Science.gov

Sample records for senior faculty research

  1. Citation Ranking versus Peer Evaluation of Senior Faculty Research Performance: A Case Study of Kurdish Scholarship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meho, Lokman I.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2000-01-01

    Analyzes the relationship between citation ranking and peer evaluation in assessing senior faculty research performance. Describes a study of faculty specializing in Kurdish studies that investigated to what degree citation ranking correlates with data from citation content analysis, book reviews, and peer ranking. (Contains 72 references.)…

  2. Increasing Leadership Capacity for Senior Women Faculty through Mutual Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    List, Karen; Sorcinelli, Mary Deane

    2018-01-01

    Mentoring has long been viewed as a powerful means of enhancing the professional success and personal wellbeing of early-career faculty; however, little is known about its benefits for senior faculty. Using data from a peer mentoring community of six senior faculty women in leadership roles at a research university, this study explores the impact…

  3. Senior Law Faculty Attitudes toward Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, David S.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This article examines the retirement plans and personal characteristics of 273 senior law school faculty, focusing on health status, income, job satisfaction, and preferred age of retirement. The study suggests that early retirement incentives and a "senior faculty" alternative to full retirement are positive institutional options. (DB)

  4. Senior Faculty Careers and Personal Development: A Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armour, Robert; And Others

    A total of 1,135 senior faculty from 6 institutions of higher education responded to a questionnaire designed to determine the relationships between personal and career development for senior college faculty and the similarities and differences in satisfaction among faculty from various disciplines. Responses from the questionnaire showed that…

  5. Research Support for Science Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blandford, Barbara; Dutton, Diane

    This survey of the Higher Education Panel of the American Council on Education, conducted during September and October 1971, concerned the split of research funds between young and senior faculty at institutions granting Ph.D.'s in science and engineering. Each institution was asked, first, to indicate which departments, in a list of 17 selected…

  6. Some Characteristics of the First Senior Students of the Anadolu University Open Education Faculty in 1985-86 Educational Year. (Turkish Case.) Educational Research Publications No. 010.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demiray, Ugur

    A survey of the 9,949 senior students in the business administration and economics programs of the Open Education Faculty (distance education) was conducted during the 1985-86 school year to obtain information on their social and socioeconomic characteristics. Usable responses were received from 8,382 students. The questionnaire sought information…

  7. Senior Thesis Research at Princeton.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prud'homme, Robert K.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews a senior undergraduate research program in chemical engineering at Princeton University. Includes strengths and requirements for a successful program. Senior thesis research provides creative problem solving experiences for students and is congruent with departmental research objectives. Selected student comments are included. (SK)

  8. The Vitality of Senior Faculty Members. Snow on the Roof-Fire in the Furnace. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report, Vol. 25, No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bland, Carole J.; Bergquist, William H.

    This report examines issues concerned with the vitality and productivity of senior faculty at institutions of higher education. The first section reviews shifting faculty demographics and is followed by a case study of the career of one professor. Next, research on the productivity of senior faculty in teaching, research, and service is reviewed.…

  9. The research impact of school psychology faculty.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Marley W; Chan-Park, Christina Y

    2015-06-01

    Hirsch's (2005) h index has become one of the most popular indicators of research productivity for higher education faculty. However, the h index varies across academic disciplines so empirically established norms for each discipline are necessary. To that end, the current study collected h index values from Scopus and Google Scholar databases for 401 tenure-track faculty members from 109 school psychology training programs. Male faculty tended to be more senior than female faculty and a greater proportion of the male faculty held professorial rank. However, female faculty members outnumbered males at the assistant and associate professor ranks. Although strongly correlated (rho=.84), h index values from Google Scholar were higher than those from Scopus. h index distributions were positively skewed with many faculty having low values and a few faculty having high values. Faculty in doctoral training programs exhibited significantly larger h index values than faculty in specialist training programs and there were univariate differences in h index values across academic rank and sex, but sex differences were not significant after taking seniority into account. It was recommended that the h index be integrated with peer review and diverse other indicators when considering individual merit. Copyright © 2015 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Expanding the Discussion of Faculty Vitality to Include Productive but Disengaged Senior Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huston, Therese A.; Norman, Marie; Ambrose, Susan A.

    2007-01-01

    In this essay, the authors begin by examining and challenging the way in which faculty vitality has been operationalized in the past, arguing for the value of institution-specific analysis of the faculty vitality issue. They then propose alternative models for understanding previously unexplored aspects of faculty vitality, drawing on research in…

  11. Senior Leaders and Teaching Environments: Faculty Perceptions of Administrators' Support of Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Eddie R.; Dumford, Amber D.; Nelson Laird, Thomas F.

    2018-01-01

    We used data from the 2012 administration of the Faculty Survey of Student Engagement to measure faculty perceptions of senior leaders' (e.g., deans, provosts, presidents) support for innovation in teaching. Specifically, this study explored what faculty characteristics predict faculty perceptions of leaders' support for innovation in teaching and…

  12. Asset-Based or Burden-Based Views of Senior and Retired Faculty: How Values Translate into Culture and Shape Practice and Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna

    2018-01-01

    This chapter reviews discourses about "senior" and retired faculty. These discourses suggest a deficit or burden-based view that shapes the values and practices of faculty and department chairs. Yet retired faculty can be valuable resources and help with teaching, service, and research. A process for changing departmental views to create…

  13. Promoting Interdisciplinary Research among Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Elena; Zhao, Weinan; Reiser, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    With the growing recognition of the importance of interdisciplinary research, many faculty have increased their efforts to form interdisciplinary research teams. Oftentimes, attempts to put together such teams are hampered because faculty have a limited picture of the research interests and expertise of their colleagues. This paper reports on…

  14. Faculty Research and Publication Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoellner, Kate; Hines, Samantha; Keenan, Teressa; Samson, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Understanding faculty work practices can translate into improved library services. This study documents how education and behavioral science faculty locate, retrieve, and use information resources for research and writing and how they publish and store their research materials. The authors interviewed twelve professors using a structured interview…

  15. A Comparative Study of Compensation of Faculty and Senior Administrative Personnel in Ontario Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayman, Brian; And Others

    A study was undertaken to compare the compensation (salary, benefits and perquisites) of faculty and senior administrative personnel in Ontario universities with that of professionals in the private and public sectors. For senior, non-academic administrative personnel, the major findings were that: compensation practice across the 13 universities…

  16. Two Sides of the Same Coin: Senior Faculty: Staying on or Opting Out?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuett, Faye

    1999-01-01

    Discusses an initiative to revitalize senior faculty through an interview with Dr. Bernice Braid, Dean of Academic and Instructional Resources at Long Island University (New York). Also presents the inducements for early retirement in the second half of this article via an interview with Dr. Leonard T. Kreisman, Senior Professor of Economics,…

  17. Advancing a Program of Research within a Nursing Faculty Role

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Marie T.; Wenzel, Jennifer; Han, Hae-Ra.; Allen, Jerilyn K.; Paez, Kathryn A.; Mock, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    Doctoral students and new faculty members often seek advice from more senior faculty on how to advance their program of research. Students may ask whether they should choose the manuscript option for their dissertation or whether they should seek a postdoctoral fellowship. New faculty members wonder whether they should pursue a career development (K) award and whether they need a mentor as they strive to advance their research while carrying out teaching, service, and practice responsibilities. In this paper, we describe literature on the impact of selected aspects of pre and postdoctoral training and faculty strategies on scholarly productivity in the faculty role. We also combine our experiences at a school of nursing within a research-intensive university to suggest strategies for success. Noting the scarcity of research that evaluates the effect of these strategies we are actively engaged in collecting data on their relationship to the scholarly productivity of students and faculty members within our own institution. PMID:19022210

  18. Mentoring students and junior faculty in faculty research: a win-win scenario.

    PubMed

    Morrison-Beedy, D; Aronowitz, T; Dyne, J; Mkandawire, L

    2001-01-01

    The concept of mentoring in nursing has focused primarily on moving novice nurses to a more advanced level of expertise in the clinical setting. With the growing emphasis on expanding evidence-based practice in nursing, however, mentoring within the context of research is becoming increasingly important. This article describes the many reciprocal benefits of research mentoring for students, junior faculty, and senior faculty researchers as well as for colleges of nursing and nursing science. Suggestions for implementing processes that facilitate successful mentoring within a research setting also are offered. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company

  19. Gender Differences in Business Faculty's Research Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yining; Zhao, Qin

    2013-01-01

    The authors use expectancy theory to evaluate gender differences in key factors that motivate faculty to conduct research. Using faculty survey data collected from 320 faculty members at 10 business schools, they found that faculty members, both men and women, who displayed higher motivation were more productive in research. Among them, pretenured…

  20. Barriers to advancement in academic surgery: views of senior residents and early career faculty.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Amalia; Elder, William B; Crandall, Marie; Brasel, Karen; Hauschild, Tricia; Neumayer, Leigh

    2013-11-01

    A significant faculty attrition rate exists in academic surgery. The authors hypothesized that senior residents and early-career faculty members have different perceptions of advancement barriers in academic surgery. A modified version of the Career Barriers Inventory-Revised was administered electronically to surgical residents and early-career surgical faculty members at 8 academic medical centers. Residents identified a lack of mentorship as a career barrier about half as often as faculty members. Residents were twice as likely as faculty members to view childbearing as a career barrier. Many early-career faculty members cite a lack of mentors as a limitation to their career development in academic surgery. Childbearing remains a complex perceived influence for female faculty members in particular. Female faculty members commonly perceive differential treatment and barriers on the basis of their sex. Faculty development programs should address both systemic and sex-specific obstacles if academic surgery is to remain a vibrant field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Senior Projects in Materials Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buxton, Richard

    1999-01-01

    A program in a materials/prototyping lab provided the structure for a year-long research activity. Students could test physical properties of a specific material or explore the use of a material in a new application. (Author/JOW)

  2. False Starts and Breakthroughs: Senior Thesis Research as a Critical Learning Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaus, Margaret; Snyder, Terry

    2018-01-01

    Every senior at Haverford College writes a thesis or its equivalent, conducting independent research with guidance from faculty and librarians. Students critically engage in investigative work in archives, field studies, and labs. In this article, librarians explore the way anthropology and history thesis writers do research to define paths toward…

  3. The Impact of Centers and Institutes on Faculty Life: Findings from a Study of Life Sciences Faculty at Research-Intensive Universities' Medical Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunton, Sarah A.; Mallon, William T.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on the impact of organized research centers on professional effort, productivity, and perceptions of work satisfaction for life sciences faculty members at research intensive universities' medical schools in the U.S. Results indicate that senior center-affiliated faculty members taught less but worked more total hours than…

  4. Senior Faculty Considering Retirement: A Developmental and Policy Issue. New Pathways: Faculty Career and Employment for the 21st Century Working Paper Series Inquiry #11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferren, Ann S.

    This paper, one in a series about the priorities of the professoriate, examines the retirement decision-making of senior faculty, along with some of the key questions faced by administrators in light of the elimination of mandatory retirement. The first part of the paper reviews some general institutional issues, such as faculty turnover, faculty…

  5. Emerging from the Academic Pipeline: Senior Women Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamrick, Florence A.

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-six women with professor rank at a large, public, research extensive university were interviewed for this study in which respondents discussed the meanings and significance associated with full professorship. Major themes included: the promotion event and the accompanying title of professor, anticipated and actual changes in their status…

  6. Multidisciplinary Mentoring Programs to Enhance Junior Faculty Research Grant Success.

    PubMed

    Freel, Stephanie A; Smith, Paige C; Burns, Ebony N; Downer, Joanna B; Brown, Ann J; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2017-10-01

    Junior faculty face challenges in establishing independent research careers. Declining funding combined with a shift to multidisciplinary, collaborative science necessitates new mentorship models and enhanced institutional support. Two multidisciplinary mentorship programs to promote grant success for junior faculty were established at the Duke University School of Medicine beginning in 2011. These four-month programs-the Path to Independence Program (PtIP) for National Institutes of Health (NIH) R applicants and the K Club for NIH K applicants-use multiple senior faculty mentors and professional grant-writing staff to provide a 20-hour joint curriculum comprising a series of lectures, hands-on workshops, career development counseling, peer groups, and an internal study section. In March 2016, the authors analyzed the success rate for all NIH grants submitted by participants since program enrollment. In a 2015 postprogram survey, participants rated their feelings of support and competency across six skill factors. From October 2011 to March 2016, the programs engaged 265 senior faculty mentors, 145 PtIP participants, and 138 K Club participants. Success rates for NIH grant applications were 28% (61 awards/220 decisions) for PtIP participants-an increase over the 2010 Duke University junior faculty baseline of 11%-and 64% (38/59) for K Club participants. Respondents reported significantly increased feelings of support and self-ratings for each competency post program. The authors plan to expand the breadth of both the mentorship pool and faculty served. Broad implementation of similar programs elsewhere could bolster success, satisfaction, and retention of junior faculty investigators.

  7. Social Work Faculty and Undergraduate Research Mentorships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Pilar S.; Hughes, Anne K.; Vélez Ortiz, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Social work faculty scholars lead the field as generators of knowledge that integrates investigative studies with practical social welfare outcomes. As such, the faculty potentially offers undergraduate researchers a different way of envisioning research that extends beyond traditional undergraduate research models. To date, however, no research…

  8. Senior Computational Scientist | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Basic Science Program (BSP) pursues independent, multidisciplinary research in basic and applied molecular biology, immunology, retrovirology, cancer biology, and human genetics. Research efforts and support are an integral part of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR). The Cancer & Inflammation Program (CIP), Basic Science Program, HLA Immunogenetics Section, under the leadership of Dr. Mary Carrington, studies the influence of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) and specific KIR/HLA genotypes on risk of and outcomes to infection, cancer, autoimmune disease, and maternal-fetal disease. Recent studies have focused on the impact of HLA gene expression in disease, the molecular mechanism regulating expression levels, and the functional basis for the effect of differential expression on disease outcome. The lab’s further focus is on the genetic basis for resistance/susceptibility to disease conferred by immunogenetic variation. KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES The Senior Computational Scientist will provide research support to the CIP-BSP-HLA Immunogenetics Section performing bio-statistical design, analysis and reporting of research projects conducted in the lab. This individual will be involved in the implementation of statistical models and data preparation. Successful candidate should have 5 or more years of competent, innovative biostatistics/bioinformatics research experience, beyond doctoral training Considerable experience with statistical software, such as SAS, R and S-Plus Sound knowledge, and demonstrated experience of theoretical and applied statistics Write program code to analyze data using statistical analysis software Contribute to the interpretation and publication of research results

  9. Faculty Rights to Scholarly Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinman, Molly

    2017-01-01

    This chapter provides a history of the scholarly publishing system, and explains how it has evolved to benefit corporate publishers to the detriment of faculty, universities, and the public. It offers the open access movement as a potential remedy for the publishing crisis, and the policy environment surrounding these new forms of communication.

  10. Faculty Rank System, Research Motivation, and Faculty Research Productivity: Measure Refinement and Theory Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tien, Flora F.; Blackburn, Robert T.

    1996-01-01

    A study explored the relationship between the traditional system of college faculty rank and faculty research productivity from the perspectives of behavioral reinforcement theory and selection function. Six hypotheses were generated and tested, using data from a 1989 national faculty survey. Results failed to support completely either the…

  11. To What Degree Does the Promotion System Reward Faculty Research Productivity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tien, Flora F.

    2007-01-01

    This study explores the research question: Does the promotion system in Taiwan reward faculty research productivity? By conducting event history analyses, I have demonstrated that the simple answer to the question is "yes." After controlling for the effects of demography, education, institutions and seniority, the discrete-time logit…

  12. Research Productivity of Sports Medicine Fellowship Faculty.

    PubMed

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Saltzman, Bryan M; Chalmers, Peter N; Frank, Rachel M; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R

    2016-12-01

    Research productivity is considered an important factor in academic advancement in sports medicine. No study to date has evaluated academic productivity and correlates of academic rank for sports medicine fellowship faculty. To describe the academic productivity of American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) fellowship program faculty and to determine the association between academic productivity, fellowship characteristics, and academic rank. Descriptive epidemiology study. Characteristics of orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs were obtained from the AOSSM and program websites. Metrics of academic productivity (Hirsch index [ h index], I-10 index, publications, citations, and number of publications in several journals) were obtained from Scopus. Statistical analyses were conducted to determine whether academic productivity differs with fellowship attributes and academic rank. A total of 90 AOSSM sports medicine fellowship programs with 610 associated faculty members were identified. Faculty were predominantly male (94%), at academic medical centers (74%), members of AOSSM (71%), and sports medicine-fellowship trained (84%). Faculty had a median of 18 (range, 0-684) publications overall, including a median of 3 (range, 0-161) publications since 2012. All measures of academic productivity were significantly higher among faculty employed at academic medical centers compared with those not employed at academic centers ( P < .05 in all cases). On multivariate ordinal regression analysis, the best correlates of higher academic rank were higher cumulative h index (1.22; P < .001) and longer time in practice since fellowship (1.14; P < .001), which predicted 63.8% of the variance in academic rank. Fellowships with a larger number of fellows had more publications and citations per faculty member, higher faculty cumulative h index, and more publications in the American Journal of Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy per faculty member ( P < .017

  13. A Causal Model of Faculty Research Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, John P.

    A causal model of faculty research productivity was developed through a survey of the literature. Models of organizational behavior, organizational effectiveness, and motivation were synthesized into a causal model of productivity. Two general types of variables were assumed to affect individual research productivity: institutional variables and…

  14. Establishing a Center to Support Faculty Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Laura; Kozleski, Elizabeth; Muth, Rodney; Rhodes, Lynn K.; White, Kim Kennedy

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the establishment in fall 2002 of a School of Education Research Center designed to support faculty in increasing productivity and quality in research. Details are provided about center goals, services, staffing, space, resources, and logistics during the first year of operation. In addition, data are shared about faculty…

  15. Faculty Workload Issues Connected to Undergraduate Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Free, Rhona; Griffith, Suzanne; Spellman, Bill

    2015-01-01

    This chapter delineates the consortial activities of the Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges (COPLAC) to explore models of undergraduate research and to address the impact of undergraduate research on faculty workload. The significant progress made on the member campus of the University of Wisconsin-Superior over the last 10 years is…

  16. Barriers and facilitators to senior centers participating in translational research.

    PubMed

    Felix, Holly C; Adams, Becky; Cornell, Carol E; Fausett, Jennifer K; Krukowski, Rebecca A; Love, ShaRhonda J; Prewitt, T Elaine; West, Delia Smith

    2014-01-01

    Senior centers are ideal locations to deliver evidence-based health promotion programs to the rapidly growing population of older Americans to help them remain healthy and independent in the community. However, little reported research is conducted in partnership with senior centers; thus, not much is known about barriers and facilitators for senior centers serving as research sites. To fill this gap and potentially accelerate research within senior centers to enhance translation of evidence-based interventions into practice, the present study examined barriers and facilitators of senior centers invited to participate in a cluster-randomized controlled trial. Primary barriers to participation related to staffing and perceived inability to recruit older adult participants meeting research criteria. The primary facilitator was a desire to offer programs that were of interest and beneficial to seniors. Senior centers are interested in participating in research that provides benefit to older adults but may need assistance from researchers to overcome participation barriers. © The Author(s) 2012.

  17. The teaching researcher: faculty attitudes towards the teaching and research roles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpay, E.; Verschoor, R.

    2014-07-01

    Results from a survey on faculty attitudes towards the teaching and research roles are presented. Attention is given to: (i) the perceived value of teaching (and teaching achievements) relative to research, (ii) approaches for research and teaching integration, (iii) the satisfaction gained from typical work tasks, and (iv) the importance of various work-life factors. Factors such as academic freedom, an intellectual work environment, flexible work hours, inspirational colleagues, and work diversity are found to be highly valued. Support from peers and colleagues is also seen as a key in learning to manage the different academic roles. A relatively low value is attributed to teaching achievements. Likewise, there is often little utilisation of teaching opportunities to support research work (other than senior-year research projects). Female faculty were found to give marginally a higher importance to teaching recognition and collaborative teaching opportunities. Based on the findings, general recommendations for supporting the teaching researcher are presented.

  18. Faculty research productivity in six Arab countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouchedid, Kamal; Abdelnour, George

    2015-10-01

    This article analyses the research output of a sample of higher education institutions (HEIs) in six Arab countries in order to start quantifying academic research productivity in the wider region of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). A questionnaire classifying HEIs was administered to 310 institutions in Lebanon, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Morocco, Saudi Arabia and Jordan. The study revealed a lack of capacity of HEIs to provide quality data, raising issues concerning institutional excellence and transparency. Those data which were available were analysed using a number of statistical methods. The result is that faculty research output in the Arab world is relatively low, confirming the existing notion of a lagging knowledge sector in the region. While traditional scholarship has focused on institutional factors such as budgetary allocation as one prime determinant of research productivity, this study claims that other factors need to be considered in explaining the low output, with broad implications for policy formulation. Such factors include overall satisfaction levels of academic staff, socialisation of faculty staff members into a research climate, and university mission vis-à-vis academic research. Given the distinct paucity of studies on faculty research productivity in HEIs in the Arab region, this study seeks to bridge this gap in the literature by providing original data derived from six Arab countries. The authors aim to provide a basis for further research into this topic.

  19. Nurse faculty as international research collaborators.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Louise C; Frith, Karen H; Barnby, Elizabeth

    2017-03-01

    Nursing faculty who desire to expand their research portfolios will benefit from collaboration with researchers with complimentary interests from different universities across the world. International collaboration can enhance the productivity of researchers who seek to conduct studies with similar populations in different environments, and who desire a larger impact based on the findings of their studies. International collaborative teams have the potential to make important discoveries that affect the health of populations across the world. Communication is a critical step in defining the roles and professional relationships of researchers involved in international collaboration. Researchers need to be cognizant of rules affecting data security, intellectual property, data ownership, and funding sources in each country. International collaborative research can be exciting and rewarding, especially when participants are culturally aware, respect universities' policies, and are mindful of the ethical and legal principles for the countries in which the research is conducted. This article describes ways to enhance the success of nursing faculty who desire a rich experience with international research collaborators. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Understanding the needs and concerns of senior faculty in academic medicine: building strategies to maintain this critical resource.

    PubMed

    Stearns, Jeffrey; Everard, Kelly M; Gjerde, Craig L; Stearns, Marjorie; Shore, William

    2013-12-01

    The average age of medical school faculty is increasing, with 30% over age 55 in 2007. In 2012, 56% of Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) members were at least 50 years old. The authors sought to identify the transition and faculty development needs of this group of senior faculty. In 2012 the authors electronically surveyed 1,708 U.S. STFM members who were 50 or older, asking about demographics, highest degree, primary employer, career options considered in the previous year, issues of concern, mentoring needs, retirement plans, and likely activities in retirement. The response rate was 45%, with 73% MD/DOs, 62% men, 89% white, and 64% employed by academic institutions. The most frequent issues of concern were balancing personal and work time (67%), maintaining health (66%), and planning for retirement (60%). Nearly a third had considered career advancement, changing employers, or reducing full-time employment. Fifty-one percent were not receiving mentoring of any kind, but 47% reported they would like to have a mentor. Sixty-four percent were planning to retire; in retirement, 75% said they would like to remain active in teaching and 55% in mentoring. Senior faculty in family medicine have significant career concerns and mentoring needs as they approach retirement, and these faculty can be valuable resources after retirement. As the age of faculty continues to rise, medical schools and specialty organizations can develop specific programs to meet the needs of these medical educators and better use this expertise in a time of limited resources.

  1. Senior Computational Scientist | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Basic Science Program (BSP) pursues independent, multidisciplinary research in basic and applied molecular biology, immunology, retrovirology, cancer biology, and human genetics. Research efforts and support are an integral part of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR). The Cancer & Inflammation Program (CIP),

  2. Re-Envisioning the Honors Senior Project: Experience as Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Kevin; Cureton, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    One of the National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) Basic Characteristics of a Fully Developed Honors Program is that it creates opportunities for undergraduate research, opportunities that frequently culminate in a senior thesis or capstone project. This article describes how the University of Texas at Arlington Honors College integrated…

  3. Senior Students' Perceptions of Entering a Research Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brent, Doug

    2017-01-01

    Most of the literature on the assignment traditionally called the "research paper" focusses on first-year students, and often centers on what they don't know or can't do. This article seeks to expand the conversation to one about the skills and knowledge displayed by senior students, and about their perceptions of the universe of…

  4. Preparing the Senior or Graduating Student for Graduate Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Bor Luen; Gan, Yunn Hwen

    2005-01-01

    Senior undergraduates in the honors or graduation year with an intention to further their career in science would soon face the real world of scientific research as a junior scientist. It is important to acquaint these students with and adequately prepare them for the key aspects of a scientist's professional life. These include technical…

  5. Black Faculty at Research Universities: Has Significant Progress Occurred?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modica, Jonathon L.; Mamiseishvili, Ketevan

    2010-01-01

    Changes in the representation, career advancement, and workplace perceptions of Black faculty at research universities in the United States over time, in comparison to White faculty were examined. Based on the analysis of data from the 1993, 1999, and 2004 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF) surveys, we found that although the overall…

  6. Capstone Senior Research Course in Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ishuan; Simonson, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe the structure and assessment of a capstone course in economics. The outcomes are noteworthy for three reasons. First, among cited evidence to date, this is the only undergraduate economics program from a nonselective public university reporting similar achievements in undergraduate research paper publications.…

  7. Annual Faculty Research Report of the Department of Systems Engineering and the Operations Research Center for the Academic Year 2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    execution, a summary of results, a list of presentations and publications and a current status. Additional information is provided on the senior...Cadets learn best when they are challenged and when they are interested. The introduction of current issues facing the military into their...faculty, officers conduct research on relevant projects to remain current in their operational branch or in the Functional Areas 49, 51, 53 and 57. The

  8. Individual Differences in Faculty Research Time Allocations across 13 Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Peter James; Kyvik, Svein

    2013-01-01

    In research universities, research time is often too scarce to satiate the wishes of all faculty and must be allocated according to guidelines and principles. We examine self-reported research hours for full-time faculty at research universities in 13 countries (Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Finland, Germany, Italy, Malaysia,…

  9. Physics Faculty Perceptions of Research-based Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayre, Eleanor

    2016-03-01

    When research-based resources are well aligned with the perceived needs of faculty, faculty members will more readily take them up. We used phenomenographic interviews of ordinary physics faculty and department chairs to identify four families of issues that faculty have around research-based assessments (RBAs). First, many faculty are interested in using RBAs, but need help with the practicalities of administering RBAs: how to find them, which ones there are, and how to administer them. Second, at the same time, many faculty think that RBAs are limited and don't measure many of the things they care about, or aren't applicable in their classes. They want assessments to measure skills, perceptions, and specific concepts. Third, many faculty want to turn to communities of other faculty and experts to help them interpret their assessment results and suggest other ways to do assessment. They want to better understand their assessment results by comparing to others and interacting with faculty from other schools to learn about how they do assessment. Fourth, many faculty consider their courses in the broader contexts of accountability and their departments. They want help with assessment in these broader contexts. We also discuss how faculty members' roles in their departments and institutions influence their perceived wants and needs around assessment. Supported by NSF DUE-1256354, DUE-1256354, DUE-1347821, DUE-1347728.

  10. Research Productivity of Accounting Faculty: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yining; Nixon, Mary R.; Gupta, Ashok; Hoshower, Leon

    2010-01-01

    This study surveyed 367 accounting faculty members from AACSB accredited Colleges of Business to examine (1) their research productivity and (2) the intrinsic and extrinsic motivators to conduct research. Wide differences in research productivity were observed in the faculty associated with doctoral vs. non-doctoral granting programs. There were…

  11. Challenges to research productivity of doctoral program nursing faculty.

    PubMed

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C; Cantrell, Mary Ann; Heverly, Mary Ann; Wise, Nancy J; Jenkinson, Amanda; Nthenge, Serah

    2014-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine, responding to a national health care crisis and related nursing labor force concerns, has called for an increase in the proportion of registered nurses with baccalaureate or higher degrees to 80% and a doubling of the number of nurses with doctorates by 2020. Simultaneously, large numbers of senior faculty are starting to retire, whereas the movement of doctorally prepared nurses into academia is insufficient to replace them. Issues associated with the efforts of nursing programs to increase their capacity to respond to the Institute of Medicine's recommendations, particularly the effect on scholarly productivity among nursing faculty in doctoral programs, are examined in this article. Creative strategies for promoting scholarly productivity among doctoral program faculty are identified. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. How do Perceptions of Autonomy Differ in General Surgery Training Between Faculty, Senior Residents, Hospital Administrators, and the General Public? A Multi-Institutional Study.

    PubMed

    Kempenich, Jason W; Willis, Ross E; Rakosi, Robert; Wiersch, John; Schenarts, Paul Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Identify barriers to resident autonomy in today's educational environment as perceived through 4 selected groups: senior surgical residents, teaching faculty, hospital administration, and the general public. Anonymous surveys were created and distributed to senior residents, faculty, and hospital administrators working within 3 residency programs. The opinions of a convenience sample of the general public were also assessed using a similar survey. Keesler Medical Center, Keesler AFB, MS; the University of Texas Health Science of San Antonio, TX; and the University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE. A total of 169 responses were collected: 32 residents, 50 faculty, 20 administrators, and 67 general public. Faculty and residents agree that when attending staff grant more autonomy, residents' self-confidence and sense of ownership improve. Faculty felt that residents should have less autonomy than residents did (p < 0.001). When asked to reflect on the current level of autonomy at their institution, 47% of residents felt that they had too little autonomy and 38% of faculty agreed. No resident or faculty felt that residents had too much autonomy at their institution. The general public were more welcoming of resident participation than faculty (p = 0.002) and administrators (p = 0.02) predicted they would be. When the general public were asked regarding their opinions about resident participation with complex procedures, they were less welcoming than faculty, administrators, and residents thought (p < 0.001). The general public were less likely to think that resident involvement would improve their quality of care (p < 0.001). Faculty and senior residents both endorse resident autonomy as important for resident development. The general public are more receptive to resident participation than anticipated. However, with increasing procedural complexity and resident independence, they were less inclined to have residents involved. The general public also had more

  13. Place of Residence: Understanding the Impact on Interactions and Relationships with Peers, Faculty, and Diverse Others among Senior Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Tara C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop empirical research leading to the understanding of the effect of place of residence on senior student interactions and relationships and the differences in this effect by race and gender. The framework for this study is based on Astin's Theory of Involvement and Input-Environment-Output Model. The data set…

  14. Burnout and Quality of Life among Healthcare Research Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enders, Felicity; West, Colin P.; Dyrbye, Liselotte; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Satele, Daniel; Sloan, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Burnout is increasingly recognized as a problem in the workplace--30% to 50% of physicians experience burnout, but no assessment of burnout has been done among healthcare research faculty. A cross-sectional survey of burnout, quality of life, and related factors was sent to all doctoral-level faculty in a large department of healthcare research.…

  15. Social Media and Mentoring in Biomedical Research Faculty Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teruya, Stacey Alan; Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine how effective and collegial mentoring in biomedical research faculty development may be implemented and facilitated through social media. Method: The authors reviewed the literature for objectives, concerns, and limitations of career development for junior research faculty. They tabularized these as developmental goals, and…

  16. Integrating Undergraduate Students in Faculty-Driven Motor Behavior Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Leah E.

    2013-01-01

    This article described the faculty-sponsored, faculty-driven approach to undergraduate research (UGR) at Auburn University. This approach is centered around research in the Pediatric Movement and Physical Activity Laboratory, and students can get elective course credit for their participation in UGR. The article also describes how students' roles…

  17. Outreach to Science Faculty and Students through Research Exhibitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Tina; Hebblethwaite, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Penfield Library at the State University of New York at Oswego (SUNY Oswego) has a gallery exhibit space near the front entrance that is used to showcase student-faculty research and art class projects. This article features the library's outreach efforts to science faculty and students through research exhibitions. The library held an exhibition…

  18. The Vanguard Faculty program: research training for complementary and alternative medicine faculty.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Erin N; Elmer, Patricia J; Morris, Cynthia D; Zwickey, Heather

    2010-10-01

    The increasing use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatment is paralleled by a growing demand for an evidence-based approach to CAM practice. In 2007, the Helfgott Research Institute at the National College of Natural Medicine (NCNM), in partnership with Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU), both in Portland, OR, began a National Institutes of Health-funded initiative to increase the quality and quantity of evidence-based medicine (EBM) content in the curricula at NCNM. One key strategy of the Research in Complementary and Alternative Medicine Program (R-CAMP) initiative was to create a faculty development program that included four components: intensive training in EBM; professional skills enhancement; peer and mentored support; and, ultimately, utilization of these skills to incorporate EBM into the curricula. This initiative is centered on a core group of faculty at NCNM, called the Vanguard Faculty, who receives early, intensive training in EBM and works to incorporate this training into classes. Training consists of an intensive, week-long course, monthly group meetings, and periodic individualized meetings. Vanguard Faculty members also receive mentorship and access to resources to pursue individualized faculty development, research or scholarly activities. Early evaluations indicate that this effort has been successful in increasing EBM content in the curricula at NCNM. This article describes the Vanguard Faculty program in an effort to share the successes and challenges of implementing a wide-ranging faculty development and curricular initiative at a complementary and alternative medicine institution.

  19. Faculty Research Productivity: Some Moderators of Associated Stressors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Robert T.; Bently, Richard J.

    1993-01-01

    A study with 894 college faculty investigated the effects of certain stress variables on different kinds of faculty research activity; psychological and organizational variables thought to moderate stress; and the effects of stressors and moderators for gender, institution type, and discipline (humanities, social sciences, natural sciences)…

  20. Developing Faculty as Researchers. ASHE 1985 Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Daniel; Creswell, John

    Domains of faculty research development are considered, with attention to various scholarly activities such as publishing in journals, editing books/monographs, publishing book reviews, and delivering papers at professional meetings. A cognitive map of faculty development is presented that incorporates findings from the literature on the sociology…

  1. Faculty Use of Author Identifiers and Researcher Networking Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tran, Clara Y.; Lyon, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    This cross-sectional survey focused on faculty use and knowledge of author identifiers and researcher networking systems, and professional use of social media, at a large state university. Results from 296 completed faculty surveys representing all disciplines (9.3% response rate) show low levels of awareness and variable resource preferences. The…

  2. Faculty at Work: Focus on Research, Scholarship, and Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Robert T.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A study compared selected personal and environmental motivational variables in college faculty with allocation of work effort to research, scholarship, and service. Faculty were from eight liberal arts and sciences departments in a range of institution types. For all institutional types, self-valuation motivators significantly accounted for the…

  3. Pharmacy Research Online. A Guide for Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkin, Derral; And Others

    This document is a self-paced training packet developed for a pilot project at the University of Houston-University Park to teach pharmacy faculty members to do their own online searching. The training begins with general topics such as the kinds of searches that can be done effectively online, the selection of appropriate databases to search, and…

  4. Art Research Online. A Guide for Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkin, Derral; And Others

    This document is a self-paced training packet developed for a pilot project at the University of Houston-University Park to teach art faculty members to do their own online searching. The training begins with general topics such as the kinds of searches that can be done most effectively online, the selection of appropriate databases to search, and…

  5. Research Reports: 1989 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Gerald R. (Editor); Six, Frank (Editor); Freeman, L. Michael (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    For the twenty-fifth consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The basic objectives of the programs are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. The Faculty Fellows spent ten weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague.

  6. A Comparison of Senior Student Affairs Officer and Student Affairs Preparatory Program Faculty Expectations of Entry-Level Professionals' Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickerson, Amy M.; Hoffman, John L.; Anan, Baramee Peper; Brown, Kelsey F.; Vong, Linda K.; Bresciani, Marilee J.; Monzon, Reynaldo; Oyler, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    This survey research project compared and contrasted faculty and SSAO expectations for discrete new professional competencies. Findings revealed few significant differences. This study further examined differences between expected and perceived levels of new professional competency. Significant gaps emerged for fiscal management, planning,…

  7. Passing the baton: Mentoring for adoption of active-learning pedagogies by research-active junior faculty.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Catherine Leimkuhler; White, Harold B

    2015-01-01

    There are barriers to adoption of research-based teaching methods. Professional development workshops may inform faculty of these methods, but effective adoption often does not follow. In addition, newly-minted research-active faculty are often overwhelmed by the many new responsibilities (grant writing, group management, laboratory setup, teaching) that accompany the position and normally do not have the time to consider novel teaching approaches. This case study documents how over a three-year period, the responsibility for teaching a nontraditional "Introduction to Biochemistry" course in a problem-based learning format was successfully transferred from a senior faculty member nearing retirement (HBW) to a newly-hired research-active assistant professor (CLG). We describe our apprenticeship project involving modeling, scaffolding, fading, and coaching. We suggest that involving faculty in active-learning pedagogy early in their career with mentoring by senior faculty overcomes barriers to adopting these methods. This case describes a specific example from which potentially useful elements can be adopted and adapted wherever biochemistry is taught. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  8. The Organization of the Faculty Development Programs for Research Assistants: The Case of Education Faculties in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabakçi, Isil; Odabasi, H. Ferhan

    2008-01-01

    The faculty development of research assistants who are at the first step of their academic careers are significant for the employment of faculty members of future and realizing the responsibilities of higher education institutions as to contribute to science and technology. However, there is little research on the features of faculty development…

  9. NASA/ASEE Faculty Fellowship Program: 2003 Research Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotnour, Tim (Editor); LopezdeCastillo, Eduardo (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 2003 NASA/ASEE Faculty Fellowship Program at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the nineteenth year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 2003 program was administered by the University of Central Florida (UCF) in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and the Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The KSC program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA Headquarters in 2003. The basic common objectives of the NASA/ASEE Faculty Fellowship Program are: A) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; B) To stimulate an exchange of ideas between teaching participants and employees of NASA; C) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants institutions; D) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. The KSC Faculty Fellows spent ten weeks (May 19 through July 25, 2003) working with NASA scientists and engineers on research of mutual interest to the university faculty member and the NASA colleague. The editors of this document were responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many research areas of current interest to NASA/KSC. A separate document reports on the administrative aspects of the 2003 program. The NASA/ASEE program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the university faculty member. In many cases a faculty member has developed a close working relationship with a particular NASA group that had provided funding beyond the two-year limit.

  10. Resident research associateships. Postdoctoral and senior research awards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Opportunities for research at Marshall Space Flight Center's Materials and Processes Laboratory, Space Sciences Laboratory, and Systems Dynamics Laboratory are described. Information is provided for applicants desiring designation as a research associate and a list of laboratory directors and research advisors is provided.

  11. The ripple effect: advancing faculty research?

    PubMed

    Kenner, Carole; Pressler, Jana L

    2008-01-01

    Many new nursing leaders assuming deanships or assistant or interim deanships have limited education, experience, or background to prepare them for the job. To assist new deans and those aspiring to be deans, the authors of this department, 2 deans, offer survival tips based on their personal experiences and insights. They address common issues, challenges, and opportunities that face academic executive teams, such as negotiating an executive contract, obtaining faculty lines, building effective work teams, managing difficult employees, and creating nimble organizational structure to respond to changing consumer, healthcare delivery, and community needs. The authors welcome counterpoint discussions with readers.

  12. Transforming Roles: Canadian Academic Librarians Embedded in Faculty Research Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedi, Shailoo; Waldie, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Academic librarians have always played an important role in providing research services and research-skills development to faculty in higher education. But that role is evolving to include the academic librarian as a unique and necessary research partner, practitioner, and participant in collaborative, grant-funded research projects. This article…

  13. Expanding Library Support of Faculty Research: Exploring Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jeanne M.; Tucker, Cory

    2013-01-01

    The changing research and information environment requires a reexamination of library support for research. This study considers research-related attitudes and practices to identify elements indicating readiness or resistance to expanding the library's role in research support. A survey of faculty conducted at the University of Nevada Las Vegas…

  14. USAF/SCEEE Summer Faculty Research Program (1979). Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    Summer Faculty Research Program participants. The program designed to stimulate ’Ilk scientific and engineering interaction between university faculty...Prog., Dept. of Industrial Engineering Facility design and location theory University of Oklahoma and routing and distribution systems 202 W. Boyd...Theory & Assistant Professor of Management Adninistration, 1975 University of Akron S.ec aIty: Organization Design Akron, OH 44325 Assigned: AFBRMC

  15. Creating a Pipeline for African American Computing Science Faculty: An Innovative Faculty/Research Mentoring Program Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charleston, LaVar J.; Gilbert, Juan E.; Escobar, Barbara; Jackson, Jerlando F. L.

