduced as spatial time-independent density distribution. We examined and compared with each other orbital parameters of accreting stars for model of the galactic nucleus with gas disc of constant and variable thickness, as well as without gas. It was found that in the presence of a gaseous disk almost half of the accreted particles interact strongly with the gas and are captured by the disc before accretion, while more than 85% of particles are affected to some extent by the disc prior to accretion. This suggests that interaction of the stellar cluster with the gas disk in the galactic nucleus might lead to the formation of stellar disk in the central part of the nucleus.

  13. Downhole gaseous liquid flow agitator

    SciTech Connect

    Kamilos, N.; Kennedy, D.D.; Lederhos, L.J. Jr.

    1989-03-14

    An apparatus is described for agitating and mixing of a gaseous phase and a liquid phase comprising: a first tube having non-blocking internal threads within the first tube to agitate a liquid phase adhering thereto with a gaseous phase passing therethrough, whereby a uniform gaseous phase and liquid phase mixture is formed; and a second tube connected to an end of the first tube having non-blocking internal threads of opposite handedness.

  14. A truly Newtonian softening length for disc simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huré, J.-M.; Trova, A.

    2015-02-01

    The softened point mass model is commonly used in simulations of gaseous discs including self-gravity while the value of associated length λ remains, to some degree, controversial. This `parameter' is however fully constrained when, in a discretized disc, all fluid cells are demanded to obey Newton's law. We examine the topology of solutions in this context, focusing on cylindrical cells more or less vertically elongated. We find that not only the nominal length depends critically on the cell's shape (curvature, radial extension, height), but it is either a real or an imaginary number. Setting λ as a fraction of the local disc thickness - as usually done - is indeed not the optimal choice. We then propose a novel prescription valid irrespective of the disc properties and grid spacings. The benefit, which amounts to 2-3 more digits typically, is illustrated in a few concrete cases. A detailed mathematical analysis is in progress.

  15. Fragmentation of vertically stratified gaseous layers: monolithic or coalescence-driven collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinnbier, František; Wünsch, Richard; Whitworth, Anthony P.; Palouš, Jan

    2016-12-01

    We investigate, using 3D hydrodynamic simulations, the fragmentation of pressure-confined, vertically stratified, self-gravitating gaseous layers. The confining pressure is either thermal pressure acting on both surfaces, or thermal pressure acting on one surface and ram-pressure on the other. In the linear regime of fragmentation, the dispersion relation we obtain agrees well with that derived by Elmegreen & Elmegreen (1978), and consequently deviates from the dispersion relations based on the thin shell approximation (Vishniac 1983) or pressure assisted gravitational instability (Wünsch et al. 2010). In the non-linear regime, the relative importance of the confining pressure to the self-gravity is a crucial parameter controlling the qualitative course of fragmentation. When confinement of the layer is dominated by external pressure, self-gravitating condensations are delivered by a two-stage process: first the layer fragments into gravitationally bound but stable clumps, and then these clumps coalesce until they assemble enough mass to collapse. In contrast, when external pressure makes a small contribution to confinement of the layer, the layer fragments monolithically into gravitationally unstable clumps and there is no coalescence. This dichotomy persists whether the external pressure is thermal or ram. We apply these results to fragments forming in a shell swept up by an expanding H II region, and find that, unless the swept up gas is quite hot or the surrounding medium has low density, the fragments have low-mass (⪉ 3 M_{_⊙}), and therefore they are unlikely to spawn stars that are sufficiently massive to promote sequential self-propagating star formation.

  16. General polytropic self-gravitating cylinder free-fall and accreting mass string with a chain of collapsed objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yu-Qing; Hu, Xu-Yao

    2016-06-01

    We present a theoretical model framework for general polytropic (GP) hydrodynamic cylinder under self-gravity of infinite length with axial uniformity and axisymmetry. For self-similar dynamic solutions, we derive valuable integrals, analytic asymptotic solutions, sonic critical curves, shock conditions, and global numerical solutions with or without expansion shocks. Among others, we investigate various dynamic solutions featured with central free-fall asymptotic behaviours, corresponding to a collapsed mass string with a sustained dynamic accretion from a surrounding mass reservoir. Depending on the allowed ranges of a scaling index a < -1, such cylindrical dynamic mass accretion rate could be steady, increasing with time and decreasing with time. Physically, such a collapsed mass string or filament would break up into a sequence of sub-clumps and segments as induced by gravitational Jeans instabilities. Depending on the scales involved, such sub-clumps would evolve into collapsed objects or gravitationally bound systems. In diverse astrophysical and cosmological contexts, such a scenario can be adapted on various temporal, spatial and mass scales to form a chain of collapsed clumps and/or compact objects. Examples include the formation of chains of proto-stars, brown dwarfs and gaseous planets along molecular filaments; the formation of luminous massive stars along magnetized spiral arms and circum-nuclear starburst rings in barred spiral galaxies; the formation of chains of compact stellar objects such as white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes along a highly condensed mass string. On cosmological scales, one can perceive the formation of chains of galaxies, chains of galaxy clusters or even chains of supermassive and hypermassive black holes in the Universe including the early Universe. All these chains referred to above include possible binaries.

  17. GASEOUS DISCHARGE DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Gow, J.D.

    1961-01-10

    An extremely compact two-terminal gaseous discharge device is described that is capable of producing neutrons in copious quantities, relatively high energy ions, intense x rays, and the like. Principal novelty resides in the provision of a crossed electric-magnetic field region in the discharge envelope that traps electrons and accelerates them to very high energies to provide an intense ionizing medium adjacent the anode of the device for ionizing gas therein with extremely high efficiency. In addition, the crossed-field trapping region holds the electrons close to the anode whereby the acceleration of ions to the cathode is not materially effected by the electron sheath and the ions assume substantially the full energy of the anodecathode potential drop. (auth)

  18. Japan's research on gaseous flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niioka, Takashi

    1995-01-01

    Although research studies on gaseous flames in microgravity in Japan have not been one-sided, they have been limited, for the most part, to comparatively fundamental studies. At present it is only possible to achieve a microgravity field by the use of drop towers, as far as gaseous flames are concerned. Compared with experiments on droplets, including droplet arrays, which have been vigorously performed in Japan, studies on gaseous flames have just begun. Experiments on ignition of gaseous fuel, flammability limits, flame stability, effect of magnetic field on flames, and carbon formation from gaseous flames are currently being carried out in microgravity. Seven subjects related to these topics are introduced and discussed herein.

  19. The structure of protoplanetary discs around evolving young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitsch, Bertram; Johansen, Anders; Lambrechts, Michiel; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    The formation of planets with gaseous envelopes takes place in protoplanetary accretion discs on time scales of several million years. Small dust particles stick to each other to form pebbles, pebbles concentrate in the turbulent flow to form planetesimals and planetary embryos and grow to planets, which undergo substantial radial migration. All these processes are influenced by the underlying structure of the protoplanetary disc, specifically the profiles of temperature, gas scale height, and density. The commonly used disc structure of the minimum mass solar nebula (MMSN) is a simple power law in all these quantities. However, protoplanetary disc models with both viscous and stellar heating show several bumps and dips in temperature, scale height, and density caused by transitions in opacity, which are missing in the MMSN model. These play an important role in the formation of planets, since they can act as sweet spots for forming planetesimals via the streaming instability and affect the direction and magnitude of type-I migration. We present 2D simulations of accretion discs that feature radiative cooling and viscous and stellar heating, and they are linked to the observed evolutionary stages of protoplanetary discs and their host stars. These models allow us to identify preferred planetesimal and planet formation regions in the protoplanetary disc as a function of the disc's metallicity, accretion rate, and lifetime. We derive simple fitting formulae that feature all structural characteristics of protoplanetary discs during the evolution of several Myr. These fits are straightforward for applying to modelling any growth stage of planets where detailed knowledge of the underlying disc structure is required. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. A new criterion for bar-forming instability in rapidly rotating gaseous and stellar systems. 2: Nonaxisymmetric form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulou, Dimitris M.; Shlosman, Isaac; Tohline, Joel E.

    1995-01-01

    We have previously introduced the parameter alpha as an indicator of stability to m = 2 nonaxisymmetric modes in rotating, self-gravitating, axisymmetric, gaseous (alpha less than or approximately equal to 0.34) and stellar (alpha less than or approximately equal to 0.25) systems. This parameter can be written as alpha = (ft/2)(exp 1/2), where t is defined as T/(absolute value of W), T is the total rotational kinetic energy, W is the total gravitational potential energy, and f is a function characteristic of the topology/connectedness and the geometric shape of a system. In this paper, we extend the stability criterion to nonaxisymmetric equilibrium systems by determining empirically the appropriate form of the function f for ellipsoids and elliptical disks and cylinders. We test the validity of this extension of the stability indicator alpha by considering its predictions for previously published, gaseous and stellar, nonaxisymmetric models. The formulation and critical values account accurately for the stability properties of m =2 modes in gaseous Riemann S-type ellipsoids (including the Jacobi and Dedekind ellipsoids) and elliptical Riemann disks as well as in stellar elliptical Freeman disks and cylinders: all these systems are dynamically stable except the stellar elliptical Freeman disks that exhibit a relatively small region of m = 2 dynamical instability. A partial disagreement in the case of stellar Freeman ellipsoids in maximum rotation may be due to the fact that the region of instability has not been previously determined with sufficient accuracy.

  1. FIRST INVESTIGATION OF THE COMBINED IMPACT OF IONIZING RADIATION AND MOMENTUM WINDS FROM A MASSIVE STAR ON A SELF-GRAVITATING CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Ngoumou, Judith; Hubber, David; Dale, James E.; Burkert, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Massive stars shape the surrounding interstellar matter (ISM) by emitting ionizing photons and ejecting material through stellar winds. To study the impact of the momentum from the wind of a massive star on the surrounding neutral or ionized material, we implemented a new HEALPix-based momentum-conserving wind scheme in the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code SEREN. A qualitative study of the impact of the feedback from an O7.5-like star on a self-gravitating sphere shows that on its own, the transfer of momentum from a wind onto cold surrounding gas has both a compressing and dispersing effect. It mostly affects gas at low and intermediate densities. When combined with a stellar source's ionizing ultraviolet (UV) radiation, we find the momentum-driven wind to have little direct effect on the gas. We conclude that during a massive star's main sequence, the UV ionizing radiation is the main feedback mechanism shaping and compressing the cold gas. Overall, the wind's effects on the dense gas dynamics and on the triggering of star formation are very modest. The structures formed in the ionization-only simulation and in the combined feedback simulation are remarkably similar. However, in the combined feedback case, different SPH particles end up being compressed. This indicates that the microphysics of gas mixing differ between the two feedback simulations and that the winds can contribute to the localized redistribution and reshuffling of gas.

  2. Effect of neutral collision and radiative heat-loss function on self-gravitational instability of viscous thermally conducting partially-ionized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaothekar, Sachin; Soni, Ghanshyam D.; Chhajlani, Rajendra K.

    2012-12-15

    The problem of thermal instability and gravitational instability is investigated for a partially ionized self-gravitating plasma which has connection in astrophysical condensations. We use normal mode analysis method in this problem. The general dispersion relation is derived using linearized perturbation equations of the problem. Effects of collisions with neutrals, radiative heat-loss function, viscosity, thermal conductivity and magnetic field strength, on the instability of the system are discussed. The conditions of instability are derived for a temperature-dependent and density-dependent heat-loss function with thermal conductivity. Numerical calculations have been performed to discuss the effect of various physical parameters on the growth rate of the gravitational instability. The temperature-dependent heat-loss function, thermal conductivity, viscosity, magnetic field and neutral collision have stabilizing effect, while density-dependent heat-loss function has a destabilizing effect on the growth rate of the gravitational instability. With the help of Routh-Hurwitz's criterion, the stability of the system is discussed.

  3. Evolution of gas in debris discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Quentin; Wyatt, Mark; Pringle, Jim

    2015-12-01

    A non negligible quantity of gas has been discovered in an increasing number of debris disc systems. ALMA high sensitivity and high resolution is changing our perception of the gaseous component of debris discs as CO is discovered in systems where it should be rapidly photodissociated. It implies that there is a replenishment mechanism and that the observed gas is secondary. Past missions such as Herschel probed the atomic part of the gas through O I and C II emission lines. Gas science in debris discs is still in its infancy, and these new observations raise a handful of questions concerning the mechanisms to create the gas and about its evolution in the planetary system when it is released. The latter question will be addressed in this talk as a self-consistent gas evolution scenario is proposed and is compared to observations for the peculiar case of β Pictoris.Our model proposes that carbon and oxygen within debris discs are created due to photodissociation of CO which is itself created from the debris disc dust (due to grain-grain collisions or photodesorption). The evolution of the carbon atoms is modelled as viscous spreading, with viscosity parameterised using an α model. The temperature, ionisation fraction and population levels of carbon are followed with a PDR model called Cloudy, which is coupled to the dynamical viscous α model. Only carbon gets ionised due to its lower ionisation potential than oxygen. The carbon gas disc can end up with a high ionisation fraction due to strong FUV radiation field. A high ionisation fraction means that the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is very active, so that α is very high. Gas density profiles can be worked out for different input parameters such as the α value, the CO input rate, the location of the input and the incoming radiation field. Observability predictions can be made for future observations, and our model is tested on β Pictoris observations. This new gas evolution model fits the carbon and CO

  4. The effects of a hot gaseous halo in galaxy major mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moster, Benjamin P.; Macciò, Andrea V.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Naab, Thorsten; Cox, T. J.

    2011-08-01

    Cosmological hydrodynamical simulations as well as observations indicate that spiral galaxies comprise five different components: dark matter halo, stellar disc, stellar bulge, gaseous disc and gaseous halo. While the first four components have been extensively considered in numerical simulations of binary galaxy mergers, the effect of a hot gaseous halo has usually been neglected even though it can contain up to 80 per cent of the total gas within the galaxy virial radius. We present a series of hydrodynamic simulations of major mergers of disc galaxies, that for the first time include a diffuse, rotating, hot gaseous halo. Through cooling and accretion, the hot halo can dissipate and refuel the cold gas disc before and after a merger. This cold gas can subsequently form stars, thus impacting the morphology and kinematics of the remnant. Simulations of isolated systems with total mass M˜ 1012 M⊙ show a nearly constant star formation rate of ˜5 M⊙ yr-1 if the hot gaseous halo is included, while the star formation rate declines exponentially if it is neglected. We conduct a detailed study of the star formation efficiency during mergers and find that the presence of a hot gaseous halo reduces the starburst efficiency (e= 0.5) compared to simulations without a hot halo (e= 0.68). The ratio of the peak star formation rate in mergers compared to isolated galaxies is reduced by almost an order of magnitude (from 30 to 5). Moreover, we find cases where the stellar mass of the merger remnant is lower than the sum of the stellar mass of the two progenitor galaxies when evolved in isolation. This suggests a revision to semi-analytic galaxy formation models which assume that a merger always leads to enhanced star formation. In addition, the bulge-to-total ratio after a major merger is decreased if hot gas is included in the halo, due to the formation of a more massive stellar disc in the remnant. We show that adding the hot gas component has a significant effect on the

  5. Zonal flow evolution and overstability in accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanon, R.; Ogilvie, G. I.

    2017-04-01

    This work presents a linear analytical calculation on the stability and evolution of a compressible, viscous self-gravitating (SG) Keplerian disc with both horizontal thermal diffusion and a constant cooling time-scale when an axisymmetric structure is present and freely evolving. The calculation makes use of the shearing sheet model and is carried out for a range of cooling times. Although the solutions to the inviscid problem with no cooling or diffusion are well known, it is non-trivial to predict the effect caused by the introduction of cooling and of small diffusivities; this work focuses on perturbations of intermediate wavelengths, therefore representing an extension to the classical stability analysis on thermal and viscous instabilities. For density wave modes, the analysis can be simplified by means of a regular perturbation analysis; considering both shear and thermal diffusivities, the system is found to be overstable for intermediate and long wavelengths for values of the Toomre parameter Q ≲ 2; a non-SG instability is also detected for wavelengths ≳18H, where H is the disc scale-height, as long as γ ≲ 1.305. The regular perturbation analysis does not, however, hold for the entropy and potential vorticity slow modes as their ideal growth rates are degenerate. To understand their evolution, equations for the axisymmetric structure's amplitudes in these two quantities are analytically derived and their instability regions obtained. The instability appears boosted by increasing the value of the adiabatic index and of the Prandtl number, while it is quenched by efficient cooling.

  6. Holographic optical disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Gan; An, Xin; Pu, Allen; Psaltis, Demetri; Mok, Fai H.

    1999-11-01

    The holographic disc is a high capacity, disk-based data storage device that can provide the performance for next generation mass data storage needs. With a projected capacity approaching 1 terabit on a single 12 cm platter, the holographic disc has the potential to become a highly efficient storage hardware for data warehousing applications. The high readout rate of holographic disc makes it especially suitable for generating multiple, high bandwidth data streams such as required for network server computers. Multimedia applications such as interactive video and HDTV can also potentially benefit from the high capacity and fast data access of holographic memory.

  7. Bryan total disc arthroplasty: a replacement disc for cervical disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Wenger, Markus; Markwalder, Thomas-Marc

    2010-01-01

    Total disc arthroplasty is a new option in the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease. Several types of cervical disc prostheses currently challenge the gold-standard discectomy and fusion procedures. This review describes the Bryan Cervical Disc System and presents the Bryan prosthesis, its indications, surgical technique, complications, and outcomes, as given in the literature. PMID:22915917

  8. Magnetic fields in giant planet formation and protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Sarah Louise

    2015-12-01

    Protoplanetary discs channel accretion onto their host star. How this is achieved is critical to the growth of giant planets which capture their massive gaseous atmosphere from the surrounding flow. Theoretical studies find that an embedded magnetic field could power accretion by hydromagnetic turbulence or torques from a large-scale field. This thesis presents a study of the inuence of magnetic fields in three key aspects of this process: circumplanetary disc accretion, gas flow across gaps in protoplanetary discs, and magnetic-braking in accretion discs. The first study examines the conditions needed for self-consistent accretion driven by magnetic fields or gravitational instability. Models of these discs typically rely on hydromagnetic turbulence as the source of effective viscosity. However, magnetically coupled,accreting regions may be so limited that the disc may not support sufficient inflow. An improved Shakura-Sunyaev ? disc is used to calculate the ionisation fraction and strength of non-ideal effects. Steady magnetically-driven accretion is limited to the thermally ionised, inner disc so that accretion in the remainder of the disc is time-dependent. The second study addresses magnetic flux transport in an accretion gap evacuated by a giant planet. Assuming the field is passively drawn along with the gas, the hydrodynamical simulation of Tanigawa, Ohtsuki & Machida (2012) is used for an a posteriori analysis of the gap field structure. This is used to post-calculate magnetohydrodynamical quantities. This assumption is self-consistent as magnetic forces are found to be weak, and good magnetic coupling ensures the field is frozen into the gas. Hall drift dominates across much of the gap, with the potential to facilitate turbulence and modify the toroidal field according to the global field orientation. The third study considers the structure and stability of magnetically-braked accretion discs. Strong evidence for MRI dead-zones has renewed interest in

  9. The origin of thick discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comerón, Sébastien

    2015-03-01

    Thick discs are defined to be disc-like components with a scale height larger than that of the classical discs. They are ubiquitous (Yoachim & Dalcanton 2006; Comerón et al. 2011a), they are made of mostly old and metal-poor stars and are most easily detected in close to edge-on galaxies. Their origin has been considered mysterious and several formation theories have been proposed: • The thick disc being formed secularly by thin disc stars heated by disc overdensities such as giant molecular clouds or spiral arms (Villumsen 1985, ApJ, 290, 75) and by stars moved outwards from their original orbits by radial migration mechanisms (Schönrich & Binney 2009). • The thick disc being formed by the heating of the thin disc by satellites (Quinn et al. 1993) and the tidal stripping of them (Abadi et al. 2003). • The thick disc being formed fast and already thick at high redshift in an highly unstable disc. Inside that thick disc, a thin disc would form afterwards as suggested by Elemgreen & Elmegreen (2006). • The thick disc being formed originally thick at high redshift by the merger of gas-rich protogalactic fragments and a thin disc forming afterwards within it (Brook et al. 2007). The first mechanism is a secular evolution mechanism. The time-scale of the second one is dependent on the merger history of the main galaxy. In the two last mechanisms, the thick disc forms already thick in a short time-scale at high redshift. Recent Milky Way studies, (see, e.g., Bovy et al. 2012), have shown indications that there is no discontinuity between the thin and the thick disc chemical and kinematic properties. Instead, those studies indicate the presence of a monotonic distribution of disc thicknesses. This would suggest a secular origin for the Milky Way thick disc. Studies in external galaxies (Yoachim & Dalcanton 2006; Comerón et al. 2011b), have shown that low-mass disc galaxies have thick disc relative masses much larger than those found in large-mass galaxies

  10. Self-gravitating branes again

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofinas, Georgios; Irakleidou, Maria

    2014-03-01

    We raise on theoretical grounds the question of the physical relevance of Israel matching conditions and their generalizations to higher codimensions, the standard cornerstone of the braneworld and other membrane scenarios. Our reasoning is based on the incapability of the conventional matching conditions to accept the Nambu-Goto probe limit, the inconsistency of codimension-2 and -3 classical defects for D=4 and the probable inconsistency of high enough codimensional defects for any D since there is no high enough Lovelock density to support them. We propose alternative matching conditions which seem to overcome the previous puzzles. Instead of varying the brane-bulk action with respect to the bulk metric at the brane position, we vary with respect to the brane embedding fields so that the gravitational backreaction is included ("gravitating Nambu-Goto matching conditions"). Here, we consider in detail the case of a codimension-2 brane in 6-dim Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity, prove its consistency for an axially symmetric cosmological configuration and show that the theory possesses richer structure compared to the standard theory. The cosmologies found have the Friedmann behavior and extra correction terms. For a radiation brane one solution avoids a cosmological singularity and undergoes accelerated expansion near the minimum scale factor. In the presence of an induced gravity term, there naturally appears in the theory the effective cosmological constant scale λ /(M64rc2), which for a brane tension λ ˜M64 (e.g. TeV4) and rc˜H0-1 gives the observed value of the cosmological constant.

  11. The Galactic stellar disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltzing, S.; Bensby, T.

    2008-12-01

    The study of the Milky Way stellar discs in the context of galaxy formation is discussed. In particular, we explore the properties of the Milky Way disc using a new sample of about 550 dwarf stars for which we have recently obtained elemental abundances and ages based on high-resolution spectroscopy. For all the stars we also have full kinematic information as well as information about their stellar orbits. We confirm results from previous studies that the thin and the thick discs have distinct abundance patterns. But we also explore a larger range of orbital parameters than what has been possible in our previous studies. Several new results are presented. We find that stars that reach high above the Galactic plane and have eccentric orbits show remarkably tight abundance trends. This implies that these stars formed out of well-mixed gas that had been homogenized over large volumes. We find some evidence that suggest that the event that most likely caused the heating of this stellar population happened a few billion years ago. Through a simple, kinematic exploration of stars with super-solar [Fe/H], we show that the solar neighbourhood contains metal-rich, high velocity stars that are very likely associated with the thick disc. Additionally, the HR1614 moving group and the Hercules and Arcturus stellar streams are discussed and it is concluded that, probably, a large fraction of the groups and streams so far identified in the disc are the result of evolution and interactions within the stellar disc rather than being dissolved stellar clusters or engulfed dwarf galaxies. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. Also based on observations collected at the Nordic Optical Telescope on La Palma, Spain, and at the European Southern Observatories on La Silla and Paranal, Chile, Proposals no. 65.L-0019(B), 67.B-0108(B), 69.B-0277.

  12. The first velocity space image of a planetary debris disc orbiting a white dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manser, Christopher James

    2015-12-01

    Since the first ESS meeting, dusty debris discs at white dwarfs have been firmly established as signposts of evolved planetary systems. We have identified a small number of systems where the circumstellar dust is accompanied by gas. The emission lines from these gaseous components are tracers of dynamic activity in these remnant planetary environments, and provide unparalleled insight into the formation and evolution of the debris discs, and into the properties of the parent planetesimals.Here we present the twelve years of spectroscopy of the prototypical gas disc at SDSS J1228+1040, revealing a spectacular long-term evolution in the morphology of the emission line profiles. Using Doppler tomography, we constructed an image of the gaseous disc in velocity space, and show that the observations are consistent with the precession of a fixed intensity pattern on a period of 27 ± 3 years. We speculate that the underlying cause of this dynamical activity is either a young, not fully circularised disc, or a perturbation of a previously stable and quiescent disc.

  13. How do accretion discs break?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Suzan

    2016-07-01

    Accretion discs are common in binary systems, and they are often found to be misaligned with respect to the binary orbit. The gravitational torque from a companion induces nodal precession in misaligned disc orbits. In this study, we first calculate whether this precession is strong enough to overcome the internal disc torques communicating angular momentum. We compare the disc precession torque with the disc viscous torque to determine whether the disc should warp or break. For typical parameters precession wins: the disc breaks into distinct planes that precess effectively independently. To check our analytical findings, we perform 3D hydrodynamical numerical simulations using the PHANTOM smoothed particle hydrodynamics code, and confirm that disc breaking is widespread and enhances accretion on to the central object. For some inclinations, the disc goes through strong Kozai cycles. Disc breaking promotes markedly enhanced and variable accretion and potentially produces high-energy particles or radiation through shocks. This would have significant implications for all binary systems: e.g. accretion outbursts in X-ray binaries and fuelling supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries. The behaviour we have discussed in this work is relevant to a variety of astrophysical systems, for example X-ray binaries, where the disc plane may be tilted by radiation warping, SMBH binaries, where accretion of misaligned gas can create effectively random inclinations and protostellar binaries, where a disc may be misaligned by a variety of effects such as binary capture/exchange, accretion after binary formation.

  14. Revival of the Jumping Disc

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ucke, C.; Schlichting, H-J.

    2009-01-01

    Snap discs made of bimetal have many technical applications as thermostats. Jumping discs are a toy version of such snap discs. Besides giving technical information, we describe physical investigations. We show especially how, through simple measurements and calculations, you can determine the initial speed ([approximately equal to]3.5 m…

  15. Hybrid cervical disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Wu, Jau-Ching; Cheng, Henrich; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2017-01-01

    For patients with multilevel cervical stenosis at nonadjacent segments, one of the traditional approaches has included a multilevel fusion of the abnormal segments as well as the intervening normal segment. In this video we demonstrate an alternative treatment plan with tailored use of a combination of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) with an intervening skipped level. The authors present the case of a 72-year-old woman with myeloradiculopathy and a large disc herniation with facet joint degeneration at C3-4 and bulging disc at C5-6. After nonoperative treatment failed, she underwent a single-level ACDF at C3-4 and single-level arthroplasty at C5-6, which successfully relieved her symptoms. No intervention was performed at the normal intervening C4-5 segment. By using ACDF combined with arthroplasty, the authors have avoided a 3-level fusion for this patient and maintained the range of motion of 2 disc levels. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/OrxcPUBvqLk .

  16. The Teddy Bears' Disc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurillard, Diana

    1985-01-01

    Reports an evaluation of the Teddy Bear disc, an interactive videodisc developed at the Open University for a second-level course in metallurgy and materials technology. Findings from observation of students utilizing the videodisc are reviewed; successful design features and design problems are considered; and development costs are outlined. (MBR)

  17. Gaseous fuel nuclear reactor research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenk, F. C.; Thom, K.

    1975-01-01

    Gaseous-fuel nuclear reactors are described; their distinguishing feature is the use of fissile fuels in a gaseous or plasma state, thereby breaking the barrier of temperature imposed by solid-fuel elements. This property creates a reactor heat source that may be able to heat the propellant of a rocket engine to 10,000 or 20,000 K. At this temperature level, gas-core reactors would provide the breakthrough in propulsion needed to open the entire solar system to manned and unmanned spacecraft. The possibility of fuel recycling makes possible efficiencies of up to 65% and nuclear safety at reduced cost, as well as high-thrust propulsion capabilities with specific impulse up to 5000 sec.

  18. Planar Reflection of Gaseous Detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damazo, Jason Scott

    Pipes containing flammable gaseous mixtures may be subjected to internal detonation. When the detonation normally impinges on a closed end, a reflected shock wave is created to bring the flow back to rest. This study built on the work of Karnesky (2010) and examined deformation of thin-walled stainless steel tubes subjected to internal reflected gaseous detonations. A ripple pattern was observed in the tube wall for certain fill pressures, and a criterion was developed that predicted when the ripple pattern would form. A two-dimensional finite element analysis was performed using Johnson-Cook material properties; the pressure loading created by reflected gaseous detonations was accounted for with a previously developed pressure model. The residual plastic strain between experiments and computations was in good agreement. During the examination of detonation-driven deformation, discrepancies were discovered in our understanding of reflected gaseous detonation behavior. Previous models did not accurately describe the nature of the reflected shock wave, which motivated further experiments in a detonation tube with optical access. Pressure sensors and schlieren images were used to examine reflected shock behavior, and it was determined that the discrepancies were related to the reaction zone thickness extant behind the detonation front. During these experiments reflected shock bifurcation did not appear to occur, but the unfocused visualization system made certainty impossible. This prompted construction of a focused schlieren system that investigated possible shock wave-boundary layer interaction, and heat-flux gauges analyzed the boundary layer behind the detonation front. Using these data with an analytical boundary layer solution, it was determined that the strong thermal boundary layer present behind the detonation front inhibits the development of reflected shock wave bifurcation.

  19. Recent topics on gaseous detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauli, Fabio

    2010-11-01

    Started in the late sixties by the invention of the multi-wire proportional chamber (MWPC), the development of modern gaseous detectors has continued for decades and is still blooming, with the introduction of new generations of innovative devices having superior position accuracy, time resolutions and rate capability. Motivated mostly by the requirements of high energy physics, the novel devices find however applications in many other fields, such as astrophysics and medical diagnostics.

  20. Recent work on gaseous detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettleton, M. A.

    The paper reviews recent progress in the field of gaseous detonations, with sections on shock diffraction and reflection, the transition to detonation, hybrid, spherically-imploding, and galloping and stuttering fronts, their structure, their transmission and quenching by additives, the critical energy for initiation and detonation of more unusual fuels. The final section points out areas where our understanding is still far from being complete and contains some suggestions of ways in which progress might be made.

  1. Dynamical friction on hot bodies in opaque, gaseous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masset, Frédéric S.; Velasco Romero, David A.

    2017-03-01

    We consider the gravitational force exerted on a point-like perturber of mass M travelling within a uniform gaseous, opaque medium at constant velocity V. The perturber irradiates the surrounding gas with luminosity L. The diffusion of the heat released is modelled with a uniform thermal diffusivity χ. Using linear perturbation theory, we show that the force exerted by the perturbed gas on the perturber differs from the force without radiation (or standard dynamical friction). Hot, underdense gas trails the mass, which gives rise to a new force component, the heating force, with direction +V, thus opposed to the standard dynamical friction. In the limit of low Mach numbers, the heating force has expression F_heat=γ (γ -1)GML/(2χ c_s^2), cs being the sound speed and γ the ratio of specific heats. In the limit of large Mach numbers, Fheat = (γ - 1)GML/(χV2)f(rminV/4χ), where f is a function that diverges logarithmically as rmin tends to zero. Remarkably, the force in the low Mach number limit does not depend on the velocity. The equilibrium speed, when it exists, is set by the cancellation of the standard dynamical friction and heating force. In the low Mach number limit, it scales with the luminosity-to-mass ratio of the perturber. Using the above results suggests that Mars- to Earth-sized planetary embryos heated by accretion in a gaseous protoplanetary disc should have eccentricities and inclinations that amount to a sizeable fraction of the disc's aspect ratio, for conditions thought to prevail at a few astronomical units.

  2. Spiral arms and disc stability in the Andromeda galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenjes, P.; Tuvikene, T.; Tamm, A.; Kipper, R.; Tempel, E.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: Density waves are often considered as the triggering mechanism of star formation in spiral galaxies. Our aim is to study relations between different star formation tracers (stellar UV and near-IR radiation and emission from H i, CO, and cold dust) in the spiral arms of M 31, to calculate stability conditions in the galaxy disc, and to draw conclusions about possible star formation triggering mechanisms. Methods: We selected fourteen spiral arm segments from the de-projected data maps and compared emission distributions along the cross sections of the segments in different datasets to each other, in order to detect spatial offsets between young stellar populations and the star-forming medium. By using the disc stability condition as a function of perturbation wavelength and distance from the galaxy centre, we calculated the effective disc stability parameters and the least stable wavelengths at different distances. For this we used a mass distribution model of M 31 with four disc components (old and young stellar discs, cold and warm gaseous discs) embedded within the external potential of the bulge, the stellar halo, and the dark matter halo. Each component is considered to have a realistic finite thickness. Results: No systematic offsets between the observed UV and CO/far-IR emission across the spiral segments are detected. The calculated effective stability parameter has a lowest value of Qeff ≃ 1.8 at galactocentric distances of 12-13 kpc. The least stable wavelengths are rather long, with the lowest values starting from ≃ 3 kpc at distances R > 11 kpc. Conclusions: The classical density wave theory is not a realistic explanation for the spiral structure of M 31. Instead, external causes should be considered, such as interactions with massive gas clouds or dwarf companions of M 31.

  3. Gas and stellar spiral structures in tidally perturbed disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettitt, Alex R.; Tasker, Elizabeth J.; Wadsley, James W.

    2016-06-01

    Tidal interactions between disc galaxies and low-mass companions are an established method for generating galactic spiral features. In this work, we present a study of the structure and dynamics of spiral arms driven in interactions between disc galaxies and perturbing companions in 3D N-body/smoothed hydrodynamical numerical simulations. Our specific aims are to characterize any differences between structures formed in the gas and stars from a purely hydrodynamical and gravitational perspective, and to find a limiting case for spiral structure generation. Through analysis of a number of different interacting cases, we find that there is very little difference between arm morphology, pitch angles and pattern speeds between the two media. The main differences are a minor offset between gas and stellar arms, clear spurring features in gaseous arms, and different radial migration of material in the stronger interacting cases. We investigate the minimum mass of a companion required to drive spiral structure in a galactic disc, finding the limiting spiral generation cases with companion masses of the order of 1 × 109 M⊙, equivalent to only 4 per cent of the stellar disc mass, or 0.5 per cent of the total galactic mass of a Milky Way analogue.

  4. LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION

    PubMed Central

    Vialle, Luis Roberto; Vialle, Emiliano Neves; Suárez Henao, Juan Esteban; Giraldo, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is the most common diagnosis among the degenerative abnormalities of the lumbar spine (affecting 2 to 3% of the population), and is the principal cause of spinal surgery among the adult population. The typical clinical picture includes initial lumbalgia, followed by progressive sciatica. The natural history of disc herniation is one of rapid resolution of the symptoms (four to six weeks). The initial treatment should be conservative, managed through medication and physiotherapy, sometimes associated with percutaneous nerve root block. Surgical treatment is indicated if pain control is unsuccessful, if there is a motor deficit greater than grade 3, if there is radicular pain associated with foraminal stenosis, or if cauda equina syndrome is present. The latter represents a medical emergency. A refined surgical technique, with removal of the extruded fragment and preservation of the ligamentum flavum, resolves the sciatic symptoms and reduces the risk of recurrence over the long term. PMID:27019834

  5. Biomechanics of Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Palepu, V.; Kodigudla, M.; Goel, V. K.

    2012-01-01

    Disc degeneration and associated disorders are among the most debated topics in the orthopedic literature over the past few decades. These may be attributed to interrelated mechanical, biochemical, and environmental factors. The treatment options vary from conservative approaches to surgery, depending on the severity of degeneration and response to conservative therapies. Spinal fusion is considered to be the “gold standard” in surgical methods till date. However, the association of adjacent level degeneration has led to the evolution of motion preservation technologies like spinal arthroplasty and posterior dynamic stabilization systems. These new technologies are aimed to address pain and preserve motion while maintaining a proper load sharing among various spinal elements. This paper provides an elaborative biomechanical review of the technologies aimed to address the disc degeneration and reiterates the point that biomechanical efficacy followed by long-term clinical success will allow these nonfusion technologies as alternatives to fusion, at least in certain patient population. PMID:22745914

  6. Mechanotransduction in intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Cheng, Chao-Min; Chen, Chien-Fu; Lai, Po-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Mechanotransduction plays a critical role in intracellular functioning—it allows cells to translate external physical forces into internal biochemical activities, thereby affecting processes ranging from proliferation and apoptosis to gene expression and protein synthesis in a complex web of interactions and reactions. Accordingly, aberrant mechanotransduction can either lead to, or be a result of, a variety of diseases or degenerative states. In this review, we provide an overview of mechanotransduction in the context of intervertebral discs, with a focus on the latest methods of investigating mechanotransduction and the most recent findings regarding the means and effects of mechanotransduction in healthy and degenerative discs. We also provide some discussion of potential directions for future research and treatments. PMID:25267492

  7. Total disc replacement.

    PubMed

    Vital, J-M; Boissière, L

    2014-02-01

    Total disc replacement (TDR) (partial disc replacement will not be described) has been used in the lumbar spine since the 1980s, and more recently in the cervical spine. Although the biomechanical concepts are the same and both are inserted through an anterior approach, lumbar TDR is conventionally indicated for chronic low back pain, whereas cervical TDR is used for soft discal hernia resulting in cervicobrachial neuralgia. The insertion technique must be rigorous, with precise centering in the disc space, taking account of vascular anatomy, which is more complex in the lumbar region, particularly proximally to L5-S1. All of the numerous studies, including prospective randomized comparative trials, have demonstrated non-inferiority to fusion, or even short-term superiority regarding speed of improvement. The main implant-related complication is bridging heterotopic ossification with resulting loss of range of motion and increased rates of adjacent segment degeneration, although with an incidence lower than after arthrodesis. A sufficiently long follow-up, which has not yet been reached, will be necessary to establish definitively an advantage for TDR, particularly in the cervical spine.

  8. Mechanics of Actuated Disc Cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehkhoda, Sevda; Detournay, Emmanuel

    2017-02-01

    This paper investigates the mechanics of an actuated disc cutter with the objective of determining the average forces acting on the disc as a function of the parameters characterizing its motion. The specific problem considered is that of a disc cutter revolving off-centrically at constant angular velocity around a secondary axis rigidly attached to a cartridge, which is moving at constant velocity and undercutting rock at a constant depth. This model represents an idealization of a technology that has been implemented in a number of hard rock mechanical excavators with the goal of reducing the average thrust force to be provided by the excavation equipment. By assuming perfect conformance of the rock with the actuated disc as well as a prescribed motion of the disc (perfectly rigid machine), the evolution of the contact surface between the disc and the rock during one actuation of the disc can be computed. Coupled with simple cutter/rock interaction models that embody either a ductile or a brittle mode of fragmentation, these kinematical considerations lead to an estimate of the average force on the cartridge and of the partitioning of the energy imparted by the disc to the rock between the actuation mechanism of the disc and the translation of the cartridge on which the actuated disc is attached.

  9. Polarimetric microlensing of circumstellar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajadian, Sedighe; Rahvar, Sohrab

    2015-12-01

    We study the benefits of polarimetry observations of microlensing events to detect and characterize circumstellar discs around the microlensed stars located at the Galactic bulge. These discs which are unresolvable from their host stars make a net polarization effect due to their projected elliptical shapes. Gravitational microlensing can magnify these signals and make them be resolved. The main aim of this work is to determine what extra information about these discs can be extracted from polarimetry observations of microlensing events in addition to those given by photometry ones. Hot discs which are closer to their host stars are more likely to be detected by microlensing, owing to more contributions in the total flux. By considering this kind of discs, we show that although the polarimetric efficiency for detecting discs is similar to the photometric observation, but polarimetry observations can help to constraint the disc geometrical parameters e.g. the disc inner radius and the lens trajectory with respect to the disc semimajor axis. On the other hand, the time-scale of polarimetric curves of these microlensing events generally increases while their photometric time-scale does not change. By performing a Monte Carlo simulation, we show that almost four optically thin discs around the Galactic bulge sources are detected (or even characterized) through photometry (or polarimetry) observations of high-magnification microlensing events during 10-yr monitoring of 150 million objects.

  10. Rethinking Black Hole Accretion Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg

    Accretion discs are staples of astrophysics. Tapping into the gravitational potential energy of the accreting material, these discs are highly efficient machines that produce copious radiation and extreme outflows. While interesting in their own right, accretion discs also act as tools to study black holes and directly influence the properties of the Universe. Black hole X-ray binaries are fantastic natural laboratories for studying accretion disc physics and black hole phenomena. Among many of the curious behaviors exhibited by these systems are black hole state transitions -- complicated cycles of dramatic brightening and dimming. Using X-ray observations with high temporal cadence, we show that the evolution of the accretion disc spectrum during black hole state transitions can be described by a variable disc atmospheric structure without invoking a radially truncated disc geometry. The accretion disc spectrum can be a powerful diagnostic for measuring black hole spin if the effects of the disc atmosphere on the emergent spectrum are well-understood; however, properties of the disc atmosphere are largely unconstrained. Using statistical methods, we decompose this black hole spin measurement technique and show that modest uncertainties regarding the disc atmosphere can lead to erroneous spin measurements. The vertical structure of the disc is difficult to constrain due to our ignorance of the contribution to hydrostatic balance by magnetic fields, which are fundamental to the accretion process. Observations of black hole X-ray binaries and the accretion environments near supermassive black holes provide mounting evidence for strong magnetization. Performing numerical simulations of accretion discs in the shearing box approximation, we impose a net vertical magnetic flux that allows us to effectively control the level of disc magnetization. We study how dynamo activity and the properties of turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability depend on the

  11. A new criterion for bar-forming instability in rapidly rotating gaseous and stellar systems. 1: Axisymmetric form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulou, Dimitris M.; Shlosman, Isaac; Tohline, Joel E.

