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Sample records for semiconducting nanotube junction

  1. Metallic Electrode: Semiconducting Nanotube Junction Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Biegel, Bryon (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A model is proposed for two observed current-voltage (I-V) patterns in an experiment with a scanning tunneling microscope tip and a carbon nanotube [Collins et al., Science 278, 100 ('97)]. We claim that there are two contact modes for a tip (metal) -nanotube semi conductor) junction depending whether the alignment of the metal and semiconductor band structure is (1) variable (vacuum-gap) or (2) fixed (touching) with V. With the tip grounded, the tunneling case in (1) would produce large dI/dV with V > 0, small dI/dV with V < 0, and I = 0 near V = 0 for an either n- or p-nanotube. However, the Schottky mechanism in (2) would result in forward current with V < 0 for an n-nanotube, while with V > 0 for an p-nanotube. The two observed I-V patterns are thus entirely explained by a tip-nanotube contact of the two types, where the nanotube must be n-type. We apply this picture to the source-drain I-V characteristics in a long nanotube-channel field-effect-transistor (Zhou et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 76, 1597 ('00)], and show that two independent metal-semiconductor junctions connected in series are responsible for the observed behavior.

  2. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalte

    2004-12-28

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  3. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  4. Modeling of Schottky Barrier Modulation due to Oxidation at Metallic Electrode and Semiconducting Carbon Nanotube Junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A model is proposed for the previously reported lower Schottky barrier for holes PHI (sub bH) in air than in vacuum at a metallic electrode - semiconducting carbon nanotube (CNT) junction. We assume that there is a transition region between the electrode and the CNT, and an appreciable potential can drop there. The role of the oxidation is to increase this potential drop with negatively charged oxygen molecules on the CNT, leading to lower PHI(sub Bh) after oxidation. The mechanism prevails in both p- and n-CNTs, and the model consistently explains the key experimental findings.

  5. Photocurrent Measurements of Carbon Nanotube PN Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, Nathaniel; Zhong, Zhaohui; Bosnick, Ken; Park, Jiwoong; McEuen, Paul

    2007-03-01

    Gated p-n junctions in semiconducting nanotubes have recently drawn much attention for their electronic and optoelectronic characteristics [1,2,3]. We investigate the photocurrent response at a nanotube gated p-n junction using a focused laser illumination source. We find that the photocurrent at zero source-drain bias increases linearly with optical power for the component of light along the length of the nanotube. Scanned photocurrent imaging demonstrates that carrier generation occurs primarily between the p- and n- type segments of the device. Measurements in an optical cryostat down to 4K reveal large photoresponse and step-like structure in the reverse bias photocurrent. These results show that nanotube p-n junctions are highly sensitive, nanoscale photodetectors. [1] J.U. Lee et al, App. Phys. Lett. 85, 145 (2004). [2] J.U. Lee, App. Phys. Lett. 87, 073101 (2005). [3] K. Bosnick et al, App. Phys. Lett. 89, 163121 (2006).

  6. Transport in Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, K. H.; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2008-03-01

    There is growing interest in the use of carbon nanotube thin films as transparent electrical conductors and thin-film transistors owing to their high optical transmittance, low sheet resistivity, and ease of fabrication. [1,2] A major contribution to the sheet resistivity originates at nanotube junctions, as electrical contact is typically poor between adjacent nanotubes. It is thus important to characterize carbon nanotube junctions in order to understand the conduction properties of nanotube thin films. To this end, we have performed ab initio density functional theory calculations to investigate the structural, electronic and transport properties of carbon nanotube junctions as a function of nanotube chirality and contact geometry [1] Z. Wu et al., Science 305, 1273 (2004) [2] E. S. Snow, J. P. Novak, P. M. Campbell, and D. Park, Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 2145 (2003).

  7. Process for separating metallic from semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Ya-Ping (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method for separating semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes is disclosed. The method utilizes separation agents that preferentially associate with semiconducting nanotubes due to the electrical nature of the nanotubes. The separation agents are those that have a planar orientation, .pi.-electrons available for association with the surface of the nanotubes, and also include a soluble portion of the molecule. Following preferential association of the separation agent with the semiconducting nanotubes, the agent/nanotubes complex is soluble and can be solubilized with the solution enriched in semiconducting nanotubes while the residual solid is enriched in metallic nanotubes.

  8. Direct Preparation of Carbon Nanotube Intramolecular Junctions on Structured Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Jianing; Zhan, Zhaoyao; Sun, Gengzhi; Mohan, Hari Krishna Salila Vijayalal; Zhou, Jinyuan; Kim, Young-Jin; Zheng, Lianxi

    2016-12-01

    Leveraging the unique properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) intramolecular junctions (IMJs) in innovative nanodevices and next-generation nanoelectronics requires controllable, repeatable, and large-scale preparation, together with rapid identification and comprehensive characterization of such structures. Here we demonstrate SWNT IMJs through directly growing ultralong SWNTs on trenched substrates. It is found that the trench configurations introduce axial strain in partially suspended nanotubes, and promote bending deformation in the vicinity of the trench edges. As a result, the lattice and electronic structure of the nanotubes can be locally modified, to form IMJs in the deformation regions. The trench patterns also enable pre-defining the formation locations of SWNT IMJs, facilitating the rapid identification. Elaborate Raman characterization has verified the formation of SWNT IMJs and identified their types. Rectifying behavior has been observed by electrical measurements on the as-prepared semiconducting-semiconducting (S-S) junction.

  9. Direct Preparation of Carbon Nanotube Intramolecular Junctions on Structured Substrates

    PubMed Central

    An, Jianing; Zhan, Zhaoyao; Sun, Gengzhi; Mohan, Hari Krishna Salila Vijayalal; Zhou, Jinyuan; Kim, Young-Jin; Zheng, Lianxi

    2016-01-01

    Leveraging the unique properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) intramolecular junctions (IMJs) in innovative nanodevices and next-generation nanoelectronics requires controllable, repeatable, and large-scale preparation, together with rapid identification and comprehensive characterization of such structures. Here we demonstrate SWNT IMJs through directly growing ultralong SWNTs on trenched substrates. It is found that the trench configurations introduce axial strain in partially suspended nanotubes, and promote bending deformation in the vicinity of the trench edges. As a result, the lattice and electronic structure of the nanotubes can be locally modified, to form IMJs in the deformation regions. The trench patterns also enable pre-defining the formation locations of SWNT IMJs, facilitating the rapid identification. Elaborate Raman characterization has verified the formation of SWNT IMJs and identified their types. Rectifying behavior has been observed by electrical measurements on the as-prepared semiconducting-semiconducting (S-S) junction. PMID:27905564

  10. Switching and Rectification in Carbon-Nanotube Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Andriotis, Antonis N.; Menon, Madhu; Chernozatonskii, Leonid

    2003-01-01

    Multi-terminal carbon-nanotube junctions are under investigation as candidate components of nanoscale electronic devices and circuits. Three-terminal "Y" junctions of carbon nanotubes (see Figure 1) have proven to be especially interesting because (1) it is now possible to synthesize them in high yield in a controlled manner and (2) results of preliminary experimental and theoretical studies suggest that such junctions could exhibit switching and rectification properties. Following the preliminary studies, current-versus-voltage characteristics of a number of different "Y" junctions of single-wall carbon nanotubes connected to metal wires were computed. Both semiconducting and metallic nanotubes of various chiralities were considered. Most of the junctions considered were symmetric. These computations involved modeling of the quantum electrical conductivity of the carbon nanotubes and junctions, taking account of such complicating factors as the topological defects (pentagons, heptagons, and octagons) present in the hexagonal molecular structures at the junctions, and the effects of the nanotube/wire interfaces. A major component of the computational approach was the use of an efficient Green s function embedding scheme. The results of these computations showed that symmetric junctions could be expected to support both rectification and switching. The results also showed that rectification and switching properties of a junction could be expected to depend strongly on its symmetry and, to a lesser degree, on the chirality of the nanotubes. In particular, it was found that a zigzag nanotube branching at a symmetric "Y" junction could exhibit either perfect rectification or partial rectification (asymmetric current-versus-voltage characteristic, as in the example of Figure 2). It was also found that an asymmetric "Y" junction would not exhibit rectification.

  11. Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes and Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Han, Jie; Yang, Liu; Govindan, T. R.; Jaffe, R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Metallic and semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) have recently been characterized using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and the manipulation of individual CNT has been demonstrated. These developments make the prospect of using CNT as molecular wires and possibly as electronic devices an even more interesting one. We have been modeling various electronic properties such as the density of states and the transmission coefficient of CNT wires and junctions. These studies involve first calculating the stability of junctions using molecular dynamics simulations and then calculating the electronic properties using a pi-electron tight binding Hamiltonian. We have developed the expertise to calculate the electronic properties of both finite-sized CNT and CNT systems with semi-infinite boundary conditions. In this poster, we will present an overview of some of our results. The electronic application of CNT that is most promising at this time is their use as molecular wires. The conductance can however be greatly reduced because of reflection due to defects and contacts. We have modeled the transmission through CNT in the presence of two types of defects: weak uniform disorder and strong isolated scatterers. We find that the conductance is affected in significantly different manners due to these defects Junctions of CNT have also been imaged using STM. This makes it essential to derive rules for the formation of junctions between tubes of different chirality, study their relative energies and electronic properties. We have generalized the rules for connecting two different CNT and have calculated the transmission and density of states through CNT junctions. Metallic and semiconducting CNT can be joined to form a stable junction and their current versus voltage characteristics are asymmetric. CNT are deformed by the application of external forces including interactions with a substrate or other CNT. In many experiments, these deformation are expected to

  12. Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes and Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Han, Jie; Yang, Liu; Govindan, T. R.; Jaffe, R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Metallic and semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) have recently been characterized using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and the manipulation of individual CNT has been demonstrated. These developments make the prospect of using CNT as molecular wires and possibly as electronic devices an even more interesting one. We have been modeling various electronic properties such as the density of states and the transmission coefficient of CNT wires and junctions. These studies involve first calculating the stability of junctions using molecular dynamics simulations and then calculating the electronic properties using a pi-electron tight binding Hamiltonian. We have developed the expertise to calculate the electronic properties of both finite-sized CNT and CNT systems with semi-infinite boundary conditions. In this poster, we will present an overview of some of our results. The electronic application of CNT that is most promising at this time is their use as molecular wires. The conductance can however be greatly reduced because of reflection due to defects and contacts. We have modeled the transmission through CNT in the presence of two types of defects: weak uniform disorder and strong isolated scatterers. We find that the conductance is affected in significantly different manners due to these defects Junctions of CNT have also been imaged using STM. This makes it essential to derive rules for the formation of junctions between tubes of different chirality, study their relative energies and electronic properties. We have generalized the rules for connecting two different CNT and have calculated the transmission and density of states through CNT junctions. Metallic and semiconducting CNT can be joined to form a stable junction and their current versus voltage characteristics are asymmetric. CNT are deformed by the application of external forces including interactions with a substrate or other CNT. In many experiments, these deformation are expected to

  13. Excitonic absorption intensity of semiconducting and metallic carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Verdenhalven, Eike; Malić, Ermin

    2013-06-19

    The knowledge of the intrinsic absorption intensity of each carbon nanotube is of crucial importance for the optical assignment of nanotube species and the estimation of their abundance in a sample. Based on a microscopic approach, we calculate excitonic absorption spectra for a variety of semiconducting and metallic nanotubes, revealing a clear diameter, chirality, and family dependence of the absorption intensity. In particular, we also study the appearance of excited excitonic transitions, which are shown to be well pronounced for semiconducting nanotubes, reaching intensities of up to 10% of the main transition. We find that nanotubes with large diameters show the most pronounced absorption intensities, confirming well the experimentally observed trend. Depending on the CNT family and transition, the absorption is enhanced or reduced with the chiral angle. This behavior reflects well the qualitative chirality dependence of the analytically derived optical matrix element.

  14. Understanding Charge Transport in Mixed Networks of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The ability to select and enrich semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with high purity has led to a fast rise of solution-processed nanotube network field-effect transistors (FETs) with high carrier mobilities and on/off current ratios. However, it remains an open question whether it is best to use a network of only one nanotube species (monochiral) or whether a mix of purely semiconducting nanotubes but with different bandgaps is sufficient for high performance FETs. For a range of different polymer-sorted semiconducting SWNT networks, we demonstrate that a very small amount of narrow bandgap nanotubes within a dense network of large bandgap nanotubes can dominate the transport and thus severely limit on-currents and effective carrier mobility. Using gate-voltage-dependent electroluminescence, we spatially and spectrally reveal preferential charge transport that does not depend on nominal network density but on the energy level distribution within the network and carrier density. On the basis of these results, we outline rational guidelines for the use of mixed SWNT networks to obtain high performance FETs while reducing the cost for purification. PMID:26867006

  15. Electrospun Composite Nanofibers of Semiconductive Polymers for Coaxial PN Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, William; Thomas, Sylvia

    The objective of this research is to investigate the conditions under P3HT and Activink, semiconducting polymers, form 1 dimension (1D) coaxial p-n junctions and to characterize their behavior in the presence of UV radiation and organic gases. For the first time, fabrication and characterization of semiconductor polymeric single fiber coaxial arrangements will be studied. Electrospinning, a low cost, fast and reliable method, with a coaxial syringe arrangement will be used to fabricate these fibers. With the formation of fiber coaxial arrangements, there will be investigations of dimensionality crossovers e.g., from one-dimensional (1D) to two-dimensional (2D). Coaxial core/shell fibers have been realized as seen in a recent publication on an electrospun nanofiber p-n heterojunction of oxides (BiFeO3 and TiO2, respectively) using the electrospinning technique with hydrothermal method. In regards to organic semiconducting coaxial p-n junction nanofibers, no reported studies have been conducted, making this study fundamental and essential for organic semiconducting nano devices for flexible electronics and multi-dimensional integrated circuits.

  16. Transport Study of Carbon Nanotube Networks with Different Ratios of Semiconducting and Metallic Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuan; Hároz, Erik; Zhang, Qi; Kono, Junichiro

    2013-03-01

    An important goal of current nanotechnology research is to obtain a quantitative understanding of how electrons drift and tunnel through junctions of nanostructures and how the overall electrical conductivity of networks of nanostructures is determined. Here, we present a comprehensive study of DC transport properties of macroscopic single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks with different ratios of metallic and semiconducting nanotubes. The temperature-dependent resistivity shows that when the length of SWCNT is orders of magnitude smaller than the dimensions of the network, the resistance mainly comes from inter-tube junctions. However, the transport mechanism changes from fluctuation-induced tunneling in metallic-enriched networks to variable range hopping in semiconductor-enriched networks. The magneto resistance (MR) of these two networks also show distinct features. In a metallic enriched network, MR is negative up to 10 Tesla below 70 K which can be explained based on weak localization theory. One the other hand, in a semiconductor-enriched network, MR is mostly positive up to 10 Tesla below 10 K, which can be explained based on the shrinking of electron wave function due to the magnetic field.

  17. Logic circuits based on individual semiconducting and metallic carbon-nanotube devices.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hyeyeon; Kälblein, Daniel; Weitz, R Thomas; Ante, Frederik; Zschieschang, Ute; Kern, Klaus; Schmidt, Oliver G; Klauk, Hagen

    2010-11-26

    Nanoscale transistors employing an individual semiconducting carbon nanotube as the channel hold great potential for logic circuits with large integration densities that can be manufactured on glass or plastic substrates. Carbon nanotubes are usually produced as a mixture of semiconducting and metallic nanotubes. Since only semiconducting nanotubes yield transistors, the metallic nanotubes are typically not utilized. However, integrated circuits often require not only transistors, but also resistive load devices. Here we show that many of the metallic carbon nanotubes that are deposited on the substrate along with the semiconducting nanotubes can be conveniently utilized as load resistors with favorable characteristics for the design of integrated circuits. We also demonstrate the fabrication of arrays of transistors and resistors, each based on an individual semiconducting or metallic carbon nanotube, and their integration on glass substrates into logic circuits with switching frequencies of up to 500 kHz using a custom-designed metal interconnect layer.

  18. Transparent conductive single-walled carbon nanotube networks with precisely tunable ratios of semiconducting and metallic nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Barnes, Teresa M; Beard, Matthew C; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Tenent, Robert C; McDonald, Timothy J; To, Bobby; Coutts, Timothy J; Heben, Michael J

    2008-06-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the optical and electrical properties of transparent conductive films made from precisely tuned ratios of metallic and semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes. The conductivity and transparency of the SWNT films are controlled by an interplay between localized and delocalized carriers, as determined by the SWNT electronic structure, tube-tube junctions, and intentional and unintentional redox dopants. The results suggest that the main resistance in the SWNT thin films is the resistance associated with tube-tube junctions. Redox dopants are found to increase the delocalized carrier density and transmission probability through intertube junctions more effectively for semiconductor-enriched films than for metal-enriched films. As a result, redox-doped semiconductor-enriched films are more conductive than either intrinsic or redox-doped metal-enriched films.

  19. Tailored semiconducting carbon nanotube networks with enhanced thermoelectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, Azure D.; Zhou, Ben H.; Lee, Jounghee; Lee, Eui-Sup; Miller, Elisa M.; Ihly, Rachelle; Wesenberg, Devin; Mistry, Kevin S.; Guillot, Sarah L.; Zink, Barry L.; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Ferguson, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    Thermoelectric power generation, allowing recovery of part of the energy wasted as heat, is emerging as an important component of renewable energy and energy efficiency portfolios. Although inorganic semiconductors have traditionally been employed in thermoelectric applications, organic semiconductors garner increasing attention as versatile thermoelectric materials. Here we present a combined theoretical and experimental study suggesting that semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes with carefully controlled chirality distribution and carrier density are capable of large thermoelectric power factors, higher than 340 μW m-1 K-2, comparable to the best-performing conducting polymers and larger than previously observed for carbon nanotube films. Furthermore, we demonstrate that phonons are the dominant source of thermal conductivity in the networks, and that our carrier doping process significantly reduces the thermal conductivity relative to undoped networks. These findings provide the scientific underpinning for improved functional organic thermoelectric composites with carbon nanotube inclusions.

  20. Tailored semiconducting carbon nanotube networks with enhanced thermoelectric properties

    DOE PAGES

    Avery, Azure D.; Zhou, Ben H.; Lee, Jounghee; ...

    2016-04-04

    Thermoelectric power generation, allowing recovery of part of the energy wasted as heat, is emerging as an important component of renewable energy and energy efficiency portfolios. Although inorganic semiconductors have traditionally been employed in thermoelectric applications, organic semiconductors garner increasing attention as versatile thermoelectric materials. Here we present a combined theoretical and experimental study suggesting that semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes with carefully controlled chirality distribution and carrier density are capable of large thermoelectric power factors, higher than 340 μW m-1 K-2, comparable to the best-performing conducting polymers and larger than previously observed for carbon nanotube films. Furthermore, we demonstrate thatmore » phonons are the dominant source of thermal conductivity in the networks, and that our carrier doping process significantly reduces the thermal conductivity relative to undoped networks. As a result, these findings provide the scientific underpinning for improved functional organic thermoelectric composites with carbon nanotube inclusions.« less

  1. Tailored semiconducting carbon nanotube networks with enhanced thermoelectric properties

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, Azure D.; Zhou, Ben H.; Lee, Jounghee; Lee, Eui -Sup; Miller, Elisa M.; Ihly, Rachelle; Wesenberg, Devin; Mistry, Kevin S.; Guillot, Sarah L.; Zink, Barry L.; Kim, Yong -Hyun; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Ferguson, Andrew J.

    2016-04-04

    Thermoelectric power generation, allowing recovery of part of the energy wasted as heat, is emerging as an important component of renewable energy and energy efficiency portfolios. Although inorganic semiconductors have traditionally been employed in thermoelectric applications, organic semiconductors garner increasing attention as versatile thermoelectric materials. Here we present a combined theoretical and experimental study suggesting that semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes with carefully controlled chirality distribution and carrier density are capable of large thermoelectric power factors, higher than 340 μW m-1 K-2, comparable to the best-performing conducting polymers and larger than previously observed for carbon nanotube films. Furthermore, we demonstrate that phonons are the dominant source of thermal conductivity in the networks, and that our carrier doping process significantly reduces the thermal conductivity relative to undoped networks. As a result, these findings provide the scientific underpinning for improved functional organic thermoelectric composites with carbon nanotube inclusions.

  2. Substrate-induced Band Gap Renormalization in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Lanzillo, Nicholas A.; Kharche, Neerav; Nayak, Saroj K.

    2014-01-01

    The quasiparticle band gaps of semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) supported on a weakly-interacting hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrate are computed using density functional theory and the GW Approximation. We find that the direct band gaps of the (7,0), (8,0) and (10,0) carbon nanotubes are renormalized to smaller values in the presence of the dielectric h-BN substrate. The decrease in the band gap is the result of a polarization-induced screening effect, which alters the correlation energy of the frontier CNT orbitals and stabilizes valence band maximum and conduction band minimum. The value of the band gap renormalization is on the order of 0.25 to 0.5 eV in each case. Accounting for polarization-induced band gap changes is crucial in comparing computed values with experiment, since nanotubes are almost always grown on substrates. PMID:24402238

  3. Photothermoelectric effect in suspended semiconducting carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Deborde, Tristan; Aspitarte, Lee; Sharf, Tal; Kevek, Joshua W; Minot, Ethan D

    2014-01-28

    We have performed scanning photocurrent microscopy measurements of field-effect transistors (FETs) made from individual ultraclean suspended carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We investigate the spatial-dependence, polarization-dependence, and gate-dependence of photocurrent and photovoltage in this system. While previous studies of surface-bound CNT FET devices have identified the photovoltaic effect as the primary mechanism of photocurrent generation, our measurements show that photothermoelectric phenomena play a critical role in the optoelectronic properties of suspended CNT FETs. We have quantified the photothermoelectric mechanisms and identified regimes where they overwhelm the photovoltaic mechanism.

  4. Exciton Dynamics in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Matt; Chmeliov, Javgenij; Ma, Yingzhong; Shinohara, Nori; Green, Alexander A.; Hersam, Mark C.; Valkunas, Leonas; Fleming, Graham

    2010-01-01

    We report femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopic study on the (6, 5) single-walled carbon nanotubes and the (7, 5) inner tubes of a dominant double-walled carbon nanotube species. We found that the dynamics of exciton relaxation probed at the first transition-allowed state (E11) of a given tube type exhibits a markedly slower decay when the second transition-allowed state (E22) is excited than that measured by exciting its first transition-allowed state (E11). A linear intensity dependence of the maximal amplitude of the transient absorption signal is found for the E22 excitation, whereas the corresponding amplitude scales linearly with the square root of the E11 excitation intensity. Theoretical modeling of these experimental findings was performed by developing a continuum model and a stochastic model with explicit consideration of the annihilation of coherent excitons. Our detailed numerical simulations show that both models can reproduce reasonably well the initial portion of decay kinetics measured upon the E22 and E11 excitation of the chosen tube species, but the stochastic model gives qualitatively better agreement with the intensity dependence observed experimentally than those obtained with the continuum model.

  5. High-performance semiconducting nanotube inks: progress and prospects.

    PubMed

    Rouhi, Nima; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter John

    2011-11-22

    While the potential for high mobility printed semiconducting nanotube inks has been clear for over a decade, a myriad of scientific and technological issues has prevented commercialization and practical use. One of the most challenging scientific problems has been to understand the relationship between the pristine, individual nanotube mobility (known to be in the 10,000 cm(2)/V·s range) and the as-deposited random network mobility (recently demonstrated in the 100 cm(2)/V·s range). An additional significant scientific hurdle has been to understand, manage, and ultimately eliminate the effects of metallic nanotubes on the network performance, specifically the on/off ratio. Additional scientific progress is important in understanding the dependence of nanotube length, diameter, and density on device performance. Finally, the development of ink formulations that are of practical use in manufacturing is of paramount importance, especially with regard to drying time and uniformity, and ultimately, the issue of scalability and cost must be addressed. Many of these issues have recently been investigated from a phenomenological point of view, and a comprehensive understanding is beginning to emerge. In this paper, we present an overview of solution-based printed carbon nanotube devices and discuss long-term technology prospects. While significant technical challenges still remain, it is clear that the prospects for the use of nanotube ink in a myriad of systems is feasible given their unmatched mobility and compatibility with heterogeneous integration into a variety of applications in printed and flexible electronics.

  6. Octagonal Defects at Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Jaskólski, W.; Pelc, M.; Chico, Leonor; Ayuela, A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate knee-shaped junctions of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes. Two dissimilar octagons appear at such junctions; one of them can reconstruct into a pair of pentagons. The junction with two octagons presents two degenerate localized states at Fermi energy (EF). The reconstructed junction has only one state near EF, indicating that these localized states are related to the octagonal defects. The inclusion of Coulomb interaction splits the localized states in the junction with two octagons, yielding an antiferromagnetic system. PMID:24089604

  7. Formation of single-walled carbon nanotube thin films enriched with semiconducting nanotubes and their application in photoelectrochemical devices.

    PubMed

    Wei, Li; Tezuka, Noriyasu; Umeyama, Tomokazu; Imahori, Hiroshi; Chen, Yuan

    2011-04-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin films, containing a high-density of semiconducting nanotubes, were obtained by a gel-centrifugation method. The agarose gel concentration and centrifugation force were optimized to achieve high semiconducting and metallic nanotube separation efficiency at 0.1 wt% agarose gel and 18,000g. The thickness of SWCNT films can be precisely controlled from 65 to 260 nm with adjustable transparency. These SWCNT films were applied in photoelectrochemical devices. Photocurrents generated by semiconducting SWCNT enriched films are 15-35% higher than those by unsorted SWCNT films. This is because of reducing exciton recombination channels as a result of the removal of metallic nanotubes. Thinner films generate higher photocurrents because charge carriers have less chances going in metallic nanotubes for recombination, before they can reach electrodes. Developing more scalable and selective methods for high purity semiconducting SWCNTs is important to further improve the photocurrent generation efficiency by using SWCNT-based photoelectrochemical devices.

  8. Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Solar Energy Harvesting

    DOE PAGES

    Blackburn, Jeffrey L.

    2017-06-14

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) represent a tunable model one-dimensional system with exceptional optical and electronic properties. High-throughput separation and purification strategies have enabled the integration of s-SWCNTs into a number of optoelectronic applications, including photovoltaics (PVs). In this Perspective, we discuss the fundamental underpinnings of two model PV interfaces involving s-SWCNTs. We first discuss s-SWCNT-fullerene heterojunctions where exciton dissociation at the donor-acceptor interface drives solar energy conversion. Next, we discuss charge extraction at the interface between s-SWCNTs and a photoexcited perovskite active layer. In each case, the use of highly enriched semiconducting SWCNT samples enables fundamental insights into themore » thermodynamic and kinetic mechanisms that drive the efficient conversion of solar photons into long-lived separated charges. As a result, these model systems help to establish design rules for next-generation PV devices containing well-defined organic semiconductor layers and help to frame a number of important outstanding questions that can guide future studies.« less

  9. Transport Modeling for Metallic Electrode: Semiconducting Nanotube Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recently, current-voltage (I-V) characteristics have been reported by Collins et al. for a system with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip and a carbon nanotube. The STM tip was driven forward into a film of many entangled nanotubes on a substrate, and then was retracted, so that one of nanotubes bridged the STM and the film. I-V characteristics had two different patterns for different heights. One showed large dI/ dV with V greater than 0, small dI/dV with V less than 0, and I = 0 near V = 0 (type-I), while the other showed rectification, i.e., I does not equal 0 only with V less than 0 (type-II), with the tip grounded. We propose a physical mechanism to explain the observed I-V patterns. We consider that the observed characteristics strongly reflected the nature of the tip (metal) - nanotube (semiconductor) contact. The other end of the nanotube was entangled well in the film, and simply provided a good Ohmic contact. We will argue that there are two different contact modes: vacuum gap and touching modes, depending on the presence or absence of a tiny vacuum gap d approx. 0.1 - 0.2 nm at the junction. These modes may be related to physisorption and chemisorption, respectively. Once admitting their existence, it is naturally shown that I-V characteristics are type-I in the vacuum gap mode, and type-II in the touching mode. We argue that the nanotube had to be an n-type semiconductor judging from the I-V characteristics, contrary to often observed p-type in the transistor applications, where p-type is probably due to the oxidation in air or the trapped charges in the silicon dioxide. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Below-gap excitation of semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Soavi, G; Grupp, A; Budweg, A; Scotognella, F; Hefner, T; Hertel, T; Lanzani, G; Leitenstorfer, A; Cerullo, G; Brida, D

    2015-11-21

    We investigate the optoelectronic properties of the semiconducting (6,5) species of single-walled carbon nanotubes by measuring ultrafast transient transmission changes with 20 fs time resolution. We demonstrate that photons with energy below the lowest exciton resonance efficiently lead to linear excitation of electronic states. This finding challenges the established picture of a vanishing optical absorption below the fundamental excitonic resonance. Our result points towards below-gap electronic states as an intrinsic property of semiconducting nanotubes.

  11. Semiconducting nanotube dominant chemical vapor deposition synthesis of isopropanol carbon feedstock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Yuchi; Wang, Chuan; Liu, Jia; Lin, Xue; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Zhou, Chongwu

    2012-02-01

    The development of guided chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of single wall carbon nanotubes provides great platform for wafer-scale integration of aligned nanotube into circuits and systems. However, the co-existence of the metallic and semiconducting nanotubes is still a major problem for the development of carbon nanotube based nanoelectronics. To address this limitation, we developed a method to get semiconducting dominant nanotube by using isopropanol carbon feedstock. We achieved a purity of 87% of semiconducting nanotube growth, which was verified by measuring single nanotube transistors fabricated from aligned nanotube arrays. Besides, Raman spectrum was characterized to confirm the enhanced fraction of semiconducting nanotube as well. To further understand chemical mechanism of synthesis at atomic level, we performed the mass spectrum study and compared the measurement results from different carbon source. Furthermore, to discuss the future application of this synthesis method, we fabricated thin-film transistor from as-grown nanotube network. Transistor with on/off ratio over 104 and mobility up to 116 cm2/vs was achieved, which shows great potential for thin-film transistor applications.

  12. Prolonging charge separation in P3HT-SWNT composites using highly enriched semiconducting nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Holt, Josh M; Ferguson, Andrew J; Kopidakis, Nikos; Larsen, Brian A; Bult, Justin; Rumbles, Garry; Blackburn, Jeffrey L

    2010-11-10

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have potential as electron acceptors in organic photovoltaics (OPVs), but the currently low-power conversion efficiencies of devices remain largely unexplained. We demonstrate effective redispersion of isolated, highly enriched semiconducting and metallic SWNTs into poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). We use these enriched blends to provide the first experimental evidence of the negative impact of metallic nanotubes. Time-resolved microwave conductivity reveals that the long-lived carrier population can be significantly increased by incorporating highly enriched semiconducting SWNTs into semiconducting polymer composites.

  13. Charge-induced anisotropic distortions of semiconducting and metallic carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gartstein, Yu N; Zakhidov, A A; Baughman, R H

    2002-07-22

    To accommodate extra electrons or holes injected into a single-wall carbon nanotube, carbon-carbon bonds adjust their lengths. Resulting changes in carbon-nanotube length as a function of charge injection provide the basis for electromechanical actuators. We show that a key mechanism at low injection levels, modulation of electron kinetic energy, provides nanotube deformations that are both anisotropic and strongly dependent on nanotube structure. Nanotubes can exhibit both expansion and contraction, as well as nonmonotonic size changes. The magnitude of the actuation response of semiconducting carbon nanotubes may be substantially larger than that of graphite.

  14. Uniformly spaced arrays of purely semiconducting carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Abram; Kumar, Bharat; Tulevski, George; Farmer, Damon; Hannon, James; Han, Shu-Jen

    Patterning uniformly spaced arrays of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is a key challenge for carbon electronics. Our group adopts a hybrid approach to meeting this goal. We use top-down lithography to pattern trenches on chips. We then use surface-selective chemical monolayers to facilitate the bottom-up assembly of solution-processed CNTs into these trenches. Previously, we showed large-scale integration of CNTs based on this approach, but modifications to this process have been needed in order to improve the yield and decrease the fraction of non-switching devices. Our latest results show a high degree of selectivity, alignment and yield of successfully placed CNTs at a 100 nm pitch. Electrical measurements confirm that these chemically placed CNTs are nearly 100% semiconducting and of similar quality to randomly dispersed ones. I will then discuss our strategies for increasing the CNT density and extending these results from chip- to wafer-scale electronics. email: alfalk@us.ibm.com.

  15. Experimental study of lattice dynamics in individual semiconducting double-walled carbon nanotubes: Tangential G modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshov, D. I.; Tran, H. N.; Slabodyan, Yu. S.; Osadchii, A. V.; Roshal', S. B.; Yuzyuk, Yu. I.

    2017-02-01

    The tangential G modes in individual semiconducting double-walled nanotubes have been examined via Raman spectroscopy over a wide laser excitation wavelength range. Individual suspended nanotubes have been synthesized via chemical vapor deposition. The ( n, m) chirality indices are determined via electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The pronounced shift in the tangential modes compared to the analogous modes of single-walled nanotubes has been observed in Raman spectra of double-walled nanotubes. The shift value is shown to depend on the interlayer distance and on the van der Waals interaction between the layers in a double-walled tube.

  16. Coherent phonon dynamics in semiconducting carbon nanotubes: a quantitative study of electron-phonon coupling.

    PubMed

    Lüer, Larry; Gadermaier, Christoph; Crochet, Jared; Hertel, Tobias; Brida, Daniele; Lanzani, Guglielmo

    2009-03-27

    We excite and detect coherent phonons in semiconducting (6,5) carbon nanotubes via a sub-10-fs pump-probe technique. Simulation of the amplitude and phase profile via time-dependent wave packet theory yields excellent agreement with experimental results under the assumption of molecular excitonic states and allows determining the electron-phonon coupling strength for the two dominant vibrational modes.

  17. Transition of single-walled carbon nanotubes from metallic to semiconducting in field-effect transistors by hydrogen plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Gang; Li, Qunqing; Jiang, Kaili; Zhang, Xiaobo; Chen, Jia; Ren, Zheng; Fan, Shoushan

    2007-06-01

    We report hydrogen plasma treatment results on converting the metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes to semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes. We found that the as-grown single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be sorted as three groups which behave as metallic, as-metallic, and semiconducting SWNTs. These three groups have different changes under hydrogen plasma treatment and successive annealing process. The SWNTs can be easily hydrogenated in the hydrogen plasma environment and the as-metallic SWNTs can be transformed to semiconducting SWNTs. The successive annealing process can break the C-H bond, so the conversion is reversible.

  18. Influence of cysteine doping on photoluminescence intensity from semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnosov, N. V.; Leontiev, V. S.; Linnik, A. S.; Karachevtsev, V. A.

    2015-03-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) from semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes can be applied for detection of cysteine. It is shown that cysteine doping (from 10-8 to 10-3 M) into aqueous suspension of nanotubes with adsorbed DNA leads to increase of PL intensity. The PL intensity was enhanced by 27% at 10-3 M cysteine concentration in suspension. Most likely, the PL intensity increases due to the passivation of p-defects on the nanotube by the cysteine containing reactive thiol group. The effect of doping with other amino acids without this group (methionine, serine, aspartic acid, lysine, proline) on the PL intensity is essentially weaker.

  19. Growth of semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow band-gap distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Liu, Chang; Wang, Bing-Wei; Jiang, Hua; Chen, Mao-Lin; Sun, Dong-Ming; Li, Jin-Cheng; Cong, Hong-Tao; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2016-03-01

    The growth of high-quality semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow band-gap distribution is crucial for the fabrication of high-performance electronic devices. However, the single-wall carbon nanotubes grown from traditional metal catalysts usually have diversified structures and properties. Here we design and prepare an acorn-like, partially carbon-coated cobalt nanoparticle catalyst with a uniform size and structure by the thermal reduction of a [Co(CN)6]3- precursor adsorbed on a self-assembled block copolymer nanodomain. The inner cobalt nanoparticle functions as active catalytic phase for carbon nanotube growth, whereas the outer carbon layer prevents the aggregation of cobalt nanoparticles and ensures a perpendicular growth mode. The grown single-wall carbon nanotubes have a very narrow diameter distribution centred at 1.7 nm and a high semiconducting content of >95%. These semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes have a very small band-gap difference of ~0.08 eV and show excellent thin-film transistor performance.

  20. Growth of semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow band-gap distribution

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Liu, Chang; Wang, Bing-Wei; Jiang, Hua; Chen, Mao-Lin; Sun, Dong-Ming; Li, Jin-Cheng; Cong, Hong-Tao; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The growth of high-quality semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow band-gap distribution is crucial for the fabrication of high-performance electronic devices. However, the single-wall carbon nanotubes grown from traditional metal catalysts usually have diversified structures and properties. Here we design and prepare an acorn-like, partially carbon-coated cobalt nanoparticle catalyst with a uniform size and structure by the thermal reduction of a [Co(CN)6]3− precursor adsorbed on a self-assembled block copolymer nanodomain. The inner cobalt nanoparticle functions as active catalytic phase for carbon nanotube growth, whereas the outer carbon layer prevents the aggregation of cobalt nanoparticles and ensures a perpendicular growth mode. The grown single-wall carbon nanotubes have a very narrow diameter distribution centred at 1.7 nm and a high semiconducting content of >95%. These semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes have a very small band-gap difference of ∼0.08 eV and show excellent thin-film transistor performance. PMID:27025784

  1. Thin film nanotube transistors based on self-assembled, aligned, semiconducting carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Engel, Michael; Small, Joshua P; Steiner, Mathias; Freitag, Marcus; Green, Alexander A; Hersam, Mark C; Avouris, Phaedon

    2008-12-23

    Thin film transistors (TFTs) are now poised to revolutionize the display, sensor, and flexible electronics markets. However, there is a limited choice of channel materials compatible with low-temperature processing. This has inhibited the fabrication of high electrical performance TFTs. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have very high mobilities and can be solution-processed, making thin film CNT-based TFTs a natural direction for exploration. The two main challenges facing CNT-TFTs are the difficulty of placing and aligning CNTs over large areas and low on/off current ratios due to admixture of metallic nanotubes. Here, we report the self-assembly and self-alignment of CNTs from solution into micron-wide strips that form regular arrays of dense and highly aligned CNT films covering the entire chip, which is ideally suitable for device fabrication. The films are formed from pre-separated, 99% purely semiconducting CNTs and, as a result, the CNT-TFTs exhibit simultaneously high drive currents and large on/off current ratios. Moreover, they deliver strong photocurrents and are also both photo- and electroluminescent.

  2. Mechanical and electronic properties at the interface between the Si(100) surface and semiconducting carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraza-Lopez, Salvador

    2007-03-01

    I discuss the ab initio mechanical and electronic properties of semiconducting carbon nanotubes adsorbed on the Si(100) surface. After revising results from nanotubes on the fully unpassivated surface[1], the interaction between a semiconducting nanotube and a fully H-passivated Si(100) surface with dopants is examined[2]. As silicon wafers are ordinarily doped, the model closely resembles experimental onditions[2,3,4], allowing for qualitative comparison. The single H-monolayer prevents electronic states in nanotubes from energetically shifting along with those of the doped supporting substrate, permitting the engineering of the relative positions of the slab and nanotube band edges. Finally, and following experimental work, we study adsorption characteristics of nanotubes on partially passivated surfaces. Surface states in the unpassivated regions modify the electronic structure of the interface and provide for the anchoring of nanotubes, deforming them in some cases. Results with and without dopants will be given[2].1 S. Barraza-Lopez et al. J. Appl. Phys. (in press). 2 Submitted. 3 Appl. Phys. Lett 83, 5029 (2003). 4 P. M. Albrecht and J. W. Lyding, Small (in press).

  3. High purity isolation and quantification of semiconducting carbon nanotubes via column chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tulevski, George S; Franklin, Aaron D; Afzali, Ali

    2013-04-23

    The isolation of semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to ultrahigh (ppb) purity is a prerequisite for their integration into high-performance electronic devices. Here, a method employing column chromatography is used to isolate semiconducting nanotubes to 99.9% purity. The study finds that by modifying the solution preparation step, both the metallic and semiconducting fraction are resolved and elute using a single surfactant system, allowing for multiple iterations. Iterative processing enables a far more rapid path to achieving the level of purities needed for high performance computing. After a single iteration, the metallic peak in the absorption spectra is completely attenuated. Although absorption spectroscopy is typically used to characterize CNT purity, it is found to be insufficient in quantifying solutions of high purity (>98 to 99%) due to low signal-to-noise in the metallic region of ultrahigh purity solutions. Therefore, a high throughput electrical testing method was developed to quantify the degree of separation by characterizing ∼4000 field-effect transistors fabricated from the separated nanotubes after multiple iterations of the process. The separation and characterization methods described here provide a path to produce the ultrahigh purity semiconducting CNT solutions needed for high performance electronics.

  4. High-performance radio frequency transistors based on diameter-separated semiconducting carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Yu; Che, Yuchi; Zhou, Chongwu; Seo, Jung-Woo T.; Hersam, Mark C.; Gui, Hui

    2016-06-06

    In this paper, we report the high-performance radio-frequency transistors based on the single-walled semiconducting carbon nanotubes with a refined average diameter of ∼1.6 nm. These diameter-separated carbon nanotube transistors show excellent transconductance of 55 μS/μm and desirable drain current saturation with an output resistance of ∼100 KΩ μm. An exceptional radio-frequency performance is also achieved with current gain and power gain cut-off frequencies of 23 GHz and 20 GHz (extrinsic) and 65 GHz and 35 GHz (intrinsic), respectively. These radio-frequency metrics are among the highest reported for the carbon nanotube thin-film transistors. This study provides demonstration of radio frequency transistors based on carbon nanotubes with tailored diameter distributions, which will guide the future application of carbon nanotubes in radio-frequency electronics.

  5. Enrichment of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes by carbothermic reaction for use in all-nanotube field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Li, Shisheng; Liu, Chang; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Sun, Dong-Ming; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2012-11-27

    Selective removal of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and consequent enrichment of semiconducting SWCNTs were achieved through an efficient carbothermic reaction with a NiO thin film at a relatively low temperature of 350 °C. All-SWCNT field effect transistors (FETs) were fabricated with the aid of a patterned NiO mask, in which the as-grown SWCNTs behaving as source/drain electrodes and the remaining semiconducting SWCNTs that survive in the carbothermic reaction as a channel material. The all-SWCNT FETs demonstrate improved current ON/OFF ratios of ∼10(3).

  6. Empirical Equation Based Chirality (n, m) Assignment of Semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes from Resonant Raman Scattering Data

    PubMed Central

    Arefin, Md Shamsul

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a technique for the chirality (n, m) assignment of semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes by solving a set of empirical equations of the tight binding model parameters. The empirical equations of the nearest neighbor hopping parameters, relating the term (2n− m) with the first and second optical transition energies of the semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes, are also proposed. They provide almost the same level of accuracy for lower and higher diameter nanotubes. An algorithm is presented to determine the chiral index (n, m) of any unknown semiconducting tube by solving these empirical equations using values of radial breathing mode frequency and the first or second optical transition energy from resonant Raman spectroscopy. In this paper, the chirality of 55 semiconducting nanotubes is assigned using the first and second optical transition energies. Unlike the existing methods of chirality assignment, this technique does not require graphical comparison or pattern recognition between existing experimental and theoretical Kataura plot.

  7. Rapid Single-Stage Separation of Micrometer-Long and High-Purity Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes by Gel Filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thendie, Boanerges; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Kitaura, Ryo; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Matsuda, Kazunari; Shinohara, Hisanori

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate the separation of high-purity, long semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) by single-stage gel filtration. Semiconducting SWCNTs are preferentially adsorbed on an allyl dextran-based gel column and then eluted with surfactant solution at a rate that depends on nanotube length as well as electronic type of nanotubes. These differences allow the separation of length-sorted and purity-enhanced s-SWCNTs by fractionated collection of the eluate, which provides the desired nanotubes for electronic device applications.

  8. Spatially Selective, High-Density Placement of Polyfluorene-Sorted Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes in Organic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Bharat; Falk, Abram L; Afzali, Ali; Tulevski, George S; Oida, Satoshi; Han, Shu-Jen; Hannon, James B

    2017-08-22

    High-performance logic based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) requires high-density arrays of selectively placed semiconducting CNTs. Although polymer-wrapping methods can allow CNTs to be sorted to a >99.9% semiconducting purity, patterning these polymer-wrapped CNTs is an outstanding problem. We report the directed self-assembly of polymer-coated semiconducting CNTs using self-assembled monolayers that bind CNTs into arrays of patterned trenches. We demonstrate that CNTs can be placed into 100 nm wide HfO2 trenches with an electrical connection yield as high as 90% and into 50 nm wide trenches with a yield as high as 70%. Our directed self-assembly method is an important step forward in pitch scaling.

  9. Characterisation of nanohybrids of porphyrins with metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotubes by EPR and optical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cambré, Sofie; Wenseleers, Wim; Culin, Jelena; Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Fonseca, Antonio; Nagy, Janos B; Goovaerts, Etienne

    2008-09-15

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are noncovalently functionalised with octaethylporphyrins (OEPs) and the resulting nanohybrids are isolated from the free OEPs. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of cobalt(II)OEP, adsorbed on the nanotube walls by pi-pi-stacking, demonstrates that the CNTs act as electron acceptors. EPR is shown to be very effective in resolving the different interactions for metallic and semiconducting tubes. Moreover, molecular oxygen is shown to bind selectively to nanohybrids with semiconducting tubes. Water solubilisation of the porphyrin/CNT nanohybrids using bile salts, after applying a thorough washing procedure, yields solutions in which at least 99% of the porphyrins are interacting with the CNTs. Due to this purification, we observe, for the first time, the isolated absorption spectrum of the interacting porphyrins, which is strongly red-shifted compared to the free porphyrin absorption. In addition a quasi-complete quenching of the porphyrin fluorescence is also observed.

  10. Selective synthesis and device applications of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes using isopropyl alcohol as feedstock.

    PubMed

    Che, Yuchi; Wang, Chuan; Liu, Jia; Liu, Bilu; Lin, Xue; Parker, Jason; Beasley, Cara; Wong, H-S Philip; Zhou, Chongwu

    2012-08-28

    The development of guided chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes provides a great platform for wafer-scale integration of aligned nanotubes into circuits and functional electronic systems. However, the coexistence of metallic and semiconducting nanotubes is still a major obstacle for the development of carbon-nanotube-based nanoelectronics. To address this problem, we have developed a method to obtain predominantly semiconducting nanotubes from direct CVD growth. By using isopropyl alcohol (IPA) as the carbon feedstock, a semiconducting nanotube purity of above 90% is achieved, which is unambiguously confirmed by both electrical and micro-Raman measurements. Mass spectrometric study was performed to elucidate the underlying chemical mechanism. Furthermore, high performance thin-film transistors with an on/off ratio above 10(4) and mobility up to 116 cm(2)/(V·s) have been achieved using the IPA-synthesized nanotube networks grown on silicon substrate. The method reported in this contribution is easy to operate and the results are highly reproducible. Therefore, such semiconducting predominated single-walled carbon nanotubes could serve as an important building block for future practical and scalable carbon nanotube electronics.

  11. Quantitative Separation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes into Metallic and Semiconducting Fractions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-15

    Nanotubes into Metallic and Semiconducting Fractions FA9550-09-1-0414 Sun, Ya-Ping Clemson University Department of Chemistry Hunter Hall Air Force Office...and be Year 2000 compliant, e.g. 30-06-1998; xx-06-1998; xx-xx-1998. 2. REPORT TYPE. State the type of report, such as final, technical, interim...Tian, L.; Meziani, M. J.; Lu, F.; Kong, C. Y.; Cao, L.; Thorne , T. J.; Sun, Y.-P. “Graphene Oxides for Homogeneous Dispersion of Carbon Nanotubes

  12. Tunable Band Gaps and Excitons in Doped Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes Made Possible by Acoustic Plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spataru, Catalin D.; Léonard, François

    2010-04-01

    Doping of semiconductors is essential in modern electronic and photonic devices. While doping is well understood in bulk semiconductors, the advent of carbon nanotubes and nanowires for nanoelectronic and nanophotonic applications raises some key questions about the role and impact of doping at low dimensionality. Here we show that for semiconducting carbon nanotubes, band gaps and exciton binding energies can be dramatically reduced upon experimentally relevant doping, and can be tuned gradually over a broad range of energies in contrast with higher dimensional systems. The latter feature is made possible by a novel mechanism involving strong dynamical screening effects mediated by acoustic plasmons.

  13. Direct measurement of the absolute absorption spectrum of individual semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Paillet, Matthieu; Tran, Huy Nam; Than, Xuan Tinh; Guebrou, Samuel Aberra; Ayari, Anthony; Miguel, Alfonso San; Phan, Ngoc-Minh; Zahab, Ahmed-Azmi; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis; Fatti, Natalia Del; Vallée, Fabrice

    2013-09-01

    The optical properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes are very promising for developing novel opto-electronic components and sensors with applications in many fields. Despite numerous studies performed using photoluminescence or Raman and Rayleigh scattering, knowledge of their optical response is still partial. Here we determine using spatial modulation spectroscopy, over a broad optical spectral range, the spectrum and amplitude of the absorption cross-section of individual semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes. These quantitative measurements permit determination of the oscillator strength of the different excitonic resonances and their dependencies on the excitonic transition and type of semiconducting nanotube. A non-resonant background is also identified and its cross-section comparable to the ideal graphene optical absorbance. Furthermore, investigation of the same single-wall nanotube either free standing or lying on a substrate shows large broadening of the excitonic resonances with increase of oscillator strength, as well as stark weakening of polarization-dependent antenna effects, due to nanotube-substrate interaction.

  14. Wide dynamic range enrichment method of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes with weak field centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Wieland G.; Tomović, Željko; Weitz, R. Thomas; Krupke, Ralph; Mikhael, Jules

    2017-03-01

    The potential of single–walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) to outperform silicon in electronic application was finally enabled through selective separation of semiconducting nanotubes from the as-synthesized statistical mix with polymeric dispersants. Such separation methods provide typically high semiconducting purity samples with narrow diameter distribution, i.e. almost single chiralities. But for a wide range of applications high purity mixtures of small and large diameters are sufficient or even required. Here we proof that weak field centrifugation is a diameter independent method for enrichment of semiconducting nanotubes. We show that the non-selective and strong adsorption of polyarylether dispersants on nanostructured carbon surfaces enables simple separation of diverse raw materials with different SWCNT diameter. In addition and for the first time, we demonstrate that increased temperature enables higher purity separation. Furthermore we show that the mode of action behind this electronic enrichment is strongly connected to both colloidal stability and protonation. By giving simple access to electronically sorted SWCNTs of any diameter, the wide dynamic range of weak field centrifugation can provide economical relevance to SWCNTs.

  15. Wide dynamic range enrichment method of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes with weak field centrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Wieland G.; Tomović, Željko; Weitz, R. Thomas; Krupke, Ralph; Mikhael, Jules

    2017-01-01

    The potential of single–walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) to outperform silicon in electronic application was finally enabled through selective separation of semiconducting nanotubes from the as-synthesized statistical mix with polymeric dispersants. Such separation methods provide typically high semiconducting purity samples with narrow diameter distribution, i.e. almost single chiralities. But for a wide range of applications high purity mixtures of small and large diameters are sufficient or even required. Here we proof that weak field centrifugation is a diameter independent method for enrichment of semiconducting nanotubes. We show that the non-selective and strong adsorption of polyarylether dispersants on nanostructured carbon surfaces enables simple separation of diverse raw materials with different SWCNT diameter. In addition and for the first time, we demonstrate that increased temperature enables higher purity separation. Furthermore we show that the mode of action behind this electronic enrichment is strongly connected to both colloidal stability and protonation. By giving simple access to electronically sorted SWCNTs of any diameter, the wide dynamic range of weak field centrifugation can provide economical relevance to SWCNTs. PMID:28317942

  16. Modeling of Current-Voltage Characteristics in Large Metal-Semiconducting Carbon Nanotube Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Biegel, Bryon A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A model is proposed for two observed current-voltage (I-V) patterns in recent experiment with a scanning tunneling microscope tip and a carbon nanotube [Collins et al., Science 278, 100 (1997)]. We claim that there are two contact modes for a tip (metal)-nanotube (semiconductor) junction depending whether the alignment of the metal and the semiconductor band structures is (1) variable (vacuum-gap) or (2) fixed (touching) with V. With the tip grounded, the tunneling case in (1) would produce large dI/dV with V > 0, small dI/dV with V < 0, and I = 0 near V = 0 for an either n- or p-nanotube. However, the Schottky mechanism in (2) would result in forward current with V < 0 for an n-nanotube, while with V > 0 for an p-nanotube. The two observed I-V patterns are thus entirely explained by a tip-nanotube contact of the two types, where the nanotube must be n-type. We apply this model to the source-drain I-V characteristics in a long nanotube-channel field-effect-transistor with metallic electrodes at low temperature [Zhou et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 76, 1597 (2000)], and show that two independent metal-semiconductor junctions in series are responsible for the observed behavior.

  17. Energy Band Gap Study of Semiconducting Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkadi, Asmaa; Decrossas, Emmanuel; El-Ghazaly, Samir

    2013-01-01

    The electronic properties of multiple semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) considering various distribution inside a bundle are studied. The model derived from the proposed analytical potential function of electron density for na individual s-SWCNT is general and can be easily applied to multiple nanotubes. This work demonstrates that regardless the number of carbon nanotubes, the strong coupling occurring between the closet neighbors reduces the energy band gap of the bundle by 10%. As expected, the coupling is strongly dependent on the distance separating the s-SWCNTs. In addition, based on the developed model, it is proposed to enhance this coupling effect by applying an electric field across the bundle to significantly reduce the energy band gap of the bundle by 20%.

  18. Energy Band Gap Study of Semiconducting Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkadi, Asmaa; Decrossas, Emmanuel; El-Ghazaly, Samir

    2013-01-01

    The electronic properties of multiple semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) considering various distribution inside a bundle are studied. The model derived from the proposed analytical potential function of the electron density for an individual s-SWCNT is general and can be easily applied to multiple nanotubes. This work demonstrates that regardless the number of carbon nanotubes, the strong coupling occurring between the closest neighbours reduces the energy band gap of the bundle by 10%. As expected, the coupling is strongly dependent on the distance separating the s-SWCNTs. In addition, based on the developed model, it is proposed to enhance this coupling effect by applying an electric field across the bundle to significantly reduce the energy band gap of the bundle by 20%.

  19. Thickness dependent sensing mechanism in sorted semi-conducting single walled nanotube based sensors.

    PubMed

    Battie, Yann; Gorintin, Louis; Ducloux, Olivier; Thobois, Philippe; Bondavalli, Paolo; Feugnet, Gilles; Loiseau, Annick

    2012-05-07

    Single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks present outstanding potential for the development of SWCNT-based gas sensors. Due to the complexity of the transport properties of this material, the physical mechanisms at stake during exposure to gas are still under debate. Previously suggested mechanisms are charge transfer between gas molecules and SWCNT and Schottky barrier modulation. By comparing electrical measurements with an analytical model based on Schottky barrier modulation, we demonstrate that one mechanism or the other is predominant depending on the percolation of metallic carbon nanotubes. Below the metallic SWCNT percolation threshold, sensing is dominated by the modulation of the Schottky barrier, while above this threshold, it is only attributed to a charge transfer between SWCNT and gas molecules. Both mechanisms are discussed in terms of sensitivity and resolution leading to routes for the optimization of a gas sensor architecture based on highly enriched semiconducting carbon nanotube films.

  20. Energy Band Gap Study of Semiconducting Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkadi, Asmaa; Decrossas, Emmanuel; El-Ghazaly, Samir

    2013-01-01

    The electronic properties of multiple semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) considering various distribution inside a bundle are studied. The model derived from the proposed analytical potential function of the electron density for an individual s-SWCNT is general and can be easily applied to multiple nanotubes. This work demonstrates that regardless the number of carbon nanotubes, the strong coupling occurring between the closest neighbours reduces the energy band gap of the bundle by 10%. As expected, the coupling is strongly dependent on the distance separating the s-SWCNTs. In addition, based on the developed model, it is proposed to enhance this coupling effect by applying an electric field across the bundle to significantly reduce the energy band gap of the bundle by 20%.

  1. Energy Band Gap Study of Semiconducting Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkadi, Asmaa; Decrossas, Emmanuel; El-Ghazaly, Samir

    2013-01-01

    The electronic properties of multiple semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) considering various distribution inside a bundle are studied. The model derived from the proposed analytical potential function of electron density for na individual s-SWCNT is general and can be easily applied to multiple nanotubes. This work demonstrates that regardless the number of carbon nanotubes, the strong coupling occurring between the closet neighbors reduces the energy band gap of the bundle by 10%. As expected, the coupling is strongly dependent on the distance separating the s-SWCNTs. In addition, based on the developed model, it is proposed to enhance this coupling effect by applying an electric field across the bundle to significantly reduce the energy band gap of the bundle by 20%.

  2. Highly Efficient and Scalable Separation of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes via Weak Field Centrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Wieland G.; Weitz, R. Thomas; Kettner, Michel; Kraus, Alexander; Schwab, Matthias Georg; Tomović, Željko; Krupke, Ralph; Mikhael, Jules

    2016-01-01

    The identification of scalable processes that transfer random mixtures of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) into fractions featuring a high content of semiconducting species is crucial for future application of SWCNTs in high-performance electronics. Herein we demonstrate a highly efficient and simple separation method that relies on selective interactions between tailor-made amphiphilic polymers and semiconducting SWCNTs in the presence of low viscosity separation media. High purity individualized semiconducting SWCNTs or even self-organized semiconducting sheets are separated from an as-produced SWCNT dispersion via a single weak field centrifugation run. Absorption and Raman spectroscopy are applied to verify the high purity of the obtained SWCNTs. Furthermore SWCNT - network field-effect transistors were fabricated, which exhibit high ON/OFF ratios (105) and field-effect mobilities (17 cm2/Vs). In addition to demonstrating the feasibility of high purity separation by a novel low complexity process, our method can be readily transferred to large scale production. PMID:27188435

  3. Semiconducting polymers with nanocrystallites interconnected via boron-doped carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kilho; Lee, Ju Min; Kim, Junghwan; Kim, Geunjin; Kang, Hongkyu; Park, Byoungwook; Ho Kahng, Yung; Kwon, Sooncheol; Lee, Sangchul; Lee, Byoung Hun; Kim, Jehan; Park, Hyung Il; Kim, Sang Ouk; Lee, Kwanghee

    2014-12-10

    Organic semiconductors are key building blocks for future electronic devices that require unprecedented properties of low-weight, flexibility, and portability. However, the low charge-carrier mobility and undesirable processing conditions limit their compatibility with low-cost, flexible, and printable electronics. Here, we present significantly enhanced field-effect mobility (μ(FET)) in semiconducting polymers mixed with boron-doped carbon nanotubes (B-CNTs). In contrast to undoped CNTs, which tend to form undesired aggregates, the B-CNTs exhibit an excellent dispersion in conjugated polymer matrices and improve the charge transport between polymer chains. Consequently, the B-CNT-mixed semiconducting polymers enable the fabrication of high-performance FETs on plastic substrates via a solution process; the μFET of the resulting FETs reaches 7.2 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), which is the highest value reported for a flexible FET based on a semiconducting polymer. Our approach is applicable to various semiconducting polymers without any additional undesirable processing treatments, indicating its versatility, universality, and potential for high-performance printable electronics.

  4. Highly Efficient and Scalable Separation of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes via Weak Field Centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Wieland G.; Weitz, R. Thomas; Kettner, Michel; Kraus, Alexander; Schwab, Matthias Georg; Tomović, Željko; Krupke, Ralph; Mikhael, Jules

    2016-05-01

    The identification of scalable processes that transfer random mixtures of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) into fractions featuring a high content of semiconducting species is crucial for future application of SWCNTs in high-performance electronics. Herein we demonstrate a highly efficient and simple separation method that relies on selective interactions between tailor-made amphiphilic polymers and semiconducting SWCNTs in the presence of low viscosity separation media. High purity individualized semiconducting SWCNTs or even self-organized semiconducting sheets are separated from an as-produced SWCNT dispersion via a single weak field centrifugation run. Absorption and Raman spectroscopy are applied to verify the high purity of the obtained SWCNTs. Furthermore SWCNT - network field-effect transistors were fabricated, which exhibit high ON/OFF ratios (105) and field-effect mobilities (17 cm2/Vs). In addition to demonstrating the feasibility of high purity separation by a novel low complexity process, our method can be readily transferred to large scale production.

  5. Synthesis procedures for production of carbon nanotube junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiricsi, Imre; Konya, Zoltan; Niesz, Krisztian; Koos, Antal A.; Biro, Laszlo P.

    2003-04-01

    A quite wide brunch of the carbon nanotube science, including the utilization of singlewall nanotube for production of nano-electronic devices has being continuously explored even nowadays. Tuning and modifying the synthesis procedures to obtain nanotube junctions of T, Y, H or X shapes lead to inappropriate results concerning the industrial or large scale production. However, the importance and the demand for these junctions are quite large, since these may be the secondary building units of carbon nanotubes based chips or even more complex nanoelectronic devices. Recently, some novel solutions of their preparation have been published. A Taiwanese group described a method to prepare multi-junctioned carbon nanotubes on mechanically pretreated silicon surface applying chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology using decomposition of methane at 1373 K. The nanotubes were nucleated following the lines prepared by scratching the surface with 600-grit sand paper. Contrary to the physical pretreatment of a substrate surface, chemical reactions can also be used for the preparation of carbon nanotube junctions. P.W. Chu et al. reported interconnecting reactions between functionalized carbon nanotubes . By the described method, the carboxyl groups on the wall of singlewall carbon nanotubes are converted to carbonyl chloride groups by reaction with SOCl2 at room temperature. The formed COCl groups are very reactive on the outer surface and can be reacted easily with various amines, particularly diamines resulting in the formation of amide bonding. When two functionalized carbon nanotubes react with such an amine molecule interconnection of tubes is generated. The resulted carbon nanotube junctions have been investigated by AFM. In this presentation, we report on the results obtained on the preparation of carbon nanotube junctions applying two different procedures. The first method is similar to Chu"s one, which was mentioned above, i.e. we used functionalized multiwall

  6. Polychiral semiconducting carbon nanotube-fullerene solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gong, Maogang; Shastry, Tejas A; Xie, Yu; Bernardi, Marco; Jasion, Daniel; Luck, Kyle A; Marks, Tobin J; Grossman, Jeffrey C; Ren, Shenqiang; Hersam, Mark C

    2014-09-10

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have highly desirable attributes for solution-processable thin-film photovoltaics (TFPVs), such as broadband absorption, high carrier mobility, and environmental stability. However, previous TFPVs incorporating photoactive SWCNTs have utilized architectures that have limited current, voltage, and ultimately power conversion efficiency (PCE). Here, we report a solar cell geometry that maximizes photocurrent using polychiral SWCNTs while retaining high photovoltage, leading to record-high efficiency SWCNT-fullerene solar cells with average NREL certified and champion PCEs of 2.5% and 3.1%, respectively. Moreover, these cells show significant absorption in the near-infrared portion of the solar spectrum that is currently inaccessible by many leading TFPV technologies.