    2014-01-01

    African Americans represent 1.3% of all computing sciences faculty in PhD-granting departments, underscoring the severe underrepresentation of Black/African American tenure-track faculty in computing (CRA, 2012). The Future Faculty/Research Scientist Mentoring (FFRM) program, funded by the National Science Foundation, was found to be an effective…

  16. Senior Laboratory Animal Technician | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Laboratory Animal Sciences Program (LASP) provides exceptional quality animal care and technical support services for animal research performed at the National Cancer Institute at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research. LASP executes this mission by providing a broad spectrum of state-of-the-art technologies and services that are focused on the design, generation, characterization and application of genetically engineered and biological animal models of human disease, which are aimed at the development of targeted diagnostics and therapies. LASP contributes to advancing human health, developing new treatments, and improving existing treatments for cancer and other diseases while ensuring safe and humane treatment of animals. KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES The Senior Laboratory Animal Technician will be responsible for: Daily tasks associated with the care, breeding and treatment of research animals for experimental purposes Management of rodent breeding colonies consisting of multiple, genetically complex strains and associated record keeping and database management Colony management procedures including: tail clipping, animal identification, weaning Data entry consistent with complex colony management Collection of routine diagnostic samples Coordinating shipment of live animals and specimens Performing rodent experimental procedures including basic necropsy and blood collection Observation and recording of physical signs of animal health Knowledge of safe working practices using chemical carcinogen and biological hazards Work schedule may include weekend and holiday hours This position is in support of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR).

  17. Evaluating Faculty Work: Expectations and Standards of Faculty Performance in Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardre, Patricia; Cox, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Expectations and the way they are communicated can influence employees' motivation and performance. Previous research has demonstrated individual effects of workplace climate and individual differences on faculty productivity. The present study focused on the characteristics of institutional performance standards, evaluation processes and…

  18. Research reports: 1991 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Gerald R. (Editor); Chappell, Charles R. (Editor); Six, Frank (Editor); Freeman, L. Michael (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The basic objectives of the programs, which are in the 28th year of operation nationally, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. The faculty fellows spent 10 weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This is a compilation of their research reports for summer 1991.

  19. Key Strategies for Building Research Capacity of University Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huenneke, Laura F.; Stearns, Diane M.; Martinez, Jesse D.; Laurila, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    Universities are under pressure to increase external research funding, and some federal agencies offer programs to expand research capacity in certain kinds of institutions. However, conflicts within faculty roles and other aspects of university operations influence the effectiveness of particular strategies for increasing research activity. We…

  20. Engaging Undergraduates in Science Research: Not Just about Faculty Willingness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eagan, M. Kevin, Jr.; Sharkness, Jessica; Hurtado, Sylvia; Mosqueda, Cynthia M.; Chang, Mitchell J.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the many benefits of involving undergraduates in research and the growing number of undergraduate research programs, few scholars have investigated the factors that affect faculty members' decisions to involve undergraduates in their research projects. We investigated the individual factors and institutional contexts that predict faculty…

  1. Increasing Nursing Faculty Research: The Iowa Gerontological Nursing Research and Regional Research Consortium Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Meridean L.; Conn, Vicki; Buckwalter, Kathleen C.; Herr, Keela; Tripp-Reimer, Toni

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Research development and regional consortium strategies are described to assist schools in all countries extend their gerontological nursing research productivity. The strategies, collaboration and mentoring experiences, and outcomes are also shared to illustrate a highly successful approach in increasing faculty programs of nursing research in a focused area of inquiry. Design A case description of gerontological nursing research development and regional consortium strategies in schools of nursing is used. The regional consortium included 17 schools of nursing that are working to increase faculty programs of gerontological nursing research. Survey responses describing publications, presentations, and research funding awards from 65 of 114 total faculty participants in consortium opportunities (pilot and mentoring grant participants, participants in summer scholars’ grantsmanship seminars) were collected annually from 1995 through 2008 to describe outcomes. Findings From 1994 through 2008, faculty participants from the consortium schools who responded to the annual surveys reported a total of 597 gerontological nursing publications, 527 presentations at research conferences, funding of 221 small and internal grants, and 130 external grant awards, including 47R-series grants and 4 K awards. Conclusions There is an urgent need for more nurse faculty with programs of research to inform the health care of persons and support the preparation of nurse clinicians and faculty. The shortage of nurse scientists with active programs of gerontological research is especially serious and limits the number of faculty who are needed to prepare future gerontological nurses, particularly those with doctoral degrees who will assume faculty positions. Further, junior faculty with a gerontological nursing research foci often lack the colleagues, mentors, and environments needed to develop successful research careers. The outcomes of the development and regional consortium

  2. Scholarly contributions of required senior research projects in a doctor of pharmacy curriculum.

    PubMed

    Assemi, Mitra; Ibarra, Francisco; Mallios, Ronna; Corelli, Robin L

    2015-03-25

    To determine dissemination outcomes and faculty perceptions of senior research projects conducted from 2008 to 2011 by PharmD students in a curricular pathway focused on direct patient care. Preceptors' reported dissemination outcomes of research projects were surveyed and their perceptions of the precepting experience were rated using a web-based survey. Results were compared to those from an earlier pharmaceutical care cohort (2002-2007) and a combined cohort of 2, more research-intensive curricular pathways at the school. The overall response rate was 90.2%. Project dissemination included 61.3% at an institutional forum, 42.3% as a submitted publication, 37.8% as a poster, and 4.5% as an oral presentation. Projects completed from 2008-2011 were significantly more likely than those from 2002-2007 to be submitted for publication (42.3% vs 10.7%, p<0.001) and published (28.8% vs 5.3%, p<0.001). Most preceptors found their research projects valuable to them professionally (88.3%) and to their own or another institution (83.5% and 78.5%, respectively). Ninety-five percent of preceptors would precept again. Dissemination rates for pharmaceutical care projects increased over time. Despite modest dissemination levels, the majority of preceptors agreed that required student research projects provide a valuable learning experience for students.

  3. Scholarly Contributions of Required Senior Research Projects in a Doctor of Pharmacy Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Ibarra, Francisco; Mallios, Ronna; Corelli, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine dissemination outcomes and faculty perceptions of senior research projects conducted from 2008 to 2011 by PharmD students in a curricular pathway focused on direct patient care. Methods. Preceptors’ reported dissemination outcomes of research projects were surveyed and their perceptions of the precepting experience were rated using a web-based survey. Results were compared to those from an earlier pharmaceutical care cohort (2002-2007) and a combined cohort of 2, more research-intensive curricular pathways at the school. Results. The overall response rate was 90.2%. Project dissemination included 61.3% at an institutional forum, 42.3% as a submitted publication, 37.8% as a poster, and 4.5% as an oral presentation. Projects completed from 2008-2011 were significantly more likely than those from 2002-2007 to be submitted for publication (42.3% vs 10.7%, p<0.001) and published (28.8% vs 5.3%, p<0.001). Most preceptors found their research projects valuable to them professionally (88.3%) and to their own or another institution (83.5% and 78.5%, respectively). Ninety-five percent of preceptors would precept again. Conclusion. Dissemination rates for pharmaceutical care projects increased over time. Despite modest dissemination levels, the majority of preceptors agreed that required student research projects provide a valuable learning experience for students. PMID:25861104

  4. Scholar Quest: A Residency Research Program Aligned with Faculty Goals

    PubMed Central

    Panchal, Ashish R.; Stolz, Uwe; Denninghoff, Kurt R.; Munger, Benson

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The ACGME requires that residents perform scholarly activities prior to graduation, but this is difficult to complete and challenging to support. We describe a residency research program, taking advantage of environmental change aligning resident and faculty goals, to become a contributor to departmental cultural change and research development. Methods: A research program, Scholar Quest (SQ), was developed as a part of an Information Mastery program. The goal of SQ is for residents to gain understanding of scholarly activity through a mentor-directed experience in original research. This curriculum is facilitated by providing residents protected time for didactics, seed grants and statistical/staff support. We evaluated total scholarly activity and resident/faculty involvement before and after implementation (PRE-SQ; 2003–2005 and POST-SQ; 2007–2009). Results: Scholarly activity was greater POST-SQ versus PRE-SQ (123 versus 27) (p<0.05) with an incidence rate ratio (IRR)=2.35. Resident and faculty involvement in scholarly activity also increased PRE-SQ to POST-SQ (22 to 98 residents; 10 to 39 faculty, p<0.05) with an IRR=2.87 and 2.69, respectively. Conclusion: Implementation of a program using department environmental change promoting a resident longitudinal research curriculum yielded increased resident and faculty scholarly involvement, as well as an increase in total scholarly activity. PMID:24868308

  5. 2002 Research Reports: NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotnour, Tim (Editor); Black, Cassandra (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 2002 NASA/ASEE Faculty Fellowship Program at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the 18th year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 2002 program was administered by the University of Central Florida (UCF) in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and the Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA Headquarters in 2002. The KSC Faculty Fellows spent ten weeks working with NASA scientists and engineers on research of mutual interest to the university faculty member and the NASA colleague. The editors of this document were responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many research areas of current interest to NASA/KSC. The NASA/ASEE program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the university faculty member.

  6. Research Reports: 1986 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, L. Michael (Editor); Speer, Fridtjof A. (Editor); Cothran, Ernestine K. (Editor); Karr, Gerald R. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    For the 22th consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted for the summer of 1986 by the University of Alabama and Marshall Space Flight Center. The basic objectives of the program are: (1)to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2)to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3)to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institution; and (4)to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. The Faculty Fellows spent ten weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interest and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research.

  7. Research reports: 1994 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, L. Michael (Editor); Chappell, Charles R. (Editor); Six, Frank (Editor); Karr, Gerald R. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    For the 30th consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The basic objectives of the programs, which are in the 31st year of operation nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. The Faculty Fellows spent 10 weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 1994.

  8. Social Media and Mentoring in Biomedical Research Faculty Development

    PubMed Central

    Teruya, Stacey Alan; Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine how effective and collegial mentoring in biomedical research faculty development may be implemented and facilitated through social media. Method The authors reviewed the literature for objectives, concerns, and limitations of career development for junior research faculty. They tabularized these as developmental goals, and aligned them with relevant social media strengths and capabilities facilitated through traditional and/or peer mentoring. Results The authors derived a model in which social media is leveraged to achieve developmental goals reflected in independent and shared projects, and in the creation and expansion of support and research networks. Conclusions Social media may be successfully leveraged and applied in achieving developmental goals for biomedical research faculty, and potentially for those in other fields and disciplines. PMID:26120494

  9. Social Media and Mentoring in Biomedical Research Faculty Development.

    PubMed

    Teruya, Stacey Alan; Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad

    2014-09-01

    To determine how effective and collegial mentoring in biomedical research faculty development may be implemented and facilitated through social media. The authors reviewed the literature for objectives, concerns, and limitations of career development for junior research faculty. They tabularized these as developmental goals, and aligned them with relevant social media strengths and capabilities facilitated through traditional and/or peer mentoring. The authors derived a model in which social media is leveraged to achieve developmental goals reflected in independent and shared projects, and in the creation and expansion of support and research networks. Social media may be successfully leveraged and applied in achieving developmental goals for biomedical research faculty, and potentially for those in other fields and disciplines.

  10. Research reports: The 1980 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. [aeronautical research and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barfield, B. F. (Editor); Kent, M. I. (Editor); Dozier, J. (Editor); Karr, G. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The Summer Faculty Fellowship Research Program objectives are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants and institutions; and to contribute to the research objectives at the NASA centers. The Faculty Fellows engaged in research projects commensurate with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague.

  11. 2000 Research Reports: NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Buckingham, Gregg (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 2000 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the 16th year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 2000 program was administered by the University of Central Florida in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) with sponsorship and funding from the Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., and KSC. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA in 2000. The NASA/ASEE Program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the university faculty member. The editors of this document were responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many problems of current interest to NASA/KSC.

  12. NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. 1994 research reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Loren A. (Editor); Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Camp, Warren (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1994 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the tenth year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 1994 program was administered by the University of Central Florida in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) with sponsorship and funding from the Office of Educational Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA Headquarters in 1994. The NASA/ASEE program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the University faculty member. The editors of this document were responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many problems of current interest to NASA/KSC.

  13. 1998 Research Reports: NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Buckingham, Gregg (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1998 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the 14th year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 1998 program was administered by the University of Central Florida in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) with sponsorship and funding from the Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., and KSC. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA in 1998. The NASA/ASEE Program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the university faculty member. The editors of this document were responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many problems of current interest to NASA/KSC.

  14. 1997 Research Reports: NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Buckingham, Gregg (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1997 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the 13th year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 1997 program was administered by the University of Central Florida in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) with sponsorship and funding from the Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., and KSC. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA in 1997. The NASA/ASEE Program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the university faculty member. The editors of this document were responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many problems of current interest to NASA/KSC.

  15. The 1982 NASA/ASEE summer faculty fellowship research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Aht NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Research Program conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center by the University of Alabama at Huntsville, Ala. during the summer of 1982 is described. Abstracts of the Final Reports submitted by the Fellows detailing the results of their research are also presented.

  16. Mentoring Undergraduate Interdisciplinary Mathematics Research Students: Junior Faculty Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gevertz, Jana L.; Kim, Peter S.; Wares, Joanna R.

    2017-01-01

    To be successful, junior faculty must properly manage their time in the face of expanding responsibilities. One such responsibility is supervising undergraduate research projects. Student research projects (either single or multi-student) can be undertaken as a full-time summer experience, or as a part-time academic year commitment. With many…

  17. Faculty Research from the Perspective of Accounting Academicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Jerry G.; Henderson, James R.

    1991-01-01

    A questionnaire solicited information and opinions from 152 accounting professors about research, promotion and salary increases, and publication productivity and outlets. Results suggest that accounting education is at a crossroads: individual faculty emphasize teaching; policies on promotion and tenure emphasize research. (JOW)

  18. Departmental Contexts and Faculty Research Activity in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeby, Jens-Christian; Try, Sverre

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to examine the relationship between departmental attributes and university faculty research activity. Since individual and departmental factors are highly interrelated, individual attributes are included in a hierarchical linear model taking into consideration the nested structure of the data. Research activity is measured…

  19. Increasing Research Productivity in Undergraduate Research Experiences: Exploring Predictors of Collaborative Faculty-Student Publications.

    PubMed

    Morales, Danielle X; Grineski, Sara E; Collins, Timothy W

    2017-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to understanding faculty-student productivity via undergraduate research from the faculty member's perspective. This study examines predictors of faculty-student publications resulting from mentored undergraduate research, including measures of faculty-student collaboration, faculty commitment to undergraduate students, and faculty characteristics. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyze data from 468 faculty members across 13 research-intensive institutions, collected by a cross-sectional survey in 2013/2014. Results show that biomedical faculty mentors were more productive in publishing collaboratively with undergraduate students when they worked with students for more than 1 year on average, enjoyed teaching students about research, had mentored Black students, had received more funding from the National Institutes of Health, had a higher H-index scores, and had more years of experience working in higher education. This study suggests that college administrators and research program directors should strive to create incentives for faculty members to collaborate with undergraduate students and promote faculty awareness that undergraduates can contribute to their research. © 2017 D. X. Morales et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  20. The 2003 NASA Faculty Fellowship Program Research Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash-Stevenson, S. K.; Karr, G.; Freeman, L. M.; Bland, J. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    For the 39th consecutive year, the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP) was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center. The program was sponsored by NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC, and operated under contract by The University of Alabama in Huntsville. In addition, promotion and applications are managed by the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and assessment is completed by Universities Space Research Association (USRA). The nominal starting and finishing dates for the 10-week program were May 27 through August 1, 2003. The primary objectives of the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program are to: (1) Increase the quality and quantity of research collaborations between NASA and the academic community that contribute to NASA s research objectives; (2) provide research opportunities for college and university faculty that serve to enrich their knowledge base; (3) involve students in cutting-edge science and engineering challenges related to NASA s strategic enterprises, while providing exposure to the methods and practices of real-world research; (4) enhance faculty pedagogy and facilitate interdisciplinary networking; (5) encourage collaborative research and technology transfer with other Government agencies and the private sector; and (6) establish an effective education and outreach activity to foster greater awareness of this program.

  1. The 2004 NASA Faculty Fellowship Program Research Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruitt, J. R.; Karr, G.; Freeman, L. M.; Hassan, R.; Day, J. B. (Compiler)

    2005-01-01

    This is the administrative report for the 2004 NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP) held at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the 40th consecutive year. The NFFP offers science and engineering faculty at U.S. colleges and universities hands-on exposure to NASA s research challenges through summer research residencies and extended research opportunities at participating NASA research Centers. During this program, fellows work closely with NASA colleagues on research challenges important to NASA's strategic enterprises that are of mutual interest to the fellow and the Center. The nominal starting and .nishing dates for the 10-week program were June 1 through August 6, 2004. The program was sponsored by NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC, and operated under contract by The University of Alabama, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, and Alabama A&M University. In addition, promotion and applications are managed by the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and assessment is completed by Universities Space Research Association (USRA). The primary objectives of the NFFP are to: Increase the quality and quantity of research collaborations between NASA and the academic community that contribute to the Agency s space aeronautics and space science mission. Engage faculty from colleges, universities, and community colleges in current NASA research and development. Foster a greater public awareness of NASA science and technology, and therefore facilitate academic and workforce literacy in these areas. Strengthen faculty capabilities to enhance the STEM workforce, advance competition, and infuse mission-related research and technology content into classroom teaching. Increase participation of underrepresented and underserved faculty and institutions in NASA science and technology.

  2. Faculty Research Productivity in Six Arab Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abouchedid, Kamal; Abdelnour, George

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses the research output of a sample of higher education institutions (HEIs) in six Arab countries in order to start quantifying academic research productivity in the wider region of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). A questionnaire classifying HEIs was administered to 310 institutions in Lebanon, Qatar, the United Arab…

  3. North Dakota Senior High Industrial Arts Program of Studies--Level II. Research Series No. 80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota State Board for Vocational Education, Bismarck. Research Coordinating Unit.

    This industrial arts program of a studies guide is the product of a research project designed to (1) ascertain programs and curricula trends of senior high school industrial arts in the fifty states, (2) develop a philosophical rationale for senior high schools in North Dakota secondary schools, and (3) develop a master plan and program of study…

  4. The Support-Stress Paradigm and Faculty Research Publication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Yorem; Finaly-Neumann, Edith

    1990-01-01

    A study developed and tested a model that examines the relative powers of support and work stress indicators in explaining faculty research productivity. Empirical examination indicates the model is most influential in physics, least in education, and that different indicators are significant in determining publication in hard and soft sciences.…

  5. FACULTY PUBLICATIONS OF THE INSTITUTE FOR RESEARCH ON EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Inst. of Research for Exceptional Children.

    THE PUBLICATIONS OF EACH OF 14 FACULTY MEMBERS OF THE INSTITUTE FOR RESEARCH ON EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN ARE LISTED BY TYPE OF PUBLICATION, THAT IS, JOURNAL ARTICLES, BOOK REVIEWS, BOOKS, AND MONOGRAPHS. ALSO INCLUDED ARE OTHER PUBLICATIONS OF THE INSTITUTE AND DOCTORAL DISSERTATIONS SUPPORTED BY THE INSTITUTE. (CG)

  6. Transdisciplinarity in Research: Perspectives of Early Career Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Megan; Martinson, Melissa L.; Nurius, Paula S.; Kemp, Susan P.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Early career faculty experiences and perspectives on transdisciplinary research are important yet understudied. Methods: Assistant professors at 50 top-ranked social work programs completed an online survey assessing perspectives on the salience of transdisciplinary training in their field, obstacles to or negative impacts of…

  7. Business Faculty Research: Satisfaction with the Web versus Library Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewald, Nancy H.; Silvius, Matthew A.

    2005-01-01

    Business faculty members teaching at undergraduate campuses of the Pennsylvania State University were surveyed in order to assess their satisfaction with free Web sources and with subscription databases for their professional research. Although satisfaction with the Web's ease of use was higher than that for databases, overall satisfaction for…

  8. Formalizing Evaluation Procedures for Marketing Faculty Research Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Dennis R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Results of a national survey of marketing department heads (n=142) indicate that few marketing departments have formalized the development and communication of research performance standards to faculty. Guidelines and methods to accomplish those procedures most efficiently were proposed. (Author/JOW)

  9. Research reports: 1985 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, G. R. (Editor); Osborn, T. L. (Editor); Dozier, J. B. (Editor); Freeman, L. M. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    A compilation of 40 technical reports on research conducted by participants in the 1985 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is given. Weibull density functions, reliability analysis, directional solidification, space stations, jet stream, fracture mechanics, composite materials, orbital maneuvering vehicles, stellar winds and gamma ray bursts are among the topics discussed.

  10. NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program: 1988 research reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Loren A. (Editor); Armstrong, Dennis W. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    This contractor's report contains all sixteen final reports prepared by the participants in the 1988 Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. Reports describe research projects on a number of topics including controlled environments, robotics, cryogenic propellant storage, polymers, hydroponic culture, adaptive servocontrol, and computer aided design

  11. Comparison of Scientific Research Projects of Education Faculties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altunay, Esen; Tonbul, Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Many studies indicate that knowledge and knowledge production are the main predictors of social development, welfare and the ability to face the future with confidence. It could be argued that knowledge production is mainly carried out by universities. This study compares 1266 scientific research projects (SRPs) completed by faculties of education…

  12. The Changing Faculty and Student Success: Selected Research on Connections between Non-Tenure-Track Faculty and Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna; Maxey, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    It is important to understand existing research on the connections between non-tenure-track faculty and student learning and to continue to research these issues. Although working conditions vary across the academy and even within a single institution, many faculty--particularly part-timers--are not permitted to contribute to curriculum planning…

  13. 2002 NASA Faculty Fellowship Program at Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahl, Joseph M.; Heyward, Ann O.; Montegani, Francis J.

    2003-01-01

    While several objectives are served with this program, the central mechanism involved is the conduct of research assignments by faculty in direct support of NASA programs. In general, the results of the research will be assimilated by NASA program managers into an overall effort and will ultimately find their way into the literature. Occasionally, specific assignments result directly in reports for publication or conference presentation. Taken as a body, the assignments represent a large intellectual contribution by the academic community to NASA programs. It is appropriate therefore to summarize the research that was accomplished. The remainder of this report consists of research summaries arranged alphabetically by participant name. For each summary, the faculty fellow is briefly identified and the assignment prepared by the GRC host organization is given. This is followed by a brief narrative, prepared by the fellow, of the research performed. Narratives provided by the accompanying students immediately follow the narratives of their professors.

  14. Reflections by a student and a faculty member on student-faculty collaborative geophysical field research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bank, C.; Rotzien, J.

    2007-12-01

    More and more students and faculty engage in collaborative research. Field geophysics provides a fascinating venue, as it always contributes to interpersonal relations, usually involves off-campus work, and often allows us to meet new people and explore a different culture. Tackling an authentic research problem keeps a faculty member excited about her/his discipline, while allowing a student to engage in the process of science, follow a researcher's thoughts and contribute to a real project. The exchange of ideas and the generation of new knowledge is rewarding to the student as it facilitates her/his academic growth. Despite the obvious advantages of including students in field-based research, few students are allowed such an opportunity because of the institutional commitment in time and money that is necessary for success. Other challenges in field-based geophysical research include steep learning curves related to the use of equipment, unknown outcomes (data that is often difficult to interpret), and a true commitment to the project on the student's part. The faculty member on the other hand faces additional challenges because of the responsibility for students in the field, scheduling constraints, limited funding, and students' diverse academic goals. This presentation will be given by a faculty member and a student who have engaged in various authentic research projects. Projects ranged from afternoon lab exercises on campus (eg, microgravity survey over a tunnel on campus), course projects connected to field trips (eg, magnetic study and subsequent potential field analysis), summer research projects (eg, georadar survey of Deboullie Lake rock glacier), to year-long undergraduate thesis projects (eg, potential field studies at igneous centres of the Navajo Volcanic Field). We will present highlights of these projects, examine their pedagogical merits, and discuss the advantages and rewards we earned as well as the challenges we faced. Despite all challenges

  15. Research Reports: 1984 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, L. M. (Editor); Osborn, T. L. (Editor); Dozier, J. B. (Editor); Karr, G. R. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A NASA/ASEE Summer Faulty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The basic objectives of the programs are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. The Faculty Fellows spent ten weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 1984. Topics covered include: (1) data base management; (2) computational fluid dynamics; (3) space debris; (4) X-ray gratings; (5) atomic oxygen exposure; (6) protective coatings for SSME; (7) cryogenics; (8) thermal analysis measurements; (9) solar wind modelling; and (10) binary systems.

  16. 1999 Research Reports: NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Buckingham, Gregg (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1999 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the 15th year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 1999 program was administered by the University of Central Florida in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE and the Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC, and KSC. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA Headquarters in 1999. The NASA/ASEE Program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the university faculty member.

  17. Research reports: 1987 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Gerald R. (Editor); Cothran, Ernestine K. (Editor); Freeman, L. Michael (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    For the 23rd consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The program was conducted by the University of Alabama in Huntsville and MSFC during the period 1 June to 7 August 1987. Operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education, the MSFC program, as well as those at other NASA Centers, was sponsored by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The basic objectives of the program are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participant's institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. This document is a compilation of Fellow's reports on their research during the Summer of 1987.

  18. Research Reports: 2001 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, G. (Editor); Pruitt, J. (Editor); Nash-Stevenson, S. (Editor); Freeman, L. M. (Editor); Karr, C. L. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    For the thirty-seventh consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE (American Society for Engineering Education) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The program was conducted by The University of Alabama in Huntsville and MSFC during the period May 29 - August 3, 2001. Operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education, the MSFC program, as well as those at other NASA Centers, was sponsored by the University Affairs Office, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC. The basic objectives of the programs, which are in the thirty-seventh year of operation nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. The Faculty Fellows spent ten weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 2001.

  19. Research Reports: 1995 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, G. R. (Editor); Chappell, C. R. (Editor); Six, F. (Editor); Freeman, L. M. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    For the 31st consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The program was conducted by the University of Alabama in Huntsville and MSFC during the period 15 May 1995 - 4 Aug. 1995. Operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education, the MSFC program, as well as those at other NASA centers, was sponsored by the Higher Education Branch, Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The basic objectives of the programs, which are in the 32nd year of operation nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. The Faculty Fellows spent 10 weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 1995. The University of Alabama in Huntsville presents the Co-Directors' report on the administrative operations of the program. Further information can be obtained by contacting any of the editors.

  20. Research Reports: 1997 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, G. R. (Editor); Dowdy, J. (Editor); Freeman, L. M. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    For the 33rd consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The program was conducted by the University of Alabama in Huntsville and MSFC during the period June 2, 1997 through August 8, 1997. Operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education, the MSFC program was sponsored by the Higher Education Branch, Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The basic objectives of the program, which are in the 34th year of operation nationally, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. The Faculty Fellows spent 10 weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 1997. The University of Alabama in Huntsville presents the Co-Directors' report on the administrative operations of the program. Further information can be obtained by contacting any of the editors.

  1. Research Reports: 1996 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, M. (Editor); Chappell, C. R. (Editor); Six, F. (Editor); Karr, G. R. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    For the 32nd consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The program was conducted by the University of Alabama and MSFC during the period May 28, 1996 through August 2, 1996. Operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education, the MSFC program, as well as those at other NASA centers, was sponsored by the Higher Education Branch, Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The basic objectives of the programs, which are in the 33rd year of operation nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. The Faculty Fellows spent 10 weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 1996. The University of Alabama presents the Co-Directors' report on the administrative operations of the program. Further information can be obtained by contacting any of the editors.

  2. Listening to Those We Serve: Assessing the Research Needs of University Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Carol A.; Murthy, Uday; Teague, Greg

    2008-01-01

    This study presents findings from a university-wide faculty survey on research resources at a top-tier research institution in the United States (U.S.). The researchers (faculty leaders) designed the original instrument, submitted it for critique and validation to a faculty senate's research body, and solicited participation from all colleges. The…

  3. How should we teach faculty about research-based teaching?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmstead, Alice; Turpen, Chandra; Prather, Edward E.

    2015-01-01

    Faculty professional development (PD) workshops are the primary mechanism used to increase the adoption and adaptation of research-based instructional strategies (RBIS). PD workshops draw in large numbers of physics and astronomy instructors and can serve a critical role in changing instructional practices within our community. Our research focuses on two of the largest and longest-running PD workshops accessible to faculty: the New Physics and Astronomy Faculty Workshop and the Center for Astronomy Education Tier I Teaching Excellence Workshop. We seek to reveal opportunities to improve these workshops through increased awareness of instructors' experiences and prior knowledge, and increased awareness of how these workshops are designed and implemented.Other studies often assume that instructors have coherent theories of teaching and learning, and conclude that many have wrong ideas that need to be confronted or 'fixed'. Our approach is to first investigate the ideas that instructors have about teaching and learning, and identify what we call their 'potentially productive resources'. This approach is better suited to inform respectful PD efforts that build on instructors' intuitions, and we have analyzed interviews with several young astronomy/physics faculty members who were about to attend these PD workshops to demonstrate how this approach can be applied. The primary findings of our first study are: 1) instructors are trying out practices that show some alignment with common RBIS; 2) instructors' values show alignment with common discipline-based education research goals; and 3) instructors often experience dissatisfaction with specific aspects of their instruction. Taken together our findings are poised to inform changes to existing PD efforts.Our ongoing research focuses on the development of a real-time observation tool to document what happens during workshops and what learning opportunities these PD practices create for participants. We will show the

  4. 34 CFR 663.20 - How is a Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellow selected?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How is a Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellow... (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FULBRIGHT-HAYS FACULTY RESEARCH ABROAD FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM Selection of Fellows § 663.20 How is a Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellow...

  5. 34 CFR 663.20 - How is a Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellow selected?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How is a Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellow... (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FULBRIGHT-HAYS FACULTY RESEARCH ABROAD FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM Selection of Fellows § 663.20 How is a Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellow...

  6. 34 CFR 663.1 - What is the Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellowship Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What is the Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad... (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FULBRIGHT-HAYS FACULTY RESEARCH ABROAD FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM General § 663.1 What is the Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellowship Program? (a...

  7. 34 CFR 663.1 - What is the Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellowship Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad... (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FULBRIGHT-HAYS FACULTY RESEARCH ABROAD FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM General § 663.1 What is the Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellowship Program? (a...

  8. 34 CFR 663.1 - What is the Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellowship Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What is the Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad... (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FULBRIGHT-HAYS FACULTY RESEARCH ABROAD FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM General § 663.1 What is the Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellowship Program? (a...

  9. 34 CFR 663.20 - How is a Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellow selected?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How is a Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellow... (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FULBRIGHT-HAYS FACULTY RESEARCH ABROAD FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM Selection of Fellows § 663.20 How is a Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellow...

  10. 34 CFR 663.1 - What is the Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellowship Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What is the Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad... (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FULBRIGHT-HAYS FACULTY RESEARCH ABROAD FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM General § 663.1 What is the Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellowship Program? (a...

  11. 34 CFR 663.20 - How is a Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellow selected?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How is a Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellow... (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FULBRIGHT-HAYS FACULTY RESEARCH ABROAD FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM Selection of Fellows § 663.20 How is a Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellow...

  12. 34 CFR 663.20 - How is a Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellow selected?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How is a Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellow... (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FULBRIGHT-HAYS FACULTY RESEARCH ABROAD FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM Selection of Fellows § 663.20 How is a Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellow...

  13. 34 CFR 663.1 - What is the Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellowship Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What is the Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad... (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FULBRIGHT-HAYS FACULTY RESEARCH ABROAD FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM General § 663.1 What is the Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellowship Program? (a...

  14. Reciprocal benefit to senior and junior peers: An outcome of a pilot research workshop at medical university.

    PubMed

    Ahsin, Sadia; Abbas, Seyyeda; Zaidi, Noshin; Azad, Nadia; Kaleem, Fatima

    2015-08-01

    A study was planned to explore and evaluate the role of senior peers in the learning process of their juniors during a Research Methodology workshop, and to assess educational advantages for seniors in leading roles. Twenty medical students participated with 15 juniors (1st to 3rd year) and 5 seniors (final/fourth year) divided into 5 groups with one senior student each at Foundation University Medical College, Islamabad, Pakistan. The seniors supervised and engaged the groups to develop research questions, formulate objectives, review literature, outline study designs, develop study tools/questionnaire and finally shape their projects in synopsis. Overall advantages to both juniors and seniors through this peer-assisted learning model were assessed by feedback proformas with open and closed-ended questions. Senior peers' facilitation was effective in the learning process of junior peers. Senior peers also gained academic benefit by exercising their leadership qualities through teaching and maintaining group dynamics.

  15. 2001 Research Reports NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 2001 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Research areas are broad. Some of the topics addressed include: project management, space shuttle safety risks induced by human factor errors, body wearable computers as a feasible delivery system for 'work authorization documents', gas leak detection using remote sensing technologies, a history of the Kennedy Space Center, and design concepts for collabsible cyrogenic storage vessels.

  16. Research Reports: 1988 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, L. Michael (Editor); Chappell, Charles R. (Editor); Cothran, Ernestine K. (Editor); Karr, Gerald R. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The basic objectives are to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA: to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Topics addressed include: cryogenics; thunderstorm simulation; computer techniques; computer assisted instruction; system analysis weather forecasting; rocket engine design; crystal growth; control systems design; turbine pumps for the Space Shuttle Main engine; electron mobility; heat transfer predictions; rotor dynamics; mathematical models; computational fluid dynamics; and structural analysis.

  17. Factors that Motivate Business Faculty to Conduct Research: An Expectancy Theory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yining; Gupta, Ashok; Hoshower, Leon

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the authors used expectancy theory to examine key factors that motivate business faculty to conduct research. The survey results, from 320 faculty members at 10 business schools, showed that faculty members who assign higher importance ratings to both the extrinsic and the intrinsic rewards of research exhibit higher research…

  18. The Main Reciprocal for Teaching Load: Faculty Use of Research Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colbeck, Carol L.

    This study examined the allocation of time college faculty give to various research tasks. Case studies were conducted of 12 faculty members in four departments selected for variation by university type (research and comprehensive) and discipline (Physics and English). The work of each faculty member was observed on five non-consecutive days for a…

  19. Funded Research of Faculty at 2-Year Institutions by Geographic Locations and Funding Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about how faculty at 2-year institutions secure grants. Although the mission of community colleges focuses more on teaching than research, many of the faculty desire to pursue grants and some actually engage in this activity. The purpose of this research was to better understand faculty at 2-year institutions regarding several…

  20. Factors Influencing Career Experiences of Selected Chinese Faculty Employed at an American Research Extensive University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooksey, Yan Zhang; Cole, Bryan R.

    2012-01-01

    Whereas research related to the experience of faculty of color is increasing, few attentions have been focused on Chinese faculty's career experience in the US. This study examined career experiences of 16 Chinese faculty members across different disciplines, ranks and genders at a studied research extensive university in Texas, US. The study used…

  1. Research reports: 1990 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, L. Michael (Editor); Chappell, Charles R. (Editor); Six, Frank (Editor); Karr, Gerald R. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Reports on the research projects performed under the NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program are presented. The program was conducted by The University of Alabama and MSFC during the period from June 4, 1990 through August 10, 1990. Some of the topics covered include: (1) Space Shuttles; (2) Space Station Freedom; (3) information systems; (4) materials and processes; (4) Space Shuttle main engine; (5) aerospace sciences; (6) mathematical models; (7) mission operations; (8) systems analysis and integration; (9) systems control; (10) structures and dynamics; (11) aerospace safety; and (12) remote sensing

  2. "The Need to Know": 1994 Senior Researcher Award Acceptance Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlsen, James C.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses issues related to music education research. Presents three criteria to guide selection of research topics. Concludes that the challenge for music researchers is to avoid research that merely supports a "favored" methodology. (ACM)

  3. The 1983 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Research Program research reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, W. J. (Editor); Duke, M. B. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    The 1983 NASA/ASEE Summary Faculty Fellowship Research Program was conducted by Texas A&M University and the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC). The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). The basic objectives of the programs, which began in 1965 at JSC and in 1964 nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members, (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. The faculty fellows spent 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with their interests and background. They worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of final reports on their research during the summer of 1983.

  4. The Light and Shadow of Feminist Research Mentorship: A Collaborative Autoethnography of Faculty-Student Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Julia; Scarduzio, Jennifer A.; Plump, Brielle; Geist-Martin, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    "Research assistant" is a term used to describe student researchers across a variety of contexts and encompasses a wide array of duties, rewards, and costs. As critical qualitative scholars situated in a discipline that rarely offers funded research assistantships to graduate students, we explore how we have engaged in faculty-student…

  5. The Teaching Researcher: Faculty Attitudes towards the Teaching and Research Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpay, E.; Verschoor, R.

    2014-01-01

    Results from a survey on faculty attitudes towards the teaching and research roles are presented. Attention is given to: (i) the perceived value of teaching (and teaching achievements) relative to research, (ii) approaches for research and teaching integration, (iii) the satisfaction gained from typical work tasks, and (iv) the importance of…

  6. How Prepared Are MSW Graduates for Doctoral Research? Views of PhD Research Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drisko, James W.; Evans, Kristin

    2018-01-01

    This national survey of PhD faculty assessed the research preparation of entering doctoral social work students on a wide range of research knowledge and related skills. The prior literature shows that PhD programs repeat much BSW and MSW research course content. This study shows that the trend continues and has perhaps widened. PhD research…

  7. The Effect of Senior Medical Student Tutors Compared to Faculty Tutors on Examination Scores of First- and Second-Year Medical Students in Two Problem-Based Learning Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakai, Damon H; D'Eon, Marcel; Trinder, Krista; Kasuya, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    At the University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine, senior medical student volunteers are used as tutors for some problem-based learning groups in both the first and second years. Previous studies on the advantages and disadvantages of student tutors compared to faculty tutors have been equivocal. This study expected to answer the…

  8. News Release: NREL Names Four Scientists Senior Research Fellows | News |

    Science.gov Websites

    , initially as a postdoctoral researcher. Now a group manager in the Materials Science Center, Al-Jassim is a . A principal engineer and platform leader in the Fuels Performance and Combustion Science Group-a group he created, McCormick leads the research team for advanced biofuels R&D. His research has

  9. Promoting resiliency for interprofessional faculty and senior medical students: Outcomes of a workshop using mind-body medicine and interactive reflective writing.

    PubMed

    Wald, Hedy S; Haramati, Aviad; Bachner, Yaacov G; Urkin, Jacob

    2016-05-01

    Health care professions faculty/practitioners/students are at risk for stress and burnout, impacting well-being, and optimal patient care. We conducted a unique intervention: an interprofessional, experiential, skills-based workshop (IESW) combining two approaches: mind-body medicine skills and interactive reflective writing (RW) fostering self-awareness, self-discovery, reflection, and meaning-making, potentially preventing/attenuating burnout and promoting resiliency. Medical and nursing faculty and senior medical students (N = 16) participated in a 2-hour workshop and completed (1) Professional Quality of Life measure (ProQOL) and (2) a questionnaire evaluating understanding of professional burnout and resiliency and perceived being prepared to apply workshop techniques. Thematic analyses of anonymized RWs exploring meaningful clinical or teaching experiences were conducted. Participants reported better understanding of professional burnout/resiliency and felt better prepared to use meditation and RW as coping tools. RW themes identified experiencing/grappling with a spectrum of emotions (positive and negative) as well as challenge and triumph within clinical and teaching experiences as professionally meaningful. Positive outcomes were obtained within a synergistic resiliency skills building exercise. Successful implementation of this IESW provides good rationale for studying impact of this intervention over a longer period of time, especially in populations with high rates of stress and burnout.