    1995-01-01

    We analyze previous results on the stability of uniformly and differentialy rotating, self-gravitating, gaseous and stellar, axisymmetric systems to derive a new stability criterion for the appearance of torodial, m = 2 intermediate or I-modes and bar modes. In the process, we demonstrate that the bar modes in stellar systems and the m = 2 I-modes in gaseous systems have many common physical characteristics and only one substantial difference: because of the anisotropy of the stress tensor, dynamical instability sets in at lower rotation in stellar systems. This difference is reflected also in the new stability criterion. The new stability parameter alpha equals (T(sub J))/(absolute value of W) is formulated first for uniformly rotating systems and is based on the angular momentum content rather than on the energy content of a system. (T(sub J) is defined as ((L)(Omega(sub J)))/2; L is the total angular momentum; Omega(sub J) is the Jeans frequency introduced by self-gravity; and W is the total gravitational potential energy.) For stability of stellar systems alpha less than or equal to 0.254-0.258 while alpha less than or equal to 0.341-0.354 for stability of gaseous systems. For uniform rotation, one can write alpha = ((ft)/2)(exp 1/2), where t is defined as T/(absolute value of W), T is the total kinetic energy due to rotation, and f is a function characteristic of the topology/connectedness and the geometric shape of a system. Equivalently, alpha equals t/(chi), where chi is defined as Omega/Omega(sub J) and Omega is the rotation frequency. Using these forms, alpha can be extended to and calculated for a variety of differentially rotating, gaseous and stellar, axisymmetric disk and spheroidal models whose equilibrium structures and stability characteristics are known. In this paper, we also estimate alpha for gaseous torodial models and for stellar disk systems embedded in an inert or responsive 'halo.' We find that the new stability criterion holds equally

  12. Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

    2007-06-01

    Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

  13. Heat distribution in disc brake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenda, Frantisek; Soukup, Josef; Kampo, Jan

    2016-06-01

    This article is deals by the thermal analysis of the disc brake with floating caliper. The issue is solved by numerically. The half 2D model is used for solution in program ADINA 8.8. Two brake discs without the ventilation are solved. One disc is made from cast iron and the second is made from stainless steel. Both materials are an isotropic. By acting the pressure force on the brake pads will be pressing the pads to the brake disc. Speed will be reduced (slowing down). On the contact surface generates the heat, which the disc and pads heats. In the next part of article is comparison the maximum temperature at the time of braking. The temperatures of both materials for brake disc (gray cast iron, stainless steel) are compares. The heat flux during braking for the both materials is shown.

  14. Enclosed rotary disc air pulser

    DOEpatents

    Olson, A. L.; Batcheller, Tom A.; Rindfleisch, J. A.; Morgan, John M.

    1989-01-01

    An enclosed rotary disc air pulser for use with a solvent extraction pulse olumn includes a housing having inlet, exhaust and pulse leg ports, a shaft mounted in the housing and adapted for axial rotation therein, first and second disc members secured to the shaft within the housing in spaced relation to each other to define a chamber therebetween, the chamber being in communication with the pulse leg port, the first disc member located adjacent the inlet port, the second disc member being located adjacent the exhaust port, each disc member having a milled out portion, the disc members positioned on the shaft so that as the shaft rotates, the milled out portions permit alternative cyclical communication between the inlet port and the chamber and the exhaust port and the chamber.

  15. Preparation of ormetoprim sulfadimethoxine medicated discs for disc diffusion assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Romet (a blend of ormetoprim and sulfadimethoxine) is a typeA medicated article for the manufacture of medicated feed in the catfish industry. Recently, the commercial manufacture of ormetoprim–sulfadimethoxine susceptibility discs was discontinued. Ormetoprim–sulfadimethoxine discs were prepared at...

  16. Sizes of protoplanetary discs after star-disc encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breslau, Andreas; Steinhausen, Manuel; Vincke, Kirsten; Pfalzner, Susanne

    2014-05-01

    Most stars do not form in isolation, but as part of a star cluster or association. These young stars are initially surrounded by protoplanetary discs. In these cluster environments tidal interactions with other cluster members can alter the disc properties. Besides the disc frequency, its mass, angular momentum, and energy, the disc's size is particularly prone to being changed by a passing star. So far the change in disc size has only been investigated for a small number of very specific encounters. Several studies investigated the effect of the cluster environment on the sizes of planetary systems like our own solar system, based on a generalisation of information from this limited sample. We performed numerical simulations covering the wide parameter space typical of young star clusters, to test the validity of this approach. Here the sizes of discs after encounters are presented, based on a size definition that is comparable to the one used in observational studies. We find that, except for encounters between equal-mass stars, the usually applied estimates are insufficient. They tend to severely overestimate the remaining disc size. We show that the disc size after an encounter can be described by a relatively simple dependence on the periastron distance and the mass ratio of the encounter partners. This knowledge allows us, for example, to pin down the types of encounter possibly responsible for the structure of today's solar system. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Imaginal disc regeneration takes flight.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Iswar K; Serras, Florenci

    2017-04-01

    Drosophila imaginal discs, the larval precursors of adult structures such as the wing and leg, are capable of regenerating after damage. During the course of regeneration, discs can sometimes generate structures that are appropriate for a different type of disc, a phenomenon termed transdetermination. Until recently, these phenomena were studied by physically fragmenting discs and then transplanting them into the abdomens of adult female flies. This field has experienced a renaissance following the development of genetic ablation systems that can damage precisely defined regions of the disc without the need for surgery. Together with more traditional approaches, these newer methods have generated many novel insights into wound healing, the mechanisms that drive regenerative growth, plasticity during regeneration and systemic effects of tissue damage and regeneration.

  18. Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water

    SciTech Connect

    Hindin, Saul G.; Roberts, George W.

    1980-08-12

    A process for exchanging isotopes of hydrogen, particularly tritium, between gaseous hydrogen and water is provided whereby gaseous hydrogen depeleted in tritium and liquid or gaseous water containing tritium are reacted in the presence of a metallic catalyst.

  19. Intraoral micro-identification discs.

    PubMed

    Hansen, R W

    1991-12-01

    Intraoral micro-identification discs have recently been utilized to provide a more permanent method of personal identification. A wafer of plastic or metal with a surface area of 2.5 to 5 mm2 and carrying identifying numbers and/or letters (indicia) is bonded to the buccal enamel surface of the posterior teeth. Personal identification can occur after the I.D. disc is identified and the indicia is read. Reading of photoreduced indicia requires the aid of a microscope subsequent to the removal of the microdisc. In situ reading of disc indicia is possible using low power handheld magnifiers if the size of the indicia approximates 0.3 mm. Computerization is an integral part of non-custom alpha/numeric type designs, but a custom disc carries a name, address, and other specific information unique to the manufacturer. The use of a computer improves access to the database and it decreases the amount of data placed on the disc. Microdisc bases may be fabricated using a mylar type plastic or they may be manufactured from a stainless steel blank. Plastic discs are constructed with an internal sandwich containing the photo-reduced indicia. Metal discs are marked with a photochemical etch or engraved with a computer driven YAG laser. Attachment of the disc to the enamel surface is accomplished by conventional etching and bonding techniques and are typically bonded to the buccal surface of the maxillary first permanent molar or the second primary molar. Clear composite bonding material covers the disc so that salivary contamination does not result in degradation of the indicia. Orthodontic style discs with a mesh back carry laser written information that may be cemented with conventional orthodontic bonding cement. Standardization of the indicia and overall design is considered to be an important aspect of patient and professional acceptance.

  20. Cervical Total Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Basho, Rahul; Hood, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration of the cervical spine remains problematic for patients and surgeons alike. Despite advances in surgical techniques and instrumentation, the solution remains elusive. Spurred by the success of total joint arthroplasty in hips and knees, surgeons and industry have turned to motion preservation devices in the cervical spine. By preserving motion at the diseased level, the hope is that adjacent segment degeneration can be prevented. Multiple cervical disc arthroplasty devices have come onto the market and completed Food and Drug Administration Investigational Device Exemption trials. Though some of the early results demonstrate equivalency of arthroplasty to fusion, compelling evidence of benefits in terms of symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration are lacking. In addition, non-industry-sponsored studies indicate that these devices are equivalent to fusion in terms of adjacent segment degeneration. Longer-term studies will eventually provide the definitive answer. PMID:24353955

  1. Combination free electron and gaseous laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Rockwood, Stephen D.; Stein, William E.

    1980-01-01

    A multiple laser having one or more gaseous laser stages and one or more free electron stages. Each of the free electron laser stages is sequentially pumped by a microwave linear accelerator. Subsequently, the electron beam is directed through a gaseous laser, in the preferred embodiment, and in an alternative embodiment, through a microwave accelerator to lower the energy level of the electron beam to pump one or more gaseous lasers. The combination laser provides high pulse repetition frequencies, on the order of 1 kHz or greater, high power capability, high efficiency, and tunability in the synchronous production of multiple beams of coherent optical radiation.

  2. Gaseous phase coal surface modification

    SciTech Connect

    Okoh, J.M.; Pinion, J.; Thiensatit, S.

    1992-05-07

    In this report, we present an improved, feasible and potentially cost effective method of cleaning and beneficiating ultrafine coal. Increased mechanization of mining methods and the need towards depyritization, and demineralization have led to an increase in the quantity of coal fines generated in recent times. For example, the amount of {minus}100 mesh coal occurring in coal preparation plant feeds now typically varies from 5 to 25% of the total feed. Environmental constraints coupled with the greatly increased cost of coal have made it increasingly important to recover more of these fines. Our method chemically modifies the surface of such coals by a series of gaseous phase treatments employing Friedel-Crafts reactions. By using olefins (ethene, propene and butene) and hydrogen chloride catalyst at elevated temperature, the surface hydrophobicity of coal is enhanced. This increased hydrophobicity is manifest in surface phenomena which reflect conditions at the solid/liquid interphase (zeta potential) and those which reflect conditions at the solid/liquid/gas interphases (contact angle, wettability and floatability).

  3. Medical Information on Optical Disc*

    PubMed Central

    Schipma, Peter B.; Cichocki, Edward M.; Ziemer, Susan M.

    1987-01-01

    Optical discs may permit a revolutionary change in the distribution and use of medical information. A single compact disc, similar in size to that used for digital audio recording, can contain over 500 million characters of information that is accessible by a Personal Computer. These discs can be manufactured at a cost lower than that of print on paper, at reasonable volumes. Software can provide the health care professional with nearly instantaneous access to the information. Thus, for the first time, the opportunity exists to have large local medical information collections. This paper describes an application of this technology in the field of Oncology.

  4. Mitral disc-valve variance

    PubMed Central

    Berroya, Renato B.; Escano, Fernando B.

    1972-01-01

    This report deals with a rare complication of disc-valve prosthesis in the mitral area. A significant disc poppet and struts destruction of mitral Beall valve prostheses occurred 20 and 17 months after implantation. The resulting valve incompetence in the first case contributed to the death of the patient. The durability of Teflon prosthetic valves appears to be in question and this type of valve probably will be unacceptable if there is an increasing number of disc-valve variance in the future. Images PMID:5017573

  5. Design Issues in Video Disc Map Display.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    Tables: disc storage capacities under various conditions. Photos: map frames. Constanzo , D.J. (1984a), "The Potential for Video Disc Technology in...discs. Constanzo , D.J. (1984b), "Requirements and Specifications for Cartographic Video Discs", presented as a poster paper at the 1984 Army Science

  6. Enlivening Physics, a Local Video Disc Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, M.

    1989-01-01

    Describes how to make and use an inexpensive video disc of physics demonstrations. Discusses the background, production of the disc, subject of the disc including angular momentum, "monkey and the hunter" experiment, Doppler shift, pressure of a constant volume of gas thermometer, and wave effects, and using the disc in classroom. (YP)

  7. Disc Golf: Teaching a Lifetime Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastham, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Disc golf is a lifetime activity that can be enjoyed by students of varying skill levels and abilities. Disc golf follows the principles of ball golf but is generally easier for students to play and enjoy success. The object of disc golf is similar to ball golf and involves throwing a disc from the teeing area to the target in as few throws as…

  8. Self-consistent internal structure of a rotating gaseous planet and its comparison with an approximation by oblate spheroidal equidensity surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald

    2015-12-01

    In an important paper, Roberts (1963b) studied the hydrostatic equilibrium of an isolated, self-gravitating, rapidly rotating polytropic gaseous body based on a controversial assumption/approximation that all (outer and internal) equidensity surfaces are in the shape of oblate spheroids whose eccentricities are a function of the equatorial radius and whose axes of symmetry are parallel to the rotation axis. We compute the three-dimensional, finite-element, fully self-consistent, continuous solution for a rapidly rotating polytropic gaseous body with Jupiter-like parameters without making any prior assumptions about its outer shape and internal structure. Upon partially relaxing the Roberts' approximation by assuming that only the outer equidensity surface is in the shape of an oblate spheroid, we also compute a finite-element solution with the same parameters without making any prior assumptions about its internal structure. It is found that all equidensity surfaces of the fully self-consistent solution differ only slightly from the oblate spheroidal shape. It is also found that the characteristic difference between the fully self-consistent solution and the outer-spheroidal-shape solution is insignificantly small. Our results suggest that the Roberts' assumption of spheroidal equidensity surfaces represents a reasonably accurate approximation for rotating polytropic gaseous bodies with Jupiter-like parameters. The numerical accuracy of our finite-element solution is checked by an exact analytic solution based on the Green's function using the spheroidal wave function. The three different solutions in non-spherical geometries - the fully self-consistent numerical solution, the numerical solution with the outer spheroidal shape and the exact analytical solution - can also serve as a useful benchmark for other solutions based on different numerical methods.

  9. Decellularized allogeneic intervertebral disc: natural biomaterials for regenerating disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhijun; Chen, Kai; Shan, Zhi; Chen, Shuai; Wang, Jiying; Mo, Jian; Ma, Jianjun; Xu, Wenbing; Qin, An; Fan, Shunwu

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration is associated with back pain and disc herniation. This study established a modified protocol for intervertebral disc (IVD) decellularization and prepared its extracellular matrix (ECM). By culturing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)(3, 7, 14 and 21 days) and human degenerative IVD cells (7 days) in the ECM, implanting it subcutaneously in rabbit and injecting ECM microparticles into degenerative disc, the biological safety and efficacy of decellularized IVD was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrated that cellular components can be removed completely after decellularization and maximally retain the structure and biomechanics of native IVD. We revealed that allogeneic ECM did not evoke any apparent inflammatory reaction in vivo and no cytotoxicity was found in vitro. Moreover, IVD ECM can induce differentiation of MSCs into IVD-like cells in vitro. Furthermore, allogeneic ECM microparticles are effective on the treatment of rabbit disc degeneration in vivo. In conclusion, our study developed an optimized method for IVD decellularization and we proved decellularized IVD is safe and effective for the treatment of degenerated disc diseases. PMID:26933821

  10. Eclipse Mapping of Accretion Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, R.

    The eclipse mapping method is an inversion technique that makes use of the information contained in eclipse light curves to probe the structure, the spectrum and the time evolution of accretion discs. In this review I present the basics of the method and discuss its different implementations. I summarize the most important results obtained to date and discuss how they have helped to improve our understanding of accretion physics, from testing the theoretical radial brightness temperature distribution and measuring mass accretion rates to showing the evolution of the structure of a dwarf novae disc throughout its outburst cycle, from isolating the spectrum of a disc wind to revealing the geometry of disc spiral shocks. I end with an outline of the future prospects.

  11. Tissue engineering: A live disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hukins, David W. L.

    2005-12-01

    A material-cell hybrid device that mimics the anatomic shape of the intervertebral disc has been made and successfully implanted into mice to show that tissue engineering may, in the future, benefit sufferers from back pain.

  12. Disc Golf, a Growing Sport

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Joseph T.; Jones, Richard E.; Runstrom, Michael; Hardy, Jolene

    2015-01-01

    Background Disc golf is a sport played much like traditional golf, but rather than using a ball and club, players throw flying discs with various throwing motions. It has been played by an estimated 8 to 12 million people in the United States. Like all sports, injuries sustained while playing disc golf are not uncommon. Although formalized in the 1970s, it has grown at a rapid pace; however, disc golf–related injuries have yet to be described in the medical literature. Purpose To describe the most common injuries incurred by disc golf players while comparing the different types of throwing styles. Study Design Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods The data in this study were collected from 883 disc golf players who responded to an online survey collected over a 1-month period. Respondents answered 49 questions related to demographics, experience, style of play, and injury details. Using a chi-square analysis, common injuries sustained in players using backhand and forehand throwing styles were compared. Results More than 81% of respondents stated that they had sustained an injury playing disc golf, including injuries to the elbow (n = 325), shoulder (n = 305), back (n = 218), and knee (n = 199). The injuries were most commonly described as a muscle strain (n = 241), sprain (n = 162), and tendinitis (n = 145). The type of throw primarily used by players varied, with 86.2% using backhand, 12.7% using forehand, and 1.1% using an overhead throw. Players using a forehand throw were more likely to sustain an elbow injury (P = .014). Many players (n = 115) stated they had undergone surgery due to a disc golf–related injury, with the most common surgeries including meniscal, shoulder, spine, and foot/ankle surgeries. Conclusion The majority of surveyed disc golfers sustained at least 1 injury while playing disc golf, with many requiring surgery. The types of injuries sustained by players varied by the types of throw primarily used. As the sport of disc golf continues

  13. Percutaneous diode laser disc nucleoplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchetti, P. P.; Longo, Leonardo

    2004-09-01

    The treatment of herniated disc disease (HNP) over the years involved different miniinvasive surgical options. The classical microsurgical approach has been substituted over the years both by endoscopic approach in which is possible to practice via endoscopy a laser thermo-discoplasty, both by percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty. In the last ten years, the percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty have been done worldwide in more than 40000 cases of HNP. Because water is the major component of the intervertebral disc, and in HNP pain is caused by the disc protrusion pressing against the nerve root, a 980 nm Diode laser introduced via a 22G needle under X-ray guidance and local anesthesia, vaporizes a small amount of nucleous polposus with a disc shrinkage and a relief of pressure on nerve root. Most patients get off the table pain free and are back to work in 5 to 7 days. Material and method: to date, 130 patients (155 cases) suffering for relevant symptoms therapy-resistant 6 months on average before consulting our department, have been treated. Eightyfour (72%) males and 46 (28%) females had a percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty. The average age of patients operated was 48 years (22 - 69). The level of disc removal was L3/L4 in 12 cases, L4/L5 in 87 cases and L5/S1 in 56 cases. Two different levels were treated at the same time in 25 patients. Results: the success rate at a minimum follow-up of 6 months was 88% with a complication rate of 0.5%.

  14. Evolution of protoplanetary discs with magnetically driven disc winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takeru K.; Ogihara, Masahiro; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Crida, Aurélien; Guillot, Tristan

    2016-12-01

    Aims: We investigate the evolution of protoplanetary discs (PPDs) with magnetically driven disc winds and viscous heating. Methods: We considered an initially massive disc with 0.1 M⊙ to track the evolution from the early stage of PPDs. We solved the time evolution of surface density and temperature by taking into account viscous heating and the loss of mass and angular momentum by the disc winds within the framework of a standard α model for accretion discs. Our model parameters, turbulent viscosity, disc wind mass-loss, and disc wind torque, which were adopted from local magnetohydrodynamical simulations and constrained by the global energetics of the gravitational accretion, largely depends on the physical condition of PPDs, particularly on the evolution of the vertical magnetic flux in weakly ionized PPDs. Results: Although there are still uncertainties concerning the evolution of the vertical magnetic flux that remains, the surface densities show a large variety, depending on the combination of these three parameters, some of which are very different from the surface density expected from the standard accretion. When a PPD is in a wind-driven accretion state with the preserved vertical magnetic field, the radial dependence of the surface density can be positive in the inner region <1-10 au. The mass accretion rates are consistent with observations, even in the very low level of magnetohydrodynamical turbulence. Such a positive radial slope of the surface density strongly affects planet formation because it inhibits the inward drift or even causes the outward drift of pebble- to boulder-sized solid bodies, and it also slows down or even reversed the inward type-I migration of protoplanets. Conclusions: The variety of our calculated PPDs should yield a wide variety of exoplanet systems.

  15. Infalling clouds on to supermassive black hole binaries - I. Formation of discs, accretion and gas dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicovic, F. G.; Cuadra, J.; Sesana, A.; Stasyszyn, F.; Amaro-Seoane, P.; Tanaka, T. L.

    2016-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that most - if not all - galaxies harbour a supermassive black hole (SMBH) at their nucleus; hence binaries of these massive objects are an inevitable product of the hierarchical evolution of structures in the Universe, and represent an important but thus-far elusive phase of galaxy evolution. Gas accretion via a circumbinary disc is thought to be important for the dynamical evolution of SMBH binaries, as well as in producing luminous emission that can be used to infer their properties. One plausible source of the gaseous fuel is clumps of gas formed due to turbulence and gravitational instabilities in the interstellar medium, that later fall towards and interact with the binary. In this context, we model numerically the evolution of turbulent clouds in near-radial infall on to equal-mass SMBH binaries, using a modified version of the SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics) code GADGET-3. We present a total of 12 simulations that explore different possible pericentre distances and relative inclinations, and show that the formation of circumbinary discs and discs around each SMBH (`mini-discs') depend on those parameters. We also study the dynamics of the formed discs, and the variability of the feeding rate on to the SMBHs in the different configurations.

  16. Wet disc contraction to galactic blue nuggets and quenching to red nuggets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekel, A.; Burkert, A.

    2014-02-01

    We study the origin of high-redshift, compact, quenched spheroids (red nuggets) through the dissipative shrinkage of gaseous discs into compact star-forming systems (blue nuggets). The discs, fed by cold streams, undergo violent disc instability that drives gas into the centre (along with mergers). The inflow is dissipative when its time-scale is shorter than the star formation time-scale. This implies a threshold of ˜0.28 in the cold-to-total mass ratio within the disc radius. For the typical gas fraction ˜0.5 at z ˜ 2, this threshold is traced back to a maximum spin parameter of ˜0.05, implying that ˜half the star-forming galaxies contract to blue nuggets, while the rest form extended stellar discs. Thus, the surface density of blue galaxies is expected to be bimodal about ˜109 M⊙ kpc-2, slightly increasing with mass. The blue nuggets are expected to be rare at low z when the gas fraction is low. The blue nuggets quench to red nuggets by complementary internal and external mechanisms. Internal quenching by a compact bulge, in a fast mode and especially at high z, may involve starbursts, stellar and active galactic nucleus feedback, or Q-quenching. Quenching due to hot-medium haloes above 1012 M⊙ provides maintenance and a slower mode at low redshift. These predictions are confirmed in simulations and are consistent with observations at z = 0-3.

  17. Gravitoturbulence in magnetized protostellar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riols, A.; Latter, H.

    2016-08-01

    Gravitational instability (GI) features in several aspects of protostellar disc evolution, most notably in angular momentum transport, fragmentation, and the outbursts exemplified by FU Ori and EX Lupi systems. The outer regions of protostellar discs may also be coupled to magnetic fields, which could then modify the development of GI. To understand the basic elements of their interaction, we perform local 2D ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulations with an imposed toroidal field. In the regime of moderate plasma beta, we find that the system supports a hot gravitoturbulent state, characterized by considerable magnetic energy and stress and a surprisingly large Toomre parameter Q ≳ 10. This result has potential implications for disc structure, vertical thickness, ionization, etc. Our simulations also reveal the existence of long-lived and dense `magnetic islands' or plasmoids. Lastly, we find that the presence of a magnetic field has little impact on the fragmentation criterion of the disc. Though our focus is on protostellar discs, some of our results may be relevant for the outer radii of AGN.

  18. Gaseous insulators for high voltage electrical equipment

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; James, David R.; Pace, Marshall O.; Pai, Robert Y.

    1979-01-01

    Gaseous insulators comprise compounds having high attachment cross sections for electrons having energies in the 0-1.3 electron volt range. Multi-component gaseous insulators comprise compounds and mixtures having overall high electron attachment cross sections in the 0-1.3 electron volt range and moderating gases having high cross sections for inelastic interactions with electrons of energies 1-4 electron volts. Suitable electron attachment components include hexafluorobutyne, perfluorobutene-2, perfluorocyclobutane, perfluorodimethylcyclobutane, perfluorocyclohexene, perfluoromethylcyclohexane, hexafluorobutadiene, perfluoroheptene-1 and hexafluoroazomethane. Suitable moderating gases include N.sub.2, CO, CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The gaseous insulating mixture can also contain SF.sub.6, perfluoropropane and perfluorobenzene.

  19. Gaseous insulators for high voltage electrical equipment

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; James, David R.; Pace, Marshall O.; Pai, Robert Y.

    1981-01-01

    Gaseous insulators comprise compounds having high attachment cross sections for electrons having energies in the 0-1.3 electron volt range. Multi-component gaseous insulators comprise compounds and mixtures having overall high electron attachment cross sections in the 0-1.3 electron volt range and moderating gases having high cross sections for inelastic interactions with electrons of energies 1-4 electron volts. Suitable electron attachment components include hexafluorobutyne, perfluorobutene-2, perfluorocyclobutane, perfluorodimethylcyclobutane, perfluorocyclohexene, perfluoromethylcyclohexane, hexafluorobutadiene, perfluoroheptene-1 and hexafluoroazomethane. Suitable moderating gases include N.sub.2, CO, CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The gaseous insulating mixture can also contain SF.sub.6, perfluoropropane and perfluorobenzene.

  20. Atomic gas in debris discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, Antonio S.; Barlow, M. J.; Crawford, I. A.; Casassus, S.

    2017-04-01

    We have conducted a search for optical circumstellar absorption lines in the spectra of 16 debris disc host stars. None of the stars in our sample showed signs of emission line activity in either Hα, Ca II or Na I, confirming their more evolved nature. Four stars were found to exhibit narrow absorption features near the cores of the photospheric Ca II and Na I D lines (when Na I D data were available). We analyse the characteristics of these spectral features to determine whether they are of circumstellar or interstellar origins. The strongest evidence for circumstellar gas is seen in the spectrum of HD 110058, which is known to host a debris disc observed close to edge-on. This is consistent with a recent ALMA detection of molecular gas in this debris disc, which shows many similarities to the β Pictoris system.

  1. Stability of galactic discs: finite arm-inclination and finite-thickness effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griv, Evgeny; Gedalin, Michael

    2012-05-01

    A modified theory of the Lin-Shu density waves, studied in connection with the problem of spiral pattern of rapidly and differentially rotating disc galaxies, is presented for both the axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric structures in highly flattened galaxies resulted from the classical Jeans instability of small gravity perturbations (e.g. those produced by a spontaneous disturbance). A new method is provided for the analytical solution of the self-consistent system of the gas-dynamic equations and the Poisson equation describing the stability of a three-dimensional galactic disc composed of stars or gaseous clouds. In order to apply the method, the modifications introduced for the properties of the gravitationally unstable, that is to say, amplitude-growing density waves are considered by removing the often used assumptions that the gravity perturbations are axisymmetric and the disc is infinitesimally thin. In contrast to previous studies, in this paper these two effects - the non-axial symmetry effect and the finite thickness effect - are simultaneously taken into account. We show that non-axisymmetric perturbations developing in a differentially rotating disc are more unstable than the axisymmetric ones. We also show that destabilizing self-gravity is far more 'dangerous' in thin discs than in thick discs. The primary effect of small but finite thickness is a reduction of the growth rate of the gravitational Jeans instability and a shift in the threshold of instability towards a longer wavelength (and larger wavelength will include more mass). The results of this paper are in qualitative agreement with previous analytical and numerical estimations of the effects. The extent to which our results on the disc's stability can have a bearing on observable spiral galaxies, including the Milky Way, is also discussed.

  2. HD 172555: Detection of 63 micrometers [OI] Emission in a Debris Disc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Barrado, D.; Augereau, J. -C.; Thi, W. F.; Roberge, A.; Eiroa, C.; Montesinos, B.; Meeus, G.; Howard, C.; Sandell, G.; Duchene, G.; Dent, W. R. F.; Lebreton, J.; Mendigutia, I.; Huelamo, N.; Menard, F.; Pinte, C.

    2012-01-01

    Context. HD 172555 is a young A7 star belonging to the Beta Pictoris Moving Group that harbours a debris disc. The Spitzer IRS spectrum of the source showed mid-IR features such as silicates and glassy silica species, indicating the presence of a warm dust component with small grains, which places HD 172555 among the small group of debris discs with such properties. The IRS spectrum also shows a possible emission of SiO gas. Aims. We aim to study the dust distribution in the circumstellar disc of HD 172555 and to asses the presence of gas in the debris disc. Methods. As part of the GASPS Open Time Key Programme, we obtained Herschel-PACS photometric and spectroscopic observations of the source. We analysed PACS observations of HD 172555 and modelled the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) with a modified blackbody and the gas emission with a two-level population model with no collisional de-excitation. Results. We report for the first time the detection of [OI] atomic gas emission at 63.18 micrometers in the HD 172555 circumstellar disc.We detect excesses due to circumstellar dust toward HD 172555 in the three photometric bands of PACS (70, 100, and 160 m). We derive a large dust particle mass of (4.8 plus-minus 0.6)x10(exp -4) Mass compared to Earth and an atomic oxygen mass of 2.5x10(exp -2)R(exp 2) Mass compared to Earth, where R in AU is the separation between the star and the inner disc. Thus, most of the detected mass of the disc is in the gaseous phase.

  3. Did Jupiter's core form in the innermost parts of the Sun's protoplanetary disc?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Sean N.; Izidoro, Andre; Bitsch, Bertram; Jacobson, Seth A.

    2016-05-01

    Jupiter's core is generally assumed to have formed beyond the snow line. Here we consider an alternative scenario that Jupiter's core may have accumulated in the innermost part of the protoplanetary disc. A growing body of research suggests that small particles (`pebbles') continually drift inward through the disc. If a fraction of drifting pebbles is trapped at the inner edge of the disc, several Earth-mass cores can quickly grow. Subsequently, the core may migrate outward beyond the snow line via planet-disc interactions. Of course, to reach the outer Solar system Jupiter's core must traverse the terrestrial planet-forming region. We use N-body simulations including synthetic forces from an underlying gaseous disc to study how the outward migration of Jupiter's core sculpts the terrestrial zone. If the outward migration is fast (τmig ˜ 104 yr), the core simply migrates past resident planetesimals and planetary embryos. However, if its migration is slower (τmig ˜ 105 yr) the core clears out solids in the inner disc by shepherding objects in mean motion resonances. In many cases, the disc interior to 0.5-1 AU is cleared of embryos and most planetesimals. By generating a mass deficit close to the Sun, the outward migration of Jupiter's core may thus explain the absence of terrestrial planets closer than Mercury. Jupiter's migrating core often stimulates the growth of another large (˜Earth-mass) core - that may provide a seed for Saturn's core - trapped in an exterior resonance. The migrating core also may transport a fraction of terrestrial planetesimals, such as the putative parent bodies of iron meteorites, to the asteroid belt.

  4. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, R. P.; Wei, R. P.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of temperature, hydrogen pressure, stress intensity, and yield strength on the kinetics of gaseous hydrogen assisted crack propagation in 18Ni maraging steels were investigated experimentally. It was found that crack growth rate as a function of stress intensity was characterized by an apparent threshold for crack growth, a stage where the growth rate increased sharply, and a stage where the growth rate was unchanged over a significant range of stress intensity. Cracking proceeded on load application with little or no detectable incubation period. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility increased with increasing yield strength.

  5. Photoevaporating transitional discs and molecular cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Sui, Ning

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the evolution of photoevaporating protoplanetary discs including mass influx from molecular cloud cores. We examine the influence of cloud core properties on the formation and evolution of transitional discs. We use one-dimensional thin disc assumption and calculate the evolution of the protoplanetary disc. The effects of X-ray photoevaporation are also included. Our calculations suggest that most discs should experience the transitional disc phase within 10 Myr. The formation time of a gap and its initial location are functions of the properties of the cloud cores. In some circumstances, discs can open two gaps by photoevaporation alone. The two gaps form when the gas in the disc can expand to large radius and if the mass at large radius is sufficiently small. The surface density profile of the disc determines whether the two gaps can form. Since the structure of a disc is determined by the properties of a molecular cloud core, the core properties determine the formation of two gaps in the disc. We further find that even when the photoevaporation rate is reduced to 10 per cent of the standard value, two gaps can still form in the disc. The only difference is that the formation time is delayed.

  6. Electromagnetic Levitation of a Disc

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle, R.; Neves, F.; de Andrade, R., Jr.; Stephan, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a teaching experiment that explores the levitation of a disc of ferromagnetic material in the presence of the magnetic field produced by a single electromagnet. In comparison to the classical experiment of the levitation of a sphere, the main advantage of the proposed laboratory bench is that the uniform magnetic field…

  7. Methods and systems for deacidizing gaseous mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Liang

    2010-05-18

    An improved process for deacidizing a gaseous mixture using phase enhanced gas-liquid absorption is described. The process utilizes a multiphasic absorbent that absorbs an acid gas at increased rate and leads to reduced overall energy costs for the deacidizing operation.

  8. Gaseous detectors of ultraviolet and visible photons

    SciTech Connect

    Peskov, V.; Borovik-Romanov, A.; Volynshikova, T.

    1994-06-01

    We describe simple methods of manufacturing in a laboratory gaseous detectors of visible photons with GaAs(Cs) and SbCs photocathodes and Ti getters. Covered by CsI protective layers they are robust enough to be stable under ordinary experimental conditions. First attempts to use these detectors for crystal scintillator and fiber readout are presented.

  9. THE LIQUID AND GASEOUS FUEL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the national liquid and gaseous fuel distribution system. he study leading to the report was performed as part of an effort to better understand emissions of volatile organic compounds from the fuel distribution system. he primary, secondary, and tertiary seg...

  10. Annual Gaseous Electronics Conference (43rd)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-23

    University Avenue Madison, WI 53706 Madison, WI 53706 aig Denman Jacques Derouard Russell DeYoung !00 Eubank, N.E., #417 Spectrometrie Physique Gaseous...Universitat Innsbruck Dawley Road Santa Clara, CA 95054 Technikerstr. 25 Hayes UB31H4 A 6020 Innstruck U.K. Austria JoanneLiu RonLockwood Leonard Loeb MIT

  11. Rotational support of giant clumps in high-z disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceverino, Daniel; Dekel, Avishai; Mandelker, Nir; Bournaud, Frederic; Burkert, Andreas; Genzel, Reinhard; Primack, Joel

    2012-03-01

    We address the internal support against total free-fall collapse of the giant clumps that form by violent gravitational instability in high-z disc galaxies. Guidance is provided by an analytic model, where the protoclumps are cut from a rotating disc and collapse to equilibrium while preserving angular momentum. This model predicts prograde clump rotation, which dominates the support if the clump has contracted to a surface density contrast ≳10. This is confirmed in hydro adaptive mesh refinement zoom-in simulations of galaxies in a cosmological context. In most high-z clumps, the centrifugal force dominates the support, ?, where Vrot is the rotation velocity and the circular velocity Vcirc measures the potential well. The clump spin indeed tends to be in the sense of the global disc angular momentum, but substantial tilts are frequent, reflecting the highly warped nature of the high-z discs. Most clumps are in Jeans equilibrium, with the rest of the support provided by turbulence, partly driven by the gravitational instability itself. The general agreement between model and simulations indicates that angular momentum loss or gain in most clumps is limited to a factor of 2. Simulations of isolated gas-rich discs that resolve the clump substructure reveal that the cosmological simulations may overestimate ? by ˜30 per cent, but the dominance of rotational support at high z is not a resolution artefact. In turn, isolated gas-poor disc simulations produce at z= 0 smaller gaseous non-rotating transient clouds, indicating that the difference in rotational support is associated with the fraction of cold baryons in the disc. In our current cosmological simulations, the clump rotation velocity is typically more than twice the disc dispersion, Vrot˜ 100 km s-1, but when beam smearing of ≥0.1 arcsec is imposed, the rotation signal is reduced to a small gradient of ≤30 km s-1 kpc-1 across the clump. The velocity dispersion in the simulated clumps is comparable to the

  12. Experimental Evaluation of a Subscale Gaseous Hydrogen/gaseous Oxygen Coaxial Rocket Injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Timothy D.; Klem, Mark D.; Breisacher, Kevin J.; Farhangi, Shahram; Sutton, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The next generation reusable launch vehicle may utilize a Full-Flow Stage Combustion (FFSC) rocket engine cycle. One of the key technologies required is the development of an injector that uses gaseous oxygen and gaseous hydrogen as propellants. Gas-gas propellant injection provides an engine with increased stability margin over a range of throttle set points. This paper summarizes an injector design and testing effort that evaluated a coaxial rocket injector for use with gaseous oxygen and gaseous hydrogen propellants. A total of 19 hot-fire tests were conducted up to a chamber pressure of 1030 psia, over a range of 3.3 to 6.7 for injector element mixture ratio. Post-test condition of the hardware was also used to assess injector face cooling. Results show that high combustion performance levels could be achieved with gas-gas propellants and there were no problems with excessive face heating for the conditions tested.

  13. Experimental Evaluation of a Subscale Gaseous Hydrogen/Gaseous Oxygen Coaxial Rocket Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Timothy D.; Klem, Mark D.; Breisacher, Kevin J.; Farhangi, Shahram; Sutton, Robert

    2002-11-01

    The next generation reusable launch vehicle may utilize a Full-Flow Stage Combustion (FFSC) rocket engine cycle. One of the key technologies required is the development of an injector that uses gaseous oxygen and gaseous hydrogen as propellants. Gas-gas propellant injection provides an engine with increased stability margin over a range of throttle set points. This paper summarizes an injector design and testing effort that evaluated a coaxial rocket injector for use with gaseous oxygen and gaseous hydrogen propellants. A total of 19 hot-fire tests were conducted up to a chamber pressure of 1030 psia, over a range of 3.3 to 6.7 for injector element mixture ratio. Post-test condition of the hardware was also used to assess injector face cooling. Results show that high combustion performance levels could be achieved with gas-gas propellants and there were no problems with excessive face heating for the conditions tested.

  14. Peripheral Disc Margin Shape and Internal Disc Derangement: Imaging Correlation in Significantly Painful Discs Identified at Provocation Lumbar Discography

    PubMed Central

    Bartynski, W.S.; Rothfus, W.E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Annular margin shape is used to characterize lumbar disc abnormality on CT/MR imaging studies. Abnormal discs also have internal derangement including annular degeneration and radial defects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential correlation between disc-margin shape and annular internal derangement on post-discogram CT in significantly painful discs encountered at provocation lumbar discography (PLD). Significantly painful discs were encountered at 126 levels in 86 patients (47 male, 39 female) studied by PLD where no prior surgery had been performed and response to intradiscal lidocaine after provocation resulted in either substantial/total relief or no improvement after lidocaine administration. Post-discogram CT and discogram imaging was evaluated for disc-margin characteristics (bulge/protrusion), features of disc internal derangement (radial annular defect [RD: radial tear/fissure/annular gap], annular degeneration) and presence/absence of discographic contrast leakage. In discs with focal protrusion, 50 of 63 (79%) demonstrated Grade 3 RD with 13 (21%) demonstrating severe degenerative change only. In discs with generalized-bulge-only, 48 of 63 (76%) demonstrated degenerative change only (primarily Dallas Grade 3) with 15 of 63 (24%) demonstrating a RD (Dallas Grade 3). Differences were highly statistically significant (p<0.001). Pain elimination with intra-discal lidocaine correlated with discographic contrast leakage (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape correlates with features of internal derangement in significantly painful discs encountered at PLD. Discs with focal protrusion typically demonstrate RD while generalized bulging discs typically demonstrated degenerative changes only (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape may provide an important imaging clue to the cause of chronic discogenic low back pain. PMID:22681741

  15. [Optic disc granuloma secondary to sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Qu-Knafo, L; Auregan-Giocanti, A

    2017-02-01

    We report a case of optic disc granuloma due to sarcoidosis. A 64-year-old, caucasian female with a history of pulmonary sarcoidosis presented with a vision loss on her left eye. The ophthalmologic examination revealed a discrete optic disc infiltrate compatible with the diagnosis of optic disc granuloma. Fluorescein angiography showed diffusion and impregnation of the granuloma without vascularitis. The optical coherence tomography demonstrated a homogenous and isoreflective lesion at the optic disc. The patient recovered her visual acuity after systemic corticosteroid treatment. Isolated optic disc granuloma is a rare condition of ocular sarcoidosis.

  16. 49 CFR 538.8 - Gallon Equivalents for Gaseous Fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION MANUFACTURING INCENTIVES FOR ALTERNATIVE FUEL VEHICLES § 538.8 Gallon Equivalents for Gaseous Fuels. The gallon equivalent of gaseous fuels, for purposes... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gallon Equivalents for Gaseous Fuels....

  17. 49 CFR 538.8 - Gallon Equivalents for Gaseous Fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION MANUFACTURING INCENTIVES FOR ALTERNATIVE FUEL VEHICLES § 538.8 Gallon Equivalents for Gaseous Fuels. The gallon equivalent of gaseous fuels, for purposes... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gallon Equivalents for Gaseous Fuels....

  18. 49 CFR 538.8 - Gallon Equivalents for Gaseous Fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION MANUFACTURING INCENTIVES FOR ALTERNATIVE FUEL VEHICLES § 538.8 Gallon Equivalents for Gaseous Fuels. The gallon equivalent of gaseous fuels, for purposes... 49 Transportation 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gallon Equivalents for Gaseous Fuels....

  19. 49 CFR 538.8 - Gallon Equivalents for Gaseous Fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION MANUFACTURING INCENTIVES FOR ALTERNATIVE FUEL VEHICLES § 538.8 Gallon Equivalents for Gaseous Fuels. The gallon equivalent of gaseous fuels, for purposes... 49 Transportation 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gallon Equivalents for Gaseous Fuels....

  20. 49 CFR 538.8 - Gallon Equivalents for Gaseous Fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION MANUFACTURING INCENTIVES FOR ALTERNATIVE FUEL VEHICLES § 538.8 Gallon Equivalents for Gaseous Fuels. The gallon equivalent of gaseous fuels, for purposes... 49 Transportation 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gallon Equivalents for Gaseous Fuels....

  1. Gaseous modification of MCrAlY coatings

    DOEpatents

    Vance, Steven J.; Goedjen, John G.; Sabol, Stephen M.; Sloan, Kelly M.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention generally describes methods for modifying MCrAlY coatings by using gaseous carburization, gaseous nitriding or gaseous carbonitriding. The modified MCrAlY coatings are useful in thermal barrier coating systems, which may be used in gas turbine engines.

  2. Synthesis of Organic Matter of Prebiotic Chemistry at the Protoplanetary Disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snytnikov, Valeriy; Stoynovskaya, Olga; Rudina, Nina

    pressure inside the disc from tens to hundred atmospheres. We simulated unsteady processes in massive circumstellar discs around YSO class O and I. In the computational experiments, we have shown that at a certain stage of its evolution the circumstellar discs of gas and solids produces local areas of high pressure. According to the classical heterogeneous catalysis, a wide range of organic and prebiotic compounds could have been synthesized in these areas. Can we capture these areas of high pressure synthesis in observation of circumstellar discs? Due to the small sizes of such areas they can be hardly ever resolved even with the modern telescopes such as ALMA. However, we can try to detect their signatures in the disc, since the gas of the disc keep the set of organic synthesis products. The idea is to define the signature of the process using laboratory experiments. Varying gas temperature and pressure in laboratory setup we can carry out the catalytic high pressure syntheses and specify the set of gaseous products. These sets of organic compounds observed in the discs may serve as indicators of the emergence of high-pressure areas of prebiotic chemistry. Thus, there is a special interest to the study of YSO class 0 and I by means of observational astronomy. For these objects, first data on the presence of individual organic compounds in massive hydrogen-helium component of the discs appear. The origin of the organic compounds that are associated with chemical reactions in the discs should be separated from the set of organic compounds of the initial molecular cloud.