  7. Label-free imaging of semiconducting and metallic carbon nanotubes in cells and mice using transient absorption microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tong, Ling; Liu, Yuxiang; Dolash, Bridget D; Jung, Yookyung; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Bergstrom, Donald E; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2011-12-04

    As interest in the potential biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes increases, there is a need for methods that can image nanotubes in live cells, tissues and animals. Although techniques such as Raman, photoacoustic and near-infrared photoluminescence imaging have been used to visualize nanotubes in biological environments, these techniques are limited because nanotubes provide only weak photoluminescence and low Raman scattering and it remains difficult to image both semiconducting and metallic nanotubes at the same time. Here, we show that transient absorption microscopy offers a label-free method to image both semiconducting and metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes in vitro and in vivo, in real time, with submicrometre resolution. By using appropriate near-infrared excitation wavelengths, we detect strong transient absorption signals with opposite phases from semiconducting and metallic nanotubes. Our method separates background signals generated by red blood cells and this allows us to follow the movement of both types of nanotubes inside cells and in the blood circulation and organs of mice without any significant damaging effects.

  8. Single-wall-carbon-nanotube/single-carbon-chain molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börrnert, Felix; Börrnert, Carina; Gorantla, Sandeep; Liu, Xianjie; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Joswig, Jan-Ole; Wagner, Frank R.; Schäffel, Franziska; Warner, Jamie H.; Schönfelder, Ronny; Rellinghaus, Bernd; Gemming, Thomas; Thomas, Jürgen; Knupfer, Martin; Büchner, Bernd; Rümmeli, Mark H.

    2010-02-01

    Stable junctions between a single carbon chain and two single-wall carbon nanotubes were produced via coalescence of functionalized fullerenes filled into a single-wall carbon nanotube and directly imaged by in situ transmission electron microscopy. First principles quantum chemical calculations support the observed stability of such molecular junctions. They also show that short carbon chains bound to other carbon structures are cumulenes and stable semiconductors due to Peierls-like distortion. Junctions like this can be regarded as archetypical building blocks for all-carbon molecular electronics.

  9. Large Bandgap Shrinkage from Doping and Dielectric Interface in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Comfort, Everett; Lee, Ji Ung

    2016-01-01

    The bandgap of a semiconductor is one of its most important electronic properties. It is often considered to be a fixed property of the semiconductor. As the dimensions of semiconductors reduce, however, many-body effects become dominant. Here, we show that doping and dielectric, two critical features of semiconductor device manufacturing, can dramatically shrink (renormalize) the bandgap. We demonstrate this in quasi-one-dimensional semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Specifically, we use a four-gated device, configured as a p-n diode, to investigate the fundamental electronic structure of individual, partially supported nanotubes of varying diameter. The four-gated construction allows us to combine both electrical and optical spectroscopic techniques to measure the bandgap over a wide doping range. PMID:27339272

  10. Purification of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes by spiral counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Knight, Martha; Lazo-Portugal, Rodrigo; Ahn, Saeyoung Nate; Stefansson, Steingrimur

    2017-02-03

    Over the last decade man-made carbon nanostructures have shown great promise in electronic applications, but they are produced as very heterogeneous mixtures with different properties so the achievement of a significant commercial application has been elusive. The dimensions of single-wall carbon nanotubes are generally a nanometer wide, up to hundreds of microns long and the carbon nanotubes have anisotropic structures. They are processed to have shorter lengths but they need to be sorted by diameter and chirality. Thus counter-current chromatography methods developed for large molecules are applied to separate these compounds. A modified mixer-settler spiral CCC rotor made with 3 D printed disks was used with a polyethylene glycol-dextran 2-phase solvent system and a surfactant gradient to purify the major species in a commercial preparation. We isolated the semi-conducting single walled carbon nanotube chiral species identified by UV spectral analysis. The further development of spiral counter-current chromatography instrumentation and methods will enable the scalable purification of carbon nanotubes useful for the next generation electronics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Single-handed helical wrapping of single-walled carbon nanotubes by chiral, ionic, semiconducting polymers.

    PubMed

    Deria, Pravas; Von Bargen, Christopher D; Olivier, Jean-Hubert; Kumbhar, Amar S; Saven, Jeffery G; Therien, Michael J

    2013-10-30

    We establish the requisite design for aryleneethynylene polymers that give rise to single-handed helical wrapping of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Highly charged semiconducting polymers that utilize either an (R)- or (S)-1,1'-bi-2-naphthol component in their respective conjugated backbones manifest HRTEM and AFM images of single-chain-wrapped SWNTs that reveal significant preferences for the anticipated helical wrapping handedness; statistical analysis of these images, however, indicates that ∼20% of the helical structures are formed with the "unexpected" handedness. CD spectroscopic data, coupled with TDDFT-based computational studies that correlate the spectral signatures of semiconducting polymer-wrapped SWNT assemblies with the structural properties of the chiral 1,1'-binaphthyl unit, suggest strongly that two distinct binaphthalene SWNT binding modes, cisoid-facial and cisoid-side, are possible for these polymers, with the latter mode responsible for inversion of helical chirality and the population of polymer-SWNT superstructures that feature the unexpected polymer helical wrapping chirality at the nanotube surface. Analogous aryleneethynylene polymers were synthesized that feature a 2,2'-(1,3-benzyloxy)-bridged (b)-1,1'-bi-2-naphthol unit: this 1,1'-bi-2-naphthol derivative is characterized by a bridging 2,2'-1,3 benzyloxy tether that restricts the torsional angle between the two naphthalene subunits along its C1-C1' chirality axis to larger, oblique angles that facilitate more extensive van der Waals contact of the naphthyl subunits with the nanotube. Similar microscopic, spectroscopic, and computational studies determine that chiral polymers based on conformationally restricted transoid binaphthyl units direct preferential facial binding of the polymer with the SWNT and thereby guarantee helically wrapped polymer-nanotube superstructures of fixed helical chirality. Molecular dynamics simulations provide an integrated picture tying together the

  12. Dielectrophoretic Assembly of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes Separated and Enriched by Spin Column Chromatography and Its Application to Gas Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Michihiko; Fujioka, Masahiro; Mai, Kaori; Watanabe, Hideaki; Martin, Yul; Suehiro, Junya

    2012-04-01

    The present authors have previously demonstrated the electrokinetic fabrication of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) gas sensor by employing dielectrophoresis. Because this method employs mass-produced SWCNTs, it can realize cheaper and more flexible SWCNT gas sensor fabrication than that based on the on-site synthesis of SWCNTs. In this study, a new protocol was proposed and tested for the separation and enrichment of semiconducting SWCNTs, aiming to improve the SWCNT gas sensor sensitivity. The protocol employed a spin column filled with size-exclusion dextran-based gel beads as well as two surfactants (sodium dodecyl sulfate and sodium deoxycholate), which had different affinities to metallic and semiconducting SWCNTs. The separation and enrichment of the semiconducting SWCNTs were confirmed by measuring their optical and electrical properties. The CNT gas sensor fabricated using enriched semiconducting SWCNTs was highly sensitive to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) gas, - more sensitive by 10 times than that fabricated using the pristine SWCNT mixture.

  13. Vacuum filtration based formation of liquid crystal films of semiconducting carbon nanotubes and high performance transistor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Benjamin; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we report ultra-thin liquid crystal films of semiconducting carbon nanotubes using a simple vacuum filtration process. Vacuum filtration of nanotubes in aqueous surfactant solution formed nematic domains on the filter membrane surface and exhibited local ordering. A 2D fast Fourier transform was used to calculate the order parameters from scanning electron microscopy images. The order parameter was observed to be sensitive to the filtration time demonstrating different regions of transformation namely nucleation of nematic domains, nanotube accumulation and large domain growth.Transmittance versus sheet resistance measurements of such films resulted in optical to dc conductivity of σ opt/σ dc = 9.01 indicative of purely semiconducting nanotube liquid crystal network.Thin films of nanotube liquid crystals with order parameters ranging from S = 0.1-0.5 were patterned into conducting channels of transistor devices which showed high I on/I off ratios from 10-19 800 and electron mobility values μ e = 0.3-78.8 cm2 (V-s)-1, hole mobility values μ h = 0.4-287 cm2 (V-s)-1. High I on/I off ratios were observed at low order parameters and film mass. A Schottky barrier transistor model is consistent with the observed transistor characteristics. Electron and hole mobilities were seen to increase with order parameters and carbon nanotube mass fractions. A fundamental tradeoff between decreasing on/off ratio and increasing mobility with increasing nanotube film mass and order parameter is therefore concluded. Increase in order parameters of nanotubes liquid crystals improved the electronic transport properties as witnessed by the increase in σ dc/σ opt values on macroscopic films and high mobilities in microscopic transistors. Liquid crystal networks of semiconducting nanotubes as demonstrated here are simple to fabricate, transparent, scalable and could find wide ranging device applications.

  14. Chirality-Selective Functionalization of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes with a Reactivity-Switchable Molecule.

    PubMed

    Powell, Lyndsey R; Kim, Mijin; Wang, YuHuang

    2017-09-13

    Chirality-selective functionalization of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been a difficult synthetic goal for more than a decade. Here we describe an on-demand covalent chemistry to address this intriguing challenge. Our approach involves the synthesis and isolation of a chemically inert diazoether isomer that can be switched to its reactive form in situ by modulation of the thermodynamic barrier to isomerization with pH and visible light that resonates with the optical frequency of the nanotube. We found that it is possible to completely inhibit the reaction in the absence of light, as determined by the limit of sensitive defect photoluminescence (less than 0.01% of the carbon atoms are bonded to a functional group). This optically driven diazoether chemistry makes it possible to selectively functionalize a specific SWCNT chirality within a mixture. Even for two chiralities that are nearly identical in diameter and electronic structure, (6,5)- and (7,3)-SWCNTs, we are able to activate the diazoether compound to functionalize the less reactive (7,3)-SWCNTs, driving the chemical reaction to near exclusion of the (6,5)-SWCNTs. This work opens opportunities to chemically tailor SWCNTs at the single chirality level for nanotube sorting, on-chip passivation, and nanoscale lithography.

  15. On the junction physics of Schottky contact of (10, 10) MX2 (MoS2, WS2) nanotube and (10, 10) carbon nanotube (CNT): an atomistic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Amretashis

    2017-04-01

    Armchair nanotubes of MoS2 and WS2 offer a sizeable band gap, with the advantage of a one dimensional (1D) electronic material, but free from edge roughness and thermodynamic instability of nanoribbons. Use of such semiconducting MX2 (MoS2, WS2) armchair nanotubes (NTs) in conjunction with metallic carbon nanotubes (CNT) can be useful for nanoelectronics and photonics applications. In this work, atomistic simulations of MoS2 NT-CNT and WS2 NT-CNT junctions are carried out to study the physics of such junctions. With density functional theory (DFT) we study the carrier density distribution, effective potential, electron difference density, electron localization function, electrostatic difference potential and projected local density of states of such MX2 NT-CNT 1D junctions. Thereafter the conductance of such a junction under moderate bias is studied with non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. From the forward bias characteristics simulated from NEGF, we extract diode parameters of the junction. The electrostatic simulations from DFT show the formation of an inhomogeneous Schottky barrier with a tendency towards charge transfer from metal and chalcogen atoms towards the C atoms. For low bias conditions, the ideality factor was calculated to be 1.1322 for MoS2 NT-CNT junction and 1.2526 for the WS2 NT-CNT junction. The Schottky barrier heights displayed significant bias dependent modulation and are calculated to be in the range 0.697-0.664 eV for MoS2 NT-CNT and 0.669-0.610 eV for the WS2 NT-CNT, respectively.

  16. In situ synthesis of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes by modified arc discharging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tingkai; Ji, Xianglin; Jin, Wenbo; Yang, Wenbo; Zhao, Xing; Dang, Alei; Li, Hao; Li, Tiehu

    2017-02-01

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) were in situ synthesized by a temperature-controlled arc discharging furnace with DC electric field using Co-Ni alloy powder as catalyst in helium gas. The microstructures of s-SWCNTs were characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and Raman spectrometry apparatus. The experimental results indicated that the best voltage value in DC electric field is 54 V, and the environmental temperature of the reaction chamber is 600 °C. The mean diameter of s-SWCNTs was estimated about 1.3 nm. The chiral vector ( n, m) of s-SWCNTs was calculated to be (10, 10) type according to the electron diffraction patterns.

  17. A photodegradable hexaaza-pentacene molecule for selective dispersion of large-diameter semiconducting carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Han, Jie; Ji, Qiyan; Li, Hongbo; Li, Gang; Qiu, Song; Li, Hai-Bei; Zhang, Qichun; Jin, Hehua; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Jin

    2016-06-08

    Harvesting high-purity semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) with removable dispersants remains a challenge. In this work, we demonstrate that small heteroacene derivatives may serve as promising selective dispersants for sorting s-SWCNTs. A rich N "doped" and thiophene-substituted hexaazapentacene molecule, denoted as 4HP, was found to be more favorable for high-purity s-SWCNTs with large diameters. Importantly, 4HP is photodegradable under 365 nm or blue light, which enables a simple deposition approach for the formation of clean s-SWCNT networks. The as-fabricated thin film transistors show excellent performance with a charge-mobility of 30-80 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and an on-off ratio of 10(4)-10(6).

  18. Recent Progress in Obtaining Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Transistor Applications.

    PubMed

    Islam, Ahmad E; Rogers, John A; Alam, Muhammad A

    2015-12-22

    High purity semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) with a narrow diameter distribution are required for high-performance transistors. Achieving this goal is extremely challenging because the as-grown material contains mixtures of s-SWCNTs and metallic- (m-) SWCNTs with wide diameter distributions, typically inadequate for integrated circuits. Since 2000, numerous ex situ methods have been proposed to improve the purity of the s-SWCNTs. The majority of these techniques fail to maintain the quality and integrity of the s-SWCNTs with a few notable exceptions. Here, the progress in realizing high purity s-SWCNTs in as-grown and post-processed materials is highlighted. A comparison of transistor parameters (such as on/off ratio and field-effect mobility) obtained from test structures establishes the effectiveness of various methods and suggests opportunities for future improvements.

  19. Tunable spin-polaron state in a singly clamped semiconducting carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistolesi, F.; Shekhter, R.

    2015-07-01

    We consider a semiconducting carbon nanotube (CNT) lying on a ferromagnetic insulating substrate with one end passing the substrate and suspended over a metallic gate. We assume that the polarized substrate induces an exchange interaction acting as a local magnetic field for the electrons in the nonsuspended CNT side. Generalizing the approach of I. Snyman and Yu.V. Nazarov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 076805 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.076805], we show that one can generate electrostatically a tunable spin-polarized polaronic state localized at the bending end of the CNT. We argue that at low temperatures manipulation and detection of the localized quantum spin state are possible.

  20. Room temperature infrared imaging sensors based on highly purified semiconducting carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Wei, Nan; Zhao, Qingliang; Zhang, Dehui; Wang, Sheng; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2015-04-21

    High performance infrared (IR) imaging systems usually require expensive cooling systems, which are highly undesirable. Here we report the fabrication and performance characteristics of room temperature carbon nanotube (CNT) IR imaging sensors. The CNT IR imaging sensor is based on aligned semiconducting CNT films with 99% purity, and each pixel or device of the imaging sensor consists of aligned strips of CNT asymmetrically contacted by Sc and Pd. We found that the performance of the device is dependent on the CNT channel length. While short channel devices provide a large photocurrent and a rapid response of about 110 μs, long channel length devices exhibit a low dark current and a high signal-to-noise ratio which are critical for obtaining high detectivity. In total, 36 CNT IR imagers are constructed on a single chip, each consists of 3 × 3 pixel arrays. The demonstrated advantages of constructing a high performance IR system using purified semiconducting CNT aligned films include, among other things, fast response, excellent stability and uniformity, ideal linear photocurrent response, high imaging polarization sensitivity and low power consumption.

  1. Angular momentum and topology in semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumida, W.; Okuyama, R.; Yamakage, A.; Saito, R.

    2016-05-01

    Semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes are classified into two types by means of the orbital angular momentum of the valley state, which is useful to study their low-energy electronic properties in finite length. The classification is given by an integer d , which is the greatest common divisor of two integers n and m specifying the chirality of nanotubes, by analyzing cutting lines. For the case that d is greater than or equal to four, the two lowest subbands from two valleys have different angular momenta with respect to the nanotube axis. Reflecting the decoupling of two valleys, discrete energy levels in finite-length nanotubes exhibit fourfold degeneracy and small lift of fourfold degeneracy by the spin-orbit interaction. For the case that d is less than or equal to two, in which the two lowest subbands from two valleys have the same angular momentum, discrete levels exhibit a lift of fourfold degeneracy reflecting the coupling of two valleys. Especially, two valleys are strongly coupled when the chirality is close to the armchair chirality. An effective one-dimensional lattice model is derived by extracting states with relevant angular momentum, which reveals the valley coupling in the eigenstates. A bulk-edge correspondence, which is a relationship between the number of edge states and the winding number calculated in the corresponding bulk system, is analytically shown by using the argument principle, and this enables us to estimate the number of edge states from the bulk property. The number of edge states depends not only on the chirality but also on the shape of boundary.

  2. Interface states in carbon nanotube junctions: Rolling up graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, H.; Ayuela, A.; Jaskólski, W.; Pelc, M.; Chico, L.

    2009-07-01

    We study the origin of interface states in carbon nanotube intramolecular junctions between achiral tubes. By applying the Born-von Karman boundary condition to an interface between armchair- and zigzag-terminated graphene layers, we are able to explain their number and energies. We show that these interface states, costumarily attributed to the presence of topological defects, are actually related to zigzag-edge states, as those of graphene zigzag nanoribbons. Spatial localization of interface states is seen to vary greatly and may extend appreciably into either side of the junction. Our results give an alternative explanation to the unusual decay length measured for interface states of semiconductor nanotube junctions and could be further tested by local probe spectroscopies.

  3. Energy transfer pathways in semiconducting carbon nanotubes revealed using two-dimensional white-light spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehlenbacher, Randy D.; McDonough, Thomas J.; Grechko, Maksim; Wu, Meng-Yin; Arnold, Michael S.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2015-04-01

    Thin film networks of highly purified semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being explored for energy harvesting and optoelectronic devices because of their exceptional transport and optical properties. The nanotubes in these films are in close contact, which permits energy to flow through the films, although the pathways and mechanisms for energy transfer are largely unknown. Here we use a broadband continuum to collect femtosecond two-dimensional white-light spectra. The continuum spans 500 to 1,300 nm, resolving energy transfer between all combinations of bandgap (S1) and higher (S2) transitions. We observe ultrafast energy redistribution on the S2 states, non-Förster energy transfer on the S1 states and anti-correlated energy levels. The two-dimensional spectra reveal competing pathways for energy transfer, with S2 excitons taking routes depending on the bandgap separation, whereas S1 excitons relax independent of the bandgap. These observations provide a basis for understanding and ultimately controlling the photophysics of energy flow in CNT-based devices.

  4. Semi-conducting single-walled carbon nanotubes are detrimental when compared to metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes for electrochemical applications.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qi; Nasir, Muhammad Zafir Mohamad; Pumera, Martin

    2017-10-03

    As-synthetized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) contain both metallic and semiconducting nanotubes. For the electronics, it is desirable to separate semiconducting SWCNTs (s-SWCNTs) from the metallic ones as s-SWCNTs provide desirable electronic properties. Here we test whether ultrapure semi-conducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) provide advantageous electrochemical properties over the as prepared SWCNTs which contain a mixture of semiconducting and metallic CNTs. We test them as a transducer platform which enhanced the detection of target analytes (ascorbic acid, dopamine, uric acid) when compared to a bare glassy carbon (GC) electrode. Despite that, the two materials exhibit significantly different electrochemical properties and performances. A mixture of m-SWCNTs and s-SWCNTs demonstrated superior performance over ultrapure s-SWCNTs with greater peak currents and pronounced shift in peak potentials to lower values in cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry for the detection of target analytes. The mixture of m- and s-SWCNTs displayed about a 4 times improved heterogeneous electron transfer rate as compared to bare GC and a 2 times greater heterogeneous electron transfer rate than s-SWCNTs, demonstrating that ultrapure SWCNTs do not provide any major enhancement over the as prepared SWCNTs.

  5. Selective nuclear localization of siRNA by metallic versus semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes in keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Huzil, John Torin; Saliaj, Evi; Ivanova, Marina V; Gharagozloo, Marjan; Loureiro, Maria Jimena; Lamprecht, Constanze; Korinek, Andreas; Chen, Ding Wen; Foldvari, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Background: The potential use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in gene therapy as delivery systems for nucleic acids has been recently recognized. Here, we describe that metallic versus semiconducting single-wall CNTs can produce significant differences in transfection rate and cellular distribution of siRNA in murine PAM212 keratinocytes. Results/Methodology: The results of cell interaction studies, coupled with supportive computational simulations and ultrastructural studies revealed that the use of metallic single wall CNTs resulted in siRNA delivery into both the cytoplasm and nucleus of keratinocytes, whereas semiconducting CNTs resulted in delivery only to the cytoplasm. Conclusion: Using enriched fractions of metallic or semiconducting CNTs for siRNA complex preparation may provide specific subcellular targeting advantages. PMID:28031892

  6. Selective nuclear localization of siRNA by metallic versus semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Huzil, John Torin; Saliaj, Evi; Ivanova, Marina V; Gharagozloo, Marjan; Loureiro, Maria Jimena; Lamprecht, Constanze; Korinek, Andreas; Chen, Ding Wen; Foldvari, Marianna

    2015-11-01

    The potential use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in gene therapy as delivery systems for nucleic acids has been recently recognized. Here, we describe that metallic versus semiconducting single-wall CNTs can produce significant differences in transfection rate and cellular distribution of siRNA in murine PAM212 keratinocytes. The results of cell interaction studies, coupled with supportive computational simulations and ultrastructural studies revealed that the use of metallic single wall CNTs resulted in siRNA delivery into both the cytoplasm and nucleus of keratinocytes, whereas semiconducting CNTs resulted in delivery only to the cytoplasm. Using enriched fractions of metallic or semiconducting CNTs for siRNA complex preparation may provide specific subcellular targeting advantages.

  7. Local gate effect of mechanically deformed crossed carbon nanotube junction.

    PubMed

    Qing, Quan; Nezich, Daniel A; Kong, Jing; Wu, Zhongyun; Liu, Zhongfan

    2010-11-10

    In this work, we have demonstrated that the local deformation at the crossed carbon nanotube (CNT) junctions can introduce significant tunable local gate effect under ambient environment. Atomic force microscope (AFM) manipulation of the local deformation yielded a variation in transconductance that was retained after removing the AFM tip. Application of a large source-drain voltage and pressing the CNT junction above a threshold pressure can respectively erase and recover the transconductance modulation reversibly. The local gate effect is found to be independent of the length of the crossed CNT and attributed to the charges residing at the deformed junctions due to formation of localized states. The number of localized charges is estimated to be in the range of 10(2) to 10(3). These results may find potential applications in electromechanical sensors and could have important implications for designing nonvolatile devices based on crossed CNT junctions.

  8. Self-filtering oscillations in carbon nanotube hetero-junctions.

    PubMed

    Scarpa, F; Narojczyk, J W; Wojciechowski, K W; Inman, D J

    2011-11-18

    We evaluate the vibrational properties of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) hetero-junction (HJ) oscillators using a hybrid atomistic-continuum approach validated by molecular mechanics/molecular dynamics simulations. The SWCNT-HJs show a broken symmetry topology of their mode shapes, with striction effects caused on the bending and radial modes by the combined effect of the HJ and the tube with the thinner radius. The single-wall nanotube HJs also show selective mass sensing properties based solely on the geometry and type of the boundary conditions of the specific nanostructure. This unusual behaviour has not been observed so far in classical SWCNT systems.

  9. Fabrication and Characterization of Self-Aligned T-gate High-Purity Semiconducting Carbon Nanotube RF Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Yuchi; Badmaev, Alexander; Kim, Pyojae; Jooyaie, Alborz; Zhou, Chongwu; Chongwu Zhou's nanolab Team

    2013-03-01

    We applied the scalable self-aligned T-shaped gate design to semiconducting nanotube RF transistors. In this way, the channel length can be scaled down to 140 nm which enables quasi ballistic transport, and the gate dielectric is reduced to 2-3 nm aluminum oxide, leading to quasi quantum capacitance operation. As a result, our nanotube transistors exhibit excellent on-chip device performance and high linearity with channel length scaling down to 140 nm. With T-shaped gate structure, a cut-off frequency up to 22 GHz and power gain frequency of 10 GHz for separated nanotube transistor are achieved. The T-shaped gate design enables high-yield wafer-scale fabrication with controllable gate length scaling. Furthermore, we also characterized the linearity properties of nanotube transistors, with the 1-dB compression point measurement, in source/load pull setup, with positive power gain to our knowledge, for the first time. Above all, our work reveals that the semiconducting nanotube RF transistor is an interesting and promising direction in high frequency device and circuit exploration.

  10. Mechanical deformations of boron nitride nanotubes in crossed junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yadong; Chen, Xiaoming; Ke, Changhong; Park, Cheol; Fay, Catharine C.; Stupkiewicz, Stanislaw

    2014-04-28

    We present a study of the mechanical deformations of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in crossed junctions. The structure and deformation of the crossed tubes in the junction are characterized by using atomic force microscopy. Our results show that the total tube heights are reduced by 20%–33% at the crossed junctions formed by double-walled BNNTs with outer diameters in the range of 2.21–4.67 nm. The measured tube height reduction is found to be in a nearly linear relationship with the summation of the outer diameters of the two tubes forming the junction. The contact force between the two tubes in the junction is estimated based on contact mechanics theories and found to be within the range of 4.2–7.6 nN. The Young's modulus of BNNTs and their binding strengths with the substrate are quantified, based on the deformation profile of the upper tube in the junction, and are found to be 1.07 ± 0.11 TPa and 0.18–0.29 nJ/m, respectively. Finally, we perform finite element simulations on the mechanical deformations of the crossed BNNT junctions. The numerical simulation results are consistent with both the experimental measurements and the analytical analysis. The results reported in this paper contribute to a better understanding of the structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and to the pursuit of their applications.

  11. Multimodal probing of oxygen and water interaction with metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotube networks under ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Anthony J.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Muckley, Eric S.; Jacobs, Christopher B.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, carbon nanotube (CNT) networks composed of semiconducting single wall nanotubes (s-SWNTs), metallic single wall nanotubes (m-SWNTs), and multiwall nanotubes (MWNTs) were exposed to O2 and H2O vapor in the dark and under UV irradiation. Changes in film resistance and mass were measured in situ. In the dark, resistance of metallic nanotube networks increases in the presence of O2 and H2O, whereas resistance of s-SWNT networks decreases. We find that UV irradiation increases the sensitivity of CNT networks to O2 and H2O by more than an order of magnitude. Under UV irradiation, the resistance of metallic nanotube networks decreases in the presence of O2 and H2O likely through the generation of free charge carriers. UV irradiation increases the gas/vapor sensitivity of s-SWNT networks by nearly a factor of 2 compared to metallic nanotube networks. Networks of s-SWNTs show evidence of delamination from the gold-plated QCM crystal, possibly due to preferential adsorption of O2 and H2O on gold.

  12. Multimodal probing of oxygen and water interaction with metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotube networks under ultraviolet irradiation

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Anthony J.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Muckley, Eric S.; ...

    2016-06-01

    In this study, carbon nanotube (CNT) networks composed of semiconducting single wall nanotubes (s-SWNTs), metallic single wall nanotubes (m-SWNTs), and multiwall nanotubes (MWNTs) were exposed to O2 and H2O vapor in the dark and under UV irradiation. Changes in film resistance and mass were measured in situ. In the dark, resistance of metallic nanotube networks increases in the presence of O2 and H2O, whereas resistance of s-SWNT networks decreases. We find that UV irradiation increases the sensitivity of CNT networks to O2 and H2O by more than an order of magnitude. Under UV irradiation, the resistance of metallic nanotube networksmore » decreases in the presence of O2 and H2O likely through the generation of free charge carriers. UV irradiation increases the gas/vapor sensitivity of s-SWNT networks by nearly a factor of 2 compared to metallic nanotube networks. Networks of s-SWNTs show evidence of delamination from the gold-plated QCM crystal, possibly due to preferential adsorption of O2 and H2O on gold.« less

  13. Multimodal probing of oxygen and water interaction with metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotube networks under ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Anthony J.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Muckley, Eric S.; Jacobs, Christopher B.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, carbon nanotube (CNT) networks composed of semiconducting single wall nanotubes (s-SWNTs), metallic single wall nanotubes (m-SWNTs), and multiwall nanotubes (MWNTs) were exposed to O2 and H2O vapor in the dark and under UV irradiation. Changes in film resistance and mass were measured in situ. In the dark, resistance of metallic nanotube networks increases in the presence of O2 and H2O, whereas resistance of s-SWNT networks decreases. We find that UV irradiation increases the sensitivity of CNT networks to O2 and H2O by more than an order of magnitude. Under UV irradiation, the resistance of metallic nanotube networks decreases in the presence of O2 and H2O likely through the generation of free charge carriers. UV irradiation increases the gas/vapor sensitivity of s-SWNT networks by nearly a factor of 2 compared to metallic nanotube networks. Networks of s-SWNTs show evidence of delamination from the gold-plated QCM crystal, possibly due to preferential adsorption of O2 and H2O on gold.

  14. Dissociating excitons photogenerated in semiconducting carbon nanotubes at polymeric photovoltaic heterojunction interfaces.

    PubMed

    Bindl, Dominick J; Safron, Nathaniel S; Arnold, Michael S

    2010-10-26

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) have strong near-infrared and visible absorptivity and exceptional charge transport characteristics, rendering them highly attractive semiconductor absorbers for photovoltaic and photodetector technologies. However, these applications are limited by a poor understanding of how photogenerated charges, which are bound as excitons in s-SWCNTs, can be dissociated in large-area solid-state devices. Here, we measure the dissociation of excitons in s-SWCNT thin films that form planar heterojunction interfaces with polymeric photovoltaic materials using an exciton dissociation-sensitive photocapacitor measurement technique that is advantageously insensitive to optically induced thermal photoconductive effects. We find that fullerene and polythiophene derivatives induce exciton dissociation, resulting in electron and hole transfer, respectively, away from optically excited s-SWCNTs. Significantly weaker or no charge transfer is observed using wider gap polymers due to insufficient energy offsets. These results are expected to critically guide the development of thin film s-SWCNT-based photosensitive devices.

  15. Water-Assisted Preparation of High-Purity Semiconducting (14,4) Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Wang, Xiao; Si, Jia; Zhao, Xiulan; Qi, Kuo; Jin, Chuanhong; Zhang, Zeyao; Li, Meihui; Zhang, Daqi; Yang, Juan; Zhang, Zhiyong; Xu, Zhi; Peng, Lian-Mao; Bai, Xuedong; Li, Yan

    2017-01-24

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs) with diameters of 1.0-1.5 nm (with similar bandgap to crystalline silicon) are highly desired for nanoelectronics. Up to date, the highest reported content of s-SWNTs as-grown is ∼97%, which is still far below the daunting requirements of high-end applications. Herein, we report a feasible and green pathway to use H2O vapor to modulate the structure of the intermetallic W6Co7 nanocrystals. By using the resultant W6Co7 nanocatalysts with a high percentage of (1 0 10) planes as structural templates, we realized the direct growth of s-SWNT with the purity of ∼99%, in which ∼97% is (14,4) tubes (diameter 1.29 nm). H2O can also act as an environmentally friendly and facile etchant for eliminating metallic SWNTs, and the content of s-SWNTs was further improved to 99.8% and (14,4) tubes to 98.6%. High purity s-SWNTs with even bandgap determined by their uniform structure can be used for the exquisite applications in different fields.

  16. Many-body effects in semiconducting single-wall silicon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Summary The electronic and optical properties of semiconducting silicon nanotubes (SiNTs) are studied by means of the many-body Green’s function method, i.e., GW approximation and Bethe–Salpeter equation. In these studied structures, i.e., (4,4), (6,6) and (10,0) SiNTs, self-energy effects are enhanced giving rise to large quasi-particle (QP) band gaps due to the confinement effect. The strong electron−electron (e−e) correlations broaden the band gaps of the studied SiNTs from 0.65, 0.28 and 0.05 eV at DFT level to 1.9, 1.22 and 0.79 eV at GW level. The Coulomb electron−hole (e−h) interactions significantly modify optical absorption properties obtained at noninteracting-particle level with the formation of bound excitons with considerable binding energies (of the order of 1 eV) assigned: the binding energies of the armchair (4,4), (6,6) and zigzag (10,0) SiNTs are 0.92, 1.1 and 0.6 eV, respectively. Results in this work are useful for understanding the physics and applications in silicon-based nanoscale device components. PMID:24455458

  17. Many-body effects in semiconducting single-wall silicon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Jacob, Timo

    2014-01-06

    The electronic and optical properties of semiconducting silicon nanotubes (SiNTs) are studied by means of the many-body Green's function method, i.e., GW approximation and Bethe-Salpeter equation. In these studied structures, i.e., (4,4), (6,6) and (10,0) SiNTs, self-energy effects are enhanced giving rise to large quasi-particle (QP) band gaps due to the confinement effect. The strong electron-electron (e-e) correlations broaden the band gaps of the studied SiNTs from 0.65, 0.28 and 0.05 eV at DFT level to 1.9, 1.22 and 0.79 eV at GW level. The Coulomb electron-hole (e-h) interactions significantly modify optical absorption properties obtained at noninteracting-particle level with the formation of bound excitons with considerable binding energies (of the order of 1 eV) assigned: the binding energies of the armchair (4,4), (6,6) and zigzag (10,0) SiNTs are 0.92, 1.1 and 0.6 eV, respectively. Results in this work are useful for understanding the physics and applications in silicon-based nanoscale device components.

  18. Surfactant free fractions of metallic and semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes via optimised gel chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Lukaszczuk, Pawel; Ruemmeli, Mark H.; Knupfer, Martin; Kalenczuk, Ryszard J.; Borowiak-Palen, Ewa

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The application of gel permeation chromatography technique in a field of SWCNT separation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-commercial agarose gel used as a column filling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Purification route is presented, quality and quantity estimation is shown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Process is ready for high-scale separation of SWCNTs. -- Abstract: We report the procedure of sorting/purification of carbon nanotubes by electronic type using chromatographic column with sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) and sodium deoxycholate (DOC) solutions as the eluents. The non-commercial agarose gel in different concentrations has been tested in the process. It was found that in optimal gel concentration the fractionation resulted in {approx}96.2% yield of semiconducting species. Importantly, to get surfactant-free fractions the post-separation purification procedure has been carried out. The UV-vis-NIR and Raman spectroscopy have been utilised for the samples analysis. High resolution transmission microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis allowed to study the sample morphology and purity, respectively.

  19. Fluorescence dynamics and fine structure of dark excitons in semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Alfonsi, Jessica; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2012-06-27

    Exact diagonalization results are reported for the bright and dark exciton structure of semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes in the framework of the Hubbard model combined with a small crystal approach for several values of the correlation coupling strength U/t. Our findings, in the low-intermediate correlation regime (1.5 < U/t < 2.1), show the presence of dark states above and below the first bright exciton |B> and can account for reported experimental values of deep triplet states below |B> and of a K-momentum singlet dark exciton above this state. In order to fit the temporal profile of the photoluminescence (PL) decay, a bottleneck mechanism is considered involving a few dark states, with the respective energy gaps correspondingly obtained in the above-mentioned correlation range. We find that a kinetic model with one dark state above and two below |B> is able to recover the observed biexponential features of the PL behaviour with a reasonable set of parameters. Within this model we attribute the long tail of the PL to a delayed luminescence process of the bright state caused by the nearby calculated dark states.

  20. Enhancement of Photoluminescence from Semiconducting Nanotubes in Aqueous Suspensions due to Cysteine and Dithiothreitol Doping: Influence of the Sonication Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnosov, Nikita V.; Leontiev, Victor S.; Karachevtsev, Victor A.

    2016-11-01

    The influence of tip sonication duration on the spectral characteristics of carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in aqueous suspension with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) has been studied by NIR luminescence, NIR absorption, and Raman spectroscopy. It was revealed that prolongation of sonication leads to weakening of the SWNT polymer coverage and appearance of additional defects on the nanotube surface. Prolongation of the tip sonication treatment of SWNT/ssDNA from 30 to 90 min leads to the increase of the number of individual nanotubes in the aqueous suspension, but it significantly decreases the photoluminescence (PL) from semiconducting SWNTs because more defects are formed on the nanotube surface. At probing the SWNT/ssDNA emission with cysteine or dithiothreitol (DTT) doping the nanotube aqueous suspension showed the different PL intensity enhancement depending on the duration of the sonication treatment and on the ability of these reducing agents to passivate emission-quenching defects on the carbon nanotube sidewall. The magnitude of the PL enhancement rises with sonication prolongation and depends on the nanotube chirality. Tight and ordered polymer coverage of (6,4) nanotubes hampers the access of the reducing agent to emission-quenching defects on the nanotube surface and provides the weaker PL intensity increasing while (7,5) nanotubes show the strongest reaction to the doping effect. The comparison of cysteine and DTT ability to passivate the emission-quenching defects showed the higher efficiency of DTT doping. This prevailing is explained by the stronger reducing activity of DTT which is determined by a lower redox potential of this molecule.

  1. Enhancement of Photoluminescence from Semiconducting Nanotubes in Aqueous Suspensions due to Cysteine and Dithiothreitol Doping: Influence of the Sonication Treatment.

    PubMed

    Kurnosov, Nikita V; Leontiev, Victor S; Karachevtsev, Victor A

    2016-12-01

    The influence of tip sonication duration on the spectral characteristics of carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in aqueous suspension with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) has been studied by NIR luminescence, NIR absorption, and Raman spectroscopy. It was revealed that prolongation of sonication leads to weakening of the SWNT polymer coverage and appearance of additional defects on the nanotube surface. Prolongation of the tip sonication treatment of SWNT/ssDNA from 30 to 90 min leads to the increase of the number of individual nanotubes in the aqueous suspension, but it significantly decreases the photoluminescence (PL) from semiconducting SWNTs because more defects are formed on the nanotube surface. At probing the SWNT/ssDNA emission with cysteine or dithiothreitol (DTT) doping the nanotube aqueous suspension showed the different PL intensity enhancement depending on the duration of the sonication treatment and on the ability of these reducing agents to passivate emission-quenching defects on the carbon nanotube sidewall. The magnitude of the PL enhancement rises with sonication prolongation and depends on the nanotube chirality. Tight and ordered polymer coverage of (6,4) nanotubes hampers the access of the reducing agent to emission-quenching defects on the nanotube surface and provides the weaker PL intensity increasing while (7,5) nanotubes show the strongest reaction to the doping effect. The comparison of cysteine and DTT ability to passivate the emission-quenching defects showed the higher efficiency of DTT doping. This prevailing is explained by the stronger reducing activity of DTT which is determined by a lower redox potential of this molecule.

  2. Novel Electrical and Optoelectronic Characterization Methods for Semiconducting Nanowires and Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzenmeyer, Aaron Michael

    As technology journalist David Pogue recounted, "If everything we own had improved over the last 25 years as much as electronics have, the average family car would travel four times faster than the space shuttle; houses would cost 200 bucks." The electronics industry is one which, through Moore's Law, created a self-fulfilling prophecy of exponential advancement. This progress has made unforeseen technologies commonplace and revealed new physical understanding of the world in which we live. It is in keeping with these trends that the current work is motivated. This dissertation focuses on the advancement of electrical and optoelectronic characterization techniques suitable for understanding the underlying physics and applications of nanoscopic devices, in particular semiconducting nanowires and nanotubes. In this work an in situ measurement platform based on a field-emission scanning electron microscope fitted with an electrical nanoprobe is shown to be a robust instrument for determining fundamental aspects of nanowire systems (i.e. the dominant mode of carrier transport and the nature of the electrical contacts to the nanowire). The platform is used to fully classify two distinct systems. In one instance it is found that indium arsenide nanowires display space-charge-limited transport and are contacted Ohmically. In the other, gallium arsenide nanowires are found to sequentially show the trap-mediated transport regimes of Poole-Frenkel effect and phonon-assisted tunneling. The contacts in this system are resolved to be asymmetric -- one is Ohmic while the other is a Schottky barrier. Additionally scanning photocurrent microscopy is used to spatially resolve optoelectronic nanowire and nanotube devices. In core/shell gallium arsenide nanowire solar cell arrays it is shown that each individual nanowire functions as a standalone solar cell. Nanotube photodiodes are mapped by scanning photocurrent microscopy to confirm an optimal current collection scheme has been

  3. Semiconducting ZnSnN2 thin films for Si/ZnSnN2 p-n junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Ruifeng; Cao, Hongtao; Liang, Lingyan; Xie, Yufang; Zhuge, Fei; Zhang, Hongliang; Gao, Junhua; Javaid, Kashif; Liu, Caichi; Sun, Weizhong

    2016-04-01

    ZnSnN2 is regarded as a promising photovoltaic absorber candidate due to earth-abundance, non-toxicity, and high absorption coefficient. However, it is still a great challenge to synthesize ZnSnN2 films with a low electron concentration, in order to promote the applications of ZnSnN2 as the core active layer in optoelectronic devices. In this work, polycrystalline and high resistance ZnSnN2 films were fabricated by magnetron sputtering technique, then semiconducting films were achieved after post-annealing, and finally Si/ZnSnN2 p-n junctions were constructed. The electron concentration and Hall mobility were enhanced from 2.77 × 1017 to 6.78 × 1017 cm-3 and from 0.37 to 2.07 cm2 V-1 s-1, corresponding to the annealing temperature from 200 to 350 °C. After annealing at 300 °C, the p-n junction exhibited the optimum rectifying characteristics, with a forward-to-reverse ratio over 103. The achievement of this ZnSnN2-based p-n junction makes an opening step forward to realize the practical application of the ZnSnN2 material. In addition, the nonideal behaviors of the p-n junctions under both positive and negative voltages are discussed, in hope of suggesting some ideas to further improve the rectifying characteristics.

  4. Printed thin film transistors and CMOS inverters based on semiconducting carbon nanotube ink purified by a nonlinear conjugated copolymer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenya; Dou, Junyan; Zhao, Jianwen; Tan, Hongwei; Ye, Jun; Tange, Masayoshi; Gao, Wei; Xu, Weiwei; Zhang, Xiang; Guo, Wenrui; Ma, Changqi; Okazaki, Toshiya; Zhang, Kai; Cui, Zheng

    2016-02-28

    Two innovative research studies are reported in this paper. One is the sorting of semiconducting carbon nanotubes and ink formulation by a novel semiconductor copolymer and second is the development of CMOS inverters using not the p-type and n-type transistors but a printed p-type transistor and a printed ambipolar transistor. A new semiconducting copolymer (named P-DPPb5T) was designed and synthesized with a special nonlinear structure and more condensed conjugation surfaces, which can separate large diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) from arc discharge SWCNTs according to their chiralities with high selectivity. With the sorted sc-SWCNTs ink, thin film transistors (TFTs) have been fabricated by aerosol jet printing. The TFTs displayed good uniformity, low operating voltage (±2 V) and subthreshold swing (SS) (122-161 mV dec(-1)), high effective mobility (up to 17.6-37.7 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) and high on/off ratio (10(4)-10(7)). With the printed TFTs, a CMOS inverter was constructed, which is based on the p-type TFT and ambipolar TFT instead of the conventional p-type and n-type TFTs. Compared with other recently reported inverters fabricated by printing, the printed CMOS inverters demonstrated a better noise margin (74% 1/2 Vdd) and was hysteresis free. The inverter has a voltage gain of up to 16 at an applied voltage of only 1 V and low static power consumption.

  5. Electronic Structure of Semiconducting and Metallic Tubes in TiO2/Carbon Nanotube Heterojunctions: Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    PubMed

    Long, Run

    2013-04-18

    The electronic structure of the TiO2(110) surface interfaced with both a semiconducting and metallic carbon nanotube (CNT) was investigated by density functional theory. Our simulations rationalized visible light photocatalytic activity of CNT/TiO2 hybrid materials higher than that under ultraviolent irradiation and showed that the photoactivity of a semiconducting CNT decorating TiO2 is better than that of the metallic CNT/TiO2 system due to efficient charge separation across the interface. This suggests that semiconducting CNT/TiO2 could be a potential photovoltaic material. In contrast, strong interaction between a metallic CNT and TiO2 leads to large charge transfer. Such charge transfer reduces the built-in potential, in turn resulting in inefficient charge separation. Functionalizing the metallic CNT with a small platinum cluster can increase the built-in potential and drive charge separation. These observations indicate that the CNT/TiO2 interface can be a potential photovoltaic material by a metal cluster decorating a CNT despite a real tube being composed of the mixture of metallic and semiconducting CNTs.

  6. Separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes into metallic and semiconducting groups: a simple and large-scale method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jing; Maeda, Y.

    2006-03-01

    Separation of a large number of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) into groups each with specifically metallic and semiconducting properties is an extremely important task for technology application. Even though effective methods (1, 2) have been devised, they suffer from drawbacks such as either the yield is low (3) or expense is high (4). In this work, we study the problem from a theoretical approach, we notice that based on the first principles calculations the binding strengths of methylamine to the semiconducting [13, 0] SWNT are only 36˜61% of that to the metallic [7, 7] SWNT, which suggests that the amines is much more attractive toward the pure metallic than the semiconducting SWNTs. Therefore starting from as-prepared SWNTs and with the assistance of amines, we achieved SWNTs with enriched metallic properties over semiconducting in a convenient and large-scale manner. References: (1) D. Chattopadhyay, L. Galeska, F. Papadimitrakopoulos, Journal of the American Chemical Society 125, 3370 (MAR 19, 2003). (2) H. P. Li et al., Journal of the American Chemical Society 126, 1014 (FEB 4, 2004). (3) R. Krupke, F. Hennrich, H. von Lohneysen, M. Kappes, SCIENCE 301, 344 (JUL 18, 2003). (4) M. Zheng et al., Science 302, 1545 (NOV 28, 2003).

  7. Observation and Modeling of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Bend Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Anantram, M. P.; Jaffe, R. L.; Kong, J.; Dai, H.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) bends, with diameters from approx. 1.0 to 2.5 nm and bend angles from 18 deg. to 34 deg., are observed in catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons at 600 - 1200 C. An algorithm using molecular dynamics simulation (MD) techniques is developed to model these structures that are considered to be SWNT junctions formed by topological defects (i.e. pentagon-heptagon pairs). The algorithm is used to predict the tube helicities and defect configurations for bend junctions using the observed tube diameters and bend angles. The number and arrangement of the defects at the junction interfaces are found to depend on the tube helicities and bend angle. The structural and energetic calculations using the Brenner potential show a number of stable junction configurations for each bend angle with the 34 deg. bends being more stable than the others. Tight binding calculations for local density of state (LDOS) and transmission coefficients are carried out to investigate electrical properties of the bend junctions.

  8. High-Purity Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: A Key Enabling Material in Emerging Electronics.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Jacques; Ding, Jianfu; Li, Zhao; Finnie, Paul; Lopinski, Gregory; Malenfant, Patrick R L

    2017-09-13

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) are emerging as a promising material for high-performance, high-density devices as well as low-cost, large-area macroelectronics produced via additive manufacturing methods such as roll-to-roll printing. Proof-of-concept demonstrations have indicated the potential of sc-SWCNTs for digital electronics, radiofrequency circuits, radiation hard memory, improved sensors, and flexible, stretchable, conformable electronics. Advances toward commercial applications bring numerous opportunities in SWCNT materials development and characterization as well as fabrication processes and printing technologies. Commercialization in electronics will require large quantities of sc-SWCNTs, and the challenge for materials science is the development of scalable synthesis, purification, and enrichment methods. While a few synthesis routes have shown promising results in making near-monochiral SWCNTs, gram quantities are available only for small-diameter sc-SWCNTs, which underperform in transistors. Most synthesis routes yield mixtures of SWCNTs, typically 30% metallic and 70% semiconducting, necessitating the extraction of sc-SWCNTs from their metallic counterparts in high purity using scalable postsynthetic methods. Numerous routes to obtain high-purity sc-SWCNTs from raw soot have been developed, including density-gradient ultracentrifugation, chromatography, aqueous two-phase extraction, and selective DNA or polymer wrapping. By these methods (termed sorting or enrichment), >99% sc-SWCNT content can be achieved. Currently, all of these approaches have drawbacks and limitations with respect to electronics applications, such as excessive dilution, expensive consumables, and high ionic impurity content. Excess amount of dispersant is a common challenge that hinders direct inclusion of sc-SWCNTs into electronic devices. At present, conjugated polymer extraction may represent the most practical route to sc-SWCNTs. By the use of

  9. Polymer-Free Electronic-Grade Aligned Semiconducting Carbon Nanotube Array.

    PubMed

    Joo, Yongho; Brady, Gerald J; Kanimozhi, Catherine; Ko, Jaehyoung; Shea, Matthew J; Strand, Michael T; Arnold, Michael S; Gopalan, Padma

    2017-08-30

    Conjugated polymers are used commonly to selectively sort semiconducting carbon nanotubes (S-CNTs) from their metallic counterparts in organic solvents. The polymer-wrapped S-CNTs can be easily processed from organic solvents into arrays of CNTs for scalable device fabrication. Though the conjugated polymers are essential for sorting and device fabrication, it is highly desirable to remove them completely as they limit the electronic properties of the device. Here, we use a commercially available polymer, namely, poly[(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-co-(6,6'-(2,2'-bipyridine))] (PFO-BPy), to sort large-diameter S-CNTs with ultrahigh selectivity and fabricate CNT-array-based field effect transistors (FETs) via a floating evaporative self-assembly (FESA) process. We report quantitative removal of the polymer wrapper from the FESA aligned S-CNT arrays using a metal-chelation-assisted polymer removal (McAPR) process. The implementation of this process on FESA films requires the selective thermal degradation of the polymer into oligomers, combined with optimization of the solvent type and temperature of the metal complexation reaction. Resulting S-CNT array FET devices show that the electronic properties of pristine CNT are preserved through this process. Optical microscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the quantitative polymer removal. We quantitatively describe the FET devices to analyze the fundamental characteristics of FETs (mobility (μ), on-conductance (Gon), and contact resistance (2Rc)) by comparing before and after polymer removal. The ability to completely remove the polymer wrapper in aligned CNT arrays without adversely affecting the device properties opens up applications beyond FETs into photovoltaics and biosensing.

  10. Photocurrent generation efficiency of a carbon nanotube pn junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCulley, Daniel; Aspitarte, Lee; Minot, Ethan

    Carrier multiplication effects can enhance the quantum efficiency of photovoltaic devices. For example, quantum dot solar cells have demonstrated photon-to-electron conversion efficiencies greater than 100% when photon energies exceed twice the band gap. Carbon nanotube photodiodes exhibit carrier multiplication effects (Gabor et al., Science 2009), but the quantum efficiency of such photodiodes has not previously been characterized. We have reproduced the carrier multiplication phenomena in individual CNT pn junctions and investigated the conditions under which it occurs. We will present early results quantifying the internal quantum efficiency of the process.

  11. High-performance partially aligned semiconductive single-walled carbon nanotube transistors achieved with a parallel technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yilei; Pillai, Suresh Kumar Raman; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2013-09-09

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are widely thought to be a strong contender for next-generation printed electronic transistor materials. However, large-scale solution-based parallel assembly of SWNTs to obtain high-performance transistor devices is challenging. SWNTs have anisotropic properties and, although partial alignment of the nanotubes has been theoretically predicted to achieve optimum transistor device performance, thus far no parallel solution-based technique can achieve this. Herein a novel solution-based technique, the immersion-cum-shake method, is reported to achieve partially aligned SWNT networks using semiconductive (99% enriched) SWNTs (s-SWNTs). By immersing an aminosilane-treated wafer into a solution of nanotubes placed on a rotary shaker, the repetitive flow of the nanotube solution over the wafer surface during the deposition process orients the nanotubes toward the fluid flow direction. By adjusting the nanotube concentration in the solution, the nanotube density of the partially aligned network can be controlled; linear densities ranging from 5 to 45 SWNTs/μm are observed. Through control of the linear SWNT density and channel length, the optimum SWNT-based field-effect transistor devices achieve outstanding performance metrics (with an on/off ratio of ~3.2 × 10(4) and mobility 46.5 cm(2) /Vs). Atomic force microscopy shows that the partial alignment is uniform over an area of 20 × 20 mm(2) and confirms that the orientation of the nanotubes is mostly along the fluid flow direction, with a narrow orientation scatter characterized by a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of <15° for all but the densest film, which is 35°. This parallel process is large-scale applicable and exploits the anisotropic properties of the SWNTs, presenting a viable path forward for industrial adoption of SWNTs in printed, flexible, and large-area electronics.

  12. Efficient Charge Extraction and Slow Recombination in Organic-Inorganic Perovskites Capped with Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ihly, Rachelle; Dowgiallo, Anne-Marie; Yang, Mengjin; Schulz, Philip; Stanton, Noah J.; Reid, Obadiah G.; Ferguson, Andrew J.; Zhu, Kai; Berry, Joseph J.; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.

    2016-04-01

    Metal-halide based perovskite solar cells have rapidly emerged as a promising alternative to traditional inorganic and thin-film photovoltaics. Although charge transport layers are used on either side of perovskite absorber layers to extract photogenerated electrons and holes, the time scales for charge extraction and recombination are poorly understood. Ideal charge transport layers should facilitate large discrepancies between charge extraction and recombination rates. Here, we demonstrate that highly enriched semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films enable rapid (sub-picosecond) hole extraction from a prototypical perovskite absorber layer and extremely slow back-transfer and recombination (hundreds of microseconds). The energetically narrow and distinct spectroscopic signatures for charges within these SWCNT thin films enables the unambiguous temporal tracking of each charge carrier with time-resolved spectroscopies covering many decades of time. The efficient hole extraction by the SWCNT layer also improves electron extraction by the compact titanium dioxide electron transport layer, which should reduce charge accumulation at each critical interface. Finally, we demonstrate that the use of thin interface layers of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes between the perovskite absorber layer and a prototypical hole transport layer improves device efficiency and stability, and reduces hysteresis.

  13. Modifying the electronic structure of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes by Ar{sup +} ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tolvanen, Antti; Buchs, Gilles; Ruffieux, Pascal; Groening, Pierangelo; Groening, Oliver; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

    2009-03-15

    Local controllable modification of the electronic structure of carbon nanomaterials is important for the development of carbon-based nanoelectronics. By combining density-functional theory simulations with Ar-ion-irradiation experiments and low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) characterization of the irradiated samples, we study the changes in the electronic structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes due to the impacts of energetic ions. As nearly all irradiation-induced defects look as nondistinctive hillocklike features in the STM images, we compare the experimentally measured STS spectra to the computed local density of states of the most typical defects with an aim to identify the type of defects and assess their abundance and effects on the local electronic structure. We show that individual irradiation-induced defects can give rise to single and multiple peaks in the band gap of the semiconducting nanotubes and that a similar effect can be achieved when several defects are close to each other. We further study the stability of defects and their evolution during STM measurements. Our results not only shed light on the abundance of the irradiation-induced defects in carbon nanotubes and their signatures in STS spectra but also suggest a way the STM can be used for engineering the local electronic structure of defected carbon nanotubes.

  14. A phenomenological model for selective growth of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes based on catalyst deactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Shunsuke; Yamada, Maho; Sakurai, Hiroko; Sekiguchi, Atsuko; Futaba, Don N.; Hata, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    A method for the selective semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) growth over a continuous range from 67% to 98%, within the diameter range of 0.8-1.2 nm, by the use of a ``catalyst conditioning process'' prior to growth is reported. Continuous control revealed an inverse relationship between the selectivity and the yield as evidenced by a 1000-times difference in yield between the highest selectivity and non-selectivity. Further, these results show that the selectivity is highly sensitive to the presence of a precise concentration of oxidative and reductive gases (i.e. water and hydrogen), and the highest selectivity occurred along the border between the conditions suitable for high yield and no-growth. Through these results, a phenomenological model has been constructed to explain the inverse relationship between yield and selectivity based on catalyst deactivation. We believe our model to be general, as the fundamental mechanisms limiting selective semiconducting SWCNT growth are common to the previous reports of limited yield.A method for the selective semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) growth over a continuous range from 67% to 98%, within the diameter range of 0.8-1.2 nm, by the use of a ``catalyst conditioning process'' prior to growth is reported. Continuous control revealed an inverse relationship between the selectivity and the yield as evidenced by a 1000-times difference in yield between the highest selectivity and non-selectivity. Further, these results show that the selectivity is highly sensitive to the presence of a precise concentration of oxidative and reductive gases (i.e. water and hydrogen), and the highest selectivity occurred along the border between the conditions suitable for high yield and no-growth. Through these results, a phenomenological model has been constructed to explain the inverse relationship between yield and selectivity based on catalyst deactivation. We believe our model to be general, as the

  15. Separation of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes for Flexible and Stretchable Electronics Using Polymer Removable Method.

    PubMed

    Lei, Ting; Pochorovski, Igor; Bao, Zhenan

    2017-04-18

    Electronics that are soft, conformal, and stretchable are highly desirable for wearable electronics, prosthetics, and robotics. Among the various available electronic materials, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and their network have exhibited high mechanical flexibility and stretchability, along with comparable electrical performance to traditional rigid materials, e.g. polysilicon and metal oxides. Unfortunately, SWNTs produced en masse contain a mixture of semiconducting (s-) and metallic (m-) SWNTs, rendering them unsuitable for electronic applications. Moreover, the poor solubility of SWNTs requires the introduction of insulating surfactants to properly disperse them into individual tubes for device fabrication. Compared to other SWNT dispersion and separation methods, e.g., DNA wrapping, density gradient ultracentrifugation, and gel chromatography, polymer wrapping can selectively disperse s-SWNTs with high selectivity (>99.7%), high concentration (>0.1 mg/mL), and high yield (>20%). In addition, this method only requires simple sonication and centrifuge equipment with short processing time down to 1 h. Despite these advantages, the polymer wrapping method still faces two major issues: (i) The purified s-SWNTs usually retain a substantial amount of polymers on their surface even after thorough rinsing. The low conductivity of the residual polymers impedes the charge transport in SWNT networks. (ii) Conjugated polymers used for SWNT wrapping are expensive. Their prices ($100-1000/g) are comparable or even higher than those of SWNTs ($10-300/g). These utilized conjugated polymers represent a large portion of the overall separation cost. In this Account, we summarize recent progresses in polymer design for selective dispersion and separation of SWNTs. We focus particularly on removable and/or recyclable polymers that enable low-cost and scalable separation methods. First, different separation methods are compared to show the advantages of the polymer

  16. Efficient separation of semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes by surfactant-composition gradient in gel filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thendie, Boanerges; Omachi, Haruka; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Shinohara, Hisanori

    2017-01-01

    Gel filtration is a powerful method of separating and purifying semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) from their metallic (m-) counterpart. However, a small amount of m-SWCNTs usually remains, thus reducing the purity of the s-SWCNTs obtained. We have investigated the effect of elution with a gradient concentration of the surfactant on the separation and purity of s-SWCNTs. By utilizing the controlled low-gradient elution (CLGE) that we have developed, the purity of s-SWCNTs is improved to 94% from the 90% obtained with the conventional separation. Furthermore, CLGE simultaneously allows diameter-based separation of small-diameter s-SWCNTs, which indicates a promising utilization of CLGE for s-SWCNT separation.

  17. High-quality, highly concentrated semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes for use in field effect transistors and biosensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Shan; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Liu, Chang; Sun, Dong-Ming; Yuan, Jiangtan; Zhao, Shi-Yong; Yin, Li-Chang; Cong, Hongtao; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2013-08-27

    We developed a simple and scalable selective synthesis method of high-quality, highly concentrated semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) by in situ hydrogen etching. Samples containing ~93% s-SWCNTs were obtained in bulk. These s-SWCNTs with good structural integrity showed a high oxidation resistance temperature of ~800 °C. Thin-film transistors based on the s-SWCNTs demonstrated a high carrier mobility of 21.1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at an on/off ratio of 1.1 × 10(4) and a high on/off ratio of 4.0 × 10(5) with a carrier mobility of 7.0 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). A biosensor fabricated using the s-SWCNTs had a very low dopamine detection limit of 10(-18) mol/L at room temperature.

  18. Large n- and p-type thermoelectric power factors from doped semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube thin films

    DOE PAGES

    MacLeod, Bradley A.; Stanton, Noah J.; Gould, Isaac E.; ...

    2017-09-08

    Lightweight, robust, and flexible single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) materials can be processed inexpensively using solution-based techniques, similar to other organic semiconductors. In contrast to many semiconducting polymers, semiconducting SWCNTs (s-SWCNTs) represent unique one-dimensional organic semiconductors with chemical and physical properties that facilitate equivalent transport of electrons and holes. These factors have driven increasing attention to employing s-SWCNTs for electronic and energy harvesting applications, including thermoelectric (TE) generators. Here we demonstrate a combination of ink chemistry, solid-state polymer removal, and charge-transfer doping strategies that enable unprecedented n-type and p-type TE power factors, in the range of 700 μW m–1 K–2 atmore » 298 K for the same solution-processed highly enriched thin films containing 100% s-SWCNTs. We also demonstrate that the thermal conductivity appears to decrease with decreasing s-SWCNT diameter, leading to a peak material zT ≈ 0.12 for s-SWCNTs with diameters in the range of 1.0 nm. Here, our results indicate that the TE performance of s-SWCNT-only material systems is approaching that of traditional inorganic semiconductors, paving the way for these materials to be used as the primary components for efficient, all-organic TE generators.« less

  19. Determination of the metallic/semiconducting ratio in bulk single-wall carbon nanotube samples by cobalt porphyrin probe electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cambré, Sofie; Wenseleers, Wim; Goovaerts, Etienne; Resasco, Daniel E

    2010-11-23

    A simple and quantitative, self-calibrating spectroscopic technique for the determination of the ratio of metallic to semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a bulk sample is presented. The technique is based on the measurement of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of the SWCNT sample to which cobalt(II)octaethylporphyrin (CoOEP) probe molecules have been added. This yields signals from both CoOEP molecules on metallic and on semiconducting tubes, which are easily distinguished and accurately characterized in this work. By applying this technique to a variety of SWCNT samples produced by different synthesis methods, it is shown that these signals for metallic and semiconducting tubes are independent of other factors such as tube length, defect density, and diameter, allowing the intensities of both signals for arbitrary samples to be retrieved by a straightforward least-squares regression. The technique is self-calibrating in that the EPR intensity can be directly related to the number of spins (number of CoOEP probe molecules), and as the adsorption of the CoOEP molecules is itself found to be unbiased toward metallic or semiconducting tubes, the measured intensities can be directly related to the mass percentage of metallic and semiconducting tubes in the bulk SWCNT sample. With the use of this method it was found that for some samples the metallic/semiconducting ratios strongly differed from the usual 1:2 ratio.

  20. Steiner minimal trees—the final destinations for lipid nanotube networks with three-way junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, YaJun; Wu, JiYe; Yin, Jie; Fan, QinShan

    2011-04-01

    Through the combination of the minimum energy principle in physics and the Steiner minimal tree (SMT) theory in geometry, this paper proves a universal law for lipid nanotube networks (LNNs): at stable equilibrium state, the network of three-way lipid nanotube junctions is equivalent to a SMT. Besides, an arbitrary (usually non-equilibrium) network of lipid nanotube junctions may fission into a SMT through diffusions and dynamic self-organizations of lipid molecules. Potential applications of the law to the micromanipulations of LNNs are presented.