  10. Senior Laboratory Animal Technician | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Laboratory Animal Sciences Program (LASP) provides exceptional quality animal care and technical support services for animal research performed at the National Cancer Institute at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research. LASP executes this mission by providing a broad spectrum of state-of-the-art technologies and services that are focused

  11. Incorporating Applied Undergraduate Research in Senior to Graduate Level Remote Sensing Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henley, Richard B.; Unger, Daniel R.; Kulhavy, David L.; Hung, I-Kuai

    2016-01-01

    An Arthur Temple College of Forestry and Agriculture (ATCOFA) senior spatial science undergraduate student engaged in a multi-course undergraduate research project to expand his expertise in remote sensing and assess the applied instruction methodology employed within ATCOFA. The project consisted of performing a change detection…

  12. The Research Process and the Library: First-Generation College Seniors vs. Freshmen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickard, Elizabeth; Logan, Firouzeh

    2013-01-01

    In a follow-up study to the ERIAL (Ethnographic Research in Illinois Academic Libraries) Project, librarians at UIC compared the responses of first-generation college freshmen from the original study to those of seniors. The study's aim was to determine whether student information literacy increases as a result of undergraduate education and to…

  13. Integrating Hands-On Undergraduate Research in an Applied Spatial Science Senior Level Capstone Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulhavy, David L.; Unger, Daniel R.; Hung, I-Kuai; Douglass, David

    2015-01-01

    A senior within a spatial science Ecological Planning capstone course designed an undergraduate research project to increase his spatial science expertise and to assess the hands-on instruction methodology employed within the Bachelor of Science in Spatial Science program at Stephen F Austin State University. The height of 30 building features…

  14. USAF Summer Faculty Research Program. 1981 Research Reports. Volume II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    Research Associate 17 (A) Spect roscop i( Analysis anld Opt. i n1iZaLtol on 1 Di. Larry R. Dalton the oxygen/ I od ine Chemica (tILase r and (8...theory appear in Fig. 7 where the inverse temper- ature dependence reflects the dominant influence of the van der Waals 2.7 attraction. Note that the...colinear geometry. Coltrin obtains a 13 depth of 6.9 kcal/mol vs. 2.7 kcal/mol obtained by Wilkins. Thus we expect more Coltrin trajectories to form van der

  15. Summer Research Program (1992). Summer Faculty Research Program (SFRP) Reports. Volume 3. Phillips Laboratory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-28

    Phillips Laboratory Kirtland Air Force Base NM 87117-6008 Sponsored by: Air Force Office of Scientific Research Bolling Air Force Base...Zindel, D.: 1963, Z. Astrophys. 57, 82. 29-13 FINAL REPORT SUMMER FACULTY RESEARCH PROGRAM AT PHILLIPS LABORATORY KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE...Program Phillips Laboratory Sponsored by: Air Force Office of Scientific

  16. Research Breathes New Life Into Senior Travel Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazey, Michael

    1986-01-01

    A survey of older citizens concerning travel interests revealed constraints to participation in a travel program. A description is given of how research on attitudes and life styles indicated ways in which these constraints could be lessened. (JD)

  17. Research Self-Efficacy Sources and Research Motivation in a Foreign Language University Faculty in Mexico: Implications for Educational Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes-Cruz, María del Rosario; Perales-Escudero, Moisés Damián

    2016-01-01

    The research self-efficacy and motivation of foreign language (FL) faculty in periphery countries is under-researched, yet there is a need to understand the impact of public policies that drive such faculty to conduct research. This paper reports a qualitative case study investigating research self-efficacy and research motivation in a group of…

  18. Students and Faculty Perceptions of an Undergraduate Nursing Research Internship Program.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Tara; Hathaway, Donna

    Nursing students in baccalaureate programs report that research is not visible in practice, and faculty conducting research report rarely interacting with students in undergraduate nursing programs. We examined student and faculty perceptions of a research internship embedded in an existing evidence-based practice course. Students (n = 15) and faculty (n = 5) viewed the internship as a positive experience that provided meaningful hands-on skills while generating interest in a potential research career. The internship also provided faculty the opportunity to identify potential doctoral students.

  19. 2003 NASA Faculty Fellowship Program at Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahl, Joseph M.; Heyward, An O.; Kankam, Mark D.

    2003-01-01

    The Office of Education at NASA Headquarters provides overall policy and direction for the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP). The American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) have joined in partnership to recruit participants, accept applications from a broad range of participants, and provide overall evaluation of the NFFP. The NASA Centers, through their University Affairs Officers, develop and operate the experiential part of the program. In concert with co-directing universities and the Centers, Fellows are selected and provided the actual research experiences. This report summarizes the 2003 session conducted at the Glenn Research Center (GRC).Research topics covered a variety of areas including, but not limited to, biological sensors, modeling of biological fluid systems, electronic circuits, ceramics and coatings, unsteady probablistic analysis and aerodynamics, gas turbines, environmental monitoring systems for water quality, air quality, gaseous and particulate emissions, bearings for flywheel energy storage, shape memory alloys,photonic interrogation and nanoprocesses,carbon nanotubes, polymer synthesis for fuel cells, aviation communications, algorithm development and RESPlan Database.

  20. Semantic Differential as One of the Research Tools Suitable for Establishing the Attitudes of Pupils to Old Age and Seniors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Divilová, Sona

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the pre-research conducted under the project entitled "Seniors in the Eyes of Children". The main objective of the project was to create and test a research tool in order to establish what the attitudes of pupils to old age and seniors were. Semantic differential was chosen for these purposes. Semantic…

  1. Reciprocal Engagement: The Process of Pedagogical Innovation among Faculty at Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boden, Karen E.

    2012-01-01

    Research Universities: very high research activity (RU/VH) faculty often emphasize research compared with teaching or service in their work. However, some faculty still intentionally endeavor to be excellent teachers by innovating pedagogy to enhance student learning. This qualitative study focused on developing a theory to describe the process…

  2. The Influence and Outcomes of a STEM Education Research Faculty Community of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadelson, Louis S.

    2016-01-01

    To address the need to increase STEM faculty member expertise in STEM education research I developed a faculty community of practice (FCP) focused on increasing knowledge and experience in STEM education research. The STEM Education Research Scholars Group (SERSG) met every other week during the academic year to study and engage in education…

  3. Faculty Research, Publications, In-Service Activities at Northeastern Oklahoma State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northeastern Oklahoma State Univ., Tahlequah.

    Contained in this publication of Northeastern Oklahoma State University are faculty publications and research reports; abstracts fo faculty-student research projects; a list of individual and group inservice activities and research in progress by college department and divisions; and a bibliography of published articles, books, and creative works.…

  4. Study of Factors Influencing Research Productivity of Agriculture Faculty Members in Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedjazi, Yousef; Behravan, Jaleh

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to analyze the relationship between individual, institutional and demographic characteristics on one hand and the research productivity of agriculture faculty members on the other. The statistical population of the research comprises 280 academic staff in agricultural faculties all over Tehran Province. The data…

  5. From Faculty for Undergraduate Neuroscience: Encouraging Innovation in Undergraduate Neuroscience Education by Supporting Student Research and Faculty Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardwick, Jean C.; Kerchner, Michael; Lom, Barbara; Ramirez, Julio J.; Wiertelak, Eric P.

    2006-01-01

    This article features the organization Faculty for Undergraduate Neuroscience. FUN was established by a group of neuroscientists dedicated to innovation and excellence in undergraduate neuroscience education and research. In the years since its inception, FUN has grown into a dynamic organization making a significant impact on the quality of…

  6. Partners in Research: Developing a Model for Undergraduate Faculty-Student Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Reitmaier Koehler, Amy; Reveling Smith, Linda; Davies, Susan; Mangan-Danckwart, Deborah

    2015-10-09

    Maintaining scholarship while delivering an undergraduate nursing program is a challenge for nursing faculty. In this paper, we describe an approach that involves undergraduate nursing students in a program of faculty research, which evaluates new approaches to teaching and learning. Students work with faculty to develop a research proposal, identifying specific questions and exploring relevant literature. Projects may include original data collection with faculty supervision, or secondary analysis of existing datasets. Foci have included partnership learning between nursing students and older adults, models of sustainability for a traveling health clinic, and experiences of aging. Findings and recommendations feed into the broader faculty research agenda, provide a foundation for subsequent projects, and inform further development of educational programs. Students have presented at local and national conferences and developed papers for publication based on this joint work. We describe the benefits and challenges of these partnerships, drawing upon student and faculty reflections.

  7. Research Motives of Faculty in Academic STEM: Measurement Invariance of the Research Motivation Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deemer, Eric D.; Mahoney, Kevin T.; Ball, Jacqueline Hebert

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined the psychometric properties of the Research Motivation Scale (RMS) in a sample of faculty members (N = 337) in university science departments. It was hypothesized that the RMS would evidence partial measurement invariance across tenure status and noninvariance across gender, given the different sociocultural factors (e.g.,…

  8. Asked More Often: Gender Differences in Faculty Workload in Research Universities and the Work Interactions That Shape Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Meara, KerryAnn; Kuvaeva, Alexandra; Nyunt, Gudrun; Waugaman, Chelsea; Jackson, Rose

    2017-01-01

    Guided by research on gendered organizations and faculty careers, we examined gender differences in how research university faculty spend their work time. We used time-diary methods to understand faculty work activities at a microlevel of detail, as recorded by faculty themselves over 4 weeks. We also explored workplace interactions that shape…

  9. Faculty Research Productivity: Why Do Some of Our Colleagues Publish More than Others?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesli, Vicki L.; Lee, Jae Mook

    2011-01-01

    The justification for studying faculty research productivity is that it affects individual advancement and reputation within academe, as well as departmental and institutional prestige (Creamer 1998, iii). Publication records are an important factor in faculty performance evaluations, research grant awards, and promotion and salary decisions. The…

  10. Collaboration in the Research and Scholarship of Feminist Women Faculty. ASHE Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickens, Cynthia Sullivan

    This study used qualitative research to develop a richer description and deeper understanding of the collaborative process among 26 feminist women faculty. The participants were all on the faculty full-time at two research universities in the Midwest and espoused feminism as evidenced by their formal association with women's studies programs. In…

  11. Foreign-Born Women Faculty Work Roles and Productivity at Research Universities in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamiseishvili, Ketevan

    2010-01-01

    Using the data from the 2004 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:04) survey, the study examined foreign-born women faculty members' work roles and productivity in the areas of teaching, research, and service in comparison with their US-born counterparts at research universities in the US. The findings provided some evidence to suggest…

  12. Exploring the Experiences of Faculty-Led Teams in Conducting Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Qi; Amundsen, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Action research has been suggested as a useful way to support university faculty to improve teaching and learning. However, there seems to be little knowledge about how faculty (and those who work with them) experience the process of doing action research. In order to explore team members' in-depth experience about what they learned and how they…

  13. Strategic Faculty Hiring in Two Public Research Universities: Pursuing Interdisciplinary Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sa, Creso M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines innovations in strategic faculty hiring emphasizing interdisciplinarity at two major public research universities in the USA. The research investigated how and why the Pennsylvania State University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison chose to pursue interdisciplinary faculty recruitment, how it was structured, and how it…

  14. Forging a Research Pathway: Perspectives of Two Post-Tenure Female Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Laureen J.; Hellsten, Laurie-Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an auto-ethnographic exploration of two post-tenure female faculty member's experiences developing their programs of research. Self-reflection was used to explore the factors that have helped or hindered the development of their research program, and the continued challenges they faced as female faculty. Composite themes were…

  15. Faculty Challenges and Barriers for Research and Publication in Tajik Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kataeva, Zumrad; DeYoung, Alan J.

    2018-01-01

    This article investigates the current state of faculty research activity within Tajik higher education institutions (HEIs), where the level of research productivity has substantially decreased in the past three decades. As part of a larger ethnographic study on professional lives of Tajik faculty members, we investigated and found enormous…

  16. Raising the Bar on External Research Funding: Infrastructure and Strategies for Enhancing Faculty Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chval, Kathryn B.; Nossaman, Larry D.

    2014-01-01

    Administrators seek faculty who have the expertise to secure external funding to support their research agenda. Administrators also seek strategies to support and enhance faculty productivity across different ranks. In this manuscript, we describe the infrastructure we established and strategies we implemented to enhance the research enterprise at…

  17. What Kind of Faculty Are Motivated to Perform Research by the Desire for Promotion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tien, Flora F.

    2008-01-01

    A policy of adding a new rank to the faculty career ladder was implemented in Taiwan in 1994. It was believed that structural changes of the incentive system would change faculty research behavior. This paper explores the question: Who are motivated to perform research by the desire for promotion? A mail survey investigating Taiwanese faculty…

  18. Enhancing Junior Faculty Research Productivity through Multiinstitution Collaboration: Participants' Impressions of the School Psychology Research Collaboration Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rush, S. Craig; Wheeler, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    In addition to teaching and service responsibilities, junior faculty members are required to be productive researchers. Despite the demand on junior faculty to produce published research, studies suggest that they often do not receive adequate assistance with their research endeavors. Mentoring is an effective form of support for junior faculty…

  19. 2014 Senior Researcher Award Acceptance Address: Cautious Optimism for the Future of Research in Music Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the transcript of Peter Webster's 2014 Senior Researcher Award Acceptance Address. Webster comments on several big ideas in music education: (1) The consideration of teaching as a blend of constructivist approaches and direct instruction that values student-centered work primarily as evidence of learning; (2) The…

  20. Research funding expectations as a function of faculty teaching/administrative workload.

    PubMed

    Surratt, Christopher K; Kamal, Khalid M; Wildfong, Peter L D

    2011-06-01

    Persistent faculty shortages at US pharmacy schools make faculty recruitment and retention a perennial priority. The literature indicates that a key retention issue is whether the faculty member's scholarship is compromised because of a heavy teaching or service workload. Assess US pharmacy faculty perceptions concerning their views of appropriate expectations of research grant support given their teaching/administrative workloads. Data and opinions were collected using a multiple-choice, cross-sectional survey instrument (SurveyMonkey®; Menlo Park, CA), e-mailed to 1047 faculty members, randomly selected from all Accreditation Council of Pharmacy Education (ACPE)-accredited US pharmacy schools. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS® (Chicago, IL) for Windows, Version 17.0. Of the researcher respondents, a majority felt that the amount of teaching expected was too much to be a competitive researcher. Teaching commitment was found more likely to increase than decrease after achieving tenure. Reported new faculty start-up funding was well below that typically found at nonpharmacy research schools. This information is anticipated to help pharmacy faculty members gauge their workload and productivity relative to a national peer group, and to help pharmacy schools improve in faculty recruitment and retention. The survey findings may assist pharmacy schools in clarifying reasonable teaching and funding expectations for pre- and post-tenure faculty, which in turn may help attract more pharmaceutical scientists to academic pharmacy positions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Academic Incentives for Faculty Participation in Community-based Participatory Research

    PubMed Central

    Nyden, Philip

    2003-01-01

    Recognizing the need to overcome the obstacles of traditional university- and discipline-oriented research approaches, a variety of incentives to promote community-based participatory research (CBPR) are presented. Experiences of existing CBPR researchers are used in outlining how this methodological approach can appeal to faculty: the common ground shared by faculty and community leaders in challenging the status quo; opportunities to have an impact on local, regional, and national policy; and opening doors for new research and funding opportunities. Strategies for promoting CBPR in universities are provided in getting CBPR started, changing institutional practices currently inhibiting CBPR, and institutionalizing CBPR. Among the specific strategies are: development of faculty research networks; team approaches to CBPR; mentoring faculty and students; using existing national CBPR networks; modifying tenure and promotion guidelines; development of appropriate measures of CBPR scholarship; earmarking university resources to support CBPR; using Institutional Review Boards to promote CBPR; making CBPR-oriented faculty appointments; and creating CBPR centers. PMID:12848841

  2. Research-based assessment affordances and constraints: Perceptions of physics faculty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Adrian; McKagan, Sarah B.; Martinuk, Mathew Sandy; Bell, Alexander; Sayre, Eleanor C.

    2016-06-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Preparing and Supporting University Physics Educators.] To help faculty use research-based materials in a more significant way, we learn about their perceived needs and desires and use this information to suggest ways for the physics education research community to address these needs. When research-based resources are well aligned with the perceived needs of faculty, faculty members will more readily take them up. We used phenomenographic interviews of ordinary physics faculty and department chairs to identify four families of issues that faculty have around research-based assessments (RBAs). First, many faculty are interested in using RBAs but need help with the practicalities of administering RBAs: how to find them, which ones there are, and how to administer them. Second, at the same time, many faculty think that RBAs are limited and do not measure many of the things they care about, or are not applicable in their classes. They want assessments to measure skills, perceptions, and specific concepts. Third, many faculty want to turn to communities of other faculty and experts to help them interpret their assessment results and suggest other ways to do assessment. They want to better understand their assessment results by comparing to others and interacting with faculty from other schools to learn about how they do assessment. Fourth, many faculty consider their courses in the broader contexts of accountability and their departments. They want help with assessment in these broader contexts. We also discuss how a faculty member's role in their department and type of institution influence their perceived wants and needs around assessment.

  3. Pharmaceutical science faculty publication records at research-intensive pharmacy colleges and schools.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Dennis F; Nahata, Milap C

    2012-11-12

    To determine yearly (phase 1) and cumulative (phase 2) publication records of pharmaceutical science faculty members at research-intensive colleges and schools of pharmacy. The publication records of pharmaceutical science faculty members at research-intensive colleges and schools of pharmacy were searched on Web of Science. Fifty colleges and schools of pharmacy were randomly chosen for a search of 1,042 individual faculty members' publications per year from 2005 to 2009. A stratified random sample of 120 faculty members also was chosen, and cumulative publication counts were recorded and bibliometric indices calculated. The median number of publications per year was 2 (range, 0-34). Overall, 22% of faculty members had no publications in any given year, but the number was highly variable depending on the faculty members' colleges or schools of pharmacy. Bibliometric indices were higher for medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutics, with pharmacology ranking third and social and administrative sciences fourth. Higher bibliometric indices were also observed for institution status (ie, public vs private) and academic rank (discipline chairperson vs non-chairperson and professor vs junior faculty member) (p<0.01 for each). The median number of cumulative publications per faculty member was 34 (range, 0-370). Significant differences exist in yearly and cumulative publication rates for faculty members and bibliometric indices among pharmaceutical science disciplines and academic ranks within research-intensive colleges and schools of pharmacy. These data may be important for benchmarking purposes.

  4. Publication Rates of Social and Administrative Sciences Pharmacy Faculty in Non-Research Intensive Pharmacy Schools.

    PubMed

    Weathers, Trenna; Unni, Elizabeth

    2018-04-01

    Objective. To assess the level of publication rates from 2011 through 2015 by Social and Administrative Sciences (SAS) faculty at non-research intensive pharmacy schools. Methods. The Web of Science database was searched using faculty names identified from the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) faculty and professional staff roster. Publication rates of SAS faculty were calculated and compared using several demographic subcategories such as public/private school, part of an academic health center, schools with PhD program, funding status, etc. Results. The 208 SAS faculty members from 59 colleges contributed to 478 publications with a mean of 95.6 publications per year and 1.62 publications per institution per year. The number of publications increased 45% over the five years from 67 publications in 2011 to 122 in 2015.The average number of publications was 0.92 per year per SAS faculty compared to 0.82 publications per year per faculty from other basic pharmaceutical sciences divisions. The most commonly published research was research articles in the area of scholarship of teaching and learning. The significant predictors of publications were being part of an academic health center, having a PhD program, and higher percent of faculty members who are SAS faculty. Conclusion. Despite being affiliated with institutions with missions less targeted on research, this study showed SAS faculty members at non-research intensive institutions consistently contribute to published literature. Further studies are needed to examine reasons for the lack of publishing by almost half of the SAS faculty and ways to increase research and publication in the field of SAS.

  5. Faculty Mentors', Graduate Students', and Performance-Based Assessments of Students' Research Skill Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldon, David F.; Maher, Michelle A.; Hurst, Melissa; Timmerman, Briana

    2015-01-01

    Faculty mentorship is thought to be a linchpin of graduate education in STEM disciplines. This mixed-method study investigates agreement between student mentees' and their faculty mentors' perceptions of the students' developing research knowledge and skills in STEM. We also compare both assessments against independent ratings of the students'…

  6. Assessment of Student and Faculty Mentor Perceptions of an International Undergraduate Research Program in Physical Geography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houser, Chris; Cahill, Anthony; Lemmons, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we assess whether students and their faculty mentors in a Research Experience for Undergraduates program have similar perceptions about the relative importance of different outcomes of their study abroad experience. Results of a Q-analysis reveal a significant difference of opinion between the students and the faculty mentors. It is…

  7. Cultural Navigators: International Faculty Fathers in the U.S Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallee, Margaret; Hart, Jeni

    2015-01-01

    Based on interviews with 16 international tenure-track and tenured faculty fathers from collectivist cultures at 2 U.S. research universities, this study explores how these men reconcile the demands of parenting with those of the academic career. Adding to a robust body of literature on the concerns of domestic faculty parents, this study focuses…

  8. Faculty Identity through Spheres of Teaching and Research Activity and Associated Genres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallego, Liliana; Castelló, Montserrat; Badia, Antoni

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to understand how faculty identity development is related to a differential use of writing genres in the teaching and research spheres of activity and whether this development follows different paths, on the bases of faculty perceptions regarding what they consider their main goal at university and their preferred sphere of…

  9. Librarian-Faculty Collaboration on a Library Research Assignment and Module for College Experience Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyes, Anne; Barbier, Pat

    2013-01-01

    A librarian and faculty member collaborated on creating a library research module for students in the faculty member's college success classes to help them learn the fundamentals of information literacy. Using the assignment "My Ideal Job," the students met four or more times with the librarian in a computer classroom to learn how to do…

  10. Developing an Organizational Understanding of Faculty Mentoring Programs in Academic Medicine in Major American Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer Zellers, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the organizational and contextual factors associated with faculty mentoring programs in academic medicine within major research institutions in the United States, and explores the usefulness of organizational behavior theory in understanding these relationships. To date, many formal faculty mentoring programs are in operation…

  11. The Workplace Satisfaction of Newly-Tenured Faculty Members at Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Brendan Christopher

    2013-01-01

    If faculty are dissatisfied with their work, colleges and universities can experience educational and organizational repercussions that include contentious departmental climates and stagnant work productivity. Researchers have studied the workplace satisfaction of faculty during three traditional career stages: the tenure-track, middle-career, and…

  12. Factors Impacting Faculty Research Productivity at a Highly-Ranked University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fung, Jin Lung Michael

    2017-01-01

    Universities around the world are facing increasing pressure to perform well in rankings, and rankings results have been shown to impact institutional reputation, ability to secure funding, and recruitment of students and faculty. Faculty research productivity is one of the main factors impacting rankings performance, and the aim of this project…

  13. Latino Faculty in STEM Disciplines: Motivation to Engage in Research Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lechuga, Vicente M.

    2012-01-01

    The scarcity of underrepresented faculty members in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines is an issue of great concern to education researchers and scholars alike. Despite their low representation, many minority faculty are able to remain motivated, even when facing barriers due to their ethnicity. I present…

  14. Faculty Perceptions of Students in Life and Physical Science Research Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonyo, Claire P.; Cantwell, Brendan

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study involved interviews of 32 faculty principle investigators at three research institutions and explored how they view the role of students within physical and life science labs. We used socialization theory and student engagement literature to analyze faculty views, which can contribute to student investment in STEM fields.…

  15. Southern Coup: Recruiting African American Faculty Members at an Elite Private Southern Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Thomas Gregory; Smith, Theophus

    2008-01-01

    Competition for highly qualified African American faculty members among elite universities in the United States remains keen. Two of the most successful research universities at recruiting African American faculty members are located in the Southeast. Employing a conceptual framework grounded in organizational culture and climate literature, in…

  16. Faculty Fathers: Toward a New Ideal in the Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallee, Margaret W.

    2014-01-01

    For the past two decades, colleges and universities have focused significant attention on helping female faculty balance work and family by implementing a series of family-friendly policies. Although most policies were targeted at men and women alike, women were intended as the primary targets and recipients. This groundbreaking book makes clear…

  17. Faculty Perspectives of Satisfaction at a Large, Public, Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Dave P.

    2013-01-01

    Higher education today is in the midst of massive transformation and the current landscape of change is unprecedented because of the sheer number of institution-molding forces that are at play and the pervasive impact these forces are having on reshaping the academy. These wide-ranging, seismic shifts have affected every aspect of faculty worklife…

  18. Campus Climate Faculty/Staff/Administrator Survey. Institutional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattice, Nancy J.

    In fall 1994, College of the Canyons (COC), in California, conducted a survey of all 380 faculty, staff, and administrators to determine their attitudes toward and experiences at the college. The survey rate was 31.8%, with 121 responses and results were compared to findings from a spring 1994 survey completed by 545 students for a 30.8% response…

  19. Peer bullying in seniors' subsidised apartment communities in Saskatoon, Canada: participatory research.

    PubMed

    Goodridge, Donna; Heal-Salahub, Jennifer; PausJenssen, Elliot; James, George; Lidington, Joan

    2017-07-01

    Given that 'home' is the major physical-spatial environment of many older adults and that home, social and neighbourhood environments are well-recognised to impact both the ability to age in place and quality of life in this population, a better understanding of the nature of social interactions within seniors' communal living environments is critical for health promotion. This paper describes a two-phase participatory research study examining peer bullying by older adults conducted in April and May, 2016. Responding to needs expressed by tenants, the objectives of this study were to identify the nature, prevalence and consequences of peer bullying for tenants of two low-income senior apartment communities. In collaboration with the local Older Adult Abuse Task Force, a screening survey on bullying was distributed to all tenants. Findings (n = 49) indicated that 39% of tenants had witnessed peer bullying and 29% had experienced bullying by peers. An adapted version of a youth bullying survey was administered in follow-up face-to-face interviews with 13 tenants. The most common forms of peer bullying were deliberate social exclusion and hurtful comments. The majority of respondents indicated that bullying was a problem for seniors and that bullies hurt other people. Outcomes of bullying included feelings of dejection and difficulties conducting everyday activities. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The undergraduate-postgraduate-faculty triad: unique functions and tensions associated with undergraduate research experiences at research universities.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Erin L; Johnson, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    We present an exploratory study of how undergraduates' involvement in research influences postgraduates (i.e., graduate and postdoctoral researchers) and faculty. We used a qualitative approach to examine the relationships among undergraduates, postgraduates, and the faculty head in a research group. In this group, undergraduates viewed postgraduates as more approachable than the faculty head both literally and figuratively. Mentorship by postgraduates presented unique challenges for undergraduates, including unrealistic expectations and varying abilities to mentor. The postgraduates and faculty head concurred that undergraduates contributed to the group's success and served as a source of frustration. Postgraduates appreciated the opportunity to observe multiple approaches to mentoring as they saw the faculty head and other postgraduates interact with undergraduates. The faculty head viewed undergraduate research as important for propagating the research community and for gaining insights into undergraduates and their postgraduate mentors. These results highlight how the involvement of undergraduates and postgraduates in research can limit and enhance the research experiences of members of the undergraduate-postgraduate-faculty triad. A number of tensions emerge that we hypothesize are intrinsic to undergraduate research experiences at research universities. Future studies can focus on determining the generalizability of these findings to other groups and disciplines.

  1. Evaluation of doctoral nursing programs in Japan by faculty members and their educational and research activities.

    PubMed

    Arimoto, Azusa; Gregg, Misuzu F; Nagata, Satoko; Miki, Yuko; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2012-07-01

    Evaluation of doctoral programs in nursing is becoming more important with the rapid increase in the programs in Japan. This study aimed to evaluate doctoral nursing programs by faculty members and to analyze the relationship of the evaluation with educational and research activities of faculty members in Japan. Target settings were all 46 doctoral nursing programs. Eighty-five faculty members from 28 programs answered the questionnaire, which included 17 items for program evaluation, 12 items for faculty evaluation, 9 items for resource evaluation, 3 items for overall evaluations, and educational and research activities. A majority gave low evaluations for sources of funding, the number of faculty members and support staff, and administrative systems. Faculty members who financially supported a greater number of students gave a higher evaluation for extramural funding support, publication, provision of diverse learning experiences, time of supervision, and research infrastructure. The more time a faculty member spent on advising doctoral students, the higher were their evaluations on the supportive learning environment, administrative systems, time of supervision, and timely feedback on students' research. The findings of this study indicate a need for improvement in research infrastructure, funding sources, and human resources to achieve quality nursing doctoral education in Japan. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Student and Faculty Outcomes of Undergraduate Science Research Projects by Geographically Dispersed Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Lawton; Kennepohl, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    Senior undergraduate research projects are important components of most undergraduate science degrees. The delivery of such projects in a distance education format is challenging. Athabasca University (AU) science project courses allow distance education students to complete research project courses by working with research supervisors in their…

  3. Resident research associateships. Postdoctoral and senior research awards: Opportunities for research at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Opportunities for research as part of NASA-sponsored programs at the JPL cover: Earth and space sciences; systems; telecommunications science and engineering; control and energy conversion; applied mechanics; information systems; and observational systems. General information on applying for an award for tenure as a guest investigator, conditions, of the award, and details of the application procedure are provided.

  4. NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. 1991 Research Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Beymer, Mark A. (Editor); Armstrong, Dennis W. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Reports from the NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program are presented. The editors are responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many problems of current interest to NASA Kennedy. Some representative titles are as follows: Development of an Accelerated Test Method for the Determination of Susceptibility to Atmospheric Corrosion; Hazardous Gas Leak Analysis in the Space Shuttle; Modeling and Control of the Automated Radiator Inspection Device; Study of the Finite Element Software Packages at KSC; Multispectral Image Processing for Plants; Algorithms for Contours Depicting Static Electric Fields during Adverse Weather Conditions; Transient Study of a Cryogenic Hydrogen Filling System; and Precision Cleaning Verification of Nonvolatile Residues by using Water, Ultrasonics, and Turbidity Analyses.

  5. Faculty Development for Medical School Community-Based Faculty: A Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance Study Exploring Institutional Requirements and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Drowos, Joanna; Baker, Suzanne; Harrison, Suzanne Leonard; Minor, Suzanne; Chessman, Alexander W; Baker, Dennis

    2017-08-01

    Community-based faculty play a large role in training medical students nationwide and require faculty development. The authors hypothesized that positive relationships exist between clerkships paying preceptors and requiring faculty development, and between protected clerkship directors' time and delivering face-to-face preceptor training, as well as with the number or length of community-based preceptor visits. Through under standing the quantity, delivery methods, barriers, and institutional support for faculty development provided to community-based preceptors teaching in family medicine clerkships, best practices can be developed. Data from the 2015 Council of Academic Family Medicine's Educational Research Alliance survey of Family Medicine Clerkship Directors were analyzed. The cross-sectional survey of clerkship directors is distributed annually to institutional representatives of U.S. and Canadian accredited medical schools. Survey questions focused on the requirements, delivery methods, barriers, and institutional support available for providing faculty development to community-based preceptors. Paying community-based preceptors was positively correlated with requiring faculty development in family medicine clerkships. The greatest barrier to providing faculty development was community-based preceptor time availability; however, face-to-face methods remain the most common delivery strategy. Many family medicine clerkship directors perform informal or no needs assessment in developing faculty development topics for community-based faculty. Providing payment to community preceptors may allow schools to enhance faculty development program activities and effectiveness. Medical schools could benefit from constructing a formal curriculum for faculty development, including formal preceptor needs assessment and program evaluation. Clerkship directors may consider recruiting and retaining community-based faculty by employing innovative faculty development delivery

  6. Work-life balance of nursing faculty in research- and practice-focused doctoral programs.

    PubMed

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C; Cantrell, Mary Ann; Heverly, Mary Ann; Jenkinson, Amanda; Nthenge, Serah

    2015-01-01

    The growing shortage of nursing faculty and the need for faculty to teach doctoral students to address the shortage call for examination of factors that may contribute to the shortage, including those that are potentially modifiable, including work-life balance.This descriptive study examined work-life balance of a national sample of nursing faculty teaching in research-focused and practice-focused doctoral programs. Data were collected through an online survey of 554 doctoral program faculty members to identify their perceptions of work-life balance and predictors of work-life balance. Work-life balance scores indicated better work-life balance than expected. Factors associated with good work-life balance included higher academic rank, having tenure, older age, years in education, current faculty position, and no involvement in clinical practice. Current faculty position was the best predictor of work-life balance. Although work-life balance was viewed positively by study participants, efforts are needed to strengthen factors related to positive work/life in view of the increasing workload of doctoral faculty as the numbers of doctoral students increase and the number of seasoned faculty decrease with anticipated waves of retirements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Write More Articles, Get More Grants: The Impact of Department Climate on Faculty Research Productivity.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Jennifer; Savoy, Julia N; Kaatz, Anna; Lee, You-Geon; Filut, Amarette; Carnes, Molly

    2017-05-01

    Many studies find that female faculty in academic medicine, science, and engineering experience adverse workplace climates. This study longitudinally investigates whether department climate is associated with future research productivity and whether the associations are stronger for female than male faculty. Two waves of a faculty climate survey, institutional grant records, and publication records were collected for 789 faculties in academic medicine, science, and engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison between 2000 and 2010. Research productivity was measured as Number of Publications and Number of Grants awarded, and department climate was measured with scales for professional interactions, department decision-making practices, climate for underrepresented groups, and work/life balance. Ordinary least squares and negative binomial regression methods were used to assess gender differences in productivity, influences of department climate on productivity, and gender differences in effects of climate on productivity. Female faculty published fewer articles and were awarded fewer grants in the baseline period, but their productivity did not differ from male faculty on these measures in subsequent years. Number of Publications was positively affected by professional interactions, but negatively affected by positive work/life balance. Number of Grants awarded was positively affected by climate for underrepresented groups. These main effects did not differ by gender; however, some three-way interactions illuminated how different aspects of department climate affected productivity differently for men and women in specific situations. In perhaps the first study to assess the longitudinal impact of department climate on faculty research productivity, positive department climate is associated with significantly greater productivity for all faculty-women and men. However, some positive aspects of climate (specifically, work/life balance) may be associated with

  8. Negotiation in academic medicine: narratives of faculty researchers and their mentors.

    PubMed

    Sambuco, Dana; Dabrowska, Agata; Decastro, Rochelle; Stewart, Abigail; Ubel, Peter A; Jagsi, Reshma

    2013-04-01

    Few researchers have explored the negotiation experiences of academic medical faculty even though negotiation is crucial to their career success. The authors sought to understand medical faculty researchers' experiences with and perceptions of negotiation. Between February 2010 and August 2011, the authors conducted semistructured, in-depth telephone interviews with 100 former recipients of National Institutes of Health mentored career development awards and 28 of their mentors. Purposive sampling ensured a diverse range of viewpoints. Multiple analysts thematically coded verbatim transcripts using qualitative data analysis software. Participants described the importance of negotiation in academic medical careers but also expressed feeling naïve and unprepared for these negotiations, particularly as junior faculty. Award recipients focused on power, leverage, and strategy, and they expressed a need for training and mentorship to learn successful negotiation skills. Mentors, by contrast, emphasized the importance of flexibility and shared interests in creating win-win situations for both the individual faculty member and the institution. When faculty construed negotiation as adversarial and/or zero-sum, participants believed it required traditionally masculine traits and perceived women to be at a disadvantage. Academic medical faculty often lack the skills and knowledge necessary for successful negotiation, especially early in their careers. Many view negotiation as an adversarial process of the sort that experts call "hard positional bargaining." Increasing awareness of alternative negotiation techniques (e.g., "principled negotiation," in which shared interests, mutually satisfying options, and fair standards are emphasized) may encourage the success of medical faculty, particularly women.

  9. [The medical faculty of the Wittenberg University 1502-1817 - the stats of research].

    PubMed

    Schlöder, Christian; Schochow, Maximilian; Steger, Florian

    2015-01-01

    This essay provides an overview of the scientific literature regarding the history of the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Wittenberg, Germany. The University of Wittenberg was the domain, where Martin Luther and Philipp Melanchton worked; in the 16th century it was one of the greatest universities of the Holy Roman Empire. There has been a controversial discussion on the history of the Faculty of Medicine since the mid-19th century. Since the 1980s, it is an accepted and studied field of research on its own. The various publications on the topic can be subdivided into three specific areas: 1. Reformation and medicine, 2. biographic works on professors of medicine, and 3. historical works regarding social and librarian fields of research. The results of those works can be interpreted and merged in view of the Faculty of Medicine. However, for a revalidation of the faculty's role within an European scientific scene further scrutiny of sources is needed.

  10. Participation of Employees and Students of the Faculty of Geodesy and Cartography in Polar Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasik, Mariusz; Adamek, Artur; Rajner, Marcin; Kurczyński, Zdzisław; Pachuta, Andrzej; Woźniak, Marek; Bylina, Paweł; Próchniewicz, Dominik

    2016-06-01

    This year the Faculty of Geodesy and Cartography, Warsaw University of Technology celebrates its 95th jubilee, which provides an opportunity to present the Faculty's rich traditions in polar research. Employees and students of the faculty for almost 60 years have taken part in research expeditions to the polar circle. The article presents various studies typical of geodesy and cartography, as well as miscellany of possible measurement applications and geodetic techniques used to support interdisciplinary research. Wide range of geodetic techniques used in polar studies includes classic angular and linear surveys, photogrammetric techniques, gravimetric measurements, GNSS satellite techniques and satellite imaging. Those measurements were applied in glaciological, geological, geodynamic, botanical researches as well as in cartographic studies. Often they were used in activities aiming to ensure continuous functioning of Polish research stations on both hemispheres. This study is a short overview of thematic scope and selected research results conducted by our employees and students.

  11. Assessment of the Impact of Teaching Demands on Research Productivity Among Doctoral Nursing Program Faculty.

    PubMed

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Cantrell, Mary Ann; Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C; Heverly, Mary Ann; Jenkinson, Amanda; Nthenge, Serah

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a study that examined the research and scholarship productivity of doctorally prepared nursing faculty teaching and mentoring doctoral students and the conflicting demands on them to maintain programs of research and scholarship. The specific aims were to (a) examine the research productivity and scholarship of faculty members teaching in doctoral programs and mentoring doctoral students to examine the perceived effectiveness of existing institutional mechanisms to support scholarship, (b) explore institutional features and personal practices used by doctoral program faculty to develop and maintain research and scholarship productivity, and (c) analyze predictors of scholarship productivity. Data were collected via an on-line researcher-developed survey that examined doctoral faculty roles/responsibilities and their relationship to their scholarly productivity, overall research productivity, and institutional features and personal practices to support research/scholarship activities. Survey respondents reported spending a large amount of time engaged in research-related activities with 58.9% (n = 326) spending anywhere from 6 to 20 hours per week conducting research, writing research-based papers, giving presentations, grant writing, or conducting evidence-based improvement projects. Scholar productivity among the respondents was robust. Personal practices that most strongly supported faculty members' scholarship productivity were the belief that engaging in scholarship made them better teachers and the personal gratification in experiencing doctoral students' successes. A multiple regression analysis conducted to determine predictors of productivity indicated that the strongest predictor was the average number of hours spent on research/scholarship-related activities, followed by time bought out from teaching and other responsibilities of the faculty role for research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Write More Articles, Get More Grants: The Impact of Department Climate on Faculty Research Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Savoy, Julia N.; Kaatz, Anna; Lee, You-Geon; Filut, Amarette; Carnes, Molly

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Many studies find that female faculty in academic medicine, science, and engineering experience adverse workplace climates. This study longitudinally investigates whether department climate is associated with future research productivity and whether the associations are stronger for female than male faculty. Method: Two waves of a faculty climate survey, institutional grant records, and publication records were collected for 789 faculties in academic medicine, science, and engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison between 2000 and 2010. Research productivity was measured as Number of Publications and Number of Grants awarded, and department climate was measured with scales for professional interactions, department decision-making practices, climate for underrepresented groups, and work/life balance. Ordinary least squares and negative binomial regression methods were used to assess gender differences in productivity, influences of department climate on productivity, and gender differences in effects of climate on productivity. Results: Female faculty published fewer articles and were awarded fewer grants in the baseline period, but their productivity did not differ from male faculty on these measures in subsequent years. Number of Publications was positively affected by professional interactions, but negatively affected by positive work/life balance. Number of Grants awarded was positively affected by climate for underrepresented groups. These main effects did not differ by gender; however, some three-way interactions illuminated how different aspects of department climate affected productivity differently for men and women in specific situations. Conclusions: In perhaps the first study to assess the longitudinal impact of department climate on faculty research productivity, positive department climate is associated with significantly greater productivity for all faculty—women and men. However, some positive aspects of climate

  13. A profile of U.S. nursing faculty in research- and practice-focused doctoral education.

    PubMed

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C; Cantrell, Mary Ann; Heverly, Mary Ann; Nthenge, Serah; Jenkinson, Amanda

    2015-03-01

    This study, which is part of a larger project, was conducted to profile the nursing faculty in the United States teaching in PhD and DNP programs. This is a descriptive study. A sample of 554 nursing faculty who teach in PhD and DNP programs was recruited by email solicitation to represent all geographic regions of the United States. Data were collected from November 2013 through January 2014 using an online survey instrument. The instrument was developed based on results of review of the literature and of focus groups of doctoral faculty (faculty teaching in doctoral programs) to ascertain characteristics of faculty teaching in doctoral programs and of the schools in which they teach. Frequencies and descriptive statistics are reported. Growth in DNP programs has outpaced growth in PhD programs, and DNP graduates have moved into doctoral education in greater numbers than PhD graduates. DNP faculty report less prior experience and current productivity scholarship than faculty in PhD programs only or both types of programs. Strategies are needed to ensure that doctoral programs are staffed by faculty who are prepared for doctoral education and the development of nursing science. The Institute of Medicine has recommended doubling the number of doctorally prepared nurses in the United States by 2020 to ensure that sufficient numbers of faculty are available to prepare the nursing labor force that is needed for delivery of healthcare services. Nurse scientists are needed to contribute to improvement in patient care quality and safety, and practice leaders are needed to facilitate the translation of research into safe, high-quality, and cost-effective care. The landscape of doctoral education in nursing is rapidly changing. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  14. "You Need to Have a Street Beat": A Qualitative Study of Faculty Research Needs and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe-Gulick, Amalia; Valentine, Greta; Brooks-Kieffer, Jamene

    2017-01-01

    In the spring of 2015, 14 faculty members in social science or in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) spoke with a working group from the University of Kansas (KU) Libraries regarding their research needs and challenges. Their responses highlighted a dynamic research environment in which individual researchers desire to…

  15. Curriculum and Faculty Development for the Teaching of Academic Research Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Judy E.; Elliott, Deni

    This report summarizes a three-year project to design a graduate level course in ethics and scientific research at Dartmouth College (New Hampshire). The goals of the project were: (1) to train faculty to teach a course in research ethics, (2) to pilot-teach a graduate course in ethics and scientific research, and (3) to develop teaching materials…

  16. A Needs Assessment Informs Development of a Participatory Research Faculty Development Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salsberg, Jon; Seller, Robbyn; Shea, Laura; Macaulay, Ann C.