  3. Curveballs in protoplanetary discs - the effect of the Magnus force on planet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, John C.

    2015-10-01

    Spinning planetesimals in a gaseous protoplanetary disc may experience a hydrodynamical force perpendicular to their relative velocities. We examine the effect this force has on the dynamics of these objects using analytical arguments based on a simple laminar disc model and numerical integrations of the equations of motion for individual grains. We focus in particular on metre-sized boulders traditionally expected to spiral in to the central star in as little as 100 years from 1 au We find that there are plausible scenarios in which this force extends the lifetime of these solids in the disc by a factor of several. More importantly the velocities induced by the Magnus force can prevent the formation of planetesimals via gravitational instability in the inner disc if the size of the dust particles is larger than of the order of 10 cm. We find that the fastest growing linear modes of the streaming instability may still grow despite the diffusive effect of the Magnus force, but it remains to be seen how the Magnus force will alter the non-linear evolution of these instabilities.

  4. Towards spark-proof gaseous pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsigaridas, S.; Beuzekom, M. v.; Chan, H. W.; Graaf, H. v. d.; Hartjes, F.; Heijhoff, K.; Hessey, N. P.; Prodanovic, V.

    2016-11-01

    The micro-pattern gaseous pixel detector, is a promising technology for imaging and particle tracking applications. It is a combination of a gas layer acting as detection medium and a CMOS pixelated readout-chip. As a prevention against discharges we deposit a protection layer on the chip and then integrate on top a micromegas-like amplification structure. With this technology we are able to reconstruct 3D track segments of particles passing through the gas thanks to the functionality of the chip. We have turned a Timepix3 chip into a gaseous pixel detector and tested it at the SPS at Cern. The preliminary results are promising and within the expectations. However, the spark protection layer needs further improvement to make reliable detectors. For this reason, we have created a setup for spark-testing. We present the first results obtained from the lab-measurements along with preliminary results from the testbeam.

  5. Effect of gaseous ammonia on nicotine sorption

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, A.M.; Singer, B.C.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    2002-06-01

    Nicotine is a major constituent of environmental tobacco smoke. Sorptive interactions of nicotine with indoor surfaces can substantially alter indoor concentrations. The phenomenon is poorly understood, including whether sorption is fully reversible or partially irreversible. They hypothesize that acid-base chemistry on indoor surfaces might contribute to the apparent irreversibility of nicotine sorption under some circumstances. Specifically, they suggest that nicotine may become protonated on surfaces, markedly reducing its vapor pressure. If so, subsequent exposure of the surface to gaseous ammonia, a common base, could raise the surface pH, causing deprotonation and desorption of nicotine from surfaces. A series of experiments was conducted to explore the effect of ammonia on nicotine sorption to and reemission from surfaces. The results indicate that, under some conditions, exposure to gaseous ammonia can substantially increase the rate of desorption of previously sorbed nicotine from common indoor surface materials.

  6. Correlation and prediction of gaseous diffusion coefficients.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrero, T. R.; Mason, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    A new correlation method for binary gaseous diffusion coefficients from very low temperatures to 10,000 K is proposed based on an extended principle of corresponding states, and having greater range and accuracy than previous correlations. There are two correlation parameters that are related to other physical quantities and that are predictable in the absence of diffusion measurements. Quantum effects and composition dependence are included, but high-pressure effects are not. The results are directly applicable to multicomponent mixtures.

  7. Gaseous reference standards of formaldehyde from trioxane.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Paul J; di Meane, Elena Amico; Vargha, Gergely M; Brown, Richard J C; Milton, Martin J T

    2013-04-15

    We have developed a dynamic reference standard of gaseous formaldehyde based on diffusion of the sublimate of trioxane and thermal conversion to formaldehyde in the gas phase. We have also produced a gravimetric standard for formaldehyde in a nitrogen matrix, also by thermal conversion of the sublimate of trioxane. Analysis of the gravimetric standard with respect to the dynamic standard has confirmed the comparability of the static and dynamic gravimetric values.

  8. Uranium enrichment export control guide: Gaseous diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    This document was prepared to serve as a guide for export control officials in their interpretation, understanding, and implementation of export laws that relate to the Zangger International Trigger List for gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment process components, equipment, and materials. Particular emphasis is focused on items that are especially designed or prepared since export controls are required for these by States that are party to the International Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty.

  9. Dry-Enzyme Test For Gaseous Chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barzana, Eduardo; Karel, Marcus; Klibanov, Alexander

    1990-01-01

    Simple, dry-chemical test detects ethanol in human breath. Method of test also adapted to detection of such toxic chemicals as formaldehyde in airstreams. Used qualitatively to detect chemical compounds above present level; for example, ethanol above legal level for driving. Also used to indicate quantitatively concentrations of compounds. Involves dry enzyme and color indicator. Adapted to detect any gaseous compound transformed by enzymes to produce change evident to human eye or to instrument.

  10. Diffusion method of seperating gaseous mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Pontius, Rex B.

    1976-01-01

    A method of effecting a relatively large change in the relative concentrations of the components of a gaseous mixture by diffusion which comprises separating the mixture into heavier and lighter portions according to major fraction mass recycle procedure, further separating the heavier portions into still heavier subportions according to a major fraction mass recycle procedure, and further separating the lighter portions into still lighter subportions according to a major fraction equilibrium recycle procedure.

  11. Coexisting stable conformations of gaseous protein ions.

    PubMed Central

    Suckau, D; Shi, Y; Beu, S C; Senko, M W; Quinn, J P; Wampler, F M; McLafferty, F W

    1993-01-01

    For further insight into the role of solvent in protein conformer stabilization, the structural and dynamic properties of protein ions in vacuo have been probed by hydrogen-deuterium exchange in a Fourier-transform mass spectrometer. Multiply charged ions generated by electrospray ionization of five proteins show exchange reactions with 2H2O at 10(-7) torr (1 torr = 133.3 Pa) exhibiting pseudo-first-order kinetics. Gas-phase compactness of the S-S cross-linked RNase A relative to denatured S-derivatized RNase A is indicated by exchange of 35 and 135 hydrogen atoms, respectively. For pure cytochrome c ions, the existence of at least three distinct gaseous conformers is indicated by the substantially different values--52, 113, and 74--of reactive H atoms; the observation of these same values for ions of a number--2, 7, and 5, respectively--of different charge states indicates conformational insensitivity to coulombic forces. For each of these conformers, the compactness in vacuo indicated by these values corresponds directly to that of a known conformer structure in the solution from which the conformer ions are produced by electrospray. S-derivatized RNase A ions also exist as at least two gaseous conformers exchanging 50-140 H atoms. Gaseous conformer ions are isometrically stable for hours; removal of solvent greatly increases conformational rigidity. More specific ion-molecule reactions could provide further details of conformer structures. Images PMID:8381533

  12. Method for reacting nongaseous material with a gaseous reactant

    DOEpatents

    Lumpkin, Robert E.; Duraiswamy, Kandaswamy

    1979-03-27

    This invention relates to a new and novel method and apparatus for reacting nongaseous material with a gaseous reactant comprising introducing a first stream containing a nongaseous material into a reaction zone; simultaneously introducing a second stream containing a gaseous reactant into the reaction zone such that the gaseous reactant immediately contacts and reacts with the first stream thereby producing a gaseous product; forming a spiralling vortex within the reaction zone to cause substantial separation of gases, including the gaseous product, from the nongaseous material; forming and removing a third stream from the reaction zone containing the gaseous product which is substantially free of the nongaseous material before a major portion of the gaseous product can react with the nongaseous material; and forming and removing a fourth stream containing the nongaseous material from the reaction zone.

  13. Chiral Self-Gravitating Cosmic Vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Rybakov, Yu.P.

    2005-06-01

    In the framework of general relativity, an exact axisymmetric (vortex) solution of the equations of motion is obtained for the SU(2) symmetric sigma model. This solution is characterized by the topological charge (winding number) and angular deficit. In the linearized approximation, the Lyapunov stability of vortices is proved and the deflection angle of a light ray in the gravitational field of the vortex (gravitational lens effect) is calculated.

  14. Proto-planetary disc evolution and dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosotti, Giovanni Pietro

    2015-05-01

    Planets form from gas and dust discs in orbit around young stars. The timescale for planet formation is constrained by the lifetime of these discs. The properties of the formed planetary systems depend thus on the evolution and final dispersal of the discs, which is the main topic of this thesis. Observations reveal the existence of a class of discs called "transitional", which lack dust in their inner regions. They are thought to be the last stage before the complete disc dispersal, and hence they may provide the key to understanding the mechanisms behind disc evolution. X-ray photoevaporation and planet formation have been studied as possible physical mechanisms responsible for the final dispersal of discs. However up to now, these two phenomena have been studied separately, neglecting any possible feedback or interaction. In this thesis we have investigated what is the interplay between these two processes. We show that the presence of a giant planet in a photo-evaporating disc can significantly shorten its lifetime, by cutting the inner regions from the mass reservoir in the exterior of the disc. This mechanism produces transition discs that for a given mass accretion rate have larger holes than in models considering only X-ray photo-evaporation, constituting a possible route to the formation of accreting transition discs with large holes. These discs are found in observations and still constitute a puzzle for the theory. Inclusion of the phenomenon called "thermal sweeping", a violent instability that can destroy a whole disc in as little as 10 4 years, shows that the outer disc left can be very short-lived (depending on the X-ray luminosity of the star), possibly explaining why very few non accreting transition discs are observed. However the mechanism does not seem to be efficient enough to reconcile with observations. In this thesis we also show that X-ray photo-evaporation naturally explains the observed correlation between stellar masses and accretion

  15. [Polish nomenclature of lumbar disc disease].

    PubMed

    Radło, Paweł; Smetkowski, Andrzej; Tesiorowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is one of the most common damage of musculoskeletal system. The incidence of pain of lumbosacral spine is estimated approximately on 60-90% in general population, whereas the incidence of disc herniation in patients experiencing low back pain is about 91%. Despite the high incidence and uncomplicated pathogenesis of disc disease there is a problem with the nomenclature. In the vast majority of cases, the naming confusion stems from ignorance of the etiology of low back pain. Different terminologies: morphological, topographical, Radiological and Clinical are used interchangeably. In addition, diagnosis is presented in a variety of languages: Polish, English and Latin. Moreover, the medical and traditional language are used alternately. The authors found in Polish literature more, than 20 terms to describe lumbar disc herniation. All of these terms in the meaning of the authors are used to determine one pathology--mechanical damage to the intervertebral disc and moving the disc material beyond the anatomical area.

  16. Close-packing of growing discs

    SciTech Connect

    Bursill, L.A.; Xudong, F. . School of Physics)

    1988-12-01

    Spiral lattices are derived by allowing growing discs to aggregate under a close-packing rule. Both Fibonacci and Lucas numbers of visible spirals arise naturally, dependent only on the choice of growth centre. Both the rate of convergence towards an ideal spiral, and chirality, are determined by the initial placement of the first few discs (initial conditions). Thus the appearance of spiral packings is no more or less mysterious than the appearance of hexagonal packed arrays of equal discs.

  17. Accretion Discs Show Their True Colours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-07-01

    Quasars are the brilliant cores of remote galaxies, at the hearts of which lie supermassive black holes that can generate enough power to outshine the Sun a trillion times. These mighty power sources are fuelled by interstellar gas, thought to be sucked into the hole from a surrounding 'accretion disc'. A paper in this week's issue of the journal Nature, partly based on observations collected with ESO's Very Large Telescope, verifies a long-standing prediction about the intensely luminous radiation emitted by these accretion discs. Uncovering the disc ESO PR Photo 21/08 Uncovering the inner disc "Astronomers were puzzled by the fact that the best models of these discs couldn't quite be reconciled with some of the observations, in particular, with the fact that these discs did not appear as blue as they should be," explains lead-author Makoto Kishimoto. Such a discrepancy could be the signal that there was something very wrong with the models. With his colleagues, he investigated this discrepancy by studying the polarised light from six quasars. This enabled them to demonstrate that the disc spectrum is as blue as predicted. "The crucial observational difficulty here has been that the disc is surrounded by a much larger torus containing hot dust, whose light partly outshines that of the disc," says Kishimoto. "Because the light coming from the disc is scattered in the disc vicinity and thus polarised, by observing only polarised light from the quasars, one can uncover the buried light from the disc." In a similar way that a fisherman would wear polarised sunglasses to help get rid of the glare from the water surface and allow him to see more clearly under the water, the filter on the telescope allowed the astronomers to see beyond surrounding clouds of dust and gas to the blue colour of the disc in infrared light. The observations were done with the FORS and ISAAC instruments on one of the 8.2-m Unit Telescopes of ESO's Very Large Telescope, located in the Atacama

  18. The quiescent phase of galactic disc growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumer, Michael; Binney, James; Schönrich, Ralph

    2016-07-01

    We perform a series of controlled N-body simulations of growing disc galaxies within non-growing, live dark matter haloes of varying mass and concentration. Our initial conditions include either a low-mass disc or a compact bulge. New stellar particles are continuously added on near-circular orbits to the existing disc, so spiral structure is continuously excited. To study the effect of combined spiral and giant molecular cloud (GMC) heating on the discs, we introduce massive, short-lived particles that sample a GMC mass function. An isothermal gas component is introduced for a subset of the models. We perform a resolution study and vary parameters governing the GMC population, the histories of star formation and radial scale growth. Models with GMCs and standard values for the disc mass and halo density provide the right level of self-gravity to explain the age-velocity dispersion relation of the solar neighbourhood (Snhd). GMC heating generates remarkably exponential vertical profiles with scaleheights that are radially constant and agree with observations of galactic thin discs. GMCs are also capable of significantly delaying bar formation. The amount of spiral-induced radial migration agrees with what is required for the metallicity distribution of the Snhd. However, in our standard models, the outward-migrating populations are not hot enough vertically to create thick discs. Thick discs can form in models with high baryon fractions, but the corresponding bars are too long, the young stellar populations too hot and the discs flare considerably.

  19. Circumplanetary discs around young giant planets: a comparison between core-accretion and disc instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szulágyi, J.; Mayer, L.; Quinn, T.

    2017-01-01

    Circumplanetary discs can be found around forming giant planets, regardless of whether core accretion or gravitational instability built the planet. We carried out state-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations of the circumplanetary discs for both formation scenarios, using as similar initial conditions as possible to unveil possible intrinsic differences in the circumplanetary disc mass and temperature between the two formation mechanisms. We found that the circumplanetary discs' mass linearly scales with the circumstellar disc mass. Therefore, in an equally massive protoplanetary disc, the circumplanetary discs formed in the disc instability model can be only a factor of 8 more massive than their core-accretion counterparts. On the other hand, the bulk circumplanetary disc temperature differs by more than an order of magnitude between the two cases. The subdiscs around planets formed by gravitational instability have a characteristic temperature below 100 K, while the core-accretion circumplanetary discs are hot, with temperatures even greater than 1000 K when embedded in massive, optically thick protoplanetary discs. We explain how this difference can be understood as the natural result of the different formation mechanisms. We argue that the different temperatures should persist up to the point when a full-fledged gas giant forms via disc instability; hence, our result provides a convenient criterion for observations to distinguish between the two main formation scenarios by measuring the bulk temperature in the planet vicinity.

  20. Total Disc Replacement in Lumbar Degenerative Disc Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    More than 10 years have passed since lumbar total disc replacement (LTDR) was introduced for the first time to the world market for the surgical management of lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD). It seems like the right time to sum up the relevant results in order to understand where LTDR stands on now, and is heading forward to. The pathogenesis of DDD has been currently settled, but diagnosis and managements are still controversial. Fusion is recognized as golden standard of surgical managements but has various kinds of shortcomings. Lately, LTDR has been expected to replace fusion surgery. A great deal of LTDR reports has come out. Among them, more than 5-year follow-up prospective randomized controlled studies including USA IDE trials were expected to elucidate whether for LTDR to have therapeutic benefit compared to fusion. The results of these studies revealed that LTDR was not inferior to fusion. Most of clinical studies dealing with LTDR revealed that there was no strong evidence for preventive effect of LTDR against symptomatic degenerative changes of adjacent segment disease. LTDR does not have shortcomings associated with fusion. However, it has a potentiality of the new complications to occur, which surgeons have never experienced in fusion surgeries. Consequently, longer follow-up should be necessary as yet to confirm the maintenance of improved surgical outcome and to observe any very late complications. LTDR still may get a chance to establish itself as a substitute of fusion both nominally and virtually if it eases the concerns listed above. PMID:26713139

  1. Grain charging in protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgner, M.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Recent work identified a growth barrier for dust coagulation that originates in the electric repulsion between colliding particles. Depending on its charge state, dust material may have the potential to control key processes towards planet formation such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and grain growth, which are coupled in a two-way process. Aims: We quantify the grain charging at different stages of disc evolution and differentiate between two very extreme cases: compact spherical grains and aggregates with fractal dimension Df = 2. Methods: Applying a simple chemical network that accounts for collisional charging of grains, we provide a semi-analytical solution. This allowed us to calculate the equilibrium population of grain charges and the ionisation fraction efficiently. The grain charging was evaluated for different dynamical environments ranging from static to non-stationary disc configurations. Results: The results show that the adsorption/desorption of neutral gas-phase heavy metals, such as magnesium, effects the charging state of grains. The greater the difference between the thermal velocities of the metal and the dominant molecular ion, the greater the change in the mean grain charge. Agglomerates have more negative excess charge on average than compact spherical particles of the same mass. The rise in the mean grain charge is proportional to N1/6 in the ion-dust limit. We find that grain charging in a non-stationary disc environment is expected to lead to similar results. Conclusions: The results indicate that the dust growth and settling in regions where the dust growth is limited by the so-called "electro-static barrier" do not prevent the dust material from remaining the dominant charge carrier.

  2. [Standardized terminology for disc disease].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Pérez, M; Gil Sierra, A; Sánchez Martín, A; Gallego Gómez, P; Pereira Boo, D

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the terminology used to describe morphological alterations in the intervertebral discs. Radiologists must be able to communicate information about the type, location, and severity of these alterations to medical and surgical clinicians. It is crucial to use simple, standard, and unified terminology to ensure comprehension not only among radiologists but also with professionals from the different specialties for whom the radiology reports are written (fundamentally traumatologists and neurosurgeons). This terminology will help ensure a more accurate diagnosis and better patient management.

  3. Tidal Decay and Disruption of Gaseous Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Brian K.; Arras, Phil; Jensen, Emily; Peacock, Sarah; Marchant, Pablo; Penev, Kaloyan

    2015-11-01

    Many gaseous exoplanets in short-period orbits are on the verge of Roche-lobe overflow, and observations, along with orbital stability analysis, show tides probably drive significant orbital decay. Thus, the coupled processes of orbital evolution and tidal disruption likely shape the observed distribution of close-in exoplanets and may even be responsible for producing the shortest-period solid planets. However, the exact outcome for an overflowing planet depends on its internal response to mass loss and variable stellar insolation, and the accompanying orbital evolution can act to enhance or inhibit the disruption process. The final orbits of the denuded remnants of gas giants may be predictable from their mass-radius relationship, and so a distinctive mass-period relationship for some short-period solid planets may provide evidence for their origins as gaseous planets. In this presentation, we will discuss our work on tidal decay and disruption of close-in gaseous planets using a new model that accounts for the fact that short-period planets have hot, distended atmospheres, which can result in overflow even for planets that are not officially in Roche lobe contact. We will also point out that the orbital expansion that can accompany mass transfer may be less effective than previously realized because the resulting accretion disk may not return all of its angular momentum to the donor, as is usually assumed. Both of these effects have bee incorporated into the fully-featured and robust Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) suite.

  4. Electrostatic Precipitation in Nearly Pure Gaseous Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhler, Charles; Calle, Carlos; Clements, Sid; Cox, Bobby; Ritz, Mindy

    2008-01-01

    Electrostatic precipitation was performed in a nearly pure gaseous nitrogen system as a possible remedy for black dust contaminant from high pressure 6000 psi lines at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. The results of a prototype electrostatic precipitator that was built and tested using nitrogen gas at standard atmospheric pressures is presented. High voltage pulsed waveforms are generated using a rotating spark gap system at 30 Hz. A unique dust delivery system utilizing the Venturi effect was devised that supplies a given amount of dust per unit time for testing purposes.

  5. Detection of Gaseous Methane on Pluto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Leslie; Tokunaga, Alan; Elliot, J.; deBergh, Catherine; Owen, Tobias; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We obtained Pluto's spectrum using the CSHELL echelle spectrograph at NASA's IRTF on Mauna Kea, on 25-26 May 1992, with a spectral resolution of 13,300. The spectral range (5998 - 6018 per centimeter, or 1661.8 - 1666.9 nm) includes the R(0) and the Q(1) - Q(9) lines of the 2v3 band of methane. The resulting spectrum shows the first detection of gaseous methane on Pluto, with a column height of 1.20 (sup +3.15) (sub -0.87) cm-A (3.22 (sup +8.46) (sub -2.34) x 10(exp 19) molecule per square centimeter)).

  6. Stellar discs in Aquarius dark matter haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBuhr, Jackson; Ma, Chung-Pei; White, Simon D. M.

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the gravitational interactions between live stellar discs and their dark matter haloes, using Λ cold dark matter haloes similar in mass to that of the Milky Way taken from the Aquarius Project. We introduce the stellar discs by first allowing the haloes to respond to the influence of a growing rigid disc potential from z = 1.3 to 1.0. The rigid potential is then replaced with star particles which evolve self-consistently with the dark matter particles until z = 0.0. Regardless of the initial orientation of the disc, the inner parts of the haloes contract and change from prolate to oblate as the disc grows to its full size. When the disc's normal is initially aligned with the major axis of the halo at z = 1.3, the length of the major axis contracts and becomes the minor axis by z = 1.0. Six out of the eight discs in our main set of simulations form bars, and five of the six bars experience a buckling instability that results in a sudden jump in the vertical stellar velocity dispersion and an accompanying drop in the m = 2 Fourier amplitude of the disc surface density. The bars are not destroyed by the buckling but continue to grow until the present day. Bars are largely absent when the disc mass is reduced by a factor of 2 or more; the relative disc-to-halo mass is therefore a primary factor in bar formation and evolution. A subset of the discs is warped at the outskirts and contains prominent non-coplanar material with a ring-like structure. Many discs reorient by large angles between z = 1 and 0, following a coherent reorientation of their inner haloes. Larger reorientations produce more strongly warped discs, suggesting a tight link between the two phenomena. The origins of bars and warps appear independent: some discs with strong bars show little disturbances at the outskirts, while the discs with the weakest bars show severe warps.

  7. Use NASA GES DISC Data in ArcGIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Wenli; Pham, Long B.; Kempler, Steve

    2015-01-01

    This presentation describes GIS relevant data at NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC), GES DISC Services and Support for GIS Users, and use cases of GES DISC data in ArcGIS.

  8. Composition of early planetary atmospheres - I. Connecting disc astrochemistry to the formation of planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cridland, A. J.; Pudritz, R. E.; Alessi, M.

    2016-09-01

    We present a model of the early chemical composition and elemental abundances of planetary atmospheres based on the cumulative gaseous chemical species that are accreted on to planets forming by core accretion from evolving protoplanetary discs. The astrochemistry of the host disc is computed using an ionization-driven, non-equilibrium chemistry network within viscously evolving disc models. We accrete gas giant planets whose orbital evolution is controlled by planet traps using the standard core accretion model and track the chemical composition of the material that is accreted on to the protoplanet. We choose a fiducial disc model and evolve planets in three traps - water ice line, dead zone and heat transition. For a disc with a lifetime of 4.1 Myr, we produce two hot Jupiters (M = 1.43, 2.67 MJupiter, r = 0.15, 0.11 au) in the heat transition and ice line trap and one failed core (M = 0.003 MJupiter, r = 3.7 au) in the dead zone. These planets are found with mixing ratios for CO and H2O of 1.99 × 10-4 and 5.0 × 10-4, respectively, for both hot Jupiters. Additionally, for these planets we find CO2 and CH4, with mixing ratios of 1.8 × 10-6 → 9.8 × 10-10 and 1.1 × 10-8 → 2.3 × 10-10, respectively. These ranges correspond well with the mixing ratio ranges that have been inferred through the detection of emission spectra from hot Jupiters by multiple authors. We compute a carbon-to-oxygen ratio of 0.227 for the ice line planet and 0.279 for the heat transition planet. These planets accreted their gas inside the ice line, hence the sub-solar C/O.

  9. Intervertebral disc replacement. Experimental study.

    PubMed

    Kostuik, J P

    1997-04-01

    Arthrodesis of the lumbosacral spine, although satisfactory for a majority of patients, has long term sequelae in 30% of patients. This is particularly true for adjacent segment degeneration. Numerous attempts at providing a mobile motion segment have been made in the past. The current status of the development of dynamic intervertebral prosthesis, including biomechanical and clinical data have been presented. The relevant material properties of plastics, ceramics, and metal are presented with the conclusion that metals currently present with the greatest longevity without undue fatigue and wear as many as 100,000,000 cycles (40 years use) as an alternative to spinal fusion. An analysis of the kinematics of the motion segment have resulted, together with the material properties in the development of a dynamic intervertebral disc for use in the lumbar spine. The disc resembles a normal motion segment. In motion stiffness and center of rotation, wear debris development in 1/300 equivalent to that of a total hip prosthesis for the same given time. Safety features include immediate screw fixation to prevent displacement, a wedge elastic (spring) shape, and a bony porous ingrowth surface. The prosthesis is constructed of cobalt chromium and titanium with minimal corrosive properties on long term testing.

  10. Thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons in noble gaseous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Wei-Rong Xu, Zhi-Cheng; Zheng, Dong-Qin; Ai, Bao-Quan

    2014-02-24

    We investigate the thermal conductivity of suspended graphene nanoribbons in noble gaseous environments using molecular dynamics simulations. It is reported that the thermal conductivity of perfect graphene nanoribbons decreases with the gaseous pressure. The decreasing is more obvious for the noble gas with large atomic number. However, the gaseous pressure cannot change the thermal conductivity of defective graphene nanoribbons apparently. The phonon spectra of graphene nanoribbons are also provided to give corresponding supports.

  11. Spiral Waves in Accretion Discs - Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffin, H. M. J.

    Spirals shocks have been widely studied in the context of galactic dynamics and protostellar discs. They may however also play an important role in some classes of close binary stars, and more particularly in cataclysmic variables. In this paper, we review the physics of spirals waves in accretion discs, present the results of numerical simulations and consider whether theory can be reconcilied with observations.

  12. Circular plate capacitor with different discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paffuti, Giampiero; Cataldo, Enrico; Di Lieto, Alberto; Maccarrone, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we write a system of integral equations for a capacitor composed of two discs of different radii, generalizing Love's equation for equal discs. We compute the complete asymptotic form of the capacitance matrix for both large and small distances obtaining a generalization of Kirchhoff's formula for the latter case.

  13. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  14. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  15. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  16. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  17. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  18. The inner cavity of the circumnuclear disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, M.; Morris, M. R.; Frank, A.; Carroll-Nellenback, J. J.; Duschl, W. J.

    2016-06-01

    The circumnuclear disc (CND) orbiting the Galaxy's central black hole is a reservoir of material that can ultimately provide energy through accretion, or form stars in the presence of the black hole, as evidenced by the stellar cluster that is presently located at the CND's centre. In this paper, we report the results of a computational study of the dynamics of the CND. The results lead us to question two paradigms that are prevalent in previous research on the Galactic Centre. The first is that the disc's inner cavity is maintained by the interaction of the central stellar cluster's strong winds with the disc's inner rim, and secondly, that the presence of unstable clumps in the disc implies that the CND is a transient feature. Our simulations show that, in the absence of a magnetic field, the interaction of the wind with the inner disc rim actually leads to a filling of the inner cavity within a few orbital time-scales, contrary to previous expectations. However, including the effects of magnetic fields stabilizes the inner disc rim against rapid inward migration. Furthermore, this interaction causes instabilities that continuously create clumps that are individually unstable against tidal shearing. Thus the occurrence of such unstable clumps does not necessarily mean that the disc is itself a transient phenomenon. The next steps in this investigation are to explore the effect of the magnetorotational instability on the disc evolution and to test whether the results presented here persist for longer time-scales than those considered here.

  19. Rapid radiative clearing of protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, Thomas J.; Clarke, Cathie J.; Owen, James E.

    2016-04-01

    The lack of observed transition discs with inner gas holes of radii greater than ˜50 au implies that protoplanetary discs dispersed from the inside out must remove gas from the outer regions rapidly. We investigate the role of photoevaporation in the final clearing of gas from low mass discs with inner holes. In particular, we study the so-called `thermal sweeping' mechanism which results in rapid clearing of the disc. Thermal sweeping was originally thought to arise when the radial and vertical pressure scalelengths at the X-ray heated inner edge of the disc match. We demonstrate that this criterion is not fundamental. Rather, thermal sweeping occurs when the pressure maximum at the inner edge of the dust heated disc falls below the maximum possible pressure of X-ray heated gas (which depends on the local X-ray flux). We derive new critical peak volume and surface density estimates for rapid radiative clearing which, in general, result in rapid dispersal happening less readily than in previous estimates. This less efficient clearing of discs by X-ray driven thermal sweeping leaves open the issue of what mechanism (e.g. far-ultraviolet heating) can clear gas from the outer disc sufficiently quickly to explain the non-detection of cold gas around weak line T Tauri stars.

  20. Novel gaseous detectors for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielsson, M.; Fonte, P.; Francke, T.; Iacobaeus, C.; Ostling, J.; Peskov, V.

    2004-02-01

    We have developed and successfully tested prototypes of two new types of gaseous detectors for medical imaging purposes. The first one is called the Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID). It is oriented on monitoring and the precise alignment of the therapeutic cancer treatment beam (pulsed gamma radiation) with respect to the patient's tumor position. The latest will be determined from an X-ray image of the patient obtained in the time intervals between the gamma pulses. The detector is based on a "sandwich" of hole-type gaseous detectors (GEM and glass microcapillary plates) with metallic gamma and X-ray converters coated with CsI layers. The second detector is an X-ray image scanner oriented on mammography and other radiographic applications. It is based on specially developed by us high rate RPCs that are able to operate at rates of 10 5 Hz/mm 2 with a position resolution better than 50 μm at 1 atm. The quality of the images obtained with the latest version of this device were in most cases more superior than those obtained from commercially available detectors.

  1. Innovative Monitoring of Atmospheric Gaseous Hydrogen Fluoride

    PubMed Central

    Bonari, Alessandro; Pompilio, Ilenia; Monti, Alessandro; Arcangeli, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) is a basic raw material for a wide variety of industrial products, with a worldwide production capacity of more than three million metric tonnes. A novel method for determining particulate fluoride and gaseous hydrogen fluoride in air is presented herewith. Air was sampled using miniaturised 13 mm Swinnex two-stage filter holders in a medium-flow pumping system and through the absorption of particulate fluoride and HF vapours on cellulose ester filters uncoated or impregnated with sodium carbonate. Furthermore, filter desorption from the holders and the extraction of the pentafluorobenzyl ester derivative based on solid-phase microextraction were performed using an innovative robotic system installed on an xyz autosampler on-line with gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectrometry (MS). After generating atmospheres of a known concentration of gaseous HF, we evaluated the agreement between the results of our sampling method and those of the conventional preassembled 37 mm cassette (±8.10%; correlation coefficient: 0.90). In addition, precision (relative standard deviation for n = 10, 4.3%), sensitivity (0.2 μg/filter), and linearity (2.0–4000 μg/filter; correlation coefficient: 0.9913) were also evaluated. This procedure combines the efficiency of GC/MS systems with the high throughput (96 samples/day) and the quantitative accuracy of pentafluorobenzyl bromide on-sample derivatisation. PMID:27829835

  2. Gaseous detonation synthesis and characterization of nano-oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Honghao; Wu, Linsong; Li, Xiaojie; Wang, Xiaohong

    2015-07-01

    Gaseous detonation is a new method of heating the precursor of nanomaterials into gas, and integrating it with combustible gas as mixture to be detonated for the synthesis of nanomaterials. In this paper, the mixed gas of oxygen and hydrogen is used as the source for detonation, to synthesize nano TiO2, nano SiO2 and nano SnO2 through gaseous detonation method, characterization and analysis of the products, it was found that the products from gaseous detonation method were of high purity, good dispersion, smaller particle size and even distribution. It also shows that for the synthesis of nano-oxides, gaseous detonation is universal.

  3. 14 CFR 34.71 - Compliance with gaseous emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Test Procedures for Engine Exhaust Gaseous Emissions (Aircraft and Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) §...

  4. 14 CFR 34.71 - Compliance with gaseous emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Test Procedures for Engine Exhaust Gaseous Emissions (Aircraft and Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) §...

  5. About detection of precessing circumpulsar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimani, Catia

    2016-08-01

    Detections of circumpulsar discs and planetary systems through electromagnetic observations appear quite rare. In the case of PSR 1931+24 and B0656+14, the hypothesis of a precessing disc penetrating the pulsar light cylinder is found consistent with radio and gamma observations from these stars. Disc self-occultation and precession may affect electromagnetic measurements. We investigate here under which conditions gravitational waves generated by circumpulsar disc precession may be detected by the proposed second-generation space interferometers DECI-hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory and Big Bang Observer. The characteristics of circumpulsar detectable precessing discs are estimated as a function of distance from the Solar system. Speculations on detection rates are presented.

  6. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bursalı, Adem; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4–5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  7. Strongly magnetized accretion discs require poloidal flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg; Armitage, Philip J.; Simon, Jacob B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by indirect observational evidence for strongly magnetized accretion discs around black holes, and the novel theoretical properties of such solutions, we investigate how a strong magnetization state can develop and persist. To this end, we perform local simulations of accretion discs with an initially purely toroidal magnetic field of equipartition strength. We demonstrate that discs with zero net vertical magnetic flux and realistic boundary conditions cannot sustain a strong toroidal field. However, a magnetic pressure-dominated disc can form from an initial configuration with a sufficient amount of net vertical flux and realistic boundary conditions. Our results suggest that poloidal flux is a necessary prerequisite for the sustainability of strongly magnetized accretion discs.

  8. Roentgenographic measurement of lumbar intervertebral disc height.

    PubMed

    Andersson, G B; Schultz, A; Nathan, A; Irstam, L

    1981-01-01

    The influences of differences in both intervertebral motion segment orientations and in reader judgments on measurements of the apparent intervertebral disc heights in lateral roentgenographs of the lumbar spine were examined. Forty-nine roentgenographs were obtained of nine discs that were titled laterally up to +/- 10 degrees, and rotated longitudinally up to +/- 20 degrees. Three orthopaedic surgeons and three radiologists measured disc heights from five of these roentgenographs, all using the same measurement method. The differences in apparent height that resulted from the orientation changes and differences in judgments among the six readers were considerable, usually of the order of one half of the nominal disc height. The results show that, while roentgenographic measurements can be used to estimate disc height, accurate measurements cannot readily be made from routine roentgenographs, and the interpretation should always be cautious.

  9. The role of thermodynamics in disc fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatellos, Dimitris; Whitworth, Anthony P.

    2009-12-01

    Thermodynamics play an important role in determining the way a protostellar disc fragments to form planets, brown dwarfs and low-mass stars. We explore the effect that different treatments of radiative transfer have in simulations of fragmenting discs. Three prescriptions for the radiative transfer are used: (i) the diffusion approximation of Stamatellos et al.; (ii) the barotropic equation of state (EOS) of Goodwin et al. and (iii) the barotropic EOS of Bate et al. The barotropic approximations capture the general evolution of the density and temperature at the centre of each proto-fragment but (i) they do not make any adjustments for particular circumstances of a proto-fragment forming in the disc and (ii) they do not take into account thermal inertia effects that are important for fast-forming proto-fragments in the outer disc region. As a result, the number of fragments formed in the disc and their properties are different, when a barotropic EOS is used. This is important not only for disc studies but also for simulations of collapsing turbulent clouds, as in many cases in such simulations stars form with discs that subsequently fragment. We also examine the difference in the way proto-fragments condense out in the disc at different distances from the central star using the diffusion approximation and following the collapse of each proto-fragment until the formation of the second core (ρ ~= 10-3gcm-3). We find that proto-fragments forming closer to the central star tend to form earlier and evolve faster from the first to the second core than proto-fragments forming in the outer disc region. The former have a large pool of material in the inner disc region that they can accrete from and grow in mass. The latter accrete more slowly and they are hotter because they generally form in a quick abrupt event.

  10. Lumbar herniated disc: spontaneous regression

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Kasım Zafer

    2017-01-01

    Background Low back pain is a frequent condition that results in substantial disability and causes admission of patients to neurosurgery clinics. To evaluate and present the therapeutic outcomes in lumbar disc hernia (LDH) patients treated by means of a conservative approach, consisting of bed rest and medical therapy. Methods This retrospective cohort was carried out in the neurosurgery departments of hospitals in Kahramanmaraş city and 23 patients diagnosed with LDH at the levels of L3−L4, L4−L5 or L5−S1 were enrolled. Results The average age was 38.4 ± 8.0 and the chief complaint was low back pain and sciatica radiating to one or both lower extremities. Conservative treatment was administered. Neurological examination findings, durations of treatment and intervals until symptomatic recovery were recorded. Laségue tests and neurosensory examination revealed that mild neurological deficits existed in 16 of our patients. Previously, 5 patients had received physiotherapy and 7 patients had been on medical treatment. The number of patients with LDH at the level of L3−L4, L4−L5, and L5−S1 were 1, 13, and 9, respectively. All patients reported that they had benefit from medical treatment and bed rest, and radiologic improvement was observed simultaneously on MRI scans. The average duration until symptomatic recovery and/or regression of LDH symptoms was 13.6 ± 5.4 months (range: 5−22). Conclusions It should be kept in mind that lumbar disc hernias could regress with medical treatment and rest without surgery, and there should be an awareness that these patients could recover radiologically. This condition must be taken into account during decision making for surgical intervention in LDH patients devoid of indications for emergent surgery. PMID:28119770

  11. Effects of photophoresis on the dust distribution in a 3D protoplanetary disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuello, N.; Gonzalez, J.-F.; Pignatale, F. C.

    2016-05-01

    Photophoresis is a physical process based on momentum exchange between an illuminated dust particle and its gaseous environment. Its net effect in protoplanetary discs (PPD) is the outward transport of solid bodies from hot to cold regions. This process naturally leads to the formation of ring-shaped features where dust piles up. In this work, we study the dynamical effects of photophoresis in PPD by including the photophoretic force in the two-fluid (gas+dust) smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code developed by Barrière-Fouchet et al. (2005). We find that the conditions of pressure and temperature encountered in the inner regions of PPD result in important photophoretic forces, which dramatically affect the radial motion of solid bodies. Moreover, dust particles have different equilibrium locations in the disc depending on their size and their intrinsic density. The radial transport towards the outer parts of the disc is more efficient for silicates than for iron particles, which has important implications for meteoritic composition. Our results indicate that photophoresis must be taken into account in the inner regions of PPD to fully understand the dynamics and the evolution of the dust composition.

  12. Autologous adipose stem cells and polylactide discs in the replacement of the rabbit temporomandibular joint disc

    PubMed Central

    Ahtiainen, Katja; Mauno, Jari; Ellä, Ville; Hagström, Jaana; Lindqvist, Christian; Miettinen, Susanna; Ylikomi, Timo; Kellomäki, Minna; Seppänen, Riitta

    2013-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc lacks functional replacement after discectomy. We investigated tissue-engineered bilayer polylactide (PLA) discs and autologous adipose stem cells (ASCs) as a potential replacement for the TMJ disc. These ASC discs were pre-cultured either in control or in differentiation medium, including transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 for one week. Prior to implantation, expression of fibrocartilaginous genes was measured by qRT-PCR. The control and differentiated ASC discs were implanted, respectively, in the right and left TMJs of rabbits for six (n = 5) and 12 months (n = 5). Thereafter, the excised TMJ areas were examined with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and histology. No signs of infection, inflammation or foreign body reactions were detected at histology, whereas chronic arthrosis and considerable condylar hypertrophy were observed in all operated joints at CBCT. The left condyle treated with the differentiated ASC discs appeared consistently smoother and more sclerotic than the right condyle. The ASC disc replacement resulted in dislocation and morphological changes in the rabbit TMJ. The ASC discs pre-treated with TGF-β1 enhanced the condylar integrity. While adverse tissue reactions were not shown, the authors suggest that with improved attachment and design, the PLA disc and biomaterial itself would hold potential for TMJ disc replacement. PMID:23720535

  13. Spontaneous Regression of Herniated Lumbar Disc with New Disc Protrusion in the Adjacent Level

    PubMed Central

    Gürcan, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs was reported occasionally. The mechanisms proposed for regression of disc herniation are still incomplete. This paper describes and discusses a case of spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs with a new disc protrusion in the adjacent level. A 41-year-old man was admitted with radiating pain and numbness in the left lower extremity with a left posterolateral disc extrusion at L5-S1 level. He was admitted to hospital with low back pain due to disc herniation caudally immigrating at L4-5 level three years ago. He refused the surgical intervention that was offered and was treated conservatively at that time. He had no neurological deficit and a history of spontaneous regression of the extruded lumbar disc; so, a conservative therapy, including bed rest, physical therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and analgesics, was advised. In conclusion, herniated lumbar disc fragments may regress spontaneously. Reports are prone to advise conservative treatment for extruded or sequestrated lumbar disc herniations. However, these patients should be followed up closely; new herniation at adjacent/different level may occur. Furthermore, it is important to know which herniated disk should be removed and which should be treated conservatively, because disc herniation may cause serious complications as muscle weakness and cauda equine syndrome. PMID:27429818

  14. Infrared radiative energy transfer in gaseous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1991-01-01

    Analyses and numerical procedures are presented to investigate the radiative interactions in various energy transfer processes in gaseous systems. Both gray and non-gray radiative formulations for absorption and emission by molecular gases are presented. The gray gas formulations are based on the Planck mean absorption coefficient and the non-gray formulations are based on the wide band model correlations for molecular absorption. Various relations for the radiative flux and divergence of radiative flux are developed. These are useful for different flow conditions and physical problems. Specific plans for obtaining extensive results for different cases are presented. The procedure developed was applied to several realistic problems. Results of selected studies are presented.