  1. Realistic-contact-induced enhancement of rectifying in carbon-nanotube/graphene-nanoribbon junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiang-Hua; Li, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Ling-Ling Xu, Liang; Luo, Kai-Wu

    2014-03-10

    Carbon-nanotube/graphene-nanoribbon junctions were recently fabricated by the controllable etching of single-walled carbon-nanotubes [Wei et al., Nat. Commun. 4, 1374 (2013)] and their electronic transport properties were studied here. First principles results reveal that the transmission function of the junctions show a heavy dependence on the shape of contacts, but rectifying is an inherent property which is insensitive to the details of contacts. Interestingly, the rectifying ratio is largely enhanced in the junction with a realistic contact and the enhancement is insensitive to the details of contact structures. The stability of rectifying suggests a significant feasibility to manufacture realistic all-carbon rectifiers in nanoelectronics.

  2. Experimental and theoretical comparison of gas desorption energies on metallic and semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mandeltort, Lynn; Chen, De-Li; Saidi, Wissam A; Johnson, J Karl; Cole, Milton W; Yates, John T

    2013-05-22

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) exhibit high surface areas and precisely defined pores, making them potentially useful materials for gas adsorption and purification. A thorough understanding of the interactions between adsorbates and SWNTs is therefore critical to predicting adsorption isotherms and selectivities. Metallic (M-) and semiconducting (S-) SWNTs have extremely different polarizabilities that might be expected to significantly affect the adsorption energies of molecules. We experimentally and theoretically show that this expectation is contradicted, for both a long chain molecule (n-heptane) and atoms (Ar, Kr, and Xe). Temperature-programmed desorption experiments are combined with van der Waals corrected density functional theory, examining adsorption on interior and exterior sites of the SWNTs. Our calculations show a clear dependence of the adsorption energy on nanotube diameter but not on whether the tubes are conducting or insulating. We find no significant experimental or theoretical difference in adsorption energies for molecules adsorbed on M- and S-SWNTs having the same diameter. Hence, we conclude that the differences in polarizabilities between M- and S-SWNTs have a negligible influence on gas adsorption for spherical molecules as well as for highly anisotropic molecules such as n-heptane. We expect this conclusion to apply to all types of adsorbed molecules where van der Waals interactions govern the molecular interaction with the SWNT.

  3. Effect of Alignment on Transport Properties of Carbon Nanotube/Metallic Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Namkung, Min; Smits, Jan; Williams, Phillip; Harvey, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Ballistic and spin coherent transport in single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are predicted to enable high sensitivity single-nanotube devices for strain and magnetic field sensing. Based upon these phenomena, electron beam lithography procedures have been developed to study the transport properties of purified HiPCO single walled carbon nanotubes for development into sensory materials for nondestructive evaluation. Purified nanotubes are dispersed in solvent suspension and then deposited on the device substrate before metallic contacts are defined and deposited through electron beam lithography. This procedure produces randomly dispersed ropes, typically 2 - 20 nm in diameter, of single walled carbon nanotubes. Transport and scanning probe microscopy studies have shown a good correlation between the junction resistance and tube density, alignment, and contact quality. In order to improve transport properties of the junctions a technique has been developed to align and concentrate nanotubes at specific locations on the substrate surface. Lithographic techniques are used to define local areas where high frequency electric fields are to be concentrated. Application of the fields while the substrate is exposed to nanotube-containing solution results in nanotube arrays aligned with the electric field lines. A second electron beam lithography layer is then used to deposit metallic contacts across the aligned tubes. Experimental measurements are presented showing the increased tube alignment and improvement in the transport properties of the junctions.

  4. Metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotubes separation using an aqueous two-phase separation technique: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Malcolm S. Y.; Ng, Eng-Poh; Juan, Joon Ching; Ooi, Chien Wei; Ling, Tau Chuan; Woon, Kai Lin; Loke Show, Pau

    2016-08-01

    It is known that carbon nanotubes show desirable physical and chemical properties with a wide array of potential applications. Nonetheless, their potential has been hampered by the difficulties in acquiring high purity, chiral-specific tubes. Considerable advancement has been made in terms of the purification of carbon nanotubes, for instance chemical oxidation, physical separation, and myriad combinations of physical and chemical methods. The aqueous two-phase separation technique has recently been demonstrated to be able to sort carbon nanotubes based on their chirality. The technique requires low cost polymers and salt, and is able to sort the tubes based on their diameter as well as metallicity. In this review, we aim to provide a review that could stimulate innovative thought on the progress of a carbon nanotubes sorting method using the aqueous two-phase separation method, and present possible future work and an outlook that could enhance the methodology.

  5. Photoinduced spontaneous free-carrier generation in semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaehong; Reid, Obadiah G.; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Rumbles, Garry

    2015-01-01

    Strong quantum confinement and low dielectric screening impart single-walled carbon nanotubes with exciton-binding energies substantially exceeding kBT at room temperature. Despite these large binding energies, reported photoluminescence quantum yields are typically low and some studies suggest that photoexcitation of carbon nanotube excitonic transitions can produce free charge carriers. Here we report the direct measurement of long-lived free-carrier generation in chirality-pure, single-walled carbon nanotubes in a low dielectric solvent. Time-resolved microwave conductivity enables contactless and quantitative measurement of the real and imaginary photoconductance of individually suspended nanotubes. The conditions of the microwave conductivity measurement allow us to avoid the complications of most previous measurements of nanotube free-carrier generation, including tube–tube/tube–electrode contact, dielectric screening by nearby excitons and many-body interactions. Even at low photon fluence (approximately 0.05 excitons per μm length of tubes), we directly observe free carriers on excitation of the first and second carbon nanotube exciton transitions. PMID:26531728

  6. Photoinduced Spontaneous Free-Carrier Generation in Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    DOE PAGES

    Park, Jaehong; Reid, Obadiah G.; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; ...

    2015-11-04

    The strong quantum confinement and low dielectric screening impart single-walled carbon nanotubes with exciton-binding energies substantially exceeding kBT at room temperature. Despite these large binding energies, reported photoluminescence quantum yields are typically low and some studies suggest that photoexcitation of carbon nanotube excitonic transitions can produce free charge carriers. Here we report the direct measurement of long-lived free-carrier generation in chirality-pure, single-walled carbon nanotubes in a low dielectric solvent. Time-resolved microwave conductivity enables contactless and quantitative measurement of the real and imaginary photoconductance of individually suspended nanotubes. We found that the conditions of the microwave conductivity measurement allow us tomore » avoid the complications of most previous measurements of nanotube free-carrier generation, including tube–tube/tube–electrode contact, dielectric screening by nearby excitons and many-body interactions. At low photon fluence (approximately 0.05 excitons per μm length of tubes), we directly observe free carriers on excitation of the first and second carbon nanotube exciton transitions.« less

  7. Photoinduced spontaneous free-carrier generation in semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaehong; Reid, Obadiah G; Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Rumbles, Garry

    2015-11-04

    Strong quantum confinement and low dielectric screening impart single-walled carbon nanotubes with exciton-binding energies substantially exceeding kBT at room temperature. Despite these large binding energies, reported photoluminescence quantum yields are typically low and some studies suggest that photoexcitation of carbon nanotube excitonic transitions can produce free charge carriers. Here we report the direct measurement of long-lived free-carrier generation in chirality-pure, single-walled carbon nanotubes in a low dielectric solvent. Time-resolved microwave conductivity enables contactless and quantitative measurement of the real and imaginary photoconductance of individually suspended nanotubes. The conditions of the microwave conductivity measurement allow us to avoid the complications of most previous measurements of nanotube free-carrier generation, including tube-tube/tube-electrode contact, dielectric screening by nearby excitons and many-body interactions. Even at low photon fluence (approximately 0.05 excitons per μm length of tubes), we directly observe free carriers on excitation of the first and second carbon nanotube exciton transitions.

  8. Photoinduced Spontaneous Free-Carrier Generation in Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jaehong; Reid, Obadiah G.; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Rumbles, Garry

    2015-11-04

    The strong quantum confinement and low dielectric screening impart single-walled carbon nanotubes with exciton-binding energies substantially exceeding kBT at room temperature. Despite these large binding energies, reported photoluminescence quantum yields are typically low and some studies suggest that photoexcitation of carbon nanotube excitonic transitions can produce free charge carriers. Here we report the direct measurement of long-lived free-carrier generation in chirality-pure, single-walled carbon nanotubes in a low dielectric solvent. Time-resolved microwave conductivity enables contactless and quantitative measurement of the real and imaginary photoconductance of individually suspended nanotubes. We found that the conditions of the microwave conductivity measurement allow us to avoid the complications of most previous measurements of nanotube free-carrier generation, including tube–tube/tube–electrode contact, dielectric screening by nearby excitons and many-body interactions. At low photon fluence (approximately 0.05 excitons per μm length of tubes), we directly observe free carriers on excitation of the first and second carbon nanotube exciton transitions.

  9. Enhancement of interfacial thermal transport by carbon nanotube-graphene junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Hua; Shao, Cheng; Luo, Shirui; Hu, Ming

    2014-02-01

    Due to the high intrinsic thermal conductivity, carbon nanotubes are very promising to serve as effective thermal interface materials for microelectronics or other cooling applications. However, the performance of carbon nanotube based thermal interface material is strongly limited by the small effective contact area and weak bonding at carbon nanotube and material interface. Here, we propose a junction structure that the carbon nanotube is bonded with a monolayer graphene, which could potentially enhance the interface thermal conductance. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the interface thermal conductance can be enhanced by at least 40% compared to direct carbon nanotube and silicon interface with strong covalent bonding, while for weak van der Waals bonding the conductance can be enhanced by almost one order of magnitude. The enhancement of thermal conductance is attributed to the efficient thermal transport between carbon nanotube and graphene, as well as the good contact between graphene and silicon surface.

  10. CoPt/CeO2 catalysts for the growth of narrow diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lei; Li, Taotao; Li, Chaowei; Ling, Lin; Zhang, Kai; Yao, Yagang

    2015-11-01

    For the application of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in nanoelectronic devices, effective techniques for the growth of semiconducting SWNTs (s-SWNTs) with a specific diameter are still a great challenge. Herein, we report a facile strategy for the selective growth of narrow diameter distributed s-SWNTs using CoPt/CeO2 catalysts. The addition of Pt into a Co catalyst dramatically reduces the diameter distributions and even the chirality distributions of the as-grown SWNTs. Oxygen vacancies that are provided by mesoporous CeO2 are responsible for creating an oxidative environment to in situ etch metallic SWNTs (m-SWNTs). Atomic force microscope (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy characterizations indicate a narrow diameter distribution of 1.32 +/- 0.03 nm and the selective growth of s-SWNTs to 93%, respectively. In addition, electronic transport measurements also confirm that the Ion/Ioff ratio is mainly in the order of ~103. This work provides an effective strategy for the facile fabrication of narrow diameter distributed s-SWNTs, which will be beneficial to fundamental research and the broad application of SWNTs for future nanoelectronics.For the application of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in nanoelectronic devices, effective techniques for the growth of semiconducting SWNTs (s-SWNTs) with a specific diameter are still a great challenge. Herein, we report a facile strategy for the selective growth of narrow diameter distributed s-SWNTs using CoPt/CeO2 catalysts. The addition of Pt into a Co catalyst dramatically reduces the diameter distributions and even the chirality distributions of the as-grown SWNTs. Oxygen vacancies that are provided by mesoporous CeO2 are responsible for creating an oxidative environment to in situ etch metallic SWNTs (m-SWNTs). Atomic force microscope (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy characterizations indicate a narrow diameter distribution of 1.32 +/- 0.03 nm and the selective growth of s-SWNTs to 93%, respectively. In addition

  11. A rational design for the separation of metallic and semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes using a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chengzhi; Wan, Da; Jia, Junji; Li, Delong; Pan, Chunxu; Liao, Lei

    2016-06-01

    The separation of metallic (m-) and semiconducting (s-) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) without causing contamination and damage is a major challenge for SWNT-based devices. As a facile and nondestructive tool, the use of a magnetic field could be an ideal strategy to separate m-/s-SWNTs, based on the difference of magnetic susceptibilities. Here, we designed a novel magnetic field-assisted floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition system to separate m-/s-SWNTs. Briefly, m-SWNTs are attracted toward the magnetic pole, leaving s-SWNTs on the substrate. By using this strategy, s-SWNTs with a purity of 99% could be obtained, which is enough to construct high-performance transistors with a mobility of 230 cm2 V-1 s-1 and an on/off ratio of 106. We also established a model to quantitatively calculate the percentage of m-SWNTs on the substrate and this model shows a good match with the experimental data. Furthermore, our rational design also provides a new avenue for the growth of SWNTs with specific chirality and manipulated arrangement due to the difference of magnetic susceptibilities between different diameters, chiralities, and types.The separation of metallic (m-) and semiconducting (s-) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) without causing contamination and damage is a major challenge for SWNT-based devices. As a facile and nondestructive tool, the use of a magnetic field could be an ideal strategy to separate m-/s-SWNTs, based on the difference of magnetic susceptibilities. Here, we designed a novel magnetic field-assisted floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition system to separate m-/s-SWNTs. Briefly, m-SWNTs are attracted toward the magnetic pole, leaving s-SWNTs on the substrate. By using this strategy, s-SWNTs with a purity of 99% could be obtained, which is enough to construct high-performance transistors with a mobility of 230 cm2 V-1 s-1 and an on/off ratio of 106. We also established a model to quantitatively calculate the percentage of m

  12. Sorting of large-diameter semiconducting carbon nanotube and printed flexible driving circuit for organic light emitting diode (OLED)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenya; Zhao, Jianwen; Qian, Long; Han, Xianying; Wu, Liangzhuan; Wu, Weichen; Song, Minshun; Zhou, Lu; Su, Wenming; Wang, Chao; Nie, Shuhong; Cui, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    A novel approach was developed to sort a large-diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (sc-SWCNT) based on copolyfluorene derivative with high yield. High purity sc-SWCNTs inks were obtained by wrapping arc-discharge SWCNTs with poly[2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)-alt-4,7-bis(thiophen-2-yl)benzo-2,1,3-thiadiazole] (PFO-DBT) aided by sonication and centrifugation in tetrahydrofuran (THF). The sorted sc-SWCNT inks and nanosilver inks were used to print top-gated thin-film transistors (TFTs) on flexible substrates with an aerosol jet printer. The printed TFTs demonstrated low operating voltage, small hysteresis, high on-state current (up to 10-3 A), high mobility and on-off ratio. An organic light emitting diode (OLED) driving circuit was constructed based on the printed TFTs, which exhibited high on-off ratio up to 104 and output current up to 3.5 × 10-4 A at Vscan = -4.5 V and Vdd = 0.8 V. A single OLED was switched on with the driving circuit, showing the potential as backplanes for active matrix OLED applications.A novel approach was developed to sort a large-diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (sc-SWCNT) based on copolyfluorene derivative with high yield. High purity sc-SWCNTs inks were obtained by wrapping arc-discharge SWCNTs with poly[2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)-alt-4,7-bis(thiophen-2-yl)benzo-2,1,3-thiadiazole] (PFO-DBT) aided by sonication and centrifugation in tetrahydrofuran (THF). The sorted sc-SWCNT inks and nanosilver inks were used to print top-gated thin-film transistors (TFTs) on flexible substrates with an aerosol jet printer. The printed TFTs demonstrated low operating voltage, small hysteresis, high on-state current (up to 10-3 A), high mobility and on-off ratio. An organic light emitting diode (OLED) driving circuit was constructed based on the printed TFTs, which exhibited high on-off ratio up to 104 and output current up to 3.5 × 10-4 A at Vscan = -4.5 V and Vdd = 0.8 V. A single OLED was switched on with the driving

  13. Giant Thermal Rectification from Single-Carbon Nanotube-Graphene Junction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xueming; Yu, Dapeng; Cao, Bingyang

    2017-07-19

    We describe the influence of the geometry parameters on the thermal rectification of single-carbon nanotube-graphene junction. The two-dimensional (2D) distribution of the thermal rectification with respect to the tube length and the side length of the graphene nanosheet are calculated and visualized. The maximum thermal rectification ratios of the designed single-carbon nanotube-graphene junction can reach 1244.1% and 1681.6% at average temperatures of 300 and 200 K, respectively. These values are much higher than those reported for single-material nanostructure-based thermal rectifiers. The thermal rectification ratios of the nanotube-graphene junction are fairly sensitive to geometry size and are almost entirely dominated by the degree of overlap of the power spectra under negative thermal bias. These findings could offer useful guidelines for the design and performance improvement of thermal diodes.

  14. Band Structures of Periodic Carbon Nanotube Junctions and Their Symmetries Analyzed by the Effective Mass Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Ryo; Tsukada, Masaru

    1999-03-01

    The band structures of the periodic nanotube junctions are investigated by the effective mass theory and the tight binding model. The periodic junctions are constructed by introducing pairs of a pentagonal defect and a heptagonal defect periodically in the carbon nanotube. We treat the periodic junctions composed by two kinds of metallic nanotubes with almost same radii, the ratio of which is between 0.7 and 1. The discussed energy region is near the undoped Fermi level. The energy bands are expressed with closed analytical forms by the effective mass theory. They are similar to the dispersion relation of Kronig-Penny model and coincide well with the numerical results by the tight binding model. The width of the gap and the band are in inverse proportion to the length of the unit cell. The degeneracy and repulsion between the two bands are determined only from symmetries.

  15. Photoluminescence Imaging of Polyfluorene Surface Structures on Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes: Implications for Thin Film Exciton Transport.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Nicolai F; Pramanik, Rajib; Dowgiallo, Anne-Marie; Ihly, Rachelle; Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Doorn, Stephen K

    2016-12-27

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have potential to act as light-harvesting elements in thin film photovoltaic devices, but performance is in part limited by the efficiency of exciton diffusion processes within the films. Factors contributing to exciton transport can include film morphology encompassing nanotube orientation, connectivity, and interaction geometry. Such factors are often defined by nanotube surface structures that are not yet well understood. Here, we present the results of a combined pump-probe and photoluminescence imaging study of polyfluorene (PFO)-wrapped (6,5) and (7,5) SWCNTs that provide additional insight into the role played by polymer structures in defining exciton transport. Pump-probe measurements suggest exciton transport occurs over larger length scales in films composed of PFO-wrapped (7,5) SWCNTs, compared to those prepared from PFO-bpy-wrapped (6,5) SWCNTs. To explore the role the difference in polymer structure may play as a possible origin of differing transport behaviors, we performed a photoluminescence imaging study of individual polymer-wrapped (6,5) and (7,5) SWCNTs. The PFO-bpy-wrapped (6,5) SWCNTs showed more uniform intensity distributions along their lengths, in contrast to the PFO-wrapped (7,5) SWCNTs, which showed irregular, discontinuous intensity distributions. These differences likely originate from differences in surface coverage and suggest the PFO wrapping on (7,5) nanotubes produces a more open surface structure than is available with the PFO-bpy wrapping of (6,5) nanotubes. The open structure likely leads to improved intertube coupling that enhances exciton transport within the (7,5) films, consistent with the results of our pump-probe measurements.

  16. Photoluminescence Imaging of Polyfluorene Surface Structures on Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes: Implications for Thin Film Exciton Transport

    DOE PAGES

    Hartmann, Nicolai F.; Pramanik, Rajib; Dowgiallo, Anne-Marie; ...

    2016-12-27

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have potential to act as light-harvesting elements in thin film photovoltaic devices, but performance is in part limited by the efficiency of exciton diffusion processes within the films. Factors contributing to exciton transport can include film morphology encompassing nanotube orientation, connectivity, and interaction geometry. Such factors are often defined by nanotube surface structures that are not yet well understood. Here, we present the results of a combined pump-probe and photoluminescence imaging study of polyfluorene (PFO)-wrapped (6,5) and (7,5) SWCNTs that provide additional insight into the role played by polymer structures in defining exciton transport. Pump-probe measurementsmore » suggest exciton transport occurs over larger length scales in films composed of PFO-wrapped (7,5) SWCNTs, compared to those prepared from PFO-bpy-wrapped (6,5) SWCNTs. To explore the role the difference in polymer structure may play as a possible origin of differing transport behaviors, we performed a photoluminescence imaging study of individual polymer-wrapped (6,5) and (7,5) SWCNTs. The PFO-bpy-wrapped (6,5) SWCNTs showed more uniform intensity distributions along their lengths, in contrast to the PFO-wrapped (7,5) SWCNTs, which showed irregular, discontinuous intensity distributions. These differences likely originate from differences in surface coverage and suggest the PFO wrapping on (7,5) nanotubes produces a more open surface structure than is available with the PFO-bpy wrapping of (6,5) nanotubes. The open structure likely leads to improved intertube coupling that enhances exciton transport within the (7,5) films, consistent with the results of our pump-probe measurements.« less

  17. Photoluminescence Imaging of Polyfluorene Surface Structures on Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes: Implications for Thin Film Exciton Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, Nicolai F.; Pramanik, Rajib; Dowgiallo, Anne-Marie; Ihly, Rachelle; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Doorn, Stephen K.

    2016-12-27

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have potential to act as light-harvesting elements in thin film photovoltaic devices, but performance is in part limited by the efficiency of exciton diffusion processes within the films. Factors contributing to exciton transport can include film morphology encompassing nanotube orientation, connectivity, and interaction geometry. Such factors are often defined by nanotube surface structures that are not yet well understood. Here, we present the results of a combined pump-probe and photoluminescence imaging study of polyfluorene (PFO)-wrapped (6,5) and (7,5) SWCNTs that provide additional insight into the role played by polymer structures in defining exciton transport. Pump-probe measurements suggest exciton transport occurs over larger length scales in films composed of PFO-wrapped (7,5) SWCNTs, compared to those prepared from PFO-bpy-wrapped (6,5) SWCNTs. To explore the role the difference in polymer structure may play as a possible origin of differing transport behaviors, we performed a photoluminescence imaging study of individual polymer-wrapped (6,5) and (7,5) SWCNTs. The PFO-bpy-wrapped (6,5) SWCNTs showed more uniform intensity distributions along their lengths, in contrast to the PFO-wrapped (7,5) SWCNTs, which showed irregular, discontinuous intensity distributions. These differences likely originate from differences in surface coverage and suggest the PFO wrapping on (7,5) nanotubes produces a more open surface structure than is available with the PFO-bpy wrapping of (6,5) nanotubes. The open structure likely leads to improved intertube coupling that enhances exciton transport within the (7,5) films, consistent with the results of our pump-probe measurements.

  18. Intra- and inter-tube exciton relaxation dynamics in high purity semiconducting and metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichida, Masao; Saito, Shingo; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Kataura, Hiromichi; Ando, Hiroaki

    2013-02-01

    We have measured the exciton and carrier dynamics in the high purity semiconducting (S-) and metallic (M-) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in the isolated and aggregated (bundled) forms. The exciton relaxation decay times are measured by using the pump-probe spectroscopy. For bundled samples, the relaxation time becomes shorter than that for isolated SWNTs sample, because of the existence of inter-tube relaxation. We estimate the relaxation rates from S-SWNT to S-SWNT and S-SWNT to M-SWNT using the decay times for isolated SWNTs, high purity S-SWNTs bundle, and doped S-SWNTs in high purity M-SWNTs bundle. For S-SWNTs, inter-tube relaxation plays an important role in the relaxation dynamics. However, for M-SWNTs, the inter-tube relaxation is not so important, and the transition energy and intensity of exciton in M-SWNTs is strongly affected by the photoexcited carriers which plays like as photo doping.

  19. Discriminating between Metallic and Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using Physisorbed Adsorbates: Role of Wavelike Charge-Density Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wang; Chen, Yun; Jiang, Qing

    2016-12-01

    Discriminating between metallic (M ) and semiconducting (S ) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) remains a fundamental challenge in the field of nanotechnology. We address this issue by studying the adsorption of the isotropic atoms Xe, Kr, and a highly anisotropic molecule n heptane on M - and S -SWNTs with density functional theory that includes many-body dispersion forces. We find that the distinct polarizabilities of M - and S -SWNTs exhibit significantly different physisorption properties, which are also strongly controlled by the SWNT's diameter, adsorption site, adsorbate coverage, and the adsorbate's anisotropy. These findings stem from the wavelike nature of charge-density fluctuations in SWNTs. Particularly, these results allow us to rationalize the unusual √{3 }×√{3 }R 3 00 phase of Kr atoms on small gap M -SWNTs and the double desorption peak temperatures of n heptane on M -SWNTs in experiments, and also propose the n heptane as an effective sensor for experimentally discriminating M - and S -SWNTs.

  20. Tuning the electronic structures of semiconducting SiC nanotubes by N and NHx (x =1,2) groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tao; Zhao, Mingwen; Xia, Yueyuan; Li, Weifeng; Song, Chen; Lin, Xiaohang; Liu, Xiangdong; Mei, Liangmo

    2006-11-01

    We investigate the stable configurations and electronic structures of silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) decorated by N and NHx (x =1,2) groups by using first-principles calculations. We find that these groups can be chemically incorporated into the network of SiCNTs in different ways, accompanied with the formation of N-C and N-Si bonds. The adsorbing energy of N and NHx (x =1,2) groups on (5,5) and (8,0) SiCNTs ranges from -1.82to-7.19eV. The electronic structures of SiCNTs can be effectively modified by these groups and display diverse characters ranging from semiconducting to semimetallic, depending on the chirality of SiCNTs as well as the way of the incorporation of these functional groups. The relationship between the electronic structures and the configurations of these functionalized SiCNTs is also addressed by performing projected density of states combined with Milliken population analysis. These results are expected to open a way to tune the electronic structures of SiCNTs which may have promising applications in building nanodevices.

  1. Selective dispersion of large-diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes with pyridine-containing copolymers.

    PubMed

    Berton, Nicolas; Lemasson, Fabien; Poschlad, Angela; Meded, Velimir; Tristram, Frank; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Hennrich, Frank; Kappes, Manfred M; Mayor, Marcel

    2014-01-29

    The purity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is a key parameter for their integration in electronic, optoelectronic and photonic devices. Samples of pristine SWNTs are inhomogeneous in terms of electric behavior and diameter and contain a variety of amorphous carbon and catalyst residues. To obtain high performance devices, purification of SWNTs is required. Conjugated polymers have emerged as efficient solubilizing and sorting agents for small diameter SWNTs (HiPco tubes, 0.7 nm<Ø<1.1 nm). Nevertheless, reports on polymers able to efficiently sort large diameter SWNTs with Ø>1.1 nm are lacking. Several pyridine-containing copolymers were synthesized for this purpose and showed efficient and selective extraction of semiconducting large diameter SWNTs (PLV tubes, Ø>1.1 nm). High concentration and high purity suspensions are obtained without the use of ultracentrifugation, which gives an up-scaling potential of the method. The emission wavelength is in near infrared region around 1550 nm and fits with broadly used telecommunication wavelength window. The processes taking place at the interface were simulated by a newly designed hybrid coarse-grain model combining density functional theory and geometrical calculation to yield insights into the wrapping processes with an unprecedented level of details for such large diameter SWNTs. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Selective Dispersion of Highly Pure Large-Diameter Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes by a Flavin for Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Park, Minsuk; Kim, Somin; Kwon, Hyeokjae; Hong, Sukhyun; Im, Seongil; Ju, Sang-Yong

    2016-09-07

    Scalable and simple methods for selective extraction of pure, semiconducting (s) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is of profound importance for electronic and photovoltaic applications. We report a new, one-step procedure to obtain respective large-diameter s- and metallic (m)-SWNT enrichment purity in excess of 99% and 78%, respectively, via interaction between the aromatic dispersing agent and SWNTs. The approach utilizes N-dodecyl isoalloxazine (FC12) as a surfactant in conjunction with sonication and benchtop centrifugation methods. After centrifugation, the supernatant is enriched in s-SWNTs with less carbonaceous impurities, whereas precipitate is enhanced in m-SWNTs. In addition, the use of an increased centrifugal force enhances both the purity and population of larger diameter s-SWNTs. Photoinduced energy transfer from FC12 to SWNTs is facilitated by respective electronic level alignment. Owing to its peculiar photoreduction capability, FC12 can be employed to precipitate SWNTs upon UV irradiation and observe absorption of higher optical transitions of SWNTs. A thin-film transistor prepared from a dispersion of enriched s-SWNTs was fabricated to verify electrical performance of the sorted sample and was observed to display p-type conductance with an average on/off ratio over 10(6) and an average mobility over 10 cm(2)/V·s.

  3. Sorting of large-diameter semiconducting carbon nanotube and printed flexible driving circuit for organic light emitting diode (OLED).

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenya; Zhao, Jianwen; Qian, Long; Han, Xianying; Wu, Liangzhuan; Wu, Weichen; Song, Minshun; Zhou, Lu; Su, Wenming; Wang, Chao; Nie, Shuhong; Cui, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    A novel approach was developed to sort a large-diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (sc-SWCNT) based on copolyfluorene derivative with high yield. High purity sc-SWCNTs inks were obtained by wrapping arc-discharge SWCNTs with poly[2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)-alt-4,7-bis(thiophen-2-yl)benzo-2,1,3-thiadiazole] (PFO-DBT) aided by sonication and centrifugation in tetrahydrofuran (THF). The sorted sc-SWCNT inks and nanosilver inks were used to print top-gated thin-film transistors (TFTs) on flexible substrates with an aerosol jet printer. The printed TFTs demonstrated low operating voltage, small hysteresis, high on-state current (up to 10(-3) A), high mobility and on-off ratio. An organic light emitting diode (OLED) driving circuit was constructed based on the printed TFTs, which exhibited high on-off ratio up to 10(4) and output current up to 3.5 × 10(-4) A at V(scan) = -4.5 V and Vdd = 0.8 V. A single OLED was switched on with the driving circuit, showing the potential as backplanes for active matrix OLED applications.

  4. Accessing the Dark Exciton States in Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Terahertz Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Liang; Chatzakis, Ioannis; Wang, Jigang; Wang Team, Dr

    2014-03-01

    Singled-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) represent a model system to systematically investigate correlated charge excitation in 1-D limits. One of the most outstanding issues both in fundamental nanotube physics and for their technological development is to detect and understand optically-forbidden, dark collective states. Thus far supporting evidence of dark states has been demonstrated in static magneto-optics and light scattering. However, the unique internal transitions from dark excitonic ground states and their dynamic evolution remain highly elusive. We report our investigation of this problem using optical pump, terahertz probe spectroscopy of (6,5) and (7,5) SWNTs. We measure transient THz conductivity from 0.5-2.5 THz (2-10.5 meV) at low temperature down to 5 K with resonant and off-resonant excitation at the E22 transitions of (6,5) and (7,5) nanotubes. These results reveal, for the first time, dynamics of lowest dark excitons and density-dependent renormalization of these many-particle states. The internal-excitonic spectroscopy with THz pulses represents a fundamentally new spectroscopy tools to study dark excitons and shine new lights on the correlation physics of excitonic ground states.

  5. Carrier photogeneration, drift and recombination in a semiconducting carbon nanotube network.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, A; Bertašius, V; Jašinskas, V; Namal, I; Hertel, T; Gulbinas, V

    2017-08-31

    Charge carrier photogeneration, drift and recombination in thin film networks of polymer-wrapped (6,5)-single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) blended with phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) have been investigated by using transient photocurrent and time-delayed collection field (TDCF) techniques. Three distinct transient photocurrent components on the nano- and microsecond timescales have been identified. We attribute the dominant (>50% of total extracted charge) ultrashort photocurrent component with a decay time below our experimental time-resolution of 2 ns to the intratube hole motion. The second component on the few microsecond timescale is attributed to the intertube hole transfer, while the slowest component is assigned to the electron drift within the PCBM phase. The hole drift distance appears to be limited by gaps in the nanotube percolation network rather than by hole trapping or recombination. Photocurrent saturation was observed when excitation densities reached more than one charge pair per nanotube; we attribute this to the local electric field screening.

  6. High field magneto-optical spectroscopy of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaver, Jonah

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) present an ideal system for study of one dimensional physics. Classically speaking, their long persistence lengths, i.e. the length over which they do not bend, result in rigid-rod-like behavior in the solution-phase. Quantum mechanically speaking, extreme confinement in the radial direction result in interesting properties for optically excited correlated electron-hole pairs, or excitons. In addition, their hollow crystalline structure presents a controllable way to modify the circumferential boundary conditions on their electronic wavefunctions resulting in changes to the electronic band structure via threading a magnetic field through the diameter. An applied magnetic field also aligns SWNTs due to their magnetic susceptibility anisotropy. We have measured the dynamic alignment properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) suspensions in pulsed high magnetic fields through linear dichroism spectroscopy. Millisecond-duration pulsed high magnetic fields up to 55 T as well as microsecond-duration pulsed ultrahigh magnetic fields up to 166 T were used. Due to their anisotropic magnetic properties, SWNTs align in an applied magnetic field, and due to their anisotropic optical properties, aligned SWNTs show linear dichroism. The characteristics of their overall alignment depend on several factors, including the viscosity and temperature of the suspending solvent, the degree of anisotropy of nanotube magnetic susceptibilities, the nanotube length distribution, the degree of nanotube bundling, and the strength and duration of the applied magnetic field. In order to explain our data, we have developed a theoretical model based on the time-dependent Smoluchowski equation for rigid rods that accurately reproduces the salient features of the experimental data. We have also investigated excitons in SWNTs in stretch aligned polyacrylic acid films, direction of stretch (n̂), through optical spectroscopy at low temperature (1.5 K

  7. Structural and dynamical properties of the junction between a single carbon nanotube and a graphene nanoribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Masatoshi; Mochiji, Kozo; Moritani, Kousuke; Inui, Norio

    2014-04-01

    Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, we consider the stable structure of a partially unzipped carbon nanotube, in which a graphene nanoribbon is formed at the tip. We characterize the shape of the junction between a single carbon nanotube and a graphene nanoribbon using three parameters: the radius of curvature, bend, and twist-rotation. The increase in the radius of curvature is proportional to the square of the distance from the boundary between the carbon nanotube and the graphene nanoribbon, and this can be explained by using continuous mechanics for a thin plate. The oscillations of the graphene nanoribbon at room temperature are also taken into consideration.

  8. A Comprehensive Numerical Investigation on the Mechanical Properties of Hetero-Junction Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ghavamian; Andreas, Öchsner

    2015-08-01

    A set of forty-three hetero-junction CNTs, made of forty-four homogeneous carbon nanotubes of different chiralities and configurations with all possible hetero-connection types, were numerically simulated, based on the finite element method in a commercial finite element software and their Young's and shear moduli, and critical buckling loads were obtained and evaluated under the tensile, torsional and buckling loads with an assumption of linear elastic deformation and also compared with each other. The comparison of the linear elastic behavior of hetero-junction CNTs and their corresponding fundamental tubes revealed that the size, type of the connection, and the bending angle in the structure of hetero-junction CNTs considerably influences the mechanical properties of these hetero-structures. It was also discovered that the Stone-Wales defect leads to lower elastic and torsional strength of hetero-junction CNTs when compared to homogeneous CNTs. However, the buckling strength of the hetero-junction CNTs was found to lie in the range of the buckling strength of their corresponding fundamental tubes. It was also determined that the shear modulus of hetero-junction carbon nanotubes generally tends to be closer to the shear modulus of their wider fundamental tubes while critical buckling loads of these heterostructures seem to be closer to critical buckling loads of their thinner fundamental tubes. The evaluation of the elastic properties of hetero-junction carbon nanotubes showed that among the hetero-junction models, those with armchair-armchair and zigzag-zigzag kinks have the highest elastic modulus while the models with armchair-zigzag connections show the lowest elastic stiffness. The results from torsion tests also revealed the fact that zigzag-zigzag and armchair-zigzag hetero-junction carbon nanotubes have the highest and the lowest shear modulus, respectively. Finally, it was observed that the highest critical buckling loads belong to armchair

  9. Electron scattering in a multiwall carbon nanotube bend junction studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapasztó, L.; Nemes-Incze, P.; Osváth, Z.; Darabont, Al.; Lambin, Ph.; Biró, L. P.

    2006-12-01

    The atomic resolution scanning tunneling microscopy investigation of a multiwall carbon nanotube bend junction is reported. Atomic resolution images taken at the junction region revealed position-dependent modulation of the electronic density of states, with a period larger than but commensurate to the underlying atomic lattice, attributed to the scattering of electrons on defect sites present in the junction region. We propose an interference model, suitable to interpret the experimentally observed electron density patterns by considering electronic states near the bands crossing points involved in the scattering processes. The model predicts that complex charge density oscillations present near defects are tunable by varying the applied bias potential.

  10. Thermal conductance of the junction between single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lin; McGaughey, Alan J. H.

    2014-11-01

    The thermal conductances of the carbon nanotube (CNT) junctions that would be found in a CNT aerogel are predicted using molecular dynamics simulations. At a temperature of 300 K, the thermal conductance of a perpendicular junction converges to 40 pW/K as the CNT lengths approach 100 nm. The key geometric parameter affecting the thermal conductance is the angle formed by the two CNTs. At pressures above 1 bar, the presence of a surrounding gas leads to an effective increase in the junction thermal conductance by providing a parallel path for energy flow.

  11. Predicting excitonic gaps of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from a field theoretic analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Konik, Robert M.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Misewich, James A.

    2015-02-17

    We demonstrate that a non-perturbative framework for the treatment of the excitations of single walled carbon nanotubes based upon a field theoretic reduction is able to accurately describe experiment observations of the absolute values of excitonic energies. This theoretical framework yields a simple scaling function from which the excitonic energies can be read off. This scaling function is primarily determined by a single parameter, the charge Luttinger parameter of the tube, which is in turn a function of the tube chirality, dielectric environment, and the tube's dimensions, thus expressing disparate influences on the excitonic energies in a unified fashion. Asmore » a result, we test this theory explicitly on the data reported in [NanoLetters 5, 2314 (2005)] and [Phys. Rev. B 82, 195424 (2010)] and so demonstrate the method works over a wide range of reported excitonic spectra.« less

  12. Interaction of Nucleobases with Semiconducting Nanotubes and Nanocages: Does the Solvent Matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhoufei; Slough, William; He, Haiying; Pandey, Ravindra; Karna, Shashi

    2013-03-01

    The tremendous advancement in nanotechnology has brought great promise in the area of bio-applications. Nanoscale materials and structures have attracted a lot of interest for their potential applications in biosensing, biorecognition, luminescent probes for DNA, biomedical labeling, drug delivery etc. Gaining fundamental understanding of the interaction of bio-systems with nanomaterials is critical in putting all these applications into full play. Despite the fact that most of these interactions appear in aqueous environment, the solvent effect has often been neglected in previous computational studies. In this talk, we will report our comparison study of nucleobases interacting with BN nanotubes and chalcogenide nanocages with/without considering the aqueous solution, based on first-principles calculations. The results reveal a significant effect from the water solution, which may largely reduce the interaction energy due to the polarization of the dielectric solvent medium.

  13. Predicting excitonic gaps of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from a field theoretic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Konik, Robert M.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Misewich, James A.

    2015-02-17

    We demonstrate that a non-perturbative framework for the treatment of the excitations of single walled carbon nanotubes based upon a field theoretic reduction is able to accurately describe experiment observations of the absolute values of excitonic energies. This theoretical framework yields a simple scaling function from which the excitonic energies can be read off. This scaling function is primarily determined by a single parameter, the charge Luttinger parameter of the tube, which is in turn a function of the tube chirality, dielectric environment, and the tube's dimensions, thus expressing disparate influences on the excitonic energies in a unified fashion. As a result, we test this theory explicitly on the data reported in [NanoLetters 5, 2314 (2005)] and [Phys. Rev. B 82, 195424 (2010)] and so demonstrate the method works over a wide range of reported excitonic spectra.

  14. Predicting excitonic gaps of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from a field theoretic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konik, Robert M.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Misewich, James A.

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate that a nonperturbative framework for the treatment of the excitations of single-walled carbon nanotubes based upon a field theoretic reduction is able to accurately describe experiment observations of the absolute values of excitonic energies. This theoretical framework yields a simple scaling function from which the excitonic energies can be read off. This scaling function is primarily determined by a single parameter, the charge Luttinger parameter of the tube, which is in turn a function of the tube chirality, dielectric environment, and the tube's dimensions, thus expressing disparate influences on the excitonic energies in a unified fashion. We test this theory explicitly on the data reported by Dukovic et al. [Nano Lett. 5, 2314 (2005), 10.1021/nl0518122] and Sfeir et al. [Phys. Rev. B 82, 195424 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.82.195424] and so demonstrate the method works over a wide range of reported excitonic spectra.

  15. Charge transport in vertically aligned, self-assembled peptide nanotube junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizrahi, Mordechay; Zakrassov, Alexander; Lerner-Yardeni, Jenny; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2012-01-01

    The self-assembly propensity of peptides has been extensively utilized in recent years for the formation of supramolecular nanostructures. In particular, the self-assembly of peptides into fibrils and nanotubes makes them promising building blocks for electronic and electro-optic applications. However, the mechanisms of charge transfer in these wire-like structures, especially in ambient conditions, are not yet fully understood. We describe here a layer-by-layer deposition methodology of short self-assembled cyclic peptide nanotubes, which results in vertically oriented nanotubes on gold substrates. Using this novel deposition methodology, we have fabricated molecular junctions with a conductive atomic force microscopy tip as a second electrode. Studies of the junctions' current-voltage characteristics as a function of the nanotube length revealed an efficient charge transfer in these supramolecular structures, with a low current attenuation constant of 0.1 Å-1, which indicate that electron transfer is dominated by hopping. Moreover, the threshold voltage to field-emission dominated transport was found to increase with peptide length in a manner that depends on the nature of the contact with the electrodes. The flexibility in the design of the peptide monomers and the ability to control their sequential order over the nanotube by means of the layer-by-layer assembly process, which is demonstrated in this work, can be used to engineer the electronic properties of self-assembled peptide nanotubes toward device applications.

  16. Charge transport in vertically aligned, self-assembled peptide nanotube junctions.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, Mordechay; Zakrassov, Alexander; Lerner-Yardeni, Jenny; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2012-01-21

    The self-assembly propensity of peptides has been extensively utilized in recent years for the formation of supramolecular nanostructures. In particular, the self-assembly of peptides into fibrils and nanotubes makes them promising building blocks for electronic and electro-optic applications. However, the mechanisms of charge transfer in these wire-like structures, especially in ambient conditions, are not yet fully understood. We describe here a layer-by-layer deposition methodology of short self-assembled cyclic peptide nanotubes, which results in vertically oriented nanotubes on gold substrates. Using this novel deposition methodology, we have fabricated molecular junctions with a conductive atomic force microscopy tip as a second electrode. Studies of the junctions' current-voltage characteristics as a function of the nanotube length revealed an efficient charge transfer in these supramolecular structures, with a low current attenuation constant of 0.1 Å(-1), which indicate that electron transfer is dominated by hopping. Moreover, the threshold voltage to field-emission dominated transport was found to increase with peptide length in a manner that depends on the nature of the contact with the electrodes. The flexibility in the design of the peptide monomers and the ability to control their sequential order over the nanotube by means of the layer-by-layer assembly process, which is demonstrated in this work, can be used to engineer the electronic properties of self-assembled peptide nanotubes toward device applications.

  17. Assembly, physics, and application of highly electronic-type purified semiconducting carbon nanotubes in aligned array field effect transistors and photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in (1) achieving highly monodisperse semiconducting carbon nanotubes without problematic metallic nanotubes and (2) depositing these nanotubes into useful, organized arrays and assemblies on substrates have created new opportunities for studying the physics of these one-dimensional conductors and for applying them in electronics and photonics technologies. In this talk, I will present on two topics that are along these lines. In the first, we have pioneered a scalable approach for depositing aligned arrays of ultrahigh purity semiconducting SWCNTs (prepared using polyfluorene-derivatives) called floating evaporative self-assembly (FESA). FESA is exploited to create FETs with exceptionally high combined on-conductance and on-off ratio of 261 μS/ μm and 2 x105, respectively, for a channel length of 240 nm. This is 1400 x greater on-off ratio than SWCNT FETs fabricated by other methods, at comparable on-conductance per width of 250 μS/ μm, and 30-100 x greater on-conductance per width, at comparable on-off ratio of 105-107. In the second, we have discovered how to efficiently harvest photons using semiconducting SWCNTs by driving the dissociation of excitons using donor/acceptor heterojunctions. The flow of energy in SWCNT films occurs across a complex energy landscape, temporally resolved using two-dimensional white light ultrafast spectroscopy. We have demonstrated simple solar cells driven by SWCNT excitons, based on bilayers between C60 and ultrathin (5 nm) films of SWCNTs that achieve a 1% solar power conversion efficiency (7% at the bandgap). High internal quantum efficiency indicates that future blended or multijunction cells exploiting multiple layers will be many times more efficient.

  18. Is there a difference in van der Waals interactions between rare gas atoms adsorbed on metallic and semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes?

    PubMed

    Chen, De-Li; Mandeltort, Lynn; Saidi, Wissam A; Yates, John T; Cole, Milton W; Johnson, J Karl

    2013-03-29

    The differences in the polarizabilities of metallic (M) and semiconducting (S) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) might give rise to differences in adsorption potentials. We show from experiments and van der Waals--corrected density functional theory that the binding energies of Xe adsorbed on M- and S-SWNTs are nearly identical. Temperature programed desorption experiments of Xe on purified M- and S-SWNTs give similar peak temperatures, indicating that desorption kinetics and binding energies are independent of the type of SWNT. Binding energies computed from vdW-corrected density functional theory are in good agreement with experiments.

  19. Is there a Difference in Van Der Waals Interactions between Rare Gas Atoms Adsorbed on Metallic and Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes?

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, De-Li; Mandeltort, Lynn; Saidi, Wissam A.; Yates, John T.; Cole, Milton W.; Johnson, J. Karl

    2013-03-01

    Differences in polarizabilities of metallic (M) and semiconducting (S) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) might give rise to differences in adsorption potentials. We show from experiments and van der Waals-corrected density functional theory (DFT) that binding energies of Xe adsorbed on M- and S-SWNTs are nearly identical. Temperature programmed desorption of Xe on purified M- and S-SWNTs give similar peak temperatures, indicating that desorption kinetics and binding energies are independent of the type of SWNT. Binding energies computed from vdW-corrected DFT are in good agreement with experiments.

  20. Role of inter-tube coupling and quantum interference on electrical transport in carbon nanotube junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Srijeet; Bhattacharyya, Tarun Kanti

    2016-09-01

    Due to excellent transport properties, Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) show a lot of promise in sensor and interconnect technology. However, recent studies indicate that the conductance in CNT/CNT junctions are strongly affected by the morphology and orientation between the tubes. For proper utilization of such junctions in the development of CNT based technology, it is essential to study the electronic properties of such junctions. This work presents a theoretical study of the electrical transport properties of metallic Carbon nanotube homo-junctions. The study focuses on discerning the role of inter-tube interactions, quantum interference and scattering on the transport properties on junctions between identical tubes. The electronic structure and transport calculations are conducted with an Extended Hückel Theory-Non Equilibrium Green's Function based model. The calculations indicate conductance to be varying with a changing crossing angle, with maximum conductance corresponding to lattice registry, i.e. parallel configuration between the two tubes. Further calculations for such parallel configurations indicate onset of short and long range oscillations in conductance with respect to changing overlap length. These oscillations are attributed to inter-tube coupling effects owing to changing π orbital overlap, carrier scattering and quantum interference of the incident, transmitted and reflected waves at the inter-tube junction.

  1. Large magnetoresistance in Heusler-alloy-based epitaxial magnetic junctions with semiconducting Cu(In0.8Ga0.2)Se2 spacer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, S.; Takahashi, Y. K.; Cheng, P.-H.; Ikhtiar, Ohkubo, T.; Kondou, K.; Otani, Y.; Mitani, S.; Hono, K.

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the structure and magneto-transport properties of magnetic junctions using a Co2Fe(Ga0.5Ge0.5) Heusler alloy as ferromagnetic electrodes and a Cu(In0.8Ga0.2)Se2 (CIGS) semiconductor as spacers. Owing to the semiconducting nature of the CIGS spacer, large magnetoresistance (MR) ratios of 40% at room temperature and 100% at 8 K were obtained for low resistance-area product (RA) values between 0.3 and 3 Ω μm2. Transmission electron microscopy observations confirmed the fully epitaxial growth of the chalcopyrite CIGS layer, and the temperature dependence of RA indicated that the large MR was due to spin dependent tunneling.

  2. Ideal dipole approximation fails to predict electronic coupling between semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Tretiak, Sergei

    2008-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are highly conjugated carbon tubes that are a few nanometers in diameter and can be up to millimeters in length. The excited electronic states of semiconductor-type SWNTs are quasi-1D excitons. It is known that these spatially-extended electronic excitations can migrate among SWNTs that are bundled together, thus quenching the fluorescence owing to the presence of metallic SWNTs. Recent advances in purification and isolation have enabled studies of electronic energy transfer (EET) between SWNTs and molecular chromophores. Here we examine the electronic coupling among SWNTs in order to understand EET involving SWNTs. There are two main difficulties that need to be addressed when studying SWNT EET. The first is to obtain the electronic coupling matrix element that promotes EET. The most common method to calculate the electronic coupling between two molecules is the point dipole approximation (PDA) method, where the electronic coupling is described as the Coulombic interaction between transition dipole moments of D and A. In this approximation, each molecule is represented by a single dipole located at the center of mass for each molecule. It is well known that the PDA method fails at small separations in molecular systems. Owing to the size of SWNTs compared to typical donor-acceptor separations, it is likely that the PDA method will fail. Even when using the PDA method, however, it is difficult to obtain the dipole strength of the transition because the radiative lifetime is obscured by thermal population of dark states in the exciton band. The second difficulty is that there are a few closely spaced states associated with the lowest bright exciton transition (E{sub 11}), and each of these states might act as energy donors or acceptors. Here we will focus on the first of these challenges: the evaluation of electronic couplings between SWNTs, overcoming the limitations of the PDA method. In the last decade, sophisticated quantum

  3. The Characterization and Circumvention of Carbon Nanotube Junctions - The Route to Practical Carbon Conductors Through Extreme Frequency, Fields, and Light

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-22

    amorphous carbon , and residual catalyst. Immediate payoff should be with the field emission emitters, which would only require treatment in the...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2015-0027 The Characterization and Circumvention of Carbon Nanotube Junctions- The Route to Practical Carbon ...Include area code) 05/22/2015 Final 20110901-20140831 The Characterization and Circumvention of Carbon Nanotube Junctions- The Route to Practical

  4. Optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes highly separated in semiconducting and metallic tubes functionalized with poly(vinylidene fluoride)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matea, A.; Baibarac, M.; Baltog, I.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the interaction of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) highly separated in metallic (M) and semiconducting (S) tubes is studied by resonant Raman scattering and FTIR spectroscopy. In this order, the PVDF/SWNTs membranes were prepared by the evaporation of dimethylformamide (DMF) from PVDF solutions containing i) the as-prepared SWNTs samples, i.e., as mixtures of metallic (33%) and semiconducting (66%) tubes (M + S-SWNTs), ii) SWNTs highly separated in metallic tubes (98%, M-SWNTs), and iii) SWNTs highly separated in semiconducting tubes (99%, S-SWNTs). An increase in the PVDF β phase weight, highlighted by the increase in the absorbance of IR band at 843 cm-1, is reported to take place in the presence of M + S-SWNTs and S-SWNTs. An increase of the PVDF γ crystalline phase weight is reported for the PVDF/M + S-SWNTs, PVDF/M-SWNTs and PVDF/S-SWNTs membranes. Using Raman scattering, a donor-acceptor interaction is invoked to take place at the interface PVDF/M + S-SWNTs and PVDF/S-SWNTs. In the case of the membranes based on PVDF and M-SWNTs, the changes reported in Raman spectra of the two constituents are explained on the base induction-interaction forces between the permanent dipole of PVDF and induced dipole of M-SWNTs.

  5. Extracting Diameter and Chirality Dependences of Optical and Electronic Properties of Semiconducting Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes from First-Principles Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaz, Rodrigo B.; Deslippe, Jack; Louie, Steven G.

    2012-02-01

    First-principles methods based on the combination of density-functional theory (DFT) for ground-state properties, GW approximation for quasiparticle properties and Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) for optical properties represent the state-of-art for accurate and reliable calculations of optical and electronic properties of solids and molecules. For semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs), they have been applied successfully to selected small-diameter tubes. In this work, we systematically calculate such properties for all zig-zag semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with diameters ranging from (10,0) to (20,0) CNTs, allowing us to extract in a reliable way the diameter and chirality dependence of many properties, such as: (i) optical transition energies; (ii) quasiparticle band gaps; (iii) exciton binding energies; (iv) bright-dark exciton splittings; (v) excited exciton states properties; (vi) transverse-polarized exciton states properties; (vii) electron and hole effective masses (and therefore excitonic reduced masses). All properties are described with good accuracy by diameter- and chirality-dependent analytical formulas, with parameters extracted from the first-principles calculations.

  6. Solution-processed polymer-sorted semiconducting carbon nanotube network transistors with low-k /high-k bilayer polymer dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Dong-Yu; Noh, Yong-Young

    2017-09-01

    Solution-processed semiconducting carbon nanotube transistors with a high mobility and an ON/OFF ratio are the most promising for use in flexible electronics. In this paper, we report low-k/high-k bilayer polymer dielectrics for solution-processed semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (s-SWNT) field-effect transistors (s-SWNT-FETs) with efficient charge transport and operation at low voltage. Thin low-k polystyrene (10 nm) is used for the first contact insulator with a channel in order to passivate the dipolar disorder induced by high-k insulators. The second gate insulator for low voltage operation is cyanoethyl pullulan (CEP), which is an environmentally friendly high-k insulator based on cellulose. Moreover, poly[(vinylidenefluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) is chosen as a single layer dielectric for comparison. A reasonably low operational voltage (<10 V) and high operational stability are achieved by the s-SWNT-FETs with polystyrene/CEP bilayer gate dielectrics. In addition, this indicates that the interface between the s-SWNTs and the low-k insulator is of critical importance for efficient charge transport.

  7. Recognition and one-pot extraction of right- and left-handed semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube enantiomers using fluorene-binaphthol chiral copolymers.

    PubMed

    Akazaki, Kojiro; Toshimitsu, Fumiyuki; Ozawa, Hiroaki; Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2012-08-01

    Synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are mixtures of right- and left-handed helicity and their separation is an essential topic in nanocarbon science. In this paper, we describe the separation of right- and left-handed semiconducting SWNTs from as-produced SWNTs. Our strategy for this goal is simple: we designed copolymers composed of polyfluorene and chiral bulky moieties because polyfluorenes with long alkyl-chains are known to dissolve only semiconducting SWNTs and chiral binaphthol is a so-called BINAP family that possesses a powerful enantiomer sorting capability. In this study, we synthesized 12 copolymers, (9,9-dioctylfluorene-2,7-diyl)x((R)- or (S)-2,2'-dimethoxy-1,1'-binaphthalen-6,6-diyl)y, where x and y are copolymer composition ratios. It was found that, by a simple one-pot sonication method, the copolymers are able to extract either right- or left-handed semiconducting SWNT enantiomers with (6,5)- and (7,5)-enriched chirality. The separated materials were confirmed by circular dichroism, vis-near IR and photoluminescence spectroscopies. Interestingly, the copolymer showed inversion of SWNT enantiomer recognition at higher contents of the chiral binaphthol moiety. Molecular mechanics simulations reveal a cooperative effect between the degree of chirality and copolymer conformation to be responsible for these distinct characteristics of the extractions. This is the first example describing the rational design and synthesis of novel compounds for the recognition and simple sorting of right- and left-handed semiconducting SWNTs with a specific chirality.

  8. Effect of eccentricity on junction and junctionless based silicon nanowire and silicon nanotube FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarlet, S. Priscilla; Ambika, R.; Srinivasan, R.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the effect of eccentricity on Junction-based Silicon Nanowire FET, Junction-based Silicon Nanotube FET, Junctionless-based Silicon Nanowire FET, and Junctionless-based Silicon Nanotube FET is investigated. Three kinds of eccentric structures are considered here. The impact of eccentricity on effective gate oxide thickness thereby gate oxide capacitance, and effective channel width are studied using 3D numerical simulations. Average radius of an ellipse is used to generate a model which captures the impact of eccentricity on gate oxide capacitance, and verified using TCAD simulations in MOS nanowire structure. The impact of eccentricity on ON current (ION), OFF current (IOFF), ION/IOFF ratio, and Unity gain cutoff frequency are investigated. Eccentricity increases the effective gate oxide thickness, the effective channel width, ION, and IOFF but reduces ION/IOFF ratio.

  9. Theoretical study of trends in conductance for molecular junctions formed with armchair carbon nanotube electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiing-Rei; Zhang, Lei; Hybertsen, Mark S.

    2007-09-01

    The transmission through prototype aromatic molecule junctions formed between armchair (metallic) carbon nanotube electrodes is studied using a tight-binding model with a Green’s function embedding approach. Analytical and numerical results for transmission near the Fermi energy are obtained for junctions of single molecules with a one-point contact to each electrode, pairs of such molecules in the junction, and double stranded molecules with a two-point contact to each electrode. While an ideal single stranded molecule (ideal polyene) with odd number of atoms gives unit transmission at the Fermi energy, two such strands in the junction demonstrate significant interference effects, with net transmission varying from near zero to near 2 depending on the specific contact sites at the electrodes. Ideal polyenes with even number of atoms give nonresonant single-molecule transmission at the Fermi energy and less pronounced interference effects from their double-molecule junctions. The bonded, two stranded junction (polyacene) also gives nonresonant transmission at the Fermi energy. Allowing for the more realistic bond alternation observed in aromatic molecules results in nonresonant transmission with exponential length dependence.

  10. Junction-Controlled Elasticity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Dispersions in Acrylic Copolymer Gels and Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Schoch, Andrew B.; Shull, Kenneth R.; Brinson, L. Catherine

    2008-08-26

    Oscillatory shear rheometry is used to study the mechanical response of single-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed in solutions of acrylic diblock or triblock copolymers in 2-ethyl-1-hexanol. Thermal transitions in the copolymer solutions provide a route for the easy processing of these composite materials, with excellent dispersion of the nanotubes as verified by near-infrared photoluminescence spectroscopy. The nanotube dispersions form elastic networks with properties that are controlled by the junction points between nanotubes, featuring a temperature-dependent elastic response that is controlled by the dynamic properties of the matrix copolymer solution. The data are consistent with the formation of micelle-like aggregates around the nanotubes. At low temperatures the core-forming poly(methyl methacrylate) blocks are glassy, and the overall mechanical response of the composite does not evolve with time. At higher temperatures the enhanced mobility of the core-forming blocks enables the junctions to achieve more intimate nanotube-nanotube contact, and the composite modulus increases with time. These aging effects are observed in both diblock and triblock copolymer solutions but are partially reversed in the triblock solutions by cooling through the gel transition of the triblock copolymer. This result is attributed to the generation of internal stresses during gelation and the ability of these stresses to break or weaken the nanotube junctions.

  11. Thermal transport across carbon nanotube-graphene covalent and van der Waals junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jingjing; Dong, Yalin; Fisher, Timothy; Ruan, Xiulin

    2015-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes and graphene are promising materials for thermal management applications due to their high thermal conductivities. However, their thermal properties are anisotropic, and the radial or cross-plane direction thermal conductivity is low. A 3D Carbon nanotube (CNT)-graphene structure has previously been proposed to address this limitation, and direct molecular dynamics simulations have been used to predict the associated thermal conductivity. In this work, by recognizing that thermal resistance primarily comes from CNT-graphene junctions, a simple network model of thermal transport in pillared graphene structure is developed. Using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics, the resistance across an individual CNT-graphene junction with sp2 covalent bonds is found to be around 6 ×10-11 m2K/W, which is significantly lower than typical values reported for planar interfaces between dissimilar materials. In contrast, the resistance across a van der Waals junction is about 4 ×10-8 m2K/W. Interestingly, when the CNT pillar length is small, the interfacial resistance of the sp2 covalent junction is found to decrease as the CNT pillar length decreases, suggesting the presence of coherence effects. To explain this intriguing trend, the junction thermal resistance is decomposed into interfacial region and boundary components, and it is found that while the boundary resistance has little dependence on the pillar length, the interfacial region resistance decreases as the pillar length decreases. This is explained by calculating the local phonon density of states (LDOS) of different regions near the boundary. The LDOS overlap between the interfacial region and the center region of CNT increases as the pillar length decreases, leading to the decrease of interfacial region resistance. The junction resistance Rj is eventually used in the network model to estimate the effective thermal conductivity, and the results agree well with direct MD simulation data, demonstrating the

  12. Role of pH controlled DNA secondary structures in the reversible dispersion/precipitation and separation of metallic and semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Maji, Basudeb; Samanta, Suman K; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2014-04-07

    Single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) oligomers (dA20, d[(C3TA2)3C3] or dT20) are able to disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in water at pH 7 through non-covalent wrapping on the nanotube surface. At lower pH, an alteration of the DNA secondary structure leads to precipitation of the SWNTs from the dispersion. The structural change of dA20 takes place from the single-stranded to the A-motif form at pH 3.5 while in case of d[(C3TA2)3C3] the change occurs from the single-stranded to the i-motif form at pH 5. Due to this structural change, the DNA is no longer able to bind the nanotube and hence the SWNT precipitates from its well-dispersed state. However, this could be reversed on restoring the pH to 7, where the DNA again relaxes in the single-stranded form. In this way the dispersion and precipitation process could be repeated over and over again. Variable temperature UV-Vis-NIR and CD spectroscopy studies showed that the DNA-SWNT complexes were thermally stable even at ∼90 °C at pH 7. Broadband NIR laser (1064 nm) irradiation also demonstrated the stability of the DNA-SWNT complex against local heating introduced through excitation of the carbon nanotubes. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay confirmed the formation of a stable DNA-SWNT complex at pH 7 and also the generation of DNA secondary structures (A/i-motif) upon acidification. The interactions of ss-DNA with SWNTs cause debundling of the nanotubes from its assembly. Selective affinity of the semiconducting SWNTs towards DNA than the metallic ones enables separation of the two as evident from spectroscopic as well as electrical conductivity studies.

  13. Nanomanipulation and Lithography: The Building (and Modeling) of Carbon Nanotube Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, Richard Nam

    2002-12-01

    Aircraft fuselages suffer alternating stress during takeoffs and landings, and fatigue cracks begin to grow, usually at rivet holes. The detection of these fatigue cracks under installed fasteners in aging aircraft is a major goal of the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) community. The use of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors in electromagnetic (EM) NDE has been increasing rapidly. For example, here at Langley Research Center, a Rotating Probe System (RPS) containing a GMR element has been incorporated into a product to detect deeply buried flaws in aerospace structures. In order to advance this eddy current probe application and many similar ones, research to create smaller, more sensitive and energy-efficient EM sensors has been aggressively pursued. Recent theoretical and experimental work on spin coherent transport supports the feasibility of carbon nanotube (CNT) based magnetic tunnel junctions. In this study, a spatial filtering scheme is presented that improves the signal to noise ratio of the RPS and does not significantly impact the number of false alarms. Signals due to buried flaws occur at higher frequencies than do signals due to rivet tilt or probe misalignment, and the strategy purposefully targets this fact. Furthermore, the spatial filtering scheme exploits decreases in the probe output that are observed immediately preceding and following the peak in output due to a fatigue crack. Using the new filters, an enhanced probability of flaw detection is expected. In the future, even tinier, more sensitive, low-power sensors are envisioned for the rotating probe and other nondestructive inspection systems. These may be comprised of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) that connect two ferromagnetic (FM) electrodes. Theoretical work has been done at Langley to model the electrical and magnetoconductance behavior of such junctions, for systems containing short "armchair" nanotubes. The present work facilitates the modeling of more realistic system

  14. Photocurrent spectroscopy of exciton and free particle optical transitions in suspended carbon nanotube pn-junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Shun-Wen; Theiss, Jesse; Hazra, Jubin; Aykol, Mehmet; Kapadia, Rehan; Cronin, Stephen B.