    2012-01-01

    University-based researchers are finding they need a new set of skills to collaborate meaningfully with non-academic research partners, and to compete for funding opportunities that require community and end-user partnerships. This article describes a needs assessment conducted to develop a participatory research faculty development workshop at…

  17. Analysis of Selected Characteristics of Faculty Conducted Curriculum Research in Small Colleges. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milliken, Russell A.

    The objective of this study was to identify characteristics of researchers and small, undergraduate colleges supportive of curriculum research. A questionnaire, designed to determine professional characteristics of the respondents, and environmental, and organizational factors supportive of curriculum research was mailed to the total faculty of…

  18. Faculty Time Allocations and Research Productivity: Gender, Race, and Family Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellas, Marcia L.; Toutkoushian, Robert K.

    1999-01-01

    A study using data from 14,614 full-time faculty examined total work hours, research productivity, and allocation of work time among teaching, research, and service. The study found variation in time expenditures and research output influenced by gender, race/ethnicity, and marital/parental status, but findings were also sensitive to definitions…

  19. Influences of Creative Personality and Working Environment on the Research Productivity of Business School Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Kihwan; Choi, Suk Bong

    2017-01-01

    Previous research on creative working environments has focused on business organizations. This study examined the influence of creative personality and creative working environment on the research productivity of business faculty. It was hypothesized that creative personality, family support, colleague support, research resources, and workload…

  20. Faculty and Student Teams and National Laboratories: Expanding the Reach of Research Opportunities and Workforce Development

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn,N.; White, K.; Stegman, M.

    The Faculty and Student Teams (FaST) Program, a cooperative effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and the National Science Foundation (NSF), brings together collaborative research teams composed of a researcher at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and a faculty member with two or three undergraduate students from a college or university. Begun by the Department of Energy in 2000 with the primary goal of building research capacity at a faculty member's home institution, the FaST Program focuses its recruiting efforts on faculty from colleges and universities with limited research facilities and those institutions that serve populations under-representedmore » in the fields of science, engineering and technology, particularly women and minorities. Once assembled, a FaST team spends a summer engaged in hands-on research working alongside a laboratory scientist. This intensely collaborative environment fosters sustainable relationships between the faulty members and BNL that allow faculty members and their BNL colleagues to submit joint proposals to federal agencies, publish papers in peer-reviewed journals, reform local curriculum, and develop new or expand existing research labs at their home institutions.« less

  1. The Integration of Research, Teaching, and Learning: Preparation of the Future STEM Faculty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jariwala, Manher

    Graduate students at research universities shape the future of STEM undergraduate education in the United States. These future faculty flow into the STEM faculties of several thousand research universities, comprehensive universities, liberal arts colleges, and community and tribal colleges. The Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching, and Learning (CIRTL) uses graduate education as the leverage point to develop STEM faculty with the capability and commitment to implement and improve effective teaching and learning practices. CIRTL has developed, implemented, and evaluated successful strategies based on three core ideas: teaching-as-research, learning communities, and learning-through-diversity. A decade of research demonstrates that STEM future faculty participating in CIRTL learning communities understand, use, and advance high-impact teaching practices. Today the CIRTL Network includes 43 research universities. Ultimately, CIRTL seeks a national STEM faculty who enable all students to learn effectively and achieve STEM literacy, whose teaching enhances recruitment into STEM careers, and whose leadership ensures continued advancement of STEM education.

  2. Faculty development initiatives to advance research literacy and evidence-based practice at CAM academic institutions.

    PubMed

    Long, Cynthia R; Ackerman, Deborah L; Hammerschlag, Richard; Delagran, Louise; Peterson, David H; Berlin, Michelle; Evans, Roni L

    2014-07-01

    To present the varied approaches of 9 complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) institutions (all grantees of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine) used to develop faculty expertise in research literacy and evidence-based practice (EBP) in order to integrate these concepts into CAM curricula. A survey to elicit information on the faculty development initiatives was administered via e-mail to the 9 program directors. All 9 completed the survey, and 8 grantees provided narrative summaries of faculty training outcomes. The grantees found the following strategies for implementing their programs most useful: assess needs, develop and adopt research literacy and EBP competencies, target early adopters and change leaders, employ best practices in teaching and education, provide meaningful incentives, capitalize on resources provided by grant partners, provide external training opportunities, and garner support from institutional leadership. Instructional approaches varied considerably across grantees. The most common were workshops, online resources, in-person short courses, and in-depth seminar series developed by the grantees. Many also sent faculty to intensive multiday extramural training programs. Program evaluation included measuring participation rates and satisfaction and the integration of research literacy and EBP learning objectives throughout the academic curricula. Most grantees measured longitudinal changes in beliefs, attitudes, opinions, and competencies with repeated faculty surveys. A common need across all 9 CAM grantee institutions was foundational training for faculty in research literacy and EBP. Therefore, each grantee institution developed and implemented a faculty development program. In developing the framework for their programs, grantees used strategies that were viewed critical for success, including making them multifaceted and unique to their specific institutional needs. These strategies, in conjunction with the

  3. Perceived Barriers to Scholarship and Research Among Pharmacy Practice Faculty: Survey Report from the AACP Scholarship/Research Faculty Development Task Force

    PubMed Central

    Robles, J. R.; Youmans, Sharon L.; Byrd, Debbie C.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To identify problems that pharmacy practice faculty members face in pursuing scholarship and to develop and recommend solutions. Methods Department chairs were asked to forward a Web-based survey instrument to their faculty members. Global responses and responses stratified by demographics were summarized and analyzed. Results Between 312 and 340 faculty members answered questions that identified barriers to scholarship and recommended corrective strategies to these barriers. The most common barrier was insufficient time (57%), and the most common recommendation was for help to “identify a research question and how to answer it.” Sixty percent reported that scholarship was required for advancement but only 32% thought scholarship should be required. Forty-one percent reported that the importance of scholarship is overemphasized. Conclusions These survey results provide guidance to improve the quantity and quality of scholarship for faculty members who wish to pursue scholarship, although many of the survey respondents indicated they did not regard scholarship as a priority. PMID:19513155

  4. Extracurricular research activities among senior medical students in Kuwait: experiences, attitudes, and barriers.

    PubMed

    Al-Halabi, Becher; Marwan, Yousef; Hasan, Mohammad; Alkhadhari, Sulaiman

    2014-01-01

    Research is the foundation of scientific advancement and improvement in quality of health care, which ensures the good health of the community. The aim of this study is to explore experiences, attitudes, and barriers of medical students in Kuwait University (KU) in regards to extracurricular research. A questionnaire about extracurricular research activities (ie, any research activity that is not part of the required undergraduate curriculum, such as publishing a paper, research elective, etc) was distributed to 175 senior medical students (years 6 and 7). Descriptive and chi-square analyses were used to analyze the responses, considering a P-value of <0.05 as the cut-off level for significance. The main outcome was defined as taking part in any of the extracurricular research activities. Of the 150 participants (response rate = 85.7%), 26 (17.3%), 68 (45.3%), 52 (34.7%), and 17 (11.3%) had published their required medical school research, presented abstracts in conferences, conducted extracurricular research, and completed a research elective/course, respectively; 99 (66.0%) took part in any of these activities. Participants who read medical journals regularly (81; 54%) reported higher participation in extracurricular research activities than those who did not read journals (P=0.003). Improving the availability of mentors for students' extracurricular research was ranked by the participants as the most important factor to improve their participation in extracurricular research (4.05/5.00). Despite the lack of adequate support, extracurricular research activities among medical students of KU were comparable to students from other countries. Barriers for these activities should be addressed by KU medical educators in order to enhance research activities among the students.

  5. Extracurricular research activities among senior medical students in Kuwait: experiences, attitudes, and barriers

    PubMed Central

    Al-Halabi, Becher; Marwan, Yousef; Hasan, Mohammad; Alkhadhari, Sulaiman

    2014-01-01

    Background Research is the foundation of scientific advancement and improvement in quality of health care, which ensures the good health of the community. The aim of this study is to explore experiences, attitudes, and barriers of medical students in Kuwait University (KU) in regards to extracurricular research. Methods A questionnaire about extracurricular research activities (ie, any research activity that is not part of the required undergraduate curriculum, such as publishing a paper, research elective, etc) was distributed to 175 senior medical students (years 6 and 7). Descriptive and chi-square analyses were used to analyze the responses, considering a P-value of <0.05 as the cut-off level for significance. The main outcome was defined as taking part in any of the extracurricular research activities. Results Of the 150 participants (response rate = 85.7%), 26 (17.3%), 68 (45.3%), 52 (34.7%), and 17 (11.3%) had published their required medical school research, presented abstracts in conferences, conducted extracurricular research, and completed a research elective/course, respectively; 99 (66.0%) took part in any of these activities. Participants who read medical journals regularly (81; 54%) reported higher participation in extracurricular research activities than those who did not read journals (P=0.003). Improving the availability of mentors for students’ extracurricular research was ranked by the participants as the most important factor to improve their participation in extracurricular research (4.05/5.00). Conclusion Despite the lack of adequate support, extracurricular research activities among medical students of KU were comparable to students from other countries. Barriers for these activities should be addressed by KU medical educators in order to enhance research activities among the students. PMID:24812535

  6. Engaging TBR Faculty in Online Research Communities and Emerging Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renner, Jasmine

    2017-01-01

    The growing impact of online research communities and emerging technologies is creating a significant paradigm shift and consequently changing the current research landscape of higher education. The rise of online research communities exemplifies a shift from traditional research engagements, to online research communities using "Web…

  7. Learning among nursing faculty: insights from a participatory action research project about teaching international students.

    PubMed

    Del Fabbro, Letitia; Mitchell, Creina; Shaw, Julie

    2015-03-01

    It is imperative that nursing education addresses the issues arising from globalization. The adjustment challenges faced by international nursing students globally highlight the need to understand how nursing faculty experience and teach nursing classes with a mix of domestic and foreign students. This article reports on a participatory action research (PAR) study to examine and enhance the scholarly teaching of international nursing students. The overarching research question for this PAR was: How did participation in a PAR study contribute to shared learning and professional development of nursing faculty teaching international students? Five major themes were identified across the PAR: creating sharing spaces, recognizing and respecting diversity, developing and acknowledging teaching capabilities, utilizing precious time, and valuing the research. In summary, PAR was a useful approach to engage faculty in research by providing a process and a space to address concerns about the teaching and learning of international students. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. The Gender and Race-Ethnicity of Faculty in Top Science and Engineering Research Departments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutel, Ann M.; Nelson, Donna J.

    This study examines the gender and racial-ethnic composition of faculty in top research departments for science and engineering "S-E - disciplines. There are critical masses of at least 15% women in top research departments in biological sciences, psychology, and social sciences but not in physical sciences and engineering. Blacks and Hispanics together make up only 4.1% of the faculty in our study. Black and Hispanic females are the most poorly represented groups; together, they make up only 1% of the faculty in top S-E research departments. For most S-E disciplines, less than 15% of full professors in top research departments are women or non-Whites.

  9. The Implementation of Action Research for the Improvement of Biology Teaching and Learning in Senior Secondary Schools in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Udeani, U. N.; Atagana, H. I.; Esiobu, G. O.

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to implement an action research strategy to improve the teaching and learning of biology in senior secondary schools in Nigeria. Specifically the following research questions were raised: (1) What are the levels of intellectual challenge included in the activities used for classroom and laboratory instructions?…

  10. Accountability and Performance in Secondary Education in Milwaukee Public Schools. The Senior Urban Education Research Fellowship Series. Volume II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Robert; Carl, Bradley; Cheng, Huiping Emily

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes work conducted to date through the Senior Urban Education Research Fellowship (SUERF) awarded by the Council of the Great City Schools to the Value-Added Research Center (VARC) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for work in the Milwaukee Public Schools (MPS). VARC has utilized its Fellowship award, entitled…

  11. Predictors of job satisfaction among Academic Faculty: Do instructional and clinical faculty differ?

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kevin C.; Song, Jae W.; Kim, H. Myra; Woolliscroft, James O.; Quint, Elisabeth H.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Gyetko, Margaret R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To identify and compare predictors of job satisfaction between the instructional and clinical faculty tracks. Method A 61-item faculty job satisfaction survey was distributed to 1,898 academic faculty at the University of Michigan Medical School. The anonymous survey was web-based. Questions covered topics on departmental organization, research, clinical and teaching support, compensation, mentorship, and promotion. Levels of satisfaction were contrasted between the two tracks, and predictors of job satisfaction were identified using linear regression models. Results The response rates for the instructional and clinical tracks were 43.1% and 41.3%, respectively. Clinical faculty reported being less satisfied with how they are mentored, and fewer reported understanding the process for promotion. There was no significant difference in overall job satisfaction between faculty tracks. Surprisingly, clinical faculty with mentors were significantly less satisfied with how they were being mentored, with career advancement and overall job satisfaction, compared to instructional faculty mentees. Additionally, senior-level clinical faculty were significantly less satisfied with their opportunities to mentor junior faculty compared to senior-level instructional faculty. Significant predictors of job satisfaction for both tracks included areas of autonomy, meeting career expectations, work-life balance, and departmental leadership. Unique to the clinical track, compensation and career advancement variables also emerged as significant predictors. Conclusion Greater effort must be placed in the continued attention to faculty well-being both at the institutional level and at the level of departmental leadership. Success in enhancing job satisfaction is more likely if directed by locally designed assessments involving department chairs, specifically in fostering more effective mentoring relationships focused on making available career advancement activities such as

  12. How faculty learn about and implement research-based instructional strategies: The case of Peer Instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dancy, Melissa; Henderson, Charles; Turpen, Chandra

    2016-06-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Preparing and Supporting University Physics Educators.] The lack of knowledge about how to effectively spread and sustain the use of research-based instructional strategies is currently a significant barrier to the improvement of undergraduate physics education. In this paper we address this lack of knowledge by reporting on an interview study of 35 physics faculty, of varying institution types, who were self-reported users of, former users of, or knowledgeable nonusers of the research-based instructional strategy Peer Instruction. Interview questions included in this analysis focused on the faculty's experiences, knowledge, and use of Peer Instruction, along with general questions about current and past teaching methods used by the interviewee. The primary findings include the following: (i) Faculty self-reported user status is an unreliable measure of their actual practice. (ii) Faculty generally modify specific instructional strategies and may modify out essential components. (iii) Faculty are often unaware of the essential features of an instructional strategy they claim to know about or use. (iv) Informal social interactions provide a significant communication channel in the dissemination process, in contrast to the formal avenues of workshops, papers, websites, etc., often promoted by change agents, and (v) experience with research-based strategies as a graduate student or through curriculum development work may be highly impactful. These findings indicate that educational transformation can be better facilitated by improving communication with faculty, supporting effective modification by faculty during implementation, and acknowledging and understanding the large impact of informal social interactions as a mode of dissemination.

  13. Partnered Research Experiences for Junior Faculty at Minority-Serving Institutions Enhance Professional Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Andrew G.; Leibowitz, Michael J.; Murray, Sandra A.; Burgess, David; Denetclaw, Wilfred F.; Carrero-Martinez, Franklin A.; Asai, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Scientific workforce diversity is critical to ensuring the realization of our national research goals and minority-serving institutions play a vital role in preparing undergraduate students for science careers. This paper summarizes the outcomes of supporting career training and research practices by faculty from teaching-intensive,…

  14. The 1982 ASEE-NASA Faculty Fellowship program (Aeronautics and Research)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, D. N.; Hodge, J. R.; Emadi, F. P.

    1982-01-01

    The NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program (Aeronautics and Research) conducted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center during the summer of 1982 is described. Abstracts of the Final Reports submitted by the Fellows detailing the results of their research are also presented.

  15. Faculty Motivation to Mentor Students through Undergraduate Research Programs: A Study of Enabling and Constraining Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morales, Danielle X.; Grineski, Sara E.; Collins, Timothy W.

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate research experiences are a "high impact" educational practice that confer benefits to students. However, little attention has been paid to understanding faculty motivation to mentor undergraduate students through research training programs, even as the number of programs has grown, requiring increasing numbers of faculty…

  16. Responsible Conduct of Research in Communication Sciences and Disorders: Faculty and Student Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minifie, Fred D.; Robey, Randall R.; Horner, Jennifer; Ingham, Janis C.; Lansing, Charissa; McCartney, James H.; Alldredge, Elham-Eid; Slater, Sarah C.; Moss, Sharon E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Two Web-based surveys (Surveys I and II) were used to assess perceptions of faculty and students in Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) regarding the responsible conduct of research (RCR). Method: Survey questions addressed 9 RCR domains thought important to the responsible conduct of research: (a) human subjects protections; (b)…

  17. Supporting Faculty Efforts to Obtain Research Funding: Successful Practices and Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiser, Robert A.; Moore, Alison L.; Bradley, Terra W.; Walker, Reddick; Zhao, Weinan

    2015-01-01

    Faculty members face increasing pressure to secure external research funding, and as a result, there is a critical need for professional development in this area. This paper describes a series of tools and services that have been designed and implemented by a College of Education Office of Research at a southeastern university in order to help…

  18. The Conceptual Landscape of iSchools: Examining Current Research Interests of Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmberg, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This study describes the intellectual landscape of iSchools and examines how the various iSchools map on to these research areas. Method: The primary focus of the data collection process was on faculty members' current research interests as described by the individuals themselves. A co-word analysis of all iSchool faculty…

  19. Research Productivity and Perceived Teaching Effectiveness: A Survey of Economics Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noser, Thomas C.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A national study of university economics faculty (n=343) examined the relationship between self-reported research output and teaching evaluation scores. Findings indicated a very weak relationship between research productivity and classroom performance, but institutional and individual characteristics seemed to explain some differences. Faculty…

  20. The Faculty Liaison as Research Coordinator: A Growing Need for the Academic Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grochmal, Helen M.

    This paper recommends the creation of a position of research coordinator by expanding the role of faculty liaison within colleges and universities to help bring services generally provided by special libraries to academic researchers. Reasons given for academic institutions to create such a position include the practicability of applying new…

  1. The Changing Nature of Governance in the Public Research University: Untangling the Web of Faculty Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yudt, Angela Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Public research universities continue to be challenged on a number of fronts--declining state revenues, increasing enrollment, calls for accountability and transparency from the public, and increasing scrutiny by governing boards. In addition, the composition of faculty at public research universities is changing. Understanding the impact that…

  2. Ask "Teaching Sociology": What Should Faculty Consider before Having Students Conduct Research in a Class?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowney, Kathleen S.

    2014-01-01

    There are many things that sociology faculty have to consider as they begin planning a student course such as: (1) why students need to understand scientific methods, by conducting research for themselves; (2) What specific learning goals and objectives will be met by students doing research, either individually or collectively?; (3) Why do…

  3. The Relationship between Statistical Analysis Abilities and the Production of Research among Saudi Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Hattami, Abdulghani Ali Dawod; Al-Ahdal, Arif Ahmed Mohammed Hassa

    2015-01-01

    Scientific research plays an important role in creating growth and progress in developing countries (Greenstone, 2010). Developed countries have realized that importance and focused on conducting scientific researches to help them make valuable decisions. Many Arab countries, including Saudi Arabia, are trying to encourage faculty members at all…

  4. Forging Faculty-Student Relationships at the College Level Using a First-Year Research Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, David C.; Davis, Patricia M.

    2008-01-01

    Coupling the scholarly activities of the chemistry research faculty with that of the first-year honors general chemistry laboratory has resulted in additional research experience for undergraduate students and a rise of productivity within the chemistry department. For seven years, first-year university honors students enrolled in the honors…

  5. From Good to Great: An Action Research Study to Improve the New Faculty Onboarding Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams-Smith, Rachel E.

    2017-01-01

    Onboarding is a procedure an organization implements to help new employees adjust to their new roles and environment. This action research project sought to answer the question of how the new faculty onboarding process at a small, private, Midwestern university could be improved. Following a review of the literature, a researcher-generated plan on…

  6. That's My Bailiwick: A Library-Sponsored Faculty Research Web Server.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderdahl, Paul A.; Hughes, Carol Ann

    2000-01-01

    Describes Bailiwick, a project at the University of Iowa library that provides Web space for faculty, staff, and graduate students to focus on particular areas of scholarly interest such as Internet bibliographies, multimedia essays, scholarly research, and collaborative research. Also explains a MOO project and a streaming video server. (LRW)

  7. Responsible Conduct of Research Assessment of Doctor of Education Candidates, Graduate Faculty, and Curriculum Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Carla J.

    2014-01-01

    The study included an assessment of doctoral students, graduate faculty, and curriculum considerations to determine the degree of infusion of research integrity and responsible conduct of research (RCR) principles within a Doctor of Education program. Study results showed substantial increases in doctoral candidates' knowledge levels of RCR,…

  8. Job Satisfaction, Salaries and Unions: The Determination of University Faculty Compensation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillydahl, Jane H.; Singell, Larry D.

    1993-01-01

    Develops a model of faculty salaries, job satisfaction, and union status, using data for 1,729 faculty members at 4-year colleges and universities. Unions significantly and positively affect full and associate professors' salaries and increase the rewards to seniority while reducing the returns to being at a research university. Union members'…

  9. An Assessment of Business Schools' Student Retention, Accreditation, and Faculty Scholarship Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavico, Frank J.; Mujtaba, Bahaudin G.

    2010-01-01

    Business schools' curriculum, faculty and graduates have become a target for many critics as they link the ethical lapses of senior executives to major scandals that have partially led to the financial challenges that the world is facing today. Some claim that business faculty research is not practical and mainly theoretical. This paper discusses…

  10. Teaching and Research Nexuses across Faculty Career Stage, Ability and Affiliated Discipline in a South Korean Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Jung Cheol

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between teaching and research is a controversial issue in higher education research. Many empirical studies have reported a near zero relationship although academics believe that teaching and research are related in diverse ways. This study focused on how the relationship differs by faculty characteristics (career stage and their…

  11. Senior academic physicians and retirement considerations.

    PubMed

    Moss, Arthur J; Greenberg, Henry; Dwyer, Edward M; Klein, Helmut; Ryan, Daniel; Francis, Charles; Marcus, Frank; Eberly, Shirley; Benhorin, Jesaia; Bodenheimer, Monty; Brown, Mary; Case, Robert; Gillespie, John; Goldstein, Robert; Haigney, Mark; Krone, Ronald; Lichstein, Edgar; Locati, Emanuela; Oakes, David; Thomsen, Poul Erik Bloch; Zareba, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of academic senior physicians are approaching their potential retirement in good health with accumulated clinical and research experience that can be a valuable asset to an academic institution. Considering the need to let the next generation ascend to leadership roles, when and how should a medical career be brought to a close? We explore the roles for academic medical faculty as they move into their senior years and approach various retirement options. The individual and institutional considerations require a frank dialogue among the interested parties to optimize the benefits while minimizing the risks for both. In the United States there is no fixed age for retirement as there is in Europe, but European physicians are initiating changes. What is certain is that careful planning, innovative thinking, and the incorporation of new patterns of medical practice are all part of this complex transition and timing of senior academic physicians into retirement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A Case Study of Spirituality in Senior Center Education: Qualitative Research in Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demarse, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a case study on the role of spirituality in adult education at a suburban senior center located in the southeast region of the country. The purpose of the case study was to understand the deeply personal role of spirituality in adult education as seen through teaching seniors and examine the personal manifestation of…

  13. Negotiation in Academic Medicine: Narratives of Faculty Researchers and Their Mentors

    PubMed Central

    Sambuco, Dana; Dabrowska, Agata; DeCastro, Rochelle; Stewart, Abigail; Ubel, Peter A.; Jagsi, Reshma

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Few researchers have explored the negotiation experiences of academic medical faculty even though negotiation is crucial to their career success. The authors sought to understand medical faculty researchers' experiences with and perceptions of negotiation. Method Between February 2010 and August 2011, the authors conducted semi-structured, in-depth telephone interviews with 100 former recipients of National Institutes of Health mentored career development awards and 28 of their mentors. Purposive sampling ensured a diverse range of viewpoints. Multiple analysts thematically coded verbatim transcripts using qualitative data analysis software. Results Participants described the importance of negotiation in academic medical careers but also expressed feeling naïve and unprepared for these negotiations, particularly as junior faculty. Award recipients focused on power, leverage, and strategy, and they expressed a need for training and mentorship to learn successful negotiation skills. Mentors, by contrast, emphasized the importance of flexibility and shared interests in creating win-win situations for both the individual faculty member and the institution. When faculty construed negotiation as adversarial and/or zero-sum, participants believed it required traditionally masculine traits and perceived women to be at a disadvantage. Conclusions Academic medical faculty often lack the skills and knowledge necessary for successful negotiation, especially early in their careers. Many view negotiation as an adversarial process of the sort that experts call “hard positional bargaining.” Increasing awareness of alternative negotiation techniques (e.g., “principled negotiation,” in which shared interests, mutually satisfying options, and fair standards are emphasized), may encourage the success of medical faculty, particularly women. PMID:23425992

  14. A formative research-guided educational intervention to improve the knowledge and attitudes of seniors towards influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hanley J; Chan, Yin Ying; Ibrahim, Muhamad Alif Bin; Wagle, Anurupa A; Wong, Christina M; Chow, Angela

    2017-11-07

    Adult influenza and pneumococcal vaccination rates in Singapore are low, and factors influencing knowledge and attitudes of seniors towards influenza, pneumonia and their respective vaccines are not well-known. Our study aims to understand the barriers and facilitators towards getting influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations among seniors in Singapore, and subsequently inform the conduct of a relevant community-based educational intervention, as well as evaluate the intervention outcomes. We performed a mixed methods study with two components: Firstly, formative research was conducted among community-dwelling seniors, using focus group discussions (FGDs), to understand their knowledge and attitudes towards influenza, pneumonia and their respective vaccines. Next, a quantitative study was conducted to evaluate knowledge of seniors and the effectiveness of an educational intervention. Four FGDs were organised with 32 participants, who were predominantly female, of lower educational background, and residing in government rental flats. Participants had varying levels of knowledge and many misconceptions about influenza, pneumonia and their respective vaccinations, with concerns about side effects and vaccine effectiveness. The formative research results were used to inform a community-based educational intervention for seniors. Our subsequent evaluation included 604 elderly participants, mainly from lower educational and socio-economic strata, who initially demonstrated poor knowledge scores (median score 5 out of 9, IQR 4-5). Following our intervention, median knowledge score improved to 7 (IQR 6-8) (p < .0001). Significant improvements in knowledge scores were observed across genders, age strata, education levels, and housing types. Our formative research identified knowledge gaps among community-dwelling seniors which affected their attitudes towards vaccination uptake. Key findings were taken into consideration when implementing the educational intervention. Our

  15. Artists as Scholars: The Research Behavior of Dance Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Shannon Marie

    2016-01-01

    The research behaviors and library use of dance scholars are widely unknown, particularly in regard to issues of access to historical materials and new technology preferences. In the past thirty years, college and university dance departments in the United States have developed into independent, research-based programs. Despite the lack of current…

  16. Training Faculty from Minority Colleges and Universities for Transportation Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leashore, Bogart R.

    1985-01-01

    Presents an overview of selected university research programs within the U.S. Department of Transportation, with a focus on grants and contracts awarded to historically Black colleges and universities. Describes a training program for urban transportation research, conducted at Howard University in 1982-83. (GC)

  17. Building interdisciplinary research models: a didactic course to prepare interdisciplinary scholars and faculty.

    PubMed

    Larson, Elaine L; Landers, Timothy F; Begg, Melissa D

    2011-02-01

    Many academicians assume that anyone can engage in interdisciplinary research, but it is clear that successful interdisciplinary efforts require mastery of specific competencies that can be learned and improved. This paper describes the development and implementation of a course designed for Master's, pre- and postdoctoral students and research faculty on models of interdisciplinary research skills, based on a set of core competencies. Major challenges included working through institutional structures that made it difficult to offer cross-school courses, and interpersonal challenges among a diverse group of students from a number of disciplines. Although universities may be poised for interdisciplinary research, strategies for faculty preparation and support are lacking. Institutions embracing the concept of team and interdisciplinary science must focus not only on the structural barriers and facilitators, but also on direct support to faculty. The didactic course described in this paper is one approach to enhance interdisciplinary research skills of scholars-in-training and faculty, and we recommend that similar efforts be widely implemented. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Assessment of Research Capacity Among Nursing Faculty in a Clinical Intensive University in The Philippines.

    PubMed

    Torres, Gian Carlo S; Estrada, Marica G; Sumile, Earl Francis R; Macindo, John Rey B; Maravilla, Susan N; Hendrix, Cristina C

    2017-10-01

    Many nursing studies are conducted in the United States, Europe, and Australia, where only a fourth of the world's population resides. There is a need to promote nursing research in Asia to enhance the contextual relevance of their evidence-based nursing interventions. A first step toward this goal is to determine the perceived research capacity among nursing faculty in academic settings in the Philippines. This study described the perceived research capacity among nursing faculty of the University of Santo Tomas - College of Nursing, Manila, Philippines. The study used a survey that contained four sections: subject demographics; knowledge and skill on research designs and research process; research involvement, services, and incentives; and factors affecting research involvement. Chi-square test of homogeneity and MANOVA analyzed the gathered data. Findings showed that the faculty perceived themselves as knowledgeable and skillful in conducting research. However, current teaching assignments hindered their capacity to conduct research. University-sponsored incentives and college-based research services had also remained underutilized despite their availability. Overall, heavy teaching load was the greatest hindrance to research endeavors. Actions must be taken to reconfigure effort allocations with careful consideration of existing university and institutional bylaws. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. How much guidance is given in the operating room? Factors influencing faculty self-reports, resident perceptions, and faculty/resident agreement.

    PubMed

    Torbeck, Laura; Williams, Reed G; Choi, Jennifer; Schmitz, Connie C; Chipman, Jeffrey G; Dunnington, Gary L

    2014-10-01

    Guidance in the operating room impacts resident confidence and ability to function independently. The purpose of this study was to explore attending surgeon guidance practices in the operating room as reported by faculty members themselves and by junior and senior residents. This was an exploratory, cross-sectional survey research study involving 91 categorical residents and 82 clinical faculty members at two academic general surgery training programs. A series of analyses of variance along with descriptive statistics were performed to understand the impact of resident training year, program, and surgeon characteristics (sex and type of surgery performed routinely) on guidance practices. Resident level (junior versus senior) significantly impacted the amount of guidance given as reported by faculty and as perceived by residents. Within each program, junior residents perceived less guidance than faculty reported giving. For senior guidance practices, however, the differences between faculty and resident practices varied by program. In terms of the effects of surgeon practice type (mostly general versus mostly complex cases), residents at both institutions felt they were more supervised closely by the faculty who perform mostly complex cases. More autonomy is given to senior than to junior residents. Additionally, faculty report a greater amount of change in their guidance practices over the training period than residents perceive. Faculty and resident agreement about the need for guidance and for autonomy are important for achieving the goals of residency training. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Community College Faculty Motivation for Basic Research, Teaching Research, and Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardre, Patricia L.

    2012-01-01

    Community college faculty members often find themselves divided between what they want to do and what they can do. Knowing what motivates faculty to engage in professional development and scholarly productive activities provides critical information for administrators. The present study explored the motivational characteristics of community…

  1. Evaluating U.S. medical schools' efforts to educate faculty researchers on research integrity and research misconduct policies and procedures.

    PubMed

    Titus, Sandra Larsen

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines how well U.S. medical school institutions are doing to promote research integrity. It is an important question to ask in order to determine whether there are sufficient and adequate protections in place to protect the U.S. Public Health Service's (PHS) resources devoted to medical research. This paper focuses on 5,100 medical school researchers' knowledge of what constitutes research misconduct as well as their willingness to report it to the research integrity officer (RIO) and educate their Ph.D. trainees. We learned that 5.6% of researchers could correctly distinguish seven or more of the nine scenarios that depicted likely research misconduct, as defined by the PHS regulations, from scenarios describing other ethical issues. Instead, researchers had expansive definitions and often inappropriately identified infractions such as conflicts of interest, Institutional Review Board (IRB) violations, and other breaches in ethical standards to be research misconduct. In addition, researchers who correctly identified four instances of likely research misconduct in the test items were highly unlikely to report their observations to a RIO. Researchers also provided insight on the factors they believe influence their decision making process of whether to report research misconduct. In addition, this paper also reports on the guidance that faculty said they provided their trainees on research misconduct issues. We conclude with a discussion and recommendations on what institutional leaders might consider doing in order to enhance their research integrity efforts and protect their institution's reputation.

  2. The 1984 ASEE-NASA summer faculty fellowship program (aeronautics and research)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dah-Nien, F.; Hodge, J. R.; Emad, F. P.

    1984-01-01

    The 1984 NASA-ASEE Faculty Fellowship Program (SFFP) is reported. The report includes: (1) a list of participants; (2) abstracts of research projects; (3) seminar schedule; (4) evaluation questionnaire; and (5) agenda of visitation by faculty programs committee. Topics discussed include: effects of multiple scattering on laser beam propagation; information management; computer techniques; guidelines for writing user documentation; 30 graphics software; high energy electron and antiproton cosmic rays; high resolution Fourier transform infrared spectrum; average monthly annual zonal and global albedos; laser backscattering from ocean surface; image processing systems; geomorphological mapping; low redshift quasars; application of artificial intelligence to command management systems.

  3. Determining Data Information Literacy Needs: A Study of Students and Research Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Jacob; Fosmire, Michael; Miller, C. C.; Nelson, Megan Sapp

    2011-01-01

    Researchers increasingly need to integrate the disposition, management, and curation of their data into their current workflows. However, it is not yet clear to what extent faculty and students are sufficiently prepared to take on these responsibilities. This paper articulates the need for a data information literacy program (DIL) to prepare…

  4. Indian Country Fellows: Foundations Pool Resources to Support TCU Faculty Dissertations, Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchbanks, Rachael

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how the American Indian College Fund helps tribal college and university (TCU) faculty members conduct research and complete their Ph.D.s--and tackle unique challenges. Funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the fellowship programs administered by the College Fund pay a one-year stipend…

  5. Good Research and Faculty Buy-in: 2 Keys to Effective Marketing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstyk, Goldie

    2008-01-01

    Effective marketing requires more than a sleek new logo. This article presents excerpts of an online discussion on the dos and don'ts of college marketing with Mary R. Stagaman, associate vice president for external relations at the University of Cincinnati. In this discussion, she noted that good research and faculty buy-in are the two keys to…

  6. University Faculty and the Value of Their Intellectual Property: Comparing IP in Teaching and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hentschke, Guilbert C.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes the protectionist and access functions of intellectual property for the teaching and research work of university faculty. The degree to which an individual piece of IP is protected or made accessible to others depends in large measure on its market-related characteristics, including costs of production, availability of…

  7. Factors Related to Faculty Research Productivity and Implications for Academic Planners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    Scrutiny over faculty allocations of time and subsequent outcomes is frequent in postsecondary education, especially at state research universities (those that receive appropriations from the state). Particularly during economic downturns, college officials and legislators must make difficult choices in fund allocation. For this reason, faculty…

  8. Does Undergraduate Student Research Constitute Scholarship? Drawing on the Experiences of One Medical Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Michelle; Howarth, F. Christopher

    2008-01-01

    While undergraduate research has been part of the learning culture in some disciplines for many years, it is only more recently that it is being included into mainstream medical curricula. Undergraduate medical students at the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, have several opportunities to undertake research…

  9. Broadening Participation in Biology Education Research: Engaging Community College Students and Faculty

    PubMed Central

    Schinske, Jeffrey N.; Balke, Virginia L.; Bangera, M. Gita; Bonney, Kevin M.; Brownell, Sara E.; Carter, Robert S.; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Dolan, Erin L.; Elliott, Samantha L.; Fletcher, Linnea; Gonzalez, Beatriz; Gorga, Joseph J.; Hewlett, James A.; Kiser, Stacey L.; McFarland, Jenny L.; Misra, Anjali; Nenortas, Apryl; Ngeve, Smith M.; Pape-Lindstrom, Pamela A.; Seidel, Shannon B.; Tuthill, Matthew C.; Yin, Yue; Corwin, Lisa A.

    2017-01-01

    Nearly half of all undergraduates are enrolled at community colleges (CCs), including the majority of U.S. students who represent groups underserved in the sciences. Yet only a small minority of studies published in discipline-based education research journals address CC biology students, faculty, courses, or authors. This marked underrepresentation of CC biology education research (BER) limits the availability of evidence that could be used to increase CC student success in biology programs. To address this issue, a diverse group of stakeholders convened at the Building Capacity for Biology Education Research at Community Colleges meeting to discuss how to increase the prevalence of CC BER and foster participation of CC faculty as BER collaborators and authors. The group identified characteristics of CCs that make them excellent environments for studying biology teaching and learning, including student diversity and institutional cultures that prioritize teaching, learning, and assessment. The group also identified constraints likely to impede BER at CCs: limited time, resources, support, and incentives, as well as misalignment between doing research and CC faculty identities as teachers. The meeting culminated with proposing strategies for faculty, administrators, journal editors, scientific societies, and funding agencies to better support CC BER. PMID:28450448

  10. The Challenge of Finding Faculty Time for Applied Research Activities in Ontario Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenkrantz, Otte

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how the role of Ontario college faculty has evolved since the advent of the Post-Secondary Education Choice and Excellence Act of 2000 and the Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology Act of 2002 in terms of whether or not the decision to create a research culture at the colleges included making time…

  11. Faculty as Undergraduate Research Mentors for Students of Color: Taking into Account the Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Joni

    2012-01-01

    This article is based on the findings of a 2-year study that examined the nature of effective faculty/student undergraduate research (UR) science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) relationships. The study site was a large urban public college where three fourths of all incoming freshmen receive need-based aid; and although not a…

  12. Fostering Undergraduate Research through a Faculty-Led Study Abroad Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shostya, Anna; Morreale, Joseph C.

    2017-01-01

    This case study contributes to the higher education curriculum development literature by showing how a faculty-led short-term study abroad experience can become the catalyst for student research and offer students an international perspective. The authors analyze students' reflections and provide data collected over the years of taking…

  13. Obstacles of Scientific Research with Faculty of University of Jadara from Their Point of View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatamleh, Habes Moh'd

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the existence of the scientific research obstacles' degree from the point of faculty at the University of Jadara from their point of view. The number of members that responded to the study reached 100 samples, and this number accounts for 80% of the study society. To achieve the objectives of the study, the researcher…

  14. How Faculty Learn about and Implement Research-Based Instructional Strategies: The Case of Peer Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dancy, Melissa; Henderson, Charles; Turpen, Chandra

    2016-01-01

    The lack of knowledge about how to effectively spread and sustain the use of research-based instructional strategies is currently a significant barrier to the improvement of undergraduate physics education. In this paper we address this lack of knowledge by reporting on an interview study of 35 physics faculty, of varying institution types, who…

  15. The Ripple Effect: Lessons from a Research and Teaching Faculty Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershberger, Andrew; Spence, Maria; Cesarini, Paul; Mara, Andrew; Jorissen, Kathleen Topolka; Albrecht, David; Gordon, Jeffrey J.; Lin, Canchu

    2009-01-01

    Building upon a related 2005 panel presentation at the 25th annual Lilly Conference on College Teaching, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, the authors, several tenure-track assistant professors and tenured associate professors who have participated in a Research and Teaching Faculty Learning Community at Bowling Green State University, share their…

  16. Use of Research-Based Instructional Strategies: How to Avoid Faculty Quitting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieman, Carl; Deslauriers, Louis; Gilley, Brett

    2013-01-01

    We have examined the teaching practices of faculty members who adopted research-based instructional strategies (RBIS) as part of the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative (CWSEI) at the University of British Columbia (UBC). Of the 70 that adopted such strategies with the support of the CWSEI program, only one subsequently stopped using these…

  17. Research Faculty Development: An Historical Perspective and Ideas for a Successful Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brutkiewicz, Randy R.