  15. Gaseous-fuel safety assessment. Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, M.C.; Edeskuty, F.J.; Bartlit, J.R.; Williamson, K.D. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory, in support of studies sponsored by the Office of Vehicle and Engine Research and Development in the US Department of Energy, has undertaken a safety assessment of selected gaseous fuels for use in light automotive transportation. The purpose is to put into perspective the hazards of these fuels relative to present day fuels and delineated criteria for their safe handling. Fuels include compressed and liquified natural gas (CNG and LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and for reference gasoline and diesel. This paper is a program status report. To date, physicochemical property data and general petroleum and transportation information were compiled; basic hazards defined; alternative fuels were safety-ranked based on technical properties alone; safety data and vehicle accident statistics reviewed; and accident scenarios selected for further analysis. Methodology for such analysis is presently under consideration.

  16. Background reduction of a spherical gaseous detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fard, Ali Dastgheibi; Loaiza, Pia; Piquemal, Fabrice; Giomataris, Ioannis; Gray, David; Gros, Michel; Magnier, Patrick; Navick, Xavier-François; Savvidis, Ilias

    2015-08-01

    The Spherical gaseous detector (or Spherical Proportional Counter, SPC) is a novel type of detector. It consists of a large spherical volume filled with gas, using a single detection readout channel. The detector allows 100 % detection efficiency. SEDINE is a low background version of SPC installed at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane (LSM) underground laboratory (4800 m.w.e) looking for rare events at very low energy threshold, below 100 eV. This work presents the details on the chemical cleaning to reduce internal 210Pb surface contamination on the copper vessel and the external radon reduction achieved via circulation of pure air inside anti-radon tent. It will be also show the radon measurement of pure gases (Ar, N, Ne, etc) which are used in the underground laboratory for the low background experiments.

  17. 2011 GASEOUS IONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Anderson

    2011-03-04

    The Gaseous Ions: Structures, Energetics and Reactions Gordon Research Conference will focus on ions and their interactions with molecules, surfaces, electrons, and light. The conference will cover theory and experiments, and systems ranging from molecular to biological to clusters to materials. The meeting goal continues to be bringing together scientists interested in fundamentals, with those applying fundamental phenomena to a wide range of practical problems. Each of the ten conference sessions will focus on a topic within this spectrum, and there will also be poster sessions for contributed papers, with sufficient space and time to allow all participants to present their latest results. To encourage active participation by young investigators, about ten of the poster abstracts will be selected for 15 minute 'hot topic' talks during the conference sessions. Hot topic selection will be done about a month before the meeting. Funds should be available to offset the participation cost for young investigators.

  18. Background reduction of a spherical gaseous detector

    SciTech Connect

    Fard, Ali Dastgheibi; Loaiza, Pia; Piquemal, Fabrice; Giomataris, Ioannis; Gray, David; Gros, Michel; Magnier, Patrick; Navick, Xavier-François

    2015-08-17

    The Spherical gaseous detector (or Spherical Proportional Counter, SPC) is a novel type of detector. It consists of a large spherical volume filled with gas, using a single detection readout channel. The detector allows 100 % detection efficiency. SEDINE is a low background version of SPC installed at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane (LSM) underground laboratory (4800 m.w.e) looking for rare events at very low energy threshold, below 100 eV. This work presents the details on the chemical cleaning to reduce internal {sup 210}Pb surface contamination on the copper vessel and the external radon reduction achieved via circulation of pure air inside anti-radon tent. It will be also show the radon measurement of pure gases (Ar, N, Ne, etc) which are used in the underground laboratory for the low background experiments.

  19. Acoustoelectric effects in a gaseous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, R. E.; Paranjape, B. V.

    1992-06-01

    The well-known acoustoelectric coupling effect in semiconductors, whereby a sound wave is amplified if a charge carrier's drift velocity exceeds the speed of sound, also exists for ions and electrons in a gaseous medium, but theoretical analysis so far has been limited to simplified collisional-exchange models [G. M. Sessler, Phys. Fluids 7, 90 (1964); U. Ingard and M. Schultz, Phys. Rev. 158, 106 (1967); T. D. Mantei and M. Fitaire, in 2 Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1971), p. 309]. The present paper is based upon more accurate considerations of collisional phenomena, leading to more realistic predictions of the qualitative and quantitative nature of the effect.

  20. The gaseous jet in supersonic crossflow

    SciTech Connect

    Heister, S.D.; Karagozian, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical/numerical model for the deflection and mixing of a single gaseous jet in a supersonic crossflow is presented. The jet cross-section is described in terms of the compressible vortex pair resulting from viscous and impulsive forces acting at the jet periphery, and the vortex pair data are combined with data for the mass and momentum balance along the jet axis in order to model the trajectory and mixing of the injected fluid. A numerical technique is employed to solve for the inviscid outer flow and the position of the bow shock which envelopes the jet. The model is shown to be capable of predicting overall jet penetration (for perfectly or slightly underexpanded jets) to within 10 percent of experimental findings, while requiring only a few seconds of computer time. 24 refs.

  1. Study of Capillary-Based Gaseous Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacobaeus, C.; Francke, T.; Danielsson, M.; Ostling, J.; Peskov, V.

    2004-06-01

    We have studied gain vs. voltage characteristics and position resolutions of multistep capillary plates (two or three capillary plates operating in a cascade), as well as capillary plates operating in a mode when the main amplification occurs between plates or between the capillary plate and the readout plate (parallel plate amplification mode). Results of these studies demonstrated that in the parallel-plate amplification mode one can reach both high gains (>100000) and good position resolutions (~100 micro meter) even with a single step arrangement. It offers a compact amplification structure, which can be used in many applications. For example, in preliminary tests we succeeded to combine it with a photocathode and use it as a position sensitive gaseous photomultiplier. CsI coated capillary plates could also be used as a high position resolution and high rate X-ray converter.

  2. Intervertebral disc properties: challenges for biodevices.

    PubMed

    Costi, John J; Freeman, Brian J C; Elliott, Dawn M

    2011-05-01

    Intervertebral disc biodevices that employ motion-preservation strategies (e.g., nucleus replacement, total disc replacement and posterior stabilization devices) are currently in use or in development. However, their long-term performance is unknown and only a small number of randomized controlled trials have been conducted. In this article, we discuss the following biodevices: interbody cages, nuclear pulposus replacements, total disc replacements and posterior dynamic stabilization devices, as well as future biological treatments. These biodevices restore some function to the motion segment; however, contrary to expectations, the risk of adjacent-level degeneration does not appear to have been reduced. The short-term challenge is to replicate the complex biomechanical function of the motion segment (e.g., biphasic, viscoelastic behavior and nonlinearity) to improve the quality of motion and minimize adjacent level problems, while ensuring biodevice longevity for the younger, more active patient. Biological strategies for regeneration and repair of disc tissue are being developed and these offer exciting opportunities (and challenges) for the longer term. Responsible introduction and rigorous assessment of these new technologies are required. In this article, we will describe the properties of the disc, explore biodevices currently in use for the surgical treatment of low back pain (with an emphasis on lumbar total disc replacement) and discuss future directions for biological treatments. Finally, we will assess the challenges ahead for the next generation of biodevices designed to replace the disc.

  3. The Quiescent Growth Of Galactic Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binney, James

    2016-09-01

    We use N-bodies to simulate the growth since redshift 2 of an isolated disc in a live halo. Giant molecular clouds (GMCs), The bar and spiral structure all play key roles in the evolution of the disc. Our GMCs are short-lived and have masses drawn from a mass spectrum. Their number density is related to the SFR. For the expected number densities and likely maximum masses of GMCs, they heat the disc very effectively at early times, and either postpone or cancel bar formation. They generate remarkably exponential vertical profiles. Spiral structure drives a level of radial migration that agrees well with that predicted by models of local chemical evolution. The radial patterns of star formation include different levels of inside-out growth. The radial scale length of the final disc is always greater than any of the scale lengths used for star formation and rather independent of the extent of inside-out growth. The only way to obtain a thick disc nearly as massive as those observed is to include in the initial conditions a massive, extended object that will be compressed into the present thick disc by the gravity of the thin disc.

  4. Stem cells sources for intervertebral disc regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vadalà, Gianluca; Russo, Fabrizio; Ambrosio, Luca; Loppini, Mattia; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc regeneration field is rapidly growing since disc disorders represent a major health problem in industrialized countries with very few possible treatments. Indeed, current available therapies are symptomatic, and surgical procedures consist in disc removal and spinal fusion, which is not immune to regardable concerns about possible comorbidities, cost-effectiveness, secondary risks and long-lasting outcomes. This review paper aims to share recent advances in stem cell therapy for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. In literature the potential use of different adult stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration has already been reported. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells, adipose tissue derived stem cells, synovial stem cells, muscle-derived stem cells, olfactory neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, disc stem cells, and embryonic stem cells have been studied for this purpose either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, several engineered carriers (e.g., hydrogels), characterized by full biocompatibility and prompt biodegradation, have been designed and combined with different stem cell types in order to optimize the local and controlled delivery of cellular substrates in situ. The paper overviews the literature discussing the current status of our knowledge of the different stem cells types used as a cell-based therapy for disc regeneration. PMID:27247704

  5. Removing gaseous NH3 using biochar as an adsorbent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia is a major fugitive gas emitted from livestock operations and fertilization production. This study tested the potential of various biochars in removing gaseous ammonia via adsorption processes. Gaseous ammonia adsorption capacities of various biochars made from two different feedstocks (wood...

  6. Another one grinds the dust: variability of the planetary debris disc at the white dwarf SDSS J104341.53+085558.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manser, Christopher J.; Gänsicke, Boris T.; Koester, Detlev; Marsh, Thomas R.; Southworth, John

    2016-10-01

    We report 9 yr of optical spectroscopy of the metal-polluted white dwarf SDSS J104341.53+085558.2, which presents morphological variations of the line profiles of the 8600 Å Ca II triplet emission from the gaseous component of its debris disc. Similar changes in the shape of the Ca II triplet have also been observed in two other systems that host a gaseous disc, and are likely related to the same mechanism. We report the Mg, Si, and Ca abundances of the debris detected in the photosphere of SDSS J1043+0855, place upper limits on O and Fe, and derive an accretion rate of (2.5-12) × 108 g s-1, consistent with those found in other systems with detected debris discs. The Mg/Si ratio and the upper limit on the Fe/Si ratio of the accreted material broadly agree with those found for the crust of the Earth. We also review the range of variability observed among white dwarfs with planetary debris discs.

  7. Chemical separation of disc components using RAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojno, Jennifer; Kordopatis, Georges; Steinmetz, Matthias; McMillan, Paul; Matijevič, Gal; Binney, James; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Boeche, Corrado; Just, Andreas; Grebel, Eva K.; Siebert, Arnaud; Bienaymé, Olivier; Gibson, Brad K.; Zwitter, Tomaž; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Navarro, Julio F.; Parker, Quentin A.; Reid, Warren; Seabroke, George; Watson, Fred

    2016-10-01

    We present evidence from the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) survey of chemically separated, kinematically distinct disc components in the solar neighbourhood. We apply probabilistic chemical selection criteria to separate our sample into α-low (`thin disc') and α-high (`thick disc') sequences. Using newly derived distances, which will be utilized in the upcoming RAVE DR5, we explore the kinematic trends as a function of metallicity for each of the disc components. For our α-low disc, we find a negative trend in the mean rotational velocity (Vφ) as a function of iron abundance ([Fe/H]). We measure a positive gradient ∂Vφ/∂[Fe/H] for the α-high disc, consistent with results from high-resolution surveys. We also find differences between the α-low and α-high discs in all three components of velocity dispersion. We discuss the implications of an α-low, metal-rich population originating from the inner Galaxy, where the orbits of these stars have been significantly altered by radial mixing mechanisms in order to bring them into the solar neighbourhood. The probabilistic separation we propose can be extended to other data sets for which the accuracy in [α/Fe] is not sufficient to disentangle the chemical disc components a priori. For such data sets which will also have significant overlap with Gaia DR1, we can therefore make full use of the improved parallax and proper motion data as it becomes available to investigate kinematic trends in these chemical disc components.

  8. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: A new gaseous detector — micro mesh gaseous structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hao-Hui; Guo, Jun-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Lian; Xu, Zi-Zong

    2009-09-01

    The structure and working principle of Micromegas (MICRO Mesh Gaseous Structure) is discussed. Some radiation sources of α and X rays are used to test this detector. The optimized electric-field intensity of the conversion gap is obtained. The transmission of electrons and the uniformity of the amplification gap are also presented. The energy resolution of the 5.9 keV peak is better than 27%.

  9. How Does Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease Affect the Disc Deformation at the Cephalic Levels In Vivo?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaobai; Xia, Qun; Passias, Peter; Li, Weishi; Wood, Kirkham; Li, Guoan

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Case-control study. Objective . To evaluate the effect of lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD) on the disc deformation at the adjacent level and at the level one above the adjacent level during end ranges of lumbar motion. Summary of Background Data It has been reported that in patients with DDD, the intervertebral discs adjacent to the diseased levels have a greater tendency to degenerate. Although altered biomechanics have been suggested to be the causative factors, few data have been reported on the deformation characteristics of the adjacent discs in patients with DDD. Methods Ten symptomatic patients with discogenic low back pain between L4 and S1 and with healthy discs at the cephalic segments were involved. Eight healthy subjects recruited in our previous studies were used as a reference comparison. The in vivo kinematics of L3–L4 (the cephalic adjacent level to the degenerated discs) and L2–L3 (the level one above the adjacent level) lumbar discs of both groups were obtained using a combined magnetic resonance imaging and dual fluoroscopic imaging technique at functional postures. Deformation characteristics, in terms of areas of minimal deformation (defined as less than 5%), deformations at the center of the discs, and maximum tensile and shear deformations, were compared between the two groups at the two disc levels. Results In the patients with DDD, there were significantly smaller areas of minimal disc deformation at L3–L4 and L2–L3 than the healthy subjects (18% compared with 45% of the total disc area, on average). Both L2–L3 and L3–L4 discs underwent larger tensile and shear deformations in all postures than the healthy subjects. The maximum tensile deformations were higher by up to 23% (of the local disc height in standing) and the maximum shear deformations were higher by approximately 25% to 40% (of the local disc height in standing) compared with those of the healthy subjects. Conclusion Both the discs of the adjacent

  10. 21 CFR 872.3970 - Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional... disc prosthesis (interpositional implant). (a) Identification. An interarticular disc prosthesis... Food and Drug Administration on or before March 30, 1999, for any interarticular disc...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3970 - Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional... disc prosthesis (interpositional implant). (a) Identification. An interarticular disc prosthesis... Food and Drug Administration on or before March 30, 1999, for any interarticular disc...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3970 - Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional... disc prosthesis (interpositional implant). (a) Identification. An interarticular disc prosthesis... Food and Drug Administration on or before March 30, 1999, for any interarticular disc...

  13. Archival-grade optical disc design and international standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Toru; Kojyo, Shinichi; Endo, Akihisa; Kodaira, Takuo; Mori, Fumi; Shimizu, Atsuo

    2015-09-01

    Optical discs currently on the market exhibit large variations in life span among discs, making them unsuitable for certain business applications. To assess and potentially mitigate this problem, we performed accelerated degradation testing under standard ISO conditions, determined the probable disc failure mechanisms, and identified the essential criteria necessary for a stable disc composition. With these criteria as necessary conditions, we analyzed the physical and chemical changes that occur in the disc components, on the basis of which we determined technological measures to reduce these degradation processes. By applying these measures to disc fabrication, we were able to develop highly stable optical discs.

  14. Mass spectrometric study of thermodynamic properties of gaseous lead tellurates. Estimation of formation enthalpies of gaseous lead polonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shugurov, S. M.; Panin, A. I.; Lopatin, S. I.; Emelyanova, K. A.

    2016-10-01

    Gaseous reactions involving lead oxides, tellurium oxide and lead tellurates were studied by the Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry. Equilibrium constants and reaction enthalpies were evaluated. Structures, molecular parameters and thermodynamic functions of gaseous PbTeO3 and Pb2TeO4 were calculated by quantum chemistry methods. The formation enthalpies ΔfH0 (298.15) = -294 ± 13 for gaseous PbTeO3 and ΔfH0 (298.15) = -499 ± 12 for gaseous Pb2TeO4 were obtained. On the base of these results the formation enthalpies of gaseous PbPoO3 and Pb2PoO4 were estimated as -249 ± 34 and -478 ± 38, respectively.

  15. Treatment of lumbar disc herniation by percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) and modified PLDD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Xiao fei; Li, Hong zhi; Wu, Ru zhou; Sui, Yun xian

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To study the micro-invasive operative method and to compare the effect of treatment of PLDD and modified PLDD for Lumbar Disc Herniation. Method: Vaporized part of the nucleus pulposus in single or multiple point after acupuncture into lumbar disc, to reach the purpose of the decompression of the lumbar disc. Result: Among the 19 cases of the regular PLDD group, the excellent and good rate was 63.2%, and among the 40 cases of the modified PLDD group, the excellent and good rate was 82.5%. Conclusion: The modified PLDD has good effect on the treatment for lumbar disc herniation.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: intervertebral disc disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... link) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Low Back Pain Fact Sheet Educational Resources (8 links) American Association ... MalaCards: intervertebral disc disease Merck Manual Consumer Version: Low Back Pain Merck Manual Consumer Version: Neck Pain The Children's ...

  17. Dynamical modelling of galactic disc outskirts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassoula, E.

    2017-03-01

    I review briefly some dynamical models of structures in the outer parts of disc galaxies, including models of polar rings, tidal tails and bridges. I then discuss the density distribution in the outer parts of discs. For this, I compare observations to results of a model in which the disc galaxy is in fact the remnant of a major merger, and find good agreement. This comparison includes radial profiles of the projected surface density and of stellar age, as well as time evolution of the break radius and of the inner and outer disc scale lengths. I also compare the radial projected surface density profiles of dynamically motivated mono-age populations and find that, compared to older populations, younger ones have flatter density profiles in the inner region and steeper in the outer one. The break radius, however, does not vary with stellar age, again in good agreement with observations.

  18. [Disc electrophoresis of collagen protein (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Reitmayr, P; Verzár, F

    1975-01-01

    The composition of proteins extracted from tendon collagen is investigated by disc electrophoresis. No qualitative differences can be demonstrated between young and old collagen. The action of formaldehyde and methionine on the tendons has no effect on the electrophoretic picture.

  19. Disc valve for sampling erosive process streams

    DOEpatents

    Mrochek, John E.; Dinsmore, Stanley R.; Chandler, Edward W.

    1986-01-01

    A four-port disc valve for sampling erosive, high temperature process streams. A rotatable disc defining opposed first and second sampling cavities rotates between fired faceplates defining flow passageways positioned to be alternatively in axial alignment with the first and second cavities. Silicon carbide inserts and liners composed of .alpha. silicon carbide are provided in the faceplates and in the sampling cavities to limit erosion while providing lubricity for a smooth and precise operation when used under harsh process conditions.

  20. THE SEPARATION OF URANIUM ISOTOPES BY GASEOUS DIFFUSION: A LINEAR PROGRAMMING MODEL,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    URANIUM, ISOTOPE SEPARATION), (*GASEOUS DIFFUSION SEPARATION, LINEAR PROGRAMMING ), (* LINEAR PROGRAMMING , GASEOUS DIFFUSION SEPARATION), MATHEMATICAL MODELS, GAS FLOW, NUCLEAR REACTORS, OPERATIONS RESEARCH

  1. Radiant Extinction Of Gaseous Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berhan, S.; Chernovsky, M.; Atreya, A.; Baum, Howard R.; Sacksteder, Kurt R.

    2003-01-01

    The absence of buoyancy-induced flows in microgravity (mu:g) and the resulting increase in the reactant residence time significantly alters the fundamentals of many combustion processes. Substantial differences between normal gravity (ng) and :g flames have been reported in experiments on candle flames [1, 2], flame spread over solids [3, 4], droplet combustion [5,6], and others. These differences are more basic than just in the visible flame shape. Longer residence times and higher concentration of combustion products in the flame zone create a thermochemical environment that changes the flame chemistry and the heat and mass transfer processes. Processes such as flame radiation, that are often ignored in ng, become very important and sometimes even controlling. Furthermore, microgravity conditions considerably enhance flame radiation by: (i) the build-up of combustion products in the high-temperature reaction zone which increases the gas radiation, and (ii) longer residence times make conditions appropriate for substantial amounts of soot to form which is also responsible for radiative heat loss. Thus, it is anticipated that radiative heat loss may eventually extinguish the Aweak@ (low burning rate per unit flame area) :g diffusion flame. Yet, space shuttle experiments on candle flames show that in an infinite ambient atmosphere, the hemispherical candle flame in :g will burn indefinitely [1]. This may be because of the coupling between the fuel production rate and the flame via the heat-feedback mechanism for candle flames, flames over solids and fuel droplet flames. Thus, to focus only on the gas-phase phenomena leading to radiative extinction, aerodynamically stabilized gaseous diffusion flames are examined. This enables independent control of the fuel flow rate to help identify conditions under which radiative extinction occurs. Also, spherical geometry is chosen for the :g experiments and modeling because: (i) It reduces the complexity by making the problem

  2. Validation of Sodium MRI of Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenyang; McArdle, Erin; Fenty, Matthew; Witschey, Walter; Elliott, Mark; Sochor, Matthew; Reddy, Ravinder; Borthakur, Arijitt

    2009-01-01

    Study Design This study demonstrated the diagnostic potential of sodium MRI for non-invasive quantification of PG in the intervertebral discs. Objective To determine the existence of a linear correlation between intervertebral disc [Na] measured from sodium MRI and [PG] measurement from DMMB assay. Summary of Background Data Previous studies have shown the possibility of quantifying [Na] in vivo using sodium MRI, however none has shown a direct linear correlation between [Na] measured from sodium MRI and [PG]. Methods 3D sodium MRI images of bovine discs were acquired and converted into [Na] maps. Samples were systematically removed from the discs for DMMB assay. The removal locations were photographically recorded and applied to the [Na] maps to extract the [Na] measurements for comparison. In vivo sodium MRI scans were also carried out on a pair of symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects. Results The linear regression fit of [Na] versus [PG] data yielded a significant linear correlation coefficient of 0.71. The in vivo sodium MRI image of the symptomatic subject showed significant [Na] decrease when compared to that of the asymptomatic subject. Conclusion Sodium MRI's specificity for PG in the intervertebral discs makes it a promising diagnostic tool for the earlier phase of disc degeneration. PMID:20147881

  3. Radio Monitoring of Protoplanetary Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubach, C.; Maddison, S. T.; Wright, C. M.; Wilner, D. J.; Lommen, D. J. P.; Koribalski, B.

    2017-01-01

    Protoplanetary disc systems observed at radio wavelengths often show excess emission above that expected from a simple extrapolation of thermal dust emission observed at short millimetre wavelengths. Monitoring the emission at radio wavelengths can be used to help disentangle the physical mechanisms responsible for this excess, including free-free emission from a wind or jet, and chromospheric emission associated with stellar activity. We present new results from a radio monitoring survey conducted with Australia Telescope Compact Array over the course of several years with observation intervals spanning days, months and years, where the flux variability of 11 T Tauri stars in the Chamaeleon and Lupus star forming regions was measured at 7 and 15 mm and 3 and 6 cm. Results show that for most sources are variable to some degree at 7 mm, indicating the presence of emission mechanisms other than thermal dust in some sources. Additionally, evidence of grain growth to cm-sized pebbles was found for some sources that also have signs of variable flux at 7 mm. We conclude that multiple processes contributing to the emission are common in T Tauri stars at 7 mm and beyond, and that a detection at a single epoch at radio wavelengths should not be used to determine all processes contributing to the emission.

  4. Circumplanetary disc or circumplanetary envelope?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szulágyi, J.; Masset, F.; Lega, E.; Crida, A.; Morbidelli, A.; Guillot, T.

    2016-08-01

    We present three-dimensional simulations with nested meshes of the dynamics of the gas around a Jupiter mass planet with the JUPITER and FARGOCA codes. We implemented a radiative transfer module into the JUPITER code to account for realistic heating and cooling of the gas. We focus on the circumplanetary gas flow, determining its characteristics at very high resolution (80 per cent of Jupiter's diameter). In our nominal simulation where the temperature evolves freely by the radiative module and reaches 13000 K at the planet, a circumplanetary envelope was formed filling the entire Roche lobe. Because of our equation of state is simplified and probably overestimates the temperature, we also performed simulations with limited maximal temperatures in the planet region (1000, 1500, and 2000 K). In these fixed temperature cases circumplanetary discs (CPDs) were formed. This suggests that the capability to form a CPD is not simply linked to the mass of the planet and its ability to open a gap. Instead, the gas temperature at the planet's location, which depends on its accretion history, plays also fundamental role. The CPDs in the simulations are hot and cooling very slowly, they have very steep temperature and density profiles, and are strongly sub-Keplerian. Moreover, the CPDs are fed by a strong vertical influx, which shocks on the CPD surfaces creating a hot and luminous shock-front. In contrast, the pressure supported circumplanetary envelope is characterized by internal convection and almost stalled rotation.

  5. Lumbar Disc Degenerative Disease: Disc Degeneration Symptoms and Magnetic Resonance Image Findings

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Shafaq; Rehmani, Muhammad Asim Khan; Raees, Aisha; Alvi, Arsalan Ahmad; Ashraf, Junaid

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Cross sectional and observational. Purpose To evaluate the different aspects of lumbar disc degenerative disc disease and relate them with magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings and symptoms. Overview of Literature Lumbar disc degenerative disease has now been proven as the most common cause of low back pain throughout the world. It may present as disc herniation, lumbar spinal stenosis, facet joint arthropathy or any combination. Presenting symptoms of lumbar disc degeneration are lower back pain and sciatica which may be aggravated by standing, walking, bending, straining and coughing. Methods This study was conducted from January 2012 to June 2012. Study was conducted on the diagnosed patients of lumbar disc degeneration. Diagnostic criteria were based upon abnormal findings in MRI. Patients with prior back surgery, spine fractures, sacroiliac arthritis, metabolic bone disease, spinal infection, rheumatoid arthritis, active malignancy, and pregnancy were excluded. Results During the targeted months, 163 patients of lumbar disc degeneration with mean age of 43.92±11.76 years, came into Neurosurgery department. Disc degeneration was most commonly present at the level of L4/L5 105 (64.4%).Commonest types of disc degeneration were disc herniation 109 (66.9%) and lumbar spinal stenosis 37 (22.7%). Spondylolisthesis was commonly present at L5/S1 10 (6.1%) and associated mostly with lumbar spinal stenosis 7 (18.9%). Conclusions Results reported the frequent occurrence of lumbar disc degenerative disease in advance age. Research efforts should endeavor to reduce risk factors and improve the quality of life. PMID:24353850

  6. Growth of graphene films from non-gaseous carbon sources

    DOEpatents

    Tour, James; Sun, Zhengzong; Yan, Zheng; Ruan, Gedeng; Peng, Zhiwei

    2015-08-04

    In various embodiments, the present disclosure provides methods of forming graphene films by: (1) depositing a non-gaseous carbon source onto a catalyst surface; (2) exposing the non-gaseous carbon source to at least one gas with a flow rate; and (3) initiating the conversion of the non-gaseous carbon source to the graphene film, where the thickness of the graphene film is controllable by the gas flow rate. Additional embodiments of the present disclosure pertain to graphene films made in accordance with the methods of the present disclosure.

  7. The Hydrodynamic Stability of Gaseous Cosmic Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnboim, Yuval; Padnos, Dan; Zinger, Elad

    2016-11-01

    Virial shocks at the edges of cosmic-web structures are a clear prediction of standard structure formation theories. We derive a criterion for the stability of the post-shock gas and of the virial shock itself in spherical, filamentary, and planar infall geometries. When gas cooling is important, we find that shocks become unstable, and gas flows uninterrupted toward the center of the respective halo, filament, or sheet. For filaments, we impose this criterion on self-similar infall solutions. We find that instability is expected for filament masses between 1011 and 1013 {M}⊙ Mpc-1. Using a simplified toy model, we then show that these filaments will likely feed halos with 1010 M ⊙ ≲ M halo ≲ 1013 M ⊙ at redshift z = 3, as well as 1012 M ⊙ ≲ M halo ≲ 1015 M ⊙ at z = 0. The instability will affect the survivability of the filaments as they penetrate gaseous halos in a non-trivial way. Additionally, smaller halos accreting onto non-stable filaments will not be subject to ram pressure inside the filaments. The instreaming gas will continue toward the center and stop either once its angular momentum balances the gravitational attraction, or when its density becomes so high that it becomes self-shielded to radiation.

  8. Gaseous Nitrogen Orifice Mass Flow Calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritrivi, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The Gaseous Nitrogen (GN2) Orifice Mass Flow Calculator was used to determine Space Shuttle Orbiter Water Spray Boiler (WSB) GN2 high-pressure tank source depletion rates for various leak scenarios, and the ability of the GN2 consumables to support cooling of Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) lubrication during entry. The data was used to support flight rationale concerning loss of an orbiter APU/hydraulic system and mission work-arounds. The GN2 mass flow-rate calculator standardizes a method for rapid assessment of GN2 mass flow through various orifice sizes for various discharge coefficients, delta pressures, and temperatures. The calculator utilizes a 0.9-lb (0.4 kg) GN2 source regulated to 40 psia (.276 kPa). These parameters correspond to the Space Shuttle WSB GN2 Source and Water Tank Bellows, but can be changed in the spreadsheet to accommodate any system parameters. The calculator can be used to analyze a leak source, leak rate, gas consumables depletion time, and puncture diameter that simulates the measured GN2 system pressure drop.

  9. Elements of radiative interactions in gaseous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1991-01-01

    Basic formulations, analyses, and numerical procedures are presented to study radiative interactions in gray as well as nongray gases under different physical and flow conditions. After preliminary fluid-dynamical considerations, essential governing equations for radiative transport are presented that are applicable under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Auxiliary relations for relaxation times and spectral absorption model are also provided. For specific applications, several simple gaseous systems are analyzed. The first system considered consists of a gas bounded by two parallel plates having the same temperature. For this system, both vibrational nonequilibrium effects and radiation conduction interactions are studied. The second system consists of fully developed laminar flow and heat transfer in a parallel plate duct under the boundary condition of a uniform surface heat flux. For this system, effects of gray surface emittance are studied. With the single exception of a circular geometry, the third system is identical to the second system. Here, the influence of nongray walls is also studied, and a correlation between the parallel plates and circular tube results is presented. The particular gases selected are CO, CO2, H2O, CH4, N2O, NH3, OH, and NO. The temperature and pressure range considered are 300 to 2000 K, and 0.1 to 100 atmosphere, respectively. Illustrative results obtained for different cases are discussed and some specific conclusions are provided.

  10. Action-FRET of a Gaseous Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Steven; Knight, Geoffrey; Halim, Mohamed Abdul; Kulesza, Alexander; Choi, Chang Min; Chirot, Fabien; MacAleese, Luke; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is an extremely powerful technique for analysis of biological molecules, in particular proteins. One aspect that has been contentious is how much native solution-phase structure is preserved upon transposition to the gas phase by soft ionization methods such as electrospray ionization. To address this question—and thus further develop mass spectrometry as a tool for structural biology—structure-sensitive techniques must be developed to probe the gas-phase conformations of proteins. Here, we report Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements on a ubiquitin mutant using specific photofragmentation as a reporter of the FRET efficiency. The FRET data is interpreted in the context of circular dichroism, molecular dynamics simulation, and ion mobility data. Both the dependence of the FRET efficiency on the charge state—where a systematic decrease is observed—and on methanol concentration are considered. In the latter case, a decrease in FRET efficiency with methanol concentration is taken as evidence that the conformational ensemble of gaseous protein cations retains a memory of the solution phase conformational ensemble upon electrospray ionization.

  11. Photocatalytic Degradation of a Gaseous Organic Pollutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jimmy C.; Chan, Linda Y. L.

    1998-06-01

    A simple and effective method to demonstrate the phenomenon of photocatalytic degradation of a gaseous organic pollutant was developed. Titanium dioxide (anatase) was used as the photocatalyst, and sunlight was found to be an effective light source for the activation of TiO2. The organic pollutant degrade in this demonstration was a common indoor air pollutant, dichloromethane. The TiO2 powder was suspended in a 3:7 ethanol/water solution, and then coated on microscopic slides. The slides together with appropriate indicators were place in 250-mL conical flasks. A small amount of the volatile dichloromethane solvent was injected into each flask, and the flasks were sealed with a piece of parafilm. Some of the flasks were exposed to direct sunlight, and some were kept in the dark. The degradation products of dichloromethane were carbon dioxide, water, and hydrogen chloride. Formation of the acidic HCl gas could be monitored easily by two indicators, the universal pH paper and ammonia. The universal pH paper would change color from green to red in the presence of HCl and H2O, while HCl would react with ammonia to form a white fume. The results of this demonstration showed that both TiO2 and light were required in this photocatalytic degradation process.

  12. Combustion characteristics of alternative gaseous fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Park, O.; Veloo, Peter S.; Liu, N.; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental flame properties of mixtures of air with hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and C{sub 1}–C{sub 4} saturated hydrocarbons were studied both experimentally and numerically. The fuel mixtures were chosen in order to simulate alternative gaseous fuels and to gain insight into potential kinetic couplings during the oxidation of fuel mixtures. The studies included the use of the counterflow configuration for the determination of laminar flame speeds, as well as extinction and ignition limits of premixed flames. The experiments were modeled using the USC Mech II kinetic model. It was determined that when hydrocarbons are added to hydrogen flames as additives, flame ignition, propagation, and extinction are affected in a counterintuitive manner. More specifically, it was found that by substituting methane by propane or n-butane in hydrogen flames, the reactivity of the mixture is reduced both under pre-ignition and vigorous burning conditions. This behavior stems from the fact that propane and n-butane produce higher amounts of methyl radicals that can readily recombine with atomic hydrogen and reduce thus the rate of the H + O{sub 2} → O + OH branching reaction. The kinetic model predicts closely the experimental data for flame propagation and extinction for various fuel mixtures and pressures, and for various amounts of carbon dioxide in the fuel blend. On the other hand, it underpredicts, in general, the ignition temperatures.

  13. Measuring scattering lengths of gaseous samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, M. G.; Black, T. C.; Haun, R.; Pushin, D. A.; Shahi, C. B.; Weitfeldt, F. E.

    2016-03-01

    Neutron interferometry represents one of the most precise techniques for measuring the coherent scattering lengths (bc) of particular nuclear isotopes. Currently bc for helium-4 is known only to 1% relative uncertainty; a factor of ten higher than precision measurements of other light isotopes. Scattering lengths are measured using a neutron interferometer and by comparing the phase shift a neutron acquires as it passes through a gaseous sample relative to that of a neutron passing through vacuum. The density of the gas is determined by continuous monitoring of the sample's temperature and pressure. Challenges for these types of experiments include achieving the necessary long-term phase stability and accurate determination of the phase shift caused by the aluminum cell used to hold the gas; a phase shift many times greater than that of the sample. The present status on the effort to measure the n-4He scattering length at the NIST center for Neutron Research will be given. Financial support provided by the NSERC `Create' and `Discovery' programs, CERC, NIST and NSF Grant PHY-1205342.

  14. DENVER DISC FILTER IN CO91107, SHOWING FIVE DOUBLESIDED DISCS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DENVER DISC FILTER IN CO-91-107, SHOWING FIVE DOUBLE-SIDED DISCS AND DRIVE MOTOR. NOTE FOUR VERTICAL SLURRY FEED PIPES FROM OVERHEAD MANIFOLD AND SUCTION PIPE IN FOREGROUND. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  15. Preparation of ormetoprim-sulfadimethoxine-medicated discs for disc diffusion assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Romet ( a blend of ormetoprim and sulfadimethoxine) is a type A medicated article for the manufacture of medicated feed in the catfish industry. Recently, the commercial manufacture of ormetoprim-sulfadimethoxine susceptibility discs was discontinued. Ormetoprim-sulfadimethoxine discs were prepare...

  16. Colours of bulges and discs within galaxy clusters and the signature of disc fading on infall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Michael J.; Stevenson, Jeffrey B.; Smith, Russell J.; Wegner, Gary A.; Lucey, John R.; Simard, Luc

    2010-11-01

    The origins of the bulge and disc components of galaxies are of primary importance to understanding galaxy formation. Here bulge-disc decomposition is performed simultaneously in B and R bands for 922 bright galaxies in eight nearby (z < 0.06) clusters with deep redshift coverage using photometry from the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) Fundamental Plane Survey. The total galaxy colours follow a universal colour-magnitude relation (CMR). The discs of L* galaxies are 0.24 mag bluer in B - R than bulges. Bulges have a significant CMR slope while the CMR slope of discs is flat. Thus the slope of the CMR of the total light is driven primarily (60 per cent) by the bulge CMR, and to a lesser extent (40 per cent) by the change in the bulge-to-total ratio as a function of magnitude. The colours of the bulge and disc components do not depend on the bulge-to-total ratio, for galaxies with bulge-to-total ratios greater than 0.2. While the colours of the bulge components do not depend significantly on environment, the median colours of discs vary significantly, with discs in the cluster centre redder by 0.10 mag than those at the virial radius. Thus while star formation in bulges appears to be regulated primarily by mass-dependent, and hence presumably internal, processes, that of discs is affected by the cluster environment.

  17. Modeling and optimization of an elastic arthroplastic disc for a degenerated disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghouchani, Azadeh; Ravari, Mohammad; Mahmoudi, Farid

    2011-10-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model (FEM) of the L3-L4 motion segment using ABAQUS v 6.9 has been developed. The model took into account the material nonlinearities and is imposed different loading conditions. In this study, we validated the model by comparison of its predictions with several sets of experimental data. Disc deformation under compression and segmental rotational motions under moment loads for the normal disc model agreed well with the corresponding in vivo studies. By linking ABAQUS with MATLAB 2010.a, we determined the optimal Young s modulus as well as the Poisson's ratio for the artificial disc under different physiologic loading conditions. The results of the present study confirmed that a well-designed elastic arthroplastic disc preferably has an annulus modulus of 19.1 MPa and 1.24 MPa for nucleus section and Poisson ratio of 0.41 and 0.47 respectively. Elastic artificial disc with such properties can then achieve the goal of restoring the disc height and mechanical function of intact disc under different loading conditions and so can reduce low back pain which is mostly caused due to disc degeneration.

  18. Reoperations Following Cervical Disc Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Lee, Dong-Ho; Caridi, John Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cervical disc replacement (CDR) has emerged as an alternative surgical option to cervical arthrodesis. With increasing numbers of patients and longer follow-ups, complications related to the device and/or aging spine are growing, leaving us with a new challenge in the management and surgical revision of CDR. The purpose of this study is to review the current literature regarding reoperations following CDR and to discuss about the approaches and solutions for the current and future potential complications associated with CDR. The published rates of reoperation (mean, 1.0%; range, 0%-3.1%), revision (mean, 0.2%; range, 0%-0.5%), and removal (mean, 1.2%; range, 0%-1.9%) following CDR are low and comparable to the published rates of reoperation (mean, 1.7%; range; 0%-3.4%), revision (mean, 1.5%; range, 0%-4.7%), and removal (mean, 2.0%; range, 0%-3.4%) following cervical arthrodesis. The surgical interventions following CDR range from the repositioning to explantation followed by fusion or the reimplantation to posterior foraminotomy or fusion. Strict patient selection, careful preoperative radiographic review and surgical planning, as well as surgical technique may reduce adverse events and the need for future intervention. Minimal literature and no guidelines exist for the approaches and techniques in revision and for the removal of implants following CDR. Adherence to strict indications and precise surgical technique may reduce the number of reoperations, revisions, and removals following CDR. Long-term follow-up studies are needed, assessing the implant survivorship and its effect on the revision and removal rates. PMID:26097667

  19. Structures induced by companions in galactic discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyziropoulos, P. E.; Efthymiopoulos, C.; Gravvanis, G. A.; Patsis, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    Using N-body simulations, we study the structures induced on a galactic disc by repeated flybys of a companion in decaying eccentric orbit around the disc. Our system is composed of a stellar disc, bulge and live dark matter halo, and we study the system's dynamical response to a sequence of a companion's flybys, when we vary (i) the disc's temperature (parametrized by Toomre's Q-parameter) and (ii) the companion's mass and initial orbit. We use a new 3D Cartesian grid code: MAIN (Mesh-adaptive Approximate Inverse N-body solver). The main features of MAIN are reviewed, with emphasis on the use of a new Symmetric Factored Approximate Sparse Inverse matrix in conjunction with the multigrid method that allows the efficient solution of Poisson's equation in three space variables. We find that (i) companions need to be assigned initial masses in a rather narrow window of values in order to produce significant and more long-standing non-axisymmetric structures (bars and spirals) in the main galaxy's disc by the repeated flyby mechanism. (ii) A crucial phenomenon is the antagonism between companion-excited and self-excited modes on the disc. Values of Q > 1.5 are needed in order to allow for the growth of the companion-excited modes to prevail over the growth of the disc's self-excited modes. (iii) We give evidence that the companion-induced spiral structure is best represented by a density wave with pattern speed nearly constant in a region extending from the inner Lindblad resonance to a radius close to, but inside, corotation.

  20. Cervical disc hernia operations through posterior laminoforaminotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yolas, Coskun; Ozdemir, Nuriye Guzin; Okay, Hilmi Onder; Kanat, Ayhan; Senol, Mehmet; Atci, Ibrahim Burak; Yilmaz, Hakan; Coban, Mustafa Kemal; Yuksel, Mehmet Onur; Kahraman, Umit

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The most common used technique for posterolateral cervical disc herniations is anterior approach. However, posterior cervical laminotoforaminomy can provide excellent results in appropriately selected patients with foraminal stenosis in either soft disc prolapse or cervical spondylosis. The purpose of this study was to present the clinical outcomes following posterior laminoforaminotomy in patients with radiculopathy. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 35 patients diagnosed with posterolateral cervical disc herniation and cervical spondylosis with foraminal stenosis causing radiculopathy operated by the posterior cervical keyhole laminoforaminotomy between the years 2010 and 2015. Results: The file records and the radiographic images of the 35 patients were assessed retrospectively. The mean age was 46.4 years (range: 34-66 years). Of the patients, 19 were males and 16 were females. In all of the patients, the neurologic deficit observed was radiculopathy. The posterolaterally localized disc herniations and the osteophytic structures were on the left side in 18 cases and on the right in 17 cases. In 10 of the patients, the disc level was at C5-6, in 18 at C6-7, in 2 at C3-4, in 2 at C4-5, in 1 at C7-T1, in 1 patient at both C5-6 and C6-7, and in 1 at both C4-5 and C5-6. In 14 of these 35 patients, both osteophytic structures and protruded disc herniation were present. Intervertebral foramen stenosis was present in all of the patients with osteophytes. Postoperatively, in 31 patients the complaints were relieved completely and four patients had complaints of neck pain and paresthesia radiating to the arm (the success of operation was 88.5%). On control examinations, there was no finding of instability or cervical kyphosis. Conclusion: Posterior cervical laminoforaminotomy is an alternative appropriate choice in both cervical soft disc herniations and cervical stenosis. PMID:27217655

  1. Reconstructing the star formation history of the Milky Way disc(s) from chemical abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snaith, O.; Haywood, M.; Di Matteo, P.; Lehnert, M. D.; Combes, F.; Katz, D.; Gómez, A.