    2015-08-03

    We study photocurrent generation in individual, suspended carbon nanotube pn-junction diodes formed by electrostatic doping using two gate electrodes. Photocurrent spectra collected under various electrostatic doping concentrations reveal distinctive behaviors for free particle optical transitions and excitonic transitions. In particular, the photocurrent generated by excitonic transitions exhibits a strong gate doping dependence, while that of the free particle transitions is gate independent. Here, the built-in potential of the pn-junction is required to separate the strongly bound electron-hole pairs of the excitons, while free particle excitations do not require this field-assisted charge separation. We observe a sharp, well defined E{sub 11} free particle interband transition in contrast with previous photocurrent studies. Several steps are taken to ensure that the active charge separating region of these pn-junctions is suspended off the substrate in a suspended region that is substantially longer than the exciton diffusion length and, therefore, the photocurrent does not originate from a Schottky junction. We present a detailed model of the built-in fields in these pn-junctions, which, together with phonon-assistant exciton dissociation, predicts photocurrents on the same order of those observed experimentally.

  15. Self-formation of highly aligned metallic, semiconducting and single chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes assemblies via a crystal template method

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Hideki; Hasegawa, Kai; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Oyane, Ayako; Naitoh, Yasuhisa

    2014-09-01

    The fabrication of an aligned array of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a single chiral state has been a significant challenge for SWCNT applications as well as for basic science research. Here, we developed a simple, unique technique to produce assemblies in which metallic, semiconducting, and single chiral state SWCNTs were densely and highly aligned. We utilized a crystal of surfactant as a template on which mono-dispersed SWCNTs in solution self-assembled. Micro-Raman measurements and scanning electron microscopy measurements clearly showed that the SWCNTs were highly and densely aligned parallel to the crystal axis, indicating that approximately 70% of the SWCNTs were within 7° of being parallel. Moreover, the assemblies exhibited good field effect transistor characteristics with an on/off ratio of 1.3 × 10{sup 5}.

  16. Nanoengineering Ni(x)Fe(1-x) catalysts for gas-phase, selective synthesis of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Wei-Hung; Sakr, Mohammed; Gao, Xuan P A; Sankaran, R Mohan

    2009-12-22

    The inhomogeneity of as-grown single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), in terms of chiral structure, is a major obstacle to integration of these novel materials in advanced electronics. While separation methods have circumvented this problem, current synthesis approaches must be refined for large-scale production of SWCNTs with uniform properties. In addition, it is highly desirable to alter the initial chirality distribution which constrains fundamental study and applications. Here, we demonstrate that semiconducting SWCNTs are selectively produced in the gas phase by engineering catalysts at the nanoscale with precise size and composition. The semiconducting content in as-grown mixtures of SWCNTs is assessed by UV-visible-NIR absorbance and micro-Raman spectroscopy and reaches a maximum purity of 90% for samples catalyzed by Ni(0.27)Fe(0.73) nanoparticles (2.0 nm mean diameter). Electrical studies are performed on thin film transistors (TFTs) fabricated from as-grown SWCNTs and reveal high on/off current ratios of 10(3).

  17. Hetero-junctions of Boron Nitride and Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis and Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, Yoke Khin

    2013-03-14

    Hetero-junctions of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are expected to have appealing new properties that are not available from pure BNNTs and CNTs. Theoretical studies indicate that BNNT/CNT junctions could be multifunctional and applicable as memory, spintronic, electronic, and photonics devices with tunable band structures. This will lead to energy and material efficient multifunctional devices that will be beneficial to the society. However, experimental realization of BNNT/CNT junctions was hindered by the absent of a common growth technique for BNNTs and CNTs. In fact, the synthesis of BNNTs was very challenging and may involve high temperatures (up to 3000 degree Celsius by laser ablation) and explosive chemicals. During the award period, we have successfully developed a simple chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique to grow BNNTs at 1100-1200 degree Celsius without using dangerous chemicals. A series of common catalyst have then been identified for the synthesis of BNNTs and CNTs. Both of these breakthroughs have led to our preliminary success in growing two types of BNNT/CNT junctions and two additional new nanostructures: 1) branching BNNT/CNT junctions and 2) co-axial BNNT/CNT junctions, 3) quantum dots functionalized BNNTs (QDs-BNNTs), 4) BNNT/graphene junctions. We have started to understand their structural, compositional, and electronic properties. Latest results indicate that the branching BNNT/CNT junctions and QDs-BNNTs are functional as room-temperature tunneling devices. We have submitted the application of a renewal grant to continue the study of these new energy efficient materials. Finally, this project has also strengthened our collaborations with multiple Department of Energy's Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs), including the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINTs) at Sandia National Laboratories and Los

  18. Electron Transport through Polyene Junctions in between Carbon Nanotubes: an Ab Initio Realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiing-Rei; Chen, Kai-Yu; Dou, Kun-Peng; Tai, Jung-Shen; Lee, Hsin-Han; Kaun, Chao-Cheng

    With both ab initio and tight-binding model calculations, we study a system of polyene bridged armchair carbon nanotube electrodes, considering one-polyene and two-polyene cases, to address aspects of quantum transport through junctions with multiple conjugated molecules. The ab initio results of the two-polyene cases not only show the interference effect in transmission, but also the sensitive dependence of such effect on the combination of relative contact sites, which agrees nicely with the tight-binding model. Moreover, we show that the discrepancy mainly brought by ab initio relaxation provides an insight into the influence upon transmission spectra, from the junction's geometry, bonding and effective potential. This work was supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology of the Republic of China under Grant Nos. 99-2112-M-003-012-MY2 and 103-2622-E-002-031, and the National Center for Theoretical Sciences of Taiwan.

  19. Ultrahigh Thermal Rectification in Pillared Graphene Structure with Carbon Nanotube-Graphene Intramolecular Junctions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xueming; Yu, Dapeng; Cao, Bingyang; To, Albert C

    2017-01-11

    In this letter, graded pillared graphene structures with carbon nanotube-graphene intramolecular junctions are demonstrated to exhibit ultrahigh thermal rectification. The designed graded two-stage pillared graphene structures are shown to have rectification values of 790.8 and 1173.0% at average temperatures 300 and 200 K, respectively. The ultrahigh thermal rectification is found to be a result of the obvious phonon spectra mismatch before and after reversing the applied thermal bias. This outcome is attributed to both the device shape asymmetry and the size asymmetric boundary thermal contacts. We also find that the significant and stable standing waves that exist in graded two-stage pillared graphene structures play an important role in this kind of thermal rectifier, and are responsible for the ultrahigh thermal rectification of the two-stage ones as well. Our work demonstrates that pillared graphene structure with SWCNT-graphene intramolecular junctions is an excellent and promising phononic device.

  20. On-Chip Chemical Self-Assembly of Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs): Toward Robust and Scale Invariant SWNTs Transistors.

    PubMed

    Derenskyi, Vladimir; Gomulya, Widianta; Talsma, Wytse; Salazar-Rios, Jorge Mario; Fritsch, Martin; Nirmalraj, Peter; Riel, Heike; Allard, Sybille; Scherf, Ullrich; Loi, Maria A

    2017-04-05

    In this paper, the fabrication of carbon nanotubes field effect transistors by chemical self-assembly of semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs) on prepatterned substrates is demonstrated. Polyfluorenes derivatives have been demonstrated to be effective in selecting s-SWNTs from raw mixtures. In this work the authors functionalized the polymer with side chains containing thiols, to obtain chemical self-assembly of the selected s-SWNTs on substrates with prepatterned gold electrodes. The authors show that the full side functionalization of the conjugated polymer with thiol groups partially disrupts the s-SWNTs selection, with the presence of metallic tubes in the dispersion. However, the authors determine that the selectivity can be recovered either by tuning the number of thiol groups in the polymer, or by modulating the polymer/SWNTs proportions. As demonstrated by optical and electrical measurements, the polymer containing 2.5% of thiol groups gives the best s-SWNT purity. Field-effect transistors with various channel lengths, using networks of SWNTs and individual tubes, are fabricated by direct chemical self-assembly of the SWNTs/thiolated-polyfluorenes on substrates with lithographically defined electrodes. The network devices show superior performance (mobility up to 24 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) ), while SWNTs devices based on individual tubes show an unprecedented (100%) yield for working devices. Importantly, the SWNTs assembled by mean of the thiol groups are stably anchored to the substrate and are resistant to external perturbation as sonication in organic solvents.

  1. Facile Isolation of Adsorbent-Free Long and Highly-Pure Chirality-Selected Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using A Hydrogen-bonding Supramolecular Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toshimitsu, Fumiyuki; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-12-01

    The ideal form of semiconducting-single-walled carbon nanotubes (sem-SWNTs) for science and technology is long, defect-free, chirality pure and chemically pure isolated narrow diameter tubes. While various techniques to solubilize and purify sem-SWNTs have been developed, many of them targeted only the chiral- or chemically-purity while sacrificing the sem-SWNT intrinsic structural identities by applying strong ultra-sonication and/or chemical modifications. Toward the ultimate purification of the sem-SWNTs, here we report a mild-conditioned extraction of the sem-SWNTs using removable supramolecular hydrogen-bonding polymers (HBPs) that are composed of dicarboxylic- or diaminopyridyl-fluorenes with ~70%-(8,6)SWNT selective extraction. Replacing conventional strong sonication techniques by a simple shaking using HPBs was found to provide long sem-SWNTs (>2.0 μm) with a very high D/G ratio, which was determined by atomic force microscopy observations. The HBPs were readily removed from the nanotube surfaces by an outer stimulus, such as a change in the solvent polarities, to provide chemically pure (8,6)-enriched sem-SWNTs. We also describe molecular mechanics calculations to propose possible structures for the HBP-wrapped sem-SWNTs, furthermore, the mechanism of the chiral selectivity for the sorted sem-SWNTs is well explained by the relationship between the molecular surface area and mass of the HBP/SWNT composites.

  2. In situ mechanical investigation of carbon nanotube-graphene junction in three-dimensional carbon nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yingchao; Kim, Nam Dong; Varshney, Vikas; Sihn, Sangwook; Li, Yilun; Roy, Ajit K; Tour, James M; Lou, Jun

    2017-02-23

    Hierarchically organized three-dimensional (3D) carbon nanotubes/graphene (CNTs/graphene) hybrid nanostructures hold great promises in composite and battery applications. Understanding the junction strength between CNTs and graphene is crucial for utilizing such special nanostructures. Here, in situ pulling an individual CNT bundle out of graphene is carried out for the first time using a nanomechanical tester developed in-house, and the measured junction strength of CNTs/graphene is 2.23 ± 0.56 GPa. The post transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of remained graphene after peeling off CNT forest confirms that the failure during pull-out test occurs at the CNT-graphene junction. Such a carefully designed study makes it possible to better understand the interfacial interactions between CNTs and graphene in the 3D CNTs/graphene nanostructures. The coupled experimental and computational effort suggests that the junction between the CNTs and the graphene layer is likely to be chemically bonded, or at least consisting of a mixture of chemical bonding and van der Waals interactions.

  3. Enhancing and optimizing electronic transport in biphenyl derivative single-molecule junctions attached to carbon nanotubes electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis-Silva, J. C.; Ferreira, D. F. S.; Leal, J. F. P.; Pinheiro, F. A.; Del Nero, J.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate, by means of ab initio calculations based on non-equilibrium Green's function method coupled to density function theory, electronic transport in molecular junctions composed of biphenyl (BP) and biphenyl within (-2H+) defect (BP2D) molecules attached to metallic (9,0) carbon nanotubes. We demonstrate that the BP2D junction exhibits unprecedented electronic transport properties, and that its conductance can be up to three orders of magnitude higher than biphenyl single-molecule junctions. These findings are explained in terms of the non-planar molecular conformation of BP2D, and of the stronger electronic coupling between the BP2D molecule and the organic electrodes, which confers high stability to the junction. Our results suggest that BP2D attached to carbon nanotubes can be explored as an efficient and highly stable platform in single-molecule electronics with extraordinary transport properties.

  4. Electronic transport in biphenyl single-molecule junctions with carbon nanotubes electrodes: The role of molecular conformation and chirality

    SciTech Connect

    Brito Silva, C. A. Jr.; Granhen, E. R.; Silva, S. J. S. da; Leal, J. F. P.; Del Nero, J.; Pinheiro, F. A.

    2010-08-15

    We investigate, by means of ab initio calculations, electronic transport in molecular junctions composed of a biphenyl molecule attached to metallic carbon nanotubes. We find that the conductance is proportional to cos{sup 2} {theta}, with {theta} the angle between phenyl rings, when the Fermi level of the contacts lies within the frontier molecular orbitals energy gap. This result, which agrees with experiments in biphenyl junctions with nonorganic contacts, suggests that the cos{sup 2} {theta} law has a more general applicability, irrespective of the nature of the electrodes. We calculate the geometrical degree of chirality of the junction, which only depends on the atomic positions, and demonstrate that it is not only proportional to cos{sup 2} {theta} but also is strongly correlated with the current through the system. These results indicate that molecular conformation plays the preponderant role in determining transport properties of biphenyl-carbon nanotubes molecular junctions.

  5. Effects of impurity on tunnel magnetoresistance in a ferromagnetic electrode/carbon nanotube/ferromagnetic electrode junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi Fouladi, A.; Javad Vahedi; Soleymani Moghaddam, M.

    2015-04-01

    Effects of impurity on the spin-dependent transport in a single wall carbon nanotube spin-valve, as ferromagnetic electrode/carbon nanotube/ferromagnetic electrode model junction is numerically investigated. Using a generalized Green's function method and the Landauer-Büttiker formalism, the impurity conditions are determined by randomly substitution of carbon atoms in the honeycomb carbon nanotube lattice by nitrogen and boron atoms. We have found that transport characteristics, including the spin-dependent current and tunnel magnetoresistance are strongly influenced by the impurity effects. We think that the results of the present report could be useful for designing the future spintronic devices.

  6. Broadband photodetector based on carbon nanotube thin film/single layer graphene Schottky junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Teng-Fei; Li, Zhi-Peng; Wang, Jiu-Zhen; Kong, Wei-Yu; Wu, Guo-An; Zheng, Yu-Zhen; Zhao, Yuan-Wei; Yao, En-Xu; Zhuang, Nai-Xi; Luo, Lin-Bao

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we present a broadband nano-photodetector based on single-layer graphene (SLG)-carbon nanotube thin film (CNTF) Schottky junction. It was found that the as-fabricated device exhibited obvious sensitivity to a wide range of illumination, with peak sensitivity at 600 and 920 nm. In addition, the SLG-CNTF device had a fast response speed (τr = 68 μs, τf = 78 μs) and good reproducibility in a wide range of switching frequencies (50–5400 Hz). The on-off ratio, responsivity, and detectivity of the device were estimated to be 1 × 102, 209 mAW‑1 and 4.87 × 1010 cm Hz1/2 W‑1, respectively. What is more, other device parameters including linear performance θ and linear dynamic range (LDR) were calculated to be 0.99 and 58.8 dB, respectively, which were relatively better than other carbon nanotube based devices. The totality of the above study signifies that the present SLG-CNTF Schottky junction broadband nano-photodetector may have promising application in future nano-optoelectronic devices and systems.

  7. Broadband photodetector based on carbon nanotube thin film/single layer graphene Schottky junction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Teng-Fei; Li, Zhi-Peng; Wang, Jiu-Zhen; Kong, Wei-Yu; Wu, Guo-An; Zheng, Yu-Zhen; Zhao, Yuan-Wei; Yao, En-Xu; Zhuang, Nai-Xi; Luo, Lin-Bao

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we present a broadband nano-photodetector based on single-layer graphene (SLG)-carbon nanotube thin film (CNTF) Schottky junction. It was found that the as-fabricated device exhibited obvious sensitivity to a wide range of illumination, with peak sensitivity at 600 and 920 nm. In addition, the SLG-CNTF device had a fast response speed (τr = 68 μs, τf = 78 μs) and good reproducibility in a wide range of switching frequencies (50–5400 Hz). The on-off ratio, responsivity, and detectivity of the device were estimated to be 1 × 102, 209 mAW−1 and 4.87 × 1010 cm Hz1/2 W−1, respectively. What is more, other device parameters including linear performance θ and linear dynamic range (LDR) were calculated to be 0.99 and 58.8 dB, respectively, which were relatively better than other carbon nanotube based devices. The totality of the above study signifies that the present SLG-CNTF Schottky junction broadband nano-photodetector may have promising application in future nano-optoelectronic devices and systems. PMID:27929053

  8. Evaluation of the nanotube intrinsic resistance across the tip-carbon nanotube-metal substrate junction by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Using an atomic force microscope (AFM) at a controlled contact force, we report the electrical signal response of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) disposed on a golden thin film. In this investigation, we highlight first the theoretical calculation of the contact resistance between two types of conductive tips (metal-coated and doped diamond-coated), individual MWCNTs and golden substrate. We also propose a circuit analysis model to schematize the «tip-CNT-substrate» junction by means of a series-parallel resistance network. We estimate the contact resistance R of each contribution of the junction such as Rtip-CNT, RCNT-substrate and Rtip-substrate by using the Sharvin resistance model. Our final objective is thus to deduce the CNT intrinsic radial resistance taking into account the calculated electrical resistance values with the global resistance measured experimentally. An unwished electrochemical phenomenon at the tip apex has also been evidenced by performing measurements at different bias voltages with diamond tips. For negative tip-substrate bias, a systematic degradation in color and contrast of the electrical cartography occurs, consisting of an important and non-reversible increase of the measured resistance. This effect is attributed to the oxidation of some amorphous carbon areas scattered over the diamond layer covering the tip. For a direct polarization, the CNT and substrate surface can in turn be modified by an oxidation mechanism. PMID:21711904

  9. Evaluation of the nanotube intrinsic resistance across the tip-carbon nanotube-metal substrate junction by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dominiczak, Maguy; Otubo, Larissa; Alamarguy, David; Houzé, Frédéric; Volz, Sebastian; Noël, Sophie; Bai, Jinbo

    2011-04-14

    Using an atomic force microscope (AFM) at a controlled contact force, we report the electrical signal response of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) disposed on a golden thin film. In this investigation, we highlight first the theoretical calculation of the contact resistance between two types of conductive tips (metal-coated and doped diamond-coated), individual MWCNTs and golden substrate. We also propose a circuit analysis model to schematize the «tip-CNT-substrate» junction by means of a series-parallel resistance network. We estimate the contact resistance R of each contribution of the junction such as Rtip-CNT, RCNT-substrate and Rtip-substrate by using the Sharvin resistance model. Our final objective is thus to deduce the CNT intrinsic radial resistance taking into account the calculated electrical resistance values with the global resistance measured experimentally. An unwished electrochemical phenomenon at the tip apex has also been evidenced by performing measurements at different bias voltages with diamond tips. For negative tip-substrate bias, a systematic degradation in color and contrast of the electrical cartography occurs, consisting of an important and non-reversible increase of the measured resistance. This effect is attributed to the oxidation of some amorphous carbon areas scattered over the diamond layer covering the tip. For a direct polarization, the CNT and substrate surface can in turn be modified by an oxidation mechanism.

  10. Change in Chirality of Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Can Overcome Anionic Surfactant Stabilization: A Systematic Study of Aggregation Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Khan, Iftheker A; Flora, Joseph R V; Nabiul Afrooz, A R M; Aich, Nirupam; Schierz, P Ariette; Ferguson, P Lee; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Saleh, Navid B

    2015-05-20

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes' (SWNT) effectiveness in applications is enhanced by debundling or stabilization. Anionic surfactants are known to effectively stabilize SWNTs. However, the role of specific chirality on surfactant-stabilized SWNT aggregation has not been studied to date. The aggregation behavior of chirally enriched (6,5) and (7,6) semiconducting SWNTs, functionalized with three anionic surfactants-sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), and sodium deoxycholate (SDOCO)-was evaluated with time-resolved dynamic light scattering. A wide range of mono- (NaCl) and di-valent (CaCl2) electrolytes as well as a 2.5 mg TOC/L Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA) were used as background chemistry. Overall, SDBS showed the most effectiveness in SWNT stability, followed by SDOCO and SDS. However, the relatively larger diameter (7,6) chiral tubes compromised the surfactant stability, compared to (6,5) chiral enrichment, due to enhanced van der Waals interaction. The presence of di-valent electrolytes overshadowed the chirality effects and resulted in similar aggregation behavior for both the SWNT samples. Molecular modeling results enumerated key differences in surfactant conformation on SWNT surfaces and identified interaction energy changes between the two chiralities to delineate aggregation mechanisms. The stability of SWNTs increased in the presence of SRHA under 10 mM monovalent and mixed electrolyte conditions. The results suggest that change in chirality can overcome surfactant stabilization of semiconducting SWNTs. SWNT stability can also be strongly influenced by the anionic surfactant structure.

  11. Carbon nanotube intramolecular p-i-n junction diodes with symmetric and asymmetric contacts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Changxin; Liao, Chenghao; Wei, Liangming; Zhong, Hanqing; He, Rong; Liu, Qinran; Liu, Xiaodong; Lai, Yunfeng; Song, Chuanjuan; Jin, Tiening; Zhang, Yafei

    2016-01-01

    A p-i-n junction diode based on the selectively doped single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) had been investigated, in which two opposite ends of individual SWCNT channel were doped into the p- and n-type SWCNT respectively while the middle segment of SWCNT was kept as the intrinsic. The symmetric and asymmetric contacts were used to fabricate the p-i-n junction diodes respectively and studied the effect of the contact on the device characteristics. It was shown that a low reverse saturation current of ~20 pA could be achieved by these both diodes. We found that the use of the asymmetric contact can effectively improve the performance of the p-i-n diode, with the rectification ratio enhanced from ~102 for the device with the Au/Au symmetric contact to >103 for the one with the Pd/Al asymmetric contact. The improvement of the device performance by the asymmetric-contact structure was attributed to the decrease of the effective Schottky-barrier height at the contacts under forward bias, increasing the forward current of the diode. The p-i-n diode with asymmetric contact also had a higher rectification ratio than its counterpart before doping the SWCNT channel, which is because that the p-i-n junction in the device decreased the reverse saturated current. PMID:26915400

  12. Structural optimization and shear performances of the nanopins based on Y-junction carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhong-Qiang; Zhong, Jun; Ye, Hong-Fei; Cheng, Guang-Gui; Ding, Jian-Ning

    2017-01-01

    Utilizing the classical molecular dynamic, we have briefly conducted geometry optimization on several typical nanopins based on Y-junction carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and further investigated their shear performance. The service performance of the nanopin is not sensitive to the length of the inserting end, while as the height of the branch tube increases, the maximum unloading force increases firstly and then keeps relatively stable. The overlong inserting end and high branch tube can lead to the severe oscillation in unloading force due to the continuous morphology change. Moreover, results show that a small angle included in Y-junction CNTs can contribute to both of the fixity of the nanopin and instability of the uninstallation process. Further investigation indicates that the orientation of the branch tubes of the nanopin determines the maximum shear performance, while the radial stability of the CNTs plays an important role in the shear performance of the nanopin. And the microstructure of the Y-junction CNT occurred during the using process can also influence its service performance.

  13. Carbon nanotube intramolecular p-i-n junction diodes with symmetric and asymmetric contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changxin; Liao, Chenghao; Wei, Liangming; Zhong, Hanqing; He, Rong; Liu, Qinran; Liu, Xiaodong; Lai, Yunfeng; Song, Chuanjuan; Jin, Tiening; Zhang, Yafei

    2016-02-01

    A p-i-n junction diode based on the selectively doped single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) had been investigated, in which two opposite ends of individual SWCNT channel were doped into the p- and n-type SWCNT respectively while the middle segment of SWCNT was kept as the intrinsic. The symmetric and asymmetric contacts were used to fabricate the p-i-n junction diodes respectively and studied the effect of the contact on the device characteristics. It was shown that a low reverse saturation current of ~20 pA could be achieved by these both diodes. We found that the use of the asymmetric contact can effectively improve the performance of the p-i-n diode, with the rectification ratio enhanced from ~102 for the device with the Au/Au symmetric contact to >103 for the one with the Pd/Al asymmetric contact. The improvement of the device performance by the asymmetric-contact structure was attributed to the decrease of the effective Schottky-barrier height at the contacts under forward bias, increasing the forward current of the diode. The p-i-n diode with asymmetric contact also had a higher rectification ratio than its counterpart before doping the SWCNT channel, which is because that the p-i-n junction in the device decreased the reverse saturated current.

  14. A p-i-n junction diode based on locally doped carbon nanotube network

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaodong; Chen, Changxin; Wei, Liangming; Hu, Nantao; Song, Chuanjuan; Liao, Chenghao; He, Rong; Dong, Xusheng; Wang, Ying; Liu, Qinran; Zhang, Yafei

    2016-01-01

    A p-i-n junction diode constructed by the locally doped network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was investigated. In this diode, the two opposite ends of the SWNT-network channel were selectively doped by triethyloxonium hexachloroantimonate (OA) and polyethylenimine (PEI) to obtain the air-stable p- and n-type SWNTs respectively while the central area of the SWNT-network remained intrinsic state, resulting in the formation of a p-i-n junction with a strong built-in electronic field in the SWNTs. The results showed that the forward current and the rectification ratio of the diode increased as the doping degree increased. The forward current of the device could also be increased by decreasing the channel length. A high-performance p-i-n junction diode with a high rectification ratio (~104), large forward current (~12.2 μA) and low reverse saturated current (~1.8 nA) was achieved with the OA and PEI doping time of 5 h and 18 h for a channel length of ~6 μm. PMID:26996610

  15. Role of pH controlled DNA secondary structures in the reversible dispersion/precipitation and separation of metallic and semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, Basudeb; Samanta, Suman K.; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2014-03-01

    Single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) oligomers (dA20, d[(C3TA2)3C3] or dT20) are able to disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in water at pH 7 through non-covalent wrapping on the nanotube surface. At lower pH, an alteration of the DNA secondary structure leads to precipitation of the SWNTs from the dispersion. The structural change of dA20 takes place from the single-stranded to the A-motif form at pH 3.5 while in case of d[(C3TA2)3C3] the change occurs from the single-stranded to the i-motif form at pH 5. Due to this structural change, the DNA is no longer able to bind the nanotube and hence the SWNT precipitates from its well-dispersed state. However, this could be reversed on restoring the pH to 7, where the DNA again relaxes in the single-stranded form. In this way the dispersion and precipitation process could be repeated over and over again. Variable temperature UV-Vis-NIR and CD spectroscopy studies showed that the DNA-SWNT complexes were thermally stable even at ~90 °C at pH 7. Broadband NIR laser (1064 nm) irradiation also demonstrated the stability of the DNA-SWNT complex against local heating introduced through excitation of the carbon nanotubes. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay confirmed the formation of a stable DNA-SWNT complex at pH 7 and also the generation of DNA secondary structures (A/i-motif) upon acidification. The interactions of ss-DNA with SWNTs cause debundling of the nanotubes from its assembly. Selective affinity of the semiconducting SWNTs towards DNA than the metallic ones enables separation of the two as evident from spectroscopic as well as electrical conductivity studies.Single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) oligomers (dA20, d[(C3TA2)3C3] or dT20) are able to disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in water at pH 7 through non-covalent wrapping on the nanotube surface. At lower pH, an alteration of the DNA secondary structure leads to precipitation of the SWNTs from the dispersion. The structural change of dA20 takes place

  16. Carbon-Nanotube Schottky Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Wong, Eric; Schlecht, Erich; Hunt, Brian; Siegel, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Schottky diodes based on semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes are being developed as essential components of the next generation of submillimeter-wave sensors and sources. Initial performance predictions have shown that the performance characteristics of these devices can exceed those of the state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes that have been the components of choice for room-temperature submillimeter-wave sensors for more than 50 years. For state-of-the-art Schottky diodes used as detectors at frequencies above a few hundred gigahertz, the inherent parasitic capacitances associated with their semiconductor junction areas and the resistances associated with low electron mobilities limit achievable sensitivity. The performance of such a detector falls off approximately exponentially with frequency above 500 GHz. Moreover, when used as frequency multipliers for generating signals, state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes exhibit extremely low efficiencies, generally putting out only micro-watts of power at frequencies up to 1.5 THz. The shortcomings of the state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes can be overcome by exploiting the unique electronic properties of semiconducting carbon nanotubes. A single-walled carbon nanotube can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on its chirality, and exhibits high electron mobility (recently reported to be approx.= 2x10(exp 5)sq cm/V-s) and low parasitic capacitance. Because of the narrowness of nanotubes, Schottky diodes based on carbon nanotubes have ultra-small junction areas (of the order of a few square nanometers) and consequent junction capacitances of the order of 10(exp -18) F, which translates to cutoff frequency >5 THz. Because the turn-on power levels of these devices are very low (of the order of nano-watts), the input power levels needed for pumping local oscillators containing these devices should be lower than those needed for local oscillators containing state-of-the-art solid

  17. Measurement of the resistance induced by a single atomic impurity on a (7,6) semiconducting carbon nanotube: scattering strength of individual potassium atoms as a function of gate voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchikawa, Ryuichi; Ahmadi, Amin; Heligman, Daniel; Zhang, Zhengyi; Mucciolo, Eduardo; Hone, James; Ishigami, Masa

    2015-03-01

    Despite many years of research, no measurements have been performed to determine resistance induced by impurities in carbon nanotubes. Over the last few years, we have developed a capability to measure the resistance induced by a single impurity atom on nanotubes with known chirality. Using this capability, we measured the resistance induced by an individual potassium atom on a (7,6) semiconducting carbon nanotube. The ``atomic'' resistance of potassium is found to be in the kohm range and has a strong dependence on the applied gate voltage. The scattering strength of the p-type (valence band) channel is approximately 20 times greater than that of the n-type (conduction band) channel. We integrate our atomically-controlled experimental result to a numerical recursive Green's function technique, which can precisely model the experiment, to understand the measured ``atomic'' resistance and the asymmetry. This work is based upon research supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0955625 and 1006230.

  18. Significant enhancement of infrared photodetector sensitivity using a semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube/C60 phototransistor.

    PubMed

    Park, Steve; Kim, Soo Jin; Nam, Ji Hyun; Pitner, Gregory; Lee, Tae Hoon; Ayzner, Alexander L; Wang, Huiliang; Fong, Scott W; Vosgueritchian, Michael; Park, Young Jun; Brongersma, Mark L; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-01-27

    A highly sensitive single-walled carbon nanotube/C60 -based infrared photo-transistor is fabricated with a responsivity of 97.5 A W(-1) and detectivity of 1.17 × 10(9) Jones at 1 kHz under a source/drain bias of -0.5 V. The much improved performance is enabled by this unique device architecture that enables a high photoconductive gain of ≈10(4) with a response time of several milliseconds.

  19. Ultrafast Terahertz Probes of Interacting Dark Excitons in Chirality-Specific Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Liang; Chatzakis, Ioannis; Patz, Aaron; Wang, Jigang

    2015-03-01

    Ultrafast terahertz spectroscopy accesses the dark excitonic ground state in resonantly excited (6,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes via internal, direct dipole-allowed transitions between the lowest-lying dark-bright pair state of ˜6 meV . An analytical model reproduces the response that enables the quantitative analysis of transient densities of dark excitons and e -h plasma, oscillator strength, transition energy renormalization, and dynamics. Nonequilibrium, yet stable, quasi-one-dimensional quantum states with dark excitonic correlations rapidly emerge even with increasing off-resonance photoexcitation and experience a unique crossover to complex phase-space filling of both dark and bright pair states, different from dense two- and three-dimensional excitons influenced by the thermalization, cooling, and ionization to free carriers.

  20. Ultrafast terahertz probes of interacting dark excitons in chirality-specific semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Liang; Chatzakis, Ioannis; Patz, Aaron; Wang, Jigang

    2015-03-13

    Ultrafast terahertz spectroscopy accesses the dark excitonic ground state in resonantly excited (6,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes via internal, direct dipole-allowed transitions between the lowest-lying dark-bright pair state of ∼6  meV. An analytical model reproduces the response that enables the quantitative analysis of transient densities of dark excitons and e-h plasma, oscillator strength, transition energy renormalization, and dynamics. Nonequilibrium, yet stable, quasi-one-dimensional quantum states with dark excitonic correlations rapidly emerge even with increasing off-resonance photoexcitation and experience a unique crossover to complex phase-space filling of both dark and bright pair states, different from dense two- and three-dimensional excitons influenced by the thermalization, cooling, and ionization to free carriers.

  1. The structure and the percolation behavior of a mixture of carbon nanotubes and molecular junctions: a Monte Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Gyemin; Jung, Hyun Tae; Shin, Kwanwoo; Sung, Bong June

    2011-05-01

    The structure and the percolation behavior of the composite of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), CNT molecular junctions and polymers are studied using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. We model a CNT as a rigid rod composed of hard spheres. "X" and "Y" molecular junctions of CNTs are constructed by joining four and three segments of CNTs, respectively. The model system consists of CNTs mixed with either "X" or "Y" molecular junctions. The system is equilibrated using Monte Carlo simulations and the equilibrated configurations are used to locate the clusters of connected molecules via a recursive algorithm. The fraction (P(perc)) of configurations with a percolating cluster is then estimated for a given total volume fraction (phi(t)) of molecules. When P(perc) reaches 0.5, phi(t) of the system is considered a percolation threshold concentration (phi(c)). The percolation behavior is found to be sensitive to the aspect ratio of CNTs and the concentration and the shape of molecular junctions. phi(c) is decreased with an increase in the aspect ratio of CNTs. As the mole fraction of molecular junctions is increased, phi(c) is decreased significantly, which suggests that molecular junctions could enhance the electric conductivity of CNT-polymer composites. X junctions are found to construct a percolating network more effectively than Y junctions. More interestingly, even though molecular junctions change the percolation behavior significantly, the site-site pair correlation functions of CNTs hardly show any difference as the mole fraction of molecular junctions is increased. This implies that the percolation of CNTs is determined by the subtle many-body correlation of CNTs that is not captured by the site-site pair correlation functions.

  2. High output voltage of magnetic tunnel junctions with a Cu(In0.8Ga0.2)Se2 semiconducting barrier with a low resistance-area product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukaiyama, Koki; Kasai, Shinya; Takahashi, Yukiko K.; Kondou, Kouta; Otani, Yoshichika; Mitani, Seiji; Hono, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Magnetoresistance (MR) and its bias-voltage dependence were investigated in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with a 2-nm-thick Cu(In0.8Ga0.2)Se2 semiconducting barrier. A relatively high MR ratio of 47% was observed with a low resistance-area product RA of 0.14 Ω·µm2 at 300 K. By increasing the bias voltage, a high output voltage (as high as 24 mV) was achieved; this value is significantly higher than those ever reported for MR devices with RA values less than 0.5 Ω·µm2. These MR performance characteristics of the MTJs with Cu(In0.8Ga0.2)Se2 are suitable for high-sensitivity read head sensors for hard disk drives with a recording density higher than 2 Tbit/in.2.

  3. Large magnetoresistance in Heusler-alloy-based epitaxial magnetic junctions with semiconducting Cu(In{sub 0.8}Ga{sub 0.2})Se{sub 2} spacer

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, S.; Takahashi, Y. K.; Ohkubo, T.; Cheng, P.-H.; Ikhtiar,; Mitani, S.; Hono, K.; Kondou, K.; Otani, Y.

    2016-07-18

    We investigated the structure and magneto-transport properties of magnetic junctions using a Co{sub 2}Fe(Ga{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 0.5}) Heusler alloy as ferromagnetic electrodes and a Cu(In{sub 0.8}Ga{sub 0.2})Se{sub 2} (CIGS) semiconductor as spacers. Owing to the semiconducting nature of the CIGS spacer, large magnetoresistance (MR) ratios of 40% at room temperature and 100% at 8 K were obtained for low resistance-area product (RA) values between 0.3 and 3 Ω μm{sup 2}. Transmission electron microscopy observations confirmed the fully epitaxial growth of the chalcopyrite CIGS layer, and the temperature dependence of RA indicated that the large MR was due to spin dependent tunneling.

  4. Nanotechnology with Carbon Nanotubes: Mechanics, Chemistry, and Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Nanotechnology of carbon nanotubes. The contents include: 1) Nanomechanics examples; 2) Experimental validation of nanotubes in composites; 3) Anisotropic plastic collapse; 4) Spatio-temporal scales, yielding single-wall nanotubes; 5) Side-wall functionalization of nanotubes; 6) multi-wall Y junction carbon nanotubes; 7) Molecular electronics with Nanotube junctions; 8) Single-wall carbon nanotube junctions; welding; 9) biomimetic dendritic neurons: Carbon nanotube, nanotube electronics (basics), and nanotube junctions for Devices,

  5. Transport Properties of p-n Junctions Formed in Boron/Nitrogen Doped Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammouri, Mahmoud; Vasiliev, Igor

    2014-03-01

    We apply ab initio computational methods based on density functional theory to study the transport properties of p-n junctions made of single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons. The p-n junctions are formed by doping the opposite ends of carbon nanostructures with boron and nitrogen atoms. Our calculations are carried out using the SIESTA electronic structure code combined with the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation functional. The transport properties are calculated using a self-consistent nonequilibrium Green's function method implemented in the TranSIESTA package. The modeled nanoscale p-n junctions exhibit linear I-V characteristics in the forward bias and nonlinear I-V characteristics with a negative differential resistance in the reverse bias. The computed transmission spectra and the I-V characteristics of the p-n junctions are compared to the results of other theoretical studies and to the available experimental data. Supported by NMSU GREG Award and by NSF CHE-1112388.

  6. PREFACE: Semiconducting oxides Semiconducting oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catlow, Richard; Walsh, Aron

    2011-08-01

    Semiconducting oxides are amongst the most widely studied and topical materials in contemporary condensed matter science, with interest being driven both by the fundamental challenges posed by their electronic and magnetic structures and properties, and by the wide range of applications, including those in catalysis and electronic devices. This special section aims to highlight recent developments in the physics of these materials, and to show the link between developing fundamental understanding and key application areas of oxide semiconductors. Several aspects of the physics of this wide and expanding range of materials are explored in this special section. Transparent semiconducting oxides have a growing role in several technologies, but challenges remain in understanding their electronic structure and the physics of charge carriers. A related problem concerns the nature of redox processes and the reactions which interconvert defects and charge carriers—a key issue which may limit the extent to which doping strategies may be used to alter electronic properties. The magnetic structures of the materials pose several challenges, while surface structures and properties are vital in controlling catalytic properties, including photochemical processes. The field profits from and exploits a wide range of contemporary physical techniques—both experimental and theoretical. Indeed, the interplay between experiment and computation is a key aspect of contemporary work. A number of articles describe applications of computational methods whose use, especially in modelling properties of defects in these materials, has a long and successful history. Several papers in this special section relate to work presented at a symposium within the European Materials Research Society (EMRS) meeting held in Warsaw in September 2010, and we are grateful to the EMRS for supporting this symposium. We would also like to thank the editorial staff of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for

  7. A cross-functional nanostructured platform based on carbon nanotube-Si hybrid junctions: where photon harvesting meets gas sensing.

    PubMed

    Rigoni, F; Pintossi, C; Drera, G; Pagliara, S; Lanti, G; Castrucci, P; De Crescenzi, M; Sangaletti, L

    2017-03-15

    A combination of the functionalities of carbon nanotube (CNT)-Si hybrid heterojunctions is presented as a novel method to steer the efficiency of the photovoltaic (PV) cell based on these junctions, and to increase the selectivity and sensitivity of the chemiresistor gas sensor operated with the p-doped CNT layer. The electrical characteristics of the junctions have been tracked by exposing the devices to oxidizing (NO2) and reducing (NH3) molecules. It is shown that when used as PV cells, the cell efficiency can be reversibly steered by gas adsorption, providing a tool to selectively dope the p-type layer through molecular adsorption. Tracking of the current-voltage curve upon gas exposure also allowed to use these cells as gas sensors with an enhanced sensitivity as compared to that provided by a readout of the electrical signal from the CNT layer alone. In turn, the chemiresistive response was improved, both in terms of selectivity and sensitivity, by operating the system under illumination, as the photo-induced charges at the junction increase the p-doping of CNTs making them more sensitive to NH3 and less to NO2.

  8. A cross-functional nanostructured platform based on carbon nanotube-Si hybrid junctions: where photon harvesting meets gas sensing

    PubMed Central

    Rigoni, F.; Pintossi, C.; Drera, G.; Pagliara, S.; Lanti, G.; Castrucci, P.; De Crescenzi, M.; Sangaletti, L.

    2017-01-01

    A combination of the functionalities of carbon nanotube (CNT)-Si hybrid heterojunctions is presented as a novel method to steer the efficiency of the photovoltaic (PV) cell based on these junctions, and to increase the selectivity and sensitivity of the chemiresistor gas sensor operated with the p-doped CNT layer. The electrical characteristics of the junctions have been tracked by exposing the devices to oxidizing (NO2) and reducing (NH3) molecules. It is shown that when used as PV cells, the cell efficiency can be reversibly steered by gas adsorption, providing a tool to selectively dope the p-type layer through molecular adsorption. Tracking of the current-voltage curve upon gas exposure also allowed to use these cells as gas sensors with an enhanced sensitivity as compared to that provided by a readout of the electrical signal from the CNT layer alone. In turn, the chemiresistive response was improved, both in terms of selectivity and sensitivity, by operating the system under illumination, as the photo-induced charges at the junction increase the p-doping of CNTs making them more sensitive to NH3 and less to NO2. PMID:28294128

  9. Electronic transport in oligo-para-phenylene junctions attached to carbon nanotube electrodes: Transition-voltage spectroscopy and chirality

    SciTech Connect

    Brito Silva, C. A. Jr.; Silva, S. J. S. da; Leal, J. F. P.; Pinheiro, F. A.; Del Nero, J.

    2011-06-15

    We have investigated, by means of a nonequilibrium Green's function method coupled to density functional theory, the electronic transport properties of molecular junctions composed of oligo-para-phenylene (with two, three, four, and five phenyl rings) covalently bridging the gap between metallic carbon nanotubes electrodes. We have found that the current is strongly correlated to a purely geometrical chiral parameter, both on-resonance and off-resonance. The Fowler-Nordheim plot exhibits minima, V{sub min}, that occur whenever the tail of a resonant transmission peak enters in the bias window. This result corroborates the scenario in which the coherent transport model gives the correct interpretation to transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS). We have shown that V{sub min} corresponds to voltages where a negative differential resistance (NDR) occurs. The finding that V{sub min} corresponds to voltages that exhibit NDR, which can be explained only in single-molecule junctions within the coherent transport model, further confirms the applicability of such models to adequately interpret TVS. The fact that the electrodes are organic is at the origin of differences in the behavior of V{sub min} if compared to the case of molecular junctions with nonorganic contacts treated so far.

  10. A cross-functional nanostructured platform based on carbon nanotube-Si hybrid junctions: where photon harvesting meets gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigoni, F.; Pintossi, C.; Drera, G.; Pagliara, S.; Lanti, G.; Castrucci, P.; de Crescenzi, M.; Sangaletti, L.

    2017-03-01

    A combination of the functionalities of carbon nanotube (CNT)-Si hybrid heterojunctions is presented as a novel method to steer the efficiency of the photovoltaic (PV) cell based on these junctions, and to increase the selectivity and sensitivity of the chemiresistor gas sensor operated with the p-doped CNT layer. The electrical characteristics of the junctions have been tracked by exposing the devices to oxidizing (NO2) and reducing (NH3) molecules. It is shown that when used as PV cells, the cell efficiency can be reversibly steered by gas adsorption, providing a tool to selectively dope the p-type layer through molecular adsorption. Tracking of the current-voltage curve upon gas exposure also allowed to use these cells as gas sensors with an enhanced sensitivity as compared to that provided by a readout of the electrical signal from the CNT layer alone. In turn, the chemiresistive response was improved, both in terms of selectivity and sensitivity, by operating the system under illumination, as the photo-induced charges at the junction increase the p-doping of CNTs making them more sensitive to NH3 and less to NO2.

  11. Multiple intra-tube junctions in the inner tube of peapod-derived double walled carbon nanotubes: theoretical study and experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ziwei; Li, Hui; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Endo, Morinobu; Ding, Feng

    2012-01-07

    The coalescence process of fullerenes in the hollow core of single walled carbon nanotubes is systematically explored by the kinetic Monte Carlo method. Two elongation (or growth) modes via the coalescence (i) between an inner tube and fullerenes and (ii) between neighboring inner tubes are identified. It is found that the coalescence of two inner tubes mostly creates a very stable intra-tube junction which is composed of multiple pentagon-heptagon pairs. As a consequence, the study predicts that the inner tube of peapod derived double walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) must contain many intra-tube junctions. Careful high resolution transmission electron microscopy observation on peapod-grown DWNT sample provides experimental evidence of the presence of the junctions.

  12. First-principles study on magnetic tunneling junctions with semiconducting CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2 barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Keisuke; Miura, Yoshio

    2017-02-01

    We theoretically investigate two magnetic tunneling junctions (MTJs) with different semiconductor barriers, CuInSe2 (CIS) and CuGaSe2 (CGS), sandwiched between Fe electrodes. We find that Δ1 wave functions provide dominant contributions to spin-dependent tunneling transport in both CIS- and CGS-based MTJs. We also find that the CGS-based MTJ has a much higher magnetoresistive (MR) ratio than the CIS-based MTJ, which indicates that a higher MR ratio is expected for a higher Ga concentration x in the recently reported CuIn1- x Ga x Se2-based MTJs. Furthermore, we show that the CIS- and CGS-based MTJs have much smaller resistance-area products (RA) than the conventional MgO-based MTJs.

  13. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics and Motors: A View from Classical and Quantum Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The tubular forms of fullerenes popularly known as carbon nanotubes are experimentally produced as single-, multiwall, and rope configurations. The nanotubes and nanoropes have shown to exhibit unusual mechanical and electronic properties. The single wall nanotubes exhibit both semiconducting and metallic behavior. In short undefected lengths they are the known strongest fibers which are unbreakable even when bent in half. Grown in ropes their tensile strength is approximately 100 times greater than steel at only one sixth the weight. Employing large scale classical and quantum molecular dynamics simulations we will explore the use of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube junctions in 2-, 3-, and 4-point molecular electronic device components, dynamic strength characterization for compressive, bending and torsional strains, and chemical functionalization for possible use in a nanoscale molecular motor. The above is an unclassified material produced for non-competitive basic research in the nanotechnology area.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics and Motors: A View from Classical and Quantum Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The tubular forms of fullerenes popularly known as carbon nanotubes are experimentally produced as single-, multiwall, and rope configurations. The nanotubes and nanoropes have shown to exhibit unusual mechanical and electronic properties. The single wall nanotubes exhibit both semiconducting and metallic behavior. In short undefected lengths they are the known strongest fibers which are unbreakable even when bent in half. Grown in ropes their tensile strength is approximately 100 times greater than steel at only one sixth the weight. Employing large scale classical and quantum molecular dynamics simulations we will explore the use of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube junctions in 2-, 3-, and 4-point molecular electronic device components, dynamic strength characterization for compressive, bending and torsional strains, and chemical functionalization for possible use in a nanoscale molecular motor. The above is an unclassified material produced for non-competitive basic research in the nanotechnology area.

  15. Synthesis, properties and applications of 3D carbon nanotube-graphene junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Zhao, Zhenghang; Niu, Jianbing; Xia, Zhenhai

    2016-11-01

    Integration of 1D carbon nanotubes and 2D graphene sheets through covalent bonding can create novel 3D nanoporous hybrid nanostructures that inherit unique mechanical, thermal, electrical and chemical properties of their building blocks and even have new properties in three dimensions. Great progress has been made in developing 3D carbon nanotube-graphene nanoarchitectures for various applications such as mechanical cushions, thermal sinkers, transistors, and renewable energy conversion. This review presents the recent advances in synthesis and analysis of the 3D nanostructures. Emphasis is put on design principles, molecular structures, processes and properties of the materials.

  16. Gate voltage dependent characteristics of p-n diodes and bipolar transistors based on multiwall CN(x)/carbon nanotube intramolecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W J; Zhang, Q F; Chai, Y; Shen, X; Wu, J L

    2007-10-03

    The electrical transport characteristics of multiwall CN(x)/carbon nanotube intramolecular junctions were studied. The junctions could be used as diodes. We found that the rectification resulted from p-n junctions, not from metal-semiconductor junctions. The gate effect was very weak when the diodes were reverse biased. At forward bias, however, some of the p-n diodes could be n-type transistors. Experimental results supported the opinion that the gate voltage dependent property is derived from the Schottky barrier between the CN(x) part and the electrode. Using p-n diodes, a bipolar transistor with nanoscale components was built, whose behavior was very similar to that of a conventional planar bipolar transistor.

  17. Nanofluidic transport in branching nanochannels: a molecular sieve based on Y-junction nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Chen, Xi

    2009-05-07

    Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we study the fundamental partitioning and screening behaviors of nanofluids confined in Y-junction nanochannels, and demonstrate their feasibility as efficient molecular sieves. A flow of gas or liquid molecules is partitioned at the junction and separated into the two side branches with different volume fractions. The opening gaps of the side branches are manipulated, and the sieve characteristics are explored as the gas phase, mixture composition/ratio, and opening dimensions are varied. The studies provide design principles for a molecular sieve with maximum probability passing one type of molecule into a screening branch, and meanwhile maximizing the rejection rate of other types of molecules.

  18. Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rao, C N; Satishkumar, B C; Govindaraj, A; Nath, M

    2001-02-16

    Carbon nanotubes were discovered soon after the successful laboratory synthesis of fullerenes. Since their discovery in 1991, there has been intensive research activity in the area of carbon nanotubes, not only because of their fascinating structural features and properties, but also because of their potential technological applications. There is increasing experimental evidence to show that carbon nanotubes may find use in nanoelectronic devices, displays, and in hydrogen storage. In this article, we discuss various important aspects related to the synthesis, structure, characterization, and mechanism of formation of multi-walled and single-walled carbon nanotubes, followed by a presentation of the important electronic, mechanical, hydrogen storage, and other properties of the nanotubes. Doping, as well as other chemical manipulations with boron and nitrogen, bring about significant changes in the properties of the nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes also serve as useful templates to make other nanostructures. Layered metal chalcogenides, boron nitride, and other materials form nanotubes and provide considerable scope for study.

  19. Hetero-junction carbon nanotube FET with lightly doped drain and source regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Reza; Doorzad, Leila

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new structure was introduced for carbon nanotube (CNT) MOSFET transistors. The proposed structure was composed of two different nanotubes for the source/drain and channel regions. Electrical characteristics of this structure were investigated using nonequilibrium Green’s function approach. Results of the simulations demonstrated that the proposed hetero-structure had almost the same ON-current and much less OFF-current and as a result higher ION/IOFF ratio than the conventional homo-structure. Results of the comparison between switching behavior in equal ION/IOFF ratio showed that, although the proposed structure had longer delay, its power dissipation for every switching event was less than that of the conventional structure. A further comparison of the switching characteristic in equal ON-current values showed that the proposed structure enjoys from shorter delay and also consumes less power-delay product (PDP) when compared to the LDDS structure.

  20. Designing nanogadgets by interconnecting carbon nanotubes with zinc layers.

    PubMed

    Khazaei, Mohammad; Lee, Sang Uck; Pichierri, Fabio; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2008-05-01

    Using first-principles calculations we propose a new approach for the design of functional units obtained by interconnecting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with different numbers of zinc layers. The theoretical investigations on electron transport properties of the resulting 1D heterojunctions containing CNTs with same or different chiralities (i.e., metallic or semiconducting) and one, two, or three zinc layers illustrate that the junctions with two semiconducting CNTs show semiconducting I-V characteristics while the junctions with two different CNT electrodes (metallic and semiconducting) show rectifying diode properties. The remarkable features emerging from this study is that the zinc layers behave as a momentum filter (near the Fermi energy the Bloch states having the same orbital character as the molecular states conduct well) when they are inserted within metallic CNT electrodes thereby providing 1D heterojunctions that can act as a wire-like, negative differential resistance (NDR), or varistor-type nanoscale device. Our results prove the idea that it is possible to design specific heterojunctions, which can select a conducting channel between two electrodes. Also, it is worth mentioning that in this study for the first time we have designed a nanoscale device with the characteristics of a varistor.

  1. Change in Chirality of Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Can Overcome Anionic Surfactant Stabilization: A Systematic Study of Aggregation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Iftheker A.; Flora, Joseph R. V.; Nabiul Afrooz, A. R. M.; Aich, Nirupam; Schierz, P. Ariette; Ferguson, P. Lee; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Saleh, Navid B.

    2015-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes’ (SWNT) effectiveness in applications is enhanced by debundling or stabilization. Anionic surfactants are known to effectively stabilize SWNTs. However, the role of specific chirality on surfactant-stabilized SWNT aggregation has not been studied to date. The aggregation behavior of chirally enriched (6,5) and (7,6) semiconducting SWNTs, functionalized with three anionic surfactants—sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), and sodium deoxycholate (SDOCO)—was evaluated with time-resolved dynamic light scattering. A wide range of mono- (NaCl) and di-valent (CaCl2) electrolytes as well as a 2.5 mg TOC/L Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA) were used as background chemistry. Overall, SDBS showed the most effectiveness in SWNT stability, followed by SDOCO and SDS. However, the relatively larger diameter (7,6) chiral tubes compromised the surfactant stability, compared to (6,5) chiral enrichment, due to enhanced van der Waals interaction. The presence of di-valent electrolytes overshadowed the chirality effects and resulted in similar aggregation behavior for both the SWNT samples. Molecular modeling results enumerated key differences in surfactant conformation on SWNT surfaces and identified interaction energy changes between the two chiralities to delineate aggregation mechanisms. The stability of SWNTs increased in the presence of SRHA under 10 mM monovalent and mixed electrolyte conditions. The results suggest that change in chirality can overcome surfactant stabilization of semiconducting SWNTs. SWNT stability can also be strongly influenced by the anionic surfactant structure. PMID:26855611

  2. Rectifying performance and negative differential behavior in graphite—chain—carbon nanotube junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Ming; Li, Jiangfan; Liew, K. M.; Yuan, Chris

    2014-01-13

    In this paper, the (5, 5) capped carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in contact with different lengths of sp monoatomic chains grown on the surface of graphite substrate are fabricated and its electronic transport properties sandwiched between CNT and graphite electrodes are investigated. The first-principles calculations based on nonequilibrium Green's function in combination with density-functional theory show that their rectifying performance and negative differential resistance behavior are observed under very low biases and obviously are enhanced when the length increases. From our analysis, the charge transfer, transmission spectra, projected density of states and evolutions of molecular orbitals are responsible for these phenomena.

  3. Rectifying performance and negative differential behavior in graphite—chain—carbon nanotube junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Ming; Li, Jiangfan; Liew, K. M.; Yuan, Chris

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the (5, 5) capped carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in contact with different lengths of sp monoatomic chains grown on the surface of graphite substrate are fabricated and its electronic transport properties sandwiched between CNT and graphite electrodes are investigated. The first-principles calculations based on nonequilibrium Green's function in combination with density-functional theory show that their rectifying performance and negative differential resistance behavior are observed under very low biases and obviously are enhanced when the length increases. From our analysis, the charge transfer, transmission spectra, projected density of states and evolutions of molecular orbitals are responsible for these phenomena.

  4. High performance thin film transistors based on regioregular poly(3-dodecylthiophene)-sorted large diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Qian, Long; Xu, Wenya; Nie, Shuhong; Gu, Weibing; Zhang, Jianhui; Zhao, Jianwen; Lin, Jian; Chen, Zheng; Cui, Zheng

    2013-05-01

    In this work, a simple and rapid method to selectively sort semiconducting-SWCNTs (sc-SWCNTs) with large diameters using regioregular poly(3-dodecylthiophene) (rr-P3DDT) is presented. The absorption spectra and Raman spectra demonstrated that metallic species of arc discharge SWCNTs were effectively removed after interaction with rr-P3DDT in toluene with the aid of sonication and centrifugation. The sorted sc-SWCNT inks have been directly used to fabricate thin film transistors (TFTs) by dip-coating, drop-casting and inkjet printing. TFTs with an effective mobility of ~34 cm2 V-1 s-1 and on-off ratios of ~107 have been achieved by dip coating and drop casting the ink on SiO2/Si substrates with pre-patterned interdigitated gold electrode arrays. The printed devices also showed excellent electrical properties with a mobility of up to 6.6 cm2 V-1 s-1 and on-off ratios of up to 105. Printed inverters based on the TFTs have been constructed on glass substrates, showing a maximum voltage gain of 112 at a Vdd of -5 V. This work paves the way for making printable logic circuits for real applications.In this work, a simple and rapid method to selectively sort semiconducting-SWCNTs (sc-SWCNTs) with large diameters using regioregular poly(3-dodecylthiophene) (rr-P3DDT) is presented. The absorption spectra and Raman spectra demonstrated that metallic species of arc discharge SWCNTs were effectively removed after interaction with rr-P3DDT in toluene with the aid of sonication and centrifugation. The sorted sc-SWCNT inks have been directly used to fabricate thin film transistors (TFTs) by dip-coating, drop-casting and inkjet printing. TFTs with an effective mobility of ~34 cm2 V-1 s-1 and on-off ratios of ~107 have been achieved by dip coating and drop casting the ink on SiO2/Si substrates with pre-patterned interdigitated gold electrode arrays. The printed devices also showed excellent electrical properties with a mobility of up to 6.6 cm2 V-1 s-1 and on-off ratios of up to 105

  5. High performance thin film transistors based on regioregular poly(3-dodecylthiophene)-sorted large diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Qian, Long; Xu, Wenya; Nie, Shuhong; Gu, Weibing; Zhang, Jianhui; Zhao, Jianwen; Lin, Jian; Chen, Zheng; Cui, Zheng

    2013-05-21

    In this work, a simple and rapid method to selectively sort semiconducting-SWCNTs (sc-SWCNTs) with large diameters using regioregular poly(3-dodecylthiophene) (rr-P3DDT) is presented. The absorption spectra and Raman spectra demonstrated that metallic species of arc discharge SWCNTs were effectively removed after interaction with rr-P3DDT in toluene with the aid of sonication and centrifugation. The sorted sc-SWCNT inks have been directly used to fabricate thin film transistors (TFTs) by dip-coating, drop-casting and inkjet printing. TFTs with an effective mobility of ∼34 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and on-off ratios of ∼10(7) have been achieved by dip coating and drop casting the ink on SiO2/Si substrates with pre-patterned interdigitated gold electrode arrays. The printed devices also showed excellent electrical properties with a mobility of up to 6.6 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and on-off ratios of up to 10(5). Printed inverters based on the TFTs have been constructed on glass substrates, showing a maximum voltage gain of 112 at a V(dd) of -5 V. This work paves the way for making printable logic circuits for real applications.

  6. Nanotube

    SciTech Connect

    LEONARD, FRANCOIS; KIENLE, DIEGO; & STEWART, DEREK

    2007-09-13

    This is a source code to calculate the current-voltage characteristics, the charge distribution and the electrostatic potential in carbon nanotube devices. The code utilizes the non-equilibrium Green's function method, implemented in a tight-binding scheme, to calculate the charge distribution and the energy-dependent transmission function, from which the current or the conductance are obtained. The electrostatic potential is obtained by solving Poisson's equation on a grid with boundary conditions on the electrodes, and at other interfaces. Self-consistency between the charge and the electrostatic potential is achieved using a linear mixing method. Different versions of the code allow the modeling of different types of nanotube devices: Version 1.0: Modeling of carbon nanotube electronic devices with cylindrical symmetry Version 1.1: Modeling of planar carbon nanotube electronic devices Version 1.2: Modeling of photocurrent in carbon nanotube devices

  7. Rationally designed graphene-nanotube 3D architectures with a seamless nodal junction for efficient energy conversion and storage

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yuhua; Ding, Yong; Niu, Jianbing; Xia, Zhenhai; Roy, Ajit; Chen, Hao; Qu, Jia; Wang, Zhong Lin; Dai, Liming

    2015-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and 2D single-atomic layer graphene have superior thermal, electrical, and mechanical properties. However, these nanomaterials exhibit poor out-of-plane properties due to the weak van der Waals interaction in the transverse direction between graphitic layers. Recent theoretical studies indicate that rationally designed 3D architectures could have desirable out-of-plane properties while maintaining in-plane properties by growing CNTs and graphene into 3D architectures with a seamless nodal junction. However, the experimental realization of seamlessly-bonded architectures remains a challenge. We developed a strategy of creating 3D graphene-CNT hollow fibers with radially aligned CNTs (RACNTs) seamlessly sheathed by a cylindrical graphene layer through a one-step chemical vapor deposition using an anodized aluminum wire template. By controlling the aluminum wire diameter and anodization time, the length of the RACNTs and diameter of the graphene hollow fiber can be tuned, enabling efficient energy conversion and storage. These fibers, with a controllable surface area, meso-/micropores, and superior electrical properties, are excellent electrode materials for all-solid-state wire-shaped supercapacitors with poly(vinyl alcohol)/H2SO4 as the electrolyte and binder, exhibiting a surface-specific capacitance of 89.4 mF/cm2 and length-specific capacitance up to 23.9 mF/cm, — one to four times the corresponding record-high capacities reported for other fiber-like supercapacitors. Dye-sensitized solar cells, fabricated using the fiber as a counter electrode, showed a power conversion efficiency of 6.8% and outperformed their counterparts with an expensive Pt wire counter electrode by a factor of 2.5. These novel fiber-shaped graphene-RACNT energy conversion and storage devices are so flexible they can be woven into fabrics as power sources. PMID:26601246

  8. Communication of Ca(2+) signals via tunneling membrane nanotubes is mediated by transmission of inositol trisphosphate through gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Lock, Jeffrey T; Parker, Ian; Smith, Ian F

    2016-10-01

    Tunneling membrane nanotubes (TNTs) are thin membrane projections linking cell bodies separated by many micrometers, which are proposed to mediate signaling and even transfer of cytosolic contents between distant cells. Several reports describe propagation of Ca(2+) signals between distant cells via TNTs, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Utilizing a HeLa M-Sec cell line engineered to upregulate TNTs we replicated previous findings that mechanical stimulation elicits robust cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations that propagate to surrounding, physically separate cells. However, whereas this was previously interpreted to involve intercellular communication through TNTs, we found that Ca(2+) signal propagation was abolished - even in TNT-connected cells - after blocking ATP-mediated paracrine signaling with a cocktail of extracellular inhibitors. To then establish whether gap junctions may enable cell-cell signaling via TNTs under these conditions, we expressed sfGFP-tagged connexin-43 (Cx43) in HeLa M-Sec cells. We observed robust communication of mechanically-evoked Ca(2+) signals between distant but TNT-connected cells, but only when both cells expressed Cx43. Moreover, we also observed communication of Ca(2+) signals evoked in one cell by local photorelease of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). Ca(2+) responses in connected cells began after long latencies at intracellular sites several microns from the TNT connection site, implicating intercellular transfer of IP3 and subsequent IP3-mediated Ca(2+) liberation, and not Ca(2+) itself, as the mediator between TNT-connected, Cx43-expressing cells. Our results emphasize the need to control for paracrine transmission in studies of cell-cell signaling via TNTs and indicate that, in this cell line, TNTs do not establish cytosolic continuity between connected cells but rather point to the crucial importance of connexins to enable communication of cytosolic Ca(2+) signals via TNTs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  9. Nano-sensors based on nanotubes: deformed-nanotubes transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farajian, Amir A.; Yakobson, Boris I.; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2003-03-01

    The main purpose of the present work is to establishing a correspondence between mechanical deformation and transport properties, which is presumably useful in nano-sensor applications. As a byproduct of this study, the potential differences in the mechanical behavior of armchair and zigzag tubes, as well as that of armchair-zigzag junctions, are also revealed. We use a tight-binding model to describe the nanotubes. Two different nanotubes are considered here, namely an armchair (6,6) and a zigzag (10,0). A relatively long portion of each of these tubes, as well as a portion of their junction, is considered, and the relaxed structures for different bending angles are derived. After obtaining the relaxed structures, the GreenÂ's function approach is employed in order to obtain the conductance of the systems under consideration. The current-voltage characteristics are then determined using the Landauer-Büttiker formalism. It is concluded that a large change in conductance usually is accompanied by severe deformations. For large bending angles a slight gap widening is observed for both the semiconducting and kink structures. It is observed that I-V characteristics indeed depend on the bending angle, hence the possibility of usage as nano-sensor.