    2012-01-01

    What does it take to be successful as a tenure-track research faculty member in a School of Medicine? What are the elements necessary to run a successful laboratory? How does one find the resources and help to know what is important for promotion and tenure? Most training in graduate school or in clinical fellowships does not answer these…

  18. Faculty Research Productivity in Hong Kong across Academic Discipline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Jisun

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the research productivity of Hong Kong academics. Specifically, it explores the individual and institutional factors that contribute to their productivity while also comparing determinants across academic disciplines. We have conducted OLS regression analysis using the international survey data from "The Changing Academics…

  19. Integrating Research, Teaching and Learning: Preparing the Future National STEM Faculty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, E. J.; Pfund, C.; Mathieu, R.

    2010-08-01

    A network of universities (Howard, Michigan State, Texas A&M, University of Colorado at Boulder, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Vanderbilt) have created a National Science Foundation-funded network to prepare a future national STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) faculty committed to learning, implementing, and advancing teaching techniques that are effective for the wide range of students enrolled in higher education. The Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching and Learning (CIRTL; http://www.cirtl.net) develops, implements and evaluates professional development programs for future and current faculty. The programs comprise graduate courses, internships, and workshops, all integrated within campus learning communities. These elements are unified and guided by adherence to three core principles, or pillars: "Teaching as Research," whereby research skills are applied to evaluating and advancing undergraduate learning; "Learning through Diversity," in which the diversity of students' backgrounds and experiences are used as a rich resource to enhance teaching and learning; and "Learning Communities" that foster shared learning and discovery among students, and between future and current faculty within a department or institution. CIRTL established a laboratory for testing its ideas and practices at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, known as the Delta Program in Research, Teaching and Learning (http://www.delta.wisc.edu). The program offers project-based graduate courses, research mentor training, and workshops for post-docs, staff, and faculty. In addition, graduate students and post-docs can partner with a faculty member in a teaching-as-research internship to define and tackle a specific teaching and learning problem. Finally, students can obtain a Delta Certificate as testimony to their engagement in and commitment to teaching and learning. Delta has proved very

  20. Anticipatory guidance as a principle of faculty development: managing transition and change.

    PubMed

    Schor, Nina F; Guillet, Ronnie; McAnarney, Elizabeth R

    2011-10-01

    Although one cannot anticipate every individual's unique responses to the transitions and changes that regularly occur in academic medicine, a department-wide faculty development program, based on predictable transition points and supporting faculty at all levels, can minimize such negative responses to change as stress and burnout. In 2007, the authors implemented a new, formal faculty development program in the pediatrics department built on the principle of anticipatory guidance, defined as providing guidance in anticipation of future academic events. The primary components of the program are mentoring committees for individual junior faculty, group leadership development and teaching forums for midlevel faculty, and events that focus on life and career changes for senior faculty. Other department-wide activities augment the program, including review of grant submissions, annual review by a senior faculty committee of the progress of National Institutes of Health mentored research (K-) awardees, women faculty luncheons, and discussions about faculty development at regular faculty meetings. The department's faculty also participate in the University of Rochester Medical Center's active faculty development program. Feedback on the faculty development program has been constructive and mainly positive and will serve to guide the continuing evolution of the program.

  1. A relative-value-based system for calculating faculty productivity in teaching, research, administration, and patient care.

    PubMed

    Hilton, C; Fisher, W; Lopez, A; Sanders, C

    1997-09-01

    To design and test a simple, easily modifiable system for calculating faculty productivity in teaching, research, administration, and patient care in which all areas of endeavor would be recognized and high productivity in one area would produce results similar to high productivity in another at the Louisiana State University School of Medicine in New Orleans. A relative-value and time-based system was designed in 1996 so that similar efforts in the four areas would produce similar scores, and a profile reflecting the authors' estimates of high productivity ("super faculty") was developed for each area. The activity profiles of 17 faculty members were used to test the system. "Super-faculty" scores in all areas were similar. The faculty members' mean scores were higher for teaching and research than for administration and patient care, and all four mean scores were substantially lower than the respective totals for the "super faculty". In each category the scores of those faculty members who scored above the mean in that category were used to calculate new mean scores. The mean scores for these faculty members were similar to those for the "super faculty" in teaching and research but were substantially lower for administration and patient care. When the mean total score of the eight faculty members predicted to have total scores below the group mean was compared with the mean total score of the nine faculty members predicted to have total scores above the group mean, the difference was significant (p < .0001). For the former, every score in each category was below the mean, with the exception of one faculty member's score in one category. Of the latter, eight had higher scores in teaching and four had higher scores in teaching and research combined. This system provides a quantitative method for the equal recognition of faculty productivity in a number of areas, and it may be useful as a starting point for other academic units exploring similar issues.

  2. USAF/SCEEE Summer Faculty Research Program (1979). Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    Optimum equipment arrangement for transmit and receive channels (d) Communication circuit performance between ships in a task force 5-11 p.: I ( e ...management and of an efficient communications system, and e ) the format to be used for future programs. The author was selected to assist with the...Problems in Fusion Research, Knoxville, Tennessee, October, 1977, pp. 741-745. 4. C. E . Oberly, Private Communication . 5. G. J. Gabriel, "Theory of

  3. Partnered Research Experiences for Junior Faculty at Minority-Serving Institutions Enhance Professional Success

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Andrew G.; Leibowitz, Michael J.; Murray, Sandra A.; Burgess, David; Denetclaw, Wilfred F.; Carrero-Martinez, Franklin A.; Asai, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Scientific workforce diversity is critical to ensuring the realization of our national research goals and minority-serving institutions play a vital role in preparing undergraduate students for science careers. This paper summarizes the outcomes of supporting career training and research practices by faculty from teaching-intensive, minority-serving institutions. Support of these faculty members is predicted to lead to: 1) increases in the numbers of refereed publications, 2) increases in federal grant funding, and 3) a positive impact on professional activities and curricular practices at their home institutions that support student training. The results presented show increased productivity is evident as early as 1 yr following completion of the program, with participants being more independently productive than their matched peers in key areas that serve as measures of academic success. These outcomes are consistent with the goals of the Visiting Professorship Program to enhance scientific practices impacting undergraduate student training. Furthermore, the outcomes demonstrate the benefits of training support for research activities at minority-serving institutions that can lead to increased engagement of students from diverse backgrounds. The practices and results presented demonstrate a successful generalizable approach for stimulating junior faculty development and can serve as a basis for long-term faculty career development strategies that support scientific workforce diversity. PMID:24006388

  4. Partnered research experiences for junior faculty at minority-serving institutions enhance professional success.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Andrew G; Leibowitz, Michael J; Murray, Sandra A; Burgess, David; Denetclaw, Wilfred F; Carrero-Martinez, Franklin A; Asai, David J

    2013-01-01

    Scientific workforce diversity is critical to ensuring the realization of our national research goals and minority-serving institutions play a vital role in preparing undergraduate students for science careers. This paper summarizes the outcomes of supporting career training and research practices by faculty from teaching-intensive, minority-serving institutions. Support of these faculty members is predicted to lead to: 1) increases in the numbers of refereed publications, 2) increases in federal grant funding, and 3) a positive impact on professional activities and curricular practices at their home institutions that support student training. The results presented show increased productivity is evident as early as 1 yr following completion of the program, with participants being more independently productive than their matched peers in key areas that serve as measures of academic success. These outcomes are consistent with the goals of the Visiting Professorship Program to enhance scientific practices impacting undergraduate student training. Furthermore, the outcomes demonstrate the benefits of training support for research activities at minority-serving institutions that can lead to increased engagement of students from diverse backgrounds. The practices and results presented demonstrate a successful generalizable approach for stimulating junior faculty development and can serve as a basis for long-term faculty career development strategies that support scientific workforce diversity.

  5. Do Family Responsibilities and a Clinical Versus Research Faculty Position Affect Satisfaction with Career and Work-Life Balance for Medical School Faculty?

    PubMed

    Beckett, Laurel; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Howell, Lydia Pleotis; Villablanca, Amparo C

    2015-06-01

    Balancing career and family obligations poses challenges to medical school faculty and contributes to dissatisfaction and attrition from academics. We examined the relationship between family setting and responsibilities, rank, and career and work-life satisfaction for faculty in a large U.S. medical school. Baseline faculty surveys were analyzed from the first year of a 4-year National Institutes of Health-funded study to evaluate awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and use of family friendly policies and career satisfaction. The study focus was on the impact of family responsibilities and characteristics of the faculty position (rank, clinical vs. nonclinical, and academic series) in multivariate comparisons between primary predictors and outcomes of interest. Both clinical and family responsibilities for children under 18 play a major and interacting role in satisfaction with career and work-life balance. Clinical faculty respondents without children at home reported significantly greater career satisfaction and better work-life balance than their nonclinical counterparts. Nonclinical faculty respondents with children reported greater satisfaction and better balance than counterparts without family responsibilities. However, the advantage in career satisfaction and work-life balance for clinical faculty respondents disappeared for those with responsibility for young children. No gender-based differences were noted in the results or across faculty rank for respondents; however, for women, reaching associate professor resulted in greater career satisfaction. This study suggests that both work-related factors and family responsibilities influence satisfaction with career and work-life balance, but the predictors appear to interact in complex and nuanced ways. Further research is needed to delineate more clearly these interactions and to explore other factors that may play important additional roles.

  6. Do Family Responsibilities and a Clinical Versus Research Faculty Position Affect Satisfaction with Career and Work–Life Balance for Medical School Faculty?

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, Laurel; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Howell, Lydia Pleotis

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Balancing career and family obligations poses challenges to medical school faculty and contributes to dissatisfaction and attrition from academics. We examined the relationship between family setting and responsibilities, rank, and career and work–life satisfaction for faculty in a large U.S. medical school. Methods: Baseline faculty surveys were analyzed from the first year of a 4-year National Institutes of Health–funded study to evaluate awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and use of family friendly policies and career satisfaction. The study focus was on the impact of family responsibilities and characteristics of the faculty position (rank, clinical vs. nonclinical, and academic series) in multivariate comparisons between primary predictors and outcomes of interest. Results: Both clinical and family responsibilities for children under 18 play a major and interacting role in satisfaction with career and work–life balance. Clinical faculty respondents without children at home reported significantly greater career satisfaction and better work–life balance than their nonclinical counterparts. Nonclinical faculty respondents with children reported greater satisfaction and better balance than counterparts without family responsibilities. However, the advantage in career satisfaction and work–life balance for clinical faculty respondents disappeared for those with responsibility for young children. No gender-based differences were noted in the results or across faculty rank for respondents; however, for women, reaching associate professor resulted in greater career satisfaction. Conclusion: This study suggests that both work-related factors and family responsibilities influence satisfaction with career and work–life balance, but the predictors appear to interact in complex and nuanced ways. Further research is needed to delineate more clearly these interactions and to explore other factors that may play important additional roles. PMID

  7. Research reports: 1990 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Loren A. (Editor); Beymer, Mark A. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    A collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in this program is presented. The topics covered include: human-computer interface software, multimode fiber optic communication links, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, rocket-triggered lightning, robotics, a flammability study of thin polymeric film materials, a vortex shedding flowmeter, modeling of flow systems, monomethyl hydrazine vapor detection, a rocket noise filter system using digital filters, computer programs, lower body negative pressure, closed ecological systems, and others. Several reports with respect to space shuttle orbiters are presented.

  8. Faculty Work-Family Issues: Finding the Balance at a Liberal Arts College

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amador Kane, Suzanne

    2008-03-01

    The demands and expectations on science faculty at liberal arts colleges are in many ways distinct from those at research universities. While these differences can work in favor of easing work-family conflicts, there are also unique problems that faculty can confront in a setting of smaller departments and undergraduate-only institutions. I will discuss how these issues play out for junior and senior faculty, with an emphasis on how concrete policy changes can make the workplace a more family-friendly and supportive environment for all faculty, as well as making liberal arts colleges more attractive options for those seeking physics faculty jobs.

  9. Academic Achievement and Personality Traits of Faculty Members of Indian Agricultural Universities: Their Effect on Teaching and Research Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramesh, P.; Reddy, K. M.; Rao, R. V. S.; Dhandapani, A.; Siva, G. Samba; Ramakrishna, A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The present study was undertaken to assess academic achievement, teaching aptitude and research attitude of Indian agricultural universities' faculty, to predict indicators for successful teachers and researchers, and thereby enhancing the quality of higher agricultural education. Methodology: Five hundred faculty members were selected to…

  10. A Case Study of Faculty Development Programs in Division I Research Institution Colleges: The Perspective of the Program Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FitzSimmons, Jason

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate faculty development from the perspectives of program administrators in different colleges of a Division I research institution. The participants were administrators of faculty development programs from eight different colleges at the institution. The research questions were (a) How do the administrators…

  11. Change in Classification Level and the Effects on Research Productivity and Merit Scores for Faculty in a School of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leech, Nancy L.; Haug, Carolyn A.; Iceman-Sands, Deanna; Moriarty, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    In this article we present results of an empirical study of the relationship between research productivity and research-related merit ratings over a 10-year period for tenured and tenure-track faculty in a school of education. The purpose of the study was to assess change in faculty productivity as a result of the institution's change in the…

  12. Growing Lemon Trees from Lemons: Lessons Reaped from a SoTL Faculty Learning Community's Research "Failures"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dich, Linh; Brown, Karen M.; Kuznekoff, Jeff H.; Conover, Theresa; Forren, John P.; Marshall, Janet

    2017-01-01

    Failure can be central to faculty research; however, failure produces a vehicle for learning. Through an interdisciplinary faculty community, the authors supported each other in facing, learning from, and overcoming "failed" aspects of research projects. This article reports obstacles encountered in conducting Scholarship of Teaching and…

  13. Passing the Baton: Mentoring for Adoption of Active-Learning Pedagogies by Research-Active Junior Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Catherine Leimkuhler; White, Harold B., III

    2015-01-01

    There are barriers to adoption of research-based teaching methods. Professional development workshops may inform faculty of these methods, but effective adoption often does not follow. In addition, newly-minted research-active faculty are often overwhelmed by the many new responsibilities (grant writing, group management, laboratory setup,…

  14. A pediatric residency research requirement to improve collaborative resident and faculty publication productivity.

    PubMed

    Kurahara, David K; Kogachi, Kaitlin; Yamane, Maya; Ly, Catherine L; Foster, Jennifer H; Masaki-Tesoro, Traci; Murai, Daniel; Rudoy, Raul

    2012-08-01

    Involvement in a research project can teach training physicians about the scientific process involved in medicine. For this reason, the University of Hawai'i pediatrics department developed a Residency Research Requirement and Program (RRRP) in 2001. We studied a 14-year time period before and after the RRRP was initiated, and found a greater then ten-fold increase in resident publications and faculty involvement in these projects. Many of these manuscripts were the result of resident collaboration and this also increased significantly. The residents who later went into fellowship training were found to be more likely to publish their work. An RRRP encourages residents and faculty to become involved in research publications and other scholarly activities. Its development may help to motivate training physicians to learn important research skills.

  15. Variables that Correlate with Faculty Use of Research-Based Instructional Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Charles; Dancy, Melissa H.; Niewiadomska-Bugaj, Magdalena

    2010-10-01

    During the Fall of 2008 a web survey, designed to collect information about pedagogical knowledge and practices, was completed by a representative sample of 722 physics faculty across the United States (a 50.3% response rate). This paper examines how 20 predictor variables correlate with faculty knowledge about and use of research-based instructional strategies (RBIS). Profiles were developed for each of four faculty levels of knowledge about and use of RBIS. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify a subset of the variables that could predict group membership. Five significant predictor variables were identified. High levels of knowledge and use of RBIS were associated with the following characteristics: attendee of the physics and astronomy new faculty workshop, attendee of at least one talk or workshop related to teaching in the last two years, satisfaction with meeting instructional goals, regular reader of one or more journals related to teaching, and being female. High research productivity and large class sizes were not found to be barriers to use of at least some RBIS.

  16. A National Initiative of Teaching, Researching, and Dreaming: Community College Faculty Research in "Achieving the Dream" Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagedorn, Linda Serra

    2015-01-01

    Dating back to 2004, the Achieving the Dream initiative was established to promote evidence-based programs and interventions to produce and sustain student success. Achieving the Dream has created a new environment and new forms of thinking among the faculty that have spurred some to action research within their classrooms and beyond. Using three…

  17. Faculty Development Workshops to Support Establishing and Sustaining Undergraduate Research Programs in the Earth Sciences (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, L. K.; Guertin, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Geosciences Division of the Council of Undergraduate Research (GeoCUR, http://curgeoscience.wordpress.com/) has a long history of supporting faculty who engage in undergraduate research. The division has held faculty development workshops at national meetings of the GSA and AGU for over 15 years. These workshops serve faculty at all career stages and cover multiple aspects of the enterprise of engaging students in undergraduate research. Topics covered include: getting a job (particularly at a primarily undergraduate institution), incorporating research into classes, mentoring independent research projects and identifying sources of internal and external funding. Originally, these workshops were funded through CUR and registration income. When the administrative costs to run the workshops increased, we successfully sought funding from the NSF Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) program. This CCLI Type 1 special project allowed the expansion of the GSA workshops from half-day to full-day and the offering of workshops to other venues, including the annual meeting of the Association of American Geographers and sectional GSA meetings. The workshops are organized and led by GeoCUR councilors, some of whom attended workshops as graduate students or new faculty. Current and past Geoscience program officers in the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) have presented on NSF funding opportunities. Based on participant surveys, the content of the workshops has evolved over time. Workshop content is also tailored to the particular audience; for example, AGU workshops enroll more graduate students and post-docs and thus the focus is on the job ';search' and getting started in undergraduate research. To date, this CCLI Type 1 project has supported 15 workshops and a variety of print and digital resources shared with workshop participants. This presentation will highlight the goals of this workshop proposal and also provide insights about strategies

  18. Cross-sectional online survey of research productivity in young Japanese nursing faculty.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Yumiko; Fukahori, Hiroki; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Narama, Miho; Kono, Ayumi; Atogami, Fumi; Kashiwagi, Masayo; Okaya, Keiko; Takamizawa, Emiko; Yoshizawa, Toyoko

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the factors affecting the research productivity of young nursing faculty in Japan. An online survey targeting young nursing scholars (aged ≤ 39 years) who were members of the Japan Academy of Nursing Science was conducted from October to November 2012. Of 1634 potential respondents, 648 completed the survey (39.7%), and 400 full-time faculty of a baccalaureate degree program were selected for the analysis. The numbers of English-language and Japanese publications in the past 3 years were regressed onto personal characteristics, such as academic degree and type of university. The mean numbers of publications in English and Japanese in the past 3 years were 0.41 and 1.63, respectively. Holding a doctoral degree was significantly related to a higher number of publications in English and Japanese (e(β) = 5.78 and e(β) = 1.89, respectively). Working at a national university (e(β) = 2.15), having a research assistant (e(β) = 2.05), and the ability to read research articles in English (e(β) = 2.27) were significantly related to more English-language publications. Having the confidence to conduct quantitative research (e(β) = 1.67) was related to a larger number of Japanese publications. The lack of mentoring (e(β) = 0.97) and university workload (e(β) = 0.96) were associated with a lesser number of Japanese publications. The research productivity of young nursing faculty appeared to be quite low. Strategies to enhance research productivity in young nursing faculty, such as encouraging the achievement of a doctoral degree or enrichment of research resources, should be undertaken. © 2014 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2014 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  19. ACCP white paper: Essential components of a faculty development program for pharmacy practice faculty.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Eric G; Burkiewicz, Jill S; Haase, Mark R; MacLaughlin, Eric J; Segal, Alissa R; Chung, Eunice P; Chan, Lingtak-Neander; Rospond, Raylene M; Barone, Joseph A; Durst, Stephen W; Wells, Barbara G

    2009-01-01

    Prospective, ongoing faculty development programs are important in the initial orientation and short- and long-term development of faculty in higher education. Pharmacy practice faculty are likely to benefit from a comprehensive faculty development program due to the complex nature of their positions, incomplete training in select areas, and multiple demands on their time. The need for faculty development programs is supported by the increased need for pharmacy practice faculty due to the increased number of colleges and schools of pharmacy, expanding enrollment in existing colleges and schools, and loss of existing senior faculty to retirement or other opportunities within or outside the academy. This White Paper describes a comprehensive faculty development program that is designed to enhance the satisfaction, retention, and productivity of new and existing pharmacy practice faculty. A comprehensive faculty development program will facilitate growth throughout a faculty member's career in pertinent areas. The structure of such a program includes an orientation program to provide an overview of responsibilities and abilities, a mentoring program to provide one-on-one guidance from a mentor, and a sustained faculty development program to provide targeted development based on individual and career needs. The content areas to be covered in each component include the institution (e.g., culture, structure, roles, responsibilities), student-related activities, teaching abilities, scholarship and research abilities, practice abilities and the practice site, and professional abilities (e.g., leadership, career planning, balancing responsibilities). A general framework for a comprehensive pharmacy practice faculty development program is provided to guide each college, school, department, and division in the design and delivery of a program that meets the needs and desires of the institution and its faculty.

  20. NASA-ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahl, Joseph M.; Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Montegani, Francis J.

    1996-01-01

    During the summer of 1996, a ten-week Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) in collaboration with Case Western Reserve University (CWRU), and the Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI). This is the thirty-third summer of this program at Lewis. It was one of nine summer programs sponsored by NASA in 1996, at various field centers under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). The objectives of the program are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science educators, (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) to enrich and refresh the research activities of participants' institutions. (4) to contribute to the research objectives of LeRC. This report is intended to recapitulate the activities comprising the 1996 Lewis Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, to summarize evaluations by the participants, and to make recommendations regarding future programs.

  1. The 1995 Research Reports: NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Buckingham, Gregg (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1995 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the eleventh year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 1995 program was administered by the University of Central Florida in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) with sponsorship and funding from the Office of Educational Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA Headquarters in 1995. The NASA/ASEE Program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the University faculty member.

  2. Mentoring doctoral students for qualitative research: interviews with experienced nursing faculty in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kayama, Mami; Gregg, Misuzu F; Asahara, Kiyomi; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Okuma, Keiko; Ohta, Kikuko; Kinoshita, Yasuhito

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to describe the process of mentoring doctoral students for qualitative research in Japanese graduate programs in nursing. Nine experienced faculty-seven nurse researchers and two sociologists-were interviewed. Participants were asked about their process of mentoring students for qualitative nursing dissertations. Data analysis was conducted using a qualitative descriptive method. Participants' age ranged from 48 to 60 years. The first theme in the mentoring process is about the individualized, one-on-one mentorship process. The second theme occurs in a group process. The third theme is coordinating mentors and establishing a network to support the evaluation system. The mentoring processes identified in this study will be useful for future faculty development. The study elucidated much room for improvement in doctoral education programs for qualitative research methods in nursing science. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Mentoring Early-Career Faculty Researchers Is Important-But First "Train the Trainer".

    PubMed

    Sood, Akshay; Tigges, Beth; Helitzer, Deborah

    2016-12-01

    It has long been known that mentoring is critical to the success of junior faculty researchers. The controlled intervention study by Libby et al published in this issue of Academic Medicine demonstrates that institutional investment in a mentored research career development program for early-career faculty investigators provided significant long-term gains in grant productivity. Academic institutions hoping to replicate this program's success by launching similar mentoring programs for their junior faculty investigators will, however, find that the Achilles' heel lies in the scarcity of skilled research mentors and the relative lack of attention to and recognition of the importance of a supportive institutional climate for mentoring. It is essential, therefore, to begin by developing programs to "train the trainer" as well as programs and policies to support mentors. As a recent trial at 16 Clinical and Translational Science Award institutions demonstrated, competency-based, structured research mentor training can improve mentors' skills.In this Commentary, the authors offer a comprehensive two-pronged framework for mentor development with elements that address both individual mentoring competencies and the institutional climate for mentoring. The framework depicts the gaps, activities, and outcomes that a mentor development program can address. Activities directed at changing the institutional climate related to mentor development should complement training activities for individual mentors. The authors propose that employing this framework's approach to mentor development will lead to the desired impact: to increase the competence, productivity, and retention of a diverse clinical and translational research workforce.

  4. Responsible conduct of research in communication sciences and disorders: faculty and student perceptions.

    PubMed

    Minifie, Fred D; Robey, Randall R; Horner, Jennifer; Ingham, Janis C; Lansing, Charissa; McCartney, James H; Alldredge, Elham-Eid; Slater, Sarah C; Moss, Sharon E

    2011-02-01

    Two Web-based surveys (Surveys I and II) were used to assess perceptions of faculty and students in Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) regarding the responsible conduct of research (RCR). Survey questions addressed 9 RCR domains thought important to the responsible conduct of research: (a) human subjects protections; (b) research involving animals; (c) publication practices and responsible authorship; (d) mentor/trainee responsibilities; (e) collaborative science; (f) peer review; (g) data acquisition, management, sharing, and ownership; (h) conflicts of interest; and (i) research misconduct. Respondents rated each of 37 topics for importance and for sufficiency of instructional coverage. Respondents to Survey I were 137 faculty members from 68 (26%) of the 261 graduate programs in CSD. By comparison, 237 students from 39 (15%) programs responded to Survey II. Data about the importance and sufficiency of coverage of each of the 37 items were transformed into z scores to reveal relative ratings among the 37 topics. Data presentations were grouped for topics in each of the 9 RCR domains. Ratings indicated the relatively high importance assigned among the 37 topics by CSD faculty and students. Sufficiency of coverage of those same topics received lower ratings. The results of these surveys support the notion that students in CSD perceive that they are receiving information about RCR. The data pertaining to sufficiency of coverage provide a basis for improving instruction in this important aspect of research education.

  5. "I Couldn't Wait to Leave the Toxic Environment": A Mixed Methods Study of Women Faculty Satisfaction and Departure from One Research Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Susan K.

    2012-01-01

    A mixed methods analysis of women faculty departure at one research institution was conducted using Hagedorn's model of faculty job satisfaction. Findings from an institution-wide survey and interviews with women faculty who had left the institution resulted in several themes: (a) a lack of resources to support faculty work, (b) a lack of…

  6. A Summer Research Program of NASA/Faculty Fellowships at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, Arden

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP) is designed to give college and university faculty members a rewarding personal as well as enriching professional experience. Fellowships are awarded to engineering and science faculty for work on collaborative research projects of mutual interest to the fellow and his or her JPL host colleague. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have participated in the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program for more than 25 years. Administrative offices are maintained both at the Caltech Campus and at JPL; however, most of the activity takes place at JPL. The Campus handles all fiscal matters. The duration of the program is ten continuous weeks. Fellows are required to conduct their research on-site. To be eligible to participate in the program, fellows must be a U.S. citizen and hold a teaching or research appointment at a U.S. university or college. The American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) contracts with NASA and manages program recruitment. Over the past several years, we have made attempts to increase the diversity of the participants in the NFFP Program. A great deal of attention has been given to candidates from minority-serving institutions. There were approximately 100 applicants for the 34 positions in 2002. JPL was the first-choice location for more than half of them. Faculty from 16 minority-serving institutions participated as well as four women. The summer began with an orientation meeting that included introduction of key program personnel, and introduction of the fellows to each other. During this welcome, the fellows were briefed on their obligations to the program and to their JPL colleagues. They were also given a short historical perspective on JPL and its relationship to Caltech and NASA. All fellows received a package, which included information on administrative procedures, roster of fellows, seminar program, housing questionnaire, directions to JPL, maps of

  7. Survey of checkpoints along the pathway to diverse biomedical research faculty

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Abigail M.; Moneta-Koehler, Liane; Chalkley, Roger

    2018-01-01

    There is a persistent shortage of underrepresented minority (URM) faculty who are involved in basic biomedical research at medical schools. We examined the entire training pathway of potential candidates to identify the points of greatest loss. Using a range of recent national data sources, including the National Science Foundation’s Survey of Earned Doctorates and Survey of Doctoral Recipients, we analyzed the demographics of the population of interest, specifically those from URM backgrounds with an interest in biomedical sciences. We examined the URM population from high school graduates through undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral training as well as the URM population in basic science tenure track faculty positions at medical schools. We find that URM and non-URM trainees are equally likely to transition into doctoral programs, to receive their doctoral degree, and to secure a postdoctoral position. However, the analysis reveals that the diversions from developing a faculty career are found primarily at two clearly identifiable places, specifically during undergraduate education and in transition from postdoctoral fellowship to tenure track faculty in the basic sciences at medical schools. We suggest focusing additional interventions on these two stages along the educational pathway. PMID:29338019

  8. Research scholars program: a faculty development initiative at the Oregon College of Oriental Medicine.

    PubMed

    Hammerschlag, Richard; Lasater, Kathie; Salanti, Sonya; Fleishman, Susan

    2008-05-01

    The Research Scholars Program (RSP) was created at the Oregon College of Oriental Medicine (OCOM) to provide faculty development in research literacy, research-informed clinical practice, and research participation skills. The RSP is part of a broad effort, funded by a National Institutes of Health/National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine R25 education grant, to infuse an evidence-based perspective into the curriculum at schools of complementary and alternative medicine. The RSP arose from the realization that this curriculum reform would first necessitate faculty training in both research appreciation and pedagogy. OCOM's grant, Acupuncture Practitioner Research Education Enhancement, is a partnership with the Oregon Health & Science University School of Nursing (OHSU SON). The RSP was developed initially as a collaborative effort among the OCOM Dean of Research (R.H.), OCOM Director of Research Education (S.F.), and an OHSU SON education specialist (K.L.). The 9-month, 8 hours per month seminar-style RSP provides the opportunity for a cohort of OCOM faculty and staff to explore research-related concepts and content as well as pedagogical practices that emphasize interactive, learner-centered teaching. The RSP adheres to a competency-based approach as developed by the Education Committee of the grant. As a tangible outcome, each Research Scholar designs a sustainable learning activity that infuses a research perspective into their courses, clinic supervision, or other sphere of influence at the college. In this paper, we describe the creative process and the lessons learned during the planning and initial implementation of the RSP. We view the early successes of the RSP as encouraging signs that research literacy and an evidence-based perspective are becoming increasingly accepted as needed skill sets for present-day practitioners of acupuncture and Oriental medicine.

  9. Knowledge brokers in a knowledge network: the case of Seniors Health Research Transfer Network knowledge brokers.

    PubMed

    Conklin, James; Lusk, Elizabeth; Harris, Megan; Stolee, Paul

    2013-01-09

    The purpose of this paper is to describe and reflect on the role of knowledge brokers (KBs) in the Seniors Health Research Transfer Network (SHRTN). The paper reviews the relevant literature on knowledge brokering, and then describes the evolving role of knowledge brokering in this knowledge network. The description of knowledge brokering provided here is based on a developmental evaluation program and on the experiences of the authors. Data were gathered through qualitative and quantitative methods, analyzed by the evaluators, and interpreted by network members who participated in sensemaking forums. The results were fed back to the network each year in the form of formal written reports that were widely distributed to network members, as well as through presentations to the network's members. The SHRTN evaluation and our experiences as evaluators and KBs suggest that a SHRTN KB facilitates processes of learning whereby people are connected with tacit or explicit knowledge sources that will help them to resolve work-related challenges. To make this happen, KBs engage in a set of relational, technical, and analytical activities that help communities of practice (CoPs) to develop and operate, facilitate exchanges among people with similar concerns and interests, and help groups and individuals to create, explore, and apply knowledge in their practice. We also suggest that the role is difficult to define, emergent, abstract, episodic, and not fully understood. The KB role within this knowledge network has developed and matured over time. The KB adapts to the social and technical affordances of each situation, and fashions a unique and relevant process to create relationships and promote learning and change. The ability to work with teams and to develop relevant models and feasible approaches are critical KB skills. The KB is a leader who wields influence rather than power, and who is prepared to adopt whatever roles and approaches are needed to bring about a valuable

  10. Knowledge brokers in a knowledge network: the case of Seniors Health Research Transfer Network knowledge brokers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this paper is to describe and reflect on the role of knowledge brokers (KBs) in the Seniors Health Research Transfer Network (SHRTN). The paper reviews the relevant literature on knowledge brokering, and then describes the evolving role of knowledge brokering in this knowledge network. Methods The description of knowledge brokering provided here is based on a developmental evaluation program and on the experiences of the authors. Data were gathered through qualitative and quantitative methods, analyzed by the evaluators, and interpreted by network members who participated in sensemaking forums. The results were fed back to the network each year in the form of formal written reports that were widely distributed to network members, as well as through presentations to the network’s members. Results The SHRTN evaluation and our experiences as evaluators and KBs suggest that a SHRTN KB facilitates processes of learning whereby people are connected with tacit or explicit knowledge sources that will help them to resolve work-related challenges. To make this happen, KBs engage in a set of relational, technical, and analytical activities that help communities of practice (CoPs) to develop and operate, facilitate exchanges among people with similar concerns and interests, and help groups and individuals to create, explore, and apply knowledge in their practice. We also suggest that the role is difficult to define, emergent, abstract, episodic, and not fully understood. Conclusions The KB role within this knowledge network has developed and matured over time. The KB adapts to the social and technical affordances of each situation, and fashions a unique and relevant process to create relationships and promote learning and change. The ability to work with teams and to develop relevant models and feasible approaches are critical KB skills. The KB is a leader who wields influence rather than power, and who is prepared to adopt whatever roles and

  11. Faculty Perceptions of the Quality Enhancement Plan in a US Public Doctoral University with Highest Research Activity: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alamoud, Maha

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore faculty members' perceptions of the QEP in a public doctoral university with highest research activity. Particularly, the study explored how faculty members perceive the role of the QEP in student learning and institutional effectiveness, the relevance of the QEP activities in student learning and…

  12. Science Teaching Beliefs and Reported Approaches within a Research University: Perspectives from Faculty, Graduate Students, and Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marbach-Ad, Gili; Ziemer, Kathryn Schaefer; Orgler, Michal; Thompson, Katerina V.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores and compares the perspectives of three populations (faculty members, graduate students, and undergraduates) toward science teaching in the College of Chemical and Life Sciences at a research-intensive university. In particular, we investigate the role of faculty professional development in reforming undergraduate science…

  13. Globalization, Internationalization and the Faculty: Culture and Perception of Full-Time Faculty at a Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirano, Alison Izawa

    2012-01-01

    The processes of globalization have an impact on society in numerous ways. As a result, higher education institutions around the world attempt to adjust to these changes through internationalization efforts. Amongst the key stakeholders who play an important role in assuring that these efforts are successful is the faculty because it is this body…

  14. Broadening Participation in Biology Education Research: Engaging Community College Students and Faculty.

    PubMed

    Schinske, Jeffrey N; Balke, Virginia L; Bangera, M Gita; Bonney, Kevin M; Brownell, Sara E; Carter, Robert S; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Dolan, Erin L; Elliott, Samantha L; Fletcher, Linnea; Gonzalez, Beatriz; Gorga, Joseph J; Hewlett, James A; Kiser, Stacey L; McFarland, Jenny L; Misra, Anjali; Nenortas, Apryl; Ngeve, Smith M; Pape-Lindstrom, Pamela A; Seidel, Shannon B; Tuthill, Matthew C; Yin, Yue; Corwin, Lisa A

    2017-01-01

    Nearly half of all undergraduates are enrolled at community colleges (CCs), including the majority of U.S. students who represent groups underserved in the sciences. Yet only a small minority of studies published in discipline-based education research journals address CC biology students, faculty, courses, or authors. This marked underrepresentation of CC biology education research (BER) limits the availability of evidence that could be used to increase CC student success in biology programs. To address this issue, a diverse group of stakeholders convened at the Building Capacity for Biology Education Research at Community Colleges meeting to discuss how to increase the prevalence of CC BER and foster participation of CC faculty as BER collaborators and authors. The group identified characteristics of CCs that make them excellent environments for studying biology teaching and learning, including student diversity and institutional cultures that prioritize teaching, learning, and assessment. The group also identified constraints likely to impede BER at CCs: limited time, resources, support, and incentives, as well as misalignment between doing research and CC faculty identities as teachers. The meeting culminated with proposing strategies for faculty, administrators, journal editors, scientific societies, and funding agencies to better support CC BER. © 2017 J. N. Schinske et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  15. The 1989 NASA-ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program in Aeronautics and Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boroson, Harold R.; Soffen, Gerald A.; Fan, Dah-Nien

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 NASA-ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at the Goddard Space Flight Center was conducted during 5 Jun. 1989 to 11 Aug. 1989. The research projects were previously assigned. Work summaries are presented for the following topics: optical properties data base; particle acceleration; satellite imagery; telemetry workstation; spectroscopy; image processing; stellar spectra; optical radar; robotics; atmospheric composition; semiconductors computer networks; remote sensing; software engineering; solar flares; and glaciers.

  16. An Investigation of Research Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Research Productivity among Faculty Members at an Emerging Research University in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasupathy, Rubini; Siwatu, Kamau Oginga

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to add to the existing knowledge base on research self-efficacy beliefs of faculty members and their influence on research productivity, and to inform higher education administrators about the relationship between research self-efficacy beliefs and research productivity. A theoretical framework of social cognitive…

  17. Advancing Heliophysics and Space Weather Research with Student Internships and Faculty Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. P.; Ng, C.; Marchese, P.; Austin, S. A.; Frost, J.; Cheung, T. K.; Tremberger, G.; Robbins, I.; Carlson, B. E.; Paglione, T.; Damas, C.; Steiner, J. C.; Rudolph, E.; Lewis, E.; Ford, K. S.; Cline, T.

    2011-12-01

    Expanding research capability in Heliophysics and Space Weather is the major focus of a collaboration between the City University of New York (CUNY) and NASA Goddard Space Fight Center (GSFC). The Heliophysics Education Consortium has a two-pronged approach centered on undergraduate research and faculty development. Summer 2011 student research projects include: Comparison of Fast Propagating Solar Waves and Slow Kelvin-Helmholtz Waves captured by SDO; Brightness Fluctuation of March 8, 2011 Eruption with Magnetic Rope Structure Measured by SDO; Investigation of Sunspot Regions, Coronal Mass Ejections and Solar Flares; An Integration and Testing Methodology for a Microsatellite; Comparative Analysis of Attitude Control Systems for Microsatellites; Spectral Analysis of Aerosols in Jupiter's Atmosphere Using HST Data; Alternative Sources of 5 GHz and 15 GHz Emissions in Active Galactic Nuclei; Probing Starburst-Driven Superwinds; Asteroid Astrometry; and Optimize an Electrostatic Deflection Element on PIXIES (Plasma Ion Experiment - Ion and Electron Sensor) for a CUNY student at GSFC. Faculty development workshops were conducted by Space Weather Action Center scientists. These workshops included a faculty development session at the CUNY Graduate Center and high school teachers professional development series at Queensborough Community College. The project is supported by NASA award NNX10AE72G.

  18. Experiences, attitudes and barriers towards research amongst junior faculty of Pakistani medical universities.

    PubMed

    Sabzwari, Saniya; Kauser, Samreen; Khuwaja, Ali Khan

    2009-11-16

    The developing world has had limited quality research and in Pakistan, research is still in its infancy. We conducted a study to assess the proportion of junior faculty involved in research to highlight their attitude towards research, and identify the factors associated with their research involvement. A cross-sectional study was conducted in four medical universities/teaching hospitals in Pakistan, representing private and public sectors. A pre-tested, self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information from 176 junior faculty members of studied universities/hospitals. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors related to attitudes and barriers in research among those currently involved in research with those who were not. Overall, 41.5% of study subjects were currently involved in research. A highly significant factor associated with current research involvement was research training during the post-graduate period (p < 0.001). Other factors associated with current involvement in research were male gender, working in the public sector and previous involvement in research. Overall, a large majority (85.2%) of doctors considered research helpful in their profession and had a positive attitude towards research; nevertheless this positive attitude was more frequently reported by doctors who were currently involved in research compared to those who were not (OR = 4.69; 95% CI = 1.54-14.26). Similarly, a large proportion (83.5%) of doctors considered research difficult to conduct; higher by doctors who were not presently involved in research (OR = 2.74; 95% CI = 1.20-6.22) Less than half of the study participants were currently involved in research. Research output may improve if identified barriers are rectified. Further studies are recommended in this area.