    2015-06-01

    We develop a chemical evolution model to study the star formation history of the Milky Way. Our model assumes that the Milky Way has formed from a closed-box-like system in the inner regions, while the outer parts of the disc have experienced some accretion. Unlike the usual procedure, we do not fix the star formation prescription (e.g. Kennicutt law) to reproduce the chemical abundance trends. Instead, we fit the abundance trends with age to recover the star formation history of the Galaxy. Our method enables us to recover the star formation history of the Milky Way in the first Gyrs with unprecedented accuracy in the inner (R < 7-8 kpc) and outer (R > 9-10 kpc) discs, as sampled in the solar vicinity. We show that half the stellar mass formed during the thick-disc phase in the inner galaxy during the first 4-5 Gyr. This phase was followed by a significant dip in star formation activity (at 8-9 Gyr) and a period of roughly constant lower-level star formation for the remaining 8 Gyr. The thick-disc phase has produced as many metals in 4 Gyr as the thin-disc phase in the remaining 8 Gyr. Our results suggest that a closed-box model is able to fit all the available constraints in the inner disc. A closed-box system is qualitatively equivalent to a regime where the accretion rate maintains a high gas fraction in the inner disc at high redshift. In these conditions the SFR is mainly governed by the high turbulence of the interstellar medium. By z ~ 1 it is possible that most of the accretion takes place in the outer disc, while the star formation activity in the inner disc is mostly sustained by the gas that is not consumed during the thick-disc phase and the continuous ejecta from earlier generations of stars. The outer disc follows a star formation history very similar to that of the inner disc, although initiated at z ~ 2, about 2 Gyr before the onset of the thin-disc formation in the inner disc.

  2. Monitoring by Control Technique - Wet Scrubber For Gaseous Control

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about Wet Scrubber For Gaseous controls used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  3. 53. THRUST SECTION HEATER AND GASEOUS NITROGEN PURGE CONTROLS ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. THRUST SECTION HEATER AND GASEOUS NITROGEN PURGE CONTROLS ON EAST SIDE OF LAUNCH DECK. LAUNCHER IN BACKGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  4. Liquid and gaseous oxygen safety review, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapin, A.

    1972-01-01

    Materials used or contained in liquid and gaseous oxygen systems are analyzed for their compatibility; and areas of possible concern in oxygen systems are outlined. Design criteria, cleaning procedures, and quality control methods are covered in detail.

  5. Method for removing acid gases from a gaseous stream

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, Everett; Zielke, Clyde W.

    1981-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking a heavy aromatic polynuclear carbonaceous feedstock containing reactive alkaline constituents to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels boiling below about 475.degree. C. at atmospheric pressure by contacting the feedstock with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst, thereafter separating a gaseous stream containing hydrogen, at least a portion of the hydrocarbon fuels and acid gases from the molten metal halide and regenerating the molten metal halide, thereby producing a purified molten metal halide stream for recycle to the hydrocracking zone, an improvement comprising; contacting the gaseous acid gas, hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels-containing stream with the feedstock containing reactive alkaline constituents to remove acid gases from the acid gas containing stream. Optionally at least a portion of the hydrocarbon fuels are separated from gaseous stream containing hydrogen, hydrocarbon fuels and acid gases prior to contacting the gaseous stream with the feedstock.

  6. Method of and apparatus for monitoring gaseous pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Cramp, J. H. W.

    1985-07-16

    Laser scanning apparatus for monitoring gaseous pollutants uses two intersecting scanning beams so that the point of intersection (which is monitored by both scanning beams) can be identified by triangulation.

  7. Favorite Demonstrations: Gaseous Diffusion: A Demonstration of Graham's Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, George B.; Ebner, Ronald D.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a demonstration in which gaseous ammonia and hydrochloric acid are used to illustrate rates of diffusion (Graham's Law). Simple equipment needed for the demonstration include a long tube, rubber stoppes, and cotton. Two related demonstrations are also explained. (DH)

  8. 91. VIEW OF OXYGEN AND GASEOUS NITROGEN TANKS AND OXIDIZER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    91. VIEW OF OXYGEN AND GASEOUS NITROGEN TANKS AND OXIDIZER APRON FROM NORTH - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  9. Heterogeneous Reaction gaseous chlorine nitrate and solid sodium chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timonen, Raimo S.; Chu, Liang T.; Leu, Ming-Taun

    1994-01-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of gaseous chlorine nitrate and solid sodium chloride was investigated over a temperature range of 220 - 300 K in a flow-tube reactor interfaced with a differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometer.

  10. Gaseous iodine monitoring in Europe after the Fukushima accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Olivier; de Vismes-Ott, Anne; Manificat, Guillaume; Gurriaran, Rodolfo; Debayle, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    After the Fukushima accident and following the worldwide dispersion of contaminated air masses, many monitoring networks have reported airborne levels of emitted radionuclides, namely and mainly cesium isotopes and iodine 131. Most of the values focused on the particulate fraction (i.e. radionuclide-labeled aerosols) and were dedicated to cesium 137, cesium 134 and iodine 131. Iodine-131 was also found under gaseous form that accounted for most part of the total (gaseous + particulate)I-131 throughout the world. This gaseous predominance was also noticed after the Chernobyl accident despite differences in the type of accident. This predominance is due to the high iodine volatility and also by a rather low transfer from the gaseous form to the particulate one by adsorption on ambient airborne particles. Paradoxically, the number of gaseous determinations was rather low compared to the magnitude of data related to the particulate form (around 10 percent). Routine monitoring of airborne radionuclides species have been extensively based on aerosol sampling for decades as this allows the long term characterization of trace levels of remnant anthropogenic radionuclides. Moreover the capability of gaseous sampler equipped with activated charcoal to allow the quantification of 131I gaseous at trace level is limited by the contact time required for the sorption of iodine on the sorbent and thus by the low acceptable flow rate (usually between 3 and 5 m3/h, exceptionally 12 m3/h). In this context and despite the fact that airborne level outside Japan were of no concern for public health, this contribute to the lack of information on the actual levels of gaseous iodine. Other incidents involving iodine determination in the air have been reported in Europe in 2011 and 2012 without any relation with the Fukushima accident. For the same reason as previously mentioned, mainly, if not only, the particulate form was reported whereas it can be supposed that the predominant form was

  11. [Passive FTIR remote sensing of gaseous pollutant in heated plume].

    PubMed

    Gao, Min-guang; Liu, Wen-qing; Zhang, Tian-shu; Liu, Cheng; Liu, Jian-guo; Wei, Qing-nong; Lu, Yi-huai; Wang, Ya-ping; Zhu, Jun; Xu, Liang

    2006-01-01

    The principle and techniques of passive remote sensing of gaseous pollutant in heated plume was illustrated and discussed in this paper. The algorithm of radiance spectra and transmittance spectra in measured region was proposed, and the method of retrieving gas concentrations with NLLS fitting algorithm was also proposed. The remote senseing of actual gaseous pollutant of smokestack was done, and the quantitative analysis of SO2 and CO2 was completed.

  12. Unravelling tidal dissipation in gaseous giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenel, M.; Mathis, S.; Remus, F.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Tidal dissipation in planetary interiors is one of the key physical mechanisms that drive the evolution of star-planet and planet-moon systems. New constraints on this dissipation are now obtained both in the solar and exo-planetary systems. Aims: Tidal dissipation in planets is intrinsically related to their internal structure. Indeed, the dissipation behaves very differently when we compare its properties in solid and fluid planetary layers. Since planetary interiors consist of both types of regions, it is necessary to be able to assess and compare the respective intensity of the reservoir of dissipation in each type of layers. Therefore, in the case of giant planets, the respective contribution of the potential central dense rocky/icy core and of the deep convective fluid envelope must be computed as a function of the mass and the radius of the core. This will allow us to obtain their respective strengths. Methods: Using a method that evaluates the reservoir of dissipation associated to each region, which is a frequency-average of complex tidal Love numbers, we compared the respective contributions of the central core and of the fluid envelope. Results: For Jupiter- and Saturn-like planets, we show that the viscoelastic dissipation in the core could dominate the turbulent friction acting on tidal inertial waves in the envelope. However, the fluid dissipation would not be negligible. This demonstrates that it is necessary to build complete models of tidal dissipation in planetary interiors from their deep interior to their surface without any arbitrary assumptions. Conclusions: We demonstrate how important it is to carefully evaluate the respective strength of each type of dissipation mechanism in planetary interiors and to go beyond the usually adopted ad-hoc models. We confirm the significance of tidal dissipation in the potential dense core of gaseous giant planets.

  13. Gaseous emissions from plants in controlled environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubay, Denis T.

    1988-01-01

    Plant growth in a controlled ecological life support system may entail the build-up over extended time periods of phytotoxic concentrations of volatile organic compounds produced by the plants themselves. Ethylene is a prominent gaseous emission of plants, and is the focus of this report. The objective was to determine the rate of ethylene release by spring wheat, white potato, and lettuce during early, middle, and late growth stages, and during both the light and dark segments of the diurnal cycle. Plants grown hydroponically using the nutrient film technique were covered with plexiglass containers for 4 to 6 h. At intervals after enclosure, gas samples were withdrawn with a syringe and analyzed for ethylene with a gas chromatograph. Lettuce produced 10 to 100 times more ethylene than wheat or potato, with production rates ranging from 141 to 158 ng g-dry/wt/h. Wheat produced from 1.7 to 14.3 ng g-dry/wt/h, with senescent wheat producing the least amount and flowering wheat the most. Potatoes produced the least amount of ethylene, with values never exceeding 5 ng g-dry/wt/h. Lettuce and potatoes each produced ethylene at similar rates whether in dark period or light period. Ethylene sequestering of 33 to 43 percent by the plexiglass enclosures indicated that these production estimates may be low by one-third to one-half. These results suggest that concern for ethylene build-up in a contained atmosphere should be greatest when growing lettuce, and less when growing wheat or potato.

  14. Euthanasia using gaseous agents in laboratory rodents.

    PubMed

    Valentim, A M; Guedes, S R; Pereira, A M; Antunes, L M

    2016-08-01

    Several questions have been raised in recent years about the euthanasia of laboratory rodents. Euthanasia using inhaled agents is considered to be a suitable aesthetic method for use with a large number of animals simultaneously. Nevertheless, its aversive potential has been criticized in terms of animal welfare. The data available regarding the use of carbon dioxide (CO2), inhaled anaesthetics (such as isoflurane, sevoflurane, halothane and enflurane), as well as carbon monoxide and inert gases are discussed throughout this review. Euthanasia of fetuses and neonates is also addressed. A table listing currently available information to ease access to data regarding euthanasia techniques using gaseous agents in laboratory rodents was compiled. Regarding better animal welfare, there is currently insufficient evidence to advocate banning or replacing CO2 in the euthanasia of rodents; however, there are hints that alternative gases are more humane. The exposure to a volatile anaesthetic gas before loss of consciousness has been proposed by some scientific studies to minimize distress; however, the impact of such a measure is not clear. Areas of inconsistency within the euthanasia literature have been highlighted recently and stem from insufficient knowledge, especially regarding the advantages of the administration of isoflurane or sevoflurane over CO2, or other methods, before loss of consciousness. Alternative methods to minimize distress may include the development of techniques aimed at inducing death in the home cage of animals. Scientific outcomes have to be considered before choosing the most suitable euthanasia method to obtain the best results and accomplish the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement).

  15. Design concepts in lumbar total disc arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Chiara M.; Zweig, Thomas; Ferguson, Stephen; Raimondi, Manuela T.; Lamartina, Claudio; Brayda-Bruno, Marco; Fornari, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    The implantation of lumbar disc prostheses based on different design concepts is widely accepted. This paper reviews currently available literature studies on the biomechanics of TDA in the lumbar spine, and is targeted at the evaluation of possible relationships between the aims of TDA and the geometrical, mechanical and material properties of the various available disc prostheses. Both theoretical and experimental studies were analyzed, by a PUBMED search (performed in February 2007, revised in January 2008), focusing on single level TDA. Both semi-constrained and unconstrained lumbar discs seem to be able to restore nearly physiological IAR locations and ROM values. However, both increased and decreased ROM was stated in some papers, unrelated to the clinical outcome. Segmental lordosis alterations after TDA were reported in most cases, for both constrained and unconstrained disc prostheses. An increase in the load through the facet joints was documented, for both semi-constrained and unconstrained artificial discs, but with some contrasting results. Semi-constrained devices may be able to share a greater part of the load, thus protecting the surrounding biological structure from overloading and possible early degeneration, but may be more susceptible to wear. The next level of development will be the biomechanical integration of compression across the motion segment. All these findings need to be supported by long-term clinical outcome studies. PMID:18946684

  16. Lubrication regimes in lumbar total disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, A; Shepherd, D E T

    2007-08-01

    A number of total disc arthroplasty devices have been developed. Some concern has been expressed that wear may be a potential failure mode for these devices, as has been seen with hip arthroplasty. The aim of this paper was to investigate the lubrication regimes that occur in lumbar total disc arthroplasty devices. The disc arthroplasty was modelled as a ball-and-socket joint. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory was used to calculate the minimum film thickness of the fluid between the bearing surfaces. The lubrication regime was then determined for different material combinations, size of implant, and trunk velocity. Disc arthroplasties with a metal-polymer or metal-metal material combination operate with a boundary lubrication regime. A ceramic-ceramic material combination has the potential to operate with fluid-film lubrication. Disc arthroplasties with a metal-polymer or metal-metal material combination are likely to generate wear debris. In future, it is worth considering a ceramic-ceramic material combination as this is likely to reduce wear.

  17. The Gaia-ESO Survey: characterisation of the [α/Fe] sequences in the Milky Way discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordopatis, G.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Gilmore, G.; Recio-Blanco, A.; de Laverny, P.; Hill, V.; Adibekyan, V.; Heiter, U.; Minchev, I.; Famaey, B.; Bensby, T.; Feltzing, S.; Guiglion, G.; Korn, A. J.; Mikolaitis, Š.; Schultheis, M.; Vallenari, A.; Bayo, A.; Carraro, G.; Flaccomio, E.; Franciosini, E.; Hourihane, A.; Jofré, P.; Koposov, S. E.; Lardo, C.; Lewis, J.; Lind, K.; Magrini, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Pancino, E.; Randich, S.; Sacco, G. G.; Worley, C. C.; Zaggia, S.

    2015-10-01

    -resolution spectroscopic surveys. Conclusions: The small variations in the spatial [α/ Fe] - [Fe/H] paths of the thin disc do not allow us to distinguish between formation models of this structure. On the other hand, the lack of radial gradients and [α/ Fe] - [Fe/H] variations for the thick disc indicate that the mechanism responsible for the mixing of metals in the young Galaxy (e.g. radial stellar migration or turbulent gaseous disc) was more efficient before the (present) thin disc started forming. Based on observations collected with the FLAMES spectrograph at the VLT/UT2 telescope (Paranal Observatory, ESO, Chile), for the Gaia-ESO Large Public Survey, programme 188.B-3002.

  18. Material considerations for intervertebral disc replacement implants.

    PubMed

    Taksali, Sudeep; Grauer, Jonathan N; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2004-01-01

    Cervical and lumbar disc replacements are being performed with increasing frequency. Much of the background for the development for these implants is drawn from the literature of other joint replacements that have been in evolution and use for decades. Important variables for the function and longevity of such disc arthroplasty implants are clearly defined by the material properties of the components used for their production. The most frequently considered materials are cobalt-chrome alloys, titanium alloys, stainless steels, polyethylene, polyurethane and ceramics. In addition to implant materials, the interfaces of such materials must be considered. The bearing surfaces of an implant, in particular, are at risk of wear and failure. Overall, successful, long-term total disc arthroplasty requires a thorough understanding of biomaterials and how they can be used to achieve their desired goals.

  19. The debris disc around HIP 17439

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüppler, Christian; Löhne, Torsten; Krivov, Alexander

    2013-07-01

    In the framework of the Herschel Open Time Key Programme DUNES the debris disc around the K2 V star HIP 17439 was observed. In PACS images the disc emission is spatially clearly extended. A simultaneous analysis of photometric observations and radial brightness profiles from the resolved images provides valuable hints for the disc structure. In an analytical model we adopted power laws for the size and radial distribution of the circumstellar dust and tested two different scenarios: (1) a broad dust ring with a radial extent of about 200AU, (2) two independent dust rings separated by a gap of several tens of AU. Both models fit the spectral energy distribution and the radial profiles quite well. In case (1) the parameters found are consistent with dust stemming from an outer planetesimal belt at ~140AU and strong transport mechanisms that drag the particles inward. Model (2) would imply two planetesimal belts, producing a narrow inner and wider outer distribution of dust.

  20. Effects of disc midplane evolution on CO snowline location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panić, O.; Min, M.

    2017-01-01

    Temperature changes in the planet forming disc midplanes carry important physico-chemical consequences, such as the effect on the locations of the condensation fronts of molecules - the snowlines. Snowlines impose major chemical gradients and possibly foster grain growth. The aim of this paper is to understand how disc midplane temperature changes with gas and dust evolution, and identify trends that may influence planet formation or allow to constrain disc evolution observationally. We calculate disc temperature, hydrostatic equilibrium and dust settling in a mutually consistent way from a grid of disc models at different stages of gas loss, grain growth and hole opening. We find that the CO snowline location depends very strongly on disc properties. The CO snowline location migrates closer to the star for increasing degrees of gas dispersal and dust growth. Around a typical A type star, the snowline can be anywhere between several tens and a few hundred au, depending on the disc properties such as gas mass and grain size. In fact, gas loss is as efficient as dust evolution in settling discs, and flat discs may be gas-poor counterparts of flared discs. Our results, in the context of different pre-main sequence evolution of the luminosity in low- and intermediate-mass stars suggests very different thermal (and hence chemical) histories in these two types of discs. Discs of T Tauri stars settle and cool down while discs of Herbig Ae stars may remain rather warm throughout the pre-main sequence.

  1. Shift in apparent contrast of disc at Secchi disc depth in coastal sea areas.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Hisayuki; Inada, Mari; Choi, Sokjin; Narita, Miho

    2013-03-01

    The relationship between Secchi disc depth and amount of suspended material in seawater varies depending on the particular marine area. To identify the cause of this dependence, we calculated the apparent contrast (C (SD)) at each Secchi disc depth in different coastal sea areas. When the turbidity from the surface to the Secchi disc depth was uniform, the C (SD) was distributed in the range of 1.3 to 0.001 for a Secchi disc depth (Z (SD)) of 2-18 m. Z (SD) tended to decrease as C (SD) became larger. The dominant wavelength for the sea color was 475-500 nm for a Secchi disc depth of 13-18 m, and 500-575 nm for a Z(SD) of 2-6 m, shifting to longer wavelengths as the Secchi disc depth increased. That is, when Z (SD) decreased, the dominant wavelength of the sea color, and the C (SD) increased simultaneously. This phenomenon seems to occur because the contrast threshold for the human eye is higher at longer wavelengths. In other words, the contrast threshold is visibly indistinguishable when the apparent contrast in ocean waters with low Secchi disc depths is high. This phenomenon occurs because the human eye is affected by the color of the sea.

  2. Disc in Flames: Roles of TNF-α and IL-1β in Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Zariel I.; Schoepflin, Zachary R.; Choi, Hyowon; Shapiro, Irving M.; Risbud, Makarand V.

    2016-01-01

    The intervertebral disc is an important mechanical structure that allows range of motion of the spinal column. Degeneration of the intervertebral disc, incited by aging, traumatic insult, genetic predisposition, or other factors, is often defined by functional and structural changes in the tissue, including excessive breakdown of the extracellular matrix, increased disc cell senescence and death, and compromised biomechanical function of the tissue. Intervertebral disc degeneration is strongly correlated with low back pain, which is a highly prevalent and costly condition, significantly contributing to loss in productivity and health care costs. Disc degeneration is a chronic, progressive condition, and current therapies are limited and often focused on symptomatic pain relief rather than curtailing the progression of the disease. Inflammatory processes, exacerbated by cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β are believed to be key mediators of disc degeneration and low back pain. In this review, we describe the contributions of TNF-α and IL-1β to changes seen during disc degeneration at the cellular and tissue level, new evidence suggesting a link between infection of the spine and low back pain, and the emerging therapeutic modalities aimed at combating these processes. PMID:26388614

  3. Cometary ices in forming protoplanetary disc midplanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdovskaya, Maria N.; Walsh, Catherine; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Furuya, Kenji; Marboeuf, Ulysse; Thiabaud, Amaury; Harsono, Daniel; Visser, Ruud

    2016-10-01

    Low-mass protostars are the extrasolar analogues of the natal Solar system. Sophisticated physicochemical models are used to simulate the formation of two protoplanetary discs from the initial prestellar phase, one dominated by viscous spreading and the other by pure infall. The results show that the volatile prestellar fingerprint is modified by the chemistry en route into the disc. This holds relatively independent of initial abundances and chemical parameters: physical conditions are more important. The amount of CO2 increases via the grain-surface reaction of OH with CO, which is enhanced by photodissociation of H2O ice. Complex organic molecules are produced during transport through the envelope at the expense of CH3OH ice. Their abundances can be comparable to that of methanol ice (few per cent of water ice) at large disc radii (R > 30 au). Current Class II disc models may be underestimating the complex organic content. Planet population synthesis models may underestimate the amount of CO2 and overestimate CH3OH ices in planetesimals by disregarding chemical processing between the cloud and disc phases. The overall C/O and C/N ratios differ between the gas and solid phases. The two ice ratios show little variation beyond the inner 10 au and both are nearly solar in the case of pure infall, but both are subsolar when viscous spreading dominates. Chemistry in the protostellar envelope en route to the protoplanetary disc sets the initial volatile and prebiotically significant content of icy planetesimals and cometary bodies. Comets are thus potentially reflecting the provenances of the midplane ices in the solar nebula.

  4. Aerodynamic investigations of a disc-wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrache, Alexandru; Frunzulica, Florin; Grigorescu, Sorin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics of a wing-disc, for a civil application in the fire-fighting system. The aerodynamic analysis is performed using a CFD code, named ANSYS Fluent, in the flow speed range up to 25 m/s, at lower and higher angle of attack. The simulation is three-dimensional, using URANS completed by a SST turbulence model. The results are used to examine the flow around the disc with increasing angle of attack and the structure of the wake.

  5. Splint-assisted disc plication surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Omar; Logan, Greg; Komath, Deepak; Grossman, Patrick; Ayliffe, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Summary Chronic disc displacement may lead to long-term pain. Temporomandibular joint surgery is reserved for those patients whose symptoms remain severe despite conservative treatment. We looked at the of effect of modified meniscopexy on patients with chronic disc displacement without reduction who did not respond to non-surgical pain management treatment. In this retrospective study a total of 59 joints was treated and all patients except one underwent splint assisted bilateral meniscopexy: this patient had splint assisted unilateral meniscopexy. At the time of presentation and following treatment all patients underwent clinical examination and were required to complete a pain and functional questionnaire. All patients reported improvement following treatment. PMID:28149454

  6. Disc valve for sampling erosive process streams

    DOEpatents

    Mrochek, J.E.; Dinsmore, S.R.; Chandler, E.W.

    1986-01-07

    A four-port disc valve is described for sampling erosive, high temperature process streams. A rotatable disc defining opposed first and second sampling cavities rotates between fired faceplates defining flow passageways positioned to be alternatively in axial alignment with the first and second cavities. Silicon carbide inserts and liners composed of [alpha] silicon carbide are provided in the faceplates and in the sampling cavities to limit erosion while providing lubricity for a smooth and precise operation when used under harsh process conditions. 1 fig.

  7. [Biology and mechanobiology of the intervertebral disc].

    PubMed

    González Martínez, Emilio; García-Cosamalón, José; Cosamalón-Gan, Iván; Esteban Blanco, Marta; García-Suarez, Olivia; Vega, José A

    2017-01-24

    The intervertebral disc (IVD) is noted for its low cell content, and being the largest avascular structure of human body. The low amount of cells in the disc have to adapt to an anaerobic metabolism with low oxygen pressure and acidic pH. Apart from surviving in an adverse microenvironment, they are exposed to a high level of mechanical stress. The biological adaptation of cells to acidosis and hyperosmolarity conditions are regulated by mechanoproteins, which are responsible for converting a mechanical signal into a cellular response, thus modifying its gene expression. Mechanobiology helps us to better understand the pathophysiology of IVD and its potential biological repair.

  8. Area Minimizing Discs in Metric Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytchak, Alexander; Wenger, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    We solve the classical problem of Plateau in the setting of proper metric spaces. Precisely, we prove that among all disc-type surfaces with prescribed Jordan boundary in a proper metric space there exists an area minimizing disc which moreover has a quasi-conformal parametrization. If the space supports a local quadratic isoperimetric inequality for curves we prove that such a solution is locally Hölder continuous in the interior and continuous up to the boundary. Our results generalize corresponding results of Douglas Radò and Morrey from the setting of Euclidean space and Riemannian manifolds to that of proper metric spaces.

  9. Fractured occluder disc: a previously unrecognized complication of the Starr-Edwards disc prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Malouf, J F; Hannoush, H M; Odell, J A

    2001-01-01

    Fracture of the occluder disc of a low-profile Starr-Edwards prosthesis is a hitherto unrecognized complication. We describe a patient who presented with right heart failure and severe pulmonary hypertension 27 years after mitral valve replacement with a model 6520 caged-disc prosthesis. At surgery, there was a longitudinal split in the occluder disc, and organized thrombus was lodged between the split segments. This case offers a unique opportunity to study the long-term effects of wear on the polyethylene poppet and Stellite cage.

  10. The effectiveness of percutaneous laser disc decompression for the prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Ming Wei; Liu, Wei; Feng, Wei; Ma, Nan

    2009-07-01

    Objective: to investigate the role of associated factors in the effectiveness of laser treatment for prolapsed lumber intervertebral disc. Method: 302 prolapsed lumber intervertebral discs in 212 patients were treated with percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD). Patients were followed up by 12month, the associated factors which affecting the effectiveness of treatment, ie age, duration of illness were analyzed. Results: Punctual Success rate was 100%. After 12 month's follow up, 86% successful outcomes were obtained, in which 93% successful outcomes were obtained in patients less than 50 years old, 92% successful outcomes was obtained in the patients whose duration of illness less than 1 year.

  11. Intervertebral disc degeneration: evidence for two distinct phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Michael A; Dolan, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    We review the evidence that there are two types of disc degeneration. ‘Endplate-driven’ disc degeneration involves endplate defects and inwards collapse of the annulus, has a high heritability, mostly affects discs in the upper lumbar and thoracic spine, often starts to develop before age 30 years, usually leads to moderate back pain, and is associated with compressive injuries such as a fall on the buttocks. ‘Annulus-driven’ disc degeneration involves a radial fissure and/or a disc prolapse, has a low heritability, mostly affects discs in the lower lumbar spine, develops progressively after age 30 years, usually leads to severe back pain and sciatica, and is associated with repetitive bending and lifting. The structural defects which initiate the two processes both act to decompress the disc nucleus, making it less likely that the other defect could occur subsequently, and in this sense the two disc degeneration phenotypes can be viewed as distinct. PMID:22881295

  12. Cell transplantation in lumbar spine disc degeneration disease.

    PubMed

    Hohaus, C; Ganey, T M; Minkus, Y; Meisel, H J

    2008-12-01

    Low back pain is an extremely common symptom, affecting nearly three-quarters of the population sometime in their life. Given that disc herniation is thought to be an extension of progressive disc degeneration that attends the normal aging process, seeking an effective therapy that staves off disc degeneration has been considered a logical attempt to reduce back pain. The most apparent cellular and biochemical changes attributable to degeneration include a decrease in cell density in the disc that is accompanied by a reduction in synthesis of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix components. With this in mind, one therapeutic strategy would be to replace, regenerate, or augment the intervertebral disc cell population, with a goal of correcting matrix insufficiencies and restoring normal segment biomechanics. Biological restoration through the use of autologous disc chondrocyte transplantation offers a potential to achieve functional integration of disc metabolism and mechanics. We designed an animal study using the dog as our model to investigate this hypothesis by transplantation of autologous disc-derived chondrocytes into degenerated intervertebral discs. As a result we demonstrated that disc cells remained viable after transplantation; transplanted disc cells produced an extracellular matrix that contained components similar to normal intervertebral disc tissue; a statistically significant correlation between transplanting cells and retention of disc height could displayed. Following these results the Euro Disc Randomized Trial was initiated to embrace a representative patient group with persistent symptoms that had not responded to conservative treatment where an indication for surgical treatment was given. In the interim analyses we evaluated that patients who received autologous disc cell transplantation had greater pain reduction at 2 years compared with patients who did not receive cells following their discectomy surgery and discs in patients that

  13. Gaseous elemental mercury and reactive gaseous mercury in coastal urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soerensen, Anne L.; Skov, Henrik; Johnson, Matthew

    2010-05-01

    Mercury is both a global and a local pollutant. Anthropogenic emissions are found in the long lived form of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg(0)) and the short lived forms of reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) and particulate mercury. Bromine is believed to be the main oxidant of Hg(0) in the atmosphere. One source of bromine is release from sea spray above the ocean. The difference in meteorological conditions and chemical composition in the marine boundary layer compared to the terrestrial boundary layer combined with mercury emissions from coastal urban areas could cause a different pattern in speciation and deposition of mercury at the coast than seen at inland urban sites. We want to investigate the impact of anthropogenic emissions on mercury concentrations in the immediate environment of coastal urban areas versus long range. This is done to better understand emission loads, speciation, and impact of mercury on air, soil, and water in urban areas. We present results from short duration measurements of Hg(0) and RGM in 15 coastal cities and their marine boundary layer. A closer examination of 3-4 days continuous harbor measurements in three urban areas in the Southern Hemisphere (Sydney (Australia), Christchurch (New Zealand) and Valparaiso (Chile)) was carried out. The speciation and concentration patterns in urban areas close to the coast could be different from inland urban areas due to the effect of e.g. bromine atoms from MBL and high relative humidity at the coast, which is mixed with polluted air from the cities. The dynamics of the observations will be discussed.

  14. Interactive Optical Disc Systems: Part 1: Analog Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hessler, David W.

    1984-01-01

    Details distinction between digital and analog data, advantages of analog storage, and optical disc use to store analog data. Configuration and potential of three levels of laser disc systems are explained. Selection of display devices for use with laser disc systems and accessing audio data are addressed. (Continued in next issue.) (EJS)

  15. 26 CFR 1.992-1 - Requirements of a DISC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... election to be treated as a DISC be in effect for such year, as described in paragraph (e) of this section... stock. (e) Election in effect. In order for a corporation to be a DISC for a taxable year, an election... for purposes of § 1.992-2(e)(3) (relating to the termination of a DISC election if a corporation...

  16. Prognosis of intervertebral disc loss from diagnosis of degenerative disc disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Lin, A.; Tay, K.; Romano, W.; Osman, Said

    2015-03-01

    Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD) is one of the most common causes of low back pain, and is a major factor in limiting the quality of life of an individual usually as they enter older stages of life, the disc degeneration reduces the shock absorption available which in turn causes pain. Disc loss is one of the central processes in the pathogenesis of DDD. In this study, we investigated whether the image texture features quantified from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be appropriate markers for diagnosis of DDD and prognosis of inter-vertebral disc loss. The main objective is to use simple image based biomarkers to perform prognosis of spinal diseases using non-invasive procedures. Our results from 65 subjects proved the higher success rates of the combination marker compared to the individual markers and in the future, we will extend the study to other spine regions to allow prognosis and diagnosis of DDD for a wider region.

  17. DISC-BASED IMMUNOASSAY MICROARRAYS. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray technology as applied to areas that include genomics, diagnostics, environmental, and drug discovery, is an interesting research topic for which different chip-based devices have been developed. As an alternative, we have explored the principle of compact disc-based...

  18. Eclipse Mapping: Astrotomography of Accretion Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, Raymundo

    The Eclipse Mapping Method is an indirect imaging technique that transforms the shape of the eclipse light curve into a map of the surface brightness distribution of the occulted regions. Three decades of application of this technique to the investigation of the structure, the spectrum and the time evolution of accretion discs around white dwarfs in cataclysmic variables have enriched our understanding of these accretion devices with a wealth of details such as (but not limited to) moving heating/cooling waves during outbursts in dwarf novae, tidally-induced spiral shocks of emitting gas with sub-Keplerian velocities, elliptical precessing discs associated to superhumps, and measurements of the radial run of the disc viscosity through the mapping of the disc flickering sources. This chapter reviews the principles of the method, discusses its performance, limitations, useful error propagation procedures, as well as highlights a selection of applications aimed at showing the possible scientific problems that have been and may be addresses with it.

  19. Disc valve for sampling erosive process streams

    DOEpatents

    Mrochek, J.E.; Dinsmore, S.R.; Chandler, E.W.

    1984-08-16

    This is a patent for a disc-type, four-port sampling valve for service with erosive high temperature process streams. Inserts and liners of ..cap alpha..-silicon carbide respectively, in the faceplates and in the sampling cavities, limit erosion while providing lubricity for a smooth and precise operation. 1 fig.

  20. Frictional Torque on a Rotating Disc

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to motion often includes a dry frictional term independent of the speed of an object and a fluid drag term varying linearly with speed in the viscous limit. (At higher speeds, quadratic drag can also occur.) Here, measurements are performed for an aluminium disc mounted on bearings that is given an initial twist and allowed to spin…

  1. Nonsurgical management of disc-interference disorders.

    PubMed

    Okeson, J P

    1991-01-01

    Disc-interference disorders are a group of intracapsular problems that make up one category of temporomandibular disorders. The dental profession's understanding of these disorders has changed greatly in recent years. This article reviews current concepts regarding the diagnosis and management of these disorders as revealed through recent clinical studies.

  2. Extradural cavernous haemangioma simulating a disc protrusion.

    PubMed

    Slavotinek, J P; Fowler, S; Sage, M R; Brophy, B P

    1999-02-01

    Cavernous haemangiomas confined to the epidural space are rare and are therefore infrequently considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural masses. In order to draw attention to this diagnosis, a case in which an epidural cavernous haemangioma simulates a lateral/foraminal disc protrusion is presented.

  3. Scaling from discs to pleated devices.

    PubMed

    Giglia, Sal; Yavorsky, David

    2007-01-01

    Membrane discs offer a convenient format for evaluating membrane performance in normal flow filtration. However, while pleated devices of different sizes tend to scale in close proportion to their contained areas, they do not necessarily scale in direct proportion from flat discs. The objectives of this study are to quantify differences in performance among sterilizing-grade membrane devices as a function of device type and size, to develop an understanding of the factors that affect device scalability, and to develop a mathematical model to predict a cartridge-to-disc scalability factor based on membrane properties and porous support properties and dimensions. Measured and predicted normalized water permeability scalability factors for seven types of pleated cartridges, including 0.1-micro and 0.2-micro rated PES, and 0.2-micro rated polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) sterilizing-grade filters in nominal 1-inch to 5-inch lengths, were determined. The results of this study indicate that pleated cartridge performance can be closely predicted based on 47-mm disc performance provided that a number of measured device parameters are properly accounted for, most importantly parasitic pressure losses in the filter device and plumbing connections, intrinsic membrane variability, true effective device filtration area, and the hydraulic properties of all porous support materials. Throughput scalability factors (discs to devices) tend to converge towards unity, especially for highly plugging streams. As the membrane fouls, the resistance through the membrane dominates other resistances, so the flux scales more linearly with membrane area and the overall scaling factor becomes close to one. The results of throughput tests on seven different cartridge types and five different challenge streams (with widely varying fouling characteristics) show that most of the throughput scaling factors were within +/-10% of 1.0. As part of this study, the effects of pressure and temperature were

  4. Enhancement of Overgrowth by Gene Interactions in Lethal(2)giant Discs Imaginal Discs from Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Buratovich, M. A.; Bryant, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    Recessive lethal mutations of the lethal(2)giant discs (l(2)gd) and lethal(2)fat (l(2)ft) loci of Drosophila melanogaster cause imaginal disc hyperplasia during a prolonged larval stage. Imaginal discs from l(2)ft l(2)gd or Gl(2)gd double homozygotes show more extensive overgrowth than in either single homozygote, and double homozygous l(2)ft l(2)gd mitotic clones in adult flies show much more overgrowth than is seen in clones homozygous for either l(2)gd or l(2)ft alone. dachsous (ds) also acts as an enhancer of l(2)gd, producing dramatically overgrown discs and causing failure to pupariate in double homozygotes. The comb gap (cg) mutation, which also interacts with ds, greatly enhances the tendency of imaginal discs from l(2)gd larvae to duplicate as they overgrow. If l(2)gd homozygotes are made heterozygous for l(2)ft, then several discs duplicate, indicating that l(2)ft acts as a dominant enhancer of l(2)gd. l(2)ft also acts as a dominant enhancer of l(2)gd, and conversely l(2)gd acts as a dominant modifier of l(2)ft. The enhancement of overgrowth caused by various mutant combinations is accompanied by changes in expression of Decapentaplegic and Wingless. These results show that tumor suppressor genes act in combination to control cell proliferation, and that tissue hyperplasia can be associated with ectopic expression of genes involved in pattern formation. PMID:9335602

  5. Role of Cytokines in Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: Pain and Disc-content

    PubMed Central

    Risbud, Makarand V.; Shapiro, Irving. M

    2014-01-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc is the major contributor to back/neck and radicular pain. It is characterized by an elevation in levels of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1 α/β, IL-6 and IL-17 secreted by the disc cells themselves; these cytokines promote matrix degradation, chemokine production and changes in cell phenotype. The resulting imbalance between catabolic and anabolic responses leads to degeneration, as well as herniation and radicular pain. Release of chemokines from degenerating discs promote infiltration and activation of T and B cells, macrophages, neutrophils, and mast cells further amplifying the inflammatory cascade. Immunocyte migration into the disc is accompanied by the appearance of microvasculature and nerve fibers arising from the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). In this inflammatory milieu, neurogenic factors in particular nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derive neurotrophic factor (BDNF) generated by disc and immune cells induce expression of pain associated cation channels in DRGs. Depolarization of these channels is likely to promote discogenic and radicular pain and reinforce the cytokine-mediated degenerative cascade. Taken together, the enhanced understanding of the contribution of cytokines and immune cells to catabolic and nociceptive processes provide new targets for treating symptomatic disc disease. PMID:24166242

  6. Fusion versus Bryan Cervical Disc in two-level cervical disc disease: a prospective, randomised study

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Lin; Zhang, Li; Hou, Yong

    2008-01-01

    In this prospective study, our aim was to compare the functional results and radiographic outcomes of fusion and Bryan Cervical Disc replacement in the treatment of two-level cervical disc disease. A total of 65 patients with two-level cervical disc disease were randomly assigned to two groups, those operated on with Bryan Cervical Disc replacement (31) and those operated on with anterior cervical fusion with an iliac crest autograft and plate (34). Clinical evaluation was carried out using the visual analogue scale (VAS), the Short Form 36 (SF-36) and the neck disability index (NDI) during a two year follow-up. Radiological evaluation sought evidence of range of motion, stability and subsidence of the prosthesis. Substantial reduction in NDI scores occurred in both groups, with greater percent improvement in the Bryan group (P = 0.023). The arm pain VAS score improvement was substantial in both groups. Bryan artificial cervical disc replacement seems reliable and safe in the treatment of patients with two-level cervical disc disease. PMID:18956190

  7. Influence of blade profile of disc cutter on numerical simulation of the disc slitting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, J.; Lu, J. B.; Yan, Q. S.; Li, S.

    2015-03-01

    The disc slitting machining experiments for electrical steel sheet were conducted to investigate the wear process of carbide alloy disc cutter and the slitting quality in the disc slitting process, and the blade contour shape of disc cutter in different slitting distance was measured by the surface profiler. A DEFORM-2D model, where the real blade profile or arc fitting profile was used as the blade contour of the cutter, was built to simulate the disc slitting process. Results show that the blade wear of disc cutter increases. The blade wear presents uneven in the side surface and cylindrical surface of the cutter, and the side wear is more serious with the increase of the slitting distance of electrical steel sheet. As the blade wear increases, the height of the rollover increases gradually, the height of the shear area increases at first and then decreases, but the height of the fracture area decreases at first and then increases. Compared with the arc fitting profile, the simulation surface morphology using the real blade profile is in good agreement with the experimental result. The variation of blade profile can change the distribution of the hydrostatic stress of sheet metal and the occurring and propagating of the crack, and the maximum hydrostatic stress can be used to estimate the change tendency of the fracture area.

  8. Differentiation of glaucomatous optic discs with different appearances using optic disc topography parameters: The Glaucoma Stereo Analysis Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanito, Masaki; Nitta, Koji; Katai, Maki; Kitaoka, Yasushi; Yokoyama, Yu; Omodaka, Kazuko; Nakazawa, Toru

    2017-01-01

    The Glaucoma Stereo Analysis Study (GSAS) is a multicenter collaborative study of the characteristics of glaucomatous optic disc morphology using a stereo fundus camera. Using GSAS dataset, the formulas for predicting different glaucomatous optic disc appearances were established. The GSAS dataset containing three-dimensionally-analyzed optic disc topographic parameters from 187 eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma was assessed with discrimination analyses to obtain formulas predictive of glaucomatous optic disc appearances: focal ischemic (FI); generalized enlargement (GE), myopic glaucomatous (MY), and senile sclerotic (SS). Using 38 optic disc parameters-substituted discrimination analyses with a stepwise forward-selection method, six parameters (temporal and nasal rim-disc ratios, mean cup depth, height variation contour, disc tilt angle, and rim decentering absolute) were selected into the formulas. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curves for predicting the four disc types with established formulas were 0.88, 0.91, 0.93, and 0.86 for FI, MY, SS, and GE, respectively. Age, visual acuity, refractive error, glaucoma (normal or high-tension glaucoma), and baseline intraocular pressure differed significantly among the four optic disc types, suggesting the appearances represent different clinical glaucoma phenotypes. Using six optic disc topographic parameters obtained by stereo fundus camera, the GSAS classification formulas predicted and quantified each component of different optic disc appearances in each eye and provided a novel parameter to describe glaucomatous optic disc characteristics. PMID:28178303

  9. Extruder system and method for treatment of a gaseous medium

    DOEpatents

    Silvi, Norberto; Perry, Robert James; Singh, Surinder Prabhjot; Balch, Gary Stephen; Westendorf, Tiffany Elizabeth Pinard

    2016-04-05

    A system for treatment of a gaseous medium, comprises an extruder having a barrel. The extruder further comprises a first inlet port, a second inlet port, and a plurality of outlet ports coupled to the barrel. The first inlet port is configured for feeding a lean sorbent, the second inlet port is configured for feeding a gaseous medium, and the plurality of outlet ports are configured for releasing a plurality of components removed from the gaseous medium. Further, the extruder comprises a plurality of helical elements coupled to a plurality of kneading elements, mounted on a shaft, and disposed within the barrel. The barrel and the plurality of helical and kneading elements together form an absorption unit and a desorption unit. The first and second inlet ports are formed in the absorption unit and the plurality of outlet ports are formed in the absorption and desorption units.