  10. Engineering of contact resistance between transparent single-walled carbon nanotube films and a-Si:H single junction solar cells by gold nanodots.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeehwan; Hong, Augustin J; Chandra, Bhupesh; Tulevski, George S; Sadana, Devendra K

    2012-04-10

    The viability of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a transparent conducting electrode on a-Si:H based single junction solar cells was explored. A Schottky barrier formed at a SWCNT/a-Si:H interface was removed by introducing high work function gold nanodots at the SWCNT/a-Si:H interface. This allows comparable device performance from SWCNT-electrode-based a-Si:H solar cells to that obtained by using conventional transparent conducting oxides. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Collaborative Research and Development (CR&D). Delivery Order 0056: Novel Nanotube Synthesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    synthesis routes for nanotubes that are not pure carbon, e.g., boron nitride , boron -carbon nitride . Carbon nanotubes ...the fact that semiconducting nanotubes are mixed with metallic nanotubes in as-grown samples. Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are structural...AFRL-RX-WP-TM-2010-4091 COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT (CR&D) Delivery Order 0056: Novel Nanotube Synthesis Myung Jong

  12. Nitrogen doping in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ewels, C P; Glerup, M

    2005-09-01

    Nitrogen doping of single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes is of great interest both fundamentally, to explore the effect of dopants on quasi-1D electrical conductors, and for applications such as field emission tips, lithium storage, composites and nanoelectronic devices. We present an extensive review of the current state of the art in nitrogen doping of carbon nanotubes, including synthesis techniques, and comparison with nitrogen doped carbon thin films and azofullerenes. Nitrogen doping significantly alters nanotube morphology, leading to compartmentalised 'bamboo' nanotube structures. We review spectroscopic studies of nitrogen dopants using techniques such as X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and Raman studies, and associated theoretical models. We discuss the role of nanotube curvature and chirality (notably whether the nanotubes are metallic or semiconducting), and the effect of doping on nanotube surface chemistry. Finally we review the effect of nitrogen on the transport properties of carbon nanotubes, notably its ability to induce negative differential resistance in semiconducting tubes.

  13. Electron transporting semiconducting polymers in organic electronics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingang; Zhan, Xiaowei

    2011-07-01

    Significant progress has been achieved in the preparation of semiconducting polymers over the past two decades, and successful commercial devices based on them are slowly beginning to enter the market. However, most of the conjugated polymers are hole transporting, or p-type, semiconductors that have seen a dramatic rise in performance over the last decade. Much less attention has been devoted to electron transporting, or n-type, materials that have lagged behind their p-type counterparts. Organic electron transporting materials are essential for the fabrication of organic p-n junctions, organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs), n-channel organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and complementary logic circuits. In this critical review we focus upon recent developments in several classes of electron transporting semiconducting polymers used in OLEDs, OFETs and OPVs, and survey and analyze what is currently known concerning electron transporting semiconductor architecture, electronic structure, and device performance relationships (87 references).

  14. Evidence for high-efficiency exciton dissociation at polymer/single-walled carbon nanotube interfaces in planar nano-heterojunction photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Ham, Moon-Ho; Paulus, Geraldine L C; Lee, Chang Young; Song, Changsik; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh; Choi, Wonjoon; Han, Jae-Hee; Strano, Michael S

    2010-10-26

    There is significant interest in combining carbon nanotubes with semiconducting polymers for photovoltaic applications because of potential advantages from smaller exciton transport lengths and enhanced charge separation. However, to date, bulk heterojunction (BHJ) devices have demonstrated relatively poor efficiencies, and little is understood about the polymer/nanotube junction. To investigate this interface, we fabricate a planar nano-heterojunction comprising well-isolated millimeter-long single-walled carbon nanotubes underneath a poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) layer. The resulting junctions display photovoltaic efficiencies per nanotube ranging from 3% to 3.82%, which exceed those of polymer/nanotube BHJs by a factor of 50-100. The increase is attributed to the absence of aggregate formation in this planar device geometry. It is shown that the polymer/nanotube interface itself is responsible for exciton dissociation. Typical open-circuit voltages are near 0.5 V with fill factors of 0.25-0.3, which are largely invariant with the number of nanotubes per device and P3HT thickness. A maximum efficiency is obtained for a 60 nm-thick P3HT layer, which is predicted by a Monte Carlo simulation that takes into account exciton generation, transport, recombination, and dissociation. This platform is promising for further understanding the potential role of polymer/nanotube interfaces for photovoltaic applications.

  15. Strain Sensitivity in Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Multifunctional Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. M. (Technical Monitor); Smits, Jan M., VI

    2005-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes represent the future of structural aerospace vehicle systems due to their unparalleled strength characteristics and demonstrated multifunctionality. This multifunctionality rises from the CNT's unique capabilities for both metallic and semiconducting electron transport, electron spin polarizability, and band gap modulation under strain. By incorporating the use of electric field alignment and various lithography techniques, a single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) test bed for measurement of conductivity/strain relationships has been developed. Nanotubes are deposited at specified locations through dielectrophoresis. The circuit is designed such that the central, current carrying section of the nanotube is exposed to enable atomic force microscopy and manipulation in situ while the transport properties of the junction are monitored. By applying this methodology to sensor development a flexible single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) based strain sensitive device has been developed. Studies of tensile testing of the flexible SWNT device vs conductivity are also presented, demonstrating the feasibility of using single walled HiPCO (high-pressure carbon monoxide) carbon nanotubes as strain sensing agents in a multi-functional materials system.

  16. Low dimensional semiconducting nanostructures: Stability, trends and promises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanaguru, Prabath

    Systematic studies of low dimensional semiconducting nanostructures have been performed. In particular, silicon-germanium (SiGe) armchair type nanotubes, and both zigzag and armchair type nanoribbons were used to represent the bottom-up approach while hematite nanoribbons were used to represent the top down approach. Four high symmetric nanostructure atomic arrangements were identified. All the SiGe nanotubes and SiGe nanoribbons show definite semiconducting character and the band gaps span over large range. Zigzag SiGe nanoribbons show direct band gap nature indicating potential applications in opto-electronic devices. Standalone SiGe nanoribbons may roll into nanotubes depending on the atomic arrangement. Li adsorption on SiGe nanotubes indicated that SiGe nanotubes have potential as anode material in Li-ion battery technology when the nanotube length is over 20 A. Most stable site for Li adsorption is Si Top site and most preferred site is Ge Top. Intrinsic puckered surface nature screen the adsorbed Li from each other and hence, increase the charge density. Hydrogen atomic adsorption increases the band gap while oxygen breaks the nanotube-wall bonds and incorporates into nanotube lattice structure. Hematite nanoribbons based on two surfaces, (110) and (104) were studied. For each surface, depending on the termination direction, it can be identified two types. Both types based on (110) surface show definite semiconducting character. One type of (104) surface based nanoribbons show surface modification while the other type obtained built-in oxygen vacancy which acquired the spin dependent transport properties and hence, possible applications in spintronics area.

  17. Engineering carbon nanotubes and nanotube circuits using electrical breakdown.

    PubMed

    Collins, P G; Arnold, M S; Avouris, P

    2001-04-27

    Carbon nanotubes display either metallic or semiconducting properties. Both large, multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs), with many concentric carbon shells, and bundles or "ropes" of aligned single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), are complex composite conductors that incorporate many weakly coupled nanotubes that each have a different electronic structure. Here we demonstrate a simple and reliable method for selectively removing single carbon shells from MWNTs and SWNT ropes to tailor the properties of these composite nanotubes. We can remove shells of MWNTs stepwise and individually characterize the different shells. By choosing among the shells, we can convert a MWNT into either a metallic or a semiconducting conductor, as well as directly address the issue of multiple-shell transport. With SWNT ropes, similar selectivity allows us to generate entire arrays of nanoscale field-effect transistors based solely on the fraction of semiconducting SWNTs.

  18. A novel investigation on carbon nanotube/ZnO, Ag/ZnO and Ag/carbon nanotube/ZnO nanowires junctions for harvesting piezoelectric potential on textile

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Azam Edberg, Jesper; Nur, Omer; Willander, Magnus

    2014-07-21

    In the present work, three junctions were fabricated on textile fabric as an alternative substrate for harvesting piezoelectric potential. First junction was formed on ordinary textile as (textile/multi-walled carbon nanotube film/zinc oxide nanowires (S1: T/CNTs/ZnO NWs)) and the other two were formed on conductive textile with the following layer sequence: conductive textile/zinc oxide nanowires (S2: CT/ZnO NWs) and conductive textile/multi-walled carbon nanotubes film/zinc oxide nanowires (S3: CT/CNTs/ZnO NWs). Piezoelectric potential was harvested by using atomic force microscopy in contact mode for the comparative analysis of the generated piezoelectric potential. ZnO NWs were synthesized by using the aqueous chemical growth method. Surface analysis of the grown nanostructures was performed by using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The growth orientation and crystalline size were studied by using X-ray diffraction technique. This study reveals that textile as an alternative substrate have many features like cost effective, highly flexible, nontoxic, light weight, soft, recyclable, reproducible, portable, wearable, and washable for nanogenerators fabrication with acceptable performance and with a wide choice of modification for obtaining large amount of piezoelectric potential.

  19. A novel investigation on carbon nanotube/ZnO, Ag/ZnO and Ag/carbon nanotube/ZnO nanowires junctions for harvesting piezoelectric potential on textile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Azam; Edberg, Jesper; Nur, Omer; Willander, Magnus

    2014-07-01

    In the present work, three junctions were fabricated on textile fabric as an alternative substrate for harvesting piezoelectric potential. First junction was formed on ordinary textile as (textile/multi-walled carbon nanotube film/zinc oxide nanowires (S1: T/CNTs/ZnO NWs)) and the other two were formed on conductive textile with the following layer sequence: conductive textile/zinc oxide nanowires (S2: CT/ZnO NWs) and conductive textile/multi-walled carbon nanotubes film/zinc oxide nanowires (S3: CT/CNTs/ZnO NWs). Piezoelectric potential was harvested by using atomic force microscopy in contact mode for the comparative analysis of the generated piezoelectric potential. ZnO NWs were synthesized by using the aqueous chemical growth method. Surface analysis of the grown nanostructures was performed by using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The growth orientation and crystalline size were studied by using X-ray diffraction technique. This study reveals that textile as an alternative substrate have many features like cost effective, highly flexible, nontoxic, light weight, soft, recyclable, reproducible, portable, wearable, and washable for nanogenerators fabrication with acceptable performance and with a wide choice of modification for obtaining large amount of piezoelectric potential.

  20. Carbon nanotube-amorphous silicon hybrid solar cell with improved conversion efficiency.

    PubMed

    Funde, Adinath M; Nasibulin, Albert G; Syed, Hashmi Gufran; Anisimov, Anton S; Tsapenko, Alexey; Lund, Peter; Santos, J D; Torres, I; Gandía, J J; Cárabe, J; Rozenberg, A D; Levitsky, Igor A

    2016-05-06

    We report a hybrid solar cell based on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) interfaced with amorphous silicon (a-Si). The high quality carbon nanotube network was dry transferred onto intrinsic a-Si forming Schottky junction for metallic SWNT bundles and heterojunctions for semiconducting SWNT bundles. The nanotube chemical doping and a-Si surface treatment minimized the hysteresis effect in current-voltage characteristics allowing an increase in the conversion efficiency to 1.5% under an air mass 1.5 solar spectrum simulator. We demonstrated that the thin SWNT film is able to replace a simultaneously p-doped a-Si layer and transparent conductive electrode in conventional amorphous silicon thin film photovoltaics.

  1. Graphenylene Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Koch, Andrew T; Khoshaman, Amir H; Fan, Harrison D E; Sawatzky, George A; Nojeh, Alireza

    2015-10-01

    A new type of carbon nanotube, based on the graphenylene motif, is investigated using density functional and tight-binding methods. Analogous to conventional graphene-based nanotubes, a two-dimensional graphenylene sheet can be "rolled" into a seamless cylinder in armchair, zigzag, or chiral orientations. The resulting nanotube can be described using the familiar (n,m) nomenclature and possesses 4-, 6-, and 12-membered rings, with three distinct bond lengths, indicating a nonuniform distribution of the electron density. The dodecagonal rings form pores, 3.3 Å in diameter in graphenylene, which become saddle-shaped paraboloids in smaller-diameter nanotubes. Density functional theory predicts zigzag nanotubes to be small-band gap semiconductors, with a generally decreasing band gap as the diameter increases. Interestingly, the calculations predict metallic characteristics for armchair nanotubes with small diameters (<2 nm), and small-band gap semiconducting characteristics for larger-diameter ones. Graphenylene nanotubes with indices mod(n-m,3) = 0 exhibit a band gap approximately equal to that of armchair graphenylene nanotubes with comparable diameter.

  2. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Photovoltaic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efstathiadis, Harry; Haldar, Pradeep; Landi, Brian J.; Denno, Patrick L.; DiLeo, Roberta A.; VanDerveer, William; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be envisioned as an individual graphene sheet rolled into a seamless cylinder (single-walled, SWNT), or concentric sheets as in the case of a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) (1). The role-up vector will determine the hexagonal arrangement and "chirality" of the graphene sheet, which will establish the nanotube to be metallic or semiconducting. The optoelectronic properties will depend directly on this chiral angle and the diameter of the SWNT, with semiconductor types exhibiting a band gap energy (2). Characteristic of MWNTs are the concentric graphene layers spaced 0.34 nm apart, with diameters from 10-200 nm and lengths up to hundreds of microns (2). In the case of SWNTs, the diameters range from 0.4 - 2 nm and lengths have been reported up to 1.5 cm (3). SWNTs have the distinguishable property of "bundling" together due to van der Waal's attractions to form "ropes." A comparison of these different structural types is shown in Figure 1. The use of SWNTS in space photovoltaic (PV) applications is attractive for a variety of reasons. Carbon nanotubes as a class of materials exhibit unprecedented optical, electrical, mechanical properties, with the added benefit of being nanoscale in size which fosters ideal interaction in nanomaterial-based devices like polymeric solar cells. The optical bandgap of semiconducting SWNTs can be varied from approx. 0.4 - 1.5 eV, with this property being inversely proportional to the nanotube diameter. Recent work at GE Global Research has shown where a single nanotube device can behave as an "ideal" pn diode (5). The SWNT was bridged over a SiO2 channel between Mo contacts and exhibited an ideality factor of 1, based on a fit of the current-voltage data using the diode equation. The measured PV efficiency under a 0.8 eV monochromatic illumination showed a power conversion efficiency of 0.2 %. However, the projected efficiency of these junctions is estimated to be > 5 %, especially when one considers the

  3. Superconducting-semiconducting nanowire hybrid microwave circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lange, G.; van Heck, B.; Bruno, A.; van Woerkom, D.; Geresdi, A.; Plissard, S. R.; Bakkers, E. P. A. M.; Akhmerov, A. R.; Dicarlo, L.

    2015-03-01

    Hybrid superconducting-semiconducting circuits offer a versatile platform for studying quantum effects in mesoscopic solid-state systems. We report the realization of hybrid artificial atoms based on Indium-Arsenide nanowire Josephson elements in a circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture. Transmon-like single-junction devices have gate-tunable transition frequencies. Split-junction devices behave as transmons near zero applied flux and as flux qubits near half flux quantum, wherein states with oppositely flowing persistent current can be driven by microwaves. This flux-qubit like behaviour results from non-sinusoidal current-phase relations in the nanowire Josephson elements. These hybrid microwave circuits are made entirely of magnetic-field compatible materials, offering new opportunities for hybrid experiments combining microwave circuits with polarized spin ensembles and Majorana bound states. We acknowledge funding from Microsoft Research and the Dutch Organization for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM).

  4. LDRD final report : chromophore-functionalized aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, Andrew L.; Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter; Krafcik, Karen Lee

    2011-09-01

    The goal of this project was to expand upon previously demonstrated single carbon nanotube devices by preparing a more practical, multi-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) device. As a late-start, proof-of-concept project, the work focused on the fabrication and testing of chromophore-functionalized aligned SWNT field effect transistors (SWNT-FET). Such devices have not yet been demonstrated. The advantages of fabricating aligned SWNT devices include increased device cross-section to improve sensitivity to light, elimination of increased electrical resistance at nanotube junctions in random mat devices, and the ability to model device responses. The project did not achieve the goal of fabricating and testing chromophore-modified SWNT arrays, but a new SWNT growth capability was established that will benefit future projects. Although the ultimate goal of fabricating and testing chromophore-modified SWNT arrays was not achieved, the work did lead to a new carbon nanotube growth capability at Sandia/CA. The synthesis of dense arrays of horizontally aligned SWNTs is a developing area of research with significant potential for new discoveries. In particular, the ability to prepare arrays of carbon nanotubes of specific electronic types (metallic or semiconducting) could yield new classes of nanoscale devices.

  5. Carbon Nanotube Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Colin; Patel, Yogeshwari; Postma, Henk W. Ch.

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement. PMID:22655070

  6. Carbon nanotube solar cells.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Colin; Patel, Yogeshwari; Postma, Henk W Ch

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement.

  7. Flexible CuS nanotubes-ITO film Schottky junction solar cells with enhanced light harvesting by using an Ag mirror.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunyan; Zhang, Zihan; Wu, Yiliang; Lv, Peng; Nie, Biao; Luo, Linbao; Wang, Li; Hu, Jigang; Jie, Jiansheng

    2013-02-01

    Here we report the fabrication of a novel photovoltaic device based on CuS nanotubes (CuSNTs) and indium tin oxide (ITO) Schottky junctions. Large-quantity synthesis of CuSNTs was accomplished via a solution-based sacrificial template method under moderate conditions, while ITO Schottky contacts were fabricated via micro-fabrication and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Upon light illumination, CuSNTs-ITO Schottky junctions exhibited pronounced photovoltaic behavior, giving rise to a power conversion efficiency of 1.17% on a conventional SiO(2)/Si substrate. Furthermore, by utilizing PET as the substrate, transparent and flexible CuSNTs-ITO solar cells were constructed and showed performance close to their device counterparts on a rigid substrate. Notably, it was found that the flexible devices were robust against tensile strain and could stand a bending angle up to ∼95°. To enhance the light absorption of the devices, an Ag mirror layer was deposited on the rear side of the PET substrate so as to allow multiple reflection and absorption of the incident light. As a result, the flexible devices showed a substantial performance improvement, yielding an efficiency of ∼2%. Our results demonstrate that low-cost and environmentally friendly CuSNTs-ITO solar cells are promising candidates for new-generation photovoltaic devices.

  8. Electrical characterization of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berliocchi, Marco; Brunetti, Francesca; Di Carlo, Aldo; Lugli, Paolo; Orlanducci, Silvia; Terranova, Maria Letizia

    2003-04-01

    Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) based nanotechnology appears to be promising for future nanoelectronics. The SWCNT may be either metallic or semiconducting and both metallic and semiconducting types of SWCNTs have been observed experimentally. This gives rise to intriguing possibilities to put together semiconductor-semiconductor and semiconductor-metal junctions for diodes and transistors. The potential for nanotubes in nanoelectronics devices, displays and nanosensors is enormous. However, in order to realize the potential of SWCNTs, it is critical to understand the properties of charge transport and to control phase purity, elicity and arrangement according to specific architectures. We have investigated the electrical properties of various SWCNTs samples whit different organization: bundles of SWCNTs, SWCNT fibres and different membranes and tablets obtained using SWCNTs purified and characterized. Electrical characterizations were carried out by a 4155B Agilent Semiconductor Parameter Analyser. In order to give a mechanical stability to SWCNTs fibres and bundles we have used a nafion matrix coating, so an electrical characterization has been performed on samples with and without this layer. I-V measurements were performed in vacuum and in air using aluminium interdigitated coplanar-electrodes (width=20mm or 40mm) on glass substrates. The behaviour observed is generally supralinear with currents of the order of mA in vacuum and lower values in air with the exception of the tablet samples where the behaviour is ohmic, the currents are higher and similar values of current are detected in air and vacuum.

  9. Semiconducting allotrope of graphene.

    PubMed

    Nisar, Jawad; Jiang, Xue; Pathak, Biswarup; Zhao, Jijun; Kang, Tae Won; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2012-09-28

    From first-principles calculations, we predict a planar stable graphene allotrope composed of a periodic array of tetragonal and octagonal (4, 8) carbon rings. The stability of this sheet is predicted from the room-temperature molecular dynamics study and the electronic structure is studied using state-of-the-art calculations such as the hybrid density functional and the GW approach. Moreover, the mechanical properties of (4, 8) carbon sheet are evaluated from the Young's modulus and intrinsic strength calculations. We find this is a stable planar semiconducting carbon sheet with a bandgap between 0.43 and 1.01 eV and whose mechanical properties are as good as graphene's.

  10. Microscopy of semiconducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennycook, S. J.

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of the trip was to present an invited talk at the 7th Oxford Conference on Microscopy of Semiconducting Materials entitled, High-Resolution Z-Contrast Imaging of Heterostructures and Superlattices, (Oxford, United Kingdom) and to visit VG Microscopes, East Grinstead, for discussions on the progress of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) 300-kV high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), which is currently on order. The traveler also visited three other institutions with 100-kV STEMs that either have or intend to purchase the necessary modifications to provide Z-contrast capability similar to that of the existing ORNL machine. Specifically, Max-Planck Institut fuer Metallforschung (Stuttgart, Germany); Cambridge University, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy (Cambridge, United Kingdom); and Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge University (Cambridge, United Kingdom) were visited. In addition, discussions were held with C. Humphreys on the possibility of obtaining joint funding for collaborative research involving electron beam writing and Z-contrast imaging in the Cambridge and Oak Ridge STEMs, respectively.

  11. Networks of semiconducting SWNTs: contribution of midgap electronic states to the electrical transport.

    PubMed

    Itkis, Mikhail E; Pekker, Aron; Tian, Xiaojuan; Bekyarova, Elena; Haddon, Robert C

    2015-08-18

    presence of midgap electronic states in the semiconducting SWNTs, which provide a source of low-energy excitations, which can contribute to hopping conductance along the nanotubes following fluctuation induced tunneling across the internanotube junctions, which together dominate the low temperature transport and limit the resistivity of the films. At high temperatures, the intrinsic carriers thermally activated across the bandgap as in a traditional semiconductor became available for band transport. The midgap states pin the Fermi level to the middle of the bandgap, and their origin is ascribed to defects in the SWNT walls. The presence of such midgap states has been reported in connection with scanning tunneling spectroscopy experiments, Coulomb blockade observations in low temperature electrical measurements, selective electrochemical deposition imaging, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, high resolution photocurrent spectroscopy, and the modeling of the electronic density of states associated with various defects. Midgap states are present in conventional semiconductors, but what is unusual in the present context is the extent of their contribution to the electrical transport in networks of semiconducting SWNTs. In this Account, we sharpen the focus on the midgap states in SC-SWNTs, their effect on the electronic properties of SC-SWNT networks, and the importance of these effects on efforts to develop electronic and photonic applications of SC-SWNTs.

  12. Electrical Transport Properties of Carbon Nanotube Metal-Semiconductor Heterojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukdar, Keka; Shantappa, Anil

    2016-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been proved to have promising applicability in various fields of science and technology. Their fascinating mechanical, electrical, thermal, optical properties have caught the attention of today’s world. We have discussed here the great possibility of using CNTs in electronic devices. CNTs can be both metallic and semiconducting depending on their chirality. When two CNTs of different chirality are joined together via topological defects, they may acquire rectifying diode property. We have joined two tubes of different chiralities through circumferential Stone-Wales defects and calculated their density of states by nearest neighbor tight binding approximation. Transmission function is also calculated to analyze whether the junctions can be used as electronic devices. Different heterojunctions are modeled and analyzed in this study. Internal stresses in the heterojunctions are also calculated by molecular dynamics simulation.

  13. Semiconducting polymers: the Third Generation.

    PubMed

    Heeger, Alan J

    2010-07-01

    There has been remarkable progress in the science and technology of semiconducting polymers during the past decade. The field has evolved from the early work on polyacetylene (the First Generation material) to a proper focus on soluble and processible polymers and co-polymers. The soluble poly(alkylthiophenes) and the soluble PPVs are perhaps the most important examples of the Second Generation of semiconducting polymers. Third Generation semiconducting polymers have more complex molecular structures with more atoms in the repeat unit. Important examples include the highly ordered and crystalline PDTTT and the ever-growing class of donor-acceptor co-polymers that has emerged in the past few years. Examples of the latter include the bithiophene-acceptor co-polymers pioneered by Konarka and the polycarbazole-acceptor co-polymers pioneered by Leclerc and colleagues. In this tutorial review, I will summarize progress in the basic physics, the materials science, the device science and the device performance with emphasis on the following recent studies of Third Generation semiconducting polymers: stable semiconducting polymers; self-assembly of bulk heterojunction (BHJ) materials by spontaneous phase separation; bulk heterojunction solar cells with internal quantum efficiency approaching 100%; high detectivity photodetectors fabricated from BHJ materials.

  14. Single Nanotube Spectral Imaging To Determine Molar Concentrations of Isolated Carbon Nanotube Species.

    PubMed

    Galassi, Thomas V; Jena, Prakrit V; Roxbury, Daniel; Heller, Daniel A

    2017-01-17

    Electronic and biological applications of carbon nanotubes can be highly dependent on the species (chirality) of nanotube, purity, and concentration. Existing bulk methods, such as absorbance spectroscopy, can quantify sp(2) carbon based on spectral bands, but nanotube length distribution, defects, and carbonaceous impurities can complicate quantification of individual particles. We present a general method to relate the optical density of a photoluminescent nanotube sample to the number of individual nanotubes. By acquiring 3-dimensional images of nanotubes embedded in a gel matrix with a reducing environment, we quantified all emissive nanotubes in a volume. Via spectral imaging, we assessed structural impurities and precisely determined molar concentrations of the (8,6) and (9,4) nanotube species. We developed an approach to obtain the molarity of any structurally enriched semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube preparation on a per-nanotube basis.

  15. Quantum capacitance modifies interionic interactions in semiconducting nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Alpha A.; Vella, Dominic; Goriely, Alain

    2016-02-01

    Nanopores made with low-dimensional semiconducting materials, such as carbon nanotubes and graphene slit pores, are used in supercapacitors. For modelling purposes, it is often assumed that such pores screen ion-ion interactions like metallic pores, i.e. that screening leads to an exponential decay of the interaction potential with ion separation. By introducing a quantum capacitance that accounts for the density of states in the material, we show that ion-ion interactions in carbon nanotubes and graphene slit pores actually decay algebraically with ion separation. This result suggests a new avenue of capacitance optimization based on tuning the electronic structure of a pore: a marked enhancement in capacitance might be achieved by developing nanopores made with metallic materials or bulk semimetallic materials.

  16. Thermoelectrics: Carbon nanotubes get high

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crispin, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Waste heat can be converted to electricity by thermoelectric generators, but their development is hindered by the lack of cheap materials with good thermoelectric properties. Now, carbon-nanotube-based materials are shown to have improved properties when purified to contain only semiconducting species and then doped.

  17. Effects of Plasma-Ion Irradiation on Structures and Properties of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    2009-10-01

    Nanocarbons of carbon allotropes have drawn great attention due to their high potential for unique properties and a variety of applications. Since carbon nanotubes among them are furnished with one-dimensional hollow inner-nanospaces, various kinds of atoms and molecules are possible to be injected into the nanospaces based on plasma nanotechnology, which could lead to innovative functionalization of the pristine ones. For that purpose original approaches using nanoscopic plasma processing mainly in ionic plasmas have been performed in order to develop SWNT(single-walled carbon nanotube)-, and DWNT(double-walled carbon nanotube)-based materials with novel functions corresponding to nano electronic and biological applications, where positive and negative ions with their energies and fluxes controlled are irradiated to immersed substrates coated with the pristine carbon nanotubes. Consequently, we have innovatively created various kinds of charge-/spin-exploited atoms and molecules encapsulated SWNTs and DWNTs. Finally, their electronic, magnetic, and optical properties are intensively investigated using a configuration of field effect transistor (FET) and a SQUID magnetometer. As a result, we have for the first time realized air-stable semi-conducting pn control, formed nano structures with magnetic semiconductor and ultimate air-stable nano pn-junctions, found distinct characteristics of negative differential resistance, and observed photoinduced electron transfer phenomena upon the encapsulated SWNTs and DWNTs.

  18. Thermal conductivity of chirality-sorted carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Feifei; Llinas, Juan P.; Li, Zuanyi; Estrada, David; Pop, Eric

    2016-03-01

    The thermal properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are of significant interest, yet their dependence on SWNT chirality has been, until now, not explored experimentally. Here, we used electrical heating and infrared thermal imaging to simultaneously study thermal and electrical transport in chirality-sorted SWNT networks. We examined solution processed 90% semiconducting, 90% metallic, purified unsorted (66% semiconducting), and as-grown HiPco SWNT films. The thermal conductivities of these films range from 80 to 370 W m-1 K-1 but are not controlled by chirality, instead being dependent on the morphology (i.e., mass and junction density, quasi-alignment) of the networks. The upper range of the thermal conductivities measured is comparable to that of the best metals (Cu and Ag), but with over an order of magnitude lower mass density. This study reveals important factors controlling the thermal properties of light-weight chirality-sorted SWNT films, for potential thermal and thermoelectric applications.

  19. Luminescent Organic Semiconducting Langmuir Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Agina, Elena V; Mannanov, Artur A; Sizov, Alexey S; Vechter, Olga; Borshchev, Oleg V; Bakirov, Artem V; Shcherbina, Maxim A; Chvalun, Sergei N; Konstantinov, Vladislav G; Bruevich, Vladimir V; Kozlov, Oleg V; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S; Paraschuk, Dmitry Yu; Ponomarenko, Sergei A

    2017-05-31

    In recent years, monolayer organic field-effect devices such as transistors and sensors have demonstrated their high potential. In contrast, monolayer electroluminescent organic field-effect devices are still in their infancy. One of the key challenges here is to create an organic material that self-organizes in a monolayer and combines efficient charge transport with luminescence. Herein, we report a novel organosilicon derivative of oligothiophene-phenylene dimer D2-Und-PTTP-TMS (D2, tetramethyldisiloxane; Und, undecylenic spacer; P, 1,4-phenylene; T, 2,5-thiophene; TMS, trimethylsilyl) that meets these requirements. The self-assembled Langmuir monolayers of the dimer were investigated by steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray reflectometry, and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction, and their semiconducting properties were evaluated in organic field-effect transistors. We found that the best uniform, fully covered, highly ordered monolayers were semiconducting. Thus, the ordered two-dimensional (2D) packing of conjugated organic molecules in the semiconducting Langmuir monolayer is compatible with its high-yield luminescence, so that 2D molecular aggregation per se does not preclude highly luminescent properties. Our findings pave the way to the rational design of functional materials for monolayer organic light-emitting transistors and other optoelectronic devices.

  20. Structure of BN Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik-Aktas, Ayten; Tao, Jing; Zuo, Jian-Min

    2004-03-01

    Boron nitride (BN) nanotubes have been the subject of intensive scientific study in recent years due to their unique properties. BN nanotubes have uniform wide gap semiconducting properties regardless of their chirality and diameter [1]. On the other hand electrical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) depend on their chirality. This unique difference between BN and CNTs makes BN nanotubes a better candidate for nano electronics and/or other nano technology applications. HRTEM and nano area electron diffraction (NAD) studies have been conducted to better understand the microstructure of BN nanotubes. In addition to TEM analysis we would like to present the results of image simulations and compare the NAD patterns with the simulated diffraction patterns. Preliminary results suggest that the BN nanotubes that have been investigated in this study showed overwhelmingly near zigzag chirality. Average diameter of the BN tubes are about 35-40 nm. Regular patches of perfect crystals have been observed along the length of the tubes except tubes with very large diameters (Dng 150 nm). Other regions of the BN nanotubes were quite defective. CNT templates have been employed in the synthesis of our samples. [1] X. Blasé, A. Rubio, S.G. Louie, M.L. Cohen, Europhysics Letters, 28 (1994) 335.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  2. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  3. Doping of Semiconducting Atomic Chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Due to the rapid progress in atom manipulation technology, atomic chain electronics would not be a dream, where foreign atoms are placed on a substrate to form a chain, and its electronic properties are designed by controlling the lattice constant d. It has been shown theoretically that a Si atomic chain is metallic regardless of d and that a Mg atomic chain is semiconducting or insulating with a band gap modified with d. For electronic applications, it is essential to establish a method to dope a semiconducting chain, which is to control the Fermi energy position without altering the original band structure. If we replace some of the chain atoms with dopant atoms randomly, the electrons will see random potential along the chain and will be localized strongly in space (Anderson localization). However, if we replace periodically, although the electrons can spread over the chain, there will generally appear new bands and band gaps reflecting the new periodicity of dopant atoms. This will change the original band structure significantly. In order to overcome this dilemma, we may place a dopant atom beside the chain at every N lattice periods (N > 1). Because of the periodic arrangement of dopant atoms, we can avoid the unwanted Anderson localization. Moreover, since the dopant atoms do not constitute the chain, the overlap interaction between them is minimized, and the band structure modification can be made smallest. Some tight-binding results will be discussed to demonstrate the present idea.

  4. Ohmic contacts to semiconducting diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidler, James R.; Taylor, M. J.; Zeisse, Carl R.; Hewett, C. A.; Delahoussaye, Paul R.

    1990-10-01

    Work was carried out to improve the electron beam evaporation system in order to achieve better deposited films. The basic system is an ion pumped vacuum chamber, with a three-hearth, single-gun e-beam evaporator. Four improvements were made to the system. The system was thoroughly cleaned and new ion pump elements, an e-gun beam adjust unit, and a more accurate crystal monitor were installed. The system now has a base pressure of 3 X 10(exp -9) Torr, and can easily deposit high-melting-temperature metals such as Ta with an accurately controlled thickness. Improved shadow masks were also fabricated for better alignment and control of corner contacts for electrical transport measurements. Appendices include: A Thermally Activated Solid State Reaction Process for Fabricating Ohmic Contacts to Semiconducting Diamond; Tantalum Ohmic Contacts to Diamond by a Solid State Reaction Process; Metallization of Semiconducting Diamond: Mo, Mo/Au, and Mo/Ni/Au; Specific Contact Resistance Measurements of Ohmic Contracts to Diamond; and Electrical Activation of Boron Implanted into Diamond.

  5. Surface physics of semiconducting nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Michele; Rurali, Riccardo

    2016-02-01

    Semiconducting nanowires (NWs) are firm candidates for novel nanoelectronic devices and a fruitful playground for fundamental physics. Ultra-thin nanowires, with diameters below 10 nm, present exotic quantum effects due to the confinement of the wave functions, e.g. widening of the electronic band-gap, deepening of the dopant states. However, although several reports of sub-10 nm wires exist to date, the most common NWs have diameters that range from 20 to 200 nm, where these quantum effects are absent or play a very minor role. Yet, the research activity on this field is very intense and these materials still promise to provide an important paradigm shift for the design of emerging electronic devices and different kinds of applications. A legitimate question is then: what makes a nanowire different from bulk systems? The answer is certainly the large surface-to-volume ratio. In this article we discuss the most salient features of surface physics and chemistry in group-IV semiconducting nanowires, focusing mostly on Si NWs. First we review the state-of-the-art of NW growth to achieve a smooth and controlled surface morphology. Next we discuss the importance of a proper surface passivation and its role on the NW electronic properties. Finally, stressing the importance of a large surface-to-volume ratio and emphasizing the fact that in a NW the surface is where most of the action takes place, we discuss molecular sensing and molecular doping.

  6. Electrochemical preparation of vertically aligned, hollow CdSe nanotubes and their p-n junction hybrids with electrodeposited Cu2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debgupta, Joyashish; Devarapalli, Ramireddy; Rahman, Shakeelur; Shelke, Manjusha V.; Pillai, Vijayamohanan K.

    2014-07-01

    Vertically aligned, hollow nanotubes of CdSe are grown on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass substrates by ZnO nanowire template-assisted electrodeposition technique, followed by selective removal of the ZnO core using NH4OH. A detailed mechanism of nucleation and anisotropic growth kinetics of nanotubes have been studied by a combination of characterization tools such as chronoamperometry, SEM and TEM. Interestingly, ``as grown'' CdSe nanotubes (CdSe NTs) on FTO coated glass plates behave as n-type semiconductors exhibiting an excellent photo-response (with a generated photocurrent density value of ~470 μA cm-2) while in contact with p-type Cu2O (p-type semiconductor, grown separately on FTO plates) because of the formation of a n-p heterojunction (type II). The observed photoresponse is 3 times higher than that of a similar device prepared with electrodeposited CdSe films (not nanotubes) and Cu2O on FTO. This has been attributed to the hollow 1-D nature of CdSe NTs, which provides enhanced inner and outer surface areas for better absorption of light and also assists faster transport of photogenerated charge carriers.Vertically aligned, hollow nanotubes of CdSe are grown on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass substrates by ZnO nanowire template-assisted electrodeposition technique, followed by selective removal of the ZnO core using NH4OH. A detailed mechanism of nucleation and anisotropic growth kinetics of nanotubes have been studied by a combination of characterization tools such as chronoamperometry, SEM and TEM. Interestingly, ``as grown'' CdSe nanotubes (CdSe NTs) on FTO coated glass plates behave as n-type semiconductors exhibiting an excellent photo-response (with a generated photocurrent density value of ~470 μA cm-2) while in contact with p-type Cu2O (p-type semiconductor, grown separately on FTO plates) because of the formation of a n-p heterojunction (type II). The observed photoresponse is 3 times higher than that of a similar

  7. Electrochemical preparation of vertically aligned, hollow CdSe nanotubes and their p-n junction hybrids with electrodeposited Cu2O.

    PubMed

    Debgupta, Joyashish; Devarapalli, Ramireddy; Rahman, Shakeelur; Shelke, Manjusha V; Pillai, Vijayamohanan K

    2014-08-07

    Vertically aligned, hollow nanotubes of CdSe are grown on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass substrates by ZnO nanowire template-assisted electrodeposition technique, followed by selective removal of the ZnO core using NH4OH. A detailed mechanism of nucleation and anisotropic growth kinetics of nanotubes have been studied by a combination of characterization tools such as chronoamperometry, SEM and TEM. Interestingly, "as grown" CdSe nanotubes (CdSe NTs) on FTO coated glass plates behave as n-type semiconductors exhibiting an excellent photo-response (with a generated photocurrent density value of ∼ 470 μA cm(-2)) while in contact with p-type Cu2O (p-type semiconductor, grown separately on FTO plates) because of the formation of a n-p heterojunction (type II). The observed photoresponse is 3 times higher than that of a similar device prepared with electrodeposited CdSe films (not nanotubes) and Cu2O on FTO. This has been attributed to the hollow 1-D nature of CdSe NTs, which provides enhanced inner and outer surface areas for better absorption of light and also assists faster transport of photogenerated charge carriers.

  8. Polymer-Decorated Carbon Nanotubes as Transducers for Label-Free Photonic Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Villemin, Elise; Gravel, Edmond; Izard, Nicolas; Filoramo, Arianna; Vivien, Laurent; Doris, Eric

    2015-12-14

    A biosensor taking advantage of the optical properties of sorted carbon nanotubes has been developed. A polyfluorene polymer bearing azido groups was synthesized and used for the selective extraction of semi-conducting nanotubes from the bulk population. The resulting polymer-decorated nanotubes were then conjugated by click-chemistry to a ligand unit (biotin), and the sensing properties of the biotinylated nanotubes were investigated by photoluminescence measurements, upon interaction with the streptavidin target.

  9. Torsional electromechanical quantum oscillations in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Segev, Lior; Srur-Lavi, Onit; Cohen, Sidney R.; Joselevich, Ernesto

    2006-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes can be distinctly metallic or semiconducting depending on their diameter and chirality. Here we show that continuously varying the chirality by mechanical torsion can induce conductance oscillations, which can be attributed to metal-semiconductor periodic transitions. The phenomenon is observed in multiwalled carbon nanotubes, where both the torque and the current are shown to be carried predominantly by the outermost wall. The oscillation period with torsion is consistent with the theoretical shifting of the corners of the first Brillouin zone of graphene across different sub-bands allowed in the nanotube. Beyond a critical torsion, the conductance irreversibly drops due to torsional failure, allowing us to determine the torsional strength of carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes could be ideal torsional springs for nanoscopic pendulums, because electromechanical detection of motion could replace the microscopic detection techniques used at present. Our experiments indicate that carbon nanotubes could be used as electronic sensors of torsional motion in nanoelectromechanical systems.

  10. Assembly of ordered carbon shells on semiconducting nanomaterials

    DOEpatents

    Sutter, Eli Anguelova; Sutter, Peter Werner

    2012-10-02

    In some embodiments of the invention, encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials are described. In certain embodiments the nanostructures described are semiconducting nanomaterials encapsulated with ordered carbon shells. In some aspects a method for producing encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials is disclosed. In some embodiments applications of encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials are described.

  11. Assembly of ordered carbon shells on semiconducting nanomaterials

    DOEpatents

    Sutter, Eli Anguelova; Sutter, Peter Werner

    2010-05-11

    In some embodiments of the invention, encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials are described. In certain embodiments the nanostructures described are semiconducting nanomaterials encapsulated with ordered carbon shells. In some aspects a method for producing encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials is disclosed. In some embodiments applications of encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials are described.

  12. Deterministic Modelling of Carbon Nanotube Near-Infrared Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellisario, Darin

    2015-03-01

    With solution-process-ability, scale-able fabrication and purification, and cheap input materials, semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks represent promising materials for near-IR solar cell (SC) applications. This promise has motivated a body of work not only developing solar cells but also exploring alignment/deposition methods and SWNT photovoltaic (PV) physics. Despite this interest, there is to date no quantitative model of SWNT solar cell operation analogous to bulk semiconductor p-n junction PVs, allowing a rigorous understanding of the physical tradeoffs driving experimental observations and informing what research will enable technological progress. In this work we have derived the steady state operation of planar heterojunction SWNT PVs from the fundamental light absorption, exciton transport, and free carrier transport behaviors of single nanotubes. Our method can treat arbitrary distributions of nanotube chiralities, lengths, orientations, defect types and concentration, bundle fraction and size, density, dielectric environment, electrode combinations, etc. We achieve this by treating individual SWNT properties as random variables, and describing the network by the dependent distributions of those properties, yielding coupled stochastic differential equations for light absorption, exciton transport, and free carrier transport. Applying the model to monochiral (6,5) films in aligned and isotropic configurations, we find that there is a strongly optimal film thickness at a given nanotube network density and orientation, reflecting an inherent tradeoff between light absorption (i.e. exciton generation) and diffusion to the electrodes. This optimal shifts lower with increasing density, and is ultra-thin (<10 nm) for horizontally-aligned films but 50-200 nm for vertically aligned films. We show that due to weak inter-SWNT exciton transport relative to exceptional intra-SWNT diffusion, vertically-aligned films are unambiguously favored

  13. Biologically templated assembly of hybrid semiconducting nanomesh for high performance field effect transistors and sensors

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Hye-Hyeon; Lee, Seung-Woo; Lee, Eun-Hee; Kim, Woong; Yi, Hyunjung

    2016-01-01

    Delicately assembled composites of semiconducting nanomaterials and biological materials provide an attractive interface for emerging applications, such as chemical/biological sensors, wearable health monitoring devices, and therapeutic agent releasing devices. The nanostructure of composites as a channel and a sensing material plays a critical role in the performance of field effect transistors (FETs). Therefore, it is highly desirable to prepare elaborate composite that can allow the fabrication of high performance FETs and also provide high sensitivity and selectivity in detecting specific chemical/biological targets. In this work, we demonstrate that high performance FETs can be fabricated with a hydrodynamically assembled composite, a semiconducting nanomesh, of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (S-SWNTs) and a genetically engineered M13 phage to show strong binding affinity toward SWNTs. The semiconducting nanomesh enables a high on/off ratio (~104) of FETs. We also show that the threshold voltage and the channel current of the nanomesh FETs are sensitive to the change of the M13 phage surface charge. This biological gate effect of the phage enables the detection of biologically important molecules such as dopamine and bisphenol A using nanomesh-based FETs. Our results provide a new insight for the preparation of composite material platform for highly controllable bio/electronics interfaces. PMID:27762315

  14. Biologically templated assembly of hybrid semiconducting nanomesh for high performance field effect transistors and sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Hye-Hyeon; Lee, Seung-Woo; Lee, Eun-Hee; Kim, Woong; Yi, Hyunjung

    2016-10-01

    Delicately assembled composites of semiconducting nanomaterials and biological materials provide an attractive interface for emerging applications, such as chemical/biological sensors, wearable health monitoring devices, and therapeutic agent releasing devices. The nanostructure of composites as a channel and a sensing material plays a critical role in the performance of field effect transistors (FETs). Therefore, it is highly desirable to prepare elaborate composite that can allow the fabrication of high performance FETs and also provide high sensitivity and selectivity in detecting specific chemical/biological targets. In this work, we demonstrate that high performance FETs can be fabricated with a hydrodynamically assembled composite, a semiconducting nanomesh, of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (S-SWNTs) and a genetically engineered M13 phage to show strong binding affinity toward SWNTs. The semiconducting nanomesh enables a high on/off ratio (~104) of FETs. We also show that the threshold voltage and the channel current of the nanomesh FETs are sensitive to the change of the M13 phage surface charge. This biological gate effect of the phage enables the detection of biologically important molecules such as dopamine and bisphenol A using nanomesh-based FETs. Our results provide a new insight for the preparation of composite material platform for highly controllable bio/electronics interfaces.

  15. Structure and electronic properties of saturated and unsaturated gallium nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiguo; Wang, Shengjie; Li, Jingbo; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2009-11-05

    The atomic and electronic structures of saturated and unsaturated GaN nanotubes along the [001] direction with (100) lateral facets are studied using first-principles calculations. Atomic relaxation of nanotubes shows that appreciable distortion occurs in the unsaturated nanotubes. All the nanotubes considered, including saturated and unsaturated ones, exhibit semiconducting, with a direct band gap. Surface states arisen from the threefold-coordinated N and Ga atoms at the lateral facets exist inside the bulk-like band gap. When the nanotubes saturated with hydrogen, these dangling bond bands are removed from the band gap, but the band gap decreases with increasing the wall thickness of the nanotubes.

  16. Transformation of Ag nanowires into semiconducting AgFeS2 nanowires.

    PubMed

    Sciacca, Beniamino; Yalcin, Anil O; Garnett, Erik C

    2015-04-08

    We report on the synthesis of semiconducting AgFeS2 nanowires, obtained from the conversion of Ag nanowires. The study of the conversion process shows that the formation of Ag2S nanowires, as an intermediate step, precedes the conversion into AgFeS2 nanowires. The chemical properties of AgFeS2 nanowires were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy at intermediate steps of the conversion process and show that the temperature at which the reaction takes place is critical to obtaining nanowires as opposed to nanotubes. Optical measurements on nanowire ensembles confirm the semiconducting nature of AgFeS2, with a direct band gap of 0.88 eV.

  17. New Concepts for the Development of Carbon Nanotube Materials for Army Related Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-16

    demonstrated to generate and amplify surface plasmons in individual semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Surface plasmons are coherent charge density waves...due to the periodic opposite-phase displacements of the electron shells with respect to the ion cores. Charge density waves produce oscillating... electric fields concentrated locally throughout the nanotube surface. The entire process can be controlled by a perpendicular electrostatic field. Our

  18. Single Wall Nanotube Type-Specific Functionalization and Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boul, Peter; Nikolaev, Pavel; Sosa, Edward; Arepalli, Sivaram; Yowell, Leonard

    2008-01-01

    Metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes were selectively solubilized in THF and separated from semiconducting nanotubes. Once separated, the functionalized metallic tubes were de-functionalized to restore their metallic band structure. Absorption and Raman spectroscopy of the enriched samples support conclusions of the enrichment of nanotube samples by metallic type. A scalable method for enriching nanotube conductive type has been developed. Raman and UV-Vis data indicate SWCNT reaction with dodecylbenzenediazonium results in metallic enrichment. It is expected that further refinement of this techniques will lead to more dramatic separations of types and diameters.

  19. Electronic and Optical Properties of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Saito, R; Nugraha, A R T; Hasdeo, E H; Hung, N T; Izumida, W

    2017-02-01

    In this article, we overview our recent theoretical works on electronic and optical properties of carbon nanotubes by going from the background to the perspectives. Electronic Raman spectra of metallic carbon nanotubes give a new picture of Raman processes. Thermoelectricity of semiconducting nanotubes gives a general concept of the confinement effect on the thermoelectric power factor. Selective excitation of only a single phonon mode is proposed by the pulsed train technique of coherent phonon spectroscopy. Occurrence of both two and four fold degeneracy in the carbon nanotube quantum dot is explained by difference group velocities and the intra/inter valley scattering near the hexagonal corner of the Brillouin zone.

  20. Ubiquity of Exciton Localization in Cryogenic Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We present photoluminescence studies of individual semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes at room and cryogenic temperatures. From the analysis of spatial and spectral features of nanotube photoluminescence, we identify characteristic signatures of unintentional exciton localization. Moreover, we quantify the energy scale of exciton localization potentials as ranging from a few to a few tens of millielectronvolts and stemming from both environmental disorder and shallow covalent side-wall defects. Our results establish disorder-induced crossover from the diffusive to the localized regime of nanotube excitons at cryogenic temperatures as a ubiquitous phenomenon in micelle-encapsulated and as-grown carbon nanotubes. PMID:27105355

  1. Ubiquity of Exciton Localization in Cryogenic Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Matthias S; Noé, Jonathan; Kneer, Alexander; Crochet, Jared J; Högele, Alexander

    2016-05-11

    We present photoluminescence studies of individual semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes at room and cryogenic temperatures. From the analysis of spatial and spectral features of nanotube photoluminescence, we identify characteristic signatures of unintentional exciton localization. Moreover, we quantify the energy scale of exciton localization potentials as ranging from a few to a few tens of millielectronvolts and stemming from both environmental disorder and shallow covalent side-wall defects. Our results establish disorder-induced crossover from the diffusive to the localized regime of nanotube excitons at cryogenic temperatures as a ubiquitous phenomenon in micelle-encapsulated and as-grown carbon nanotubes.

  2. A new class of boron nanotube.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Ying; Li, You-Cheng

    2009-12-07

    The configurations, stability and electronic structures of a new class of boron sheet and related boron nanotubes are predicted within the framework of density functional theory. This boron sheet is sparser than those of recent proposals. Our theoretic results show that the stable boron sheet remains flat and is metallic. There are bands similar to the pi-bands in graphite near the Fermi level. Stable nanotubes with various diameters and chiral vectors can be rolled from the sheet. Within our study, only the thin (8, 0) nanotube with a band gap of 0.44 eV is semiconducting, while all the other thicker boron nanotubes are metallic, independent of their chirality. It indicates the possibility, in the design of nanodevices, to control the electronic transport properties of the boron nanotube through the diameter.

  3. Pulsed laser annealing of ion-implanted semiconducting GaAs for homojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowndes, D. H.; Cleland, J. W.; Fletcher, J.; Narayan, J.; Westbrook, R. D.; Wood, R. F.; Christie, W. H.; Eby, R. E.

    The results of a study whose purpose was to evaluate the combination of ion implantation followed by pulsed ruby laser annealing (II/PLA), as a method for shallow p-n junction formation in semiconducting GaAs substrates, are reported. High dose Zn, Mg, Si and Se implants were used. PLA was carried out in air without encapsulation, and with thin sputtered SiO2 encapsulation layers. The combination of I-V, C-V, SEM, TEM and SIMS measurements that were carried out have important implications for photovoltaic applications including the possibility of forming planar junctions, the choice of implanted ions to obtain high electrical activation, the optimum pulsed laser energy density range, the resultant junction depth and electrical characteristics, and the presence of laser- and implantation-induced residual defects

  4. Fingerprinting seamless single-walled carbon nanotube junctions via the migration of encapsulated N2 molecules from bottom to top: are arrays of VA-SWNTs continuous?

    PubMed

    Thurakitseree, Theerapol; Kramberger, Christian; Singjai, Pisith; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2017-03-17

    Structure control such as diameter changes along single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be achieved in arrays of vertically aligned (VA-) SWNTs by switching the feedstock during growth. The local nature of the macroscopic transition from one diameter to another is then questioned as one can either envisage seamless transitions or discontinuous individual SWNTs. Here, we demonstrate that encapsulated molecules can serve as markers to doubtlessly identify seamless interconnections in macroscopic samples. A migration of nitrogen molecules inside the continuous SWNTs is observed using bulk scale measurements on double-layered SWNT arrays synthesized from different carbon/nitrogen feedstocks. The existence of N2 molecules at the top of the SWNT arrays proves that there are continuous SWNTs throughout the double layered arrays with different diameters.

  5. Growth of semiconducting graphene on palladium.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon-Yong; Ciobanu, Cristian V; Petrova, Vania; Shenoy, Vivek B; Bareño, Javier; Gambin, Vincent; Petrov, Ivan; Kodambaka, Suneel

    2009-12-01

    We report in situ scanning tunneling microscopy studies of graphene growth on Pd(111) during ethylene deposition at temperatures between 723 and 1023 K. We observe the formation of monolayer graphene islands, 200-2000 A in size, bounded by Pd surface steps. Surprisingly, the topographic image contrast from graphene islands reverses with tunneling bias, suggesting a semiconducting behavior. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements confirm that the graphene islands are semiconducting, with a band gap of 0.3 +/- 0.1 eV. On the basis of density functional theory calculations, we suggest that the opening of a band gap is due to the strong interaction between graphene and the Pd substrate. Our findings point to the possibility of preparing semiconducting graphene layers for future carbon-based nanoelectronic devices via direct deposition onto strongly interacting substrates.

  6. High-density integration of carbon nanotubes via chemical self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hongsik; Afzali, Ali; Han, Shu-Jen; Tulevski, George S.; Franklin, Aaron D.; Tersoff, Jerry; Hannon, James B.; Haensch, Wilfried

    2012-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes have potential in the development of high-speed and power-efficient logic applications. However, for such technologies to be viable, a high density of semiconducting nanotubes must be placed at precise locations on a substrate. Here, we show that ion-exchange chemistry can be used to fabricate arrays of individually positioned carbon nanotubes with a density as high as 1 × 109 cm-2--two orders of magnitude higher than previous reports. With this approach, we assembled a high density of carbon-nanotube transistors in a conventional semiconductor fabrication line and then electrically tested more than 10,000 devices in a single chip. The ability to characterize such large distributions of nanotube devices is crucial for analysing transistor performance, yield and semiconducting nanotube purity.

  7. Physical and Electronic Isolation of Carbon Nanotube Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OKeeffe, James; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Multi-walled nanotubes are proposed as a method to electrically and physically isolate nanoscale conductors from their surroundings. We use tight binding (TB) and density functional theory (DFT) to simulate the effects of an external electric field on multi-wall nanotubes. Two categories of multi-wall nanotube are investigated, those with metallic and semiconducting outer shells. In the metallic case, simulations show that the outer wall effectively screens the inner core from an applied electric field. This offers the ability to reduce crosstalk between nanotube conductors. A semiconducting outer shell is found not to perturb an electric field incident on the inner core, thereby providing physical isolation while allowing the tube to remain electrically coupled to its surroundings.

  8. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, J.R.; Plut, T.A.; Martens, J.S.

    1995-05-02

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material. 10 figs.

  9. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, Joel R.; Plut, Thomas A.; Martens, Jon S.

    1995-01-01

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material.

  10. Poly(3-hexylthiophene)/multiwalled carbon hybrid coaxial nanotubes: nanoscale rectification and photovoltaic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kihyun; Shin, Ji Won; Lee, Yong Baek; Cho, Mi Yeon; Lee, Suk Ho; Park, Dong Hyuk; Jang, Dong Kyu; Lee, Cheol Jin; Joo, Jinsoo

    2010-07-27

    We fabricate hybrid coaxial nanotubes (NTs) of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) coated with light-emitting poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). The p-type P3HT material with a thickness of approximately 20 nm is electrochemically deposited onto the surface of the MWCNT. The formation of hybrid coaxial NTs of the P3HT/MWCNT is confirmed by a transmission electron microscope, FT-IR, and Raman spectra. The optical and structural properties of the hybrid NTs are characterized using ultraviolet and visible absorption, Raman, and photoluminescence (PL) spectra where, it is shown that the PL intensity of the P3HT materials decreases after the hybridization with the MWCNTs. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the outer P3HT single NT show the semiconducting behavior, while ohmic behavior is observed for the inner single MWCNT. The I-V characteristics of the hybrid junction between the outer P3HT NT and the inner MWCNT, for the hybrid single NT, exhibit the characteristics of a diode (i.e., rectification), whose efficiency is clearly enhanced with light irradiation. The rectification effect of the hybrid single NT has been analyzed in terms of charge tunneling models. The quasi-photovoltaic effect is also observed at low bias for the P3HT/MWCNT hybrid single NT.

  11. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Daniel A; Paul, David L

    2009-07-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell-cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology.

  12. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Goodenough, Daniel A.; Paul, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell–cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology. PMID:20066080

  13. Superconducting-semiconducting circuits, devices and systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kroger, H.; Ghoshal, U.S.

    1991-06-18

    This paper describes a superconducting-semiconducting electrical circuit element. It comprises: a superconducting charge controlled three-terminal device, having a device control terminal, a second terminal and a third terminal, wherein the output current between the second and third terminals is controlled by the voltage applied to the control terminal, and wherein the output current exhibits superconducting characteristics as a function of temperature and input charge conditions; and a cryogenic semiconducting interconnect circuit, adapted to receive as an input an output signal from the superconducting device, and to provide a semiconductor switching voltage level output signal modulated by the input signal from the superconducting device.

  14. Spectroscopy of Many-Body Effects in Carbon Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-15

    modules of this project: Module 1. Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistor ( CNTFET ): At the heart of this project lies the...fabrication of CNTFET which enables us to controllably change the Fermi energy in a semiconducting nanotube by changing the gate voltage. By applying a...the CNTFET device. We have a new design for the fabrication procedure of CNTFET with a step-by-step roadmap towards completion of the device. We

  15. Dispersionless propagation of electron wavepackets in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosati, Roberto; Rossi, Fausto; Dolcini, Fabrizio

    2015-06-15

    We investigate the propagation of electron wavepackets in single-walled carbon nanotubes via a Lindblad-based density-matrix approach that enables us to account for both dissipation and decoherence effects induced by various phonon modes. We show that, while in semiconducting nanotubes the wavepacket experiences the typical dispersion of conventional materials, in metallic nanotubes its shape remains essentially unaltered, even in the presence of the electron-phonon coupling, up to micron distances at room temperature.

  16. Medium scale carbon nanotube thin film integrated circuits on flexible plastic substrates

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A; Cao, Qing; Alam, Muhammad; Pimparkar, Ninad

    2015-02-03

    The present invention provides device components geometries and fabrication strategies for enhancing the electronic performance of electronic devices based on thin films of randomly oriented or partially aligned semiconducting nanotubes. In certain aspects, devices and methods of the present invention incorporate a patterned layer of randomly oriented or partially aligned carbon nanotubes, such as one or more interconnected SWNT networks, providing a semiconductor channel exhibiting improved electronic properties relative to conventional nanotubes-based electronic systems.

  17. Boron nitride nanotubes and nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio; Huang, Yang; Terao, Takeshi; Mitome, Masanori; Tang, Chengchun; Zhi, Chunyi

    2010-06-22

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a layered material with a graphite-like structure in which planar networks of BN hexagons are regularly stacked. As the structural analogue of a carbon nanotube (CNT), a BN nanotube (BNNT) was first predicted in 1994; since then, it has become one of the most intriguing non-carbon nanotubes. Compared with metallic or semiconducting CNTs, a BNNT is an electrical insulator with a band gap of ca. 5 eV, basically independent of tube geometry. In addition, BNNTs possess a high chemical stability, excellent mechanical properties, and high thermal conductivity. The same advantages are likely applicable to a graphene analogue-a monatomic layer of a hexagonal BN. Such unique properties make BN nanotubes and nanosheets a promising nanomaterial in a variety of potential fields such as optoelectronic nanodevices, functional composites, hydrogen accumulators, electrically insulating substrates perfectly matching the CNT, and graphene lattices. This review gives an introduction to the rich BN nanotube/nanosheet field, including the latest achievements in the synthesis, structural analyses, and property evaluations, and presents the purpose and significance of this direction in the light of the general nanotube/nanosheet developments.

  18. Electroluminescence et radiation thermique dans les nanotubes de carbone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Elyse

    We present here a spectroscopic study of the light emission properties of different nanotube devices with the aim to clarify the different mechanisms leading to the light emission. The first study consists of taking measurements from a thick (˜ 450 nm) macroscopic suspended carbon nanotube film connected between two electrodes. A significant increase of the temperature is expected when voltage is applied since thermal dissipation by the substrate is suppressed for this configuration. In imaging mode, we observed that infrared light is emitted from the entire area of the film instead of being localized. This observation demonstrates that the light emission arise from thermal emission. Spectra measured on this device all present a smooth response, characteristic of that of a blackbody. As expected for a pure thermal source, the results fit well the Planck formula. Because the Planck formula is temperature dependant, it became possible to extract a lower limit of the temperature of the film as a function of voltage. The temperature increases more or less from 350K to 600K when the voltage increases from 0.1V to 1.6V. The second study is made using a sub-monolayer network of carbon nanotubes interconnected together to form a semiconducting layer. The large number of tube-tube junctions in the networks limits the current and prevents the temperature to rise significantly at higher bias. The intimate contact between the network and the substrate also prevent the temperature of the film to increase significantly due to a good thermalizaton. Hence, electroluminescence from excitonic recombination is expected to be dominant over heat radiation for this type of devices. First, spatial resolution measurements on long channel network devices shows that the light-emitting zone is always located near the minority charge injector contact. This result demonstrates that light emission arises from electroluminescence in network from a bipolar current. Thermal emission can therefore

  19. Controlled production of aligned-nanotube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrones, M.; Grobert, N.; Olivares, J.; Zhang, J. P.; Terrones, H.; Kordatos, K.; Hsu, W. K.; Hare, J. P.; Townsend, P. D.; Prassides, K.; Cheetham, A. K.; Kroto, H. W.; Walton, D. R. M.