  19. Research on the Healthy Lifestyle Model, Active Ageing, and Loneliness of Senior Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Jui-Ying; Lu, Kuo-Song

    2014-01-01

    Taiwan has the fastest ageing population in the world. Thus, the government and local policy makers need to formulate policies not just for the nursing and care needs of the aged. They also need to actively promote the need for lifelong learning among seniors in order to achieve elderly-friendly objectives, such as health promotion and delays in…

  20. A Tradition Unlike Any Other: Research on the Value of an Honors Senior Thesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, H. Kay

    2016-01-01

    An honors senior thesis introduces students into a world of scholarship and professional activity in a way that no single course, either semester- or year-long, can do (Anderson, Lyons, and Weiner). Many honors educators consider honors thesis work to be the defining honors experience. For graduate schools, employers, and the students themselves,…

  1. Seniors' Postsecondary Plans and Scholarships School Year 2012-2013. Research & Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    During their senior year, students in the Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) schools develop a postsecondary plan indicating their intentions upon graduation from high school. Postsecondary plan data were generated and consists of several categories, including attending a four-year college/university, attending a two-year/community…

  2. Seniors' Postsecondary Plans and Scholarships School Year 2013-14. Research & Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    The Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) collects information on seniors' academic and career plans after graduation in the form of a postsecondary plan. The information collected consists of several categories, including attending a four-year college/university, attending a two-year/ community college, attending a vocational/technical…

  3. Senior to Senior: Living Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, Kathy

    2004-01-01

    Senior to Senior: Living Lessons is a program created to provide meaningful horticulture therapy activities for community minority elders (60 years of age and older) and senior college students (20 years of age and older) from an Historically Black University. The program's objectives were to promote positive intergenerational relationships and to…

  4. Beyond Teaching and Research: Faculty Perceptions of Service Roles at Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamiseishvili, Ketevan; Miller, Michael T.; Lee, Donghun

    2016-01-01

    Faculty members in higher education institutions frequently have the responsibility of providing service activities to their institutions, professional societies, and external communities. This responsibility, however, generally carries little reward in the workplace and does not play a major role in promotion criteria. For the study we report…

  5. Research productivity of doctor of physical therapy faculty promoted in the southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Littman, Marissa A.; Sonne, James W.; Smith, Gerald V.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Little information exists on the research productivity of successfully promoted tenure-track Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) faculty. Objective: To determine the research productivity that typically results in successful promotion. Design: We collected publicly available curriculum vitae (CVs) from faculty currently in accredited DPT programs and who had been successfully promoted from an institution in the southeastern USA from 2000 through 2016. Total publication count, journal impact factor, funding, citations, and other metrics were analysed from 45 subjects of 22 of the 64 CAPTE-accredited DPT programs in the southeast. Results: None of the studied metrics were normally distributed with time to promotion as determined by a Shapiro-Wilk test. These faculty exhibited a median publication count of 4, range 0 to 43; median of average citation count of 12.4, range 0 to 87.25; median of average journal impact factor of 2.866, range 0 to 6.280; median external funding received of $9910, range $0.00 to $19 543 198; and median author h-index of 3, range 0 to 17. The median number of years before promotion was 6, ranging from 3 to 13 years. Linear regression analysis indicates a poor fit with no significant correlation between years before promotion and any of the studied metrics. No correlation between journal impact factor and number of citations was observed (m = −0.22, p = 0.728, R2 = 0.0003). Prior to promotion 31% (14 of 45) did not receive external funding and 24% (11 of 45) had a 0 h-index. The Carnegie Classification of the institution did not significantly correlate with research productivity metrics in this dataset (p = 0.213). Conclusion: While faculty unsuccessful in promotion were not identifiable using this method, this research can be used by faculty and committees to evaluate research productivity against regional data and promote competitive standards with peer institutions. Abbreviations: CAPTE: Commission on

  6. Research productivity of doctor of physical therapy faculty promoted in the southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Littman, Marissa A; Sonne, James W; Smith, Gerald V

    2017-01-01

    Little information exists on the research productivity of successfully promoted tenure-track Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) faculty. To determine the research productivity that typically results in successful promotion. We collected publicly available curriculum vitae (CVs) from faculty currently in accredited DPT programs and who had been successfully promoted from an institution in the southeastern USA from 2000 through 2016. Total publication count, journal impact factor, funding, citations, and other metrics were analysed from 45 subjects of 22 of the 64 CAPTE-accredited DPT programs in the southeast. None of the studied metrics were normally distributed with time to promotion as determined by a Shapiro-Wilk test. These faculty exhibited a median publication count of 4, range 0 to 43; median of average citation count of 12.4, range 0 to 87.25; median of average journal impact factor of 2.866, range 0 to 6.280; median external funding received of $9910, range $0.00 to $19 543 198; and median author h-index of 3, range 0 to 17. The median number of years before promotion was 6, ranging from 3 to 13 years. Linear regression analysis indicates a poor fit with no significant correlation between years before promotion and any of the studied metrics. No correlation between journal impact factor and number of citations was observed (m = -0.22, p = 0.728, R 2  = 0.0003). Prior to promotion 31% (14 of 45) did not receive external funding and 24% (11 of 45) had a 0 h-index. The Carnegie Classification of the institution did not significantly correlate with research productivity metrics in this dataset (p = 0.213). While faculty unsuccessful in promotion were not identifiable using this method, this research can be used by faculty and committees to evaluate research productivity against regional data and promote competitive standards with peer institutions. CAPTE: Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapist Education; DPT: Doctor of Physical Therapy.

  7. A thematic analysis of the role of the organisation in building allied health research capacity: a senior managers' perspective.

    PubMed

    Golenko, Xanthe; Pager, Susan; Holden, Libby

    2012-08-27

    Evidence-based practice aims to achieve better health outcomes in the community. It relies on high quality research to inform policy and practice; however research in primary health care continues to lag behind that of other medical professions. The literature suggests that research capacity building (RCB) functions across four levels; individual, team, organisation and external environment. Many RCB interventions are aimed at an individual or team level, yet evidence indicates that many barriers to RCB occur at an organisational or external environment level. This study asks senior managers from a large healthcare organisation to identify the barriers and enablers to RCB. The paper then describes strategies for building allied health (AH) research capacity at an organisational level from a senior managers' perspective. This qualitative study is part of a larger collaborative RCB project. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with nine allied health senior managers. Recorded interviews were transcribed and NVivo was used to analyse findings and emergent themes were defined. The dominant themes indicate that the organisation plays an integral role in building AH research capacity and is the critical link in creating synergy across the four levels of RCB. The organisation can achieve this by incorporating research into its core business with a whole of organisation approach including its mission, vision and strategic planning. Critical success factors include: developing a co-ordinated and multidisciplinary approach to attain critical mass of research-active AH and enhance learning and development; support from senior managers demonstrated through structures, processes and systems designed to facilitate research; forming partnerships to increase collaboration and sharing of resources and knowledge; and establishing in internal framework to promote recognition for research and career path opportunities. This study identifies four key themes: whole of

  8. Senior Leader Career Management: Implications for Senior Leaders and Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Jean

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative research study across three large consumer products organizations explored career management of senior leaders to gain an understanding of what is important to senior leaders in their careers and what strategies they are using for career management. It also investigated senior leaders' expectations of organizations for career…

  9. Female science faculty in liberal arts colleges and research universities: A case study of building careers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCartney, Kerry Michelle

    2001-07-01

    This study investigates the lives of twelve female science faculty in higher education, in both the Liberal Arts College and the Research University environments. The study focuses on two areas---the gender issue and women's positive experiences in being science faculty. The methods used are qualitative, including interviews and self-esteem, achievement-motivation, and self-descriptive word ranking scales, which were used to determine success and determination to understand the desire to continue in the field of academic science. The central findings of the study focused on the rampant gender and sexual discrimination that was apparent at the Liberal Arts College science department, and the desire to balance a family with a career. The common misperception that a woman cannot be an academic science and have a family appeared to have troubled most of the subjects in the study. It appeared that the support of a spouse and family are two factors that have led to the continuation of the majority of the women to want to remain in academic science. The issue of gender touched on the lack of financial compensation among some of the female science faculty in the study, as well as the need for more institutional and structural support for human relations within the science departments.

  10. [Conviction, pragmatism, research enthusiasm--mechanisms of conformity. The Medical Faculty of Giessen during National Socialism].

    PubMed

    Oehler-Klein, Sigrid

    2007-01-01

    In the course of its history the University of Giessen was threatened several times by closure, due to the University's geographical location, size, or a relative lack of reputation. This paper deals with the policy of the University's Medical Faculty during the Nazi period, when it faced specific demands and opportunities. While the University's restructuring had been initiated by some active National Socialists, this process was pragmatically supported by the Medical Faculty as a whole in order to gain advantages from its location. In particular, the Faculty (1.) institutionalized racial hygiene--a chair for one of the most radical representatives of this subject in Germany was requested--and (2.) established collaboration with the "Wehrmacht". The newly opened up perspectives for research were seen as an opportunity. In fact, from 1940 the University of Giessen was frequented again by many medical students; in 1943, the Berlin Academy for Military Medicine relocated some institutes and scientists to the University of Giessen, as the capital had become too unsafe for them because of increasing air raids.

  11. The Geoscience Diversity Enhancement Program (GDEP): A Model for Faculty and Student Engagement in Urban Geoscience Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambos, E. L.; Lee, C.; Behl, R.; Francis, R. D.; Holk, G.; Larson, D.; Rodrigue, C.; Wechsler, S.; Whitney, D.

    2004-12-01

    For the past three years (2002-2004) faculty in the departments of geological sciences, geography, and anthropology at California State University, Long Beach have joined to offer an NSF-funded (GEO-0119891) eight-week summer research experience to faculty and students at Long Beach area high schools and community colleges. GDEP's goal is to increase the numbers of students from underrepresented groups (African-American, Hispanic, American Indian, Pacific Islander, and disabled) enrolling in baccalaureate degree programs in the geosciences. The major strategies to achieve this goal all tie to the concept of research-centered experiences, which might also be termed inquiry-based instruction. More than fifteen (15) separate and diverse geoscience research studies have been conducted. These include such disparate topics as geochemical studies of fault veins, GPS/GIS surveys of vegetation patterns for fire hazard assessment, and seismic studies of offshore fault systems. As the program has matured, research projects have become more interdisciplinary, and faculty research teams have expanded. Whereas the first year, each CSULB faculty member tended to lead her/his project as a separate endeavor, by the third summer, faculty were collaborating in research teams. Several projects have involved community-based research, at sites within an hour's drive from the urban Long Beach campus. For example, last summer, four faculty linked together to conduct a comprehensive geography and geology study of an Orange County wilderness area, resulting in creation of maps, brochures, and websites for use by the general public. Another faculty group conducted geophysical surveys at an historic archaeological site in downtown Los Angeles, producing maps of underground features that will be incorporated into a cultural center and museum. Over the past three summers, the program has grown to involve more than 25 high school and community college students, and more than 30 CSULB, high

  12. WASP (Write a Scientific Paper): Open access unsolicited emails for scholarly work - Young and senior researchers perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cuschieri, Sarah; Grech, Victor

    2018-04-20

    The increasing demand on academics and researchers to publish has led to the development of fake journals (also known as predatory journals). Such journals lack peer review and precipitate unfair criticism toward legitimate open access journals. Predatory journals tend to bombard a researcher's mailbox on a daily basis, inviting authors to submit a review/manuscript/opinion/short case to their journal while promising expedited publication - against a fee. This study assessed the unsolicited emails received over the period of November 2017 by a young and by a senior researcher. The young researcher received a substantially higher amount of emails (n = 101) compared to the senior researcher (n = 23). The article processing costs for solicited journals received, ranged between $49 and $3019. These journals are almost all only indexed in Google Scholar and do not display any meaningful journal metrics. Furthermore, the majority of the unsolicited emails were not relevant to the researcher's field of study. Therefore authors and readers alike should evaluate emails received with regard to journal legitimacy prior to submission of work to possibly predatory journals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Research productivity among faculty members at medical and health schools in Saudi Arabia. Prevalence, obstacles, and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Alghanim, Saad A; Alhamali, Rashid M

    2011-12-01

    To identify the prevalence, factors and obstacles affecting research productivity among academic staff at medical and health colleges in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. This cross-sectional survey employed self-administered questionnaires to collect data on faculty members' profile, research activities, and obstacles impeding research productivity. The questionnaires were distributed randomly to 500 faculty members, of which 389 (77.8%) completed the questionnaire at 10 medical and health colleges during January to April 2011. The data were analyzed and presented in a descriptive fashion. Only 150 (38.6%) respondents reported published work in the past 2 years. Of these, 80% indicated sole-authors research and around a quarter (26%) reported co-authors work. Males and young faculty members were more likely to publish research than their counterparts. Faculty members who reported involvement in administrative activities were less likely to publish. Those who reported supervising postgraduate students or had attained training on research methods were more likely to produce research. Respondents perceived that lack of time, lack of research assistants, lack of funds for research, and being busy with teaching load were the most cited obstacles impeding research productivity. Understanding factors and barriers impeding research productivity is a prerequisite for interventions that are directed to promote health services research among faculty members in medical schools.

  14. Influences on Faculty Willingness to Mentor Undergraduate Students from Another University as Part of an Interinstitutional Research Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Danielle X.; Grineski, Sara E.; Collins, Timothy W.

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, the National Institutes of Health invested $31 million in 10 primary institutions across the United States through the Building Undergraduate Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD) program; one requirement of BUILD is sending undergraduate trainees from those primary institutions to partner institutions for research experiences. Mechanisms like BUILD are designed to broaden research opportunities for students, especially those from underrepresented backgrounds. However, to our knowledge, no studies have examined faculty willingness to mentor undergraduates from other institutions through structured training programs. Survey data from 536 faculty members at 13 institutions were collected in Fall 2013 and analyzed using multiple statistical techniques. Results show that faculty who valued the opportunity to increase diversity in the academy and those who believed that mentoring undergraduates benefited their own research expressed greater willingness to serve as research mentors to visiting undergraduates, and faculty who perceived that they did not have the ability to accommodate additional students expressed less willingness to do so. Most respondents viewed student and faculty incentives as motivating factors in their willingness to mentor, but their perspectives on different types of incentives varied based on faculty career stage, discipline, and research funding status. Results have important implications for designing multi-institutional undergraduate research training programs. PMID:27521237

  15. The Impact of Institutional and Peer Support on Faculty Research Productivity: A Comparative Analysis of Research vs. Non-Research Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ju, Ming

    2010-01-01

    Across the landscape of American higher education, research has gradually established its dominant role in faculty work since the end of WWII--a paradigm shift yet to be fully studied and understood. Situated on their traditional locales on the spectrum stretching from pure teaching to heavy research, contemporary institutions all attempt to be…

  16. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program (1987). Program Management Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    lllllll~hEEEI ,II .2 I. 1.25u 11111 1 1 MICROCOP RESOLUTION TES CHART 1% 0., :: nb- l q1 120 I iI UNITED STATES AIR FORCE SUMMER FACULTY RESEARCH...certain chemical compound , its pharmacological properties and the pathways of metabolism, absorption, distribution and excretion must be investigated, the...criteria can be recommended for personnel who handle or are otherwise in contact with such compounds . 5.0. r ,r,. -,&5 N The Toxic Hazards Division

  17. MET Senior Projects at an Urban University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neff, Gregory; And Others

    A report describes the Purdue University Calumet Mechanical Engineering Technology (MET) program, especially the approaches used to enhance industrial involvement and take advantage of the urban setting to find real-life senior project problems. The outreach program, used by faculty to find student senior project material, is described along with…

  18. Marshall Space Flight Center Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Six, N. F. (Compiler)

    2015-01-01

    The Faculty Fellowship program was revived in the summer of 2015 at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, following a period of diminished faculty research activity here since 2006 when budget cuts in the Headquarters' Education Office required realignment. Several senior Marshall managers recognized the need to involve the Nation's academic research talent in NASA's missions and projects to the benefit of both entities. These managers invested their funds required to establish the renewed Faculty Fellowship program in 2015, a 10-week residential research involvement of 16 faculty in the laboratories and offices at Marshall. These faculty engineers and scientists worked with NASA collaborators on NASA projects, bringing new perspectives and solutions to bear. This Technical Memorandum is a compilation of the research reports of the 2015 Marshall Faculty Fellowship program, along with the Program Announcement (appendix A) and the Program Description (appendix B). The research touched on seven areas-propulsion, materials, instrumentation, fluid dynamics, human factors, control systems, and astrophysics. The propulsion studies included green propellants, gas bubble dynamics, and simulations of fluid and thermal transients. The materials investigations involved sandwich structures in composites, plug and friction stir welding, and additive manufacturing, including both strength characterization and thermosets curing in space. The instrumentation projects involved spectral interfero- metry, emissivity, and strain sensing in structures. The fluid dynamics project studied the water hammer effect. The human factors project investigated the requirements for close proximity operations in confined spaces. Another team proposed a controls system for small launch vehicles, while in astrophysics, one faculty researcher estimated the practicality of weather modification by blocking the Sun's insolation, and another found evidence in satellite data of the detection of a warm

  19. Senioritis: Some Paths to Sanity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Roland

    1978-01-01

    A social studies course for high school seniors combines a problems of democracy content with options emphasizing long-term accountability. Each student has a faculty adviser who encourages the student to pursue a specialized social studies topic. (Author/DB)

  20. African American Faculty Expressing Concerns: Breaking the Silence at Predominantly White Research Oriented Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Henry H.; Edwards, Willie J.

    2016-01-01

    A Delphi method was used with a panel of 24 African American faculty employed at 43 predominantly white doctoral extensive universities to arrive at a group consensus on a list of concerns that African American faculty in general experienced or held. Using the Delphi method a panel of African American faculty initially worked from a list of eight…

  1. Faculty Response to Retrenchment. AAHE-ERIC/Higher Education Research Currents, June 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddy, Margot Sanders

    The innovative actions that faculty, and institutions on behalf of faculty, have taken to adjust to retrenchment and the changing academic profession are considered. It is suggested that faculty have three kinds of employment options to present conditions such as the scarcity of tenure-track positions and the failure of salaries to keep pace with…

  2. Mentor Networks in Academic Medicine: Moving Beyond a Dyadic Conception of Mentoring for Junior Faculty Researchers

    PubMed Central

    DeCastro, Rochelle; Sambuco, Dana; Ubel, Peter A.; Stewart, Abigail; Jagsi, Reshma

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Career development award programs often require formal establishment of mentoring relationships. The authors sought to gain a nuanced understanding of mentoring from the perspective of a diverse national sample of faculty clinician-researchers who were all members of formal mentoring relationships. Method Between February 2010 and August 2011, the authors conducted semi-structured, in-depth telephone interviews with 100 former recipients of National Institutes of Health mentored career development awards and 28 of their mentors. Purposive sampling ensured a diverse range of viewpoints. Multiple analysts thematically coded verbatim transcripts using qualitative data analysis software. Results Three relevant themes emerged: (1) the numerous roles and behaviors associated with mentoring in academic medicine, (2) the improbability of finding a single person who can fulfill the diverse mentoring needs of another individual, and (3) the importance and composition of mentor networks. Many respondents described the need to cultivate more than one mentor. Several participants discussed the utilization of peer mentors, citing benefits such as pooled resources and mutual learning. Female participants generally acknowledged the importance of having at least one female mentor. Some observed that their portfolio of mentors needed to evolve in order to remain effective. Conclusions Those who seek to promote the careers of faculty in academic medicine should focus upon developing mentoring networks, rather than hierarchical mentoring dyads. The members of each faculty member's mentoring team or network should reflect the protégé's individual needs and preferences, with special attention towards ensuring diversity in terms of area of expertise, academic rank, and gender. PMID:23425990

  3. Realizing Student, Faculty, and Institutional Outcomes at Scale: Institutionalizing Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity within Systems and Consortia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malachowski, Mitchell; Osborn, Jeffrey M.; Karukstis, Kerry K.; Ambos, Elizabeth L.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reviews the evidence for the effectiveness of undergraduate research as a student, faculty, and institutional success pathway, and provides the context for the Council on Undergraduate Research's support for developing and enhancing undergraduate research in systems and consortia. The chapter also provides brief introductions to each…

  4. Mentoring of Junior Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, William H.

    1992-01-01

    Some personal aspects of the mentoring relationship between senior and junior faculty are discussed, including the "psychological contract" between mentor and protege, the unique role played by the mentor in an organizational context, mentor characteristics, and 10 specific principles of effective mentoring. (MSE)

  5. Course-based undergraduate research experiences in molecular biosciences-patterns, trends, and faculty support.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jack T H

    2017-08-15

    Inquiry-driven learning, research internships and course-based undergraduate research experiences all represent mechanisms through which educators can engage undergraduate students in scientific research. In life sciences education, the benefits of undergraduate research have been thoroughly evaluated, but limitations in infrastructure and training can prevent widespread uptake of these practices. It is not clear how faculty members can integrate complex laboratory techniques and equipment into their unique context, while finding the time and resources to implement undergraduate research according to best practice guidelines. This review will go through the trends and patterns in inquiry-based undergraduate life science projects with particular emphasis on molecular biosciences-the research-aligned disciplines of biochemistry, molecular cell biology, microbiology, and genomics and bioinformatics. This will provide instructors with an overview of the model organisms, laboratory techniques and research questions that are adaptable for semester-long projects, and serve as starting guidelines for course-based undergraduate research. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. The research school of Marie Curie in the Paris faculty, 1907-14.

    PubMed

    Davis, J L

    1995-07-01

    As the most famous woman scientist of the twentieth century, there has been no shortage of books and articles on the life and career of Marie Curie (1867-1934). Her role as director of a laboratory-based research school in the new scientific field of radioactivity, a field which embraced both chemistry and physics, however, has never been examined. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the question of research schools, and Morrell, Ravetz, Geison, and Klosterman, amongst others, have written on this subject. Using, in part, the methodology of Morrell, this paper investigates the role of Marie Curie as a school director in the Paris Faculty in the years 1907-14, examining the work and characteristics of her school and assessing her effectiveness as a director.

  7. What do Canadian seniors say supports their quality of life? Findings from a national participatory research study.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Toba; Brown, Ivan; Cogan, Tara; Dallaire, Clemence; Laforest, Sophie; McGowan, Patrick; Raphael, Dennis; Richard, Lucie; Thompson, Loraine; Young, Joyce

    2004-01-01

    A national project investigated seniors' perceptions of the influences upon their quality of life. The seven participating cities were Montreal, Quebec City, Ottawa, Toronto, Regina, Vancouver and Whitehorse. The project focussed on policy decisions affecting the quality of life of seniors. It was a participatory study in which seniors controlled the direction and shape of the project in each city. Focus groups and individual interviews with seniors and stakeholders. Data analysis used qualitative methods to see the world through the eyes of participants. Each project was committed to hearing the voices of seniors and their views on which issues were affecting the quality of their lives. Across the seven cities, seniors highlighted access to information, health care, housing, income security, safety and security, social contacts and networks, and transportation as key issues that affect the quality of life of seniors in Canada. The findings affirm the value of participatory activities that involve seniors working with other sectors as a productive policy-informing approach. The Seniors' Quality of Life projects demonstrate the conceptual power of the determinants of health perspective to understand seniors' quality of life issues. While seniors considered health care to be a continuing concern, they also recognized socio-economic issues as significantly affecting the quality of their lives.

  8. Long Live Traditional Textbook Problems!?--Constraints on Faculty Use of Research-Based Problems in Introductory Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Though many research-based problem types have been shown effective in promoting students' conceptual understanding and scientific abilities, the extent of their use in actual classrooms remains unclear. We interviewed and surveyed 16 physics and engineering faculty members at a large US Midwest research university to investigate how university…

  9. Healthy Families on American Indian Reservations: A Summary of Six Years of Research by Tribal College Faculty, Staff, and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Louellyn; Stauss, Joseph H.; Nelson, Claudia E.

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a review and summary of six years of research on food assistance and nutrition issues on Indian reservations across America that was carried out by tribal college faculty, staff, and students through a federal small grants program. An assessment of the impacts and implications of this unique research program on the tribal…

  10. The 2010 Rankings of Chemical Education and Science Education Journals by Faculty Engaged in Chemical Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towns, Marcy H.; Kraft, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Faculty active in chemical education research from around the world ranked 22 journals publishing research in chemical education and science education. The results of this survey can be used to supplement impact factors that are often used to compare the quality of journals in a field. Knowing which journals those in the field rank as top tier is…

  11. Faculty Member Perceptions of Facilities and Administrative Costs for Sponsored Research at Historically Black Colleges and Universities in Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Ashley J.

    2017-01-01

    There has been great concern about the relationship between the federal government and universities with regard to improving funding for research and scholarly activity. Faculty members at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have been instrumental in advancing research and development on behalf of society. The purpose of this…

  12. A Successful Model of Collaborative Undergraduate Research: A Multi-Faculty, Multi-Project, Multi-Institution Team Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodzicka, Julie A.; Ford, Thomas E.; Caudill, Abbie; Ohanmamooreni, Alyna

    2015-01-01

    A collaborative research grant from the National Science Foundation allowed the first two authors to provide students at primarily undergraduate institutions with a multi-faculty, multi-institution team research experience. Teams of undergraduate students at Western Carolina University and Washington and Lee University collaborated with one…

  13. Senior Research Connects Students with a Living Laboratory As Part of an Integrated Crop and Livestock System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senturklu, Songul; Landblom, Douglas; Brevik, Eric C.

    2015-04-01

    highest expenses in beef cattle production. Senior research investigating the impact of livestock integration and multi-species cover crop grown within the crop rotation is studying changes in soil attributes resulting from the crop-animal integration by measuring bulk density and in-season soil fertility in the crop rotation. These responses are further contrasted with results from within the crop rotation and responses from perennial native range. Students that become engaged in the research represent a broad cross section of the consuming public and include high school junior and senior students, college undergraduate students that conduct research projects, postdoctoral research scientists engaged in senior level research, agricultural extension educators, and finally, farmer and rancher businessmen. The integrated nature of the research provides a wealth of learning opportunities for these various groups. For the high school students, visits to the living laboratory increase awareness and introduces students to a potential career path in agriculture, natural resource fields, and the many allied vocational fields that support agriculture. When college undergraduate students visit the living laboratory, they seek to address a researchable question or a problem in agriculture, while fulfilling requirements for graduation by conducting a research project. Because postdoctoral students want to be actively engaged in research and advanced learning, they are interested in conducting research in the living laboratory that can be published in peer reviewed journals. Agricultural extension educators, who advise farmers and ranchers, are looking for research results from the living laboratory that can be convey to their constituents. Farmers and ranchers participate in workshop events that give them face-to-face learning opportunities that they can use to effect change in their farm and ranch businesses. Each of these demographic groups are unique in their interest in the

  14. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program. Program Technical Report. 1990. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-05

    aft"W--0" II I i 1. A -- U14 ONLY (L ..... h .REPORT DAE J P WORT N-vt A A CVEE . . ftW NO 55 June 1991 IAnnual/Fna Set 89൧-Aug 90 4.OW ARDMORBUnited...States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program 1990 \\3oVxx’( \\Q )? J . Program Technical Report 2 & AUTOR() F49620-88-C-0053 Mr Rodney Darrah 7.Pg...PAGE OF ASTA. rUNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSTPTFn r~TTI ~ a. - h I "AEOSR*TR* 91 O~’~8 rJ2c) ~ H4- h’ tfi ~ t( -4 C. b.t1:~ ~jr - J :1 Ii 4 ( CD UNITED STATES

  15. Summer Research Program (1992). Summer Faculty Research Program (SFRP) Reports. Volume 6. Arnold Engineering Development Center, Civil Engineering Laboratory, Frank J. Seiler Research Laboratory, Wilford Hall Medical Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    concentrations of DNT, its degradation intermediate 4-methyl 5- nitrocatechol, and TNT were determined by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC...to more cost-effective site characterization and cleanup. Many such studies have been performed using chromatography and/or liquid scintillation...volume set that summarizes the research accomplishments of faculty, graduate student, and high school participants in the 1992 AFOSR Summer Research

  16. Influences on Faculty Willingness to Mentor Undergraduate Students from Another University as Part of an Interinstitutional Research Training Program.

    PubMed

    Morales, Danielle X; Grineski, Sara E; Collins, Timothy W

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, the National Institutes of Health invested $31 million in 10 primary institutions across the United States through the Building Undergraduate Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD) program; one requirement of BUILD is sending undergraduate trainees from those primary institutions to partner institutions for research experiences. Mechanisms like BUILD are designed to broaden research opportunities for students, especially those from underrepresented backgrounds. However, to our knowledge, no studies have examined faculty willingness to mentor undergraduates from other institutions through structured training programs. Survey data from 536 faculty members at 13 institutions were collected in Fall 2013 and analyzed using multiple statistical techniques. Results show that faculty who valued the opportunity to increase diversity in the academy and those who believed that mentoring undergraduates benefited their own research expressed greater willingness to serve as research mentors to visiting undergraduates, and faculty who perceived that they did not have the ability to accommodate additional students expressed less willingness to do so. Most respondents viewed student and faculty incentives as motivating factors in their willingness to mentor, but their perspectives on different types of incentives varied based on faculty career stage, discipline, and research funding status. Results have important implications for designing multi-institutional undergraduate research training programs. © 2016 D. X. Morales et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  17. Nursing Faculty Members' Perspectives of Faculty-to-Faculty Workplace Incivility among Nursing Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amos, Kimberly S.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, nursing faculty incivility has been a searing topic of research. Nursing research included studies on incivility among nursing students, incivility between nursing students and nursing faculty, and incivility in the clinical setting. However, literature specifically on nursing faculty incivility was limited. This descriptive,…

  18. [Laboratory of Pharmacognosy of Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra (Portugal): teaching and et research (1902-1980)].

    PubMed

    Cabral, Célia; Lígia Salgueiro; Pita, João Rui

    2016-03-01

    In this article the authors present a brief history of the Laboratory of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, Portugal (1902-1980). The authors refer the importance of pharmacognosy in the study plans, the scientific research and the scientific collection of pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra. This heritage consists of collection of drugs prepared in the laboratory of pharmacognosy, a collection Drogen-Lehrsammlung purchased to E. Merck and a collection of botanic-didactic models of the XIXth century of the famous German manufacturer R. Brendel. The authors study the relationship between research and teaching, highlighting the importance of the collections of drugs.

  19. Preparing students for research: faculty/librarian collaboration in a pre-doctoral physical therapy research course.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Salome V; Bigelow, Susan

    2015-12-01

    In this article, guest writers Susan Bigelow and Dr Salome Brooks from Springfield College, Massachusetts, present an overview of their evaluative research study in which a faculty professor and the liaison librarian collaborated to develop an information literacy course entitled Physical Therapy (PT) and Health care Research Skills, in order to teach necessary information literacy skills to upper-level undergraduate PT students. Triangulation of the Physical Therapy and Information Literacy standards in alignment with the course objectives strengthened the collaboration, course development and expectations of student performance. Student performance was assessed through formal and expected evaluative means, and the preliminary evidence suggests some key successes in the course outcomes. © 2015 Health Libraries Group.

  20. Manufacturing Mississippi's Workforce: An Assessment of Employability Skills as Perceived by Faculty and Senior Students of Four Year Manufacturing Related Degree Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Mamie Yvette

    2012-01-01

    A worldwide concern exists that undergraduate programs are not producing graduates with the kind of lifelong learning and professional skills needed for workplace success. Numerous research studies indicate new employees lack needed employability skills such as teamwork, decision-making, and communication. Similarly, recent national and state…

  1. Developing a Research Identity: Promoting a Research Mindset among Faculty and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEachern, Kirstin P.; Horton, Jessica L.

    2016-01-01

    This article details how the authors, two educators with doctoral degrees, attempt to harmonize their researcher and educator identities and seek to empower their students and fellow teachers as researchers. They describe how their doctoral programs influenced their beliefs about the power of a researcher identity, and they suggest ways…

  2. The First Ninety Days: Transition Strategies Utilized by New Senior Student Affairs Officers at Four-Year, Public Research, Land Grant Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Frances Elise

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore, document, analyze, and describe employment transition strategies utilized by senior student affairs officers prior to, and during the first 90 days of their appointment at a 4-year, public research, land grant institution. Four research questions were posed to address the problems identified,…

  3. Mentoring for Responsible Research: The Creation of a Curriculum for Faculty to Teach RCR in the Research Environment.

    PubMed

    Plemmons, Dena K; Kalichman, Michael W

    2018-02-01

    Despite more than 25 years of a requirement for training in the responsible conduct of research (RCR), there is still little consensus about what such training should include, how it should be delivered, nor what constitutes "effectiveness" of such training. This lack of consensus on content, approaches and outcomes is evident in recent data showing high variability in the development and implementation of RCR instruction across universities and programs. If we accept that one of the primary aims of instruction in RCR/research ethics is "to foster a community of social responsibility" (Antes et al. 2009: 398), then it makes sense to consider the research environment itself-where learning one's science happens where one also engages in social interaction around that science. In order to take the best advantage of that already existing/naturally occurring research environment, the authors, through a deliberative, collaborative, and integrative process, crafted a workshop curriculum meant to arm research faculty with concrete and specific tools to effectively introduce research ethics in the context of the research environment.

  4. A Study of Faculty Perception of the Implementation of the Articulated Faculty Concept. Self-Study Report No. 3. Institutional Research Series 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Woodford W.

    In 1975 and 1981, surveys were conducted at the Lima regional campus of Ohio State University (OSU) to determine the perceptions of tenured and nontenured faculty with regard to the articulated faculty concept, whereby regional campus instructors are fully affiliated with academic departments at the OSU central campus. Faculty were asked to…

  5. The Use of Research-Based Instructional Strategies in Introductory Physics: Where do Faculty Leave the Innovation-Decision Process?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Charles; Dancy, Melissa; Niewiadomska-Bugaj, Magdalena

    2013-03-01

    During the Fall of 2008 a web survey was completed by a representative sample of 722 United States physics faculty. In this talk we will briefly present summary statistics to describe faculty knowledge about and use of 24 specific research-based instructional strategies (RBIS). We will then analyze the results based on a four stage model of the innovation-decision process: knowledge, trial, continuation, and high use. The largest losses occur at the continuation stage, with approximately 1/3 of faculty discontinuing use of all RBIS after trying one or more of these strategies. These results suggest that common dissemination strategies are good at creating knowledge about RBIS and motivation to try a RBIS, but more work is needed to support faculty during implementation and continued use of RBIS. Based on a logistic regression analysis, only nine of the 20 potential predictor variables measured were statistically significant when controlling for other variables. Faculty age, institutional type, and percentage of job related to teaching were not found to be correlated with knowledge or use at any stage. High research productivity and large class sizes were not found to be barriers to use of at least some RBIS. Supported by NSF #0715698.

  6. The Interplay of Gender in the Careers of White Female and Male Senior Professors. ASHE Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaman-Smith, Kandis; Placier, Margaret

    A grounded theory study was conducted using open-ended interviews with white male and female senior, tenured faculty members. The setting was a major Midwestern research one university. Four male and five female participants, all white agreed to participate. An open-ended interview protocol was used. Following grounded theory strategies, open…

  7. The Ambivalence of the Israeli Academic Profession: Research vs. Teaching. The Academic Profession Approaches the Twenty-First Century: the Carnegie Foundation International Survey, Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, Esther E.; And Others

    Attitudes of Israeli senior faculty concerning research and teaching were evaluated using the Carnegie international questionnaire. Approximately one third of the total faculty population in Israel was randomly sampled, but stratified by institutional size. The questionnaire was sent to 2,225 faculty and 502 returned completed forms (22.56…

  8. Integrating Teacher Behaviors with Character Strengths and Virtues for Faculty Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGovern, Thomas V.; Miller, Samantha Leigh

    2008-01-01

    We describe a model for new and senior faculty members, integrating a behavioral approach to enhancing teaching skills with research from the field of positive psychology on virtues and character strengths. The Teacher Behaviors Checklist (Keeley, Smith, & Buskist, 2006) identifies target behaviors amenable to modification, derived from…

  9. Perceptions of Faculty toward Integrating Technology in Undergraduate Higher Education Traditional Classrooms at Research-Focused Regional Universities in South Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, Cheri Deann

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the perceptions of faculty members who use technology in undergraduate higher education traditional classrooms in research-focused regional universities in South Texas. Faculty members at research-focused regional universities are expected to divide time judiciously into three major areas: research, service, and…

  10. A Social Capital Perspective on the Mentoring of Undergraduate Life Science Researchers: An Empirical Study of Undergraduate-Postgraduate-Faculty Triads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aikens, Melissa L.; Sadselia, Sona; Watkins, Keiana; Evans, Mara; Eby, Lillian T.; Dolan, Erin L.

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduate researchers at research universities are often mentored by graduate students or postdoctoral researchers (referred to collectively as "postgraduates") and faculty, creating a mentoring triad structure. Triads differ based on whether the undergraduate, postgraduate, and faculty member interact with one another about the…

  11. The Academic Profession in Canada: Perceptions of Canadian University Faculty about Research and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gopaul, Bryan; Jones, Glen A.; Weinrib, Julian; Metcalfe, Amy; Fisher, Donald; Gingras, Yves; Rubenson, Kjell

    2016-01-01

    Previous scholarly attention to the experiences of faculty members has emphasized the contexts of US institutions, with minimal attention to the experiences of faculty members at Canadian universities. This paper presents the findings of the Canadian component of an international survey that was administered in 19 different jurisdictions to…

  12. Managing Institutional Research Advancement: Implications from a University Faculty Time Allocation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Derrick M.; Slade, Catherine P.

    2016-01-01

    While much is known about faculty time allocation, we know very little about how traditional managerial factors influence faculty time allocation behaviors. We know even less about the possible downsides associated with relying on these traditional managerial factors. Using survey data from the National Science Foundation/Department of Energy…

  13. Determining Faculty Perceived Needs for Professional Development: An Action Research Model. AIR 1989 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gratton, Margaret; Walleri, R. Dan

    To determine the perceived needs among faculty for professional development, a survey was conducted of 165 faculty in 13 divisions. Questionnaires were returned by 129, or 78% with over 50% responding from each division. Among the results were the following: (1) the most widely used (93%) professional development resources, inservice sessions, was…

  14. Academic Faculty in University Research Centers: Neither Capitalism's Slaves nor Teaching Fugitives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozeman, Barry; Boardman, Craig

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses university-industry interactions for both educational and industrial outcomes. The results suggest that while academic faculty who are affiliated with centers are more involved with industry than non-affiliated faculty, affiliates are also more involved with and supportive of students at the undergraduate, graduate, and…

  15. The Tithing of Higher Education, Out-of-Pocket Spending by Faculty. A Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maury, Kathleen; And Others

    This study was done to determine how much faculty in the Minnesota State University System spend out of their own pocket to support their work. A survey was distributed to all system faculty (n=2,370) and included demographic and spending pattern items as well as open-ended items. Seven hundred and eleven surveys were returned. Results indicated…

  16. Assessing a Writing Intensive General Education Capstone: Research as Faculty Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrish, Juli; Hesse, Doug; Bateman, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    We explain how collaboratively assessing a writing-intensive general education capstone seminar constituted a high-impact practice for faculty development. Students at the University of Denver complete an Advanced Seminar taught by faculty across the curriculum. Topics and themes vary widely, as do types of assigned writing, making assessment an…

  17. Integrating Experiential Learning and Applied Sociology to Promote Student Learning and Faculty Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holtzman, Mellisa; Menning, Chadwick

    2015-01-01

    Although the benefits of experiential learning for students are well documented, such courses are sometimes seen as a professional burden for faculty because they are very labor- and time-intensive endeavors. This paper suggests, however, that the time investment in experiential learning courses can be made more efficient if faculty members treat…

  18. Variations in the Characteristics of Part-Time Faculty by General Fields of Instruction and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Ernst

    1998-01-01

    Data from the 1993 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty are analyzed for patterns in part-time faculty characteristics in vocationally oriented and liberal arts-oriented two- and four-year colleges, by discipline group. Characteristics examined include qualifications, job satisfaction, economic condition (income, additional employment), reasons…

  19. Evaluating How Education Faculty Spend Their Time at a Private Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Michelle Silver

    2012-01-01

    Defining and measuring faculty productivity are among the most central issues for quality and accountability in higher education today, and it is the subject this study seeks to illuminate. This study first examines how the productivity of faculty in the School of Education at a private university differ according to different faculty…

  20. Oh, Won't You Stay? Predictors of Faculty Intent to Leave a Public Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, John F.; Healy, Richard; Sullivan, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and predicting faculty intent to leave is important to the development of improved conceptual frameworks of faculty success as well as the implementation of effective retention strategies for academic leaders and institutions that invest considerable resources in recruitment, institutional support, and compensation. This study…

  1. Oh, Won't You Stay? Predictors of Faculty Intent to Leave a Public Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, John F.; Healy, Richard; Sullivan, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Understanding and predicting faculty intent to leave is important to the development of improved conceptual frameworks of faculty success as well as the implementation of effective retention strategies for academic leaders and institutions that invest considerable resources in recruitment, institutional support, and compensation. This study…

  2. African American Social Work Faculty: Overcoming Existing Barriers and Achieving Research Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Junior Lloyd; Huggins-Hoyt, Kimberly Y.; Holosko, Michael J.; Briggs, Harold E.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored the scholarship experiences of top-ranked African American faculty in schools of social work. Method: Qualitative interviews were conducted with N = 10 top-ranked African American faculty identified as achieving considerable productivity and impact of scholarship. Findings: Four major themes were identified, each of…

  3. A Scaling Research on Faculty Characteristics That Higher Education Students Prioritize

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Güvendir, Meltem Acar

    2014-01-01

    In view of the importance of taking student preferences into account while establishing educational practices, this study explores which faculty member characteristic fourth year students mostly prefer in a higher education institution. A faculty member characteristics form that includes ten characteristics was administered to 419 fourth year…

  4. The Doktabörse - an innovative online platform for research projects at the medical faculty of the LMU Munich.

    PubMed

    Nicolai, Leo; Gradel, Maximilian; Antón, Sofia; Pander, Tanja; Kalb, Anke; Köhler, Lisa; Fischer, Martin R; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos; von der Borch, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: One of the most important extracurricular aspects of medical studies in Germany is a research thesis completed by most students. This research project often times conveys relevant competencies for the physician's role as scientist. Nevertheless, the choice of the right project remains a challenge. Reasons for this are among others, missing structures for a comprehensive overview of research groups and their respective projects. Description of the project: We developed the online platform Doktabörse as an online marketplace for doctoral research projects. The platform enables authorized researchers to create working groups and upload, deactivate and change research projects within their institute. For interested students, a front end with integrated search function displays these projects in a structured and well-arranged way. In parallel, the Doktabörse provides for a comprehensive overview of research at the medical faculty. We evaluated Researchers' and students' use of the platform. Results: 96,6% of students participating in the evaluation (n=400) were in favor of a centralized research platform at the medical faculty. The platform grew at a steady pace and included 120 research groups in June 2016. The students appreciated the structure and design of the Doktabörse. Two thirds of all uploaded projects matched successfully with doctoral students via the platform and over 94% of researchers stated that they did not need technical assistance with uploading projects and handling the platform. Discussion : The Doktabörse represents an innovative and well accepted platform for doctoral research projects. The platform is perceived positively by researchers and students alike. However, students criticized limited extent and timeliness of offered projects. In addition, the platform serves as databank of research at the medical faculty of the LMU Munich. The future potential of this platform is to provide for an integrated management solution of

  5. Small Groups, Significant Impact: A Review of Peer-Led Team Learning Research with Implications for STEM Education Researchers and Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Sarah Beth; Varma-Nelson, Pratibha

    2016-01-01

    Peer-led team learning (PLTL) research has expanded from its roots in program evaluation of student success measures in Workshop Chemistry to a spectrum of research questions and qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods study approaches. In order to develop recommendations for PLTL research and propose best practices for faculty who will…

  6. Job Satisfaction of Faculty Teaching Higher Education. An Examination of Herzberg's Dual-Factor Theory and Porter's Need Satisfaction Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moxley, Linda S.