  10. Extension of JAGUAR Procedures for New Gaseous and Condensed Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiel, Leonard; Baker, Ernest; Murphy, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    JAGUAR is a highly efficient and accurate thermochemical equilibrium program for the detonation properties of explosives. In previous studies equation of state EXP-6 parameters for H-CN-O gaseous explosives product species have been optimized with available individual species Hugoniot data. The Jaguar library also includes solid and liquid properties for carbon and aluminum, silicon, and boron compounds. In this study the Jaguar property library has been expanded to include additional gaseous, liquid, and solid detonation products. New EXP-6 parameters for gaseous fluorine and chlorine compounds have been established through theoretical procedures, and by analyses of Hugoniot data for the actual species or for reactants which decompose into these compounds. Properties for additional condensed species have also been analyzed and added to the library. Extensive tests have beeb performed to determine the accuracy of calculated detonation properties in comparison to experimental data. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the Institute for Multi Scale Reactive Modeling.

  11. Extension of jaguar procedures for new gaseous species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiel, Leonard; Baker, Ernest L.; Murphy, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    Jaguar is a highly efficient and accurate thermochemical equilibrium program for the detonation properties of explosives. In previous studies, equation of state Exp-6 parameters for H-C-N-O gaseous explosives product species have been optimized with available individual species Hugoniot data. The Jaguar library also includes solid and liquid properties for carbon and aluminum, silicon, and boron compounds. In this study the Jaguar property library has been expanded to include additional gaseous detonation products. New Exp-6 parameters for gaseous fluorine and chlorine compounds have been established by analyses of Hugoniot data for the actual species or for reactants which decompose into these compounds. Tests with data for explosives and additional compounds containing fluorine and chlorine have been performed to determine the accuracy of calculated detonation properties in comparison to experimental data.

  12. Characteristics of response factors of coaxial gaseous rocket injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Daniel, B. R.; Zinn, B. T.

    1975-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation undertaken to determine the frequency dependence of the response factors of various gaseous propellant rocket injectors subject to axial instabilities are presented. The injector response factors were determined, using the modified impedance-tube technique, under cold-flow conditions simulating those observed in unstable rocket motors. The tested injectors included a gaseous-fuel injector element, a gaseous-oxidizer injector element and a coaxial injector with both fuel and oxidizer elements. Emphasis was given to the determination of the dependence of the injector response factor upon the open-area ratio of the injector, the length of the injector orifice, and the pressure drop across the injector orifices. The measured data are shown to be in reasonable agreement with the corresponding injector response factor data predicted by the Feiler and Heidmann model.

  13. Creep Behavior of Anisotropic Functionally Graded Rotating Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rattan, Minto; Chamoli, Neeraj; Singh, Satya Bir; Gupta, Nishi

    2013-08-01

    The creep behavior of an anisotropic rotating disc of functionally gradient material (FGM) has been investigated in the present study using Hill's yield criteria and the creep behavior in this case is assumed to follow Sherby's constitutive model. The stress and strain rate distributions are calculated for disc having different types of anisotropy and the results obtained are compared graphically. It is concluded that the anisotropy of the material has a significant effect on the creep behavior of the FGM disc. It is also observed that the FGM disc shows better creep behavior than the non-FGM disc.

  14. SIGN, a WIMP detector based on high pressure gaseous neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. T.; Gao, J.; Maxin, J.; Miller, J.; Salinas, G.; Wang, H.

    A new WIMP detector concept based on the measurement of Scintillation and Ionization in Gaseous Neon (SIGN) is presented. The detector employs room temperature gaseous neon at a pressure of ≥100 bars as the WIMP target. The ionization is readout using either charge gain or electrofluorescence or both in a modified cylindrical proportional chamber geometry. The primary scintillation is detected by placing a CsI photocathode on the inside wall of the cylindrical chamber. The neon is doped with xenon (≤0.5%) for signal enhancement. Theoretical considerations suggest that the measurement of both scintillation and ionization will provide discrimination between nuclear and electron recoils in this gas mixture.

  15. Dipper discs not inclined towards edge-on orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansdell, M.; Gaidos, E.; Williams, J. P.; Kennedy, G.; Wyatt, M. C.; LaCourse, D. M.; Jacobs, T. L.; Mann, A. W.

    2016-10-01

    The so-called dipper stars host circumstellar discs and have optical and infrared light curves that exhibit quasi-periodic or aperiodic dimming events consistent with extinction by transiting dusty structures orbiting in the inner disc. Most of the proposed mechanisms explaining the dips - i.e. occulting disc warps, vortices, and forming planetesimals - assume nearly edge-on viewing geometries. However, our analysis of the three known dippers with publicly available resolved sub-mm data reveals discs with a range of inclinations, most notably the face-on transition disc J1604-2130 (EPIC 204638512). This suggests that nearly edge-on viewing geometries are not a defining characteristic of the dippers and that additional models should be explored. If confirmed by further observations of more dippers, this would point to inner disc processes that regularly produce dusty structures far above the outer disc mid-plane in regions relevant to planet formation.

  16. The avian intervertebral disc arises from rostral sclerotome and lacks a nucleus pulposus: Implications for evolution of the vertebrate disc

    PubMed Central

    Bruggeman, Bradley J.; Maier, Jennifer A.; Mohiuddin, Yasmin S.; Powers, Rae; Lo, YinTing; Guimarães-Camboa, Nuno; Evans, Sylvia M.; Harfe, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    Deterioration of the intervertebral discs is an unfortunate consequence of aging. The intervertebral disc in mammals is composed of three parts: a jelly-like center called the nucleus pulposus, the cartilaginous annulus fibrosus and anterior and posterior endplates that attach the discs to vertebrae. In order to understand the origin of the disc, we have investigated the intervertebral region of chickens. Surprisingly, our comparison of mouse and chicken discs revealed that chicken discs lack nuclei pulposi. In addition, the notochord, which in mice forms nuclei pulposi, was found to persist as a rod-like structure and express Shh throughout chicken embryogenesis. Our fate mapping data indicates that cells originating from the rostral half of each somite are responsible for forming the avian disc while cells in the caudal region of each somite form vertebrae. A histological analysis of mammalian and non-mammalian organisms suggests that nuclei pulposi are only present in mammals. PMID:22354863

  17. Nuclear waste disposal utilizing a gaseous core reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paternoster, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of a gaseous core nuclear reactor designed to produce power to also reduce the national inventories of long-lived reactor waste products through nuclear transmutation was examined. Neutron-induced transmutation of radioactive wastes is shown to be an effective means of shortening the apparent half life.

  18. An introduction to technetium in the gaseous diffusion cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, D.W.

    1996-09-01

    The radioisotope technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc) was introduced into the gaseous diffusion plants (GDP) as a contaminant in uranium that had been reprocessed from spent nuclear reactor fuel. {sup 99}Tc is a product of the nuclear fission of uranium-235 ({sup 235}U). The significantly higher emitted radioactivity of {sup 99}Tc generates concern in the enrichment complex and warrants increased attention (1) to the control of all site emissions, (2) to worker exposures and contamination control when process equipment requires disassembly and decontamination, and (3) to product purity when the enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) product is marketed to the private sector. A total of 101,268 metric tons of RU ({approximately}96% of the total) was fed at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) between FY1953 and FY1976. An additional 5600 metric tons of RU from the government reactors were fed at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), plus an approximate 500 tons of foreign reactor returns. Only a small amount of RU was fed directly at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The slightly enriched PGDP product was then fed to either the ORGDP or PORTS cascades for final enrichment. Bailey estimated in 1988 that of the 606 kg of Tc received at PGDP from RU, 121 kg was subsequently re-fed to ORGDP and 85 kg re-fed to PORTS.

  19. Crystal growing by electrodeposition from dense gaseous solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naiditch, S.; Williams, R. A.

    1970-01-01

    Single crystals and dendritic formations of silver are grown on platinum electrodes by electrodeposition from a dense gaseous solution of silver nitrate in ammonia. Process is modification of hydrothermal process, and also differs from standard electrodeposition by permitting single crystals to be grown from hydrogen-bonded solvents.

  20. Atmospheric escape by magnetically driven wind from gaseous planets

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Yuki A.; Suzuki, Takeru K.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2014-09-01

    We calculate the mass loss driven by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves from hot Jupiters by using MHD simulations in one-dimensional flux tubes. If a gaseous planet has a magnetic field, MHD waves are excited by turbulence at the surface, dissipate in the upper atmosphere, and drive gas outflows. Our calculation shows that mass-loss rates are comparable to the observed mass-loss rates of hot Jupiters; therefore, it is suggested that gas flow driven by MHD waves can play an important role in the mass loss from gaseous planets. The mass-loss rate varies dramatically with the radius and mass of a planet: a gaseous planet with a small mass but an inflated radius produces a very large mass-loss rate. We also derive an analytical expression for the dependence of mass-loss rate on planet radius and mass that is in good agreement with the numerical calculation. The mass-loss rate also depends on the amplitude of the velocity dispersion at the surface of a planet. Thus, we expect to infer the condition of the surface and the internal structure of a gaseous planet from future observations of mass-loss rate from various exoplanets.

  1. CO 2-laser photoacoustic detection of gaseous n-pentylacetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herecová, Lenka; Hejzlar, Tomáš; Pavlovský, Jiří; Míček, Dalibor; Zelinger, Zdeněk; Kubát, Pavel; Janečková, Radmila; Nevrlý, Václav; Bitala, Petr; Střižík, Michal; Klouda, Karel; Civiš, Svatopluk

    2009-07-01

    The absorption spectra of gaseous n-pentylacetate were investigated by FT IR spectroscopy as well as CO 2-laser photoacoustic spectroscopy for simulation of the dispersion of a nerve agent (sarin) within a modeled atmospheric boundary layer. Three CO 2-laser emission lines were used for photoacoustic detection of n-pentylacetate with detection limit in the range of 1-3 ppm.

  2. Methods for deacidizing gaseous mixtures by phase enhanced absorption

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Liang

    2012-11-27

    An improved process for deacidizing a gaseous mixture using phase enhanced gas-liquid absorption is described. The process utilizes a multiphasic absorbent that absorbs an acid gas at increased rate and leads to reduced overall energy costs for the deacidizing operation.

  3. Thermodynamic and transport properties of gaseous tetrafluoromethane in chemical equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. L.; Boney, L. R.

    1973-01-01

    Equations and in computer code are presented for the thermodynamic and transport properties of gaseous, undissociated tetrafluoromethane (CF4) in chemical equilibrium. The computer code calculates the thermodynamic and transport properties of CF4 when given any two of five thermodynamic variables (entropy, temperature, volume, pressure, and enthalpy). Equilibrium thermodynamic and transport property data are tabulated and pressure-enthalpy diagrams are presented.

  4. 40 CFR 91.415 - Raw gaseous sampling procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... particles from the flow of gas required for analysis. The sample line for HC measurement must be heated. The... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Raw gaseous sampling procedures. 91.415 Section 91.415 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...

  5. 40 CFR 91.415 - Raw gaseous sampling procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... particles from the flow of gas required for analysis. The sample line for HC measurement must be heated. The... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Raw gaseous sampling procedures. 91.415 Section 91.415 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...

  6. 40 CFR 91.415 - Raw gaseous sampling procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... particles from the flow of gas required for analysis. The sample line for HC measurement must be heated. The... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Raw gaseous sampling procedures. 91.415 Section 91.415 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...

  7. 40 CFR 91.415 - Raw gaseous sampling procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... particles from the flow of gas required for analysis. The sample line for HC measurement must be heated. The... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Raw gaseous sampling procedures. 91.415 Section 91.415 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...

  8. External tank gaseous oxygen line simulated lightning tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H. E.; Avery, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    Tests were made to evaluate the effects of lightning strikes on the shuttle external tank gaseous oxygen pressurization line. This line, designed to conduct gaseous oxygen may also act as a lightning conductor. Questions have been raised as to the potential hazard of this line as a lightning conductor with speculation as to the damage that might occur to the pressurization line, and the adjacent thermal protective surfaces, from a lightning strike. The region of investigation was from above the cone of the launch tower lightning protection to 15.24 km (50, 000 ft) altitude. Tests were performed on samples of thin wall stainless steel tubing filled with gaseous oxygen under simulated flight conditions. No specimen malfunctions occurred when the tests were conducted according to JSC specifications. Based on the JSC specifications and the results of these tests, it is concluded that a lightning strike will not cause a malfunction of the shuttle external tank gaseous oxygen line made of the representative material tested.

  9. Hall magneto-hydrodynamics in protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthune, W.; Lesur, G.; Ferreira, J.

    2016-12-01

    Protoplanetary discs exhibit large-scale, organised structures. Because they are dense and cold, they should be weakly ionized, and hence concerned by non-ideal plasma effects, such as the Hall effect. We perform numerical simulations of non-stratified Keplerian discs, in the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic framework. We show that the Hall effect causes self-organisation through three distinct stages. A weak Hall effect enhances turbulent transport. At intermediate strength, it produces magnetized vortices. A strong Hall effect generates axisymmetric zonal flows. These structures may trap dust particles, and thus influence planetary formation. The transport of angular momentum is quenched in the organised state, impugning the relevance of magneto-rotational turbulence as a driving mechanism of accretion in Hall dominated regions.

  10. Material Science in Cervical Total Disc Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Martin H.; Mehta, Vivek A.; Tuchman, Alexander; Hsieh, Patrick C.

    2015-01-01

    Current cervical total disc replacement (TDR) designs incorporate a variety of different biomaterials including polyethylene, stainless steel, titanium (Ti), and cobalt-chrome (CoCr). These materials are most important in their utilization as bearing surfaces which allow for articular motion at the disc space. Long-term biological effects of implanted materials include wear debris, host inflammatory immune reactions, and osteolysis resulting in implant failure. We review here the most common materials used in cervical TDR prosthetic devices, examine their bearing surfaces, describe the construction of the seven current cervical TDR devices that are approved for use in the United States, and discuss known adverse biological effects associated with long-term implantation of these materials. It is important to appreciate and understand the variety of biomaterials available in the design and construction of these prosthetics and the considerations which guide their implementation. PMID:26523281

  11. Grand Challenges in Protoplanetary Disc Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, Thomas J.; Ilee, John D.; Forgan, Duncan H.; Facchini, Stefano; Price, Daniel J.; Boneberg, Dominika M.; Booth, Richard A.; Clarke, Cathie J.; Gonzalez, Jean-François; Hutchison, Mark A.; Kamp, Inga; Laibe, Guillaume; Lyra, Wladimir; Meru, Farzana; Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Panić, Olja; Rice, Ken; Suzuki, Takeru; Teague, Richard; Walsh, Catherine; Woitke, Peter; Community authors

    2016-10-01

    The Protoplanetary Discussions conference-held in Edinburgh, UK, from 2016 March 7th-11th-included several open sessions led by participants. This paper reports on the discussions collectively concerned with the multi-physics modelling of protoplanetary discs, including the self-consistent calculation of gas and dust dynamics, radiative transfer, and chemistry. After a short introduction to each of these disciplines in isolation, we identify a series of burning questions and grand challenges associated with their continuing development and integration. We then discuss potential pathways towards solving these challenges, grouped by strategical, technical, and collaborative developments. This paper is not intended to be a review, but rather to motivate and direct future research and collaboration across typically distinct fields based on community-driven input, to encourage further progress in our understanding of circumstellar and protoplanetary discs.

  12. Cervical disc arthroplasty: Pros and cons

    PubMed Central

    Moatz, Bradley; Tortolani, P. Justin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cervical disc arthroplasty has emerged as a promising potential alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in appropriately selected patients. Despite a history of excellent outcomes after ACDF, the question as to whether a fusion leads to adjacent segment degeneration remains unanswered. Numerous US investigational device exemption trials comparing cervical arthroplasty to fusion have been conducted to answer this question. Methods: This study reviews the current research regarding cervical athroplasty, and emphasizes both the pros and cons of arthroplasty as compared with ACDF. Results: Early clinical outcomes show that cervical arthroplasty is as effective as the standard ACDF. However, this new technology is also associated with an expanding list of novel complications. Conclusion: Although there is no definitive evidence that cervical disc replacement reduces the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration, it does show other advantages; for example, faster return to work, and reduced need for postoperative bracing. PMID:22905327

  13. Thalamic Pain Misdiagnosed as Cervical Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tae Ha; Choi, Soo Il; Yoo, Jee In; Choi, Young Soon; Lim, Young Su; Sang, Bo Hyun; Bang, Yun Sic; Kim, Young Uk

    2016-04-01

    Thalamic pain is a primary cause of central post-stroke pain (CPSP). Clinical symptoms vary depending on the location of the infarction and frequently accompany several pain symptoms. Therefore, correct diagnosis and proper examination are not easy. We report a case of CPSP due to a left acute thalamic infarction with central disc protrusion at C5-6. A 45-year-old-male patient experiencing a tingling sensation in his right arm was referred to our pain clinic under the diagnosis of cervical disc herniation. This patient also complained of right cramp-like abdominal pain. After further evaluations, he was diagnosed with an acute thalamic infarction. Therefore detailed history taking should be performed and examiners should always be aware of other symptoms that could suggest a more dangerous disease.

  14. Inflammation in intervertebral disc degeneration and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Molinos, Maria; Almeida, Catarina R.; Caldeira, Joana; Cunha, Carla; Gonçalves, Raquel M.; Barbosa, Mário A.

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is one of the major causes of low back pain, a problem with a heavy economic burden, which has been increasing in prevalence as populations age. Deeper knowledge of the complex spatial and temporal orchestration of cellular interactions and extracellular matrix remodelling is critical to improve current IVD therapies, which have so far proved unsatisfactory. Inflammation has been correlated with degenerative disc disease but its role in discogenic pain and hernia regression remains controversial. The inflammatory response may be involved in the onset of disease, but it is also crucial in maintaining tissue homeostasis. Furthermore, if properly balanced it may contribute to tissue repair/regeneration as has already been demonstrated in other tissues. In this review, we focus on how inflammation has been associated with IVD degeneration by describing observational and in vitro studies as well as in vivo animal models. Finally, we provide an overview of IVD regenerative therapies that target key inflammatory players. PMID:25673296

  15. Vertical cup/disc ratio in relation to optic disc size: its value in the assessment of the glaucoma suspect

    PubMed Central

    Garway-Heath, D.; Ruben, S.; Viswanathan, A.; Hitchings, R.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—The vertical cup/disc ratio (CDR) has long been used in the assessment of the glaucoma suspect, though the wide range of CDR values in the normal population limits its use. Cup size is related physiologically to disc size and pathologically to glaucomatous damage. Disc size can be measured at the slit lamp as the vertical disc diameter (DD). The ability of the CDR, in relation to DD, to identify glaucomatous optic discs was investigated.
METHODS—88 normal, 53 early glaucoma, and 59 ocular hypertensive subjects underwent stereoscopic optic disc photography and clinical biometry. Photographs were analysed in a masked fashion by computer assisted planimetry. The relation between vertical cup diameter and DD was explored by linear regression, and expressed in terms of CDR. The upper limit of normal was defined by the 95% prediction intervals of this regression (method 1) and by the upper 97.5 percentile for CDR (method 2). The sensitivity and specificity of CDR to identify an optic disc as glaucomatous was tested with these disc size dependent and disc size independent cut offs in small, medium, and large discs.
RESULTS—The CDR was related to DD by the equation CDR = (−1.31 + (1.194 × DD))/DD. The sensitivity in small, medium, and large discs was 80%, 60%, and 38% respectively for method 1 and 33%, 67%, and 63% respectively for method 2. Specificity was 98.9% (method 1) and 97.7% (method 2).
CONCLUSIONS—The CDR, relative to disc size, is useful clinically, especially to assist in identifying small glaucomatous discs.

 Keywords: cup/disc ratio; glaucoma; imaging PMID:9924296

  16. The Astral Curved Disc of Chevroches (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devevey, F. Rousseau, A.

    2009-08-01

    The excavation of the unexplored secondary agglomeration in Chevroches (Nièvre), from 2001 to 2002, directed by F. Devevey (INRAP), has led to the discovery of an astrological bronze curved disc of a type unknown in the ancient world; it is inscribed with three lines in Greek transcribing Egyptian an Roman months, and the twelve signs of the zodiac. This article presents the first observations.

  17. Development of fluorescent multilayer disc structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beliak, Ievgen; Butenko, Larisa

    2011-09-01

    The fluorescent multilayer disc (FMD) consists of a substrate and the sandwich-structure of information and intermediate layers. While all the structure of the disc is transparent and homogeneous the parasitic signal will be caused mostly by photoluminescence (PL) and absorption of pits areas where laser light is unfocused. At large number of layers (10 or more) the noise level will get significant value, so it was suggested to derive readout signal as a variable one. Also it was proposed to record information only by the lands, to decrease the absorbance level and thus uncontrolled changing of the noise level. Furthermore in the FMD information layer there are inner and outside peripheral areas which hold a stable level of parasitic signal during readout from the edges of the disc. While the PL readout signal is spatially isotropic the optical head of the FMD drive receives just a part of the probing beam energy. PL quantum yield, absorption factor, receiver systems exposure loss coefficients are other reasons of the low PL signal. Thus the problem of the low SNR in this case is a major one and the only way of its solving is synthesis of the dye with a high PL quantum yield. The PL relaxation time on the other hand is a main feature of the data reading rate and therefore selection of the appropriate recording material will allow to bring this parameter in accordance to parameters of modern optical discs. To achieve this goal the composite organic pyrazoline dyes where synthesized and investigated as effective medium with a PL quantum yield up to 60-70%, relaxation time less than 100 ns, PL wide spectrum and opportunity of two-photon absorption. These parameters were further improved by a method based on the performance of organic dye molecules in the zeolite matrix.

  18. Can Exercise Positively Influence the Intervertebral Disc?

    PubMed

    Belavý, Daniel L; Albracht, Kirsten; Bruggemann, Gert-Peter; Vergroesen, Pieter-Paul A; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2016-04-01

    To better understand what kinds of sports and exercise could be beneficial for the intervertebral disc (IVD), we performed a review to synthesise the literature on IVD adaptation with loading and exercise. The state of the literature did not permit a systematic review; therefore, we performed a narrative review. The majority of the available data come from cell or whole-disc loading models and animal exercise models. However, some studies have examined the impact of specific sports on IVD degeneration in humans and acute exercise on disc size. Based on the data available in the literature, loading types that are likely beneficial to the IVD are dynamic, axial, at slow to moderate movement speeds, and of a magnitude experienced in walking and jogging. Static loading, torsional loading, flexion with compression, rapid loading, high-impact loading and explosive tasks are likely detrimental for the IVD. Reduced physical activity and disuse appear to be detrimental for the IVD. We also consider the impact of genetics and the likelihood of a 'critical period' for the effect of exercise in IVD development. The current review summarises the literature to increase awareness amongst exercise, rehabilitation and ergonomic professionals regarding IVD health and provides recommendations on future directions in research.

  19. Lumbar Disc Herniation Presented with Contralateral Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Pius; Ju, Chang Il; Kim, Hyeun Sung; Kim, Seok Won

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to unravel the putative mechanism underlying the neurologic deficits contralateral to the side with lumbar disc herniation (LDH) and to elucidate the treatment for this condition. Methods From January 2009 to June 2015, 8 patients with LDH with predominantly contralateral neurologic deficits underwent surgical treatment on the side with LDH with or without decompressing the symptomatic side. A retrospective review of charts and radiological records of these 8 patients was performed. The putative mechanisms underlying the associated contralateral neurological deficits, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), electromyography (EMG), and the adequate surgical approach are discussed here. Results MRI revealed a similar laterally skewed paramedian disc herniation, with the apex deviated from the symptomatic side rather than directly compressing the nerve root; this condition may generate a contralateral traction force. EMG revealed radiculopathies in both sides of 6 patients and in the herniated side of 2 patients. Based on EMG findings and the existence of suspicious lateral recess stenosis of the symptomatic side, 6 patients underwent bilateral decompression of nerve roots and 2 were subjected to a microscopic discectomy to treat the asymptomatic disc herniation. No specific conditions such as venous congestion, nerve root anomaly or epidural lipomatosis were observed, which may be considered the putative pathomechanism causing the contralateral neurological deficits. The symptoms resolved significantly after surgery. Conclusion The traction force generated on the contralateral side and lateral recess stenosis, rather than direct compression, may cause the contralateral neurologic deficits observed in LDH. PMID:28264243

  20. Engineering alginate for intervertebral disc repair.

    PubMed

    Bron, Johannes L; Vonk, Lucienne A; Smit, Theodoor H; Koenderink, Gijsje H

    2011-10-01

    Alginate is frequently studied as a scaffold for intervertebral disc (IVD) repair, since it closely mimics mechanical and cell-adhesive properties of the nucleus pulposus (NP) of the IVD. The aim of this study was to assess the relation between alginate concentration and scaffold stiffness and find preparation conditions where the viscoelastic behaviour mimics that of the NP. In addition, we measured the effect of variations in scaffold stiffness on the expression of extracellular matrix molecules specific to the NP (proteoglycans and collagen) by native NP cells. We prepared sample discs of different concentrations of alginate (1%-6%) by two different methods, diffusion and in situ gelation. The stiffness increased with increasing alginate concentration, while the loss tangent (dissipative behaviour) remained constant. The diffusion samples were ten-fold stiffer than samples prepared by in situ gelation. Sample discs prepared from 2% alginate by diffusion closely matched the stiffness and loss tangent of the NP. The stiffness of all samples declined upon prolonged incubation in medium, especially for samples prepared by diffusion. The biosynthetic phenotype of native cells isolated from NPs was preserved in alginate matrices up to 4 weeks of culturing. Gene expression levels of extracellular matrix components were insensitive to alginate concentration and corresponding matrix stiffness, likely due to the poor adhesiveness of the cells to alginate. In conclusion, alginate can mimic the viscoelastic properties of the NP and preserve the biosynthetic phenotype of NP cells but certain limitations like long-term stability still have to be addressed.

  1. Testing hydrodynamics schemes in galaxy disc simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Few, C. G.; Dobbs, C.; Pettitt, A.; Konstandin, L.

    2016-08-01

    We examine how three fundamentally different numerical hydrodynamics codes follow the evolution of an isothermal galactic disc with an external spiral potential. We compare an adaptive mesh refinement code (RAMSES), a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code (SPHNG), and a volume-discretized mesh-less code (GIZMO). Using standard refinement criteria, we find that RAMSES produces a disc that is less vertically concentrated and does not reach such high densities as the SPHNG or GIZMO runs. The gas surface density in the spiral arms increases at a lower rate for the RAMSES simulations compared to the other codes. There is also a greater degree of substructure in the SPHNG and GIZMO runs and secondary spiral arms are more pronounced. By resolving the Jeans length with a greater number of grid cells, we achieve more similar results to the Lagrangian codes used in this study. Other alterations to the refinement scheme (adding extra levels of refinement and refining based on local density gradients) are less successful in reducing the disparity between RAMSES and SPHNG/GIZMO. Although more similar, SPHNG displays different density distributions and vertical mass profiles to all modes of GIZMO (including the smoothed particle hydrodynamics version). This suggests differences also arise which are not intrinsic to the particular method but rather due to its implementation. The discrepancies between codes (in particular, the densities reached in the spiral arms) could potentially result in differences in the locations and time-scales for gravitational collapse, and therefore impact star formation activity in more complex galaxy disc simulations.

  2. Spinning disc atomisation process: Modelling and computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Sisoev, Grigory; Shikhmurzaev, Yulii

    2016-11-01

    The atomisation of liquids using a spinning disc (SDA), where the centrifugal force is used to generate a continuous flow, with the liquid eventually disintegrating into drops which, on solidification, become particles, is a key element in many technologies. Examples of such technologies range from powder manufacturing in metallurgy to various biomedical applications. In order to be able to control the SDA process, it is necessary to understand it as a whole, from the feeding of the liquid and the wave pattern developing on the disc to the disintegration of the liquid film into filaments and these into drops. The SDA process has been the subject of a number of experimental studies and some elements of it, notably the film on a spinning disc and the dynamics of the jets streaming out from it, have been investigated theoretically. However, to date there have been no studies of the process as a whole, including, most importantly, the transition zone where the film that has already developed a certain wave pattern disintegrates into jets that spiral out. The present work reports some results of an ongoing project aimed at producing a definitive map of regimes occurring in the SDA process and their outcome.

  3. Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy: a disease of intercalated discs.

    PubMed

    Calore, Martina; Lorenzon, Alessandra; De Bortoli, Marzia; Poloni, Giulia; Rampazzo, Alessandra

    2015-06-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM) is an acquired progressive disease having an age-related penetrance and showing clinical manifestations usually during adolescence and young adulthood. It is characterized clinically by a high incidence of severe ventricular tachyarrhythmias and sudden cardiac death and pathologically by degeneration of ventricular cardiomyocytes with replacement by fibro-fatty tissue. Whereas, in the past, the disease was considered to involve only the right ventricle, more recent clinical studies have established that the left ventricle is frequently involved. ACM is an inherited disease in up to 50% of cases, with predominantly an autosomal dominant pattern of transmission, although recessive inheritance has also been described. Since most of the pathogenic mutations have been identified in genes encoding desmosomal proteins, ACM is currently defined as a disease of desmosomes. However, on the basis of the most recent description of the intercalated disc organization and of the identification of a novel ACM gene encoding for an area composita protein, ACM can be considered as a disease of the intercalated disc, rather than only as a desmosomal disease. Despite increasing knowledge of the genetic basis of ACM, we are just beginning to understand early molecular events leading to cardiomyocyte degeneration, fibrosis and fibro-fatty substitution. This review summarizes recent advances in our comprehension of the link between the molecular genetics and pathogenesis of ACM and of the novel role of cardiac intercalated discs.

  4. Reactive thin film flows over spinning discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Wray, Alex; Yang, Junfeng; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    We consider the dynamics of a thin film flowing over a spinning disc in the presence of a chemical reaction, and associated heat and mass transfer. We use a boundary-layer approximation in conjunction with the Karman-Polhausen approximation for the velocity distribution in the film to derive a set of coupled one-dimensional evolution equations for the film thickness, radial and azimuthal flow rates, concentration of the reagents and products, and temperature. These highly nonlinear partial differential equations are solved numerically to reveal the formation of large-amplitude waves that travel from the disc inlet to its periphery. The influence of these waves on the concentration and temperature profiles is analysed for a wide range of system parameters: the Damkohler and Schmidt numbers, the thermal Peclet numbers, and the dimensionless disc radius (a surrogate for the Eckman number). It is shown that these waves lead to significant enhancement of the rates of heat and mass transfer associated with the reactive flow; these are measured by tracking the temporal evolution of local and spatially-averaged Nusselt and Sherwood numbers, respectively. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  5. Risk Factors for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weimin; Han, Zhiwei; Liu, Jiang; Yu, Lili; Yu, Xiuchun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recurrent lumbar disc herniation (rLDH) is a common complication following primary discectomy. This systematic review aimed to investigate the current evidence on risk factors for rLDH. Cohort or case-control studies addressing risk factors for rLDH were identified by search in Pubmed (Medline), Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane library from inception to June 2015. Relevant results were pooled to give overall estimates if possible. Heterogeneity among studies was examined and publication bias was also assessed. A total of 17 studies were included in this systematic review. Risk factors that had significant relation with rLDH were smoking (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.53–2.58), disc protrusion (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.15–2.79), and diabetes (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.06–1.32). Gender, BMI, occupational work, level, and side of herniation did not correlate with rLDH significantly. Based on current evidence, smoking, disc protrusion, and diabetes were predictors for rLDH. Patients with these risk factors should be paid more attention for prevention of recurrence after primary surgery. More evidence provided by high-quality observational studies is still needed to further investigate risk factors for rLDH. PMID:26765413

  6. Hydrogen sulfide protects against endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial injury in nucleus pulposus cells and ameliorates intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Daoliang; Jin, Haiming; Wen, Jianxia; Chen, Jiaoxiang; Chen, Deheng; Cai, Ningyu; Wang, Yongli; Wang, Jianle; Chen, Yu; Zhang, Xiaolei; Wang, Xiangyang

    2017-03-01

    It has been suggested that excessive apoptosis in intervertebral disc cells induced by inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β, is related to the process of intervertebral disc degeneration (IVDD). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gaseous signaling molecule, has drawn attention for its anti-apoptosis role in various pathophysiological processes in degenerative diseases. To date, there has been no investigation of the correlation of H2S production and IVDD or of the effects of H2S on IL-1β-induced apoptosis in nucleus pulposus (NP) cells. Here, we found that the expression levels of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), two key enzymes in the generation of H2S, were significantly decreased in human degenerate NP tissues as well as in IL-1β-treated NP cells. NaHS (H2S donor) administration showed a protective effect by inhibiting the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by IL-1β stimulation in vitro, the effect was related to activation of the PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. Suppression of these pathways by specific inhibitors, LY294002 and PD98059, partially reduced the protective effect of NaHS. Moreover, in the percutaneous needle puncture disc degeneration rat tail model, disc degeneration was partially reversed by NaHS administration. Taken together, our results suggest that H2S plays a protective role in IVDD and the underlying mechanism involves PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 signaling pathways-mediated suppression of ER stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in IL-1β-induced NP cells.

  7. Towards detecting methanol emission in low-mass protoplanetary discs with ALMA: the role of non-LTE excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfenov, S. Yu.; Semenov, D. A.; Sobolev, A. M.; Gray, M. D.

    2016-08-01

    The understanding of organic content of protoplanetary discs is one of the main goals of the planet formation studies. As an attempt to guide the observational searches for weak lines of complex species in discs, we modelled the (sub)millimetre spectrum of gaseous methanol (CH3OH), one of the simplest organic molecules, in the representative T Tauri system. We used 1+1D disc physical model coupled to the gas-grain ALCHEMIC chemical model with and without 2D-turbulent mixing. The computed CH3OH abundances along with the CH3OH scheme of energy levels of ground and excited torsional states were used to produce model spectra obtained with the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) 3D line radiative transfer code LIME. We found that the modelled non-LTE intensities of the CH3OH lines can be lower by factor of >10-100 than those calculated under assumption of LTE. Though population inversion occurs in the model calculations for many (sub)millimetre transitions, it does not lead to the strong maser amplification and noticeably high line intensities. We identify the strongest CH3OH (sub)millimetre lines that could be searched for with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) in nearby discs. The two best candidates are the CH3OH 50 - 40A+ (241.791 GHz) and 5-1 - 4-1E (241.767 GHz) lines, which could possibly be detected with the ˜5σ signal-to-noise ratio after ˜3 h of integration with the full ALMA array.

  8. Be discs in binary systems - I. Coplanar orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panoglou, Despina; Carciofi, Alex C.; Vieira, Rodrigo G.; Cyr, Isabelle H.; Jones, Carol E.; Okazaki, Atsuo T.; Rivinius, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Be stars are surrounded by outflowing circumstellar matter structured in the form of decretion discs. They are often members of binary systems, where it is expected that the decretion disc interacts both radiatively and gravitationally with the companion. In this work we study how various orbital (period, mass ratio and eccentricity) and disc (viscosity) parameters affect the disc structure in coplanar binaries. The main effects of the secondary on the disc are its truncation and the accumulation of material inwards of truncation. We find two limiting cases with respect to the effects of eccentricity: in circular or nearly circular prograde orbits, the disc maintains a rotating, constant in shape, configuration, which is locked to the orbital phase. The disc structure appears smaller in size, more elongated and more massive for small viscosity parameter, small orbital separation and/or high mass ratio. In highly eccentric orbits, the effects are more complex, with the disc structure strongly dependent on the orbital phase. We also studied the effects of binarity in the disc continuum emission. Since the infrared and radio SED are sensitive to the disc size and density slope, the truncation and matter accumulation result in considerable modifications in the emergent spectrum. We conclude that binarity can serve as an explanation for the variability exhibited in observations of Be stars, and that our model can be used to detect invisible companions.

  9. Solute transport in intervertebral disc: experiments and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Das, D B; Welling, A; Urban, J P G; Boubriak, O A

    2009-04-01

    Loss of nutrient supply to the human intervertebral disc (IVD) cells is thought to be a major cause of disc degeneration in humans. To address this issue, transport of molecules of different size have been analyzed by a combination of experimental and modeling studies. Solute transport has been compared for steady-state and transient diffusion of several different solutes with molecular masses in the range 3-70 kDa, injected into parts of the disc where degeneration is thought most likely to occur first and into the blood supply to the disc. Diffusion coefficients of fluorescently tagged dextran molecules of different molecular weights have been measured in vitro using the concentration gradient technique in thin specimens of disc outer annulus and nucleus pulposus. Diffusion coefficients were found to decrease with molecular weight following a nonlinear relationship. Diffusion coefficients changed more rapidly for solutes with molecular masses less than 10 kDa. Although unrealistic or painful, solutes injected directly into the disc achieve the largest disc coverage with concentrations that would be high enough to be of practical use. Although more practical, solutes injected into the blood supply do not penetrate to the central regions of the disc and their concentrations dissipate more rapidly. Injection into the disc would be the best method to get drugs or growth factors to regions of degeneration in IVDs quickly; else concentrations of solute must be kept at a high value for several hours in the blood supply to the discs.

  10. BP Piscium: its flaring disc imaged with SPHERE/ZIMPOL★

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, J.; Girard, J. H.; Canovas, H.; Min, M.; Sitko, M.; Ginski, C.; Jeffers, S. V.; Mawet, D.; Milli, J.; Rodenhuis, M.; Snik, F.; Keller, C. U.

    2017-03-01

    Whether BP Piscium (BP Psc) is either a pre-main sequence T Tauri star at d ≈ 80 pc, or a post-main sequence G giant at d ≈ 300 pc is still not clear. As a first-ascent giant, it is the first to be observed with a molecular and dust disc. Alternatively, BP Psc would be among the nearest T Tauri stars with a protoplanetary disc (PPD). We investigate whether the disc geometry resembles typical PPDs, by comparing polarimetric images with radiative transfer models. Our Very Large Telescope/Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet REsearch (SPHERE)/Zurich IMaging Polarimeter (ZIMPOL) observations allow us to perform polarimetric differential imaging, reference star differential imaging, and Richardson-Lucy deconvolution. We present the first visible light polarization and intensity images of the disc of BP Psc. Our deconvolution confirms the disc shape as detected before, mainly showing the southern side of the disc. In polarized intensity the disc is imaged at larger detail and also shows the northern side, giving it the typical shape of high-inclination flared discs. We explain the observed disc features by retrieving the large-scale geometry with MCMAX radiative transfer modelling, which yields a strongly flared model, atypical for discs of T Tauri stars.

  11. Radioactivity in gaseous waste discharged from the separations facilities during fourth quarter of 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Sliger, G. J.

    1980-02-22

    This document is issued quarterly for the purpose of summarizing the radioactive gaseous wastes that are discharged from the facilities of the Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell). Data on alpha and beta emissions during 1979 are presented where relevant to the gaseous effluent. Emission data are not included on gaseous wastes produced within the 200 areas by other Hanford contractors.

  12. Clinically-Relevant Cell Sources for TMJ Disc Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Johns, D.E.; Wong, M. E.; Athanasiou, K.A.

    2010-01-01

    Tissue-engineering of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc aims to provide patients with TMJ disorders an option to replace diseased tissue with autologous, functional tissue. This study examined clinically-relevant cell sources by comparing costal chondrocytes, dermal fibroblasts, a mixture of the two, and TMJ disc cells in a scaffoldless tissue-engineering approach. It was hypothesized that all constructs would produce matrix relevant to the TMJ disc, but the mixture constructs were expected to appear most like the TMJ disc constructs. Costal chondrocyte and mixture constructs were morphologically and biochemically superior to the TMJ disc and dermal fibroblast constructs, and their compressive properties were not significantly different. Costal chondrocyte constructs produced almost 40 times more collagen and 800 times more glycosaminoglycans than TMJ constructs. This study demonstrates the ability of costal chondrocytes to produce extracellular matrix that may function in a TMJ disc replacement. PMID:18502963

  13. Accretion disc viscosity: a limit on the anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Chris

    2015-07-01

    Observations of warped discs can give insight into the nature of angular momentum transport in accretion discs. Only a few objects are known to show strong periodicity on long time-scales, but when such periodicity is present it is often attributed to precession of the accretion disc. The X-ray binary Hercules X-1/HZ Herculis (Her X-1) is one of the best examples of such periodicity and has been linked to disc precession since it was first observed. By using the current best-fitting models to Her X-1, which invoke precession driven by radiation warping, I place a constraint on the effective viscosities that act in a warped disc. These effective viscosities almost certainly arise due to turbulence induced by the magnetorotational instability. The constraints derived here are in agreement with analytical and numerical investigations into the nature of magnetohydrodynamic disc turbulence, but at odds with some recent global simulations.

  14. Gusty, gaseous flows of FIRE: galactic winds in cosmological simulations with explicit stellar feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratov, Alexander L.; Kereš, Dušan; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Hopkins, Philip F.; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norman

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of the galaxy-scale gaseous outflows from the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) simulations. This suite of hydrodynamic cosmological zoom simulations resolves formation of star-forming giant molecular clouds to z = 0, and features an explicit stellar feedback model on small scales. Our simulations reveal that high-redshift galaxies undergo bursts of star formation followed by powerful gusts of galactic outflows that eject much of the interstellar medium and temporarily suppress star formation. At low redshift, however, sufficiently massive galaxies corresponding to L* progenitors develop stable discs and switch into a continuous and quiescent mode of star formation that does not drive outflows far into the halo. Mass-loading factors for winds in L* progenitors are η ≈ 10 at high redshift, but decrease to η ≪ 1 at low redshift. Although lower values of η are expected as haloes grow in mass over time, we show that the strong suppression of outflows with decreasing redshift cannot be explained by mass evolution alone. Circumgalactic outflow velocities are variable and broadly distributed, but typically range between one and three times the circular velocity of the halo. Much of the ejected material builds a reservoir of enriched gas within the circumgalactic medium, some of which could be later recycled to fuel further star formation. However, a fraction of the gas that leaves the virial radius through galactic winds is never regained, causing most haloes with mass Mh ≤ 1012 M⊙ to be deficient in baryons compared to the cosmic mean by z = 0.