    1997-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes might be usefully employed in nanometre-scale engineering and electronics. Electrical conductivity measurements on the bulk material, on individual multi-walled and single-walled nanotubes and on bundles of single-walled nanotubes have revealed that they may behave as metallic, insulating or semiconducting nanowires, depending on the method of production-which controls the degree of graphitization, the helicity and the diameter. Measurements of Young's modulus show that single nanotubes are stiffer than commercial carbon fibres. Methods commonly used to generate nanotubes-carbon-arc discharge techniques, catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbons and condensed-phase electrolysis-generally suffer from the drawbacks that polyhedral particles are also formed and that the dimensions of the nanotubes are highly variable. Here we describe a method for generating aligned carbon nanotubes by pyrolysis of 2-amino-4,6-dichloro-s-triazine over thin films of a cobalt catalyst patterned on a silica substrate by laser etching. The use of a patterned catalyst apparently encourages the formation of aligned nanotubes. The method offers control over length (up to about 50μm) and fairly uniform diameters (30-50nm), as well as producing nanotubes in high yield, uncontaminated by polyhedral particles.

  20. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2012-07-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1853-1872, 2012.

  1. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  2. Semiconducting compounds and devices incorporating same

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Facchetti, Antonio; Boudreault, Pierre-Luc; Miyauchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-19

    Disclosed are molecular and polymeric compounds having desirable properties as semiconducting materials. Such compounds can exhibit desirable electronic properties and possess processing advantages including solution-processability and/or good stability. Organic transistor and photovoltaic devices incorporating the present compounds as the active layer exhibit good device performance.

  3. Semiconducting compounds and devices incorporating same

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J; Facchetti, Antonio; Boudreault, Pierre-Luc; Miyauchi, Hiroyuki

    2014-06-17

    Disclosed are molecular and polymeric compounds having desirable properties as semiconducting materials. Such compounds can exhibit desirable electronic properties and possess processing advantages including solution-processability and/or good stability. Organic transistor and photovoltaic devices incorporating the present compounds as the active layer exhibit good device performance.

  4. A facile and low-cost length sorting of single-wall carbon nanotubes by precipitation and applications for thin-film transistors.

    PubMed

    Gui, Hui; Chen, Haitian; Khripin, Constantine Y; Liu, Bilu; Fagan, Jeffrey A; Zhou, Chongwu; Zheng, Ming

    2016-02-14

    Semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with long lengths are highly desirable for many applications such as thin-film transistors and circuits. Previously reported length sorting techniques usually require sophisticated instrumentation and are hard to scale up. In this paper, we report for the first time a general phenomenon of a length-dependent precipitation of surfactant-dispersed carbon nanotubes by polymers, salts, and their combinations. Polyelectrolytes such as polymethacrylate (PMAA) and polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) are found to be especially effective on cholate and deoxycholate dispersed SWCNTs. By adding PMAA to these nanotube dispersions in a stepwise fashion, we have achieved nanotube precipitation in a length-dependent order: first nanotubes with an average length of 650 nm, and then successively of 450 nm, 350 nm, and 250 nm. A similar effect of nanotube length sorting has also been observed for PSS. To demonstrate the utility of the length fractionation, the 650 nm-long nanotube fraction was subjected to an aqueous two-phase separation to obtain semiconducting enriched nanotubes. Thin-film transistors fabricated with the resulting semiconducting SWCNTs showed a carrier mobility up to 18 cm(2) (V s)(-1) and an on/off ratio up to 10(7). Our result sheds new light on the phase behavior of aqueous nanotube dispersions under high concentrations of polymers and salts, and offers a facile, low-cost, and scalable method to produce length sorted semiconducting nanotubes for macroelectronics applications.

  5. INTERDISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Interaction of Methane with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Role of Defects, Curvature and Nanotubes Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganji, M. D.; Asghary, M.; Najafi, A. A.

    2010-05-01

    We investigate the interaction of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and methane molecule from the first principles. Adsorption energies are calculated, and methane affinities for the typical semiconducting and metallic nanotubes are compared. We also discuss role of the structural defects and nanotube curvature on the adsorption capability of the SWCNTs. We could observe larger adsorption energies for the metallic CNTs in comparison with the semiconducting CNTs. The obtained results for the zig zag nanotubes with various diameters reveal that the adsorption energy is higher for nanotubes with larger diameters. For defected tubes the adsorption energies are calculated for various configurations such as methane molecule approaching to the defect sites pentagon, hexagon, and heptagon in the tube surface. The results show that the introduce defects have an important contribution to the adsorption mechanism of the methane on SWNTs.

  6. Semiconducting polymer nanoparticles as photoacoustic molecular imaging probes in living mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Kanyi; Shuhendler, Adam J.; Jokerst, Jesse V.; Mei, Jianguo; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Bao, Zhenan; Rao, Jianghong

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging holds great promise for the visualization of physiology and pathology at the molecular level with deep tissue penetration and fine spatial resolution. To fully utilize this potential, photoacoustic molecular imaging probes have to be developed. Here, we introduce near-infrared light absorbing semiconducting polymer nanoparticles as a new class of contrast agents for photoacoustic molecular imaging. These nanoparticles can produce a stronger signal than the commonly used single-walled carbon nanotubes and gold nanorods on a per mass basis, permitting whole-body lymph-node photoacoustic mapping in living mice at a low systemic injection mass. Furthermore, the semiconducting polymer nanoparticles possess high structural flexibility, narrow photoacoustic spectral profiles and strong resistance to photodegradation and oxidation, enabling the development of the first near-infrared ratiometric photoacoustic probe for in vivo real-time imaging of reactive oxygen species--vital chemical mediators of many diseases. These results demonstrate semiconducting polymer nanoparticles to be an ideal nanoplatform for developing photoacoustic molecular probes.

  7. Semiconducting polymer nanoparticles as photoacoustic molecular imaging probes in living mice.

    PubMed

    Pu, Kanyi; Shuhendler, Adam J; Jokerst, Jesse V; Mei, Jianguo; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Bao, Zhenan; Rao, Jianghong

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging holds great promise for the visualization of physiology and pathology at the molecular level with deep tissue penetration and fine spatial resolution. To fully utilize this potential, photoacoustic molecular imaging probes have to be developed. Here, we introduce near-infrared light absorbing semiconducting polymer nanoparticles as a new class of contrast agents for photoacoustic molecular imaging. These nanoparticles can produce a stronger signal than the commonly used single-walled carbon nanotubes and gold nanorods on a per mass basis, permitting whole-body lymph-node photoacoustic mapping in living mice at a low systemic injection mass. Furthermore, the semiconducting polymer nanoparticles possess high structural flexibility, narrow photoacoustic spectral profiles and strong resistance to photodegradation and oxidation, enabling the development of the first near-infrared ratiometric photoacoustic probe for in vivo real-time imaging of reactive oxygen species--vital chemical mediators of many diseases. These results demonstrate semiconducting polymer nanoparticles to be an ideal nanoplatform for developing photoacoustic molecular probes.

  8. Production of semiconducting gold-DNA nanowires by application of DC bias.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rakesh K; West, Leigh; Kumar, Amrita; Joshi, Nidhi; Alwarappan, Subbiah; Kumar, Ashok

    2010-05-07

    There is considerable interest in using DNA nanowires or nanotubes in a wide variety of bioelectronic applications and microcircuitry. Various methods have been developed to construct DNA nanostructures. Here, we report a novel method to construct semiconducting DNA nanowires by applying a suitable DC bias to a gold plating solution containing double-stranded DNA. The self-assembled nanowires fabricated by this method contain attached gold nanoparticles. Further, we report that the dimensions of the nanowires can be easily manipulated by altering the applied DC bias. We also confirmed the semiconducting nature of the DNA nanowires by studying their resistance-temperature behavior from 25 to 65 degrees C in a microelectrode system. These studies describe a simple process by which gold-decorated, semiconducting DNA nanowires could be created and may lead to a breakthrough in the field of self-assembly of nanometer-scale circuits. The self-assembled structures do have some similarity with tube-like structures but in the present work we are using the term 'DNA nanowires' to define the structures.

  9. Graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials and use as electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Tour, James M.; Zhu, Yu; Li, Lei; Yan, Zheng; Lin, Jian

    2016-09-27

    Provided are methods of making graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials. Such methods generally include: (1) associating a graphene film with a substrate; (2) applying a catalyst and a carbon source to the graphene film; and (3) growing carbon nanotubes on the graphene film. The grown carbon nanotubes become covalently linked to the graphene film through carbon-carbon bonds that are located at one or more junctions between the carbon nanotubes and the graphene film. In addition, the grown carbon nanotubes are in ohmic contact with the graphene film through the carbon-carbon bonds at the one or more junctions. The one or more junctions may include seven-membered carbon rings. Also provided are the formed graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials.

  10. Label-free immunodetection with CMOS-compatible semiconducting nanowires.

    PubMed

    Stern, Eric; Klemic, James F; Routenberg, David A; Wyrembak, Pauline N; Turner-Evans, Daniel B; Hamilton, Andrew D; LaVan, David A; Fahmy, Tarek M; Reed, Mark A

    2007-02-01

    Semiconducting nanowires have the potential to function as highly sensitive and selective sensors for the label-free detection of low concentrations of pathogenic microorganisms. Successful solution-phase nanowire sensing has been demonstrated for ions, small molecules, proteins, DNA and viruses; however, 'bottom-up' nanowires (or similarly configured carbon nanotubes) used for these demonstrations require hybrid fabrication schemes, which result in severe integration issues that have hindered widespread application. Alternative 'top-down' fabrication methods of nanowire-like devices produce disappointing performance because of process-induced material and device degradation. Here we report an approach that uses complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) field effect transistor compatible technology and hence demonstrate the specific label-free detection of below 100 femtomolar concentrations of antibodies as well as real-time monitoring of the cellular immune response. This approach eliminates the need for hybrid methods and enables system-scale integration of these sensors with signal processing and information systems. Additionally, the ability to monitor antibody binding and sense the cellular immune response in real time with readily available technology should facilitate widespread diagnostic applications.

  11. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kazumichi; Stopfer, Mark

    2013-12-02

    In vertebrates and invertebrates, signaling among neurons is most commonly mediated by chemical synapses. At these synapses neurotransmitter released by presynaptic neurons is detected by receptors on the postsynaptic neurons, leading to an influx of ions through the receptors themselves or through channels activated by intracellular signaling downstream of the receptors. But neurons can communicate with each other in a more direct way, by passing signals composed of small molecules and ions through pores called gap junctions. Gap junctions that transmit electrical signals are called electrical synapses. Unlike most chemical synapses, electrical synapses interact through axon-to-axon or dendrite-to-dendrite contacts. Found throughout the nervous system, they are probably best known for linking the relatively few inhibitory, GABAergic, neurons into large, effective networks within vertebrate brains. They are particularly important early in development before the formation of most chemical synapses, but recent work shows gap junctions play important roles in the adult nervous system, too. Gap junctions are sometimes thought to be mere passageways between cells. But, as recent work shows, their properties can be complex and surprising. Gap junctions help generate, propagate, and regulate neural oscillations, can filter electrical signals, and can be modulated in a variety of ways. Here we discuss recent work highlighting the diversity and importance of gap junctions throughout the nervous system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Electrical device fabrication from nanotube formations

    DOEpatents

    Nicholas, Nolan Walker; Kittrell, W. Carter; Kim, Myung Jong; Schmidt, Howard K.

    2013-03-12

    A method for forming nanotube electrical devices, arrays of nanotube electrical devices, and device structures and arrays of device structures formed by the methods. Various methods of the present invention allow creation of semiconducting and/or conducting devices from readily grown SWNT carpets rather than requiring the preparation of a patterned growth channel and takes advantage of the self-controlling nature of these carpet heights to ensure a known and controlled channel length for reliable electronic properties as compared to the prior methods.

  13. Facile fabrication of organic/inorganic nanotube heterojunction arrays for enhanced photoelectrochemical water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yingzhi; Li, Aoxiang; Yue, Xiaoqi; Wang, Lu-Ning; Huang, Zheng-Hong; Kang, Feiyu; Volinsky, Alex A.

    2016-07-01

    Organic/inorganic heterojunction photoanodes are appealing for making concurrent use of the highly photoactive organic semiconductors, and the efficient dielectric screening provided by their inorganic counterparts. In the present work, organic/inorganic nanotube heterojunction arrays composed of TiO2 nanotube arrays and a semiconducting N,N-(dicyclohexyl) perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide (PDi) layer were fabricated for photoelectrochemical water splitting. In this arrayed architecture, a PDi layer with a tunable thickness was coated on anodic TiO2 nanotube arrays by physical vapor deposition, which is advantageous for the formation of a uniform layer and an adequate interface contact between PDi and TiO2. The obtained PDi/TiO2 junction exhibited broadened visible light absorption, and an effective interface for enhanced photogenerated electron-hole separation, which is supported by the reduced charge transfer resistance and prolonged excitation lifetime via impedance spectroscopy analysis and fluorescence emission decay investigations. Consequently, such a heterojunction photoanode was photoresponsive to a wide visible light region of 400-600 nm, and thus demonstrated a highly enhanced photocurrent density at 1.23 V vs. a reversible hydrogen electrode. Additionally, the durability of such a photoanode can be guaranteed after long-time illumination because of the geometrical restraint imposed by the PDi aggregates. These results pave the way to discover new organic/inorganic assemblies for high-performance photoelectric applications and device integration.Organic/inorganic heterojunction photoanodes are appealing for making concurrent use of the highly photoactive organic semiconductors, and the efficient dielectric screening provided by their inorganic counterparts. In the present work, organic/inorganic nanotube heterojunction arrays composed of TiO2 nanotube arrays and a semiconducting N,N-(dicyclohexyl) perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide (PDi

  14. Real function of semiconducting polymer in GaAs/polymer planar heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang; You, Wei

    2013-08-27

    We systematically investigated GaAs/polymer hybrid solar cells in a simple planar junction, aiming to fundamentally understand the function of semiconducting polymers in GaAs/polymer-based heterojunction solar cells. A library of semiconducting polymers with different band gaps and energy levels were evaluated in GaAs/polymer planar heterojunctions. The optimized thickness of the active polymer layer was discovered to be ultrathin (~10 nm). Further, the open-circuit voltage (Voc) of such GaAs/polymer planar heterojunctions was fixed around 0.6 V, regardless of the HOMO energy level of the polymer employed. On the basis of this evidence and others, we conclude that n-type GaAs/polymer planar heterojunctions are not type II heterojunctions as originally assumed. Instead, n-type GaAs forms a Schottky barrier with its corresponding anode, while the semiconducting polymer of appropriate energy levels can function as hole transport layer and/or electron blocking layer. Additionally, we discover that both GaAs surface passivation and thermal annealing can improve the performance of GaAs/polymer hybrid solar cells.

  15. Magnetic nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Matsui, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-11-16

    A magnetic nanotube includes bacterial magnetic nanocrystals contacted onto a nanotube which absorbs the nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are contacted on at least one surface of the nanotube. A method of fabricating a magnetic nanotube includes synthesizing the bacterial magnetic nanocrystals, which have an outer layer of proteins. A nanotube provided is capable of absorbing the nanocrystals and contacting the nanotube with the nanocrystals. The nanotube is preferably a peptide bolaamphiphile. A nanotube solution and a nanocrystal solution including a buffer and a concentration of nanocrystals are mixed. The concentration of nanocrystals is optimized, resulting in a nanocrystal to nanotube ratio for which bacterial magnetic nanocrystals are immobilized on at least one surface of the nanotubes. The ratio controls whether the nanocrystals bind only to the interior or to the exterior surfaces of the nanotubes. Uses include cell manipulation and separation, biological assay, enzyme recovery, and biosensors.

  16. Electron transport properties of a single-walled carbon nanotube in the presence of hydrogen cyanide: first-principles analysis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anurag; Sharma, Vikash; Kaur, Kamalpreet; Khan, Md Shahzad; Ahuja, Rajeev; Rao, V K

    2015-07-01

    First-principles analysis based on density functional theory was performed to compute the electronic and transport properties of a single-walled carbon nanotube in the presence of hydrogen cyanide. A chiral (4,1) carbon nanotube was found to become less metallic as the number of hydrogen cyanide molecules nearby increased. When there were a sufficient number of hydrogen cyanide molecules close to the nanotube, it became semiconducting. This metallic to semiconducting transformation of the nanotube was verified by analyzing its conductance and current as a function of the number of molecules of hydrogen cyanide present. The conductivity of the carbon nanotube was very high when no hydrogen cyanide molecules were present, but decreased considerably when even just a single hydrogen cyanide molecule approached the surface of the nanotube.

  17. TEM-nanoindentation studies of semiconducting structures.

    PubMed

    Le Bourhis, E; Patriarche, G

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of nanoindentation coupled with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigations of the plastic behaviour of semiconducting structures and its implication for device design. Instrumented nanoindentation has been developed to extract the mechanical behaviour of small volumes scaled to those encountered in semiconductor heterostructures. We illustrate that TEM is a powerful complementary tool for the study of local plasticity induced by nanoindentation. TEM-nanoindentation allows for detailed understanding of the plastic deformation in semiconducting structures and opens practical routes for improvement of devices. Performances of heterostructures are deteriously affected by dislocations that relax the lattice mismatched layers. Different ways to obtain compliant substructures are being developed in order to concentrate the plastic relaxation underneath the heterostructure. Such approaches allow for mechanical design of micro- and opto-electronic devices to be considered throughout the fabrication process.

  18. Carbon nanotube interaction with DNA.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gang; Maragakis, Paul; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2005-05-01

    We investigate a system consisting of B-DNA and an array of (10,0) carbon nanotubes periodically arranged to fit into the major groove of the DNA. We obtain an accurate electronic structure of the combined system, which reveals that it is semiconducting and that the bands on either end of the gap are derived exclusively from one of the two components. We discuss in detail how this system can be used as either an electronic switch involving transport through both components, or as a device for ultrafast DNA sequencing.

  19. Low bandgap semiconducting polymers for polymeric photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Wang, Kai; Gong, Xiong; Heeger, Alan J

    2016-08-22

    In order to develop high performance polymer solar cells (PSCs), full exploitation of the sun-irradiation from ultraviolet (UV) to near infrared (NIR) is one of the key factors to ensure high photocurrents and thus high efficiency. In this review, five of the effective design rules for approaching LBG semiconducting polymers with high molar absorptivity, suitable energy levels, high charge carrier mobility and high solubility in organic solvents are overviewed. These design stratagems include fused heterocycles for facilitating π-electron flowing along the polymer backbone, groups/atoms bridging adjacent rings for maintaining a high planarity, introduction of electron-withdrawing units for lowering the bandgap (Eg), donor-acceptor (D-A) copolymerization for narrowing Eg and 2-dimensional conjugation for broadened absorption and enhanced hole mobility. It has been demonstrated that LBG semiconducting polymers based on electron-donor units combined with strong electron-withdrawing units possess excellent electronic and optic properties, emerging as excellent candidates for efficient PSCs. While for ultrasensitive photodetectors (PDs), which have intensive applications in both scientific and industrial sectors, sensing from the UV to the NIR region is of critical importance. For polymer PDs, Eg as low as 0.8 eV has been obtained through a rational design stratagem, covering a broad wavelength range from the UV to the NIR region (1450 nm). However, the response time of the polymer PDs are severely limited by the hole mobility of LBG semiconducting polymers, which is significantly lower than those of the inorganic materials. Thus, further advancing the hole mobility of LBG semiconducting polymers is of equal importance as broadening the spectral response for approaching uncooled ultrasensitive broadband polymer PDs in the future study.

  20. Hydrothermal synthetic strategies of inorganic semiconducting nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Shi, Weidong; Song, Shuyan; Zhang, Hongjie

    2013-07-07

    Because of their unique chemical and physical properties, inorganic semiconducting nanostructures have gradually played a pivotal role in a variety of research fields, including electronics, chemical reactivity, energy conversion, and optics. A major feature of these nanostructures is the quantum confinement effect, which strongly depends on their size, shape, crystal structure and polydispersity. Among all developed synthetic methods, the hydrothermal method based on a water system has attracted more and more attention because of its outstanding advantages, such as high yield, simple manipulation, easy control, uniform products, lower air pollution, low energy consumption and so on. Precise control over the hydrothermal synthetic conditions is a key to the success of the preparation of high-quality inorganic semiconducting nanostructures. In this review, only the representative hydrothermal synthetic strategies of inorganic semiconducting nanostructures are selected and discussed. We will introduce the four types of strategies based on exterior reaction system adjustment, namely organic additive- and template-free hydrothermal synthesis, organic additive-assisted hydrothermal synthesis, template-assisted hydrothermal synthesis and substrate-assisted hydrothermal synthesis. In addition, the two strategies based on exterior reaction environment adjustment, including microwave-assisted and magnetic field-assisted hydrothermal synthesis, will be also described. Finally, we conclude and give the future prospects of this research area.

  1. Electromechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube devices on micromachined cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Eun-Kyoung; Park, Chan-Hyun; Lee, Jung A.; Kim, Min-Seok; Lee, Kwang-Cheol; So, Hye-Mi; Ahn, Chiwon; Chang, Hyunju; Kong, Ki-jeong; Kim, Ju-Jin; Lee, Jeong-O.

    2012-11-01

    We have investigated the electromechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by constructing carbon nanotube transistors on micro-cantilevers. SWNTs and ultra-long carbon nanotubes (UNTs) were grown on free-standing Si3N4 membranes by using chemical vapor deposition, and electrical contacts were generated with electron beam lithography and lift-off. The cantilevers bearing SWNT devices were micromachined so that hybrid cantilevers with various spring constants were fabricated. To measure the electromechanical properties of the SWNTs, precisely controlled forces were generated by a microbalance and applied to the hybrid cantilever devices. Upon bending, the conductances of the metallic and large-gap semiconducting UNTs showed no notable change, whereas the conductances of the small-gap semiconducting UNTs and networks of SWNTs increased. Numerical simulations of bended SWNT made using a multiscale simulator supported the hypothesis that the small-gap semiconducting SWNTs undergo a metallic transformation upon bending.

  2. Single-walled carbon nanotube networks for flexible and printed electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaumseil, Jana

    2015-07-01

    Networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be processed from solution and have excellent mechanical properties. They are highly flexible and stretchable. Depending on the type of nanotubes (semiconducting or metallic) they can be used as replacements for metal or transparent conductive oxide electrodes or as semiconducting layers for field-effect transistors (FETs) with high carrier mobilities. They are thus competitive alternatives to other solution-processable materials for flexible and printed electronics. This review introduces the basic properties of SWNTs, current methods for dispersion and separation of metallic and semiconducting SWNTs and techniques to deposit and pattern dense networks from dispersion. Recent examples of applications of carbon nanotubes as conductors and semiconductors in (opto-)electronic devices and integrated circuits will be discussed.

  3. Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Electronic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1997-01-01

    The carbon Nanotube junctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for use as the building blocks in the formation of nanoscale molecular electronic networks. While the simple joint of two dissimilar tubes can be generated by the introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise perfect hexagonal graphene sheet, more complex joints require other mechanisms. In this work we explore structural characteristics of complex 3-point junctions of carbon nanotubes using a generalized tight-binding molecular-dynamics scheme. The study of pi-electron local densities of states (LDOS) of these junctions reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap.

  4. Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Electronic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1997-01-01

    The carbon Nanotube junctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for use as the building blocks in the formation of nanoscale molecular electronic networks. While the simple joint of two dissimilar tubes can be generated by the introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise perfect hexagonal graphene sheet, more complex joints require other mechanisms. In this work we explore structural characteristics of complex 3-point junctions of carbon nanotubes using a generalized tight-binding molecular-dynamics scheme. The study of pi-electron local densities of states (LDOS) of these junctions reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap.

  5. Atomic nanotube welders: boron interstitials triggering connections in double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Endo, Morinobu; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Takuya; Kim, Yoong-Ahm; Van Lier, Gregory; Charlier, Jean-Christophe; Terrones, Humberto; Terrones, Mauricio; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2005-06-01

    Here we demonstrate that the incorporation of boron (B) atoms between double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) during thermal annealing (1400-1600 degrees C) results in covalent nanotube "Y" junctions, DWNT coalescence, and the formation of flattened multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). These processes occur via the merging of adjacent tubes, which is triggered by B interstitial atoms. We observe that B atom interstitials between DWNTs are responsible for the rapid establishment of covalent connections between neighboring tubes (polymerization), thereby resulting in the fast annealing of the carbon cylinders with B atoms embedded in the newly created carbon nanotube network. Once B is in the lattice, tube faceting (polygonization) starts to occur, and the electronic properties are expected to change dramatically. Therefore, B atoms indeed act as atomic nanotube fusers (or welders), and this process could now be used in assembling novel electronic nanotube devices, nanotube networks, carbon nanofoams and heterojunctions exhibiting p-type electronic properties.

  6. Analysis of long-channel nanotube field-effect-transistors (NT FETs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an analysis of long-channel nanotube (NT) field effect transistors (FET) from NASA's Ames Research Center. The structure of such a transistor including the electrode contact, 1D junction, and the planar junction is outlined. Also mentioned are various characteristics of a nanotube tip-equipped scanning tunnel microscope (STM).

  7. Carbon nanotube macroelectronics: toward system-on-plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuan; Takei, Kuniharu; Takahashi, Toshitakei; Javey, Ali

    2013-05-01

    We report solution-based processing of high-purity semiconducting carbon nanotube networks that has led to low-cost fabrication of large quantity of thin-film transistors (TFTs) with excellent yield and highly uniform, respectable performance on mechanically flexible substrates. Based on the semiconducting carbon nanotube TFTs, a wide range of macro-scale system-level electronics have been demonstrated including flexible integrated circuits, flexible full-color active-matrix organic light-emitting diode display, and smart interactive skin sensor that can simultaneously map and respond to the outside stimulus. Our work shows carbon nanotubes' immense promise as a low-cost and scalable TFT technology for nonconventional electronic systems with excellent performances.

  8. Energetics and electronic structure of double-walled boron nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hui; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2010-03-01

    Single-walled boron nanotubes have been studied extensively since their first successful fabrication in experiments. On the other hand, double-walled or multi-walled boron nanotubes have not yet been discussed in literature. Here, using density functional theory, we present a stable semiconducting two-dimensional double-layered boron sheet, which is 0.14 eV/atom more stable than the most stable single-layered α-sheet [1]. This double-layered sheet is stabilized due to the formation of inter-layer bonds. We show that double-walled boron nanotubes made from this double-layered sheet are all semiconducting. These double-walled nanotubes are more stable than single-walled ones for large nanotubes, but become less energetically favorable when the tube radius is smaller than 20 å due to their large curvature energies. To reduce the large curvature energies, we construct double-walled nanotubes whose inner and outer walls have different number of atoms around their circumference. The resulting nanotubes are more stable than single-walled ones for all radii.[4pt] [1] H. Tang, and S. Ismail-Beigi, PRL 99, 115501 (2007).

  9. Enhancing conductivity of metallic carbon nanotube networks by transition metal adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Ketolainen, T. Havu, V.; Puska, M. J.

    2015-02-07

    The conductivity of carbon nanotube thin films is mainly determined by carbon nanotube junctions, the resistance of which can be reduced by several different methods. We investigate electronic transport through carbon nanotube junctions in a four-terminal configuration, where two metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes are linked by a group 6 transition metal atom. The transport calculations are based on the Green’s function method combined with the density-functional theory. The transition metal atom is found to enhance the transport through the junction near the Fermi level. However, the size of the nanotube affects the improvement in the conductivity. The enhancement is related to the hybridization of chromium and carbon atom orbitals, which is clearly reflected in the character of eigenstates near the Fermi level. The effects of chromium atoms and precursor molecules remaining adsorbed on the nanotubes outside the junctions are also examined.

  10. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Synthesized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, Michael A.; Larkin, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have generated a great deal of scientific and commercial interest because of the countless envisioned applications that stem from their extraordinary materials properties. Included among these properties are high mechanical strength (tensile and modulus), high thermal conductivity, and electrical properties that make different forms of single-walled CNTs either conducting or semiconducting, and therefore, suitable for making ultraminiature, high-performance CNT-based electronics, sensors, and actuators. Among the limitations for CNTs is their inability to survive in high-temperature, harsh-environment applications. Silicon carbon nanotubes (SiCNTs) are being developed for their superior material properties under such conditions. For example, SiC is stable in regards to oxidation in air to temperatures exceeding 1000 C, whereas carbon-based materials are limited to 600 C. The high-temperature stability of SiCNTs is envisioned to enable high-temperature, harsh-environment nanofiber- and nanotube-reinforced ceramics. In addition, single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors are being developed for hightemperature, high-power electronics, and by analogy to CNTs with silicon semiconductors, SiCNTs with single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors may allow high-temperature harsh-environment nanoelectronics, nanosensors, and nanoactuators to be realized. Another challenge in CNT development is the difficulty of chemically modifying the tube walls, which are composed of chemically stable graphene sheets. The chemical substitution of the CNTs walls will be necessary for nanotube self-assembly and biological- and chemical-sensing applications. SiCNTs are expected to have a different multiple-bilayer wall structure, allowing the surface Si atoms to be functionalized readily with molecules that will allow SiCNTs to undergo self-assembly and be compatible with a variety of materials (for biotechnology applications and high-performance fiber-reinforced ceramics).

  11. On the mechanism of carbon nanotube formation: the role of the catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ayre, G N; Uchino, T; Mazumder, B; Hector, A L; Hutchison, J L; Smith, D C; Ashburn, P; de Groot, C H

    2011-10-05

    This work examines the recent developments in non-traditional catalyst-assisted chemical vapour deposition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with a view to determining the essential role of the catalyst in nanotube growth. A brief overview of the techniques reliant on the structural reorganization of carbon to form CNTs is provided. Additionally, CNT synthesis methods based upon ceramic, noble metal, and semiconducting nanoparticle catalysts are presented. Experimental evidence is provided for CNT growth using noble metal and semiconducting nanoparticle catalysts. A model for CNT growth consistent with the experimental results is proposed, in which the structural reorganization of carbon to form CNTs is paramount. © 2011 IOP Publishing Ltd

  12. On the mechanism of carbon nanotube formation: the role of the catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayre, G. N.; Uchino, T.; Mazumder, B.; Hector, A. L.; Hutchison, J. L.; Smith, D. C.; Ashburn, P.; de Groot, C. H.

    2011-10-01

    This work examines the recent developments in non-traditional catalyst-assisted chemical vapour deposition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with a view to determining the essential role of the catalyst in nanotube growth. A brief overview of the techniques reliant on the structural reorganization of carbon to form CNTs is provided. Additionally, CNT synthesis methods based upon ceramic, noble metal, and semiconducting nanoparticle catalysts are presented. Experimental evidence is provided for CNT growth using noble metal and semiconducting nanoparticle catalysts. A model for CNT growth consistent with the experimental results is proposed, in which the structural reorganization of carbon to form CNTs is paramount.

  13. Electrical properties and applications of carbon nanotube structures.

    PubMed

    Bandaru, Prabhakar R

    2007-01-01

    The experimentally verified electrical properties of carbon nanotube structures and manifestations in related phenomena such as thermoelectricity, superconductivity, electroluminescence, and photoconductivity are reviewed. The possibility of using naturally formed complex nanotube morphologies, such as Y-junctions, for new device architectures are then considered. Technological applications of the electrical properties of nanotube derived structures in transistor applications, high frequency nanoelectronics, field emission, and biological sensing are then outlined. The review concludes with an outlook on the technological potential of nanotubes and the need for new device architectures for nanotube systems integration.

  14. Double-walled boron nitride nanotubes grown by floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung Jong; Chatterjee, Shahana; Kim, Seung Min; Stach, Eric A; Bradley, Mark G; Pender, Mark J; Sneddon, Larry G; Maruyama, Benji

    2008-10-01

    One-dimensional nanostructures exhibit quantum confinement which leads to unique electronic properties, making them attractive as the active elements for nanoscale electronic devices. Boron nitride nanotubes are of particular interest since, unlike carbon nanotubes, all chiralities are semiconducting. Here, we report a synthesis based on the use of low pressures of the molecular precursor borazine in conjunction with a floating nickelocene catalyst that resulted in the formation of double-walled boron nitride nanotubes. As has been shown for carbon nanotube production, the floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition method has the potential for creating high quality boron nitride nanostructures with high production volumes.

  15. Separation of empty and water-filled single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Jeffrey A; Huh, Ji Yeon; Simpson, Jeffrey R; Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Holt, Josh M; Larsen, Brian A; Walker, Angela R Hight

    2011-05-24

    The separation of empty and water-filled laser ablation and electric arc synthesized nanotubes is reported. Centrifugation of these large-diameter nanotubes dispersed with sodium deoxycholate using specific conditions produces isolated bands of empty and water-filled nanotubes without significant diameter selection. This separation is shown to be consistent across multiple nanotube populations dispersed from different source soots. Detailed spectroscopic characterization of the resulting empty and filled fractions reveals that water filling leads to systematic changes to the optical and vibrational properties. Furthermore, sequential separation of the resolved fractions using cosurfactants and density gradient ultracentrifugation reveals that water filling strongly influences the optimal conditions for metallic and semiconducting separation.

  16. THz bandwidth optical switching with carbon nanotube metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Nikolaenko, Andrey E; Papasimakis, Nikitas; Chipouline, Arkadi; De Angelis, Francesco; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2012-03-12

    We provide the first demonstration of exceptional light-with-light optical switching performance of a carbon nanotube metamaterial - a hybrid nanostructure of a plasmonic metamaterial with semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes. A modulation depth of 10% in the near-IR with sub-500 fs response time is achieved with a pump fluence of just 10 μJ/cm², which is an order of magnitude lower than in previously reported artificial nanostructures. The improved switching characteristics of the carbon nanotube metamaterial are defined by an excitonic nonlinearity of carbon nanotubes resonantly enhanced by a concentration of local fields in the metamaterial. Since the spectral position of the excitonic response and metamaterial plasmonic resonance can be adjusted by using carbon nanotubes of different diameter and scaling of the metamaterial design, the giant nonlinear response of the hybrid metamaterial - in principle - can be engineered to cover the entire second and third telecom windows, from O- to U-band.

  17. Fitting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Optical Spectra.

    PubMed

    Pfohl, Moritz; Tune, Daniel D; Graf, Arko; Zaumseil, Jana; Krupke, Ralph; Flavel, Benjamin S

    2017-03-31

    In this work, a comprehensive methodology for the fitting of single-walled carbon nanotube absorption spectra is presented. Different approaches to background subtraction, choice of line profile, and calculation of full width at half-maximum are discussed both in the context of previous literature and the contemporary understanding of carbon nanotube photophysics. The fitting is improved by the inclusion of exciton-phonon sidebands, and new techniques to improve the individualization of overlapped nanotube spectra by exploiting correlations between the first- and second-order optical transitions and the exciton-phonon sidebands are presented. Consideration of metallic nanotubes allows an analysis of the metallic/semiconducting content, and a process of constraining the fit of highly congested spectra of carbon nanotube solid films according to the spectral weights of each (n, m) species in solution is also presented, allowing for more reliable resolution of overlapping peaks into single (n, m) species contributions.

  18. Fitting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Optical Spectra

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a comprehensive methodology for the fitting of single-walled carbon nanotube absorption spectra is presented. Different approaches to background subtraction, choice of line profile, and calculation of full width at half-maximum are discussed both in the context of previous literature and the contemporary understanding of carbon nanotube photophysics. The fitting is improved by the inclusion of exciton–phonon sidebands, and new techniques to improve the individualization of overlapped nanotube spectra by exploiting correlations between the first- and second-order optical transitions and the exciton–phonon sidebands are presented. Consideration of metallic nanotubes allows an analysis of the metallic/semiconducting content, and a process of constraining the fit of highly congested spectra of carbon nanotube solid films according to the spectral weights of each (n, m) species in solution is also presented, allowing for more reliable resolution of overlapping peaks into single (n, m) species contributions. PMID:28393134

  19. Interfacial properties of semiconducting transition metal chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaegermann, W.; Tributsch, H.

    This review is aimed at the correlation of structural and electronic properies of semiconducting transition metal chalcogenides with molecular surface processes and mechanisms in photoelectrochemistry, (photo)catalysis, geochemistry and hydrometallurgy. Layer-type, pyrite structured and transition metal cluster containing chalcogenides are selected as model systems to explain the principles involved. Special emphasis is given to the discussion of materials which involve transition metal d- states in the interfacial reaction pathways of holes and electrons. Since they initiate and control heterogeneous coordination chemistry at the surfaces they may provide the possibility of tailoring selective and catalytically demanding reactions. Examples of such mechanisms are presented and discussed in relation to surface properties involved.

  20. Metallic and semiconducting nanoparticles in LCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Anshul; Urbanski, Martin; Mori, Taizo; Kitzerow, Heinz-S.; Hegmann, Torsten

    This chapter provides an overview of recent advances in nanoparticleliquid crystal dispersions with a particular focus on bulk versus surface effects. Surface effects will include the role of surface functionalization of metal and semiconducting nanoparticles as well as interfacial effects, alignment and anchoring in thin liquid crystal films related to nanoparticle segregation. We will also try to provide a practical guide for experimental work on nanoparticle-liquid crystal dispersions, including tips and best practices for preparing dispersions, detecting and preventing inhomogeneities as well as Dos and Don'ts for handling samples and filling test cells for electrooptic, spectroscopic, and other experiments critical for research in this area.

  1. Carbon nanotubes: Synthesis, integration and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jing

    Ever since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have captured the attention of researchers worldwide due to their remarkable structural, electrical and mechanical properties. They not only offer an ideal playground for fundamental research but also render great potential for all kinds of applications, including future electronic devices, sensors, exceptionally strong materials, flat-panel displays, hydrogen fuel cells, and so on. This thesis reports the study of nanotube properties and some of its applications. It is divided into three parts: (1) The chemical synthesis of individual single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) via chemical vapor deposition of methane; (2) the integration of individual SWNT into electronic circuits; (3) The studies on the electrical properties of these nanotubes, and the exploration of their potential applications. In order to facilitate the studies and applications of nanotubes, great efforts have been made towards their synthesis and production. Our approach is the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, through which we can produce individual SWNTs with high quality and high yield. However, the nanotubes produced directly using CVD (and other methods like laser ablation and arc discharge) are always tangled and bundled up together, and buried inside the graphitized bulk catalyst, which renders the manipulation and characterization a difficult task. We solved this problem by combining the chemical synthesis and conventional nanofabrication techniques together with selectively growing nanotubes at specific sites. Therefore, individual carbon nanotubes can be easily integrated into electrical circuits. Theoretical studies have shown nanotubes possess unique electronic properties; a SWNT be metallic, semiconducting or semi-metallic depending on its helicity. In our experimental studies we have observed all the 3 types of behaviors and confirmed the theoretical predictions. We also investigated the realization of various nanotube functional

  2. Interplay between tight junctions & adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Hannah K; Maiers, Jessica L; DeMali, Kris A

    2017-09-01

    Cell-cell adhesions are critical for the development and maintenance of tissues. Present at sites of cell-cell contact are the adherens junctions and tight junctions. The adherens junctions mediate cell-cell adhesion via the actions of nectins and cadherins. The tight junctions regulate passage of ions and small molecules between cells and establish cell polarity. Historically, the adherens and tight junctions have been thought of as discrete complexes. However, it is now clear that a high level of interdependency exists between the two junctional complexes. The adherens junctions and tight junctions are physically linked, by the zonula occludens proteins, and linked via signaling molecules including several polarity complexes and actin cytoskeletal modifiers. This review will first describe the individual components of both the adherens and tight junctions and then discuss the coupling of the two complexes with an emphasis on the signaling links and physical interactions between the two junctional complexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Abnormal hopping conduction in semiconducting polycrystalline graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeongho; Mitchel, William C.; Elhamri, Said; Grazulis, Larry; Altfeder, Igor

    2013-07-01

    We report the observation of an abnormal carrier transport phenomenon in polycrystalline semiconducting graphene grown by solid carbon source molecular beam epitaxy. At the lowest temperatures in samples with small grain size, the conduction does not obey the two-dimensional Mott-type variable-range hopping (VRH) conduction often reported in semiconducting graphene. The hopping exponent p is found to deviate from the 1/3 value expected for Mott VRH with several samples exhibiting a p=2/5 dependence. We also show that the maximum energy difference between hopping sites is larger than the activation energy for nearest-neighbor hopping, violating the assumptions of the Mott model. The 2/5 dependence more closely agrees with the quasi-one-dimensional VRH model proposed by Fogler, Teber, and Shklovskii (FTS). In the FTS model, conduction occurs by tunneling between neighboring metallic wires. We suggest that metallic edge states and conductive grain boundaries play the role of the metallic wires in the FTS model.

  4. Coupling of carbon and peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Javier; Vázquez-Vázquez, Carlos; Kalinin, Arseny; Geckeler, Kurt E; Granja, Juan R

    2014-02-12

    Two of the main types of nanotubular architectures are the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and the self-assembling cyclic peptide nanotubes (SCPNs). We here report the preparation of the dual composite resulting from the ordered combination of both tubular motifs. In the resulting architecture, the SWCNTs can act as templates for the assembly of SCPNs that engage the carbon nanotubes noncovalently via pyrene "paddles", each member of the resulting hybrid stabilizing the other in aqueous solution. The particular hybrids obtained in the present study formed highly ordered oriented arrays and display complementary properties such as electrical conductivity. Furthermore, a self-sorting of the cyclic peptides toward semiconducting rather than metallic SWCNTs is also observed in the aqueous dispersions. It is envisaged that a broad range of exploitable properties may be achieved and/or controlled by varying the cyclic peptide components of similar SWCNT/SCPN hybrids.

  5. Quenching of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Fluorescence by Dissolved Oxygen Reveals Selective Single-Stranded DNA Affinities.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Bachilo, Sergei M; Weisman, R Bruce

    2017-04-13

    The selective interactions between short oligomers of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and specific structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes have been exploited in powerful methods for nanotube sorting. We report here that nanotubes coated with ssDNA also display selective interactions through the selective quenching of nanotube fluorescence by dissolved oxygen. In aqueous solutions equilibrated under 1 atm of O2, emission intensity from semiconducting nanotubes is reduced by between 9 and 40%, varying with the combination of ssDNA sequence and nanotube structure. This quenching reverses promptly and completely on removal of dissolved O2 and may be due to physisorption on nanotube surfaces. Fluorescence quenching offers a simple, nondestructive approach for studying the structure-selective interactions of ssDNA with single-walled carbon nanotubes and identifying recognition sequences.

  6. Semiconducting monolayer materials as a tunable platform for excitonic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Marco; Palummo, Maurizia; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2012-11-27

    The recent advent of two-dimensional monolayer materials with tunable optical properties and high carrier mobility offers renewed opportunities for efficient, ultrathin excitonic solar cells alternative to those based on conjugated polymer and small molecule donors. Using first-principles density functional theory and many-body calculations, we demonstrate that monolayers of hexagonal BN and graphene (CBN) combined with commonly used acceptors such as PCBM fullerene or semiconducting carbon nanotubes can provide excitonic solar cells with tunable absorber gap, donor-acceptor interface band alignment, and power conversion efficiency, as well as novel device architectures. For the case of CBN-PCBM devices, we predict power conversion efficiency limits in the 10-20% range depending on the CBN monolayer structure. Our results demonstrate the possibility of using monolayer materials in tunable, efficient, ultrathin solar cells in which unexplored exciton and carrier transport regimes are at play.

  7. High Performance Organic Transistors: Percolating Arrays of Nanotubes Functionalized with an Electron Deficient Olefin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-03

    electronics. In the present work, we have extended carbon nanotube functionalization via a 2-2 cycloaddition to electron withdrawing non-fluorinated...have extended carbon nanotube functionalization via a 2-2 cycloaddition to electron withdrawing non-fluorinated olefins as well. Our results show...Moyon et Al. 27 work on cycloaddition of azomenthine suggests preferential functionalization of the semiconducting tubes. In contrast, Kamaras et al

  8. Writing simple RF electronic devices on paper with carbon nanotube ink.

    PubMed

    Dragoman, M; Flahaut, E; Dragoman, D; Al Ahmad, M; Plana, R

    2009-09-16

    This paper shows that we can print on paper simple high-frequency electronic devices such as resistances, capacitances or inductances, with values that can be changed in a controllable manner by an applied dc voltage. This tunability is achieved with the help of an ink containing functionalized carbon nanotubes and water. After the water is evaporated from the paper, the nanotubes remain steadily imprinted on paper, showing a semiconducting behavior and tunable electrical properties.

  9. Growth and characterization of high-density mats of single-walled carbon nanotubes for interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.; Zhong, G.; Telg, H.; Thomsen, C.; Warner, J. H.; Briggs, G. A. D.; Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U.; Roth, S.

    2008-10-20

    We grow high-density, aligned single wall carbon nanotube mats for use as interconnects in integrated circuits by remote plasma chemical vapor deposition from a Fe-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film catalyst. We carry out extensive Raman characterization of the resulting mats, and find that this catalyst system gives rise to a broad range of nanotube diameters, with no preferential selectivity of semiconducting tubes, but with at least 1/3 of metallic tubes.

  10. First-principles study of band-gap change in deformed nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Bin; Lakatos, Gregory W.; Peng, Shu; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2005-10-01

    The effects of cross-sectional deformation and bending on the electronic structures of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are examined. Upon increasing the deformation, semiconducting SWNTs undergo semiconductor-metal transition, and the conduction band and valence band show asymmetric response to the deformation. The metallic tubes' electronic structures are relatively insensitive to similar mechanical deformation. Using the properties of deformed nanotubes, we propose a conceptual design of SWNT-based single-electron quantum-well devices.

  11. Pure carbon nanoscale devices: Nanotube heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chico, L.; Crespi, V.H.; Benedict, L.X.; Louie, S.G.; Cohen, M.L. |

    1996-02-01

    Introduction of pentagon-heptagon pair defects into the hexagonal network of a single carbon nanotube can change the helicity of the tube and alter its electronic structure. Using a tight-binding method to calculate the electronic structure of such systems we show that they behave as nanoscale metal/semiconductor or semiconductor/semiconductor junctions. These junctions could be the building blocks of nanoscale electronic devices made entirely of carbon. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  12. Gate-tunable carbon nanotube-MoS2 heterojunction p-n diode.

    PubMed

    Jariwala, Deep; Sangwan, Vinod K; Wu, Chung-Chiang; Prabhumirashi, Pradyumna L; Geier, Michael L; Marks, Tobin J; Lauhon, Lincoln J; Hersam, Mark C

    2013-11-05

    The p-n junction diode and field-effect transistor are the two most ubiquitous building blocks of modern electronics and optoelectronics. In recent years, the emergence of reduced dimensionality materials has suggested that these components can be scaled down to atomic thicknesses. Although high-performance field-effect devices have been achieved from monolayered materials and their heterostructures, a p-n heterojunction diode derived from ultrathin materials is notably absent and constrains the fabrication of complex electronic and optoelectronic circuits. Here we demonstrate a gate-tunable p-n heterojunction diode using semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and single-layer molybdenum disulfide as p-type and n-type semiconductors, respectively. The vertical stacking of these two direct band gap semiconductors forms a heterojunction with electrical characteristics that can be tuned with an applied gate bias to achieve a wide range of charge transport behavior ranging from insulating to rectifying with forward-to-reverse bias current ratios exceeding 10(4). This heterojunction diode also responds strongly to optical irradiation with an external quantum efficiency of 25% and fast photoresponse <15 μs. Because SWCNTs have a diverse range of electrical properties as a function of chirality and an increasing number of atomically thin 2D nanomaterials are being isolated, the gate-tunable p-n heterojunction concept presented here should be widely generalizable to realize diverse ultrathin, high-performance electronics and optoelectronics.

  13. Optoelectronics with Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Megumi

    2011-12-01

    The carbon nanotube is a promising material for future micro- and nano-scale electronics because of its unique electronic properties, high carrier mobility and extraordinary capacity for high current density. In particular, semiconducting carbon nanotubes are direct bandgap materials with a typical energy gap in the order of 1 eV, which means they emit light in the near-infrared range, making them an attractive option in telecommunications applications. However, there have been few systematic investigations of electrically-induced light emission (i.e. electroluminescence) from carbon nanotubes, and their emission properties are not well understood. In this dissertation, we explore the characteristics of electroluminescence in three different types of carbon-nanotube devices. The first is a single-tube field-effect transistor (CNTFET), whose emission has previously been found to have a very broad spectral shape and low emission efficiency. We analyze the spectral shape in detail, which reveals that a high electric field near metal contacts contributes most to the bias-dependent component of broadening, in addition to smaller contributions from tube nonuniformity, inelastic scattering of phonons, high temperature, etc. In the second part of the study, single-tube light-emitting diodes are constructed by employing a split top-gate scheme. The split gate creates p- and n-doped regions electrostatically, so that electrons and holes combine between the two sections and can decay radiatively. This configuration creates electron-hole pairs under much lower electric fields and gives us a greater control over carrier distribution in the device channel, resulting in much narrower spectral linewidths and an emission intensity several orders of magnitude larger than that of CNTFETs. The much better signal-to-noise also leads to the observation of emission from defect-induced states. Finally, we extend the idea of the single-tube p-n diode and fabricate CNT film diodes from many

  14. Doping Scheme of Semiconducting Atomic Chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Atomic chains, precise structures of atomic scale created on an atomically regulated substrate surface, are candidates for future electronics. A doping scheme for intrinsic semiconducting Mg chains is considered. In order to suppress the unwanted Anderson localization and minimize the deformation of the original band shape, atomic modulation doping is considered, which is to place dopant atoms beside the chain periodically. Group I atoms are donors, and group VI or VII atoms are acceptors. As long as the lattice constant is long so that the s-p band crossing has not occurred, whether dopant atoms behave as donors or acceptors is closely related to the energy level alignment of isolated atomic levels. Band structures are calculated for Br-doped (p-type) and Cs-doped (n-type) Mg chains using the tight-binding theory with universal parameters, and it is shown that the band deformation is minimized and only the Fermi energy position is modified.

  15. Ni doping of semiconducting boron carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Nina; Liu Jing; Adenwalla, S.; Langell, M. A.; Kizilkaya, Orhan

    2010-01-15

    The wide band gap, temperature stability, high resistivity, and robustness of semiconducting boron carbide make it an attractive material for device applications. Undoped boron carbide is p type; Ni acts as a n-type dopant. Here we present the results of controlled doping of boron carbide with Ni on thin film samples grown using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The change in the dopant concentration within the thin film as a function of the dopant flow rate in the precursor gas mixture was confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements; with increasing dopant concentration, current-voltage (I-V) curves clearly establish the trend from p-type to n-type boron carbide.

  16. Plasma effects in semiconducting nanowire growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrikov, Kostya (Ken); Seo, Dong Han; Mehdipour, Hamid; Cheng, Qijin; Kumar, Shailesh

    2012-02-01

    Three case studies are presented to show low-temperature plasma-specific effects in the solution of (i) effective control of nucleation and growth; (ii) environmental friendliness; and (iii) energy efficiency critical issues in semiconducting nanowire growth. The first case (related to (i) and (iii)) shows that in catalytic growth of Si nanowires, plasma-specific effects lead to a substantial increase in growth rates, decrease of the minimum nanowire thickness, and much faster nanowire nucleation at the same growth temperatures. For nucleation and growth of nanowires of the same thickness, much lower temperatures are required. In the second example (related to (ii)), we produce Si nanowire networks with controllable nanowire thickness, length, and area density without any catalyst or external supply of Si building material. This case is an environmentally-friendly alternative to the commonly used Si microfabrication based on a highly-toxic silane precursor gas. The third example is related to (iii) and demonstrates that ZnO nanowires can be synthesized in plasma-enhanced CVD at significantly lower process temperatures than in similar neutral gas-based processes and without compromising structural quality and performance of the nanowires. Our results are relevant to the development of next-generation nanoelectronic, optoelectronic, energy conversion and sensing devices based on semiconducting nanowires.Three case studies are presented to show low-temperature plasma-specific effects in the solution of (i) effective control of nucleation and growth; (ii) environmental friendliness; and (iii) energy efficiency critical issues in semiconducting nanowire growth. The first case (related to (i) and (iii)) shows that in catalytic growth of Si nanowires, plasma-specific effects lead to a substantial increase in growth rates, decrease of the minimum nanowire thickness, and much faster nanowire nucleation at the same growth temperatures. For nucleation and growth of nanowires

  17. Optical antenna effect in semiconducting nanowires.

    PubMed

    Chen, G; Wu, Jian; Lu, Qiujie; Gutierrez, H R; Xiong, Qihua; Pellen, M E; Petko, J S; Werner, D H; Eklund, P C

    2008-05-01

    We report on investigations of the interaction of light with nanoscale antennae made from crystalline GaP nanowires (NWs). Using Raman scattering, we have observed strong optical antenna effects which we identify with internal standing wave photon modes of the wire. The antenna effects were probed in individual NWs whose diameters are in the range 40 < d < 300 nm. The data and our calculations show that the nature of the backscattered light is critically dependent on the interplay between a photon confinement effect and bulk Raman scattering. At small diameter, d < 65 nm, the NWs are found to act like a nearly perfect dipole antenna and the bulk Raman selection rules are masked leading to a polarized scattering intensity function I R approximately cos4 theta. Underscoring the importance of this work is the realization that a fundamental understanding of the "optical antenna effect" in semiconducting NWs is essential to the analysis of all electro-optic effects in small diameter filaments.

  18. Response functions of semiconducting lithium indium diselenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukosi, Eric; Chvala, Ondrej; Stowe, Ashley

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the results of a computational investigation that determined the gamma-ray and neutron response functions of a new semiconducting material, 6LiInSe2, which is very sensitive to thermal neutrons. Both MCNP6 simulations and custom post-processing/simulation techniques were used to determine various detection properties of LISe. The computational study included consideration of energetic electron escape, the contribution from the activation of 115In and subsequent decay of 116In, triton and alpha particle escape from the 6Li reaction pathway, and the effect of incomplete charge collection when detecting neutrons via the 6Li reaction pathway. The result of neutron detection with incomplete charge collection was compared to experimental results and showed general agreement, where holes exhibit a lower mobility-lifetime product than electrons, as expected for compound semiconductors.

  19. Bulk semiconducting scintillator device for radiation detection

    DOEpatents

    Stowe, Ashley C.; Burger, Arnold; Groza, Michael

    2016-08-30

    A bulk semiconducting scintillator device, including: a Li-containing semiconductor compound of general composition Li-III-VI.sub.2, wherein III is a Group III element and VI is a Group VI element; wherein the Li-containing semiconductor compound is used in one or more of a first mode and a second mode, wherein: in the first mode, the Li-containing semiconductor compound is coupled to an electrical circuit under bias operable for measuring electron-hole pairs in the Li-containing semiconductor compound in the presence of neutrons and the Li-containing semiconductor compound is also coupled to current detection electronics operable for detecting a corresponding current in the Li-containing semiconductor compound; and, in the second mode, the Li-containing semiconductor compound is coupled to a photodetector operable for detecting photons generated in the Li-containing semiconductor compound in the presence of the neutrons.

  20. Ferromagnetism and semiconducting of boron nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    More recently, motivated by extensively technical applications of carbon nanostructures, there is a growing interest in exploring novel non-carbon nanostructures. As the nearest neighbor of carbon in the periodic table, boron has exceptional properties of low volatility and high melting point and is stronger than steel, harder than corundum, and lighter than aluminum. Boron nanostructures thus are expected to have broad applications in various circumstances. In this contribution, we have performed a systematical study of the stability and electronic and magnetic properties of boron nanowires using the spin-polarized density functional calculations. Our calculations have revealed that there are six stable configurations of boron nanowires obtained by growing along different base vectors from the unit cell of the bulk α-rhombohedral boron (α-B) and β-rhombohedral boron (β-B). Well known, the boron bulk is usually metallic without magnetism. However, theoretical results about the magnetic and electronic properties showed that, whether for the α-B-based or the β-B-based nanowires, their magnetism is dependent on the growing direction. When the boron nanowires grow along the base vector [001], they exhibit ferromagnetism and have the magnetic moments of 1.98 and 2.62 μB, respectively, for the α-c [001] and β-c [001] directions. Electronically, when the boron nanowire grows along the α-c [001] direction, it shows semiconducting and has the direct bandgap of 0.19 eV. These results showed that boron nanowires possess the unique direction dependence of the magnetic and semiconducting behaviors, which are distinctly different from that of the bulk boron. Therefore, these theoretical findings would bring boron nanowires to have many promising applications that are novel for the boron bulk. PMID:23244063

  1. Electronic interaction in composites of a conjugated polymer and carbon nanotubes: first-principles calculation and photophysical approaches

    PubMed Central

    Wéry, Jany; Duvail, Jean-Luc; Lefrant, Serge; Yaya, Abu; Ewels, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms that control the photophysics of composite films made of a semiconducting conjugated polymer (poly(paraphenylene vinylene), PPV) mixed with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) up to a concentration of 64 wt % are determined by using photoexcitation techniques and density functional theory. Charge separation is confirmed experimentally by rapid quenching of PPV photoluminescence and changes in photocurrent starting at relatively low concentrations of SWNT. Calculations predict strong electronic interaction between the polymer and the SWNT network when nanotubes are semiconducting. PMID:26171290

  2. Nanogenerator comprising piezoelectric semiconducting nanostructures and Schottky conductive contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhong L. (Inventor); Wang, Xudong (Inventor); Song, Jinhui (Inventor); Zhou, Jun (Inventor); He, Jr-Hau (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A semiconducting device includes a substrate, a piezoelectric wire, a structure, a first electrode and a second electrode. The piezoelectric wire has a first end and an opposite second end and is disposed on the substrate. The structure causes the piezoelectric wire to bend in a predetermined manner between the first end and the second end so that the piezoelectric wire enters a first semiconducting state. The first electrode is coupled to the first end and the second electrode is coupled to the second end so that when the piezoelectric wire is in the first semiconducting state, an electrical characteristic will be exhibited between the first electrode and the second electrode.

  3. Laser method for forming low-resistance ohmic contacts on semiconducting oxides

    DOEpatents

    Narayan, Jagdish

    1981-01-01

    This invention is a new method for the formation of high-quality ohmic contacts on wide-band-gap semiconducting oxides. As exemplified by the formation of an ohmic contact on n-type BaTiO.sub.3 containing a p-n junction, the invention entails depositing a film of a metallic electroding material on the BaTiO.sub.3 surface and irradiating the film with a Q-switched laser pulse effecting complete melting of the film and localized melting of the surface layer of oxide immediately underlying the film. The resulting solidified metallic contact is ohmic, has unusually low contact resistance, and is thermally stable, even at elevated temperatures. The contact does not require cleaning before attachment of any suitable electrical lead. This method is safe, rapid, reproducible, and relatively inexpensive.

  4. Method for forming low-resistance ohmic contacts on semiconducting oxides

    DOEpatents

    Narayan, J.

    1979-10-01

    The invention provides a new method for the formation of high-quality ohmic contacts on wide-band-gap semiconducting oxides. As exemplified by the formation of an ohmic contact on n-type BaTiO/sub 3/ containing a p-n junction, the invention entails depositing a film of a metallic electroding material on the BaTiO/sub 3/ surface and irradiating the film with a Q-switched laser pulse effecting complete melting of the film and localized melting of the surface layer of oxide immediately underlying the film. The resulting solidified metallic contact is ohmic, has unusually low contact resistance, and is thermally stable, even at elevated temmperatures. The contact does not require cleaning before attachment of any suitable electrical lead. This method is safe, rapid, reproducible, and relatively inexpensive.

  5. The performance of in situ grown Schottky-barrier single wall carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhixian; Eres, Gyula; Jin, Rongying; Subedi, Alaska P; Mandrus, David; Kim, Eugene

    2009-01-01

    Electrical transport measurements were used to study device behavior that results from the interplay of defects and inadvertent contact variance that develops in as-grown semiconducting single wall carbon nanotube devices with nominally identical Au contacts. The transport measurements reveal that as-grown nanotubes contain defects that limit the performance of field-effect transistors with ohmic contacts. In Schottky-barrier field-effect transistors the device performance is dominated by the Schottky barrier and the nanotube defects have little effect. We also observed strong rectifying behavior attributed to extreme contact asymmetry due to the different nanoscale roughness of the gold contacts formed during nanotube growth.

  6. Nanotubes, Nanowires, and Nanocantilevers in Biosensor Development

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-03-08

    In this chapter, the reviews on biosensor development based on 1-D nanomaterials, CNTs, semiconducting nanowires, and some cantilevers will be introduced. The emphasis of this review will be placed on CNTs and electrochemical/electronic biosensor developments. Section 2 of this chapter gives a detailed description of carbon nanotubes-based biosensor development, from fabrication of carbon nanotubes, the strategies for construction of carbon nanotube based biosensors to their bioapplications. In the section of the applications of CNTs based biosensors, various detection principles, e. g. electrochemical, electronic, and optical method, and their applications are reviewed in detail. Section 3 introduces the method for synthesis of semiconducting nanowires, e.g. silicon nanowires, conducting polymer nanowires and metal oxide nanowires and their applications in DNA and proteins sensing. Section 4 simply describes the development for nanocantilevers based biosensors and their application in DNA and protein diagnosis. Each section starts from a brief introduction and then goes into details. Finally in the Conclusion section, the development of 1-D nanomaterials based biosensor development is summarized.

  7. Simulation and modeling of carbon nanotube devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shu

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are molecular wires that exhibit a number of exceptional chemical, electronic, and mechanical properties. Investigating on these properties and exploring conceptual usages of these properties in devices are conducted by using simulation tools ranging from molecular dynamics, tight-binding, to ab-initio simulations. Four major aspects of carbon nanotube devices are studied. First, we investigate the mechanism of using CNTs to detect the presence of chemical gases such as NO2, NH3, and O2. We discover that the process of NO2 gas sensing is not simply the process of adsorption and desorption of NO2 gas on the CNT surface, but rather it involves the complex process of NO2 gas molecule's reaction on the CNTs surface, which produce NO and NO3 molecules. These findings show that NO3 is the real agent behind the slow recovery of SWCNTs as sensing devices. We also conduct analysis on molecular adsorption on charged SWCNT by electric field manipulation. Secondly, to detect the presence of CO and water molecules that have long evaded the detection of intrinsic carbon nanotubes as sensing devices, we propose the design of a new breed of nanotube based sensor devices. These devices are developed by substitutional doping of the so-called impurity atoms (such as Boron, Nitrogen atoms) into intrinsic single wall carbon nanotubes, or by using composite BxCyNz nanotubes. Thirdly, the effects of flattening and bending on the size of the band gap in CNT are examined. Increasing cross-sectional flattening is found to initially close the band gap in semiconducting tubes, while ultimately re-opening the gap at high degrees of flattening. Using the properties of deformed nanotubes, a simple design for a CNT based quantum well device is proposed. Finally, interactions of metal atoms (Al, Ti) with semiconducting single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) are investigated. Comparison of the energetics of these metal atoms on (8,0) CNT surface shows significant differences

  8. Thermionic refrigeration at CNT-CNT junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Pipe, K. P.

    2016-10-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is used to study carrier energy relaxation following thermionic emission at the junction of two van der Waals bonded single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). An energy-dependent transmission probability gives rise to energy filtering at the junction, which is predicted to increase the average electron transport energy by as much as 0.115 eV, leading to an effective Seebeck coefficient of 386 μV/K. MC results predict a long energy relaxation length (˜8 μm) for hot electrons crossing the junction into the barrier SWCNT. For SWCNTs of optimal length, an analytical transport model is used to show that thermionic cooling can outweigh parasitic heat conduction due to high SWCNT thermal conductivity, leading to a significant cooling capacity (2.4 × 106 W/cm2).