    In October 1975 a questionnaire was sent to 200 members randomly selected from the "Directory of Faculty Members Teaching in the Field of Higher Education" to determine satisfaction with their teaching role. The research was designed to test Herzberg's theory, which states that "hygiene factors" (job context) are related to…

  7. Professional Development for Adjunct Teaching Faculty in a Research-Intensive University: Engagement in Scholarly Approaches to Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Andrea S.; Wong, Tracy J.; Hubball, Harry T.

    2013-01-01

    Research-intensive universities around the world are increasingly drawing upon leading practitioners in professional fields as adjunct faculty to deliver high quality student learning experiences in diverse undergraduate and graduate program contexts. To support effective professional development in these contexts, many universities have developed…

  8. The Development of Research Networks among Early-Career Faculty Members in the Science, Engineering and Health Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bankart, Charles Allen Swanson

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a better understanding of the patterns and processes of collaboration in the performance of research, as well as to understand why and how early-career faculty members engage in collaborative partnerships. With an eye toward institutional policy and academic programming, special emphasis was placed on how…

  9. What Do They Tell Their Students? Business Faculty Acceptance of the Web and Library Databases for Student Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewald, Nancy H.

    2005-01-01

    Business faculty were surveyed as to their use of free Web resources and subscription databases for their own and their students' research. A much higher percentage of respondents either require or encourage Web use by their students than require or encourage database use, though most also advise use of multiple sources.

  10. A Three-Pronged Approach to Evaluating Salary Equity among Faculty, Administrators, and Staff at a Metropolitan Research University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armacost, Robert L.

    A study was conducted to evaluate inequalities in salary for all regular faculty, administrative, and staff employees with respect to gender and ethnicity at a major metropolitan research university. In all, there were 648 minorities in the study and 1,443 women. Three approaches were used to test for inequalities: (1) a multiple regression…

  11. Analyzing Citation and Research Collaboration Characteristics of Faculty in Aerospace, Civil and Environmental, Electrical and Computer, and Mechanical Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Li

    2018-01-01

    This article investigates citation and research collaboration habits of faculty in four engineering departments. The analysis focuses on similarities and differences among the engineering disciplines. Main differences exist in the use of conference papers and technical reports. The age of cited materials varies by discipline and by format.…

  12. Mediation Works: An Action Research Study Evaluating the Peer Mediation Program from the Eyes of Mediators and Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Jacqueline Yvonne; Boes, Susan R.

    2013-01-01

    A literature review was conducted to understand how mediators and faculty view a Peer Mediation Program (PMP). The review identified four subgroups: mediators, teachers, administrators, and school counselors as well as their views on the success or lack of success of PMPs. The research also reflects how to best engage stakeholders in the mediation…

  13. An Exploration of the Influence of Instructional Technologies on Faculty Motivation and Teaching Innovation on a Research Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaeffer, S. J., III

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how the introduction of instructional technologies has influenced the motivational attitudes of higher education faculty at research-oriented institutions with respect to their teaching responsibilities. This was a qualitative study using case-study methodology and involved multiple (4)…

  14. Fostering Academic Cooperation and Collaboration through the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: A Faculty Research Abroad Program in Poland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barczyk, Casimir C.; Davis, Nancy; Zimmerman, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    This study is a narrative analysis of participants' perceptions of the development of cross-cultural awareness through "The Faculty Research Abroad Program in Poland," a joint initiative between a regional campus of a Midwestern land grant university and a private university in Poland. The purpose was to foster academic cooperation and…

  15. The Process of General Education Reform from a Faculty Perspective at a Research-Extensive University: A Grounded Theory Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hachtmann, Frauke

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a theory for institutional change that explains the process and implementation of "Achievement-Centered Education" (ACE) from the faculty perspective. ACE is a new general education program at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, a public, doctoral/research-extensive institution. A constant…

  16. Affordable and Open Textbooks: An Exploratory Study of Faculty Attitudes. Research & Occasional Paper Series. CSHE.9.09

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, Diane; Lawrence, Shannon; Acord, Sophia Krzys; Dixson, Jason

    2009-01-01

    The Student Public Interest Research Groups (Student PIRGs)--who have been at the forefront of raising awareness about textbook affordability for much of the past decade--launched a two-year campaign (MakeTextbooksAffordable.org/statement) in 2007 to drive mainstream faculty's acceptance of open textbooks and other affordable alternatives in place…

  17. International Education in the 21st Century: The Importance of Faculty in Developing Study Abroad Research Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giedt, Todd; Gokcek, Gigi; Ghosh, Jayati

    2015-01-01

    This paper argues for a reimagining of education abroad that fuses short-term programming with some kind of experiential research component led by home campus disciplinary faculty, especially those in the sciences, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields, in order to better integrate the study abroad program into the core undergraduate…

  18. STEM Faculty as Learners in Pedagogical Reform and the Role of Research Articles as Professional Development Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Mulnix, Amy B.

    2016-01-01

    Discipline-based education research (DBER) publications are opportunities for professional development around science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education reform. Learning theory tells us these publications could be more impactful if authors, reviewers, and editors pay greater attention to linking principles and practice. This approach, which considers faculty as learners and STEM education reform as content, has the potential to better support faculty members because it promotes a deeper understanding of the reasons why a pedagogical change is effective. This depth of understanding is necessary for faculty members to successfully transfer new knowledge to their own contexts. A challenge ahead for the emergent learning sciences is to better integrate findings from across sister disciplines; DBER reports can take a step in that direction while improving their usefulness for instructors. PMID:27810872

  19. Faculty Work and Results: Productivity Review, 2000-01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Univ., Eugene.

    This report describes the roles and productivity of faculty members in the Oregon University System (OUS). Of the 3,199 ranked instructional faculty members in 2000-2001, three-fourths were full time, but the proportion of full-time faculty in the senior ranks and holding tenure has declined since 1995-1996. The proportion of faculty members who…

  20. Senior Benefits

    Science.gov Websites

    Behavioral Health Office of Children's Services Office of the Commissioner Office of Substance Misuse and Addiction Prevention Finance & Management Services Health Care Services Juvenile Justice Public Assistance Public Health Seniors & Disabilities Services Boards, Councils & Commissions Services

  1. Senior Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanfield, Ronald

    This report describes and evaluates an adult education experiment for the elderly of the Uptown Model Cities area of Chicago. The purpose of the "Senior Studies" program was to increase opportunities for adult and continuing education for the older people of the area through the development of a curriculum that encompassed art, literature, music,…

  2. Race, Disadvantage and Faculty Experiences in Academic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Lisa A.; Carr, Phyllis

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Despite compelling reasons to draw on the contributions of under-represented minority (URM) faculty members, US medical schools lack these faculty, particularly in leadership and senior roles. Objective The study’s purpose was to document URM faculty perceptions and experience of the culture of academic medicine in the US and to raise awareness of obstacles to achieving the goal of having people of color in positions of leadership in academic medicine. Design The authors conducted a qualitative interview study in 2006–2007 of faculty in five US medical schools chosen for their diverse regional and organizational attributes. Participants Using purposeful sampling of medical faculty, 96 faculty were interviewed from four different career stages (early, plateaued, leaders and left academic medicine) and diverse specialties with an oversampling of URM faculty. Approach We identified patterns and themes emergent in the coded data. Analysis was inductive and data driven. Results Predominant themes underscored during analyses regarding the experience of URM faculty were: difficulty of cross-cultural relationships; isolation and feeling invisible; lack of mentoring, role models and social capital; disrespect, overt and covert bias/discrimination; different performance expectations related to race/ethnicity; devaluing of research on community health care and health disparities; the unfair burden of being identified with affirmative action and responsibility for diversity efforts; leadership’s role in diversity goals; and financial hardship. Conclusions Achieving an inclusive culture for diverse medical school faculty would help meet the mission of academic medicine to train a physician and research workforce that meets the disparate needs of our multicultural society. Medical school leaders need to value the inclusion of URM faculty. Failure to fully engage the skills and insights of URM faculty impairs our ability to provide the best science

  3. Race, disadvantage and faculty experiences in academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Pololi, Linda; Cooper, Lisa A; Carr, Phyllis

    2010-12-01

    Despite compelling reasons to draw on the contributions of under-represented minority (URM) faculty members, US medical schools lack these faculty, particularly in leadership and senior roles. The study's purpose was to document URM faculty perceptions and experience of the culture of academic medicine in the US and to raise awareness of obstacles to achieving the goal of having people of color in positions of leadership in academic medicine. The authors conducted a qualitative interview study in 2006-2007 of faculty in five US medical schools chosen for their diverse regional and organizational attributes. Using purposeful sampling of medical faculty, 96 faculty were interviewed from four different career stages (early, plateaued, leaders and left academic medicine) and diverse specialties with an oversampling of URM faculty. We identified patterns and themes emergent in the coded data. Analysis was inductive and data driven. Predominant themes underscored during analyses regarding the experience of URM faculty were: difficulty of cross-cultural relationships; isolation and feeling invisible; lack of mentoring, role models and social capital; disrespect, overt and covert bias/discrimination; different performance expectations related to race/ethnicity; devaluing of research on community health care and health disparities; the unfair burden of being identified with affirmative action and responsibility for diversity efforts; leadership's role in diversity goals; and financial hardship. Achieving an inclusive culture for diverse medical school faculty would help meet the mission of academic medicine to train a physician and research workforce that meets the disparate needs of our multicultural society. Medical school leaders need to value the inclusion of URM faculty. Failure to fully engage the skills and insights of URM faculty impairs our ability to provide the best science, education or medical care.

  4. 25-year analysis of a dental undergraduate research training program (BSc Dent) at the University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Scott, J E; de Vries, J; Iacopino, A M

    2008-12-01

    Research in the context of the dental school has traditionally been focused on institutional/faculty accomplishments and generating new knowledge to benefit the profession. Only recently have significant efforts been made to expand the overall research programming into the formal dental curriculum, to provide students with a baseline exposure to the research and critical thinking processes, encourage evidence-based decision-making, and stimulate interest in academic/research careers. Various approaches to curriculum reform and the establishment of multiple levels of student research opportunities are now part of the educational fabric of many dental schools worldwide. Many of the preliminary reports regarding the success and vitality of these programs have used outcomes measures and metrics that emphasize cultural changes within institutions, student research productivity, and student career preferences after graduation. However, there have not been any reports from long-standing programs (a minimum of 25 years of cumulative data) that describe dental school graduates who have had the benefit of research/training experiences during their dental education. The University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry initiated a BSc Dent program in 1980 that awarded a formal degree for significant research experiences taking place within the laboratories of the Faculty-based researchers and has continued to develop and expand this program. The success of the program has been demonstrated by the continued and increasing demands for entry, the academic achievements of the graduates, and the numbers of graduates who have completed advanced education/training programs or returned to the Faculty as instructors. Analysis of our long-term data validates many recent hypotheses and short-term observations regarding the benefits of dental student research programs. This information may be useful in the design and implementation of dental student research programs at other dental schools.

  5. Use of research-based instructional strategies in introductory physics: Where do faculty leave the innovation-decision process?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Charles; Dancy, Melissa; Niewiadomska-Bugaj, Magdalena

    2012-12-01

    During the fall of 2008 a web survey, designed to collect information about pedagogical knowledge and practices, was completed by a representative sample of 722 physics faculty across the United States (50.3% response rate). This paper presents partial results to describe how 20 potential predictor variables correlate with faculty knowledge about and use of research-based instructional strategies (RBIS). The innovation-decision process was conceived of in terms of four stages: knowledge versus no knowledge, trial versus no trial, continuation versus discontinuation, and high versus low use. The largest losses occur at the continuation stage, with approximately 1/3 of faculty discontinuing use of all RBIS after trying one or more of these strategies. Nine of the predictor variables were statistically significant for at least one of these stages when controlling for other variables. Knowledge and/or use of RBIS are significantly correlated with reading teaching-related journals, attending talks and workshops related to teaching, attending the physics and astronomy new faculty workshop, having an interest in using more RBIS, being female, being satisfied with meeting instructional goals, and having a permanent, full-time position. The types of variables that are significant at each stage vary substantially. These results suggest that common dissemination strategies are good at creating knowledge about RBIS and motivation to try a RBIS, but more work is needed to support faculty during implementation and continued use of RBIS. Also, contrary to common assumptions, faculty age, institutional type, and percentage of job related to teaching were not found to be barriers to knowledge or use at any stage. High research productivity and large class sizes were not found to be barriers to use of at least some RBIS.

  6. USAF/SCEEE Summer Faculty Research Program (1982). Research Reports. Volume 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    Engineering (802) 658-3330 Assigned: RADC/Griffiss Dr. Milton J. Alexander Degree: D.B.A., Management , 1968 Professor Specialty: Management ...Information Auburn University Systems, Operational Management Department Research Auburn, AL 36830 Assigned: LMC (205) 826-4730 Dr. Gary L. Allen Degree: Ph.D...Ph.D., Industrial Professor Engineering, 1951 Oklahoma State University Specialty: Project Management , Industrial Engineering & Management Dept

  7. USAF/SCEEE Summer Faculty Research Program. Research Reports. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    in the early years included Bessie Coleman, first black ’woman pilot, Harriet Quimby, Matilde Moisant, Katherine and Marjorie Stinson, Ruth Law, and... Martinus Nijhoff. Cavallo, R. E., 1979b, (ed.), Systems Research Movement: Characteristics, Accomplishments and Current Developments, Special Issue of

  8. Summer Research Program (1992). Summer Faculty Research Program (SFRP) Reports. Volume 5A. Wright Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    1992 6-~1 SOME RESULTS IN MACIIINE- LEARNING Mike Breen Assistant Professor Department of Mathematics Tennessee Technological Universitv Abstract The...Research Laboratory; Wilford Hall Medical Center 12 High School Apprenticeship Program Reports: Armstrong Laboratory 13 High School Apprenticeship ...Program Reports: Phillips Laboratory 14 High School Apprenticeship Program Reports: Rome Laboratory 15 High School Apprenticeship Program Reports

  9. The Senior Toronto Oncology Panel (STOP) Study: Research Participation for Older Adults With Cancer and Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Puts, Martine T E; Sattar, Schroder; Fossat, Takami; Fitch, Margaret I; Macdonald, Geraldine J; Hsu, Tina; Szumacher, Ewa; Stephens, Douglas A; Robinson, Joseph; Macdonald, David; Choate, Andrew S; Pitters, Eric; Liu, Barbara; Jeffs, Lianne; McGilton, Katherine S; Alibhai, Shabbir M H

    2017-10-01

    Background: Patient engagement in research may lead to better-designed studies and improved health outcomes. The objectives of this study were to identify the research priorities of older adults with cancer (OAWCs) and their caregivers and examine how to engage these individuals in research teams and what supports are needed. Methods: We conducted 3 public meetings and 7 focus groups to delineate research priorities and the supports needed to facilitate integration of OAWCs and their caregivers on research teams. Results: A total of 33 older adults and 19 caregivers attended a public meeting and 27 older adults and 17 caregivers participated in a focus group. Most of the OAWCs and their caregivers had never participated in research before. Three themes were identified from the focus groups: (1) motivation to be on a team; (2) ability to make meaningful contributions; and (3) logistical considerations to facilitate engagement. Most participants were motivated to be a research team member and be involved in all steps of research if it could benefit them or future patients and caregivers. OAWCs and their caregivers were highly motivated to improve outcomes. Required logistics included flexibility regarding time and location, accessibility to computer technology, transportation support, materials worded in lay language, and attending/having short training sessions, as well as the presence of peer support. Conclusions: OAWCs and their caregivers are very motivated and willing to participate in research and to be research team members. Logistics and the social aspects of being on a team are important. Copyright © 2017 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  10. Lessons for Establishing a Foundation for Data Use in DC Public Schools. The Senior Urban Education Research Fellowship Series. Volume I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smerdon, Becky; Evan, Aimee

    2010-01-01

    With a grant from the Council of the Great City Schools' Senior Urban Education Research Fellowship Program, the authors began a project designed to identify the roots of the dropout problem in the District of Columbia by identifying middle grades students' exhibiting behaviors associated with dropping out of high school. Their plan was to use DC…

  11. A Review of Activity Trackers for Senior Citizens: Research Perspectives, Commercial Landscape and the Role of the Insurance Industry.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Salvatore; Barton, John; O'Flynn, Brendan

    2017-06-03

    The objective assessment of physical activity levels through wearable inertial-based motion detectors for the automatic, continuous and long-term monitoring of people in free-living environments is a well-known research area in the literature. However, their application to older adults can present particular constraints. This paper reviews the adoption of wearable devices in senior citizens by describing various researches for monitoring physical activity indicators, such as energy expenditure, posture transitions, activity classification, fall detection and prediction, gait and balance analysis, also by adopting consumer-grade fitness trackers with the associated limitations regarding acceptability. This review also describes and compares existing commercial products encompassing activity trackers tailored for older adults, thus providing a comprehensive outlook of the status of commercially available motion tracking systems. Finally, the impact of wearable devices on life and health insurance companies, with a description of the potential benefits for the industry and the wearables market, was analyzed as an example of the potential emerging market drivers for such technology in the future.

  12. A Review of Activity Trackers for Senior Citizens: Research Perspectives, Commercial Landscape and the Role of the Insurance Industry

    PubMed Central

    Tedesco, Salvatore; Barton, John; O’Flynn, Brendan

    2017-01-01

    The objective assessment of physical activity levels through wearable inertial-based motion detectors for the automatic, continuous and long-term monitoring of people in free-living environments is a well-known research area in the literature. However, their application to older adults can present particular constraints. This paper reviews the adoption of wearable devices in senior citizens by describing various researches for monitoring physical activity indicators, such as energy expenditure, posture transitions, activity classification, fall detection and prediction, gait and balance analysis, also by adopting consumer-grade fitness trackers with the associated limitations regarding acceptability. This review also describes and compares existing commercial products encompassing activity trackers tailored for older adults, thus providing a comprehensive outlook of the status of commercially available motion tracking systems. Finally, the impact of wearable devices on life and health insurance companies, with a description of the potential benefits for the industry and the wearables market, was analyzed as an example of the potential emerging market drivers for such technology in the future. PMID:28587188

  13. Energy Frontier Research Centers: A View from Senior EFRC Representatives (2011 EFRC Summit, panel session)

    ScienceCinema

    Drell, Persis [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Armstrong, Neal [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Carter, Emily [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); DePaolo, Don [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gunnoe, Brent [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2018-04-26

    A distinguished panel of scientists from the EFRC community provide their perspective on the importance of EFRCs for addressing critical energy needs at the 2011 EFRC Summit. Persis Drell, Director at SLAC, served as moderator. Panel members are Neal Armstrong (Director of the Center for Interface Science: Solar Electric Materials, led by the University of Arizona), Emily Carter (Co-Director of the Combustion EFRC, led by Princeton University. She is also Team Leader of the Heterogeneous Functional Materials Center, led by the University of South Caroline), Don DePaolo (Director of the Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2, led by LBNL), and Brent Gunnoe (Director of the Center for Catalytic Hydrocarbon Functionalization, led by the University of Virginia). The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several “grand challenges” and use-inspired “basic research needs” recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting

  14. Energy Frontier Research Centers: A View from Senior EFRC Representatives (2011 EFRC Summit, panel session)

    SciTech Connect

    Drell, Persis; Armstrong, Neal; Carter, Emily

    2011-05-25

    A distinguished panel of scientists from the EFRC community provide their perspective on the importance of EFRCs for addressing critical energy needs at the 2011 EFRC Summit. Persis Drell, Director at SLAC, served as moderator. Panel members are Neal Armstrong (Director of the Center for Interface Science: Solar Electric Materials, led by the University of Arizona), Emily Carter (Co-Director of the Combustion EFRC, led by Princeton University. She is also Team Leader of the Heterogeneous Functional Materials Center, led by the University of South Caroline), Don DePaolo (Director of the Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2, led by LBNL),more » and Brent Gunnoe (Director of the Center for Catalytic Hydrocarbon Functionalization, led by the University of Virginia). The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several “grand challenges” and use-inspired “basic research needs” recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed

  15. Technical Writing and Communication in a Senior-Level Seminar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, A. S.; Latosi-Sawin, Elizabeth

    1999-10-01

    To prepare chemistry majors for entry into graduate school and professional life, a senior-level seminar has been designed at Missouri Western State College that introduces students to scientific journals and aspects of professional communication. Students select topics, conduct research, report progress, write summaries for technical and nontechnical audiences, prepare abstracts, organize outlines, and present a formal research paper. At semester's end, each student delivers a 45-minute seminar to peers and departmental faculty, using easily learned presentation software. Faculty who would adopt this approach need to guide student research, emphasize purpose and audience, illustrate a synthesis of sources, support writing as a process, and help students overcome their fear of public speaking.

  16. A simulation-based assessment approach to increase safety among senior drivers : [research brief].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-03-01

    In the U.S., there are about 38 million licensed drivers over : age 65; about 1/8 of our population. By 2024, this figure : will DOUBLE to 25%. The current research is intended to : address the driving capabilities of our older population, : as accid...

  17. Research into the Play Competences of Children of Senior Pre-School Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinogradova, Irina A.; Ivanova, Elena V.; Savenkova, Tatiana D.; Tsaplina, Olga V.

    2017-01-01

    Relevance of the research: This is determined by an obligation to search for opportunities that can potentially make use of play activities observed during the development of play competencies in pre-school children. The purpose of the study: Its purpose is to identify the features of game playing competencies at pre-school age, to determine the…

  18. Research on Demand Analysis of the Users of the Senior English Diagnostic System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Chen; Zhang, Hui; Yao, Qian; Wu, Min

    2013-01-01

    As the significance of learning English is becoming increasingly apparent, more and more English online practice systems are used by English learners. However, a thorough process of research and detailed analysis of user demand have not fully implemented before the design of these systems. As a result, these systems may suffer the defects of low…

  19. The Influence of Performance-Based Management on Teaching and Research Performance of Finnish Senior Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kivistö, Jussi; Pekkola, Elias; Lyytinen, Anu

    2017-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of performance-based management in higher education, empirical research on its actual impact has remained scarce, particularly in Europe. With agency theory as a framework, our study utilised survey data collected from Finnish universities in order to explore the influence of performance management on perceived teaching…

  20. Enhancing the Careers of Under-Represented Junior Faculty in Biomedical Research: The Summer Institute Program to Increase Diversity (SIPID).

    PubMed

    Rice, Treva K; Liu, Li; Jeffe, Donna B; Jobe, Jared B; Boutjdir, Mohamed; Pace, Betty S; Rao, Dabeeru C

    2014-01-01

    The Summer Institute Program to Increase Diversity (SIPID) in Health-Related Research is a career advancement opportunity sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Three mentored programs address difficulties experienced by junior investigators in establishing independent research careers and academic advancement. Aims are to increase the number of faculty from under-represented minority groups who successfully compete for external research funding. Data were collected using a centralized data-entry system from three Summer Institutes. Outcomes include mentees' satisfaction rating about the program, grant and publications productivity and specific comments. Fifty-eight junior faculty mentees (38% male) noticeably improved their rates of preparing/submitting grant applications and publications, with a 18-23% increase in confidence levels in planning and conducting research. According to survey comments, the training received in grantsmanship skills and one-on-one mentoring were the most valuable program components. The SIPID mentoring program was highly valued by the junior faculty mentees. The program will continue in 2011-2014 as PRIDE (PRogram to Increase Diversity among individuals Engaged in health-related research). Long-term follow-up of current mentees will be indexed at five years post training (2013). In summary, these mentoring programs hope to continue increasing the diversity of the next generation of scientists in biomedical research.

  1. Faculty Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillan, Bob, Ed.; McFerrin, Karen, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on faculty development and technology: "Involving Faculty in Faculty Development" (Kristine Blair and Dan Madigan); "Technology Use in Higher Education: A Faculty Development Model" (Jessica Kahn); "A Faculty of Education as a Community of Learners: Growing to Meet the Demands of…

  2. The Transformative Impact of Undergraduate Research Mentoring on Students and the Role of the Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) in Supporting Faculty Mentors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, L. K.; Singer, J.

    2015-12-01

    Undergraduate Research (UR) is broadly accepted as a high impact educational practice. Student participation in UR contributes to measurable gains in content knowledge and skills/methodology, oral and written communication skills, problem solving and critical thinking, self-confidence, autonomy, among others. First-generation college students and students from underrepresented minorities that participate in UR are more likely to remain in STEM majors, persist to graduation, and pursue graduate degrees. While engagement in the research process contributes to these outcomes, the impact of the interaction with the faculty mentor is critical. A number of studies provide evidence that it is the relationship that forms with the faculty mentor that is most valued by students and strongly contributes to their career development. Faculty mentors play an important role in student development and the relationship between mentor and student evolves from teacher to coach to colleague. Effective mentoring is not an inherent skill and is generally not taught in graduate school and generally differs from mentoring of graduate students. Each UR mentoring relationship is unique and there are many effective mentoring models and practices documented in the literature. The Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) has a long history of supporting faculty who engage in research with undergraduates and offers resources for establishing UR programs at individual, departmental, and institutional levels. The Geosciences Division of CUR leads faculty development workshops at professional meetings and provides extensive resources to support geosciences faculty as UR mentors (http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/undergraduate_research/index.html). Examples of effective mentoring strategies are highlighted, including a model developed by SUNY- Buffalo State that integrates mentoring directly into the evaluation of UR.

  3. A Women in Radiology Group Fosters Career Development for Faculty and Trainees.

    PubMed

    Gaetke-Udager, Kara; Knoepp, Ursula S; Maturen, Katherine E; Leschied, Jessica R; Chong, Suzanne; Klein, Katherine A; Kazerooni, Ella

    2018-07-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the outcomes of a women in radiology (WIR) group during the first 6 years of its existence, including members' satisfaction, activities, and differences based on seniority. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to group members. Survey questions were related to the usefulness of sessions, mentoring, professional opportunities, and camaraderie. Comparisons were made on the basis of training status and seniority. Continuous variables were compared using means, t tests, and correlations, and categoric variables were compared using counts, percentages, and chi-square tests or Mantel-Haenszel tests. Surveys were sent to 61 women, including trainees and faculty; the response rate was 49% (38% of trainees and 53% of faculty). Overall satisfaction score for WIR sessions was high (mean summary score, 1.42 ± 0.37 [SD], with 1 meaning very satisfied and 4 meaning very unsatisfied). Trainees and junior faculty were more likely than senior faculty to report expanded internal networking opportunities (94% vs 69%; p = 0.07), to have gained a mentor (67% vs 8%; p = 0.001), and to have increased research involvement (33% vs 0%; p = 0.02). Both groups were equally likely to have become mentors. Almost all respondents (93%) reported increased camaraderie among women in the department. A WIR group can provide career development tools for its members. In this study, trainees and junior faculty reported increased networking and research involvement and gaining a mentor but were equally likely as senior faculty to have become mentors. Most members reported increased camaraderie among women in the department. A WIR group may help to accelerate professional development among trainees and junior faculty, thereby contributing to a more diverse and enabled workforce.

  4. The benefits associated with volunteering among seniors: a critical review and recommendations for future research.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Nicole D; Damianakis, Thecla; Kröger, Edeltraut; Wagner, Laura M; Dawson, Deirdre R; Binns, Malcolm A; Bernstein, Syrelle; Caspi, Eilon; Cook, Suzanne L

    2014-11-01

    There is an urgent need to identify lifestyle activities that reduce functional decline and dementia associated with population aging. The goals of this article are to review critically the evidence on the benefits associated with formal volunteering among older adults, propose a theoretical model of how volunteering may reduce functional limitations and dementia risk, and offer recommendations for future research. Database searches identified 113 papers on volunteering benefits in older adults, of which 73 were included. Data from descriptive, cross-sectional, and prospective cohort studies, along with 1 randomized controlled trial, most consistently reveal that volunteering is associated with reduced symptoms of depression, better self-reported health, fewer functional limitations, and lower mortality. The extant evidence provides the basis for a model proposing that volunteering increases social, physical, and cognitive activity (to varying degrees depending on characteristics of the volunteer placement) which, through biological and psychological mechanisms, leads to improved functioning; we further propose that these volunteering-related functional improvements should be associated with reduced dementia risk. Recommendations for future research are that studies (a) include more objective measures of psychosocial, physical, and cognitive functioning; (b) integrate qualitative and quantitative methods in prospective study designs; (c) explore further individual differences in the benefits associated with volunteering; (d) include occupational analyses of volunteers' specific jobs in order to identify their social, physical, and cognitive complexity; (e) investigate the independent versus interactive health benefits associated with volunteering relative to engagement in other forms of activity; and (f) examine the relationship between volunteering and dementia risk. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Commentary: Racism and Bias in Health Professions Education: How Educators, Faculty Developers, and Researchers Can Make a Difference.

    PubMed

    Karani, Reena; Varpio, Lara; May, Win; Horsley, Tanya; Chenault, John; Miller, Karen Hughes; O'Brien, Bridget

    2017-11-01

    The Research in Medical Education (RIME) Program Planning Committee is committed to advancing scholarship in and promoting dialogue about the critical issues of racism and bias in health professions education (HPE). From the call for studies focused on underrepresented learners and faculty in medicine to the invited 2016 RIME plenary address by Dr. Camara Jones, the committee strongly believes that dismantling racism is critical to the future of HPE.The evidence is glaring: Dramatic racial and ethnic health disparities persist in the United States, people of color remain deeply underrepresented in medical school and academic health systems as faculty, learner experiences across the medical education continuum are fraught with bias, and current approaches to teaching perpetuate stereotypes and insufficiently challenge structural inequities. To achieve racial justice in HPE, academic medicine must commit to leveraging positions of influence and contributing from these positions. In this Commentary, the authors consider three roles (educator, faculty developer, and researcher) represented by the community of scholars and pose potential research questions as well as suggestions for advancing educational research relevant to eliminating racism and bias in HPE.

  6. Salary-Trend Study of Faculty in Marketing Management and Research for the Years 1995-96 and 1998-99.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Richard D.

    This report, covering 2,892 marketing management and research faculty, is part of an annual national survey of faculty salaries. The survey consists of two parts: one covering public and one covering private four-year colleges and universities. Data for the baseline year 1995-96 and the trend year 1998-99 were collected for full-time teaching…

  7. An Academic Community of "Hermandad": Research for the Educational Advancement of Latinas (REAL), a Motivating Factor for First-Tier Tenure-Track Latina Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Elsa Cantu; Machado-Casas, Margarita

    2013-01-01

    Research studies have found that an integral part of being a tenure-track faculty member is the relationship between the higher education institution and individual faculty members (Mawdsley, 1999). Tenure-track positions are competitive spaces that demand and expect assistant professors to excel in publishing, teaching, and scholarly activity.…

  8. Higher Education Funding: The Role of the Institutional Researcher in the Development of Student/Faculty Ratio Guidelines. AIR 1988 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosman, Erica J.; Bartram, John W.

    The experiences are described of the University of Colorado institutional researcher in serving on a statewide task force charged with revising the student/faculty ratio guidelines that form the basis of the faculty funding formula. Following a description of the task force structure and procedures, the methodology employed in analyzing and…

  9. Research University STEM Faculty Members' Motivation to Engage in Teaching Professional Development: Building the Choir through an Appeal to Extrinsic Motivation and Ego

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouwma-Gearhart, Jana

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative, grounded-theory-based study that explored the motivations of science and engineering faculty to engage in teaching professional development at a major research university. Faculty members were motivated to engage in teaching professional development due to extrinsic motivations, mainly a weakened professional…

  10. Task Force on Faculty Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hozeski, Bruce W.; And Others

    A survey was conducted of 532 faculty members and 11 administrators at Ball State University (Indiana) concerning the number of hours that faculty typically work; extent of their time devoted to teaching, research, and service/administration; how faculty workload differs by rank and status; and how faculty feel about productivity issues. Findings…

  11. Faculty Development and Achievement: A Faculty's View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braskamp, Larry A.; And Others

    The way that 48 faculty at a major research university view their professional aspirations, achievement, and career conflicts between their professional activities and personal relationships was evaluated. In addition, a conceptual framework of faculty development using three professorial ranks as three qualitatively different stages of…

  12. The Effects of Classroom Research by Part-Time Faculty upon the Retention of Adult Learners. Practitioner-Based Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Diana K.

    In 1990, a study was conducted at Fullerton College (FC), a large suburban community college in Southern California, to determine if the use of classroom research by part-time faculty would stimulate greater involvement in learning and increase the course completion rate of adult learners in evening classes. A group of 16 part-time faculty…

  13. Nurturing educational research at Dartmouth Medical School: the synergy among innovative ideas, support faculty, and administrative structures.

    PubMed

    Nierenberg, David W; Carney, Patricia A

    2004-10-01

    In recent years, Dartmouth Medical School has increased its commitment to educational research within the school, and in collaboration with other schools across the country. Passionate faculty members with ideas and expertise in particular curricular areas are one critical component needed for a successful educational research program. Other components include an atmosphere that fosters research collaborations and mentoring, and various types of institutional support structures. This same model has effectively supported basic science and clinical research for decades. Because of the complexities involved in studying medical education, Dartmouth Medical School has invested in support structures for educational grant and manuscript development, financial support for pilot projects and partial salary support for investigators and key staff members, and other support targeted toward specific research projects. Ultimately, the goal is to use the results of the school's educational research projects to improve the curriculum through cycles of hypothesis development and testing, providing evidence for subsequent curricular change. When some research findings are relevant and applicable for use in other medical schools, that is an additional benefit of the educational research process. In this report, the authors describe the development of Dartmouth Medical School's infrastructure for supporting educational research, which has helped to accelerate the educational research productivity teaching faculty now enjoy. The authors also address some of the challenges that they anticipate in the near future.

  14. Senior scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A small task force of volunteer senior scientists and engineers was organized recently under the aegis of the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) “to utilize its collective talents for the betterment of society and to provide opportunities for individual personal accomplishment and enrichment.” Among the projects under consideration are assisting the Washington, D.C., school system to improve its science and mathematics instruction and assessing the impact of technology on older persons.One of the task force's first projects is to develop a roster of retired scientists and engineers in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area to garner volunteer talent for future projects.

  15. Career Stage Differences in Pre-Tenure Track Faculty Perceptions of Professional and Personal Relationships with Colleagues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponjuan, Luis; Conley, Valerie Martin; Trower, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between pre-tenure faculty members in different career stages during their tenure process and their perceptions of professional and personal relationships with senior colleagues and peers. Hence, the research question guiding this study explores these specific relationships: What individual…

  16. 2016 Senior Researcher Award Acceptance Address: Developing Productive Researchers Through Mentoring, Rethinking Doctoral Dissertations, and Facilitating Positive Publishing Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Wendy L.

    2016-01-01

    In her acceptance address, Wendy Sims provides a unique perspective based on thoughts and reflections resulting from her 8 years of service as the ninth Editor of the "Journal of Research in Music Education" ("JRME"). Specifically, she addresses how college-level music education researchers can promote positive attitudes toward…

  17. Academic productivity of faculty associated with microsurgery fellowships.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Qing Zhao; Ricci, Joseph A; Silvestre, Jason; Ho, Olivia A; Lee, Bernard T

    2017-09-01

    The Hirsch index (h-index) is widely recognized as a reliable measure of academic productivity. While previous studies have applied the h-index to surgical disciplines, none have analyzed microsurgery faculty. This manuscript aims to examine the h-index of microsurgery fellowship faculty to categorize its applicability to microsurgeons as a determinant of academic output. Faculty demographics and institution characteristics were obtained from the American Society of Reconstructive Microsurgery (ASRM) and official program websites. Faculty h-indices were calculated using the Scopus database (Elsevier, USA). Data was assessed using bivariate analysis and multiple linear regression models to determine the relationship between independent variables and total publications, career h-index and 5-year h-index (h5-index) of each faculty. A total of 139 faculties from 22 programs met inclusion criteria. The median faculty age was 44 (IQR 13) and 84.9% of faculty were male. Faculty size, number of years of fellowship existence, number of fellows, FACS memberships, number of free flaps annually, and academic appointment title were significantly associated with the total publications, h-index, and h5-index. Multivariable analysis based on the significant independent variables demonstrated that geographical region and faculty ranks were significantly associated with the h5-index. Variables associated with seniority (age, years of practice after fellowship, and academic appointment) were positively correlated with the h-index. Given the increased use of bibliometrics in academic medicine, these results show that h-index is a viable tool that can be used to assess research productivity among academic microsurgeons. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Student and Faculty Views on Process of Science Skills at a Large, Research-Intensive University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addis, Elizabeth A.; Powell-Coffman, Jo Anne

    2018-01-01

    The Association of American Colleges and Universities ranks multiple process of science (POS) skills among the top-10 skills employers seek in college graduates. As part of an effort to explore and align the emphasis on POS skills in our science departments, we sought three things: (a) to determine if faculty and students felt enough time was…

  19. Education Faculty Job Satisfaction in Major Research Universities. ASHE Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plascak-Craig, Faye D.; Bean, John P.

    The study attempted to: (1) identify predictors of global job satisfaction in university faculty members; (2) determine the relative importance of each predictor and its overall ability to predict global job satisfaction; (3) determine if the value appraisal model, developed for this study, is more accurate than more conventional predictive…

  20. Faculty Motivation to Participate in Program Learning Outcomes Assessment at a Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brey, Amanda M.

    2017-01-01

    External stakeholders have demanded evidence that college students learn what their institutions and programs say they will learn (Ewell, 2009; Hutchings 2010; Kuh, 2001). As the architects of curriculum and the defenders of academic freedom, faculty are responsible for any initiatives that may affect those pedagogical goals (Kuh, et al., 2015).…

  1. Stimulating Invention Disclosures by Faculty Researchers--A Guide for the University Invention Administrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcy, Willard

    Intended as a guide for university administrators, this manual discusses programs to help faculty members in the recognition of inventions and to increase the flow of their disclosure. The benefits of patenting are outlined and it is suggested that these benefits provide justification for initiating a program to increase disclosures. Important…

  2. Understanding Faculty Perceptions of the Future: Action Research for Academic Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malenfant, Kara Josephine

    2011-01-01

    The intent of this study was to aid academic librarians in examining their perceptions of the future of higher education, engaging disciplinary faculty members to understand their views, and determining actions to take to shape the future. In this mixed methods study, scenarios about the future of higher education served as the basis for…

  3. Getting a Tenure-Track Faculty Position at a Teaching-Centered Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkens, Robert; Comfort, Kristen

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this article is to provide critical information to chemical engineers seeking a tenure-track faculty position within academia. We outline the application and submission process from start to finish, including a discussion on critical evaluation metrics sought by search committees. In addition, we highlight frequent mistakes made by…

  4. Adding faculty in transportation areas : research progress on geomaterials and non-destructive sensor technology.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-08-01

    This funding was provided to help departments build up their faculty in the transportation field over the next years. Broad areas will : be considered as listed in the UTC mission or other areas that relate to State Departments of Transportation and ...