  15. New Brown Dwarf Discs in Upper Scorpius Observed with WISE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, P.; Scholz, A.; Ray, T. P.; Natta, A.; Marsh, K. A.; Padgett, D.; Ressler, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    We present a census of the disc population for UKIDSS selected brown dwarfs in the 5-10 Myr old Upper Scorpius OB association. For 116 objects originally identified in UKIDSS, the majority of them not studied in previous publications, we obtain photometry from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer data base. The resulting colour magnitude and colour colour plots clearly show two separate populations of objects, interpreted as brown dwarfs with discs (class II) and without discs (class III). We identify 27 class II brown dwarfs, 14 of them not previously known. This disc fraction (27 out of 116, or 23%) among brown dwarfs was found to be similar to results for K/M stars in Upper Scorpius, suggesting that the lifetimes of discs are independent of the mass of the central object for low-mass stars and brown dwarfs. 5 out of 27 discs (19 per cent) lack excess at 3.4 and 4.6 microns and are potential transition discs (i.e. are in transition from class II to class III). The transition disc fraction is comparable to low-mass stars.We estimate that the time-scale for a typical transition from class II to class III is less than 0.4 Myr for brown dwarfs. These results suggest that the evolution of brown dwarf discs mirrors the behaviour of discs around low-mass stars, with disc lifetimes of the order of 5 10 Myr and a disc clearing time-scale significantly shorter than 1 Myr.

  16. Herschel DEBRIS survey of debris discs around A stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thureau, N.

    2014-11-01

    The Herschel DEBRIS survey (Disc Emission via a Bias-free Reconnaissance in the Infrared/Submillimetre) brings a unique perspective to the study of debris discs around main-sequence A-type stars. We have observed a sample of 89 A-stars with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) on the Herschel space telescope at 100 and 160 μm. A statistical analysis of the data shows a lower debris disc rate than has previously been found. The drop is due in part to the fact that some excess sources were resolved as background objects by the superior angular resolution (a factor of 2.5) of PACS-100 relative to that of Spitzer (MIPS-70). We found a 3-σ detection rate of 23 myblue which is similar to the the detection rate around main-sequence F, G and K stars. Most of the debris discs were detected around the youngest and hottest stars in our sample. The incidence of discs in single and multiple systems was similar. The debris discs in multiple systems ware found either in tight binary systems (<1 AU) or wide ones (>100 AU). Debris discs in both tight and wide binary systems have physical properties that are statistically similar to those of discs around single stars. We did not detect any debris discs in binary systems with intermediate separation, in which the orbit and the debris disc would be on the same scale. One possible explanation is that discs in intermediate systems have evolved much faster owing to the disc-companion interactions and they are now undetectable.

  17. Glaucomatous-Type Optic Discs in High Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Nagaoka, Natsuko; Jonas, Jost B.; Morohoshi, Kei; Moriyama, Muka; Shimada, Noriaki; Yoshida, Takeshi; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the prevalence of glaucoma in patients with high myopia defined as myopic refractive error of >-8 diopters or axial length ≥26.5 mm. Methods The hospital-based observational study included 172 patients (336 eyes) with a mean age of 61.9±12.3 years and mean axial length of 30.1±2.3 mm (range: 24.7–39.1mm). Glaucomatous-type optic discs were defined by glaucomatous optic disc appearance. Glaucoma was defined by glaucomatous optic disc appearance and glaucomatous Goldmann visual field defects not corresponding with myopic macular changes. Results Larger disc area (mean: 3.18±1.94 mm2) was associated with longer axial length (P<0.001; standardized correlation coefficient: 0.45). Glaucoma was detected in 94 (28%; 95% Confidence intervals: 23%, 33%) eyes. In multivariate analysis, glaucoma prevalence was 3.2 times higher (P<0.001) in megalodiscs (>3.79 mm2) than in normal-sized discs or small discs (<1.51 mm2) after adjusting for older age. Axial length was not significantly (P = 0.38) associated with glaucoma prevalence in that model. Glaucoma prevalence increased by a factor of 1.39 for each increase in optic disc area by one mm2. Again, axial length was not significantly (P = 0.38) associated with glaucoma prevalence when added to this multivariate model. Conclusion Within highly myopic individuals, glaucoma prevalence increased with larger optic disc size beyond a disc area of 3.8 mm2. Highly myopic megalodiscs as compared to normal sized discs or small discs had a 3.2 times higher risk for glaucomatous optic nerve neuropathy. The increased glaucoma prevalence in axial high myopia was primarily associated with axial myopia associated disc enlargement and not with axial elongation itself. PMID:26425846

  18. Audiovisual Bounce-Inducing Effect: Attention Alone Does Not Explain Why the Discs Are Bouncing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grassi, Massimo; Casco, Clara

    2009-01-01

    Two discs moving from opposite points in space, overlapping and stopping at the other disc's starting point, can be seen as either bouncing or streaming through each other. With silent displays, observers report the discs as streaming, whereas if a sound is played when the discs touch each other, observers report the discs as bouncing. The origin…

  19. Spiral-driven accretion in protoplanetary discs . III. Tridimensional simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennebelle, Patrick; Lesur, Geoffroy; Fromang, Sébastien

    2017-03-01

    Context. Understanding how accretion proceeds in proto-planetary discs, and more generally, understanding their dynamics, is a crucial questions that needs to be answered to explain the conditions in which planets form. Aims: The role that accretion of gas from the surrounding molecular cloud onto the disc may have on its structure needs to be quantified. Methods: We performed tridimensional simulations using the Cartesian AMR code RAMSES of an accretion disc that is subject to infalling material. Results: For the aspect ratio of H/R ≃ 0.15 and disc mass Md ≃ 10-2M⊙ used in our study, we find that for typical accretion rates of the order of a few 10-7M⊙ yr-1, values of the α parameter as high as a few 10-3 are inferred. The mass that is accreted in the inner part of the disc is typically at least 50% of the total mass that has been accreted onto the disc. Conclusions: Our results suggest that external accretion of gas at moderate values onto circumstellar discs may trigger prominent spiral arms that are reminiscent of recent observations made with various instruments, and may lead to significant transport through the disc. If confirmed from observational studies, such accretion may therefore influence disc evolution.

  20. Notochord Cells in Intervertebral Disc Development and Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Matthew R.; Séguin, Cheryle A.

    2016-01-01

    The intervertebral disc is a complex structure responsible for flexibility, multi-axial motion, and load transmission throughout the spine. Importantly, degeneration of the intervertebral disc is thought to be an initiating factor for back pain. Due to a lack of understanding of the pathways that govern disc degeneration, there are currently no disease-modifying treatments to delay or prevent degenerative disc disease. This review presents an overview of our current understanding of the developmental processes that regulate intervertebral disc formation, with particular emphasis on the role of the notochord and notochord-derived cells in disc homeostasis and how their loss can result in degeneration. We then describe the role of small animal models in understanding the development of the disc and their use to interrogate disc degeneration and associated pathologies. Finally, we highlight essential development pathways that are associated with disc degeneration and/or implicated in the reparative response of the tissue that might serve as targets for future therapeutic approaches. PMID:27252900

  1. The effect of radiative feedback on disc fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercer, Anthony; Stamatellos, Dimitris

    2017-02-01

    Protostellar discs may become massive enough to fragment producing secondary low-mass objects: planets, brown dwarfs and low-mass stars. We study the effect of radiative feedback from such newly formed secondary objects using radiative hydrodynamic simulations. We compare the results of simulations without any radiative feedback from secondary objects with those where two types of radiative feedback are considered: (i) continuous and (ii) episodic. We find that (i) continuous radiative feedback stabilizes the disc and suppresses further fragmentation, reducing the number of secondary objects formed; (ii) episodic feedback from secondary objects heats and stabilizes the disc when the outburst occurs, but shortly after the outburst stops, the disc becomes unstable and fragments again. However, fewer secondary objects are formed compared to the case without radiative feedback. We also find that the mass growth of secondary objects is mildly suppressed due to the effect of their radiative feedback. However, their mass growth also depends on where they form in the disc and on their subsequent interactions, such that their final masses are not drastically different from the case without radiative feedback. We find that the masses of secondary objects formed by disc fragmentation are from a few MJ to a few 0.1 M⊙. Planets formed by fragmentation tend to be ejected from the disc. We conclude that planetary-mass objects on wide orbits (wide-orbit planets) are unlikely to form by disc fragmentation. Nevertheless, disc fragmentation may be a significant source of free-floating planets and brown dwarfs.

  2. MECHANICAL DESIGN CRITERIA FOR INTERVERTEBRAL DISC TISSUE ENGINEERING

    PubMed Central

    Nerurkar, Nandan L.; Elliott, Dawn M.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    Due to the inability of current clinical practices to restore function to degenerated intervertebral discs, the arena of disc tissue engineering has received substantial attention in recent years. Despite tremendous growth and progress in this field, translation to clinical implementation has been hindered by a lack of well-defined functional benchmarks. Because successful replacement of the disc is contingent upon replication of some or all of its complex mechanical behaviour, it is critically important that disc mechanics be well characterized in order to establish discrete functional goals for tissue engineering. In this review, the key functional signatures of the intervertebral disc are discussed and used to propose a series of native tissue benchmarks to guide the development of engineered replacement tissues. These benchmarks include measures of mechanical function under tensile, compressive and shear deformations for the disc and its substructures. In some cases, important functional measures are identified that have yet to be measured in the native tissue. Ultimately, native tissue benchmark values are compared to measurements that have been made on engineered disc tissues, identifying measures where functional equivalence was achieved, and others where there remain opportunities for advancement. Several excellent reviews exist regarding disc composition and structure, as well as recent tissue engineering strategies; therefore this review will remain focused on the functional aspects of disc tissue engineering. PMID:20080239

  3. Analysis of rabbit intervertebral disc physiology based on water metabolism. II. Changes in normal intervertebral discs under axial vibratory load

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, N.; Tsuji, H.; Ohshima, H.; Kitano, S.; Itoh, T.; Sano, A.

    1988-11-01

    Metabolic changes induced by axial vibratory load to the spine were investigated based on water metabolism in normal intervertebral discs of rabbits with or without pentobarbital anesthesia. Tritiated water concentration in the intervertebral discs of unanesthetized rabbits was reduced remarkably by axial vibration for 30 minutes using the vibration machine developed for this study. Repeated vibratory load for 18 and 42 hours duration showed the recovery of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O concentration of the intervertebral disc without anesthesia. Computer simulation suggested a reduction of blood flow surrounding the intervertebral disc following the vibration stress. However, no reduction of the /sup 3/H/sub 2/O concentration in the intervertebral disc was noted under anesthesia. Emotional stress cannot be excluded as a factor in water metabolism in the intervertebral disc.

  4. Shuttle Gaseous Hydrogen Venting Risk from Flow Control Valve Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, J. Philip; Baurle, Robert A.; Gafney, Richard L.; Norris, Andrew T.; Pellett, Gerald L.; Rock, Kenneth E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a series of studies to assess the potential risk associated with the failure of one of three gaseous hydrogen flow control valves in the orbiter's main propulsion system during the launch of Shuttle Endeavour (STS-126) in November 2008. The studies focused on critical issues associated with the possibility of combustion resulting from release of gaseous hydrogen from the external tank into the atmosphere during assent. The Shuttle Program currently assumes hydrogen venting from the external tank will result in a critical failure. The current effort was conducted to increase understanding of the risk associated with venting hydrogen given the flow control valve failure scenarios being considered in the Integrated In-Flight Anomaly Investigation being conducted by NASA.

  5. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Horak, C.M.

    1993-09-01

    This two-part report, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental Report for 1992, is published annually. It reflects the results of an environmental monitoring program designed to quantify potential increases in the concentration of contaminants and potential doses to the resident human population. The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) overall goal for environmental management is to protect the environment and PGDP`s neighbors and to maintain full compliance with all current regulations. The current environmental strategy is to identify any deficiencies and to develop a system to resolve them. The long-range goal of environmental management is to minimize the source of pollutants, reduce the generation of waste, and minimize hazardous waste by substitution of materials.

  6. Thermodynamic Properties of the Gaseous Gallium Molybdates and Tungstates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopatin, S. I.; Shugurov, S. M.; Gunina, A. O.

    2009-10-01

    A number of gaseous oxyacid salts have been identified by Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry by vaporizing Ga2O3 from molybdenum and tungsten cells. The stability of gaseous molecules Ga2MoO4, Ga2WO4, Ga2Mo2O7, and Ga2W2O7 was deduced from the measurements. The structures and molecular parameters of all salts investigated were obtained using quantum chemical calculations. On the basis of equilibrium constants measured for gas-phase reactions, the standard formation enthalpies were determined to be -827 ± 26, -843 ± 26, -1578 ± 32, and -1525 ± 34 kJ·mol-1 for Ga2MoO4, Ga2WO4, Ga2Mo2O7, and Ga2W2O7, respectively.

  7. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to summarize effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results and compliance with environmental laws, regulations, and orders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Environmental monitoring at PGDP consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of liquid and gaseous discharges to the environment. Environmental surveillance is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of air, water, soil, foodstuff, biota, and other media. Environmental monitoring is performed to characterize and quantify contaminants, assess radiation exposures of members of the public, demonstrate compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, and detect and assess the effects (if any) on the local environment. Multiple samples are collected throughout the year and are analyzed for radioactivity, chemical content, and various physical attributes.

  8. High-Pressure Gaseous Burner (HPGB) Facility Became Operational

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    2003-01-01

    A gas-fueled high-pressure combustion facility with optical access, developed over the last 3 years, is now collecting research data in a production mode. The High-Pressure Gaseous Burner (HPGB) rig at the NASA Glenn Research Center can operate at sustained pressures up to 60 atm with a variety of gaseous fuels and liquid jet fuel. The facility is unique because it is the only continuous-flow, hydrogen-capable 60-atm rig in the world with optical access. It will provide researchers with new insights into flame conditions that simulate the environment inside the ultra-high-pressure-ratio combustion chambers of tomorrow s advanced aircraft engines. The facility provides optical access to the flame zone through four fused-silica optical windows, enabling the calibration of nonintrusive optical diagnostics to measure chemical species and temperature. The data from the HPGB rig enable the validation of numerical codes that simulate gas turbine combustors.

  9. Gaseous sodium sulfate formation in flames and flowing gas environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.; Miller, R. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Fryburg, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    Formation of Na2SO4(g) in flames and hot flowing gas systems was studied by high pressure, free-jet expansion, modulated molecular beam mass spectrometric sampling. Fuel-lean CH4-O2 flames doped with SO2, H2O and NaCl yielded the gaseous Na2SO4 molecule in residence times of less than one millisecond. Intermediate species NaSO2(g) and NaSO3(g) were also observed and measured. Composition profiles were obtained for all reaction products. Nonflame flowing gas experiments showed that Na2SO4 and NaSO3 gaseous molecules were formed at 1140 C in mixtures of O2, H2O(g), SO2 and NaCl(g). Experimental results are compared with calculated equilibrium thermodynamic predictions.

  10. Thermodynamic properties of the gaseous gallium molybdates and tungstates.

    PubMed

    Lopatin, S I; Shugurov, S M; Gunina, A O

    2009-12-03

    A number of gaseous oxyacid salts have been identified by Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry by vaporizing Ga(2)O(3) from molybdenum and tungsten cells. The stability of gaseous molecules Ga(2)MoO(4), Ga(2)WO(4), Ga(2)Mo(2)O(7), and Ga(2)W(2)O(7) was deduced from the measurements. The structures and molecular parameters of all salts investigated were obtained using quantum chemical calculations. On the basis of equilibrium constants measured for gas-phase reactions, the standard formation enthalpies were determined to be -827 +/- 26, -843 +/- 26, -1578 +/- 32, and -1525 +/- 34 kJ.mol(-1) for Ga(2)MoO(4), Ga(2)WO(4), Ga(2)Mo(2)O(7), and Ga(2)W(2)O(7), respectively.

  11. Method of producing gaseous products using a downflow reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cortright, Randy D; Rozmiarek, Robert T; Hornemann, Charles C

    2014-09-16

    Reactor systems and methods are provided for the catalytic conversion of liquid feedstocks to synthesis gases and other noncondensable gaseous products. The reactor systems include a heat exchange reactor configured to allow the liquid feedstock and gas product to flow concurrently in a downflow direction. The reactor systems and methods are particularly useful for producing hydrogen and light hydrocarbons from biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons using aqueous phase reforming. The generated gases may find used as a fuel source for energy generation via PEM fuel cells, solid-oxide fuel cells, internal combustion engines, or gas turbine gensets, or used in other chemical processes to produce additional products. The gaseous products may also be collected for later use or distribution.

  12. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental report for 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Counce-Brown, D.

    1991-09-01

    This two-part report, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site Environmental Report for 1990, is published annually. It reflects the results of a comprehensive, year-round program to monitor the impact of operations at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) on the area's groundwater and surface waters, soil, air quality, vegetation, and wildlife. In addition, an assessment of the effect of PGDP effluents on the resident human population is made. PGDP's overall goal for environmental management is to protect the environment and PGDP's neighbors and to maintain full compliance with all current regulations. The current environmental strategy is to identify any deficiencies and to develop a system to resolve them. The long-range goal of environmental management is to minimize the source of pollutants, to reduce the formation of waste, and to minimize hazardous waste by substitution of materials.

  13. WIMP-wind detection with an advanced gaseous tracking device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Atsushi; Hattori, Kaori; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Miuchi, Kentaro; Nagayoshi, Tsutomu; Nishimura, Hironobu; Okada, Yoko; Orito, Reiko; Sekiya, Hiroyuki; Tanimori, Toru

    Measuring a wind of weakly interaction massive particles (WIMPs) blowing from the direction of the solar motion is said to be one of the most reliable methods to identify a signature of WIMPs. We have developed a micro time projection chamber (μ-TPC) with a gaseous two-dimensional micro pixel chamber (μ-PIC) readout and studied its performance as a WIMP-wind detector.

  14. Environmental protection facilities safety study: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    The purpose of this Safety Study is to examine the existing facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant that are dedicated to environmental protection. Seven separate, numbered facilities and five unnumbered continuous air sampling stations are identified as the fixed facilities to protect the environment. Each is examined from the standpoint of hazardous materials, monitoring and protection systems, confinement systems, ventilation systems, criticality control systems, fire protection systems, waste disposal systems, and safety systems.

  15. Interpretation of the [ClIII] Lines in Gaseous Nebulae.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H; Czyzak, S J; Walker, M F; Krueger, T K

    1970-05-01

    The intensity ratio of the green lambdalambda5517 and 5537 lines of [ClIII] serves as an indicatrix of the electron density in many gaseous nebulae whose spectra can be observed with an image converter. Quantitative interpretation of the line ratio requires accurate values of the collisional strengths and transition probabilities. With improved values of these parameters we have revised electron densities for a number of nebulae; the results seem to be in good accord with those derived from other criteria.

  16. Method and apparatus for analyzing particle-containing gaseous suspensions

    DOEpatents

    Solomon, Peter R.; Carangelo, Robert M.; Best, Philip E.

    1987-01-01

    The method and apparatus permit analyses, by optical means, of properties of gaseous suspensions of particles, by measuring radiation that is emitted, transmitted or scattered by the particles. Determinations of composition, size, temperature and spectral emittance can be performed either in-situ or by sampling, and Fourier-transform infrared spectrometric techniques are most effectively used. Apparatus specifically adapted for performing radiation scattering analyses, and for collecting radiation from different sources, are provided.

  17. Method and apparatus for analyzing particle-containing gaseous suspensions

    DOEpatents

    Solomon, P.R.; Carangelo, R.M.; Best, P.E.

    1987-03-24

    The method and apparatus permit analyses, by optical means, of properties of gaseous suspensions of particles, by measuring radiation that is emitted, transmitted or scattered by the particles. Determinations of composition, size, temperature and spectral emittance can be performed either in-situ or by sampling, and Fourier-transform infrared spectrometric techniques are most effectively used. Apparatus specifically adapted for performing radiation scattering analyses, and for collecting radiation from different sources, are provided. 51 figs.

  18. Process and composition for drying of gaseous hydrogen halides

    DOEpatents

    Tom, Glenn M.; Brown, Duncan W.

    1989-08-01

    A process for drying a gaseous hydrogen halide of the formula HX, wherein X is selected from the group consisting of bromine, chlorine, fluorine, and iodine, to remove water impurity therefrom, comprising: contacting the water impurity-containing gaseous hydrogen halide with a scavenger including a support having associated therewith one or more members of the group consisting of: (a) an active scavenging moiety selected from one or more members of the group consisting of: (i) metal halide compounds dispersed in the support, of the formula MX.sub.y ; and (ii) metal halide pendant functional groups of the formula -MX.sub.y-1 covalently bonded to the support, wherein M is a y-valent metal, and y is an integer whose value is from 1 to 3; (b) corresponding partially or fully alkylated compounds and/or pendant functional groups, of the metal halide compounds and/or pendant functional groups of (a); wherein the alkylated compounds and/or pendant functional groups, when present, are reactive with the gaseous hydrogen halide to form the corresponding halide compounds and/or pendant functional groups of (a); and M being selected such that the heat of formation, .DELTA.H.sub.f of its hydrated halide, MX.sub.y.(H.sub.2 O).sub.n, is governed by the relationship: .DELTA.H.sub.f .gtoreq.n.times.10.1 kilocalories/mole of such hydrated halide compound wherein n is the number of water molecules bound to the metal halide in the metal halide hydrate. Also disclosed is an appertaining scavenger composition and a contacting apparatus wherein the scavenger is deployed in a bed for contacting with the water impurity-containing gaseous hydrogen halide.

  19. Overview of seismic considerations at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, R.J.; Stoddart, W.C.; Burnett, W.A.; Beavers, J.E.

    1992-10-01

    This paper presents an overview of seismic considerations at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), which is managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the Department of Energy (DOE). The overview describes the original design, the seismic evaluations performed for the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) issued in 1985, and current evaluations and designs to address revised DOE requirements. Future plans to ensure changes in requirements and knowledge are addressed.

  20. FREQUENCY CONTROL OF RF HEATING OF GASEOUS PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Herold, E.W.

    1962-09-01

    This invention relates to the heating of gaseous plasma by radiofrequency ion-cyclotron resonance heating. The cyclotron resonance frequencies are varied and this invention provides means for automatically controlling the frequency of the radiofrequency to maximize the rate of heating. To this end, a servo-loop is provided to sense the direction of plasma heating with frequency and a control signal is derived to set the center frequency of the radiofrequency energy employed to heat the plasma. (AEC)

  1. Gaseous models of globular clusters with stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deiters, S.; Spurzem, R.

    Comparing different approaches for modelling the evolution of star clusters, gaseous models have the advantage of high "particle numbers" but --- until now --- the disadvantage of a lack of realism (Giersz & Spurzem 1994, MNRAS 269, 24 1). To improve gaseous models towards a more realistic description of globular clusters one has to take the effects of stellar evolution and many (primordial) binaries into account and add a consistent treatment of the tidal field of the galaxy (Chernoff & Weinberg 1990, ApJ 351, 121; Portegies Zwart 1998, AA in press). We want to present the first steps on our way towards more realistic gaseous models: We show results of the first implementation of stellar evolution in a spherically symmetric anisotropic gaseous model. We subdivide our model in several dynamical components, each with different stellar mass, whose stellar evolution is followed in a parameterized way. Thus we can simulate the effects of the evolution of stars of different masses in the cluster: During their evolution the stars lose a significant amount of their initial mass, which can easily escape from the cluster. Hence the binding energy of the cluster is reduced. We show several models with different initial conditions with and without the effects of stellar evolution. Their evolution is followed into core bounce and during the post-collapse phase. Dynamical properties of the clusters for the different initial conditions are compared. If time allows we will focus briefly on the treatment of a (time-independent) tidal boundary, modelling the gravitational field of the mother galaxy in our models and give an outlook on the next steps towards more realism in our models of globular clusters, e.g. the inclusion of stochastic binaries (Spurzem & Giersz 1996, MNRAS 283, 805) and stellar finite-size effects.

  2. Disc and condylar head position in the temporomandibular joint with and without disc displacement.

    PubMed

    Badel, Tomislav; Pavicin, Ivana Savić; Jakovac, Marko; Kern, Josipa; Zadravec, Dijana

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the difference between disc and condyle position between temporomandibular joints (TMJs) without disc displacement (DD) in asymptomatic volunteers, and patients who have DD in contralateral joints, respectively unilateral DD. Secondly, there were two TMJ groups which consisted of measurements from patients' symptomatic DD and volunteers with asymptomatic DD. The study included 79 TMJs of 40 patients with unilateral DD. In the group of 25 asymptomatic volunteers, 20 volunteers were without DD bilaterally (40 joints), while five had DD in at least one TMJ. All subjects were examined clinically and DD was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Left and right TMJs were analysed independently for each participant based on their DD status (symptomatic, asymptomatic, and without DD). All asymptomatic TMJs did not have any clinical signs of TMJ functional abnormalities. There was a significant statistical difference between disc position among TMJs without DD in asymptomatic volunteers and TMJs without DD in patients (p = 0.016). Moreover, no significant differences were found between condyle position in the same groups of joints (p = 0.706). There were no significant differences in the DD position (p = 0.918) or condyle position (p = 0.453) between the group with asymptomatic volunteers' joints and the group with symptomatic patients' joints. There was a significant difference between patient and volunteers' joints without DD: the disc was positioned more anteriorly in patients' joints without DD than in joints of asymptomatic volunteers without DD.

  3. Does condylar height decrease more in temporomandibular joint nonreducing disc displacement than reducing disc displacement?

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ying-Kai; Yang, Chi; Cai, Xie-Yi; Xie, Qian-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to compare condylar height changes of anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDwR) and anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDwoR) in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) quantitatively, to get a better understanding of the changes in condylar height of patients with anterior disc displacement who had received no treatment, and to provide useful information for treatment protocol. This longitudinal retrospective study enrolled 206 joints in 156 patients, which were divided into ADDWR group and ADDwoR group based on magnetic resonance imaging examination. The joints were assessed quantitatively for condylar height at initial and follow-up visits. Also, both groups were further divided into 3 subgroups according to age: <15 years group, 15 to 21 years group, and 22 to 35 years group. Paired t test and independent t test were used to assess intra- and intergroup differences. The average age of the ADDwR group was 19.65 years with a mean of 9.47 months’ follow-up. The follow-up interval of the patients with ADDwoR was 7.96 months, with a mean age of 18.51 years. Condylar height in ADDwoR tended to decrease more than those in ADDwR, especially during the pubertal growth spurt and with the presence of osteoarthrosis, meaning ADDwoR could cause a severe disturbance in mandibular development. Thus, an early disc repositioning was suggested to avoid decrease in condylar height. PMID:27583909

  4. AIRS Mission Support from GES DISC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Jennifer; Hearty, Thomas; Savtchenko, Audrey; Ding, Feng; Esfandiari, Ed; Theobald, Mike; Vollmer, Bruce; Kempler, Steve

    2015-01-01

    This talk will describe the support and distribution of AIRS (Atmospheric Infra Red Sounding) data products that are archived and distributed from the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center. Along with data stewardship, an important mission of GES DISC is to enhance the usability of data and broaden the user base. We will provide a brief summary of the current online archive and distribution metrics for the AIRS v5 and v6 products. We will also describe collaborative data sets and services (e.g., visualization and potential science applications) and solicit feedback for potential future services.

  5. ISASS Policy Statement – Lumbar Artificial Disc

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The primary goal of this Policy Statement is to educate patients, physicians, medical providers, reviewers, adjustors, case managers, insurers, and all others involved or affected by insurance coverage decisions regarding lumbar disc replacement surgery. Procedures This Policy Statement was developed by a panel of physicians selected by the Board of Directors of ISASS for their expertise and experience with lumbar TDR. The panel's recommendation was entirely based on the best evidence-based scientific research available regarding the safety and effectiveness of lumbar TDR. PMID:25785243

  6. Development of an Optical Disc Recorder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    ILIP S LABORATORIE S rotary air bearing ( Model 4B). The air bearing has been direct- ly coupled to one end of the motor shaft. A 2000-line optical...available for 4 30 rps operation. 4.4 Materials Evaluation A Model 907 He-Ne laser was received from Spectra Physics. Output was found to be 25 mW in...Modulation was provided by a Harris Model 180 acoustoptic modulator. - • Pulse duration was approximately 500 nsec; disc rotation speed was 6 rps . Figure 8

  7. Cell therapy for the degenerating intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wei; Lu, Zhouyu; Qin, Ling; Mauck, Robert L; Smith, Harvey E; Smith, Lachlan J; Malhotra, Neil R; Heyworth, Martin F; Caldera, Franklin; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi; Zhang, Yejia

    2017-03-01

    Spinal conditions related to intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration cost billions of dollars in the US annually. Despite the prevalence and soaring cost, there is no specific treatment that restores the physiological function of the diseased IVD. Thus, it is vital to develop new treatment strategies to repair the degenerating IVD. Persons with IVD degeneration without back pain or radicular leg pain often do not require any intervention. Only patients with severe back pain related to the IVD degeneration or biomechanical instability are likely candidates for cell therapy. The IVD progressively degenerates with age in humans, and strategies to repair the IVD depend on the stage of degeneration. Cell therapy and cell-based gene therapy aim to address moderate disc degeneration; advanced stage disease may require surgery. Studies involving autologous, allogeneic, and xenogeneic cells have all shown good survival of these cells in the IVD, confirming that the disc niche is an immunologically privileged site, permitting long-term survival of transplanted cells. All of the animal studies reviewed here reported some improvement in disc structure, and 2 studies showed attenuation of local inflammation. Among the 50 studies reviewed, 25 used some type of scaffold, and cell leakage is a consistently noted problem, though some studies showed reduced cell leakage. Hydrogel scaffolds may prevent cell leakage and provide biomechanical support until cells can become established matrix producers. However, these gels need to be optimized to prevent this leakage. Many animal models have been leveraged in this research space. Rabbit is the most frequently used model (28 of 50), followed by rat, pig, and dog. Sheep and goat IVDs resemble those of humans in size and in the absence of notochordal cells. Despite this advantage, there were only 2 sheep and 1 goat studies of 50 studies in this cohort. It is also unclear if a study in large animals is needed before clinical trials since

  8. Plasma-assisted cataluminescence sensor array for gaseous hydrocarbons discrimination.

    PubMed

    Na, Na; Liu, Haiyan; Han, Jiaying; Han, Feifei; Liu, Hualin; Ouyang, Jin

    2012-06-05

    Combining plasma activation and cross-reactivity of sensor array, we have developed a plasma-assisted cataluminescence (PA-CTL) sensor array for fast sensing and discrimination of gaseous hydrocarbons, which can be potentially used for fast diagnosis of lung cancer. Based on dielectric barrier discharge, a low-temperature plasma is generated to activate gaseous hydrocarbons with low cataluminescence (CTL) activities. Extremely increased CTL responses have been obtained, which resulted in a plasma assistance factor of infinity (∞) for some hydrocarbons. On a 4 × 3 PA-CTL sensor array made from alkaline-earth nanomaterials, gaseous hydrocarbons showed robust and unique CTL responses to generate characteristic patterns for fast discrimination. Because of the difference in the component of hydrocarbons in breath, exhaled breath samples from donors with and without lung cancer were tested, and good discrimination has been achieved by this technique. In addition, the feasibility of multidimentional detection based on temperature was confirmed. It had good reproducibility and gave a linear range of 65-6500 ng/mL or 77-7700 ppmv (R > 0.98) for CH(4) with a detection limit of 33 ng/mL (38 ppmv) on MgO. The PA-CTL sensor array is simple, low-cost, thermally stable, nontoxic, and has an abundance of alkaline-earth nanomaterials to act as sensing elements. This has expanded the applications of CTL-based senor arrays and will show great potential in clinical fast diagnosis.

  9. Gaseous Emissions from Aircraft Engines. A Handbook for the Calculation of Emission Indexes and Gaseous Emissions from Aircraft Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    corresponded to intervals of stable engine operation, as specified by the operators of the engine. Each laboratory reported emission indexes for the read ...period. The test established 50 read periods for gaseous emissions. Tabl, 5-1 gives the emission indexes at idle, high idle, approach, cruise and...emission indexes from a T58-GE-8F engine Test Cell - 12 Location - Naval Air Rework Facility, North Island IDLE Date Time Reading Prior Emission index

  10. The jet-disc connection in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbarrato, T.; Padovani, P.; Ghisellini, G.

    2014-11-01

    We present our latest results on the connection between accretion rate and relativistic jet power in active galactic nuclei (AGN), by using a large sample which includes mostly blazars, but contains also some radio galaxies. The jet power can be traced by γ-ray luminosity in the case of blazars, and radio luminosity for both classes. The accretion-disc luminosity is instead traced by the broad emission lines. Among blazars, we find a correlation between broad line emission and the γ-ray or radio luminosities, suggesting a direct tight connection between jet power and accretion rate. We confirm that the observational differences between blazar subclasses reflect differences in the accretion regime, but with blazars only we cannot properly access the low-accretion regime. By introducing radio galaxies, we succeed in observing the fingerprint of the transition between radiatively efficient and inefficient accretion discs in the jetted AGN family. The transition occurs at the standard critical value Ld/LEdd ˜ 10-2 and it appears smooth. Below this value, the ionizing luminosity emitted by the accretion structure drops significantly.

  11. Bulk Comptonization by turbulence in accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, J.; Blaes, O. M.

    2016-06-01

    Radiation pressure dominated accretion discs around compact objects may have turbulent velocities that greatly exceed the electron thermal velocities within the disc. Bulk Comptonization by the turbulence may therefore dominate over thermal Comptonization in determining the emergent spectrum. Bulk Comptonization by divergenceless turbulence is due to radiation viscous dissipation only. It can be treated as thermal Comptonization by solving the Kompaneets equation with an equivalent `wave' temperature, which is a weighted sum over the power present at each scale in the turbulent cascade. Bulk Comptonization by turbulence with non-zero divergence is due to both pressure work and radiation viscous dissipation. Pressure work has negligible effect on photon spectra in the limit of optically thin turbulence, and in this limit radiation viscous dissipation alone can be treated as thermal Comptonization with a temperature equivalent to the full turbulent power. In the limit of extremely optically thick turbulence, radiation viscous dissipation is suppressed, and the evolution of local photon spectra can be understood in terms of compression and expansion of the strongly coupled photon and gas fluids. We discuss the consequences of these effects for self-consistently resolving and interpreting turbulent Comptonization in spectral calculations in radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of high luminosity accretion flows.

  12. Genetic Factors in Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yi; Egan, Brian; Wang, Jinxi

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a major cause of disability and imposes huge economic burdens on human society worldwide. Among many factors responsible for LBP, intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is the most common disorder and is a target for intervention. The etiology of IDD is complex and its mechanism is still not completely understood. Many factors such as aging, spine deformities and diseases, spine injuries, and genetic factors are involved in the pathogenesis of IDD. In this review, we will focus on the recent advances in studies on the most promising and extensively examined genetic factors associated with IDD in humans. A number of genetic defects have been correlated with structural and functional changes within the intervertebral disc (IVD), which may compromise the disc’s mechanical properties and metabolic activities. These genetic and proteomic studies have begun to shed light on the molecular basis of IDD, suggesting that genetic factors are important contributors to the onset and progression of IDD. By continuing to improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of IDD, specific early diagnosis and more effective treatments for this disabling disease will be possible in the future. PMID:27617275

  13. The cellular memory disc of reprogrammed cells.

    PubMed

    Anjamrooz, Seyed Hadi

    2013-04-01

    The crucial facts underlying the low efficiency of cellular reprogramming are poorly understood. Cellular reprogramming occurs in nuclear transfer, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) formation, cell fusion, and lineage-switching experiments. Despite these advances, there are three fundamental problems to be addressed: (1) the majority of cells cannot be reprogrammed, (2) the efficiency of reprogramming cells is usually low, and (3) the reprogrammed cells developed from a patient's own cells activate immune responses. These shortcomings present major obstacles for using reprogramming approaches in customised cell therapy. In this Perspective, the author synthesises past and present observations in the field of cellular reprogramming to propose a theoretical picture of the cellular memory disc. The current hypothesis is that all cells undergo an endogenous and exogenous holographic memorisation such that parts of the cellular memory dramatically decrease the efficiency of reprogramming cells, act like a barrier against reprogramming in the majority of cells, and activate immune responses. Accordingly, the focus of this review is mainly to describe the cellular memory disc (CMD). Based on the present theory, cellular memory includes three parts: a reprogramming-resistance memory (RRM), a switch-promoting memory (SPM) and a culture-induced memory (CIM). The cellular memory arises genetically, epigenetically and non-genetically and affects cellular behaviours. [corrected].

  14. Risk Factors for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The most common complication after lumbar discectomy is reherniation. As the first step in reducing the rate of recurrence, many studies have been conducted to find out the factors that may increase the reherniation risk. Some reported factors are age, sex, the type of lumbar disc herniation, the amount of fragments removed, smoking, alcohol consumption and the length of restricted activities. In this review, the factors studied thus far are summarized, excepting factors which cannot be chosen or changed, such as age or sex. Apart from the factors shown here, many other risk factors such as diabetes, family history, history of external injury, duration of illness and body mass index are considered. Few are agreed upon by all. The reason for the diverse opinions may be that many clinical and biomechanical variables are involved in the prognosis following operation. For the investigation of risk factors in recurrent lumbar disc herniation, large-scale multicenter prospective studies will be required in the future. PMID:24761206

  15. Operative Management of Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu Chao; Osti, Orso Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar degenerative disc disease is extremely common. Current evidence supports surgery in carefully selected patients who have failed non-operative treatment and do not exhibit any substantial psychosocial overlay. Fusion surgery employing the correct grafting and stabilization techniques has long-term results demonstrating successful clinical outcomes. However, the best approach for fusion remains debatable. There is some evidence supporting the more complex, technically demanding and higher risk interbody fusion techniques for the younger, active patients or patients with a higher risk of non-union. Lumbar disc arthroplasty and hybrid techniques are still relatively novel procedures despite promising short-term and mid-term outcomes. Long-term studies demonstrating superiority over fusion are required before these techniques may be recommended to replace fusion as the gold standard. Novel stem cell approaches combined with tissue engineering therapies continue to be developed in expectation of improving clinical outcomes. Results with appropriate follow-up are not yet available to indicate if such techniques are safe, cost-effective and reliable in the long-term. PMID:27559465

  16. Unstable Roche-Lobe Overflow of Gaseous Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Brian

    The discoveries of more than 100 roughly Earth-sized bodies with orbital periods less than 1 day, ultra-short-period planets or candidates (USPs), have challenged planet formation theories, and evidence suggests USPs may be the remnants of gaseous planets that shed their atmospheres. Indeed, many hot Jupiters are near Roche-Lobe overflow (RLO), and tidal decay can push them the rest of the way in. Recent work has shown stable RLO (atmospheres lost via a steady outflow and thin accretion disk) probably cannot produce USPs on its own but suggested unstable RLO (atmospheres quickly shed on dynamical timescales) may. In fact, stable RLO may drive overflowing hot Jupiters into unstable RLO, and by analogy with the common-envelope binaries, the core that remains can drive off the gaseous envelope at the cost of its orbital energy. Wellestablished mass-radius relations for gaseous planets, coupled to simple energy and angular momentum considerations, provide a connection between the observed masses and periods for USPs and their putative progenitor gaseous planets, with few free parameters. We propose to investigate the hypothesis that USPs originate through tidal decay and a combination of stable and unstable Roche-lobe overflow of short-period gaseous planets through the following studies: -We will explore the planetary masses, orbital periods, etc. that produce unstable RLO using the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) suite. -We will relate the observed periods and masses of USPs to their putative progenitor masses and periods to see whether they are consistent with the unstable RLO hypothesis. This proposal is directly relevant to the Exoplanets Research Program since it seeks to "understand the ... physical processes of exoplanets" and "improve understanding of [their] origins" through "theoretical studies ... and modeling'". We also expect that it will have broad impacts on a variety of astrophysical topics: -Ultra-short period planets could

  17. The comparative analysis of rocks' resistance to forward-slanting disc cutters and traditionally installed disc cutters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao-Huang; Fei, Sun; Liang, Meng

    2016-08-01

    At present, disc cutters of a full face rock tunnel boring machine are mostly mounted in the traditional way. Practical use in engineering projects reveals that this installation method not only heavily affects the operation life of disc cutters, but also increases the energy consumption of a full face rock tunnel boring machine. To straighten out this issue, therefore, a rock-breaking model is developed for disc cutters' movement after the research on the rock breaking of forward-slanting disc cutters. Equations of its displacement are established based on the analysis of velocity vector of a disc cutter's rock-breaking point. The functional relations then are brought forward between the displacement parameters of a rock-breaking point and its coordinate through the analysis of micro displacement of a rock-breaking point. Thus, the geometric equations of rock deformation are derived for the forward-slanting installation of disc cutters. With a linear relationship remaining between the acting force and its deformation either before or after the leap breaking, the constitutive relation of rock deformation can be expressed in the form of generalized Hooke law, hence the comparative analysis of the variation in the resistance of rock to the disc cutters mounted in the forward-slanting way with that in the traditional way. It is discovered that with the same penetration, strain of the rock in contact with forward-slanting disc cutters is apparently on the decline, in other words, the resistance of rock to disc cutters is reduced. Thus wear of disc cutters resulted from friction is lowered and energy consumption is correspondingly decreased. It will be useful for the development of installation and design theory of disc cutters, and significant for the breakthrough in the design of full face rock tunnel boring machine.