  9. Josephson radiation from InSb-nanowire junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Woerkom, David; Proutski, Alexander; Krivachy, Tamas; Bouman, Daniel; van Gulik, Ruben; Gul, Onder; Cassidy, Maja; Car, Diana; Bakkers, Erik; Kouwenhoven, Leo; Geresdi, Attila

    Semiconducting nanowire Josephson junctions has recently gained interest as building blocks for Majorana circuits and gate-tuneable superconducting qubits . Here we investigate the rich physics of the Andreev bound state spectrum of InSb nanowire junctions utilizing the AC Josephson relation 2eV_bias =hf . We designed and characterized an on-chip microwave circuit coupling the nanowire junction to an Al/AlOx/Al tunnel junction. The DC response of the tunnel junction is affected by photon-assisted quasiparticle current, which gives us the possibility to measure the radiation spectrum of the nanowire junction up to several tens of GHz in frequency. Our circuit design allows for voltage or phase biasing of the Josephson junction enabling direct mapping of Andreev bound states. We discuss our fabrication methods and choice of materials to achieve radiation detection up to a magnetic field of few hundred milliTesla, compatible with Majorana states in spin-orbit coupled nanowires. This work has been supported by the Netherlands Foundations FOM, Abstract NWO and Microsoft Corporation Station Q.

  10. Arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes with full surface coverage for high-performance electronics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qing; Han, Shu-jen; Tulevski, George S; Zhu, Yu; Lu, Darsen D; Haensch, Wilfried

    2013-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes have exceptional electronic properties and have been proposed as a replacement for silicon in applications such as low-cost thin-film transistors and high-performance logic devices. However, practical devices will require dense, aligned arrays of electronically pure nanotubes to optimize performance, maximize device packing density and provide sufficient drive current (or power output) for each transistor. Here, we show that aligned arrays of semiconducting carbon nanotubes can be assembled using the Langmuir-Schaefer method. The arrays have a semiconducting nanotube purity of 99% and can fully cover a surface with a nanotube density of more than 500 tubes/µm. The nanotube pitch is self-limited by the diameter of the nanotube plus the van der Waals separation, and the intrinsic mobility of the nanotubes is preserved after array assembly. Transistors fabricated using this approach exhibit significant device performance characteristics with a drive current density of more than 120 µA µm(-1), transconductance greater than 40 µS µm(-1) and on/off ratios of ∼1 × 10(3).

  11. A Study on Novel Methods to Improve Conductivity of Carbon Nanotube Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yao

    Carbon nanotubes have gained considerable attention in recent years, and have found applications in a variety of fields such as nanotechnology, electronics and optics thanks to their exceptional electrical, optical and mechanical properties. Individual nanotubes have demonstrated extraordinary electron carrying and conducting ability, however, when constructed into networks, the device until this day still fall short of the expectation when being compared with conditional conducting materials. Reasons for this limitation generally include the intrinsic (junctions) and the extrinsic (impurities) ones. Both factors introduce resistance to the electron transport within single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) film. In this thesis, three novel methods were adopted in order to tackle those two problems from a different perspective. Glycolic acid treatment is used to replace traditional strong inorganic acid to target specifically the surfactants trapped inside the network while preserving the structure of SWNT. Glycolic acid was used for both transferred and sprayed processes. In both cases, certain levels of improvement were observed in terms of conducting performance. The decrease in resistance was as high as 11% for sprayed films, and 18% for transferred films. Inconsistency from sample to sample did occur, especially for samples prepared by the membrane transfer technique. Diffusion activities were examined for metal particles deposited on SWNT networks, establishing the foundation for using metal particles as a medium to improve interjunction electron conduction for SWNT networks. In order to accurately evaluate the degree of diffusion, a novel masking method was developed using NaCl crystallites. The diffusion coefficient and activation energy for Gold particles on the surface of SWNTs films were measured. The behavior can be described as a combination of diffusion of metal particles driven by concentration gradient and metal particles aggregation to reduce surface

  12. Intrinsic BWF-lineshape Observed by Raman Scattering in Isolated Metallic Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maultzsch, Janina; Wu, Yang; Knoesel, Ernst; Chandra, Bhupesh; Huang, Mingyuan; Sfeir, Matt; Brus, Louis; Hone, James; Heinz, Tony

    2007-03-01

    Broadened and asymmetric lineshapes for Raman scattering in the high-energy (or G) modes of metallic carbon nanotubes have been reported for many years. There remains, however, controversy about whether this behavior is an intrinsic feature of metallic nanotubes or is induced by perturbations. To address this issue, we have examined isolated metallic nanotubes suspended in air, with chiral indices determined independently by Rayleigh scattering and Raman measurements of the radial breathing mode. Our data show that strong broadening (to FWHM > 50/cm) and weak asymmetry are typical of the high-energy Raman modes, with lineshapes describable by a Breit-Wigner-Fano (BWF) form. Significant variation in peak width and Raman shift is, however, observed as a function of the nanotube chiral index. Indeed, some metallic nanotubes have lineshapes and widths that are very similar to those of semiconducting nanotubes. We will discuss the observed variation and the origin of the BWF lineshape.

  13. Chirality dependence of the absorption cross section of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Vialla, Fabien; Roquelet, Cyrielle; Langlois, Benjamin; Delport, Géraud; Santos, Silvia Morim; Deleporte, Emmanuelle; Roussignol, Philippe; Delalande, Claude; Voisin, Christophe; Lauret, Jean-Sébastien

    2013-09-27

    The variation of the optical absorption of carbon nanotubes with their geometry has been a long-standing question at the heart of both metrological and applicative issues, in particular because optical spectroscopy is one of the primary tools for the assessment of the chiral species abundance of samples. Here, we tackle the chirality dependence of the optical absorption with an original method involving ultraefficient energy transfer in porphyrin-nanotube compounds that allows uniform photoexcitation of all chiral species. We measure the absolute absorption cross section of a wide range of semiconducting nanotubes at their S22 transition and show that it varies by up to a factor of 2.2 with the chiral angle, with type I nanotubes showing a larger absorption. In contrast, the luminescence quantum yield remains almost constant.

  14. Chirality Dependence of the Absorption Cross Section of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vialla, Fabien; Roquelet, Cyrielle; Langlois, Benjamin; Delport, Géraud; Santos, Silvia Morim; Deleporte, Emmanuelle; Roussignol, Philippe; Delalande, Claude; Voisin, Christophe; Lauret, Jean-Sébastien

    2013-09-01

    The variation of the optical absorption of carbon nanotubes with their geometry has been a long-standing question at the heart of both metrological and applicative issues, in particular because optical spectroscopy is one of the primary tools for the assessment of the chiral species abundance of samples. Here, we tackle the chirality dependence of the optical absorption with an original method involving ultraefficient energy transfer in porphyrin-nanotube compounds that allows uniform photoexcitation of all chiral species. We measure the absolute absorption cross section of a wide range of semiconducting nanotubes at their S22 transition and show that it varies by up to a factor of 2.2 with the chiral angle, with type I nanotubes showing a larger absorption. In contrast, the luminescence quantum yield remains almost constant.

  15. Carbon nanotube based pressure sensor for flexible electronics

    SciTech Connect

    So, Hye-Mi; Sim, Jin Woo; Kwon, Jinhyeong; Yun, Jongju; Baik, Seunghyun; Chang, Won Seok

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The electromechanical change of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. • Fabrication of CNT field-effect transistor on flexible substrate. • CNT based FET integrated active pressure sensor. • The integrated device yields an increase in the source-drain current under pressure. - Abstract: A pressure sensor was developed based on an arrangement of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) supported by a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. The VACNTs embedded in the PDMS matrix were structurally flexible and provided repeated sensing operation due to the high elasticities of both the polymer and the carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The conductance increased in the presence of a loading pressure, which compressed the material and induced contact between neighboring CNTs, thereby producing a dense current path and better CNT/metal contacts. To achieve flexible functional electronics, VACNTs based pressure sensor was integrated with field-effect transistor, which is fabricated using sprayed semiconducting carbon nanotubes on plastic substrate.

  16. Photoluminescence mechanisms of metallic Zn nanospheres, semiconducting ZnO nanoballoons, and metal-semiconductor Zn/ZnO nanospheres

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jin-Han; Patil, Ranjit A.; Devan, Rupesh S.; Liu, Zhe-An; Wang, Yi-Ping; Ho, Ching-Hwa; Liou, Yung; Ma, Yuan-Ron

    2014-01-01

    We utilized a thermal radiation method to synthesize semiconducting hollow ZnO nanoballoons and metal-semiconductor concentric solid Zn/ZnO nanospheres from metallic solid Zn nanospheres. The chemical properties, crystalline structures, and photoluminescence mechanisms for the metallic solid Zn nanospheres, semiconducting hollow ZnO nanoballoons, and metal-semiconductor concentric solid Zn/ZnO nanospheres are presented. The PL emissions of the metallic Zn solid nanospheres are mainly dependent on the electron transitions between the Fermi level (EF) and the 3d band, while those of the semiconducting hollow ZnO nanoballoons are ascribed to the near band edge (NBE) and deep level electron transitions. The PL emissions of the metal-semiconductor concentric solid Zn/ZnO nanospheres are attributed to the electron transitions across the metal-semiconductor junction, from the EF to the valence and 3d bands, and from the interface states to the valence band. All three nanostructures are excellent room-temperature light emitters. PMID:25382186

  17. Exciton-plasmon interactions in carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drosdoff, David; Bondarev, Igor

    The response properties of semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNs) allow for the excitation of both plasmons and excitons at optical frequencies, which can interact with each other to give rise to a variety of phenomena and applications. If carbon nanotubes are aligned in a periodic array, then energy bands can be formed due to the array periodicity. Using a quantum electrodynamics approach, the energy dispersion relation for the coupled exciton and plasmon excitations in the CN array is theoretically analyzed. The predicted result is the formation of photonic bands, which may give rise to tunable optoelectronic devices and other applications. Supported by NSF-ECCS-1306871.

  18. Assessment of chemically separated carbon nanotubes for nanoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Zaric, Sasa; Tu, Xiaomin; Wang, Xinran; Zhao, Wei; Dai, Hongjie

    2008-02-27

    It remains an elusive goal to obtain high performance single-walled carbon-nanotube (SWNT) electronics such as field effect transistors (FETs) composed of single- or few-chirality SWNTs, due to broad distributions in as-grown materials. Much progress has been made by various separation approaches to obtain materials enriched in metal or semiconducting nanotubes or even in single chiralties. However, research in validating SWNT separations by electrical transport measurements and building functional electronic devices has been scarce. Here, we performed length, diameter, and chirality separation of DNA functionalized HiPco SWNTs by chromatography methods, and we characterized the chiralities by photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, and electrical transport measurements. The use of these combined methods provided deeper insight to the degree of separation than either technique alone. Separation of SWNTs by chirality and diameter occurred at varying degrees that decreased with increasing tube diameter. This calls for new separation methods capable of metallicity or chirality separation of large diameter SWNTs (in the approximately 1.5 nm range) needed for high performance nanoelectronics. With most of the separated fractions enriched in semiconducting SWNTs, nanotubes placed in parallel in short-channel (approximately 200 nm) electrical devices fail to produce FETs with high on/off switching, indicating incomplete elimination of metallic species. In rare cases with a certain separated SWNT fraction, we were able to fabricate FET devices composed of small-diameter, chemically separated SWNTs in parallel, with high on-/off-current (I(on)/I(off)) ratios up to 105 owing to semiconducting SWNTs with only a few (n,m) chiralities in the fraction. This was the first time that chemically separated SWNTs were used for short channel, all-semiconducting SWNT electronics dominant by just a few (n,m)'s. Nevertheless, the results suggest that

  19. Multi-Scale Simulations of Carbon Nanotubes: Mechanics and Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak

    2003-01-01

    Carbon Nanotube (CNT) is a tubular form of carbon with diameter as small as 1 nm. Length: few mn to microns. CNT is configurationally equivalent to a two dimensional graphene sheet rolled into a tube. CNT exhibits extraordinary mechanical properties; Young's modulus over 1 Tera Pascal, as stiff as diamond, and tensile strength approx. 200 GPa. CNT can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on chirality.

  20. Multi-Scale Simulations of Carbon Nanotubes: Mechanics and Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak

    2003-01-01

    Carbon Nanotube (CNT) is a tubular form of carbon with diameter as small as 1 nm. Length: few mn to microns. CNT is configurationally equivalent to a two dimensional graphene sheet rolled into a tube. CNT exhibits extraordinary mechanical properties; Young's modulus over 1 Tera Pascal, as stiff as diamond, and tensile strength approx. 200 GPa. CNT can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on chirality.

  1. Majorana fermion wavefunctions in carbon nanotubes and carbynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadykov, N. R.; Aporoski, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    Electron properties of semiconducting zigzag carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be described by two uncoupled Dirac equations of dimension (1+1) for the particle with nonzero mass. The solutions of these equations are two charge-neutral Majorana fields. An analogous equation is obtained for the carbon chains. We use the approach, wherein wavefunction of charged particle is represented as the production of a rapidly oscillating exponent and the slowly varying function amplitude depending on the longitudinal coordinate.

  2. Computational Nanotechnology of Materials, Devices, and Machines: Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Kwak, Dolhan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The mechanics and chemistry of carbon nanotubes have relevance for their numerous electronic applications. Mechanical deformations such as bending and twisting affect the nanotube's conductive properties, and at the same time they possess high strength and elasticity. Two principal techniques were utilized including the analysis of large scale classical molecular dynamics on a shared memory architecture machine and a quantum molecular dynamics methodology. In carbon based electronics, nanotubes are used as molecular wires with topological defects which are mediated through various means. Nanotubes can be connected to form junctions.

  3. Semiconducting Metal Oxide Based Sensors for Selective Gas Pollutant Detection

    PubMed Central

    Kanan, Sofian M.; El-Kadri, Oussama M.; Abu-Yousef, Imad A.; Kanan, Marsha C.

    2009-01-01

    A review of some papers published in the last fifty years that focus on the semiconducting metal oxide (SMO) based sensors for the selective and sensitive detection of various environmental pollutants is presented. PMID:22408500

  4. Fabrication of hetero-junction diode using NiO thin film on ITO/glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Sonali; Sharma, Vinay; Kuanr, Bijoy K.

    2016-05-01

    Fabrication, characterization and testing of hetero-junctions of NiO thin films were done. Nickel films were evaporated on polished ITO coated glass substrates using thermal deposition. The films were annealed at high temperatures in the presence of oxygen to obtain NiO films. The rectifying current-voltage (I-V) properties confirmed that a hetero-junction diode was successfully formed. The AC and DC behavior of hetero-junction using DC silver-probes were determined. The threshold voltage, ideality factor and reverse saturation current of hetero junction were determined. We have compared these I-V characteristics with semiconducting PN junction diode. To test the device characteristics, we used the structure as a diode clipper at various frequencies. It is showed that our device is a better high-frequency junction-device than a normal PN junction diode.

  5. Improving the electrical conductivity of carbon nanotube networks: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Li, Elise Y; Marzari, Nicola

    2011-12-27

    We address the issue of the low electrical conductivity observed in carbon nanotube networks using first-principles calculations of the structure, stability, and ballistic transport of different nanotube junctions. We first study covalent linkers, using the nitrene-pyrazine case as a model for conductance-preserving [2 + 1] cycloadditions, and discuss the reasons for their poor performance. We then characterize the role of transition-metal adsorbates in improving mechanical coupling and electrical tunneling between the tubes. We show that the strong hybridization between the transition-metal d orbitals with the π orbitals of the nanotube can provide an excellent electrical bridge for nanotube-nanotube junctions. This effect is maximized in the case of nitrogen-doped nanotubes, thanks to the strong mechanical coupling between the tubes mediated by a single transition metal adatom. Our results suggest effective strategies to optimize the performance of carbon nanotube networks.

  6. Alloyed 2D Metal-Semiconductor Atomic Layer Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Yonghun; Nam, Jaewook; Chung, Hee-Suk; Kim, Dong Jae; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sang Won; Park, Jucheol; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Byoung Hun; Park, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Cho, Byungjin

    2016-03-09

    Heterostructures of compositionally and electronically variant two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are viable building blocks for ultrathin optoelectronic devices. We show that the composition of interfacial transition region between semiconducting WSe2 atomic layer channels and metallic NbSe2 contact layers can be engineered through interfacial doping with Nb atoms. WxNb1-xSe2 interfacial regions considerably lower the potential barrier height of the junction, significantly improving the performance of the corresponding WSe2-based field-effect transistor devices. The creation of such alloyed 2D junctions between dissimilar atomic layer domains could be the most important factor in controlling the electronic properties of 2D junctions and the design and fabrication of 2D atomic layer devices.

  7. Junction-based field emission structure for field emission display

    DOEpatents

    Dinh, Long N.; Balooch, Mehdi; McLean, II, William; Schildbach, Marcus A.

    2002-01-01

    A junction-based field emission display, wherein the junctions are formed by depositing a semiconducting or dielectric, low work function, negative electron affinity (NEA) silicon-based compound film (SBCF) onto a metal or n-type semiconductor substrate. The SBCF can be doped to become a p-type semiconductor. A small forward bias voltage is applied across the junction so that electron transport is from the substrate into the SBCF region. Upon entering into this NEA region, many electrons are released into the vacuum level above the SBCF surface and accelerated toward a positively biased phosphor screen anode, hence lighting up the phosphor screen for display. To turn off, simply switch off the applied potential across the SBCF/substrate. May be used for field emission flat panel displays.

  8. The influence of contact transparency on the superconducting proximity effect in thin semiconducting films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vissers, Michael Robert

    The superconducting proximity effect allows for the introduction of pair correlations into otherwise normal metals provided that they are coupled through a sufficiently transparent junction. The influence of this proximity effect manifests itself by modifying both the normal layer sheet resistance in the proximity affected region, Rs, and the junction conductance across the N-S boundary, Gc. These two quantities are impossible to measure simultaneously with any single two terminal device even if it is a four point measurement. However, a new three terminal device structure allows us to make two independent four point voltage measurements, which permits the extraction of these two intrinsic aspects of the proximity effect when combined with simple Ohm's law modeling. Devices with completely in-situ junctions between niobium and heavily doped n-GaAs and n-InAs were fabricated via molecular beam epitaxy. In order to reduce the Schottky barrier, a graded and delta-doped InGaAs cap was inserted at the interface. Careful construction of the doping profile in the cap allows for extremely transparent junctions just prior to the onset of superconductivity, the most transparent Nb-GaAs junctions yet reported. The transparency of the junction can be evaluated by calculating the number of available quantum channels between the two different Fermi surfaces and using the Landauer formalism to determine the ideal junction conductance. Comparison to the experimental junction conductance permits the discovery of the fundamental transmission coefficient for transport across the N-S interface. If the semiconducting depth is small enough the presence of correlations in the semiconductor are observed. Samples with deeper depths exhibit no direct evidence of superconductivity inside the semiconductor. Samples consisting of doped InAs were also fabricated and measured. These samples exhibit almost perfect contact between the superconductor and the semiconductor and pair correlations are

  9. A facile and low-cost length sorting of single-wall carbon nanotubes by precipitation and applications for thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Hui; Chen, Haitian; Khripin, Constantine Y.; Liu, Bilu; Fagan, Jeffrey A.; Zhou, Chongwu; Zheng, Ming

    2016-02-01

    Semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with long lengths are highly desirable for many applications such as thin-film transistors and circuits. Previously reported length sorting techniques usually require sophisticated instrumentation and are hard to scale up. In this paper, we report for the first time a general phenomenon of a length-dependent precipitation of surfactant-dispersed carbon nanotubes by polymers, salts, and their combinations. Polyelectrolytes such as polymethacrylate (PMAA) and polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) are found to be especially effective on cholate and deoxycholate dispersed SWCNTs. By adding PMAA to these nanotube dispersions in a stepwise fashion, we have achieved nanotube precipitation in a length-dependent order: first nanotubes with an average length of 650 nm, and then successively of 450 nm, 350 nm, and 250 nm. A similar effect of nanotube length sorting has also been observed for PSS. To demonstrate the utility of the length fractionation, the 650 nm-long nanotube fraction was subjected to an aqueous two-phase separation to obtain semiconducting enriched nanotubes. Thin-film transistors fabricated with the resulting semiconducting SWCNTs showed a carrier mobility up to 18 cm2 (V s)-1 and an on/off ratio up to 107. Our result sheds new light on the phase behavior of aqueous nanotube dispersions under high concentrations of polymers and salts, and offers a facile, low-cost, and scalable method to produce length sorted semiconducting nanotubes for macroelectronics applications.Semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with long lengths are highly desirable for many applications such as thin-film transistors and circuits. Previously reported length sorting techniques usually require sophisticated instrumentation and are hard to scale up. In this paper, we report for the first time a general phenomenon of a length-dependent precipitation of surfactant-dispersed carbon nanotubes by polymers, salts, and their

  10. Joint measurement of current-phase relations and transport properties of hybrid junctions using a three junctions superconducting quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    Basset, J.; Delagrange, R.; Weil, R.; Kasumov, A.; Bouchiat, H.; Deblock, R.

    2014-07-14

    We propose a scheme to measure both the current-phase relation and differential conductance dI/dV of a superconducting junction, in the normal and the superconducting states. This is done using a dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device with two Josephson junctions in parallel with the device under investigation and three contacts. As a demonstration, we measure the current-phase relation and dI/dV of a small Josephson junction and a carbon nanotube junction. In this latter case, in a regime where the nanotube is well conducting, we show that the non-sinusoidal current phase relation we find is consistent with the theory for a weak link, using the transmission extracted from the differential conductance in the normal state. This method holds great promise for future investigations of the current-phase relation of more exotic junctions.

  11. Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, Janet; Hull, David; Gorican, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) are of significant interest to the scientific and technical communities for many of the same reasons that carbon nanotubes (CNT) have attracted wide attention. Both materials have potentially unique and important properties for structural and electronic applications. However of even more consequence than their similarities may be the complementary differences between carbon and boron nitride nanotubes While BNNT possess a very high modulus similar to CNT, they also possess superior chemical and thermal stability. Additionally, BNNT have more uniform electronic properties, with a uniform band gap of 5.5 eV while CNT vary from semi-conductive to highly conductive behavior. Boron nitride nanotubes have been synthesized both in the literature and at NASA Glenn Research Center, by a variety of methods such as chemical vapor deposition, arc discharge and reactive milling. Consistent large scale production of a reliable product has proven difficult. Progress in the reproducible synthesis of 1-2 gram sized batches of boron nitride nanotubes will be discussed as well as potential uses for this unique material.

  12. Spray printing of organic semiconducting single crystals

    PubMed Central

    Rigas, Grigorios-Panagiotis; Payne, Marcia M.; Anthony, John E.; Horton, Peter N.; Castro, Fernando A.; Shkunov, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Single-crystal semiconductors have been at the forefront of scientific interest for more than 70 years, serving as the backbone of electronic devices. Inorganic single crystals are typically grown from a melt using time-consuming and energy-intensive processes. Organic semiconductor single crystals, however, can be grown using solution-based methods at room temperature in air, opening up the possibility of large-scale production of inexpensive electronics targeting applications ranging from field-effect transistors and light-emitting diodes to medical X-ray detectors. Here we demonstrate a low-cost, scalable spray-printing process to fabricate high-quality organic single crystals, based on various semiconducting small molecules on virtually any substrate by combining the advantages of antisolvent crystallization and solution shearing. The crystals' size, shape and orientation are controlled by the sheer force generated by the spray droplets' impact onto the antisolvent's surface. This method demonstrates the feasibility of a spray-on single-crystal organic electronics. PMID:27874001

  13. Novel metastable metallic and semiconducting germaniums.

    PubMed

    Selli, Daniele; Baburin, Igor A; Martoňák, Roman; Leoni, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Group-IVa elements silicon and germanium are known for their semiconducting properties at room temperature, which are technologically critical. Metallicity and superconductivity are found at higher pressures only, Ge β-tin (tI4) being the first high-pressure metallic phase in the phase diagram. However, recent experiments suggest that metallicity in germanium is compatible with room conditions, calling for a rethinking of our understanding of its phase diagram. Missing structures can efficiently be identified based on structure prediction methods. By means of ab initio metadynamics runs we explored the lower-pressure region of the phase diagram of germanium. A monoclinic germanium phase (mC16) with four-membered rings, less dense than diamond and compressible into β-tin phase (tI4) was found. Tetragonal bct-5 appeared between diamond and tI4. mC16 is a narrow-gap semiconductor, while bct-5 is metallic and potentially still superconducting in the very low pressure range. This finding may help resolving outstanding experimental issues.

  14. Novel metastable metallic and semiconducting germaniums

    PubMed Central

    Selli, Daniele; Baburin, Igor A.; Martoňák, Roman; Leoni, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Group-IVa elements silicon and germanium are known for their semiconducting properties at room temperature, which are technologically critical. Metallicity and superconductivity are found at higher pressures only, Ge β-tin (tI4) being the first high-pressure metallic phase in the phase diagram. However, recent experiments suggest that metallicity in germanium is compatible with room conditions, calling for a rethinking of our understanding of its phase diagram. Missing structures can efficiently be identified based on structure prediction methods. By means of ab initio metadynamics runs we explored the lower-pressure region of the phase diagram of germanium. A monoclinic germanium phase (mC16) with four-membered rings, less dense than diamond and compressible into β-tin phase (tI4) was found. Tetragonal bct-5 appeared between diamond and tI4. mC16 is a narrow-gap semiconductor, while bct-5 is metallic and potentially still superconducting in the very low pressure range. This finding may help resolving outstanding experimental issues. PMID:23492980

  15. Spray printing of organic semiconducting single crystals.

    PubMed

    Rigas, Grigorios-Panagiotis; Payne, Marcia M; Anthony, John E; Horton, Peter N; Castro, Fernando A; Shkunov, Maxim

    2016-11-22

    Single-crystal semiconductors have been at the forefront of scientific interest for more than 70 years, serving as the backbone of electronic devices. Inorganic single crystals are typically grown from a melt using time-consuming and energy-intensive processes. Organic semiconductor single crystals, however, can be grown using solution-based methods at room temperature in air, opening up the possibility of large-scale production of inexpensive electronics targeting applications ranging from field-effect transistors and light-emitting diodes to medical X-ray detectors. Here we demonstrate a low-cost, scalable spray-printing process to fabricate high-quality organic single crystals, based on various semiconducting small molecules on virtually any substrate by combining the advantages of antisolvent crystallization and solution shearing. The crystals' size, shape and orientation are controlled by the sheer force generated by the spray droplets' impact onto the antisolvent's surface. This method demonstrates the feasibility of a spray-on single-crystal organic electronics.

  16. Spray printing of organic semiconducting single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigas, Grigorios-Panagiotis; Payne, Marcia M.; Anthony, John E.; Horton, Peter N.; Castro, Fernando A.; Shkunov, Maxim

    2016-11-01

    Single-crystal semiconductors have been at the forefront of scientific interest for more than 70 years, serving as the backbone of electronic devices. Inorganic single crystals are typically grown from a melt using time-consuming and energy-intensive processes. Organic semiconductor single crystals, however, can be grown using solution-based methods at room temperature in air, opening up the possibility of large-scale production of inexpensive electronics targeting applications ranging from field-effect transistors and light-emitting diodes to medical X-ray detectors. Here we demonstrate a low-cost, scalable spray-printing process to fabricate high-quality organic single crystals, based on various semiconducting small molecules on virtually any substrate by combining the advantages of antisolvent crystallization and solution shearing. The crystals' size, shape and orientation are controlled by the sheer force generated by the spray droplets' impact onto the antisolvent's surface. This method demonstrates the feasibility of a spray-on single-crystal organic electronics.

  17. Hot Electrons Regain Coherence in Semiconducting Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, Jonathan; Nayak, Abhay Kumar; Avraham, Nurit; Norris, Andrew; Yan, Binghai; Fulga, Ion Cosma; Kang, Jung-Hyun; Karzig, Toesten; Shtrikman, Hadas; Beidenkopf, Haim

    2017-04-01

    The higher the energy of a particle is above equilibrium, the faster it relaxes because of the growing phase space of available electronic states it can interact with. In the relaxation process, phase coherence is lost, thus limiting high-energy quantum control and manipulation. In one-dimensional systems, high relaxation rates are expected to destabilize electronic quasiparticles. Here, we show that the decoherence induced by relaxation of hot electrons in one-dimensional semiconducting nanowires evolves nonmonotonically with energy such that above a certain threshold hot electrons regain stability with increasing energy. We directly observe this phenomenon by visualizing, for the first time, the interference patterns of the quasi-one-dimensional electrons using scanning tunneling microscopy. We visualize the phase coherence length of the one-dimensional electrons, as well as their phase coherence time, captured by crystallographic Fabry-Pèrot resonators. A remarkable agreement with a theoretical model reveals that the nonmonotonic behavior is driven by the unique manner in which one-dimensional hot electrons interact with the cold electrons occupying the Fermi sea. This newly discovered relaxation profile suggests a high-energy regime for operating quantum applications that necessitate extended coherence or long thermalization times, and may stabilize electronic quasiparticles in one dimension.

  18. Electronic modulations in a single wall carbon nanotube induced by the Au(111) surface reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Clair, Sylvain; Shin, Hyung-Joon; Kim, Yousoo E-mail: maki@riken.jp; Kawai, Maki E-mail: maki@riken.jp

    2015-02-02

    The structural and electronic structure of single wall carbon nanotubes adsorbed on Au(111) has been investigated by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The nanotubes were dry deposited in situ in ultrahigh vacuum onto a perfectly clean substrate. In some cases, the native herringbone reconstruction of the Au(111) surface interacted directly with adsorbed nanotubes and produced long-range periodic oscillations in their local density of states, corresponding to charge transfer modulations along the tube axis. This effect, however, was observed not systematically for all tubes and only for semiconducting tubes.

  19. Deformation of doubly clamped single-walled carbon nanotubes in an electrostatic field.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao; Philippe, Laetitia

    2009-05-29

    In this Letter, we demonstrate a strong dependence of the electrostatic deformation of doubly clamped single-walled carbon nanotubes on both the field strength and the tube length, using molecular simulations. Metallic nanotubes are found to be more sensitive to an electric field than semiconducting ones of the same size. For a given electric field, the induced deformation increases with tube length but decreases with tube radius. Furthermore, it is found that nanotubes can be more efficiently bent in a center-oriented transverse electric field.

  20. Launching propagating surface plasmon polaritons by a single carbon nanotube dipolar emitter.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Nicolai; Piredda, Giovanni; Berthelot, Johann; des Francs, Gérard Colas; Bouhelier, Alexandre; Hartschuh, Achim

    2012-01-11

    We report on the excitation of propagating surface plasmon polaritons in thin metal films by a single emitter. Upon excitation in the visible regime, individual semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes are shown to act as directional near-infrared point dipole sources launching propagating surface plasmons mainly along the direction of the nanotube axis. Plasmon excitation and propagation is monitored in Fourier and real space by leakage radiation microscopy and is modeled by rigorous theoretical calculations. Coupling to plasmons almost completely reshapes the emission of nanotubes both spatially and with respect to polarization as compared to photoluminescence on a dielectric substrate. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  1. Controlled fabrication of porous double-walled TiO2 nanotubes via ultraviolet-assisted anodization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ghafar; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Jae Joon; Cho, Sung Oh

    2014-03-01

    Double-walled TiO2 nanotubes with porous wall morphologies are fabricated by anodization under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. TiO2 formed by anodization of Ti is activated to generate electrons and holes by UV and the anodization process is influenced by the photo-generated charges. As a consequence, morphologies of the fabricated TiO2 nanotubes can be adjusted by controlling the UV illumination. Double-walled TiO2 nanotubes or single-walled nanotubes can be selectively formed by switching on/off the UV illumination. The thickness of the inner and outer walls of the double-walled nanotubes can be tailored by changing the UV power. Due to their larger surface areas compared to single-walled nanotubes, the porous double-walled nanotubes exhibit an enhanced photo-degradation rate for methylene blue (MB). The mechanism of the porous double-walled TiO2 nanotubes is proposed based on the photoactive semiconducting property of the as-growing TiO2 nanotubes under UV.Double-walled TiO2 nanotubes with porous wall morphologies are fabricated by anodization under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. TiO2 formed by anodization of Ti is activated to generate electrons and holes by UV and the anodization process is influenced by the photo-generated charges. As a consequence, morphologies of the fabricated TiO2 nanotubes can be adjusted by controlling the UV illumination. Double-walled TiO2 nanotubes or single-walled nanotubes can be selectively formed by switching on/off the UV illumination. The thickness of the inner and outer walls of the double-walled nanotubes can be tailored by changing the UV power. Due to their larger surface areas compared to single-walled nanotubes, the porous double-walled nanotubes exhibit an enhanced photo-degradation rate for methylene blue (MB). The mechanism of the porous double-walled TiO2 nanotubes is proposed based on the photoactive semiconducting property of the as-growing TiO2 nanotubes under UV. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  2. A microcavity-controlled, current-driven, on-chip nanotube emitter at infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fengnian; Steiner, Mathias; Lin, Yu-Ming; Avouris, Phaedon

    2008-10-01

    Recent studies of the optical properties of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes suggest that these truly nanometre-scale systems have a promising future in nanophotonics, in addition to their well-known potential in electronics. Semiconducting single-walled nanotubes have a direct, diameter-dependent bandgap and can be excited readily by current injection, which makes them attractive as nano-emitters. The electroluminescence is spectrally broad, spatially non-directional, and the radiative yield is low. Here we report the monolithic integration of a single, electrically excited, semiconducting nanotube transistor with a planar lambda/2 microcavity, thus taking an important first step in the development of nanotube-based nanophotonic devices. The spectral full-width at half-maximum of the emission is reduced from approximately 300 to approximately 40 nm at a cavity resonance of 1.75 microm, and the emission becomes highly directional. The maximum enhancement of the radiative rate is estimated to be 4. We also show that both the optically and electrically excited luminescence of single-walled nanotubes involve the same E11 excitonic transition.

  3. Gel electrophoresis using a selective radical for the separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mesgari, Sara; Sundramoorthy, Ashok Kumar; Loo, Leslie S; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2014-01-01

    We have applied agarose gel electrophoresis (AGE) to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) that have been pre-reacted with metallic-selective ionic radicals and then re-suspended with sodium cholate (SC) surfactant to obtain highly purified (up to 98%) semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs). The proposed combination method exploits the preferential reactivity with the metallic nanotube of the radicals generated from an azo naphthalene compound (Direct Blue 71(I)) to preferentially increase the surface charge, and therefore the electrophoretic mobilities, of the metallic nanotube population under the influence of the electric field in AGE. The excellent separation achieved was verified by UV-vis-NIR and Raman spectroscopy as well as by the performance of field effect transistors fabricated with semiconducting-enriched SWNTs. FETs fabricated with -assisted AGE-separated semiconducting nanotubes exhibited mobilities of ∼3.6 to 11.7 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and on/off ratios from 10(2) to 10(6).

  4. Quantum dot-like excitonic behavior in individual single walled-carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Alexander-Webber, Jack A.; Jia, Wei; Reid, Benjamin P. L.; Stranks, Samuel D.; Holmes, Mark J.; Chan, Christopher C. S.; Deng, Chaoyong; Nicholas, Robin J.; Taylor, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes are one-dimensional materials with great prospects for applications such as optoelectronic and quantum information devices. Yet, their optical performance is hindered by low fluorescent yield. Highly mobile excitons interacting with quenching sites are attributed to be one of the main non-radiative decay mechanisms that shortens the exciton lifetime. In this paper we report on time-integrated photoluminescence measurements on individual polymer wrapped semiconducting carbon nanotubes. An ultra narrow linewidth we observed demonstrates intrinsic exciton dynamics. Furthermore, we identify a state filling effect in individual carbon nanotubes at cryogenic temperatures as previously observed in quantum dots. We propose that each of the CNTs is segmented into a chain of zero-dimensional states confined by a varying local potential along the CNT, determined by local environmental factors such as the amount of polymer wrapping. Spectral diffusion is also observed, which is consistent with the tunneling of excitons between these confined states. PMID:27849046

  5. Transient absorption spectroscopy and imaging of individual chirality-assigned single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo; Hartland, Gregory V; Huang, Libai

    2012-06-26

    Femtosecond transient absorption microscopy was employed to study the excited-state dynamics of individual semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with simultaneously high spatial (∼200 nm) and temporal (∼300 fs) resolution. Isolated SWNTs were located using atomic force microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy was employed to determine the chiral index of select nanotubes. This unique experimental approach removes sample heterogeneity in ultrafast measurements of these complex materials. Transient absorption spectra of the individual SWNTs were obtained by recording transient absorption images at different probe wavelengths. These measurements provide new information about the origin of the photoinduced absorption features of SWNTs. Transient absorption traces were also collected for individual SWNTs. The dynamics show a fast, ∼1 ps, decay for all the semiconducting nanotubes studied, which is significantly faster than the previously reported decay times for SWNT suspensions. We attributed this fast relaxation to coupling between the excitons created by the pump laser pulse and the substrate.

  6. Quantum dot-like excitonic behavior in individual single walled-carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Alexander-Webber, Jack A.; Jia, Wei; Reid, Benjamin P. L.; Stranks, Samuel D.; Holmes, Mark J.; Chan, Christopher C. S.; Deng, Chaoyong; Nicholas, Robin J.; Taylor, Robert A.

    2016-11-01

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes are one-dimensional materials with great prospects for applications such as optoelectronic and quantum information devices. Yet, their optical performance is hindered by low fluorescent yield. Highly mobile excitons interacting with quenching sites are attributed to be one of the main non-radiative decay mechanisms that shortens the exciton lifetime. In this paper we report on time-integrated photoluminescence measurements on individual polymer wrapped semiconducting carbon nanotubes. An ultra narrow linewidth we observed demonstrates intrinsic exciton dynamics. Furthermore, we identify a state filling effect in individual carbon nanotubes at cryogenic temperatures as previously observed in quantum dots. We propose that each of the CNTs is segmented into a chain of zero-dimensional states confined by a varying local potential along the CNT, determined by local environmental factors such as the amount of polymer wrapping. Spectral diffusion is also observed, which is consistent with the tunneling of excitons between these confined states.

  7. Carbon Nanotube Based Light Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, russell A. (Inventor); Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Ingram, JoAnne L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A light sensor substrate comprises a base made from a semi-conductive material and topped with a layer of an electrically non-conductive material. A first electrode and a plurality of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based conductors are positioned on the layer of electrically non-conductive material with the CNT-based conductors being distributed in a spaced apart fashion about a periphery of the first electrode. Each CNT-based conductor is coupled on one end thereof to the first electrode and extends away from the first electrode to terminate at a second free end. A second or gate electrode is positioned on the non-conductive material layer and is spaced apart from the second free end of each CNT-based conductor. Coupled to the first and second electrode is a device for detecting electron transfer along the CNT-based conductors resulting from light impinging on the CNT-based conductors.

  8. Photonics based on carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Among direct-bandgap semiconducting nanomaterials, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) exhibit strong quasi-one-dimensional excitonic optical properties, which confer them a great potential for their integration in future photonics devices as an alternative solution to conventional inorganic semiconductors. In this paper, we will highlight SWCNT optical properties for passive as well as active applications in future optical networking. For passive applications, we directly compare the efficiency and power consumption of saturable absorbers (SAs) based on SWCNT with SA based on conventional multiple quantum wells. For active applications, exceptional photoluminescence properties of SWCNT, such as excellent light-emission stabilities with temperature and excitation power, hold these nanometer-scale materials as prime candidates for future active photonics devices with superior performances. PMID:23803293

  9. Biaxially stretchable carbon nanotube transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Meng-Yin; Zhao, Juan; Curley, Nicholas J.; Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Ma, Zhenqiang; Arnold, Michael S.

    2017-09-01

    Biaxially stretchable field effect transistors (FETs) fabricated on elastomeric substrates are demonstrated incorporating a buckled network of polymer-wrapped semiconducting carbon nanotubes in the channel and a buckled layer of an ion gel as the gate dielectric. The FETs maintain an on/off ratio of >104 and a field-effect mobility of >5 cm2 V-1 s-1 for biaxial elongation up to 67% or uniaxial elongation either parallel or perpendicular to the channel. The performance is stable for at least 10 000 stretch-release cycles. Failure analysis shows that the extent of elongation is limited only by the magnitude of the pre-strain used during fabrication. This work is important because deformable FETs are needed for future technologies including stretchable electronics and displays.

  10. Reversibility, dopant desorption, and tunneling in the temperature-dependent conductivity of type-separated, conductive carbon nanotube networks.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Teresa M; Blackburn, Jeffrey L; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Coutts, Timothy J; Heben, Michael J

    2008-09-23

    We present a comprehensive study of the effects of doping and temperature on the conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks. We investigated nearly type-pure networks as well as networks comprising precisely tuned mixtures of metallic and semiconducting tubes. Networks were studied in their as-produced state and after treatments with nitric acid, thionyl chloride, and hydrazine to explore the effects of both intentional and adventitious doping. For intentionally and adventitiously doped networks, the sheet resistance (R(s)) exhibits an irreversible increase with temperature above approximately 350 K. Dopant desorption is shown to be the main cause of this increase and the observed hysteresis in the temperature-dependent resistivity. Both thermal and chemical dedoping produced networks free of hysteresis. Temperature-programmed desorption data showed that dopants are most strongly bound to the metallic tubes and that networks consisting of metallic tubes exhibit the best thermal stability. At temperatures below the dopant desorption threshold, conductivity in the networks is primarily controlled by thermally assisted tunneling through barriers at the intertube or interbundle junctions.

  11. Reversibility, Dopant Desorption, and Tunneling in the Temperature-Dependent Conductivity of Type-Separated, Conductive Carbon Nanotube Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, T. M.; Blackburn, J. L.; van de Lagemaat, J.; Coutts, T. J.; Heben, M. J.

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the effects of doping and temperature on the conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks. We investigated nearly type-pure networks as well as networks comprising precisely tuned mixtures of metallic and semiconducting tubes. Networks were studied in their as-produced state and after treatments with nitric acid, thionyl chloride, and hydrazine to explore the effects of both intentional and adventitious doping. For intentionally and adventitiously doped networks, the sheet resistance (R{sub s}) exhibits an irreversible increase with temperature above {approx}350 K. Dopant desorption is shown to be the main cause of this increase and the observed hysteresis in the temperature-dependent resistivity. Both thermal and chemical dedoping produced networks free of hysteresis. Temperature-programmed desorption data showed that dopants are most strongly bound to the metallic tubes and that networks consisting of metallic tubes exhibit the best thermal stability. At temperatures below the dopant desorption threshold, conductivity in the networks is primarily controlled by thermally assisted tunneling through barriers at the intertube or interbundle junctions.

  12. Nanotube Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEuen, Paul L.

    2002-01-01

    Under this project, we explored the feasibility of utilizing carbon nanotubes in sensing applications. The grant primarily supported a graduate student, who worked on a number of aspects of the electrical properties of carbon nanotubes in collaboration with other researchers in my group. The two major research accomplishments are described below. The first accomplishment is the demonstration that solution carbon nanotube transistors functioned well in an electrolyte environment. This was important for two reasons. First, it allowed us to explore the ultimate limits of nanotube electronic performance by using the electrolyte as a highly effective gate, with a dielectric constant of approximately 80 and an effective insulator thickness of approximately 1 nm. Second, it showed that nanotubes function well under biologically relevant conditions (salty water) and therefore offer great promise as biological sensors. The second accomplishment was the demonstration that a voltage pulse applied to an AFM tip could be used to electrically cut carbon nanotubes. We also showed that a carefully applied pulse could also 'nick' a nanotube, creating a tunnel barrier without completely breaking the tube. Nicking was employed to make, for example, a quantum dot within a nanotube.

  13. Nanotube Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEuen, Paul L.

    2002-01-01

    Under this project, we explored the feasibility of utilizing carbon nanotubes in sensing applications. The grant primarily supported a graduate student, who worked on a number of aspects of the electrical properties of carbon nanotubes in collaboration with other researchers in my group. The two major research accomplishments are described below. The first accomplishment is the demonstration that solution carbon nanotube transistors functioned well in an electrolyte environment. This was important for two reasons. First, it allowed us to explore the ultimate limits of nanotube electronic performance by using the electrolyte as a highly effective gate, with a dielectric constant of approximately 80 and an effective insulator thickness of approximately 1 nm. Second, it showed that nanotubes function well under biologically relevant conditions (salty water) and therefore offer great promise as biological sensors. The second accomplishment was the demonstration that a voltage pulse applied to an AFM tip could be used to electrically cut carbon nanotubes. We also showed that a carefully applied pulse could also 'nick' a nanotube, creating a tunnel barrier without completely breaking the tube. Nicking was employed to make, for example, a quantum dot within a nanotube.

  14. Growth of Horizontal Semiconducting SWNT Arrays with Density Higher than 100 tubes/μm using Ethanol/Methane Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lixing; Zhang, Shuchen; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Horizontally aligned semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (s-SWNT) arrays with a certain density are highly desirable for future electronic devices. However, obtaining s-SWNT arrays with simultaneously high purity and high density is extremely challenging. We report herein a rational approach, using ethanol/methane chemical vapor deposition, to grow SWNT arrays with a s-SWNT ratio over 91% and a density higher than 100 tubes/μm. In this approach, at a certain temperature, ethanol was fully thermally decomposed to feed carbon atoms for Trojan-Mo catalysts growing high density SWNT arrays, while the incomplete pyrolysis of methane provided appropriate active H radicals with the help of catalytic sapphire surface to inhibit metallic SWNT (m-SWNT) growth. The synergistic effect of ethanol/methane mixtures resulted in enriched semiconducting SWNTs and no obvious decrease in nanotube density due to their milder reactivity and higher controllability at suitable growth conditions. This work represents a step forward in large-area synthesis of high density s-SWNT arrays on substrates and demonstrates potential applications in scalable carbon nanotube electronics.

  15. What happens in Josephson junctions at high critical current densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massarotti, D.; Stornaiuolo, D.; Lucignano, P.; Caruso, R.; Galletti, L.; Montemurro, D.; Jouault, B.; Campagnano, G.; Arani, H. F.; Longobardi, L.; Parlato, L.; Pepe, G. P.; Rotoli, G.; Tagliacozzo, A.; Lombardi, F.; Tafuri, F.

    2017-07-01

    The impressive advances in material science and nanotechnology are more and more promoting the use of exotic barriers and/or superconductors, thus paving the way to new families of Josephson junctions. Semiconducting, ferromagnetic, topological insulator and graphene barriers are leading to unconventional and anomalous aspects of the Josephson coupling, which might be useful to respond to some issues on key problems of solid state physics. However, the complexity of the layout and of the competing physical processes occurring in the junctions is posing novel questions on the interpretation of their phenomenology. We classify some significant behaviors of hybrid and unconventional junctions in terms of their first imprinting, i.e., current-voltage curves, and propose a phenomenological approach to describe some features of junctions characterized by relatively high critical current densities Jc. Accurate arguments on the distribution of switching currents will provide quantitative criteria to understand physical processes occurring in high-Jc junctions. These notions are universal and apply to all kinds of junctions.

  16. Physical Properties of Thin Film Semiconducting Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouras, N.; Djebbouri, M.; Outemzabet, R.; Sali, S.; Zerrouki, H.; Zouaoui, A.; Kesri, N.

    2005-10-01

    The physics and chemistry of semiconducting materials is a continuous question of debate. We can find a large stock of well-known properties but at the same time, many things are not understood. In recent years, porous silicon (PS-Si), diselenide of copper and indium (CuInSe2 or CIS) and metal oxide semiconductors like tin oxide (SnO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) have been subjected to extensive studies because of the rising interest their potential applications in fields such as electronic components, solar panels, catalysis, gas sensors, in biocompatible materials, in Li-based batteries, in new generation of MOSFETS. Bulk structure and surface and interface properties play important roles in all of these applications. A deeper understanding of these fundamental properties would impact largely on technological application performances. In our laboratory, thin films of undoped and antimony-doped films of tin oxide have been deposited by chemical vapor deposition. Spray pyrolysis was used for ZnO. CIS was prepared by flash evaporation or close-space vapor transport. Some of the deposition parameters have been varied, such as substrate temperature, time of deposition (or anodization), and molar concentration of bath preparation. For some samples, thermal annealing was carried out under oxygen (or air), under nitrogen gas and under vacuum. Deposition and post-deposition parameters are known to strongly influence film structure and electrical resistivity. We investigated the influence of film thickness and thermal annealing on structural optical and electrical properties of the films. Examination of SnO2 by x-ray diffraction showed that the main films are polycrystalline with rutile structure. The x-ray spectra of ZnO indicated a hexagonal wurtzite structure. Characterizations of CIS films with compositional analysis, x-ray diffraction, scanning microscopy, spectrophotometry, and photoluminescence were carried out.

  17. Heteroporphyrin nanotubes and composites

    DOEpatents

    Shelnutt, John A.; Medforth, Craig J.; Wang, Zhongchun

    2007-05-29

    Heteroporphyrin nanotubes, metal nanostructures, and metal/porphyrin-nanotube composite nanostructures formed using the nanotubes as photocatalysts and structural templates, and the methods for forming the nanotubes and composites.

  18. Heteroporphyrin nanotubes and composites

    DOEpatents

    Shelnutt, John A.; Medforth, Craig J.; Wang, Zhongchun

    2006-11-07

    Heteroporphyrin nanotubes, metal nanostructures, and metal/porphyrin-nanotube composite nanostructures formed using the nanotubes as photocatalysts and structural templates, and the methods for forming the nanotubes and composites.

  19. Superconducting Proximity Effect in Thin Semiconducting Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vissers, Michael; Flexner, Soren; Welander, Paul; Inderhees, Kevin; Eckstein, James

    2007-03-01

    The superconducting proximity effect changes both the transport properties of the N-layer as well as the conductance between the N and S layers. We use a novel 3 terminal device structure to probe this which provides two resistance measurements allowing us to measure both the N-layer sheet resistance, Rs, as well as the junction conductance, Gc. When the N-layer is a degenerate semiconductor, the changes in these quantities are large. Gc increases much more than the factor of 2 that Andreev reflection theory predicts, and both Rs as well as Gc exhibit reentrance as a function of temperature. We interpret these changes as the N-S boundary moving into the semiconductor increasing Gc while simultaneously removing volume in the N-layer that had been used in normal transport. Magnetic fields applied both parallel and perpendicular to the junction cause the maximum conductance to increase while the sheet resistance rises. The magnitude of the necessary field implies a local proximity effect. This work was supported by the DOE BES at the F. Seitz Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois, Urbana.

  20. Transport phenomena in an anisotropically aligned single-wall carbon nanotube film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Dong Jae; Kim, Keun Soo; Park, Young Soo; Suh, Eun Kyoung; An, Kay Hyeok; Moon, Jeong-Mi; Lim, Seong Chu; Park, Soo Hyeon; Jeong, Yoon Hee; Lee, Young Hee

    2001-12-01

    Thin films of aligned carbon nanotubes were prepared by a simple mechanical rubbing from a singlewalled carbon nanotube powder, which was synthesized by the catalytic arc discharge. The measured electrical resistivity shows high anisotropy (ρN/ρP) ranging from 5 to 15. The annealed samples show a monotonic decrease in the resistivity with increasing temperature. Carbon nanotubes in the mat act as strong Luttinger liquids with g values ranging from 0.18 to 0.26, similar to an isolated nanotube. We propose that the transport is dominantly governed by the formation of metal-metal crossed junctions of nanotubes in the mat.

  1. Ab Initio Study of Covalently Functionalized Graphene and Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Sanjiv; Hammouri, Mahmoud; Vasiliev, Igor; Magedov, Igor; Frolova, Liliya; Kalugin, Nikolai

    2014-03-01

    The electronic and structural properties of carbon nanomaterials can be affected by chemical functionalization. We apply ab initio computational methods based on density functional theory to study the properties of graphene and single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with benzyne. Our calculations are carried out using the SIESTA electronic structure code combined with the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange correlation functional. The calculated binding energies, densities of states, and band structures of functionalized graphene and carbon nanotubes are analyzed in comparison with the available experimental data. The surfaces of carbon nanotubes are found to be significantly more reactive toward benzyne molecules than the surface of graphene. The strength of interaction between benzyne and carbon nanotubes is affected by the curvature of the nanotube sidewall. The binding energies of benzyne molecules attached to both semiconducting zigzag and metallic armchair nanotubes increase with decreasing the nanotube diameter. Supported by NSF CHE-1112388, NMSU GREG Award, NSF ECCS-0925988, NIH-5P20RR016480-12, and NIH- P20 GM103451.

  2. Catalytic CO2-to-CO conversion in water by covalently functionalized carbon nanotubes with a molecular iron catalyst.

    PubMed

    Maurin, Antoine; Robert, Marc

    2016-10-04

    The covalent grafting of an Fe porphyrin on carbon nanotubes led to efficient electroreduction of CO2 into CO in water (pH 7.3). CO was obtained with high selectivity and turnover at 0.5 V overpotential. The grafting strategy may be further extended to various conductive and semi-conductive surfaces.

  3. A first-principle study of one-dimensional carbon atomic chain inserted single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuliang; Zhong, JianXin; Yuan, JianMei; Zhao, Xinluo; Ando, Yoshinori

    2006-05-01

    Using first principles calculations, we investigate the atomic and electronic structure of carbon nanowires (CNWs) as the carbon chain inserted into single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). It indicates that the (5,5) CNW system exhibits metallic character, however, the insertion of carbon chain can transit a semi-conducting (9,0) SWCNT into a metallic.

  4. Carbon nanotube transistors scaled to a 40-nanometer footprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qing; Tersoff, Jerry; Farmer, Damon B.; Zhu, Yu; Han, Shu-Jen

    2017-06-01

    The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors challenges the device research community to reduce the transistor footprint containing all components to 40 nanometers within the next decade. We report on a p-channel transistor scaled to such an extremely small dimension. Built on one semiconducting carbon nanotube, it occupies less than half the space of leading silicon technologies, while delivering a significantly higher pitch-normalized current density—above 0.9 milliampere per micrometer at a low supply voltage of 0.5 volts with a subthreshold swing of 85 millivolts per decade. Furthermore, we show transistors with the same small footprint built on actual high-density arrays of such nanotubes that deliver higher current than that of the best-competing silicon devices under the same overdrive, without any normalization. We achieve this using low-resistance end-bonded contacts, a high-purity semiconducting carbon nanotube source, and self-assembly to pack nanotubes into full surface-coverage aligned arrays.

  5. Single-nanotube Devices from Purified HiPCO Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Danvers E.

    2005-03-01

    We have developed a purification process that retains the remarkable electronic properties of single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) material. Nanotubes grown by the HiPCO method (High Pressure catalytic decomposition of Carbon monOxide) are purified and suspended as single tubes and small bundles in a surfactant solution. SWNTs are deposited on functionalized substrates and contacted by electrodes. The resulting circuits consist of high quality metallic and semiconducting nanotubes that are apparently unaffected by the purification process. Circuits made from raw HiPCO material have vastly inferior device parameters indicating the crucial role of the purification process. We show how source-drain current measurements as a function of temperature and backgate voltage can be used to determine the energy gap of a semiconducting nanotube in a field effect transistor geometry. This work represents significant progress towards the goal of producing complex integrated circuits from bulk-grown SWNT material. This work has been partially supported by NSF (Grants DMR 00- 79909 (MRSEC); DMR-0203378), by NASA (NAG8-2172), and the Petroleum Research Fund. DJ acknowledges support from an NSF- funded IGERT Fellowship Grant DGE-0221664 administered through Penn's Center for the Science and Engineering of Nanoscale Systems.

  6. Carbon nanotube transistors scaled to a 40-nanometer footprint.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qing; Tersoff, Jerry; Farmer, Damon B; Zhu, Yu; Han, Shu-Jen

    2017-06-30

    The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors challenges the device research community to reduce the transistor footprint containing all components to 40 nanometers within the next decade. We report on a p-channel transistor scaled to such an extremely small dimension. Built on one semiconducting carbon nanotube, it occupies less than half the space of leading silicon technologies, while delivering a significantly higher pitch-normalized current density-above 0.9 milliampere per micrometer at a low supply voltage of 0.5 volts with a subthreshold swing of 85 millivolts per decade. Furthermore, we show transistors with the same small footprint built on actual high-density arrays of such nanotubes that deliver higher current than that of the best-competing silicon devices under the same overdrive, without any normalization. We achieve this using low-resistance end-bonded contacts, a high-purity semiconducting carbon nanotube source, and self-assembly to pack nanotubes into full surface-coverage aligned arrays. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  7. Near-field imaging of single walled carbon nanotubes emitting in the telecom wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La China, F.; Caselli, N.; Sarti, F.; Biccari, F.; Torrini, U.; Intonti, F.; Vinattieri, A.; Durán-Valdeiglesias, E.; Alonso Ramos, C.; Le Roux, X.; Balestrieri, M.; Filoramo, A.; Vivien, L.; Gurioli, M.

    2016-09-01

    Hybrid systems based on carbon nanotubes emitting in the telecom wavelength range and Si-photonic platforms are promising candidates for developing integrated photonic circuits. Here, we consider semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs) emitting around 1300 nm or 1550 nm wavelength. The nanotubes are deposited on quartz substrate for mapping their photoluminescence in hyperspectral near-field microscopy. This method allows for a sub-wavelength resolution in detecting the spatial distribution of the emission of single s-SWNTs at room temperature. Optical signature delocalized over several micrometers is observed, thus denoting the high quality of the produced carbon nanotubes on a wide range of tube diameters. Noteworthy, the presence of both nanotube bundles and distinct s-SWNT chiralities is uncovered.

  8. One-dimensional transport in hybrid metal-semiconductor nanotube systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelin, M. F.; Bondarev, I. V.

    2016-03-01

    We develop an electron transport theory for the hybrid system of a semiconducting carbon nanotube that encapsulates a one-atom-thick metallic wire. The theory predicts Fano resonances in electron transport through the system, whereby the interaction of electrons on the wire with nanotube plasmon generated near fields blocks some of the wire transmission channels to open up the new coherent plasmon-mediated channel in the nanotube forbidden gap outside the wire transmission band. Such a channel makes the entire hybrid system transparent in the energy domain where neither wire nor nanotube is individually transparent. This effect can be used to control and optimize charge transfer in hybrid nanodevices built on metal-semiconductor nanotube systems.

  9. Resonant Phase Matching of Josephson Junction Traveling Wave Parametric Amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Kevin; Macklin, Chris; Siddiqi, Irfan; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-10-01

    We propose a technique to overcome phase mismatch in Josephson-junction traveling wave parametric amplifiers in order to achieve high gain over a broad bandwidth. Using "resonant phase matching," we design a compact superconducting device consisting of a transmission line with subwavelength resonant inclusions that simultaneously achieves a gain of 20 dB, an instantaneous bandwidth of 3 GHz, and a saturation power of -98 dBm. Such an amplifier is well suited to cryogenic broadband microwave measurements such as the multiplexed readout of quantum coherent circuits based on superconducting, semiconducting, or nanomechanical elements, as well as traditional astronomical detectors.

  10. Effect of tubular chiralities of single-walled ZnO nanotubes on electronic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qin; Liu, Zhenghui; Zhou, Liping; Yu, Yiqing; Wu, Xuemei

    2017-04-01

    The electronic transport properties of single-walled ZnO nanotubes with different chiralities are investigated by nonequilibrium Green's function combined with density functional theory. In this paper we consider three representative ZnO nanotubes, namely (3, 3) armchair, (5, 0) zigzag, and (4, 2) chiral, with a similar diameter of about 5.4 Å. Short nanotubes exhibit good conductance behavior. As the tube length increases, the conductance decreases at low bias and the nanotubes indicate semiconducting behavior. The current-voltage characteristics of the nanotubes longer than 3 nm depend weakly on the length of the tubes. The armchair and chiral ZnO nanotubes with the same length and diameter have almost overlapped current-voltage curves. The electron transport behaviors are analyzed in terms of the transmission spectra, density of states and charge population of these nanotubes. The results indicate that the resonant peaks above the Fermi level are responsible for electric currents. However, the zigzag ZnO nanotubes exhibit asymmetric current-voltage curves attributed to the built-in polarization field and give larger current than the armchair and chiral nanotubes at the same bias. The features explored here strongly suggest that the ZnO nanotubes are stable, flexible structures, which are valuable in Nano-Electromechanical System.

  11. High-throughput optical imaging and spectroscopy of individual carbon nanotubes in devices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaihui; Hong, Xiaoping; Zhou, Qin; Jin, Chenhao; Li, Jinghua; Zhou, Weiwei; Liu, Jie; Wang, Enge; Zettl, Alex; Wang, Feng

    2013-12-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes are uniquely identified by a pair of chirality indices (n,m), which dictate the physical structures and electronic properties of each species. Carbon nanotube research is currently facing two outstanding challenges: achieving chirality-controlled growth and understanding chirality-dependent device physics. Addressing these challenges requires, respectively, high-throughput determination of the nanotube chirality distribution on growth substrates and in situ characterization of the nanotube electronic structure in operating devices. Direct optical imaging and spectroscopy techniques are well suited for both goals, but their implementation at the single nanotube level has remained a challenge due to the small nanotube signal and unavoidable environment background. Here, we report high-throughput real-time optical imaging and broadband in situ spectroscopy of individual carbon nanotubes on various substrates and in field-effect transistor devices using polarization-based microscopy combined with supercontinuum laser illumination. Our technique enables the complete chirality profiling of hundreds of individual carbon nanotubes, both semiconducting and metallic, on a growth substrate. In devices, we observe that high-order nanotube optical resonances are dramatically broadened by electrostatic doping, an unexpected behaviour that points to strong interband electron-electron scattering processes that could dominate ultrafast dynamics of excited states in carbon nanotubes.

  12. Epithelial adhesive junctions

    PubMed Central

    Capaldo, Christopher T.; Farkas, Attila E.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial adhesive cell-to-cell contacts contain large, plasma membrane-spanning multiprotein aggregates that perform vital structural and signaling functions. Three prominent adhesive contacts are the tight junction, adherens junction, and the desmosome. Each junction type has unique cellular functions and a complex molecular composition. In this review, we comment on recent and exciting advances in our understanding of junction composition and function. PMID:24592313

  13. Selective Surface Charge Sign Reversal on Metallic Carbon Nanotubes for Facile Ultrahigh Purity Nanotube Sorting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Nguyen, Tuan Dat; Cao, Qing; Wang, Yilei; Tan, Marcus Y C; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2016-03-22

    Semiconducting (semi-) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) must be purified of their metallic (met-) counterparts for most applications including nanoelectronics, solar cells, chemical sensors, and artificial skins. Previous bulk sorting techniques are based on subtle contrasts between properties of different nanotube/dispersing agent complexes. We report here a method which directly exploits the nanotube band structure differences. For the heterogeneous redox reaction of SWNTs with oxygen/water couple, the aqueous pH can be tuned so that the redox kinetics is determined by the availability of nanotube electrons only at/near the Fermi level, as predicted quantitatively by the Marcus-Gerischer (MG) theory. Consequently, met-SWNTs oxidize much faster than semi-SWNTs and only met-SWNTs selectively reverse the sign of their measured surface zeta potential from negative to positive at the optimized acidic pH when suspended with nonionic surfactants. By passing the redox-reacted nanotubes through anionic hydrogel beads, we isolate semi-SWNTs to record high electrically verified purity above 99.94% ± 0.04%. This facile charge sign reversal (CSR)-based sorting technique is robust and can sort SWNTs with a broad diameter range.