  18. Tissue Engineering a Biological Repair Strategy for Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Grace D.; Leach, J. Kent; Klineberg, Eric O.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The intervertebral disc is a critical part of the intersegmental soft tissue of the spinal column, providing flexibility and mobility, while absorbing large complex loads. Spinal disease, including disc herniation and degeneration, may be a significant contributor to low back pain. Clinically, disc herniations are treated with both nonoperative and operative methods. Operative treatment for disc herniation includes removal of the herniated material when neural compression occurs. While this strategy may have short-term advantages over nonoperative methods, the remaining disc material is not addressed and surgery for mild degeneration may have limited long-term advantage over nonoperative methods. Furthermore, disc herniation and surgery significantly alter the mechanical function of the disc joint, which may contribute to progression of degeneration in surrounding tissues. We reviewed recent advances in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strategies that may have a significant impact on disc herniation repair. Our review on tissue engineering strategies focuses on cell-based and inductive methods, each commonly combined with material-based approaches. An ideal clinically relevant biological repair strategy will significantly reduce pain and repair and restore flexibility and motion of the spine. PMID:26634189

  19. On the formation of planetary systems in photoevaporating transition discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terquem, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    In protoplanetary discs, planetary cores must be at least 0.1 M⊕ at 1 au for migration to be significant; this mass rises to 1 M⊕ at 5 au. Planet formation models indicate that these cores form on million year time-scales. We report here a study of the evolution of 0.1 and 1 M⊕ cores, migrating from about 2 and 5 au, respectively, in million year old photoevaporating discs. In such a disc, a gap opens up at around 2 au after a few million years. The inner region subsequently accrete on to the star on a smaller time-scale. We find that, typically, the smallest cores form systems of non-resonant planets beyond 0.5 au with masses up to about 1.5 M⊕. In low-mass discs, the same cores may evolve in situ. More massive cores form systems of a few Earth-mass planets. They migrate within the inner edge of the disc gap only in the most massive discs. Delivery of material to the inner parts of the disc ceases with opening of the gap. Interestingly, when the heavy cores do not migrate significantly, the type of systems that are produced resembles our Solar system. This study suggests that low-mm flux transition discs may not form systems of planets on short orbits but may instead harbour Earth-mass planets in the habitable zone.

  20. Dust dynamics in 2D gravito-turbulent discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ji-Ming; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Stone, James M.; Chiang, Eugene

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of solid bodies in protoplanetary discs are subject to the properties of any underlying gas turbulence. Turbulence driven by disc self-gravity shows features distinct from those driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI). We study the dynamics of solids in gravito-turbulent discs with two-dimensional (in the disc plane), hybrid (particle and gas) simulations. Gravito-turbulent discs can exhibit stronger gravitational stirring than MRI-active discs, resulting in greater radial diffusion and larger eccentricities and relative speeds for large particles (those with dimensionless stopping times tstopΩ > 1, where Ω is the orbital frequency). The agglomeration of large particles into planetesimals by pairwise collisions is therefore disfavoured in gravito-turbulent discs. However, the relative speeds of intermediate-size particles (tstopΩ ˜ 1) are significantly reduced as such particles are collected by gas drag and gas gravity into coherent filament-like structures with densities high enough to trigger gravitational collapse. First-generation planetesimals may form via gravitational instability of dust in marginally gravitationally unstable gas discs.

  1. 21 CFR 872.3970 - Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... implant). 872.3970 Section 872.3970 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3970 Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant). (a) Identification. An interarticular disc...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3970 - Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant). 872.3970 Section 872.3970 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Food and Drug Administration on or before March 30, 1999, for any interarticular disc...

  3. RADIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF EXPERIMENTAL DISC DEGENERATION IN RABBITS

    PubMed Central

    Vialle, Emiliano; Vialle, Luiz Roberto; Arruda, André de Oliveira; Riet, Ricardo Nascimento; Krieger, Antônio Bernardo de Queiroz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To validate radiographic evaluation of a rabbit model for disc degeneration. Methods: Lumbar intervertebral discs of New Zealand rabbits were stabbed three times with a 18G needle at a limited depth of 5mm, through lateral approach. Serial radiographic images were taken on the early pre-and postoperative periods, and after four, eight and 12 weeks of the procedure, with subsequent analysis of disc height, osteophyte formation, endplate sclerosis, and presence of disc degeneration. The statistical analysis of data was validated by the Kappa coefficient, with a confidence interval (CI) of 95%. Results: A significant reduction of disc space was found on AP X-ray images after 12 postoperative weeks, with Kappa = 0.489 for CI 95% (0.25-0.72) with p < 0.001. X-ray signs of disc degeneration also presented Kappa = 0.63 for CI 95% (0.39-0.86) with p < 0.001. The remaining assessed criteria showed positive results, but with a lower Kappa value. Conclusion: The disc degeneration model using rabbits as proposed in this study was shown to be feasible, with positive X-ray correlation between pre- and postoperative images, validating the potential to induce disc degeneration in this animal model for future studies. PMID:27022512

  4. Angiogenesis in the degeneration of the lumbar intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    David, Gh; Iencean, SM; Mohan, A

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the study is to show the histological and biochemical changes that indicate the angiogenesis of the intervertebral disc in lumbar intervertebral disc hernia and the existence of epidemiological correlations between these changes and the risk factors of lumbar intervertebral disc hernia, as well as the patient's quality of life (QOL). We have studied 50 patients aged between 18 and 73 years old, who have undergone lumbar intervertebral disc hernia surgery, making fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor level measurements, as elements in the process of appreciating the disc angiogenesis. Also, pre–surgery and post–surgery QOL has been measured, as well as the intensity of the pain syndrome. We have identified factors capable of stimulating vascular endothelial growth (VEGF, FGF–2) for the examined disc material, but histological examination did not show angiogenesis. The process of angiogenesis at the degenerated intervertebral disc level affects the patient's quality of life both pre and postoperatively, and may be a predictive factor for the post–operative results. Patients can prevent the appearance of angiogenesis type degenerative processes of the intervertebral disc by avoiding angiogenesis correlated factors (weight control, physical effort, and smoking). PMID:20968201

  5. Goddard Earth Science Data and Information Center (GES DISC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempler, Steve

    2016-01-01

    The GES DIS is one of 12 NASA Earth science data centers. The GES DISC vision is to enable researchers and educators maximize knowledge of the Earth by engaging in understanding their goals, and by leading the advancement of remote sensing information services in response to satisfying their goals. This presentation will describe the GES DISC approach, successes, challenges, and best practices.

  6. Analytical Investigation on Squeal Phenomena Generated in Bicycle Disc Brakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakae, Takashi; Sueoka, Atsuo; Ryu, Takahiro

    The squeal phenomenon is often generated in bicycle disc brakes. This paper deals analytically with the generation mechanism and the criterion of whether or not the squeal occurs. According to the experimental studies, it has been made clear that the squeal is mainly in-plane vibration in the direction of disc surface with the frequency about 1kHz caused by frictional characteristics with negative slope with respect to the relative velocity. An analytical model of the bicycle disc brake system has been devised to confirm the experimental results, in which a coupled in-plane and out-of-plane vibrating system is composed of the disc, hub, caliper and spokes. The resulting frequency of squeal and the unstable vibration modes of the disc and spokes from the analytical model agreed well with the experimental results.

  7. [L1-2 lumbar disc herniation: a case report].

    PubMed

    Monobe, T; Fujita, T; Nakaue, Y; Nishi, N

    1996-03-01

    A 49-year-old female presented a two-year history of pain in the right thigh and lower back. Neurological examination on admission demonstrated weakness of the right iliopsoas and quadriceps, hypesthesia on the right L1-2 dermatome. Radiological examination including myelography, CT myelography and discography disclosed an L1-2 herniated disc. Sagittal MRI also revealed an L1-2, an L4-5 and L5-S1 protruded disc. A posterior microdiscectomy (Love's method) was performed for the L1-2 disc. A controlateral protruded disc which compressed the L-2 nerve root was identified and partially removed. The postoperative myelography showed residual disc. The patient was free from pain and regained normal sensorimotor function. Love's posterior microdiscectomy has a disadvantage in that the operative field is limited. Careful surgical procedure was needed to avoid injury to nerve roots and the cauda equina in a tight L1-2 lumbar canal.

  8. Lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and related factors in Korean firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Tae-Won; Ahn, Yeon-Soon; Byun, Junsu; Lee, Jong-In; Kim, Kun-Hyung; Kim, Youngki; Song, Han-Soo; Lee, Chul-Gab; Kwon, Young-Jun; Yoon, Jin-Ha; Jeong, Kyoungsook

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The job of firefighting can cause lumbar burden and low back pain. This study aimed to identify the association between age and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and whether the association differs between field and administrative (non-field) firefighters. Methods Subjects were selected using a stratified random sampling method. Firefighters were stratified by geographic area, gender, age and type of job. First, 25 fire stations were randomly sampled considering regional distribution. Then firefighters were stratified by gender, age and their job and randomly selected among the strata. A questionnaire survey and MRI scans were performed, and then four radiologists used Pfirrmann classification methods to determine the grade of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration. Results Pfirrmann grade increased with lumbar intervertebral disc level. Analysis of covariance showed that age was significantly associated with lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration (p<0.05). The value of β (parameter estimate) was positive at all lumbar intervertebral disc levels and was higher in the field group than in the administrative group at each level. In logistic regression analysis, type of job was statistically significant only with regard to the L4–5 intervertebral disc (OR 3.498, 95% CI 1.241 to 9.860). Conclusions Lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration is associated with age, and field work such as firefighting, emergency and rescue may accelerate degeneration in the L4–5 intervertebral disc. The effects of field work on lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration were not clear in discs other than at the level L4–5. PMID:27354080

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Biological Aging in Intervertebral Discs

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Nam V.; Hartman, Robert A.; Patil, Prashanti R.; Risbud, Makarand V.; Kletsas, Dimitris; Iatridis, James C.; Hoyland, Judith A.; Le Maitre, Christine L.; Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Kang, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced age is the greatest risk factor for the majority of human ailments, including spine-related chronic disability and back pain, which stem from age-associated intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). Given the rapid global rise in the aging population, understanding the biology of intervertebral disc aging in order to develop effective therapeutic interventions to combat the adverse effects of aging on disc health is now imperative. Fortunately, recent advances in aging research have begun to shed light on the basic biological process of aging. Here we review some of these insights and organize the complex process of disc aging into three different phases to guide research efforts to understand the biology of disc aging. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge and the recent progress made to elucidate specific molecular mechanisms underlying disc aging. In particular, studies over the last few years have uncovered cellular senescence and genomic instability as important drivers of disc aging. Supporting evidence comes from DNA repair-deficient animal models that show increased disc cellular senescence and accelerated disc aging. Additionally, stress-induced senescent cells have now been well documented to secrete catabolic factors, which can negatively impact the physiology of neighboring cells and ECM. These along with other molecular drivers of aging are reviewed in depth to shed crucial insights into the underlying mechanisms of age-related disc degeneration. We also highlight molecular targets for novel therapies and emerging candidate therapeutics that may mitigate age-associated IDD. PMID:26890203

  10. Gas Modelling in the Disc of HD 163296

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilling, I.; Woitke, P.; Meeus, G.; Mora, A.; Montesinos, B.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Eiroa, C.; Thi, W. -F.; Isella, A.; Roberge, A.; Martin-Zaidi, C.; Kamp, I.; Pinte, C.; Sandell, G.; Vacca, W. D.; Menard, F.; Mendigutia, I.; Duchene, G.; Dent, W. R. F.; Aresu, G.; Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present detailed model fits to observations of the disc around the Herbig Ae star HD 163296. This well-studied object has an age of approx. 4Myr, with evidence of a circumstellar disc extending out to approx. 540AU. We use the radiation thermo-chemical disc code ProDiMo to model the gas and dust in the circumstellar disc of HD 163296, and attempt to determine the disc properties by fitting to observational line and continuum data. These include new Herschel/PACS observations obtained as part of the open-time key program GASPS (Gas in Protoplanetary Systems), consisting of a detection of the [Oi] 63 m line and upper limits for several other far infrared lines. We complement this with continuum data and ground-based observations of the CO-12 3-2, 2-1 and CO-13 J=1-0 line transitions, as well as the H2 S(1) transition. We explore the effects of stellar ultraviolet variability and dust settling on the line emission, and on the derived disc properties. Our fitting efforts lead to derived gas/dust ratios in the range 9-100, depending on the assumptions made. We note that the line fluxes are sensitive in general to the degree of dust settling in the disc, with an increase in line flux for settled models. This is most pronounced in lines which are formed in the warm gas in the inner disc, but the low excitation molecular lines are also affected. This has serious implications for attempts to derive the disc gas mass from line observations. We derive fractional PAH abundances between 0.007 and 0.04 relative to ISM levels. Using a stellar and UV excess input spectrum based on a detailed analysis of observations, we find that the all observations are consistent with the previously assumed disc geometry

  11. Changes in disc status in the reducing and nonreducing anterior disc displacement of temporomandibular joint: a longitudinal retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying Kai; Yang, Chi; Xie, Qian Yang

    2016-09-27

    Treatment procedures for anterior disc displacement (ADD) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are far from reaching a consensus. The aim of the study was to evaluate disc status changes of anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDWR) and without reduction (ADDWoR) comparatively, to get a better understanding of the disease progress without intervention. This longitudinal retrospective study included 217 joints in 165 patients, which were divided into ADDWR group and ADDWoR group based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. The joints were assessed quantitatively for disc length and displacement distance at initial and follow-up visits. Disc morphology, which was classified in 5 types, was also evaluated. Paired t-test and Wilcoxon signed rank test were used to assess intra-group differences and independent t-test for inter-group differences. Moreover, analysis of covariance was applied to analyze influential factors for changes in disc length and displacement distance. According to our results, discs tended to become shorter, move further forward and distort more seriously in ADDWoR group than in ADDWR group after follow-up. Moreover, discs were prone to become shorter and more anteriorly displaced in teenagers, type I and III morphologies, advanced Wilkes stages, or those with joint effusion. Follow-up period seemed to be not critical.

  12. Changes in disc status in the reducing and nonreducing anterior disc displacement of temporomandibular joint: a longitudinal retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ying Kai; Yang, Chi; Xie, Qian Yang

    2016-01-01

    Treatment procedures for anterior disc displacement (ADD) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are far from reaching a consensus. The aim of the study was to evaluate disc status changes of anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDWR) and without reduction (ADDWoR) comparatively, to get a better understanding of the disease progress without intervention. This longitudinal retrospective study included 217 joints in 165 patients, which were divided into ADDWR group and ADDWoR group based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. The joints were assessed quantitatively for disc length and displacement distance at initial and follow-up visits. Disc morphology, which was classified in 5 types, was also evaluated. Paired t-test and Wilcoxon signed rank test were used to assess intra-group differences and independent t-test for inter-group differences. Moreover, analysis of covariance was applied to analyze influential factors for changes in disc length and displacement distance. According to our results, discs tended to become shorter, move further forward and distort more seriously in ADDWoR group than in ADDWR group after follow-up. Moreover, discs were prone to become shorter and more anteriorly displaced in teenagers, type I and III morphologies, advanced Wilkes stages, or those with joint effusion. Follow-up period seemed to be not critical. PMID:27671371

  13. Magnetised accretion discs in Kerr spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranea-Sandoval, Ignacio F.; García, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Context. Observational data from X-ray binary systems provide strong evidence of astronomical objects that are too massive and compact to be explained as neutron or hybrid stars. When these systems are in the thermal (high/soft) state, they emit mainly in the 0.1-5 keV energy range. This emission can be explained by thin accretion discs that formed around compact objects like black holes. The profile of the fluorescent iron line is useful to obtain insight into the nature of the compact object. General relativity does not ensure that a black hole must form after the complete gravitational collapse of very massive stars, and other theoretical models such as naked singularities cannot be discarded. The cosmic censorship conjecture was proposed by Penrose to avoid these possibilities and is yet to be proven. Aims: We study the effect caused by external magnetic fields on the observed thermal spectra and iron line profiles of thin accretion discs formed around Kerr black holes and naked singularities. We aim to provide a tool that can be used to estimate the presence of magnetic fields in the neighbourhood of a compact object and to probe the cosmic censorship conjecture in these particular astrophysical environments. Methods: We developed a numerical scheme able to calculate thermal spectra of magnetised Page-Thorne accretion discs formed around rotating black holes and naked singularities as seen by an arbitrary distant observer. We incorporated two different magnetic field configurations: uniform and dipolar, using a perturbative scheme in the coupling constant between matter and magnetic field strength. Under the same assumptions, we obtained observed synthetic line profiles of the 6.4 keV fluorescent iron line. Results: We show that an external magnetic field produces potentially observable modifications on the thermal energy spectrum and the fluorescent iron line profile. Thermal energy spectra of naked singularities are harder and brighter than those from black

  14. Gaseous pollutants in particulate matter epidemiology: confounders or surrogates?

    PubMed Central

    Sarnat, J A; Schwartz, J; Catalano, P J; Suh, H H

    2001-01-01

    Air pollution epidemiologic studies use ambient pollutant concentrations as surrogates of personal exposure. Strong correlations among numerous ambient pollutant concentrations, however, have made it difficult to determine the relative contribution of each pollutant to a given health outcome and have led to criticism that health effect estimates for particulate matter may be biased due to confounding. In the current study we used data collected from a multipollutant exposure study conducted in Baltimore, Maryland, during both the summer and winter to address the potential for confounding further. Twenty-four-hour personal exposures and corresponding ambient concentrations to fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)), ozone, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and carbon monoxide were measured for 56 subjects. Results from correlation and regression analyses showed that personal PM(2.5) and gaseous air pollutant exposures were generally not correlated, as only 9 of the 178 individual-specific pairwise correlations were significant. Similarly, ambient concentrations were not associated with their corresponding personal exposures for any of the pollutants, except for PM(2.5), which had significant associations during both seasons (p < 0.0001). Ambient gaseous concentrations were, however, strongly associated with personal PM(2.5) exposures. The strongest associations were shown between ambient O(3) and personal PM(2.5) (p < 0.0001 during both seasons). These results indicate that ambient PM(2.5) concentrations are suitable surrogates for personal PM(2.5) exposures and that ambient gaseous concentrations are surrogates, as opposed to confounders, of PM(2.5). These findings suggest that the use of multiple pollutant models in epidemiologic studies of PM(2.5) may not be suitable and that health effects attributed to the ambient gases may actually be a result of exposures to PM(2.5). PMID:11675271

  15. Effect of low-dose gaseous ozone on pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Treatment of chronically infected wounds is a challenge, and bacterial environmental contamination is a growing issue in infection control. Ozone may have a role in these situations. The objective of this study was to determine whether a low dose of gaseous ozone/oxygen mixture eliminates pathogenic bacteria cultivated in Petri dishes. Methods A pilot study with 6 bacterial strains was made using different concentrations of ozone in an ozone-oxygen mixture to determine a minimally effective dose that completely eliminated bacterial growth. The small and apparently bactericidal gaseous dose of 20 μg/mL ozone/oxygen (1:99) mixture, applied for 5min under atmospheric pressure was selected. In the 2nd phase, eight bacterial strains with well characterized resistance patterns were evaluated in vitro using agar-blood in adapted Petri dishes (105 bacteria/dish). The cultures were divided into 3 groups: 1- ozone-oxygen gaseous mixture containing 20 μg of O3/mL for 5 min; 2- 100% oxygen for 5 min; 3- baseline: no gas was used. Results The selected ozone dose was applied to the following eight strains: Escherichia coli, oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, oxacillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae, carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter baumannii susceptible only to carbapenems, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa susceptible to imipenem and meropenem. All isolates were completely inhibited by the ozone-oxygen mixture while growth occurred in the other 2 groups. Conclusion A single topical application by nebulization of a low ozone dose completely inhibited the growth of all potentially pathogenic bacterial strains with known resistance to antimicrobial agents. PMID:23249441

  16. Gaseous mercury emissions from natural sources in Canadian landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, W. H.; Beauchamp, S.; Edwards, G.; Poissant, L.; Rasmussen, P.; Tordon, R.; Dias, G.; Kemp, J.; van Heyst, B.; Banic, C. M.

    2005-09-01

    Field measurements of mercury air-surface exchange from natural settings were made in various Canadian landscapes. Soil and water samples were analyzed for mercury concentrations, and air-surface exchange fluxes from these substrates were determined using dynamic chamber, micrometeorological, or modeling methods. Environmental variables, including air and soil/water temperature, solar radiation, humidity, and wind speed, were monitored concurrently with the air-surface exchange to better understand the processes affecting the environmental cycling of mercury. Average mercury fluxes from aquatic landscapes ranged from 0.0 to 5.0 ng m-2 h-1 with total mercury concentration in water ranging from 0.3 to 6.5 ng L-1. A significant correlation (R2 = 0.47) was found between gaseous Hg fluxes and total Hg concentration in water. Mean gaseous Hg fluxes from forest soils varied from -0.4 to 2.2 ng m-2 h-1, while those from agricultural fields ranged from 1.1 to 2.9 ng m-2 h-1. Non-mineralized bedrock, sand, and till sites yielded fluxes ranging from -0.03 to 5.9 ng m-2 h-1. Mean fluxes from mercuriferous geological substrates at various locations were large compared to non-mercuriferous sites, ranging from 9.1 to 1760 ng m-2 h-1, and represent natural emissions. The corresponding total mercury substrate concentrations ranged from 0.360 to 180 ppm. A significant correlation (R2 = 0.66) was found between Hg fluxes and total Hg concentrations in mineralized and non-mineralized substrates. These gaseous Hg flux measurements represent a significant contribution to understanding natural mercury cycling, but there are still insufficient data and knowledge of processes to properly scale up fluxes from natural sources in Canada.

  17. Truncated disc surface brightness profiles produced by flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borlaff, Alejandro; Eliche-Moral, M. Carmen; Beckman, John; Font, Joan

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies have discarded that flares in galactic discs may explain the truncation that are frequently observed in highly-inclined galaxies (Kregel et al. 2002). However, no study has systematically analysed this hypothesis using realistic models for the disc, the flare and the bulge. We derive edge-on and face-on surface brightness profiles for a series of realistic galaxy models with flared discs that sample a wide range of structural and photometric parameters across the Hubble Sequence, accordingly to observations. The surface brightness profile for each galaxy model has been simulated for edge-on and face-on views to find out whether the flared disc produces a significant truncation in the disc in the edge-on view compared to the face-on view or not. In order to simulate realistic images of disc galaxies, we have considered the observational distribution of the photometric parameters as a function of the morphological type for three mass bins (10 < log10(M/M ⊙) < 10.7, 10.7 < log10(M/M ⊙) < 11 and log10(M/M ⊙) > 11), and four morphological type bins (S0-Sa, Sb-Sbc, Sc-Scd and Sd-Sdm). For each mass bin, we have restricted the photometric and structural parameters of each modelled galaxy to their characteristic observational ranges (μ0, disc, μeff, bulge, B/T, M abs, r eff, n bulge, h R, disc) and the flare in the disc (h z, disc/h R, disc, ∂h z, disc/∂R, see de Grijs & Peletier 1997, Graham 2001, López-Corredoira et al. 2002, Yoachim & Dalcanton 2006, Bizyaev et al. 2014, Mosenkov et al. 2015). Contrary to previous claims, the simulations show that realistic flared disks can be responsible for the truncations observed in many edge-on systems, preserving the profile of the non-flared analogous model in face-on view. These breaks reproduce the properties of the weak-to-intermediate breaks observed in many real Type-II galaxies in the diagram relating the radial location of the break (R brkII) in units of the inner disk scale-length with the

  18. Preliminary study of disc hydrodynamic polishing.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Lin, Bin; Zhang, XiaoFeng; Liu, PengFei

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a developed polishing method based on elastic emission machining and Jules Verne-a variation on fluid jet polishing-is presented. This method is named disc hydrodynamic polishing (DHDP). A computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based model that consists of a CFD model and an erosion model is introduced to predict the surface roughness obtained by DHDP. The performance of DHDP is studied by experiments. The slurry used in the experiments comprises 95% deionized water and 5% cerium oxide particles. Fused-silica glass is chosen as the workpiece. After the experiments, an ultrasmooth surface without cracks is obtained. The simulation results principally coincide with the experimental results. The experimental results show that the actual roughness is slightly less than the prediction and smaller particles are more favorable for obtaining a better surface roughness.

  19. Methodologic evaluation of the lumbar disc syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    Though the lumbar disc syndrome is a costly and ubiquitous affliction, effective evaluation of the disease process has been confounded by major unaddressed methodological short falls. Prominent difficulties include: inattention to the clinical boundaries of the syndrome, neglected co-morbid disease processes, comparison of unequal treatment groups and premature clinical data extrapolation, inadequate diagnostic validation, variability in surgical observation, and reliance upon follow-up techniques faulted by unaddressed distorting factors. Proposals for improvement include: formulation of suitable stratification subgroups emphasizing age and sign-symptom intensity and duration, techniques for improved diagnostic return from surgical exploration, suggestions toward improved quantitation of clinical testing procedures, and implantation of a quality of life scale. PMID:6454306

  20. Sacral Perineural Cyst Accompanying Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Chang Il; Shin, Ho; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2009-01-01

    Although most of sacral perineural cysts are asymptomatic, some may produce symptoms. Specific radicular pain may be due to distortion, compression, or stretching of nerve root by a space occupying cyst. We report a rare case of S1 radiculopathy caused by sacral perineural cyst accompanying disc herniation. The patient underwent a microscopic discectomy at L5-S1 level. However, the patient's symptoms did not improved. The hypesthesia persisted, as did the right leg pain. Cyst-subarachnoid shunt was set to decompress nerve root and to equalize the cerebrospinal fluid pressure between the cephalad thecal sac and cyst. Immediately after surgery, the patient had no leg pain. After 6 months, the patient still remained free of leg pain. PMID:19352483

  1. Multilayer optical disc system using homodyne detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurokawa, Takahiro; Ide, Tatsuro; Tanaka, Yukinobu; Watanabe, Koichi

    2014-09-01

    A write/read system using high-productivity multilayer optical discs was developed. The recording medium used in the system consists of planar recording layers and a separated guide layer, and is fabricated by web coating and lamination process. The recording layers in the medium are made of one-photon-absorption material, on which data can be recorded with a normal laser diode. The developed system is capable of focusing and tracking on the medium and amplifying readout signals by using phase-diversity homodyne detection. A highly layer-selective focusing method using homodyne detection was also proposed. This method obtains stable focus-error signals with clearly separated S-shaped curves even when layer spacing is quite narrow, causing large interlayer crosstalk. Writing on the medium and reading with the signal amplification effect of homodyne detection was demonstrated. In addition, the effectiveness of the method was experimentally evaluated.

  2. NOx formation in combustion of gaseous fuel in ejection burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimár, Miroslav; Kulikov, Andrii

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this work is to prepare model for researching of the formation in combustion of gaseous fuels. NOx formation is one of the main ecological problems nowadays as nitrogen oxides is one of main reasons of acid rains. The ANSYS model was designed according to the calculation to provide full combustion and good mixing of the fuel and air. The current model is appropriate to research NOx formation and the influence of the different principles of NOx reduction method. Applying of designed model should spare both time of calculations and research and also money as you do not need to measure the burner characteristics.

  3. Adsorption properties and gaseous mercury transformation rate of natural biofilm.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jinping; Zhao, Wenchang; Liu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Cheng; Liu, Caie; Wang, Wenhua

    2008-11-01

    Biofilms were developed on glass microscope slides in a natural aquatic environment and their mercury adsorption properties were evaluated. Results demonstrated that the biofilms contained a large number of bacterial cells and associated extracellular polymers. Mercury forms detected in the biofilms were mainly bound to residual matter and organic acids. The adsorption processes could be described by a Langmuir isotherm. The optimum conditions for adsorption of mercury to natural biofilm were an ionic strength of 0.1 mol/L, pH 6 and an optimum adsorption time of 40 min. The transformation rate was 0.79 microg gaseous mercury per gram of biofilm.

  4. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental report for 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Counce-Brown, D.

    1991-09-01

    This calendar year 1990 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: the summary, discussion, and conclusions (Part 1) and the data presentation (Part 2). The objectives of this report are as follows: report 1990 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site, provide reasonably detailed information about the plant site and plant operations, provide detailed information on input and assumptions used in all calculations, provide trend analyses (when appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on plant quality assurance.

  5. Viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients of gaseous and liquid oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanley, H. J. M.; Mccarty, R. D.; Sengers, J. V.

    1974-01-01

    Equations and tables are presented for the viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients of gaseous and liquid oxygen at temperatures between 80 K and 400 K for pressures up to 200 atm. and at temperatures between 80 K and 2000 K for the dilute gas. A description of the anomalous behavior of the thermal conductivity in the critical region is included. The tabulated coefficients are reliable to within about 15% except for a region in the immediate vicinity of the critical point. Some possibilities for future improvements of this reliability are discussed.

  6. Some recent trends in the evolution of gaseous detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpak, G.

    1982-05-01

    The emission of VUV light by electrons drifting in intense electric fields, with or without ionizing collisions, plays an important role in a variety of new classes of gaseous detectors, which are briefly analysed. New types of X-ray detectors with high-energy resolution, 8% fwhm at 6 keV, 1 mm spatial resolution, have been built. Large-surface VUV imaging photon detectors have important applications in Cherenkov ring imaging. Multistep avalanche chambers, invented for high-rate applications, appear to be a useful ingredient for single-photon detection, and find surprizing applications in applied fields such as high-accuracy chromatography or thermal neutron localization.

  7. An appraisal of techniques for administration of gaseous nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Tibballs, J; Hochmann, M; Carter, B; Osborne, A

    1993-12-01

    Gaseous nitric oxide (NO) is a potent selective pulmonary vasodilator. When mixed with O2 for more than 10-15 minutes it forms toxic amounts of nitrogen dioxide (NO2). We describe two techniques to administer 20 parts per million (ppm) during mechanical ventilation. A technique using flows of NO and O2 at low pressure to drive a Siemens Servo 900C ventilator provided a constant inspired concentration of NO. Another technique in which NO was added to the inspiratory limb of a Siemens Servo 900C ventilator driven by high pressure oxygen provided a highly variable concentration (9-53 ppm) of inspired NO.

  8. Burnett Simulations of Gaseous Flows in Transition Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. X.; Bao, F. B.; Lin, J. Z.

    2011-09-01

    Burnett equations with the slip boundary conditions are used to study the three-dimensional gaseous flow in slip and transition regime. The results were first compared with those of DSMC method and good agreements were achieved. The effects of inlet to outlet pressure ratios and Knudsen numbers on flow characteristics were analyzed. The compressible effect increases the pressure nonlinear distribution while the rarefied effect reduces the nonlinear trend. With the same pressure ratio and cross-section area, the flow rate decreases with the increase of aspect ratio.

  9. Advances in capillary-based gaseous UV imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacobaeus, C.; Breskin, A.; Danielsson, M.; Francke, T.; Mörmann, D.; Ostling, J.; Peskov, V.

    2004-06-01

    We studied gain and position resolution of gaseous UV-photon detectors combining single- and cascaded- glass capillary-plate multipliers and CsI photocathodes. Two modes of operation were investigated: a conventional one, where the main amplification occurs within capillary holes and a parallel-plate amplification mode, where the main amplification occurs between the capillary plate and the readout anode. Results of these studies demonstrate that in the parallel-plate amplification mode one can reach both high gains (>10 5) and good position resolutions (˜100 μm) even with a single-element multiplier. This offers a compact amplification structure, which can be used in many applications.

  10. Radiative interactions in transient energy transfer in gaseous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.

    1985-01-01

    Analyses and numerical procedures are presented to investigate the radiative interactions in transient energy transfer processes in gaseous systems. The nongray radiative formulations are based on the wide-band model correlations for molecular absorption. Various relations for the radiative flux are developed; these are useful for different flow conditions and physical problems. Specific plans for obtaining extensive results for different cases are presented. The methods presented in this study can be extended easily to investigate the radiative interactions in realistic flows of hydrogen-air species in the scramjet engine.

  11. Low-mass gas envelopes around accreting cores embedded in radiative 3D discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lega, Elena; Lambrechts, Michiel

    2016-10-01

    Planets with a core mass larger than few Earth masses and a gaseous envelope not exceeding about 10% of the total mass budget are common. Such planets are present in the Solar System (Uranus, Neptune) and are frequently observed around other stars.Our knowledge about the evolution of gas envelopes is mainly based on 1D models. However, such models cannot investigate the complex interaction between the forming envelope and the surrounding gas disc.In this work we perform 3D hydrodynamics simulations accounting for energy transfer and radiative cooling using the FARGOCA code (Lega et al., MNRAS 440, 2014). In addition to the usually considered heatingsources, namely viscous and compressional heating, we have modeled the energy deposited by the accretion of solids.We show that the thermal evolution of the envelope of a 5 Earth mass core is mainly dominated by compressional heating for accretion rates lower than 5 Earth masses per 105 years.Additionally, we demonstrate efficient gas circulation through the envelope. Under certain conditions, the competition between gas circulation and cooling of the envelope can efficiently delay the onset of runaway accretion. This could help in explaining the population of planets with low-mass gas envelope.

  12. ROS: Crucial Intermediators in the Pathogenesis of Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Minghui; Lan, Minghong; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Yang; Huang, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in degenerative intervertebral disc (IVD) indicates the contribution of oxidative stress to IVD degeneration (IDD), giving a novel insight into the pathogenesis of IDD. ROS are crucial intermediators in the signaling network of disc cells. They regulate the matrix metabolism, proinflammatory phenotype, apoptosis, autophagy, and senescence of disc cells. Oxidative stress not only reinforces matrix degradation and inflammation, but also promotes the decrease in the number of viable and functional cells in the microenvironment of IVDs. Moreover, ROS modify matrix proteins in IVDs to cause oxidative damage of disc extracellular matrix, impairing the mechanical function of IVDs. Consequently, the progression of IDD is accelerated. Therefore, a therapeutic strategy targeting oxidative stress would provide a novel perspective for IDD treatment. Various antioxidants have been proposed as effective drugs for IDD treatment. Antioxidant supplementation suppresses ROS production in disc cells to promote the matrix synthesis of disc cells and to prevent disc cells from death and senescence in vitro. However, there is not enough in vivo evidence to support the efficiency of antioxidant supplementation to retard the process of IDD. Further investigations based on in vivo and clinical studies will be required to develop effective antioxidative therapies for IDD. PMID:28392887

  13. Miniaturized Lab-on-a-Disc (miniLOAD).

    PubMed

    Glass, Nick R; Shilton, Richie J; Chan, Peggy P Y; Friend, James R; Yeo, Leslie Y

    2012-06-25

    A miniaturized centrifugal microfluidic platform for lab-on-a-chip applications is presented. Unlike its macroscopic Lab-on-a-CD counterpart, the miniature Lab-on-a-Disc (miniLOAD) device does not require moving parts to drive rotation of the disc, is inexpensive, disposable, and significantly smaller, comprising a 10-mm-diameter SU-8 disc fabricated through two-step photolithography. The disc is driven to rotate using surface acoustic wave irradiation incident upon a fluid coupling layer from a pair of offset, opposing single-phase unidirectional transducers patterned on a lithium niobate substrate. The irradiation causes azimuthally oriented acoustic streaming with sufficient intensity to rotate the disc at several thousand revolutions per minute. In this first proof-of-concept, the capability of the miniLOAD platform to drive capillary-based valving and mixing in microfluidic structures on a disc similar to much larger Lab-on-a-CD devices is shown. In addition, the ability to concentrate aqueous particle suspensions at radial positions in a channel in the disc dependent on the particles' size is demonstrated. To the best of our knowledge, the miniLOAD concept is the first centrifugal microfluidic platform small enough to be self-contained in a handheld device.

  14. Disc-based microarrays: principles and analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Morais, Sergi; Puchades, Rosa; Maquieira, Ángel

    2016-07-01

    The idea of using disk drives to monitor molecular biorecognition events on regular optical discs has received considerable attention during the last decade. CDs, DVDs, Blu-ray discs and other new optical discs are universal and versatile supports with the potential for development of protein and DNA microarrays. Besides, standard disk drives incorporated in personal computers can be used as compact and affordable optical reading devices. Consequently, a CD technology, resulting from the audio-video industry, has been used to develop analytical applications in health care, environmental monitoring, food safety and quality assurance. The review presents and critically evaluates the current state of the art of disc-based microarrays with illustrative examples, including past, current and future developments. Special mention is made of the analytical developments that use either chemically activated or raw standard CDs where proteins, oligonucleotides, peptides, haptens or other biological probes are immobilized. The discs are also used to perform the assays and must maintain their readability with standard optical drives. The concept and principle of evolving disc-based microarrays and the evolution of disk drives as optical detectors are also described. The review concludes with the most relevant uses ordered chronologically to provide an overview of the progress of CD technology applications in the life sciences. Also, it provides a selection of important references to the current literature. Graphical Abstract High density disc-based microarrays.

  15. The Disc Origin of the Milky Way Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Matteo, P.

    2016-06-01

    The Galactic bulge, that is the prominent out-of-plane over-density present in the inner few kiloparsecs of the Galaxy, is a complex structure, as the morphology, kinematics, chemistry, and ages of its stars indicate. To understand the nature of its main components-those at [Fe/H] ≳ -1 dex-it is necessary to make an inventory of the stellar populations of the Galactic disc(s), and of their borders: the chemistry of the disc at the solar vicinity, well known from detailed studies of stars over many years, is not representative of the whole disc. This finding, together with the recent revisions of the mass and sizes of the thin and thick discs, constitutes a major step in understanding the bulge complexity. N-body models of a boxy-/peanut-shaped bulge formed from a thin disc through the intermediary of a bar have been successful in interpreting a number of global properties of the Galactic bulge, but they fail in reproducing the detailed chemo-kinematic relations satisfied by its components and their morphology. It is only by adding the thick disc to the picture that we can understand the nature of the Galactic bulge.

  16. Evolution of an accretion disc in binary black hole systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Shigeo S.; Takahashi, Sanemichi Z.; Toma, Kenji

    2017-03-01

    We investigate evolution of an accretion disc in binary black hole (BBH) systems and possible electromagnetic counterparts of the gravitational waves from mergers of BBHs. Perna et al. proposed a novel evolutionary scenario of an accretion disc in BBHs in which a disc eventually becomes 'dead', i.e. the magnetorotational instability (MRI) becomes inactive. In their scenario, the dead disc survives until a few seconds before the merger event. We improve the dead disc model and propose another scenario, taking account of effects of the tidal torque from the companion and the critical ionization degree for MRI activation more carefully. We find that the mass of the dead disc is much lower than that in the Perna's scenario. When the binary separation sufficiently becomes small, the mass inflow induced by the tidal torque reactivates MRI, restarting mass accretion on to the black hole. We also find that this disc 'revival' happens more than thousands of years before the merger. The mass accretion induced by the tidal torque increases as the separation decreases, and a relativistic jet could be launched before the merger. The emissions from these jets are too faint compared to gamma-ray bursts, but detectable if the merger events happen within ≲10 Mpc or if the masses of the black holes are as massive as ∼105 M⊙.

  17. A photoevaporative gap in the closest planet-forming disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercolano, Barbara; Rosotti, Giovanni P.; Picogna, Giovanni; Testi, Leonardo

    2017-01-01

    The dispersal of the circum-stellar discs of dust and gas surrounding young low-mass stars has important implications for the formation of planetary systems. Photoevaporation from energetic radiation from the central object is thought to drive the dispersal in the majority of discs, by creating a gap which disconnects the outer from the inner regions of the disc and then disperses the outer disc from the inside-out, while the inner disc keeps draining viscously on to the star. In this Letter, we show that the disc around TW Hya, the closest protoplanetary disc to Earth, may be the first object where a photoevaporative gap has been imaged around the time at which it is being created. Indeed, the detected gap in the Atacama large millimeter/submillimeter array images is consistent with the expectations of X-ray photoevaporation models, thus not requiring the presence of a planet. The photoevaporation model is also consistent with a broad range of properties of the TW Hya system, e.g. accretion rate and the location of the gap at the onset of dispersal. We show that the central, unresolved 870 μm continuum source might be produced by free-free emission from the gas and/or residual dust inside the gap.

  18. Accretion of the Moon from non-canonical discs.

    PubMed

    Salmon, J; Canup, R M

    2014-09-13

    Impacts that leave the Earth-Moon system with a large excess in angular momentum have recently been advocated as a means of generating a protolunar disc with a composition that is nearly identical to that of the Earth's mantle. We here investigate the accretion of the Moon from discs generated by such 'non-canonical' impacts, which are typically more compact than discs produced by canonical impacts and have a higher fraction of their mass initially located inside the Roche limit. Our model predicts a similar overall accretional history for both canonical and non-canonical discs, with the Moon forming in three consecutive steps over hundreds of years. However, we find that, to yield a lunar-mass Moon, the more compact non-canonical discs must initially be more massive than implied by prior estimates, and only a few of the discs produced by impact simulations to date appear to meet this condition. Non-canonical impacts require that capture of the Moon into the evection resonance with the Sun reduced the Earth-Moon angular momentum by a factor of 2 or more. We find that the Moon's semi-major axis at the end of its accretion is approximately 7R⊕, which is comparable to the location of the evection resonance for a post-impact Earth with a 2.5 h rotation period in the absence of a disc. Thus, the dynamics of the Moon's assembly may directly affect its ability to be captured into the resonance.

  19. On the vertical-shear instability in astrophysical discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, A. J.; Latter, H. N.

    2015-06-01

    We explore the linear stability of astrophysical discs exhibiting vertical shear, which arises when there is a radial variation in the temperature or entropy. Such discs are subject to a `vertical-shear instability', which recent non-linear simulations have shown to drive hydrodynamic activity in the MRI-stable regions of protoplanetary discs. We first revisit locally isothermal discs using the quasi-global reduced model derived by Nelson et al. This analysis is then extended to global axisymmetric perturbations in a cylindrical domain. We also derive and study a reduced model describing discs with power-law radial entropy profiles (`locally polytropic discs'), which are somewhat more realistic in that they possess physical (as opposed to numerical) surfaces. The fastest growing modes have very short wavelengths and are localized at the disc surfaces (if present), where the vertical shear is maximal. An additional class of modestly growing vertically global body modes is excited, corresponding to destabilized classical inertial waves (`r modes'). We discuss the properties of both types of modes, and stress that those that grow fastest occur on the shortest available length-scales (determined either by the numerical grid or the physical viscous length). This ill-posedness makes simulations of the instability difficult to interpret. We end with some brief speculation on the non-linear saturation and resulting angular momentum transport.

  20. Convection in axially symmetric accretion discs with microscopic transport coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malanchev, K. L.; Postnov, K. A.; Shakura, N. I.

    2017-01-01

    The vertical structure of stationary thin accretion discs is calculated from the energy balance equation with heat generation due to microscopic ion viscosity η and electron heat conductivity κ, both depending on temperature. In the optically thin discs it is found that for the heat conductivity increasing with temperature, the vertical temperature gradient exceeds the adiabatic value at some height, suggesting convective instability in the upper disc layer. There is a critical Prandtl number, Pr = 4/9, above which a Keplerian disc become fully convective. The vertical density distribution of optically thin laminar accretion discs as found from the hydrostatic equilibrium equation cannot be generally described by a polytrope but in the case of constant viscosity and heat conductivity. In the optically thick discs with radiation heat transfer, the vertical disc structure is found to be convectively stable for both absorption-dominated and scattering-dominated opacities, unless a very steep dependence of the viscosity coefficient on temperature is assumed. A polytropic-like structure in this case is found for Thomson scattering-dominated opacity.