  14. Semiconducting polymer single crystals and devices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Huanli

    2016-11-01

    Highly ordered organic semiconductors in solid state with optimal molecular packing are critical to their electrical performance. Single crystals with long-range molecular orders and nearly perfect molecular packing are the best candidates, which already have been verified to exhibit the highest performance whether based on inorganic or small organic materials. However, in comparison, preparing high quality polymer crystals remains a big challenge in polymer science because of the easy entanglements of the long and flexible polymer chains during self-assembly process, which also significantly limits the development of their crystalline polymeric electronic devices. Here we have carried out systematical investigations to prepare high quality semiconducting polymers and high performance semiconducting polymer crystal optoelectronic devices have been successfully fabricated. The semiconducting polymeric devices demonstrate significantly enhanced charge carreir transport compared to their thin films, and the highest carreir mobiltiy could be approcahing 30 cm2 V-1s-1, one of the highest mobiltiy values for polymer semiconductors.

  15. Wideband rotating junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochernyaev, V. N.

    1993-06-01

    Rotating junctions of coaxial-waveguide and waveguide type with a traveling wave coefficient exceeding 0.8 in a wide frequency range are considered. The design of these junctions is based on a method of the theory of electrodynamic circuits. Numerical results are obtained for rotating junctions of partially filled rectangular waveguide type and their particular cases.

  16. Solvent effects on polymer sorting of carbon nanotubes with applications in printed electronics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiliang; Hsieh, Bing; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Liu, Peng; Tassone, Christopher J; Diao, Ying; Lei, Ting; Houk, Kendall N; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-01-07

    Regioregular poly(3-alkylthiophene) (P3AT) polymers have been previously reported for the selective, high-yield dispersion of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in toluene. Here, five alternative solvents are investigated, namely, tetrahydrofuran, decalin, tetralin, m-xylene, and o-xylene, for the dispersion of SWCNTs by poly(3-dodecylthiophene) P3DDT. The dispersion yield could be increased to over 40% using decalin or o-xylene as the solvents while maintaining high selectivity towards semiconducting SWCNTs. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit solvents are used to explain the improved sorting yield. In addition, a general mechanism is proposed to explain the selective dispersion of semiconducting SWCNTs by conjugated polymers. The possibility to perform selective sorting of semiconducting SWCNTs using various solvents provides a greater diversity of semiconducting SWCNT ink properties, such as boiling point, viscosity, and surface tension as well as toxicity. The efficacy of these new semiconducting SWCNT inks is demonstrated by using the high boiling point and high viscosity solvent tetralin for inkjet-printed transistors, where solvent properties are more compatible with the inkjet printing head and improved droplet formation.

  17. Spin and charge transport in double-junction Fe/MgO/GaAs/MgO/Fe heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Wolski, S. Szczepański, T.; Dugaev, V. K.; Barnaś, J.; Landgraf, B.; Slobodskyy, T.; Hansen, W.

    2015-01-28

    We present theoretical and experimental results on tunneling current in single Fe/MgO/GaAs and double Fe/MgO/GaAs/MgO/Fe tunnel junctions. The charge and spin currents are calculated as a function of external voltage for different sets of parameters characterizing the semiconducting GaAs layer. Transport characteristics of a single Fe/MgO/GaAs junction reveal typical diode as well as spin diode features. The results of numerical calculations are compared with current-voltage characteristics measured experimentally for double tunnel junction structures, and a satisfactory agreement of the theoretical and experimental results has been achieved.

  18. Organic ferroelectric/semiconducting nanowire hybrid layer for memory storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Ronggang; Kassa, Hailu G.; Haouari, Rachid; Marrani, Alessio; Geerts, Yves H.; Ruzié, Christian; van Breemen, Albert J. J. M.; Gelinck, Gerwin H.; Nysten, Bernard; Hu, Zhijun; Jonas, Alain M.

    2016-03-01

    Ferroelectric materials are important components of sensors, actuators and non-volatile memories. However, possible device configurations are limited due to the need to provide screening charges to ferroelectric interfaces to avoid depolarization. Here we show that, by alternating ferroelectric and semiconducting nanowires over an insulating substrate, the ferroelectric dipole moment can be stabilized by injected free charge carriers accumulating laterally in the neighboring semiconducting nanowires. This lateral electrostatic coupling between ferroelectric and semiconducting nanowires offers new opportunities to design new device architectures. As an example, we demonstrate the fabrication of an elementary non-volatile memory device in a transistor-like configuration, of which the source-drain current exhibits a typical hysteretic behavior with respect to the poling voltage. The potential for size reduction intrinsic to the nanostructured hybrid layer offers opportunities for the development of strongly miniaturized ferroelectric and piezoelectric devices.Ferroelectric materials are important components of sensors, actuators and non-volatile memories. However, possible device configurations are limited due to the need to provide screening charges to ferroelectric interfaces to avoid depolarization. Here we show that, by alternating ferroelectric and semiconducting nanowires over an insulating substrate, the ferroelectric dipole moment can be stabilized by injected free charge carriers accumulating laterally in the neighboring semiconducting nanowires. This lateral electrostatic coupling between ferroelectric and semiconducting nanowires offers new opportunities to design new device architectures. As an example, we demonstrate the fabrication of an elementary non-volatile memory device in a transistor-like configuration, of which the source-drain current exhibits a typical hysteretic behavior with respect to the poling voltage. The potential for size reduction

  19. Semiconducting glasses: A new class of thermoelectric materials?

    SciTech Connect

    Goncalves, A.P.; Vaney, J.B.; Lenoir, B.; Piarristeguy, A.; Pradel, A.; Monnier, J.; Ochin, P.; Godart, C.

    2012-09-15

    The deeper understanding of the factors that affect the dimensionless figure of merit, ZT, and the use of new synthetic methods has recently led to the development of novel systems with improved thermoelectric performances. Albeit up to now with ZT values lower than the conventional bulk materials, semiconducting glasses have also emerged as a new family of potential thermoelectric materials. This paper reviews the latest advances on semiconducting glasses for thermoelectric applications. Key examples of tellurium-based glasses, with high Seebeck coefficients, very low thermal conductivities and tunable electrical conductivities, are presented. ZT values as high as 0.2 were obtained at room temperature for several tellurium-based glasses with high copper concentrations, confirming chalcogenide semiconducting glasses as good candidates for high-performance thermoelectric materials. However, the temperature stability and electrical conductivity of the reported glasses are still not good enough for practical applications and further studies are still needed to enhance them. - Graphical abstract: Power factor as a function of the temperature for the Cu{sub 27.5}Ge{sub 2.5}Te{sub 70} and Cu{sub 30}As{sub 15}Te{sub 55} seniconducting glasses. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A review of semiconducting glasses for thermoelectrics applications is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The studied semiconducting glasses present very low thermal conductivities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composition can tune electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZT=0.2 is obtained at 300 K for different semiconducting glasses.

  20. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Ying; Zepp, Richard G

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that may damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate environmental transformations of CNTs. Photosensitization by derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus with different intrinsic characteristics (e.g., diameter and electronic properties), has been investigated under environmentally relevant aquatic conditions. We used the CNT-sensitized photoisomerization of sorbic acid ((2E,4E)-hexa-2,4-dienoic acid) and singlet oxygen formation to quantify the triplet states ((3)CNT*) formed upon irradiation of selected single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The CNTs used in our studies were derivatized by carboxyl groups to facilitate their dispersion in water. Results indicate that high-defect-density (thus well-stabilized), small-diameter, and semiconducting-rich CNTs have higher-measured excited triplet state formation and therefore singlet oxygen ((1)O2) yield. Derivatized SWCNTs were significantly more photoreactive than derivatized MWCNTs. Moreover, addition of sodium chloride resulted in increased aggregation and small increases in (1)O2 production of CNTs. The most photoreactive CNTs exhibited comparable photoreactivity (in terms of (3)CNT* formation and (1)O2 yield) to reference natural organic matter (NOM) under sunlight irradiation with the same mass-based concentration. Selected reference NOM could therefore be useful in evaluating environmental photoreactivity or intended antibacterial applications of CNTs.

  1. Carbon Nanotube based Nanotechnolgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyyappan, M.

    2000-10-01

    Carbon nanotube(CNT) was discovered in the early 1990s and is an off-spring of C60(the fullerene or buckyball). CNT, depending on chirality and diameter, can be metallic or semiconductor and thus allows formation of metal-semiconductor and semiconductor-semiconductor junctions. CNT exhibits extraordinary electrical and mechanical properties and offers remarkable potential for revolutionary applications in electronics devices, computing and data storage technology, sensors, composites, storage of hydrogen or lithium for battery development, nanoelectromechanical systems(NEMS), and as tip in scanning probe microscopy(SPM) for imaging and nanolithography. Thus the CNT synthesis, characterization and applications touch upon all disciplines of science and engineering. A common growth method now is based on CVD though surface catalysis is key to synthesis, in contrast to many CVD applications common in microelectronics. A plasma based variation is gaining some attention. This talk will provide an overview of CNT properties, growth methods, applications, and research challenges and opportunities ahead.

  2. Nanotube radio.

    PubMed

    Jensen, K; Weldon, J; Garcia, H; Zettl, A

    2007-11-01

    We have constructed a fully functional, fully integrated radio receiver from a single carbon nanotube. The nanotube serves simultaneously as all essential components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A direct current voltage source, as supplied by a battery, powers the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, we demonstrate successful music and voice reception.

  3. Nanotube Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kenneth; Weldon, Jeff; Garcia, Henry; Zettl, Alex

    2008-03-01

    We have constructed a fully functional, fully integrated radio receiver from a single carbon nanotube. The nanotube serves simultaneously as all essential components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A direct current voltage source, as supplied by a battery, powers the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, we demonstrate successful music and voice reception.

  4. YBCO Josephson Junction Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-14

    Conductus 969 West Maude Avenue ř ’AEOTR. 19 4 0 0 75 Sunnyvale CA 94086 9. SPONSORING MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) ’C 510 N’_ ; i )N !’->.G...the primary junction being investigated at Conductus (and one of the better performing junctions in the community) was the bi-epitaxial structure [4...achieved. 2.1 Junctions At the time of proposal, the primary junction being investigated at Conductus (and one of the better performing junctions in

  5. Graphane nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiao-Dong; Yang, Tao; Hoffmann, Roald; Ashcroft, N W; Martin, Richard L; Rudin, Sven P; Zhu, Jian-Xin

    2012-08-28

    In this work, one-dimensional graphane nanotubes (GN, stoichiometry CH), built from 2D single-sheet graphanes, are explored theoretically. Zigzag type GN(10,0) and armchair type GN(10,10) structures with varying surface termination were investigated in detail. GN(10,10)-A is found to be the most stable configuration among the GN structures considered. An annealing analysis indicates that graphane-A and GN(10,10)-A are likely to be stable at elevated temperature. A possible reaction path to GN(10,10)-A is suggested by the reaction of single-walled carbon nanotube (10,10) + H(2); the indications are that the GN(10,10)-A can be made at low temperature and high partial pressure of H(2) gas from the corresponding nanotube. The graphane nanotubes are predicted to be wide band gap insulators. A study of the effect of the diameter of GN structures shows, unexpectedly, that the gap increases on reducing the diameter of the graphane nanotubes. We also investigated several partially hydrogenated graphenes and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT); the greater hydrogenation is, the more stable is the resulting structure. The band gap of graphene or SWNT can be tuned via hydrogenation.

  6. Anomalous aharonov-bohm gap oscillations in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Sangalli, Davide; Marini, Andrea

    2011-10-12

    The gap oscillations caused by a magnetic flux penetrating a carbon nanotube represent one of the most spectacular observations of the Aharonov-Bohm effect at the nanoscale. Our understanding of this effect is, however, based on the assumption that the electrons are strictly confined on the tube surface, on trajectories that are not modified by curvature effects. Using an ab initio approach based on density functional theory, we show that this assumption fails at the nanoscale inducing important corrections to the physics of the Aharonov-Bohm effect. Curvature effects and electronic density that is spilled out of the nanotube surface are shown to break the periodicity of the gap oscillations. We predict the key phenomenological features of this anomalous Aharonov-Bohm effect in semiconductive and metallic tubes and the existence of a large metallic phase in the low flux regime of multiwalled nanotubes, also suggesting possible experiments to validate our results.

  7. Nanorobot assembly of carbon nanotubes for mid-IR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Ning; Zhang, Jiangbo; Szu, Harold; Li, Guangyong

    2007-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have a potential to be efficient infrared (IR) detection material due to their unique electronic properties. As a one-dimensional nano-structural material, the ballistic electronic transport property makes the noise equivalent temperature difference smaller compared with other semi-conducting materials. In order to verify this unique property, a single pixel CNT-based infrared photodetector is fabricated by depositing the CNTs on the substrate surface and then aligning them to bridge the electrode gap using the atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nano-robotic system. The photon-generated electron-hole pairs within the carbon nanotube are separated by an external electric field between the two electrodes. The separated carriers contribute to the current flowing through the carbon nanotube and form the photocurrent. By monitoring the photocurrent, the incident infrared can be detected and quantified. Experimental results show the good sensitivity of CNTs to the infrared light.

  8. Fundamental performance limits of carbon nanotube thin-film transistors achieved using hybrid molecular dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Sangwan, Vinod K; Ortiz, Rocio Ponce; Alaboson, Justice M P; Emery, Jonathan D; Bedzyk, Michael J; Lauhon, Lincoln J; Marks, Tobin J; Hersam, Mark C

    2012-08-28

    In the past decade, semiconducting carbon nanotube thin films have been recognized as contending materials for wide-ranging applications in electronics, energy, and sensing. In particular, improvements in large-area flexible electronics have been achieved through independent advances in postgrowth processing to resolve metallic versus semiconducting carbon nanotube heterogeneity, in improved gate dielectrics, and in self-assembly processes. Moreover, controlled tuning of specific device components has afforded fundamental probes of the trade-offs between materials properties and device performance metrics. Nevertheless, carbon nanotube transistor performance suitable for real-world applications awaits understanding-based progress in the integration of independently pioneered device components. We achieve this here by integrating high-purity semiconducting carbon nanotube films with a custom-designed hybrid inorganic-organic gate dielectric. This synergistic combination of materials circumvents conventional design trade-offs, resulting in concurrent advances in several transistor performance metrics such as transconductance (6.5 μS/μm), intrinsic field-effect mobility (147 cm(2)/(V s)), subthreshold swing (150 mV/decade), and on/off ratio (5 × 10(5)), while also achieving hysteresis-free operation in ambient conditions.

  9. Enhanced Thermoelectric Performance of Hybrid Nanoparticle-Single-Molecule Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerah-Harush, Elinor; Dubi, Yonatan

    2015-06-01

    It was recently suggested that molecular junctions would be excellent elements for efficient and high-power thermoelectric energy-conversion devices. However, experimental measurements of thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions indicate rather poor efficiency, raising the question of whether it is indeed possible to design a setup for molecular junctions that will exhibit enhanced thermoelectric performance. Here we suggest that hybrid single-molecule-nanoparticle junctions can serve as efficient thermoelectric converters. The introduction of a semiconducting nanoparticle introduces new tuning capabilities, which are absent in conventional metal-molecule-metal junctions. Using a generic model for the molecule and nanoparticle with realistic parameters, we demonstrate that the thermopower can be of the order of hundreds of microvolts per degree kelvin and that the thermoelectric figure of merit can reach values close to 1, an improvement of 4 orders of magnitude over existing measurements. This favorable performance persists over a wide range of experimentally relevant parameters and is robust against disorder (in the form of surface-attached molecules) and against electron decoherence at the nanoparticle-molecule interface.

  10. Electrical properties of carbon nanotube FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, T.; Ohno, Y.; Kishimoto, S.

    2008-08-01

    The electrical properties of carbon nanotube FETs (CNTFETs) have been studied in detail. The conduction type of the CNTFETs was dependent on the work function of the contact metal, which suggests that Fermi level pinning at the metal/nanotube interface is not strong. Based on the two-probe and four-probe resistance measurements, it has been shown that the carrier transport at the contact is explained by the edge contact model even in the diffusive regime. The chemical doping using F4TCNQ was effective in reducing not only the channel resistance but also the contact resistance. In the CNTFETs fabricated using plasma-enhanced (PE) CVD-grown nanotubes, the drain current of the most of the devices could be modulated by the gate voltage with small OFF current suggesting the preferential growth of the nanotubes with semiconducting behavior. Multichannel top-gate CNTFETs with horizontally-aligned nanotubes as channels have been successfully fabricated using CNT growth on the ST-cut quartz substrate, arc-discharge plasma deposition of the catalyst metal, and ALD gate insulator deposition. The devices show normally-on and n-type conduction property with a relatively-high ON current of 13 mA/mm. CNTFETs with nanotube network have also been fabricated by direct growth on the SiO2/Si substrate using grid-inserted PECVD and using catalyst formed on the channel area of the FETs. The uniformity of the electrical properties of the network channel CNTFETs were very good. Finally, it has been shown that the surface potential profile measurement based on the electrostatic force detection in the scanning probe microscopy was effective in studying the behavior of the CNTFETs such as the transient behavior and the effect of the defects.

  11. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    The study of carbon nanotubes, since their discovery by Iijima in 1991, has become a full research field with significant contributions from all areas of research in solid-state and molecular physics and also from chemistry. This Focus Issue in New Journal of Physics reflects this active research, and presents articles detailing significant advances in the production of carbon nanotubes, the study of their mechanical and vibrational properties, electronic properties and optical transitions, and electrical and transport properties. Fundamental research, both theoretical and experimental, represents part of this progress. The potential applications of nanotubes will rely on the progress made in understanding their fundamental physics and chemistry, as presented here. We believe this Focus Issue will be an excellent guide for both beginners and experts in the research field of carbon nanotubes. It has been a great pleasure to edit the many excellent contributions from Europe, Japan, and the US, as well from a number of other countries, and to witness the remarkable effort put into the manuscripts by the contributors. We thank all the authors and referees involved in the process. In particular, we would like to express our gratitude to Alexander Bradshaw, who invited us put together this Focus Issue, and to Tim Smith and the New Journal of Physics staff for their extremely efficient handling of the manuscripts. Focus on Carbon Nanotubes Contents <;A article="1367-2630/5/1/117">Transport theory of carbon nanotube Y junctions R Egger, B Trauzettel, S Chen and F Siano The tubular conical helix of graphitic boron nitride F F Xu, Y Bando and D Golberg Formation pathways for single-wall carbon nanotube multiterminal junctions Inna Ponomareva, Leonid A Chernozatonskii, Antonis N Andriotis and Madhu Menon Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes J W Seo, E Couteau

  12. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    The study of carbon nanotubes, since their discovery by Iijima in 1991, has become a full research field with significant contributions from all areas of research in solid-state and molecular physics and also from chemistry. This Focus Issue in New Journal of Physics reflects this active research, and presents articles detailing significant advances in the production of carbon nanotubes, the study of their mechanical and vibrational properties, electronic properties and optical transitions, and electrical and transport properties. Fundamental research, both theoretical and experimental, represents part of this progress. The potential applications of nanotubes will rely on the progress made in understanding their fundamental physics and chemistry, as presented here. We believe this Focus Issue will be an excellent guide for both beginners and experts in the research field of carbon nanotubes. It has been a great pleasure to edit the many excellent contributions from Europe, Japan, and the US, as well from a number of other countries, and to witness the remarkable effort put into the manuscripts by the contributors. We thank all the authors and referees involved in the process. In particular, we would like to express our gratitude to Alexander Bradshaw, who invited us put together this Focus Issue, and to Tim Smith and the New Journal of Physics staff for their extremely efficient handling of the manuscripts. Focus on Carbon Nanotubes Contents Transport theory of carbon nanotube Y junctions R Egger, B Trauzettel, S Chen and F Siano The tubular conical helix of graphitic boron nitride F F Xu, Y Bando and D Golberg Formation pathways for single-wall carbon nanotube multiterminal junctions Inna Ponomareva, Leonid A Chernozatonskii, Antonis N Andriotis and Madhu Menon Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes J W Seo, E Couteau, P Umek, K Hernadi, P Marcoux, B Lukic, Cs Mikó, M Milas, R Gaál and L Forró Transitional behaviour in the transformation from active end

  13. Superconducting Proximity Effect in Thin Semiconducting Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vissers, Michael; Flexner, Soren; Welander, Paul; Inderhees, Kevin; McArdle, Tim; Eckstein, Jim

    2008-03-01

    We report results using a novel 3 terminal device structure that provides two independent resistance measurements that we use to examine the influence of the superconducting proximity effect on both the transport properties of the thin film N layer by quantifying its sheet resistance, Rs, as well as independently measuring the junction conductance across the N-S boundary, Gc. When the N layer is a degenerate semiconductor the changes in these quantities are large. Gc increases much more than the factor of 2 that Andreev Reflection or BTK theory predicts, and both Gc and Rs exhibit reentrance as temperature decreases. We interpret these effects as being due to a transition between a phase fluctuating and phase stiff proximity effect in the N layer. This manifests itself by moving the N-S electrical boundary into the semiconductor, increasing Gc, while simultaneously removing volume available to normal transport forcing the measured Rs to increase. This work was supported by the DOE BES at the F. Seitz Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois, Urbana.

  14. Cobalt Doping of Semiconducting Boron Carbide Using Cobaltocene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    a semiconducting boron carbide homojunction diode has been fabricated. This diode has potential applications in neutron detection, direct neutron ...REF-1 viii List of Figures Figure Page 1-1. Prototype handheld neutron ...to corrosive, high temperature, and mechanically abrasive environments. [1] Because 10B has a large thermal neutron capture cross section (3840

  15. Synergistic Functions of Enzymes Bound to Semiconducting Layers.

    PubMed

    Kamada, K; Yamada, A; Kamiuchi, M; Tokunaga, M; Ito, D; Soh, N

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis and cooperative functions of hybrid materials composed of enzyme and semiconducting layers are described in this chapter. The hybrids were produced via a simple physical interaction between the components, that is, electrostatic interaction in an aqueous solution. To form interstratifying enzymes in the galleries, solution pH, which is a key parameter to decide surface potential, should be adjusted appropriately. In other words, enzymes should have an opposite charge when compared to that of the layers at an identical pH. Even though the intercalation slightly reduced enzymatic activity as compared to those of the free enzymes, stability under cruel conditions was drastically improved due to screening effect of semiconducting layers from extrinsic stimuli. In addition, photochemical control of redox enzymes sandwiched between semiconducting layers was accomplished. Light irradiation of the hybrids induced band gap excitation of the layers, and holes produced in the valence band activated the enzymes. It was revealed that the semiconducting layers with magnetic elements might be useful to magnetic application (separation) of enzymes as similar to conventional magnetic beads. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Diameter dependence of TO phonon frequencies and the Kohn anomaly in armchair single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telg, Hagen; Hároz, Erik H.; Duque, Juan G.; Tu, Xiaomin; Khripin, Constantine Y.; Fagan, Jeffrey A.; Zheng, Ming; Kono, Junichiro; Doorn, Stephen K.

    2014-12-01

    We present resonant Raman scattering experiments on nanotube samples enriched in metallic armchair single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). We establish the transverse optical (ATO) phonon frequency for the (5,5) through (10,10) armchair species, ranging in diameter from 0.68 to 1.36 nm. The frequencies show a strong diameter dependence similar to that previously observed in semiconducting nanotubes. We show that the ATO frequencies in armchair SWCNTs are dramatically upshifted from those of semiconducting SWCNTs. Furthermore, using electrochemical doping, we demonstrated that the ATO frequencies in armchair SWCNTs are independent of the position of the Fermi level. These results suggest that the upshift is a result of a Kohn anomaly involving a forward-scattering mechanism of electrons close to the Fermi level. This is in contrast to the well-known Kohn anomaly that dominates the downshift of the ALO and E2 g phonons in nonarmchair metallic SWCNTs and graphene, respectively.

  17. Nanotube cathodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  18. Nanotubes of boron nitride filled with molybdenum clusters.

    PubMed

    Golberg, D; Bando, Y; Kurashima, K; Sato, T

    2001-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes are known to be metallic or semiconducting, depending on their helicity and diameter. However, boron nitride (BN) nanotubes are the only nanotubular product known to date that are predicted to have stable insulating properties that are independent of their atomic structure and morphology. Thus, the BN tube has attracted prime attention as an advanced nanoinsulating shield for all types of encapsulated conducting material, i.e., metal wires, clusters, etc. However, so far there have been no successes in controlled one-dimensional filling of BN nanotubes with conductive material. We report the first experimental results on the synthesis, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersion X-ray analysis, and electron energy loss spectroscopy of BN nanotubes that are filled with Mo clusters over their entire length. This was accomplished by means of two-step thermochemical treatment of chemically vapor-deposited C nanotubes with B2O3, CuO, and MoO3 oxides in a flowing N2 atmosphere. The first examples of BN nanotubes filled with molybdenum clusters are reported and the formation of the first nanocable (approximately 10 nm in length), consisting of a conductive metal core and an insulating BN nanotubular shield is demonstrated.

  19. Vacuum template synthesis of multifunctional nanotubes with tailored nanostructured walls

    PubMed Central

    Filippin, A. Nicolas; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Saghi, Zineb; Idígoras, Jesús; Burdet, Pierre; Barranco, Angel; Midgley, Paul; Anta, Juan A.; Borras, Ana

    2016-01-01

    A three-step vacuum procedure for the fabrication of vertical TiO2 and ZnO nanotubes with three dimensional walls is presented. The method combines physical vapor deposition of small-molecules, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of inorganic functional thin films and layers and a post-annealing process in vacuum in order to remove the organic template. As a result, an ample variety of inorganic nanotubes are made with tunable length, hole dimensions and shapes and tailored wall composition, microstructure, porosity and structure. The fabrication of multishell nanotubes combining different semiconducting oxides and metal nanoparticles is as well explored. This method provides a feasible and reproducible route for the fabrication of high density arrays of vertically alligned nanotubes on processable substrates. The emptying mechanism and microstructure of the nanotubes have been elucidated through SEM, STEM, HAADF-STEM tomography and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. In this article, as a proof of concept, it is presented the straightforward integration of ZnO nanotubes as photoanode in a photovoltaic cell and as a photonic oxygen gas sensor. PMID:26860367

  20. Vacuum template synthesis of multifunctional nanotubes with tailored nanostructured walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippin, A. Nicolas; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Saghi, Zineb; Idígoras, Jesús; Burdet, Pierre; Barranco, Angel; Midgley, Paul; Anta, Juan A.; Borras, Ana

    2016-02-01

    A three-step vacuum procedure for the fabrication of vertical TiO2 and ZnO nanotubes with three dimensional walls is presented. The method combines physical vapor deposition of small-molecules, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of inorganic functional thin films and layers and a post-annealing process in vacuum in order to remove the organic template. As a result, an ample variety of inorganic nanotubes are made with tunable length, hole dimensions and shapes and tailored wall composition, microstructure, porosity and structure. The fabrication of multishell nanotubes combining different semiconducting oxides and metal nanoparticles is as well explored. This method provides a feasible and reproducible route for the fabrication of high density arrays of vertically alligned nanotubes on processable substrates. The emptying mechanism and microstructure of the nanotubes have been elucidated through SEM, STEM, HAADF-STEM tomography and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. In this article, as a proof of concept, it is presented the straightforward integration of ZnO nanotubes as photoanode in a photovoltaic cell and as a photonic oxygen gas sensor.

  1. The Effect of the Semiconductive Screen on Space Charge Suppression in Cross-Linked Polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Han, Bai; Song, Wei; Wang, Xuan; Lei, Qing-Quan

    2014-10-01

    The space charge distributions of cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) with Borouge's Borlink™ semiconductive screen type LE0550 and LE0595 from a pulsed electro-acoustic method are obtained. The contact interface morphology at the semiconductive screen and the structure of XLPE near the interface are characterized. The dielectric spectrum and the conductivity current of XLPE with the different semiconductive electrodes are compared. The semiconductive screen changes the structure and the dielectric characteristic of XLPE near the contact interface, which may be the main reason for space charge suppression in XLPE with Borouge's type LE0550 semiconductive screen.

  2. Myosins in cell junctions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Katy C.; Cheney, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    The development of cell-cell junctions was a fundamental step in metazoan evolution, and human health depends on the formation and function of cell junctions. Although it has long been known that actin and conventional myosin have important roles in cell junctions, research has begun to reveal the specific functions of the different forms of conventional myosin. Exciting new data also reveals that a growing number of unconventional myosins have important roles in cell junctions. Experiments showing that cell junctions act as mechanosensors have also provided new impetus to understand the functions of myosins and the forces they exert. In this review we will summarize recent developments on the roles of myosins in cell junctions. PMID:22954512

  3. The remote electron beam-induced current analysis of grain boundaries in semiconducting and semi-insulating materials.

    PubMed

    Holt, D B

    2000-01-01

    When no charge collecting p-n junction or Schottky barrier is present in the specimen, but two contacts are applied, conductive mode scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations known as remote electron beam-induced current (REBIC) can be made. It was described as "remote" EBIC because the contacts to the specimen can lie at macroscopic distances from the beam impact point. In recent years, REBIC has been found to be useful not only for studies of grain boundaries in semiconducting silicon and germanium, but also in semi-insulating materials such as the wider bandgap II-VI compounds and electroceramic materials like varistor ZnO and positive temperature coefficient resistor (PTCR) BaTiO3. The principles of this method are outlined. Accounts are given of the five forms of charge collection and resistive contrast that appear at grain boundaries (GBs) in REBIC micrographs. These are (1) terraced contrast due to high resistivity boundary layers, (2) peak and trough (PAT) contrast due to charge on the boundary, (3) reversible contrast seen only under external voltage bias due to the beta-conductive effect in a low conductivity boundary layer, (4) dark contrast due to enhanced recombination, and (5) bright contrast apparently due to reduced recombination. For comparison, the results of the extensive EBIC studies of GBs in Si and Ge are first outlined and then the results of recent REBIC grain boundary studies in both semiconducting and semi-insulating materials are reviewed.

  4. Quantum conductance of carbon nanotubes with defects

    SciTech Connect

    Chico, L.; Benedict, L.X.; Louie, S.G.; Cohen, M.L. |

    1996-07-01

    We study the conductance of metallic carbon nanotubes with vacancies and pentagon-heptagon pair defects within the Landauer formalism. Using a tight-binding model and a Green{close_quote}s function technique to calculate the scattering matrix, we examine the one-dimensional to two-dimensional crossover in these systems and show the existence of metallic tube junctions in which the conductance is suppressed for symmetry reasons. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  5. Nanotube phonon waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2013-10-29

    Disclosed are methods and devices in which certain types of nanotubes (e.g., carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes conduct heat with high efficiency and are therefore useful in electronic-type devices.

  6. Impact of Radial Compression on the Conductance of Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Sudhanshu; Saini, Gaurav; Qureshi, S.

    2014-01-01

    The electronic behavior of semiconducting carbon nanotubes based CNTFET under the influence of radial deformation defect present in the channel is theoretically investigated using nonequilibrium Green's function method self-consistently coupled with three-dimensional electrostatics. It was found that deformation in the CNTFET channel composed of a small diameter semiconducting carbon nanotube can increase its conductance by a factor of 4 or more depending upon the average reduction in the C-C bond length after compression. This increase in CNTFET conductance is directly related to the movement of the electronic states toward the Fermi level when the tubes are squeezed. Furthermore, the device ON-OFF current ratio also decreases with increase in applied compression which makes it hard to switch-OFF the device.

  7. Chirality Characterization of Dispersed Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Williams, Phillip A.; Mayweather, Candis D.; Wincheski, Buzz; Park, Cheol; Namkung, Juock S.

    2005-01-01

    Raman scattering and optical absorption spectroscopy are used for the chirality characterization of HiPco single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) dispersed in aqueous solution with the surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate. Radial breathing mode (RBM) Raman peaks for semiconducting and metallic SWNTs are identified by directly comparing the Raman spectra with the Kataura plot. The SWNT diameters are calculated from these resonant peak positions. Next, a list of (n, m) pairs, yielding the SWNT diameters within a few percent of that obtained from each resonant peak position, is established. The interband transition energies for the list of SWNT (n, m) pairs are calculated based on the tight binding energy expression for each list of the (n, m) pairs, and the pairs yielding the closest values to the corresponding experimental optical absorption peaks are selected. The results reveal that (1, 11), (4, 11), and (0, 11) as the most probable chiralities of the semiconducting nanotubes. The results also reveal that (4, 16), (6, 12) and (8, 8) are the most probable chiralities for the metallic nanotubes. Directly relating the Raman scattering data to the optical absorption spectra, the present method is considered the simplest technique currently available. Another advantage of this technique is the use of the E(sup 8)(sub 11) peaks in the optical absorption spectrum in the analysis to enhance the accuracy in the results.

  8. Empirical evaluation of attractive van der Waals potentials for type-purified single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbie, Erik K.; Ihle, Thomas; Harris, John M.; Semler, Matthew R.

    2012-06-01

    van der Waals forces play a critical role in the structure and stability of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) materials. Thin films assembled from SWCNTs purified by electronic type show particular promise for flexible electronics applications, but mechanical durability remains an unresolved issue. Using transition resonances determined from spectroscopic measurements of type-purified SWCNTs deposited on quartz, coupled with analogous spectroscopic characterization of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates, we use the Lifshitz theory of van der Waals dispersion interactions developed by Rajter and co-workers [Rajter , Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.76.045417 76, 045417 (2007)] to examine the influence of electronic type on van der Waals contact potentials in polymer-supported nanotube networks. Our results suggest a significantly stronger nanotube-nanotube and nanotube-polymer attraction for the semiconducting SWCNT fractions, consistent with recent measurements of the electronic durability of flexible transparent SWCNT coatings.

  9. Rectifying diodes from asymmetrically functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhong; Kondratenko, Mykola; Dao, Lê H; Perepichka, Dmitrii F

    2006-03-15

    Asymmetrically functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been prepared by a covalent reaction of an 11-mercaptoundecanol-modified Au surface with oxidized SWNT cylinders. While one end of the tubes is attached to gold substrate via ester groups, the free carboxylic substituents on the other end can be either ionized (CO2-) or esterified (CO2Et), creating a donor-acceptor asymmetric and acceptor-acceptor symmetric SWNT, respectively. Study of the SWNT monolayer conductance in Hg drop junction experiments reveals a pronounced diode-like behavior for donor-SWNT-acceptor junctions, while acceptor-SWNT-acceptor junctions are electrically symmetric.

  10. Band-Gap Opening in Metallic Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Encapsulation of an Organic Salt.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Ortega, Belén; Villalva, Julia; Vera-Hidalgo, Mariano; Ruiz-González, Luisa; Burzurí, Enrique; Pérez, Emilio M

    2017-09-25

    The encapsulation of viologen derivatives into metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) results in the opening of a band gap, making the SWNTs semiconducting. Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy confirm the encapsulation process. Through the fabrication of field-effect transistor devices, the change of the electronic structure of the tubes from metallic to semiconducting upon the encapsulation is confirmed. The opening of a gap in the band structure of the tubes was not detected in supramolecular controls. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Boosting photoresponse in silicon metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector using semiconducting quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Chandan; Kim, Yonghwan; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-11-01

    Silicon based metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors have faster photogeneration and carrier collection across the metal-semiconductor Schottky contacts, and CMOS integratibility compared to conventional p-n junction photodetectors. However, its operations are limited by low photogeneration, inefficient carrier-separation, and low mobility. Here, we show a simple and highly effective approach for boosting Si MSM photodetector efficiency by uniformly decorating semiconducting CdSe quantum dots on Si channel (Si-QD). Significantly higher photocurrent on/off ratio was achieved up to over 500 compared to conventional Si MSM photodetector (on/off ratio ~5) by increasing photogeneration and improving carrier separation. Furthermore, a substrate-biasing technique invoked wide range of tunable photocurrent on/off ratio in Si-QD photodetector (ranging from 2.7 to 562) by applying suitable combinations of source-drain and substrate biasing conditions. Strong photogeneration and carrier separation were achieved by employing Stark effect into the Si-QD hybrid system. These results highlight a promising method for enhancing Si MSM photodetector efficiency more than 100 times and simultaneously compatible with current silicon technologies.

  12. Optoelectronic properties of Mg{sub 2}Si semiconducting layers with high absorption coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Takashi; Sago, Yuichiro; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki

    2011-09-15

    In an attempt to develop a low-cost material for solar cell devices, polycrystalline magnesium silicide (poly-Mg{sub 2}Si) semiconducting layers have been prepared by applying rf magnetron sputtering using a Mg{sub 2}Si target. The optimum substrate temperature for the poly-Mg{sub 2}Si growth was found to be T{sub s} = 200 deg. C; the film deposition at higher temperatures leads to desorption of Mg atoms from the growing surface, while the amorphous phase formation occurs at room temperature. The poly-Mg{sub 2}Si layer deposited at T{sub s} = 200 deg. C shows the (111) preferential orientation with a uniform grain size of {approx}50 nm. The dielectric function of the poly-Mg{sub 2}Si layer has been determined accurately by spectroscopic ellipsometry. From the analysis, quite high absorption coefficients and an indirect gap of 0.77 eV in the poly-Mg{sub 2}Si layer have been confirmed. The above poly-Mg{sub 2}Si layer shows clear photoconductivity and can be applied as a narrow-gap bottom layer in multi-junction solar cell devices.

  13. Charge Transport in Two-Photon Semiconducting Structures for Solar Fuels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guohua; Du, Kang; Haussener, Sophia; Wang, Kaiying

    2016-10-20

    Semiconducting heterostructures are emerging as promising light absorbers and offer effective electron-hole separation to drive solar chemistry. This technology relies on semiconductor composites or photoelectrodes that work in the presence of a redox mediator and that create cascade junctions to promote surface catalytic reactions. Rational tuning of their structures and compositions is crucial to fully exploit their functionality. In this review, we describe the possibilities of applying the two-photon concept to the field of solar fuels. A wide range of strategies including the indirect combination of two semiconductors by a redox couple, direct coupling of two semiconductors, multicomponent structures with a conductive mediator, related photoelectrodes, as well as two-photon cells are discussed for light energy harvesting and charge transport. Examples of charge extraction models from the literature are summarized to understand the mechanism of interfacial carrier dynamics and to rationalize experimental observations. We focus on a working principle of the constituent components and linking the photosynthetic activity with the proposed models. This work gives a new perspective on artificial photosynthesis by taking simultaneous advantages of photon absorption and charge transfer, outlining an encouraging roadmap towards solar fuels.

  14. Boosting photoresponse in silicon metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector using semiconducting quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Chandan; Kim, Yonghwan; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    Silicon based metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors have faster photogeneration and carrier collection across the metal-semiconductor Schottky contacts, and CMOS integratibility compared to conventional p-n junction photodetectors. However, its operations are limited by low photogeneration, inefficient carrier-separation, and low mobility. Here, we show a simple and highly effective approach for boosting Si MSM photodetector efficiency by uniformly decorating semiconducting CdSe quantum dots on Si channel (Si-QD). Significantly higher photocurrent on/off ratio was achieved up to over 500 compared to conventional Si MSM photodetector (on/off ratio ~5) by increasing photogeneration and improving carrier separation. Furthermore, a substrate-biasing technique invoked wide range of tunable photocurrent on/off ratio in Si-QD photodetector (ranging from 2.7 to 562) by applying suitable combinations of source-drain and substrate biasing conditions. Strong photogeneration and carrier separation were achieved by employing Stark effect into the Si-QD hybrid system. These results highlight a promising method for enhancing Si MSM photodetector efficiency more than 100 times and simultaneously compatible with current silicon technologies. PMID:27886274

  15. High-speed logic integrated circuits with solution-processed self-assembled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Han, Shu-Jen; Tang, Jianshi; Kumar, Bharat; Falk, Abram; Farmer, Damon; Tulevski, George; Jenkins, Keith; Afzali, Ali; Oida, Satoshi; Ott, John; Hannon, James; Haensch, Wilfried

    2017-09-01

    As conventional monolithic silicon technology struggles to meet the requirements for the 7-nm technology node, there has been tremendous progress in demonstrating the scalability of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors down to the size that satisfies the 3-nm node and beyond. However, to date, circuits built with carbon nanotubes have overlooked key aspects of a practical logic technology and have stalled at simple functionality demonstrations. Here, we report high-performance complementary carbon nanotube ring oscillators using fully manufacturable processes, with a stage switching frequency of 2.82 GHz. The circuit was built on solution-processed, self-assembled carbon nanotube arrays with over 99.9% semiconducting purity, and the complementary feature was achieved by employing two different work function electrodes.

  16. Effect of UV irradiation on adsorption/desorption of oxygen and water on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muckley, Eric S.; Nelson, Anthony J.; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Ivanov, Ilia N.

    2016-02-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) films composed of semiconducting single wall nanotubes (s-SWNTs), metallic single wall nanotubes (m-SWNTs), and multiwall nanotubes (MWNTs) were exposed to O2 and H2O vapor in the dark and under UV irradiation. Changes in the film conductivity and mass were measured in situ. We find that UV irradiation increases the resistive response of CNT films to O2 and H2O by more than an order of magnitude. In m-SWNT and MWNT films, UV irradiation changes the sign of the resistive response to O2 and H2O by generating free charge carriers. S-SWNTs show the largest UV-induced resistive response and exhibit weakening of van der Waals interactions with the QCM crystal when exposed to gas/vapor.

  17. Integration of self-assembled carbon nanotube transistors: statistics and gate engineering at the wafer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marty, L.; Bonhomme, A.; Iaia, A.; André, E.; Rauwel, E.; Dubourdieu, C.; Toffoli, A.; Ducroquet, F.; Bonnot, A. M.; Bouchiat, V.

    2006-10-01

    We present a full process based on chemical vapour deposition that allows fabrication and integration at the wafer scale of carbon-nanotube-based field effect transistors. We make a statistical analysis of the integration yield that allows assessment of the parameter fluctuations of the titanium-nanotube contact obtained by self-assembly. This procedure is applied to raw devices without post-process. Statistics at the wafer scale reveal the respective role of semiconducting and metallic connected nanotubes and show that connection yields up to 86% can be reached. For large scale device integration, our process has to implement both wafer-scale self-assembly of the nanotubes and high transistor performances. In order to address this last issue, a gate engineering process has been investigated. We present the improvements obtained using low and high κ dielectrics for the gate oxide.

  18. Effect of UV irradiation on the dynamics of oxygen and water interaction with carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Anthony J; Ivanov, Ilia N

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) films composed of semiconducting single wall nanotubes (s-SWNTs), metallic single wall nanotubes (m-SWNTs), and multiwall nanotubes (MWNTs) were exposed to O2 and H2O vapor in the dark and under UV irradiation. Changes in the film conductivity and mass were measured in situ. We find that UV irradiation increases the resistive response of CNT films to O2 and H2O by more than an order of magnitude. In m-SWNT and MWNT films, UV irradiation changes the sign of the resistive response to O2 and H2O by generating free charge carriers. S-SWNTs show the largest UV-induced resistive response and exhibit weakening of van der Waals interactions with the QCM crystal when exposed to gas/vapor.

  19. Strong and Broadly Tunable Plasmon Resonances in Thick Films of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Kuan-Chang; Falk, Abram L; Ho, Po-Hsun; Farmer, Damon B; Tulevski, George; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Avouris, Phaedon; Han, Shu-Jen

    2017-09-13

    Low-dimensional plasmonic materials can function as high quality terahertz and infrared antennas at deep subwavelength scales. Despite these antennas' strong coupling to electromagnetic fields, there is a pressing need to further strengthen their absorption. We address this problem by fabricating thick films of aligned, uniformly sized semiconducting carbon nanotubes and showing that their plasmon resonances are strong, narrow, and broadly tunable. With thicknesses ranging from 25 to 250 nm, our films exhibit peak attenuation reaching 70%, ensemble quality factors reaching 9, and electrostatically tunable peak frequencies by a factor of 2.3. Excellent nanotube alignment leads to the attenuation being 99% linearly polarized along the nanotube axis. Increasing the film thickness blueshifts the plasmon resonators down to peak wavelengths as low as 1.4 μm, a new near-infrared regime in which they can both overlap the S11 nanotube exciton energy and access the technologically important infrared telecom band.

  20. High-speed logic integrated circuits with solution-processed self-assembled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Shu-Jen; Tang, Jianshi; Kumar, Bharat; Falk, Abram; Farmer, Damon; Tulevski, George; Jenkins, Keith; Afzali, Ali; Oida, Satoshi; Ott, John; Hannon, James; Haensch, Wilfried

    2017-09-01

    As conventional monolithic silicon technology struggles to meet the requirements for the 7-nm technology node, there has been tremendous progress in demonstrating the scalability of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors down to the size that satisfies the 3-nm node and beyond. However, to date, circuits built with carbon nanotubes have overlooked key aspects of a practical logic technology and have stalled at simple functionality demonstrations. Here, we report high-performance complementary carbon nanotube ring oscillators using fully manufacturable processes, with a stage switching frequency of 2.82 GHz. The circuit was built on solution-processed, self-assembled carbon nanotube arrays with over 99.9% semiconducting purity, and the complementary feature was achieved by employing two different work function electrodes.

  1. Selective breakdown of metallic pathways in double-walled carbon nanotube networks.

    PubMed

    Ng, Allen L; Sun, Yong; Powell, Lyndsey; Sun, Chuan-Fu; Chen, Chien-Fu; Lee, Cheng S; Wang, YuHuang

    2015-01-07

    Covalently functionalized, semiconducting double-walled carbon nanotubes exhibit remarkable properties and can outperform their single-walled carbon nanotube counterparts. In order to harness their potential for electronic applications, metallic double-walled carbon nanotubes must be separated from the semiconductors. However, the inner wall is inaccessible to current separation techniques which rely on the surface properties. Here, the first approach to address this challenge through electrical breakdown of metallic double-walled carbon nanotubes, both inner and outer walls, within networks of mixed electronic types is described. The intact semiconductors demonstrate a ∼62% retention of the ON-state conductance in thin film transistors in response to covalent functionalization. The selective elimination of the metallic pathways improves the ON/OFF ratio, by more than 360 times, to as high as 40 700, while simultaneously retaining high ON-state conductance.

  2. Nanotube News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Smaller, faster computers, bullet-proof t-shirts, and itty-bitty robots--such are the promises of nanotechnology and the cylinder-shaped collection of carbon molecules known as nanotubes. But for these exciting ideas to become realities, scientists must understand how these miracle molecules perform under all sorts of conditions. This brief…

  3. Nanotube News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Smaller, faster computers, bullet-proof t-shirts, and itty-bitty robots--such are the promises of nanotechnology and the cylinder-shaped collection of carbon molecules known as nanotubes. But for these exciting ideas to become realities, scientists must understand how these miracle molecules perform under all sorts of conditions. This brief…

  4. Semiconducting phase in borophene: role of defect and strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Gargee; Mahata, Arup; Choudhuri, Indrani; Pathak, Biswarup

    2017-10-01

    Boron is an interesting element due to its chemical and structural complexity. Recent synthesis of borophene led scientists to study boron monolayer-based materials for various applications. Using density functional theory calculations, nineteen different phases of boron monolayer (with hexagonal hole densities from 1/32–8/32) are studied to understand their origin of buckling, stability, and planarity. Projected densities of states of various phases of borophene-based systems with defect are plotted into in-plane (s  +  p x   +  p y ) and out-of-plane (p z ) orbitals to understand the role of the σ and π-bands towards their geometry and stability. Interestingly, the λ 5-sheet shows semiconducting properties under uniaxial/biaxial tensile/compressive strains and it shows excellent dynamical, thermal, and mechanical properties and is thus a promising semiconducting phase for electronic devices.

  5. Optically transparent semiconducting polymer nanonetwork for flexible and transparent electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kilho; Park, Byoungwook; Kim, Geunjin; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Park, Sungjun; Kim, Jehan; Jung, Suhyun; Jeong, Soyeong; Kwon, Sooncheol; Kang, Hongkyu; Kim, Junghwan; Yoon, Myung-Han; Lee, Kwanghee

    2016-12-01

    Simultaneously achieving high optical transparency and excellent charge mobility in semiconducting polymers has presented a challenge for the application of these materials in future “flexible” and “transparent” electronics (FTEs). Here, by blending only a small amount (˜15 wt %) of a diketopyrrolopyrrole-based semiconducting polymer (DPP2T) into an inert polystyrene (PS) matrix, we introduce a polymer blend system that demonstrates both high field-effect transistor (FET) mobility and excellent optical transparency that approaches 100%. We discover that in a PS matrix, DPP2T forms a web-like, continuously connected nanonetwork that spreads throughout the thin film and provides highly efficient 2D charge pathways through extended intrachain conjugation. The remarkable physical properties achieved using our approach enable us to develop prototype high-performance FTE devices, including colorless all-polymer FET arrays and fully transparent FET-integrated polymer light-emitting diodes.

  6. Transport properties in semiconducting NbS{sub 2} nanoflakes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y. H.; Chen, R. S. Ho, C. H.; Peng, C. C.; Huang, Y. S.

    2014-09-01

    The electronic transport properties in individual niobium disulphide (NbS{sub 2}) nanoflakes mechanically exfoliated from the bulk crystal with three rhombohedral (3R) structure grown by chemical vapor transport were investigated. It is found that the conductivity values of the single-crystalline nanoflakes are approximately two orders of magnitude lower than that of their bulk counterparts. Temperature-dependent conductivity measurements show that the 3R-NbS{sub 2} nanoflakes exhibit semiconducting transport behavior, which is also different from the metallic character in the bulk crystals. In addition, the noncontinuous conductivity variations were observed at the temperature below 180 K for both the nanoflakes and the bulks, which is attributed to the probable charge density wave transition. The photoconductivities in the semiconducting nanoflakes were also observed under the excitation at 532 nm wavelength. The probable mechanisms resulting in the different transport behaviors between the NbS{sub 2} nanostructure and bulk were discussed.

  7. An alternative approach to charge transport in semiconducting electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomchick, J.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    The excess-carrier charge transport through the space-charge region of a semiconducting electrode is analyzed by a technique known as the flux method. In this approach reflection and transmission coefficients appropriate for a sheet of uniform semiconducting material describe its transport properties. A review is presented of the flux method showing that the results for a semiconductor electrode reduce in a limiting case to those previously found by Gaertner if the depletion layer is treated as a perfectly transmitting medium in which scattering and recombination are ignored. Then, in the framework of the flux method the depletion layer is considered more realistically by explicitly taking into account scattering and recombination processes which occur in this region.

  8. Optically transparent semiconducting polymer nanonetwork for flexible and transparent electronics

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kilho; Park, Byoungwook; Kim, Geunjin; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Park, Sungjun; Kim, Jehan; Jung, Suhyun; Jeong, Soyeong; Kwon, Sooncheol; Kang, Hongkyu; Kim, Junghwan; Yoon, Myung-Han; Lee, Kwanghee

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneously achieving high optical transparency and excellent charge mobility in semiconducting polymers has presented a challenge for the application of these materials in future “flexible” and “transparent” electronics (FTEs). Here, by blending only a small amount (∼15 wt %) of a diketopyrrolopyrrole-based semiconducting polymer (DPP2T) into an inert polystyrene (PS) matrix, we introduce a polymer blend system that demonstrates both high field-effect transistor (FET) mobility and excellent optical transparency that approaches 100%. We discover that in a PS matrix, DPP2T forms a web-like, continuously connected nanonetwork that spreads throughout the thin film and provides highly efficient 2D charge pathways through extended intrachain conjugation. The remarkable physical properties achieved using our approach enable us to develop prototype high-performance FTE devices, including colorless all-polymer FET arrays and fully transparent FET-integrated polymer light-emitting diodes. PMID:27911774

  9. Ab-initio study of structural, mechanical and electronic properties of functionalized carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Milowska, Karolina Z.; Birowska, Magdalena; Majewski, Jacek A.

    2013-12-04

    We present exemplary results of extensive studies of structural, mechanical and electronic properties of covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We report new results for metallic (9,0), and semiconducting (10,0) single-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT) functionalized with -COOH, -OH, and both groups with concentration up to 12.5%. Our studies are performed in the framework of the density functional theory (DFT). We discuss here the stability, local and global changes in structure, elastic moduli (Young's, Shear, and Bulk), electronic structure and resulting band gaps, as a function of the density of the adsorbed molecules.

  10. Doping induced structural stability and electronic properties of GaN nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anurag; Khan, Mohammad Irfan; Tyagi, Neha; Swaroop Khare, Purnima

    2014-01-01

    The present paper discusses the effect of manganese doping on the structural stability and electronic band gap of chiral (2, 1), armchair (3, 3), and zigzag ((6, 0) and (10, 0)) single walled GaN nanotube by using density functional theory based Atomistix Toolkit (ATK) Virtual NanoLab (VNL). The structural stability has been analyzed in terms of minimum ground state total energy, binding, and formation energy. As an effect of Mn doping (1-4 atoms), all the GaN nanotubes taken into consideration show semiconducting to metallic transition first and after certain level of Mn doping changes its trend.

  11. Doping Induced Structural Stability and Electronic Properties of GaN Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohammad Irfan; Tyagi, Neha; Swaroop Khare, Purnima

    2014-01-01

    The present paper discusses the effect of manganese doping on the structural stability and electronic band gap of chiral (2, 1), armchair (3, 3), and zigzag ((6, 0) and (10, 0)) single walled GaN nanotube by using density functional theory based Atomistix Toolkit (ATK) Virtual NanoLab (VNL). The structural stability has been analyzed in terms of minimum ground state total energy, binding, and formation energy. As an effect of Mn doping (1–4 atoms), all the GaN nanotubes taken into consideration show semiconducting to metallic transition first and after certain level of Mn doping changes its trend. PMID:24707225

  12. Structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced epoxy resins.

    PubMed

    Suggs, Kelvin; Wang, Xiao-Qian

    2010-03-01

    Nanocomposites of cured epoxy resin reinforced by single-walled carbon nanotubes exhibit a plethora of interesting behaviors at the molecular level. We have employed a combination of force-field-based molecular mechanics and first-principles calculations to study the corresponding binding and charge-transfer behavior. The simulation study of various nanotube species and curing agent configurations provides insight into the optimal structures in lieu of interfacial stability. An analysis of charge distributions of the epoxy functionalized semiconducting and metallic tubes reveals distinct level hybridizations. The implications of these results for understanding dispersion mechanism and future nano reinforced composite developments are discussed.

  13. Enzyme-Mediated Assimilation of DNA-Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    have a Young’s modulus approximately 5 times that of hardened steel.4 Contingent on chirality , SWNTs can be either metallic or semiconducting in nature...and purified on the basis of size and chirality by ion exchange chromatography or gradient centrifugation.9-13 Creating pure soluble SWNTs is the...a novel method for assembling DNA- functionalized SWNTs by phosphodiester bonding catalyzed by ssDNA-ligase to formmacroscopic carbon nanotube

  14. Ultrafast nonlinear photoresponse of single-wall carbon nanotubes: a broadband degenerate investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuo; Wang, Fengqiu; Zhu, Chunhui; Meng, Yafei; Liu, Yujie; Liu, Wenqing; Tang, Jingyi; Liu, Kaihui; Hu, Guohua; Howe, Richard C. T.; Hasan, Tawfique; Zhang, Rong; Shi, Yi; Xu, Yongbing

    2016-04-01

    Understanding of the fundamental photoresponse of carbon nanotubes has broad implications for various photonic and optoelectronic devices. Here, Z-scan and pump-probe spectroscopy performed across 600-2400 nm were combined to give a broadband `degenerate' mapping of the nonlinear absorption properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). In contrast to the views obtained from non-degenerate techniques, sizable saturable absorption is observed from the visible to the near-infrared range, including the spectral regions between semiconducting excitonic peaks and metallic tube transitions. In addition, the broadband mapping unambiguously reveals a photobleaching to photoinduced absorption transition feature within the first semiconducting excitonic band ~2100 nm, quantitatively marking the long-wavelength cut-off for saturable absorption of the SWNTs investigated. Our findings present a much clearer physical picture of SWNTs' nonlinear absorption characteristics, and help provide updated design guidelines for SWNT based nonlinear optical devices.Understanding of the fundamental photoresponse of carbon nanotubes has broad implications for various photonic and optoelectronic devices. Here, Z-scan and pump-probe spectroscopy performed across 600-2400 nm were combined to give a broadband `degenerate' mapping of the nonlinear absorption properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). In contrast to the views obtained from non-degenerate techniques, sizable saturable absorption is observed from the visible to the near-infrared range, including the spectral regions between semiconducting excitonic peaks and metallic tube transitions. In addition, the broadband mapping unambiguously reveals a photobleaching to photoinduced absorption transition feature within the first semiconducting excitonic band ~2100 nm, quantitatively marking the long-wavelength cut-off for saturable absorption of the SWNTs investigated. Our findings present a much clearer physical picture of

  15. Preparation of mechanically aligned carbon nanotube films and their anisotropic transport phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Dong Jae; Kim, Keun Soo; Park, Young Soo; An, Kay Hyeok; Moon, Jeong-Mi; Lim, Seong Chu; Lee, Young Hee

    2001-10-01

    Thin films of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared by a simple mechanical rubbing from single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) slurry, which was synthesized by the catalytic arc discharge. The measured electrical resistivity shows high anisotropy ρN/ρP ranging from 5 to 15. The annealed samples show a monotonic decrease in the resistivity with increasing temperature. CNTs in the mat act as strong Luttinger liquids with g values ranging from 0.18 to 0.26, similar to an isolated nanotube. We propose that the transport is dominantly governed by the formation of metal-metal crossed junctions of nanotubes in the mat.

  16. Simulation of carbon nanotube welding through Ar bombardment.

    PubMed

    Kucukkal, Mustafa U; Stuart, Steven J

    2017-04-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes show promise as nanoscale transistors for nanocomputing applications. This use will require appropriate methods for creating electrical connections between distinct nanotubes, analogous to welding of metallic wires at larger length scales, but methods for performing nanoscale chemical welding are not yet sufficiently understood. This study examines the effect of Ar bombardment on the junction of two crossed single-walled carbon nanotubes, to understand the value and limitations of this method for generating connections between nanotubes. A geometric criterion was used to assess the quality of the junctions formed, with the goal of identifying the most productive conditions for experimental ion bombardment. In particular, the effects of nanotube chirality, Ar impact kinetic energy, impact particle flux and fluence, and annealing temperature were considered. The most productive bombardment conditions, leading to the most crosslinking of the tubes with the smallest loss of graphitic (i.e., conductive) character, were found to be at relatively mild impact energies (100 eV), with low flux and high-temperature (3000 K) annealing. Particularly noteworthy for experimental application, a high junction quality is maintained for a relatively broad range of fluences, from 3 × 10(19) m(-2) to at least 1 × 10(20) m(-2).

  17. Thiofluorographene-hydrophilic graphene derivative with semiconducting and genosensing properties.

    PubMed

    Urbanová, Veronika; Holá, Kateřina; Bourlinos, Athanasios B; Čépe, Klára; Ambrosi, Adriano; Loo, Adeline Huiling; Pumera, Martin; Karlický, František; Otyepka, Michal; Zbořil, Radek

    2015-04-08

    We present the first example of covalent chemistry on fluorographene, enabling the attachment of -SH groups through nucleophilic substitution of fluorine in a polar solvent. The resulting thiographene-like, 2D derivative is hydrophilic with semiconducting properties and bandgap between 1 and 2 eV depending on F/SH ratio. Thiofluorographene is applied in DNA biosensing by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Optical modulation of single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strano, Michael S.

    2007-03-01

    Recent advances in the spectroscopy of single walled carbon nanotubes have significantly enhanced our ability to understand and control their surface chemistry, both covalently and non-covalently. Our work has focused on modulating the optical properties of semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes as near infrared photoluminescent sensors for chemical analysis. Molecular detection using near-infrared light between 0.9 and 1.3 eV has important biomedical applications because of greater tissue penetration and reduced auto-fluorescent background in thick tissue or whole-blood media. In one system, the transition of DNA secondary structure modulates the dielectric environment of the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) around which it is adsorbed. The SWNT band-gap fluorescence undergoes a red shift when an encapsulating 30-nucleotide oligomer is exposed to counter ions that screen the charged backbone. We demonstrate the detection of the mercuric ions in whole blood, tissue, and from within living mammalian cells using this technology. Similar results are obtained for DNA hybridization and the detection of single nucleotide polymorphism. We also report the synthesis and successful testing of near-infrared β-D-glucose sensors2 that utilize a different mechanism: a photoluminescence modulation via charge transfer. The results demonstrate new opportunities for nanoparticle optical sensors that operate in strongly absorbing media of relevance to medicine or biology.

  19. Graphene nanoribbons production from flat carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Melo, W. S.; Guerini, S.; Diniz, E. M.

    2015-11-14

    Graphene nanoribbons are of great interest for pure and applied sciences due to their unique properties which depend on the nanoribbon edges, as, for example, energy gap and antiferromagnetic coupling. Nevertheless, the synthesis of nanoribbons with well-defined edges remains a challenge. To collaborate with this subject, here we propose a new route for the production of graphene nanoribbons from flat carbon nanotubes filled with a one-dimensional chain of Fe atoms by first principles calculations based on density functional theory. Our results show that Fe-filled flat carbon nanotubes are energetically more stable than non flattened geometries. Also we find that by hydrogenation or oxygenation of the most curved region of the Fe-filled flat armchair carbon nanotube, it occurred a spontaneous production of zigzag graphene nanoribbons which have metallic or semiconducting behavior depending on the edge and size of the graphene nanoribbon. Such findings can be used to create a new method of synthesis of regular-edge carbon nanoribbons.

  20. Indian Ocean Triple Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Tapscott, C.R.; Patriat, P.; Fisher, R.L.; Sclater, J.G.; Hoskins, H.; Parsons, B.

    1980-09-10

    The boundaries of three major plates (Africa, India, and Antarctica) meet in a triple junction in the Indian Ocean near 25 /sup 0/S, 70 /sup 0/E. Using observed bathymetry and magnetic anomalies, we locate the junction to within 5 km and show that it is a ridge-ridge-ridge type. Relative plate motion is N60 /sup 0/E at 50 mm/yr (full rate) across the Central Indian Ridge, N47 /sup 0/E at 60 mm/yr across the Southeast Indian Ridge, and N3 /sup 0/W at 15 mm/yr across te Southwest Indian Ridge; the observed velocity triangle is closed. Poles of instantaneous relative plate motion are determined for all plate pairs. The data in the South Atlantic and Indian oceans are consistent with a rigid African plate without significant internal deformation. Two of the ridges at the triple junction are normal midocean spreading centers with well-defined median valleys. The Southwest Indian Ridge, however, has a peculiar morphology near the triple junction, that of an elongate triangular deep, with the triple junction at its apex. The floor of the deep represents crust formed at the Southwest Indian Ridge, and the morphology is a consequence of the evolution of the triple junction and is similar to that at the Galapagos Triple Junction. Though one cannot determine with precision the stability conditions at the triple junction, the development of the junction over the last 10 m.y. can be mapped, and the topographic expressions of the triple junction traces may be detected on the three plates.