  5. Faculty Research Productivity 1972-1988: Development and Application of Constant Units of Measure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bieber, Jeffery P.; Blackburn, Robert T.

    1993-01-01

    This study investigated changes in publishing opportunities by college/university faculty between 1972 and 1988 in three disciplines: biology, philosophy, and English. Changes in amount of publishing space available and numbers of individuals competing for that space indicated inflation rates for all three fields (especially biology) requiring…

  6. Research University STEM Faculty Members' Motivation to Engage in Teaching Professional Development: Building the Choir Through an Appeal to Extrinsic Motivation and Ego

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwma-Gearhart, Jana

    2012-10-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative, grounded-theory-based study that explored the motivations of science and engineering faculty to engage in teaching professional development at a major research university. Faculty members were motivated to engage in teaching professional development due to extrinsic motivations, mainly a weakened professional ego, and sought to bring their teaching identities in better concordance with their researcher identities. The results pose a challenge to a body of research that has concluded that faculty must be intrinsically motivated to participate in teaching professional development. Results confirmed a pre-espoused theory of motivation, self-determination theory; a discussion of research literature consideration during grounded theory research is offered. A framework for motivating more faculty members at research universities to engage in teaching professional development is provided.

  7. Faculty Cultures, Faculty Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Ann E.

    1990-01-01

    College faculty live and work in four cultures: that of the academic profession, the discipline, the academy as an organization, and the institution type. Each of these influences how they function in the organization. Colleges should recognize and build on the sometimes conflicting cultures. (Author/MSE)

  8. Analysis of educational research at a medical faculty in Germany and suggestions for strategic development - a case study.

    PubMed

    Prediger, Sarah; Harendza, Sigrid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evidence-based medical education is playing an increasingly important role in the choice of didactic methods and the development of medical curricula and assessments. In Germany, a growing number of educational research projects has accompanied an ongoing change in the medical education process. The aim of this project was to assess medical education research activities at one medical faculty to develop procedural recommendations for the support and development of best evidence medical education. Methods: Using a newly developed online questionnaire, the 65 institutes and departments of the medical faculty of Hamburg University at Hamburg University Medical-Center (UKE) were asked to report their medical education research and service projects, medical education publications, medical education theses, financial support for educational projects, and supportive structures that they would consider helpful in the future. The data were grouped, and a SWOT analysis was performed. Results: In total, 60 scientists who were involved in 112 medical education research publications between 1998 and 2014 were identified at the UKE. Twenty-five of them had published at least one manuscript as first or last author. Thirty-three UKE institutions were involved in educational service or research projects at the time of the study, and 75.8% of them received internal or external funding. Regular educational research meetings and the acquisition of co-operation partners were mentioned most frequently as beneficial supportive structures for the future. Conclusion: An analysis to define the status quo of medical education research at a medical faculty seems to be a helpful first step for the development of a strategy and structure to further support researchers in medical education.

  9. Analysis of educational research at a medical faculty in Germany and suggestions for strategic development – a case study

    PubMed Central

    Prediger, Sarah; Harendza, Sigrid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evidence-based medical education is playing an increasingly important role in the choice of didactic methods and the development of medical curricula and assessments. In Germany, a growing number of educational research projects has accompanied an ongoing change in the medical education process. The aim of this project was to assess medical education research activities at one medical faculty to develop procedural recommendations for the support and development of best evidence medical education. Methods: Using a newly developed online questionnaire, the 65 institutes and departments of the medical faculty of Hamburg University at Hamburg University Medical-Center (UKE) were asked to report their medical education research and service projects, medical education publications, medical education theses, financial support for educational projects, and supportive structures that they would consider helpful in the future. The data were grouped, and a SWOT analysis was performed. Results: In total, 60 scientists who were involved in 112 medical education research publications between 1998 and 2014 were identified at the UKE. Twenty-five of them had published at least one manuscript as first or last author. Thirty-three UKE institutions were involved in educational service or research projects at the time of the study, and 75.8% of them received internal or external funding. Regular educational research meetings and the acquisition of co-operation partners were mentioned most frequently as beneficial supportive structures for the future. Conclusion: An analysis to define the status quo of medical education research at a medical faculty seems to be a helpful first step for the development of a strategy and structure to further support researchers in medical education. PMID:27990467

  10. Postdoctoral and Senior Postdoctoral Resident Research Associateship Program and Research Management Associateship Program for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Information on the status of all Resident Research Associated and Research Management Associates is provided. All Associated whose tenure continued as of June 1, 1985 are listed alphabetically by laboratory. Also included are their countries of citizenship and dates of tenure. The status of reporting obligations are summarized. A list of progress reports received during this reporting period is also provided. All Associates who terminated during the reporting period are listed.

  11. Excellence in teaching for promotion and tenure in animal and dairy sciences at doctoral/research universities: a faculty perspective.

    PubMed

    Wattiaux, M A; Moore, J A; Rastani, R R; Crump, P M

    2010-07-01

    In this study, animal or dairy sciences faculty from doctoral/research universities were surveyed to clarify teaching performance expectations for the purpose of promotion and tenure of assistant professors. A survey tool including 15 evaluation criteria was available online and at the registration desk of the 2005 Joint Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association and the American Society of Animal Science. The analyzed data set included 47 faculty (41 tenured and 6 tenure-track) with a substantial teaching responsibility from 27 different departments in 25 states. Four criteria were perceived as currently overemphasized: student evaluation of the instructor, student evaluation of the course, authoring peer-reviewed publications, and authoring an undergraduate textbook or book chapter. Nevertheless, more than 50% of respondents reported that these criteria should be used. One criterion emerged as being currently underemphasized: documentation of personal assessment of one's own teaching by preparing a portfolio. The lack of consensus for the remaining 10 items may have reflected substantial differences in institutional practices. The significance of overemphasis or underemphasis of certain criteria varied substantially depending on the respondent's perceived institutional mission. When asked about recognition within their department, 68% of respondents indicated that efforts in teaching improvement were properly rewarded. Respondents doubted the meaningfulness and appropriateness of student ratings tools as currently used. Results also suggested that animal and dairy science faculty placed a higher value on criteria recognizing excellence in teaching based on intradepartmental recognition (e.g., interactions with close-up peers and students) rather than recognition within a broader community of scholars as evidenced by authorship or success in generating funding for teaching. Proposed improvements in the evaluation of teaching for promotion and tenure

  12. A Helping Hand for Young Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    June, Audrey Williams

    2008-01-01

    With the academic year just under way, many junior faculty members in search of much-needed advice and guidance have begun to make critical connections with senior colleagues. Departmental pairings are the most standard form of faculty mentoring, as is the practice of newly minted professors' tapping colleagues on their own to answer questions…

  13. Faculty Members Can Lead, but Will They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barden, Dennis M.; Curry, Janel

    2013-01-01

    Colleges and universities looking to recruit leaders from within the faculty ranks will face more and more difficulty. From their respective positions--as a provost (Janel) and a search consultant (Dennis)--they often hear senior executives in higher education say that building a new generation of faculty leaders will be a major challenge in the…

  14. The 1975 NASA/ASEE summer faculty fellowship research program. [research in the areas of aerospace engineering, aerospace systems, and information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A research program was conducted to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members, to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA engineers and scientists, and to enrich the research activities of the participants' institutions. Abstracts of reports submitted at the end of the program are presented. Topics investigated include multispectral photography, logic circuits, gravitation theories, information systems, fracture mechanics, holographic interferometry, surface acoustic wave technology, ion beams in the upper atmosphere, and hybrid microcircuits.

  15. Progress through High School: A Study of Senior Secondary Schooling in New South Wales. ACER Research Monograph No. 43.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainley, John; Sheret, Michael

    This book provides an overview of a 4-year longitudinal study of senior secondary schooling in the government high schools of New South Wales, Australia. The study followed the progress from year 9 to year 12 of 3,000 students from 22 government secondary schools in 2 metropolitan and 2 nonmetropolitan regions. The book is divided into 10…

  16. From High School to the Future: The Challenge of Senior Year in Chicago Public Schools. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roderick, Melissa; Coca, Vanessa; Moeller, Eliza; Kelley-Kemple, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In a 2010 address to the College Board, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan laid out a vision for high school that advances the Obama administration's goal of the U.S. once again leading the world in educational attainment. There is no grade in which the magnitude and complexity of this shift becomes clearer than in senior year. Historically,…

  17. Senior University Officials' Approaches to Global Engagement: A Case Study of a Private and a Public Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Shirley

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon of globalization has a significant impact on higher education, but the lack of a clear roadmap for how senior university officials should create and implement global engagement strategies and for how these approaches support (or impede) an organizational culture that fosters globalization remains a gap in knowledge in higher…

  18. A Social Capital Perspective on the Mentoring of Undergraduate Life Science Researchers: An Empirical Study of Undergraduate–Postgraduate–Faculty Triads

    PubMed Central

    Aikens, Melissa L.; Sadselia, Sona; Watkins, Keiana; Evans, Mara; Eby, Lillian T.; Dolan, Erin L.

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduate researchers at research universities are often mentored by graduate students or postdoctoral researchers (referred to collectively as “postgraduates”) and faculty, creating a mentoring triad structure. Triads differ based on whether the undergraduate, postgraduate, and faculty member interact with one another about the undergraduate’s research. Using a social capital theory framework, we hypothesized that different triad structures provide undergraduates with varying resources (e.g., information, advice, psychosocial support) from the postgraduates and/or faculty, which would affect the undergraduates’ research outcomes. To test this, we collected data from a national sample of undergraduate life science researchers about their mentoring triad structure and a range of outcomes associated with research experiences, such as perceived gains in their abilities to think and work like scientists, science identity, and intentions to enroll in a PhD program. Undergraduates mentored by postgraduates alone reported positive outcomes, indicating that postgraduates can be effective mentors. However, undergraduates who interacted directly with faculty realized greater outcomes, suggesting that faculty interaction is important for undergraduates to realize the full benefits of research. The “closed triad,” in which undergraduates, postgraduates, and faculty all interact directly, appeared to be uniquely beneficial; these undergraduates reported the highest gains in thinking and working like a scientist. PMID:27174583

  19. An alternative path to improving university Earth science teaching and developing the geoscience workforce: Postdoctoral research faculty involvement in clinical teacher preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirakparvar, N. A.; Sessa, J.; Ustunisik, G. K.; Nadeau, P. A.; Flores, K. E.; Ebel, D. S.

    2013-12-01

    It is estimated that by the year 2020 relative to 2009, there will be 28% more Earth Science jobs paying ≥ $75,000/year1 in the U.S.A. These jobs will require advanced degrees, but compared to all arts and science advanced degrees, the number of physical science M.S. and Ph.D. awarded per year decreased from 2.5% in 1980 to 1.5% in 20092. This decline is reflected on a smaller scale and at a younger age: in the New York City school system only 36% of all 8th graders have basic proficiency in science 3. These figures indicate that the lack achievement in science starts at a young age and then extends into higher education. Research has shown that students in grades 7 - 12 4,5 and in university level courses 6 both respond positively to high quality science teaching. However, much attention is focused on improving science teaching in grades 7- 12, whereas at many universities lower level science courses are taught by junior research and contingent faculty who typically lack formal training, and sometimes interest, in effective teaching. The danger here is that students might enter university intending to pursue geoscience degrees, but then encounter ineffective instructors, causing them to lose interest in geoscience and thus pursue other disciplines. The crux of the matter becomes how to improve the quality of university-level geoscience teaching, without losing sight of the major benchmark of success for research faculty - scholarly publications reporting innovative research results. In most cases, it would not be feasible to sidetrack the research goals of early career scientists by placing them into a formal teacher preparation program. But what happens when postdoctoral research scientists take an active role in clinical teacher preparation as part of their research appointments? The American Museum of Natural History's Masters of Arts in Teaching (AMNH-MAT) urban residency pilot program utilizes a unique approach to grade 7 - 12 Earth Science teacher

  20. An Analysis of Research from Faculty at U.S. Adult Reconstruction Fellowships.

    PubMed

    Formby, Peter M; Pavey, Gabriel J; Van Blarcum, Gregory S; Mack, Andrew W; Newman, Michael T

    2015-12-01

    We reviewed all articles published in three major orthopaedic journals from January 2010 to December 2014. Any article focusing on adult reconstruction of the hip or knee was reviewed for first and last authorship, institution, and level of evidence. Three institutions had authored work from arthroplasty faculty that fell within the top five most published institutions in all three journals, while one institution ranked first in all three journals. 43 of 67 (64.2%) reconstruction fellowships had at least one publication included in this study. The majority of the adult reconstruction literature published by faculty at U.S. reconstruction fellowships stems from a few academic centers with the ten most prolific institutions accounting for 65.9% of all U.S. fellowship publications. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. What Makes a Senior Thesis Good?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trosset, Carol; Weisler, Steven

    2018-01-01

    Kuh (2008) describes the capstone as a "culminating experience" students undertake close to graduation often involving "a project of some sort that integrates and applies what they've learned" (p. 11). The senior thesis is one form of the capstone in which students write an analytic paper under faculty supervision, typically as…

  2. STEM Faculty as Learners in Pedagogical Reform and the Role of Research Articles as Professional Development Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Mulnix, Amy B

    2016-01-01

    Discipline-based education research (DBER) publications are opportunities for professional development around science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education reform. Learning theory tells us these publications could be more impactful if authors, reviewers, and editors pay greater attention to linking principles and practice. This approach, which considers faculty as learners and STEM education reform as content, has the potential to better support faculty members because it promotes a deeper understanding of the reasons why a pedagogical change is effective. This depth of understanding is necessary for faculty members to successfully transfer new knowledge to their own contexts. A challenge ahead for the emergent learning sciences is to better integrate findings from across sister disciplines; DBER reports can take a step in that direction while improving their usefulness for instructors. © 2016 A. B. Mulnix. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  3. Annual Faculty Research Report of the Department of Systems Engineering and the Operations Research Center for the Academic Year 2006

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    Senior Investigators: COL Darrall Henderson, Ph.D. LTC Simon R. Goerger, Ph.D. Points of Contact: NAME ADDRESS PHONE OTHER LTC Eric R. Keller...revision. Non-Refereed Publications LTC Tim Trainor*, Dr. Greg Parnell*, LTC Brigitte Kwinn*, MAJ John Brence*, CPT Eric Tollefson*, Ms. Robin Burk*, MAJ...Parnell, Brigitte Kwinn, John Brence, Eric Tollefson, Pat Downes. The US Army Uses Decision Analysis in Designing Its US Installation Regions

  4. Grant Success for Early-Career Faculty in Patient-Oriented Research: Difference-in-Differences Evaluation of an Interdisciplinary Mentored Research Training Program.

    PubMed

    Libby, Anne M; Hosokawa, Patrick W; Fairclough, Diane L; Prochazka, Allan V; Jones, Pamela J; Ginde, Adit A

    2016-12-01

    Since 2004, the Clinical Faculty Scholars Program (CFSP) at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus has provided intensive interdisciplinary mentoring and structured training for early-career clinical faculty from multiple disciplines conducting patient-oriented clinical and outcomes research. This study evaluated the two-year program's effects by comparing grant outcomes for CFSP participants and a matched comparison cohort of other junior faculty. Using 2000-2011 institutional grant and employment data, a cohort of 25 scholars was matched to a cohort of 125 comparison faculty (using time in rank and pre-period grant dollars awarded). A quasi-experimental difference-in-differences design was used to identify the CFSP effect on grant outcomes. Grant outcomes were measured by counts and dollars of grant proposals and awards as principal investigator. Outcomes were compared within cohorts over time (pre- vs. post-period) and across cohorts. From pre- to post-period, mean annual counts and dollars of grant awards increased significantly for both cohorts, but mean annual dollars increased significantly more for the CFSP than for the comparison cohort (delta $83,427 vs. $27,343, P < .01). Mean annual counts of grant proposals also increased significantly more for the CFSP than for the comparison cohort: 0.42 to 2.34 (delta 1.91) versus 0.77 to 1.07 (delta 0.30), P < .01. Institutional investment in mentored research training for junior faculty provided significant grant award gains that began after one year of CFSP participation and persisted over time. The CFSP is a financially sustainable program with effects that are predictable, significant, and enduring.

  5. A qualitative inquiry into the challenges and complexities of research supervision: viewpoints of postgraduate students and faculty members.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Alireza; Bazrafkan, Leila; Yamani, Nikoo

    2015-07-01

    The supervision of academic theses at the Universities of Medical Sciences is one of the most important issues with several challenges. The aim of the present study is to discover the nature of problems and challenges of thesis supervision in Iranian universities of medical sciences. The study was conducted with a qualitative method using conventional content analysis approach. Nineteen faculty members, using purposive sampling, and 11 postgraduate medical sciences students (Ph.D students and residents) were selected on the basis of theoretical sampling. The data were gathered through semi-structured interviews and field observations in Shiraz and Isfahan universities of medical sciences from September 2012 to December 2014. The qualitative content analysis was used with a conventional approach to analyze the data. While experiencing the nature of research supervision process, faculties and the students faced some complexities and challenges in the research supervision process. The obtained codes were categorized under 4 themes Based on the characteristics; included "contextual problem", "role ambiguity in thesis supervision", "poor reflection in supervision" and "ethical problems". The result of this study revealed that there is a need for more attention to planning and defining the supervisory, and research supervision. Also, improvement of the quality of supervisor and students relationship must be considered behind the research context improvement in research supervisory area.

  6. Perceptions of academic administrators of the effect of involvement in doctoral programs on faculty members' research and work-life balance.

    PubMed

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C; Cantrell, Mary Ann; Heverly, Mary Ann; Wise, Nancy; Jenkinson, Amanda

    Support for research strongly predicts doctoral program faculty members' research productivity. Although academic administrators affect such support, their views of faculty members' use of support are unknown. We examined academic administrators' perceptions of institutional support and their perceptions of the effects of teaching doctoral students on faculty members' scholarship productivity and work-life balance. An online survey was completed by a random sample of 180 deans/directors of schools of nursing and doctoral programs directors. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, chi-square analysis, and analysis of variance. Deans and doctoral program directors viewed the level of productivity of program faculty as high to moderately high and unchanged since faculty started teaching doctoral students. Deans perceived better administrative research supports, productivity, and work-life balance of doctoral program faculty than did program directors. Findings indicate the need for greater administrative support for scholarship and mentoring given the changes in the composition of doctoral program faculty. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Each to Their Own CURE: Faculty Who Teach Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experiences Report Why You Too Should Teach a CURE†

    PubMed Central

    Shortlidge, Erin E.; Bangera, Gita; Brownell, Sara E.

    2017-01-01

    Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) meet national recommendations for integrating research experiences into life science curricula. As such, CUREs have grown in popularity and many research studies have focused on student outcomes from CUREs. Institutional change literature highlights that understanding faculty is also key to new pedagogies succeeding. To begin to understand faculty perspectives on CUREs, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 61 faculty who teach CUREs regarding why they teach CUREs, what the outcomes are, and how they would discuss a CURE with a colleague. Using grounded theory, participant responses were coded and categorized as tangible or intangible, related to both student and faculty-centered themes. We found that intangible themes were prevalent, and that there were significant differences in the emphasis on tangible themes for faculty who have developed their own independent CUREs when compared with faculty who implement pre-developed, national CUREs. We focus our results on the similarities and differences among the perspectives of faculty who teach these two different CURE types and explore trends among all participants. The results of this work highlight the need for considering a multi-dimensional framework to understand, promote, and successfully implement CUREs. PMID:28656071

  8. Social work practice with LGBT seniors.

    PubMed

    Gratwick, Steve; Jihanian, Lila J; Holloway, Ian W; Sanchez, Marisol; Sullivan, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    The Los Angeles Gay & Lesbian Center began providing services to LGBT seniors in 2008. Since then, the Center's seniors program has grown to over 3,300 clients. It provides a variety of enrichment and support services with the overarching goal of empowering seniors to successfully age in place. This article outlines the service delivery program of the Center's Seniors Services Department and describes its successes and challenges in meeting the needs of diverse LGBT seniors. It offers future directions for social work practice, policy, and research with LGBT older adults.

  9. The NSF Undergraduate ALFALFA Team: Partnering with Arecibo Observatory to Offer Undergraduate and Faculty Extragalactic Radio Astronomy Research Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribaudo, Joseph; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Haynes, Martha P.; Balonek, Thomas J.; Cannon, John M.; Coble, Kimberly A.; Craig, David W.; Denn, Grant R.; Durbala, Adriana; Finn, Rose; Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; Hoffman, G. Lyle; Lebron, Mayra E.; Miller, Brendan P.; Crone-Odekon, Mary; O'Donoghue, Aileen A.; Olowin, Ronald Paul; Pantoja, Carmen; Pisano, Daniel J.; Rosenberg, Jessica L.; Troischt, Parker; Venkatesan, Aparna; Wilcots, Eric M.; ALFALFA Team

    2017-01-01

    The NSF-sponsored Undergraduate ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) Team (UAT) is a consortium of 20 institutions across the US and Puerto Rico, founded to promote undergraduate research and faculty development within the extragalactic ALFALFA HI blind survey project and follow-up programs. The objective of the UAT is to provide opportunities for its members to develop expertise in the technical aspects of observational radio spectroscopy, its associated data analysis, and the motivating science. Partnering with Arecibo Observatory, the UAT has worked with more than 280 undergraduates and 26 faculty to date, offering 8 workshops onsite at Arecibo (148 undergraduates), observing runs at Arecibo (69 undergraduates), remote observing runs on campus, undergraduate research projects based on Arecibo science (120 academic year and 185 summer projects), and presentation of results at national meetings such as the AAS (at AAS229: Ball et al., Collova et al., Davis et al., Miazzo et al., Ruvolo et al, Singer et al., Cannon et al., Craig et al., Koopmann et al., O'Donoghue et al.). 40% of the students and 45% of the faculty participants have been women and members of underrepresented groups. More than 90% of student alumni are attending graduate school and/or pursuing a career in STEM. 42% of those pursuing graduate degrees in Physics or Astronomy are women.In this presentation, we summarize the UAT program and the current research efforts of UAT members based on Arecibo science, including multiwavelength followup observations of ALFALFA sources, the UAT Collaborative Groups Project, the Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs (SHIELD), and the Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS). This work has been supported by NSF grants AST-0724918/0902211, AST-075267/0903394, AST-0725380, AST-121105, and AST-1637339.

  10. Faculty as Learners: Developing Thinking Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddy, Pamela L.; Garza Mitchell, Regina L.

    2012-01-01

    The shifting demographics of faculty ranks, expansion of faculty work, and the expectations of accountability and revenue production place new demands on today's faculty. Collaborating with other faculty members is one option for easing workload demands and reinvigorating faculty members in the conduct of their teaching and research. In this…

  11. Effect of Nanotechnology Instructions on Senior High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Chow-Chin; Sung, Chia-Chi

    2011-01-01

    In this research, we cooperate with senior high school teachers to understand current nanotechnology model of senior high school nanotechnology curriculum in Taiwan. Then design senior high school nanotechnology (nano-tech) curriculum to teach 503 senior high school students. After teaching the nano-tech curriculum we use the "Nanotechnology…

  12. Integration of Educational and Research Activities of Medical Students (Experience of the Medical Faculty of Saint Petersburg State University).

    PubMed

    Balakhonov, Aleksei V; Churilov, Leonid P; Erman, Mikhail V; Shishkin, Aleksandr N; Slepykh, Lyudmila A; Stroev, Yuri I; Utekhin, Vladimir J; Basantsova, Natalia Y

    2017-12-01

    The article is devoted to the role of research activity of the medical students in higher education of physicians. The teaching of physicians in classical universities and specialized medical schools is compared. The history of physicians' training in Russia in imperial, Soviet and post-Soviet periods is reviewed and compared to development of higher medical education in other countries. Article gives the the description of all failed attempts to establish a Medical Faculty within oldest classical university of Russia, crowned by history of last and successful attempt of its establishment. Authors' experience of adjoining education and research in curriculum and extra-curricular life of this Medical Faculty is discussed. The problems of specialization and fundamentalization of medical education are subjected to analysis. Clinical reasoning and reasoning of scholar-experimentalist are compared. The article reviews the role of term and course papers and significance of self-studies and graduation thesis in education of a physician. The paper gives original definition of interactive learning, and discusses the methods and pathways of intermingling the fundamental science and clinical medicine in medical teaching for achievement of admixed competencies of medical doctor and biomedical researcher.

  13. Designing an orientation program for new faculty.

    PubMed

    Holyfield, Lavern J; Berry, Charles W

    2008-12-01

    The Faculty Development Committee (FDC) at Baylor College of Dentistry (BCD) is charged with providing programs and activities that facilitate the success of existing faculty in the constantly changing environment of academia. In response to concerns regarding the challenges wrought by current and projected shortages of dental faculty across the nation, the FDC was prompted to assess development opportunities available to BCD faculty. A professional development resource that we found deficient was a formal, comprehensive orientation program for newly hired faculty. To guide the efforts of the committee in developing this program, a survey was designed and administered during an annual faculty retreat. Respondents were new and junior faculty, senior faculty, and some administrators. The results of the survey to determine requirements for new faculty orientation became the basis for formalizing BCD's new faculty orientation program. This article provides an overview of the new faculty orientation process from design to program implementation and describes the development and use of a faculty survey to determine the fundamental elements of a faculty development program, identification of essential individuals for designing/implementing the program, and implementation of a new faculty orientation program at BCD.

  14. Reinforcing Our "Keystone" Faculty: Strategies to Support Faculty in the Middle Years of Academic Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Roger G.; Chang, Deborah A.

    2006-01-01

    Mid-career faculty are the keystone of the academic enterprise. They fill essential instructional, program development, administrative, and citizenship roles at their institutions. They form a bridge between faculty generations by mentoring new colleagues and assuming leadership duties as their senior colleagues move toward retirement. Mid-career…

  15. Faculty Salaries in Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hexter, Holly

    1990-01-01

    This research brief highlights data on faculty salaries in colleges and universities, outlines recent trends and their implications, and identifies major sources of data on the subject. Tables provide data on average faculty salaries for 1988-89 by academic rank and institution type (public, church, independent); by gender and academic rank; and…

  16. Faculty Internationalization Priorities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criswell, John R., II; Zhu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The internationalization of higher education has been the subject of a substantial body of research. However, few studies have examined how faculty members, significant implementers of internationalization, think about internationalization priorities. This article presents the results of a questionnaire which was sent to faculty members at three…

  17. Let Seniors Lead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dreis, Janice; Rehage, Larry

    2006-01-01

    Senior year of high school doesn't have to be a time of student disengagement, Dreis and Rehage claim. At New Trier High School in Winetka, Illinois, educators recognize seniors' readiness to contribute as instructional leaders in the classroom. The Senior Instructional Leadership Corps puts any interested senior into a working relationship…

  18. Predictors of job satisfaction among academic faculty members: do instructional and clinical staff differ?

    PubMed

    Chung, Kevin C; Song, Jae W; Kim, H Myra; Woolliscroft, James O; Quint, Elisabeth H; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Gyetko, Margaret R

    2010-10-01

    This study aimed to identify and compare predictors of job satisfaction between instructional and clinical faculty members. A 61-item faculty job satisfaction survey was distributed to 1898 academic faculty members at the University of Michigan Medical School. The anonymous survey was web-based. Questions covered topics on departmental organisation, research, clinical and teaching support, compensation, mentorship, and promotion. Levels of satisfaction were contrasted between faculty members on the two tracks, and predictors of job satisfaction were identified using linear regression models. Response rates for the instructional and clinical faculty groups were 43.1% and 46.7%, respectively. Clinical faculty members reported being less satisfied with how they were mentored and fewer reported understanding the process for promotion. There was no significant difference in overall job satisfaction between the two faculty groups. Surprisingly, clinical faculty members with mentors were significantly less satisfied with how they were mentored and with career advancement, and were significantly less likely to choose an academic career if they had to do it all over again compared with instructional faculty mentees. Additionally, senior-level clinical faculty members were significantly less satisfied with their opportunities to mentor junior faculty members compared with senior-level instructional faculty staff. Significant predictors of job satisfaction for both groups included areas of autonomy, meeting career expectations, work-life balance, and departmental leadership. In the clinical track only, compensation and career advancement variables also emerged as significant predictors of overall job satisfaction. Greater emphasis must be placed on faculty members' well-being at both the institutional level and the level of departmental leadership. Efforts to enhance job satisfaction and improve retention are more likely to succeed if they are directed by locally designed

  19. 5 CFR 842.211 - Senior Executive Service, Defense Intelligence Senior Executive Service, and Senior Cryptologic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Intelligence Senior Executive Service, and Senior Cryptologic Executive Service. 842.211 Section 842.211... Intelligence Senior Executive Service, and Senior Cryptologic Executive Service. (a) A member of the Senior Executive Service, the Defense Intelligence Senior Executive Service, or the Senior Cryptologic Senior...

  20. 5 CFR 842.211 - Senior Executive Service, Defense Intelligence Senior Executive Service, and Senior Cryptologic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Intelligence Senior Executive Service, and Senior Cryptologic Executive Service. 842.211 Section 842.211... Intelligence Senior Executive Service, and Senior Cryptologic Executive Service. (a) A member of the Senior Executive Service, the Defense Intelligence Senior Executive Service, or the Senior Cryptologic Senior...

  1. 5 CFR 842.211 - Senior Executive Service, Defense Intelligence Senior Executive Service, and Senior Cryptologic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Intelligence Senior Executive Service, and Senior Cryptologic Executive Service. 842.211 Section 842.211... Intelligence Senior Executive Service, and Senior Cryptologic Executive Service. (a) A member of the Senior Executive Service, the Defense Intelligence Senior Executive Service, or the Senior Cryptologic Senior...

  2. 5 CFR 842.211 - Senior Executive Service, Defense Intelligence Senior Executive Service, and Senior Cryptologic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Intelligence Senior Executive Service, and Senior Cryptologic Executive Service. 842.211 Section 842.211... Intelligence Senior Executive Service, and Senior Cryptologic Executive Service. (a) A member of the Senior Executive Service, the Defense Intelligence Senior Executive Service, or the Senior Cryptologic Senior...

  3. 5 CFR 842.211 - Senior Executive Service, Defense Intelligence Senior Executive Service, and Senior Cryptologic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Intelligence Senior Executive Service, and Senior Cryptologic Executive Service. 842.211 Section 842.211... Intelligence Senior Executive Service, and Senior Cryptologic Executive Service. (a) A member of the Senior Executive Service, the Defense Intelligence Senior Executive Service, or the Senior Cryptologic Senior...

  4. Knowledge and Perceptions of Family Leave Policies Among Female Faculty in Academic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Karen M.; Kaplan, Samantha A.; Raj, Anita; Carr, Phyllis L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this research was to examine the knowledge and perceptions of family leave policies and practices among senior leaders including American Association of Medical College members of the Group on Women in Medicine and Science (GWIMS) to identify perceived barriers to career success and satisfaction among female faculty. Methods In 2011–2012 GWIMS representatives and senior leaders at 24 medical schools were invited to participate in an interview about faculty perceptions of gender equity and overall institutional climate. An inductive thematic analysis of the qualitative data was conducted to identify themes represented in participant responses. The research team read and reviewed institutional family leave policies for concordance with key informant descriptions. Findings 22 GWIMS representatives and senior leaders comprised the final sample. Participants were female, 18 (82%) were full professors with the remainder being associate professors. Compared with publicly available policies at each institution, the knowledge of nine participants was consistent with policies, was discrepant for six, with the remaining seven acknowledging a lack of knowledge of policies. Four major themes were identified from the interview data: 1) Framing family leave as a personal issue undermines its effect on female faculty success; 2) Poor communication of policies impairs access and affects organizational climate; 3) Discrepancies in leave implementation disadvantage certain faculty in terms of time and pay; 4) Leave policies are valued and directly related to academic productivity. Conclusions Family leave policies are an important aspect of faculty satisfaction and academic success, yet policy awareness by senior leaders is lacking. Further organizational support is needed to promote equitable policy creation and implementation to support women in medical academia. PMID:24533979

  5. Knowledge and perceptions of family leave policies among female faculty in academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Christine M; Freund, Karen M; Kaplan, Samantha A; Raj, Anita; Carr, Phyllis L

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the knowledge and perceptions of family leave policies and practices among senior leaders including American Association of Medical College members of the Group on Women in Medicine and Science (GWIMS) to identify perceived barriers to career success and satisfaction among female faculty. In 2011 and 2012, GWIMS representatives and senior leaders at 24 medical schools were invited to participate in an interview about faculty perceptions of gender equity and overall institutional climate. An inductive, thematic analysis of the qualitative data was conducted to identify themes represented in participant responses. The research team read and reviewed institutional family leave policies for concordance with key informant descriptions. There were 22 GWIMS representatives and senior leaders in the final sample. Participants were all female; 18 (82%) were full professors with the remainder being associate professors. Compared with publicly available policies at each institution, the knowledge of nine participants was consistent with policies, was discrepant for six, with the remaining seven acknowledging a lack of knowledge of policies. Four major themes were identified from the interview data: 1) Framing family leave as a personal issue undermines its effect on female faculty success; 2) poor communication of policies impairs access and affects organizational climate; 3) discrepancies in leave implementation disadvantage certain faculty in terms of time and pay; and 4) leave policies are valued and directly related to academic productivity. Family leave policies are an important aspect of faculty satisfaction and academic success, yet policy awareness among senior leaders is lacking. Further organizational support is needed to promote equitable policy creation and implementation to support women in medical academia. Copyright © 2014 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Procurement of State-of-the-Art Research Equipment to Support Faculty Members Within the RNAi Therapeutics Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Terence Flotte, MD; Patricia McNulty

    2010-06-29

    This project funded the procurement of state-of-the-art research equipment to support world class faculty members within the RNAi Therapeutics Institute, a central program of the Advanced Therapeutics Cluster (ATC) project. The equipment purchased under this grant supports the RNA Therapeutics Institute (RTI) at the University of Massachusetts Medical School which seeks to build a community of scientists passionate about RNA. By uniting researchers studying the fundamental biology and mechanisms of cellular RNAs with those working to devise human therapies using or targeting nucleic acids, the RTI represents a new model for scientific exploration. By interweaving basic and applied nucleic acidmore » scientists with clinicians dedicated to finding new cures, our goal is to create a new paradigm for organizing molecular research that enables the rapid application of new biological discoveries to solutions for unmet challenges in human health.« less

  7. [The history of organization of the research laboratories based at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology of the Faculty of General Medicine].

    PubMed

    Lapchenko, A S; Kucherov, A G; Ivanets, I V; Aslamazova, V I; Order, R Ya; Yushkina, M A

    This article was designed to describe the history of the establishment and development of the research divisions based at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology of the Faculty of General Medicine, N.I. Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University, including laser, vestibulogical, and audiological laboratories. The authors present an overview of the main research activities and achievements of the Department with special reference to the management of Meniere's disease, cochlear-vestibular disorders associated with sensorineural hearing loss, injuries to the organs of hearing, and diseases of the central nervous system. Also discussed are the peculiarities of the laser-assisted medical care and the possibilities for the application of therapeutic and surgical lasers for the purposes of the practical otorhinolaryngological work.

  8. Estimation of citation-based scholarly activity among radiation oncology faculty at domestic residency-training institutions: 1996-2007.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mehee; Fuller, Clifton D; Thomas, Charles R

    2009-05-01

    Advancement in academic radiation oncology is largely contingent on research productivity and the perceived external influence of an individual's scholarly work. The purpose of this study was to use the Hirsch index (h-index) to estimate the research productivity of current radiation oncology faculty at U.S. academic institutions between 1996 and 2007. We performed bibliometric citation database searches for available radiation oncology faculty at domestic residency-training institutions (n = 826). The outcomes analyzed included the total number of manuscripts, total number of citations, and the h-index between 1996 and 2007. Analysis of overall h-index rankings with stratification by academic ranking, junior vs. senior faculty status, and gender was performed. Of the 826 radiation oncologists, the mean h-index was 8.5. Of the individuals in the top 10% by the h-index, 34% were chairpersons, 88% were senior faculty, and 13% were women. A greater h-index was associated with a higher academic ranking and senior faculty status. Recursive partitioning analysis revealed an h-index threshold of 15 (p <0.0001) as an identified breakpoint between the senior and junior faculty. Overall, women had lower h-indexes compared with men (mean, 6.4 vs. 9.4); however, when stratified by academic ranking, the gender differential all but disappeared. Using the h-index as a partial surrogate for research productivity, it appears that radiation oncologists in academia today comprise a prolific group, however, with a highly skewed distribution. According to the present analysis, the h-index correlated with academic ranking. Thus, it potentially has utility in the process of promotion decisions. Overall, women in radiation oncology were less academically productive than men; the possible reasons for the gender differential are discussed.

  9. The culture of academic medicine: faculty perceptions of the lack of alignment between individual and institutional values.

    PubMed

    Pololi, Linda; Kern, David E; Carr, Phyllis; Conrad, Peter; Knight, Sharon

    2009-12-01

    Energized, talented faculty are essential to achieving the missions of academic medical centers (AMCs) in education, research and health care. The alignment of individuals' values with workplace experiences are linked to meaningfulness of work and productivity. To determine faculty values and their alignment with institutional values. A qualitative hypothesis-generating interview study to understand the professional experiences of faculty and organizational approach in five AMCs that were nationally representative in regional and organizational characteristics. Analysis was inductive and data driven. Using stratified, purposeful sampling, we interviewed 96 male and female faculty at different career stages (early career, plateaued, senior faculty and those who had left academic medicine) and diverse specialties (generalists, medical and surgical subspecialists, and research scientists). Dominant themes that emerged from the data. Faculty described values relating to excellence in clinical care, community service (including care for the underserved and disadvantaged), teaching, intellectual rigor/freedom and discovery, all values that mirror the stated missions of AMCs. However, many faculty also described behaviors that led them to conclude that their AMCs, in practice, undervalued excellence in clinical care, and their social and educational missions. Themes were seen across gender, career stage, race and discipline, except that female leaders appeared more likely than male leaders to identify incongruence of individual values and organizational practices. In this study of five diverse medical schools, faculty values were well aligned with stated institutional missions; however, many perceived that institutional behaviors were not always aligned with individual faculty values.

  10. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 20: Engineers as information processors: A survey of US aerospace engineering faculty and students

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Maurita Peterson; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1991-01-01

    U.S. aerospace engineering faculty and students were surveyed as part of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Research Project. Faculty and students were viewed as information processors within a conceptual framework of information seeking behavior. Questionnaires were received from 275 faculty members and 640 students, which were used to determine: (1) use and importance of information sources; (2) use of specific print sources and electronic data bases; (3) use of information technology; and (4) the influence of instruction on the use of information sources and the products of faculty and students. Little evidence was found to support the belief that instruction in library or engineering information use has significant impact either on broadening the frequency or range of information products and sources used by U.S. aerospace engineering students.

  11. What Role Does The Executive Officer Play In Ensuring Senior Officer Success Building An Organization Of Trust Is Key

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-16

    TRUST IS KEY BY Robert F. King, Lt Col, USAF A Research Report Submitted to the Faculty In Partial Fulfillment of the Graduation Requirements... trust is required for organizations to be highly efficient with high morale. It is incumbent upon the senior leader to envision and take steps toward...a leadership environment of trust , but because the executive officer sits at the nexus of crucial trust relationships and is often the “face” of the

  12. Developmental practicum experiences of preservice teachers in deaf education: implications for practicum placement and faculty-student collaborative research.

    PubMed

    Guteng, S I; Tracy, T; Chappell, B

    2000-12-01

    The study examined the developmental practicum experiences of second-year graduate students in deaf education. Participants in the study consisted of a convenient sample of five practicum students. Triangulated data for the study came from the researcher's observational notes, e-mail correspondence with participants, and participants' journals. Inductive analysis was used to analyze the data. Results of the study evinced developmental experiences that are different from those reported in previous studies. The results of the study have significant implications for (a) practicum placement of graduate students in deaf education in terms of site-based orientation, use of the clinical model of supervision, opportunities for self-reflection, and periodic practicum seminars; and (b) faculty-student collaborative research in terms of planning, ethical issues, students' time needs, and training.

  13. Faculty Compensation Systems: Impact on the Quality of Higher Education. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Terry P.; Bergerson, Peter J.

    Faculty compensation is a critical management tool for increasing faculty productivity, improving cost efficiency, and enhancing an institution's public image. Factors that determine faculty compensation include academic rank, faculty productivity, discipline market pay, ability to obtain external grants, seniority or length of service, service in…

  14. Global faculty development: lessons learned from the Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research (FAIMER) initiatives.

    PubMed

    Burdick, William P

    2014-08-01

    Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research (FAIMER) faculty development programs have operated since 2001 and are designed to overcome many of the challenges inherent in global health collaborations, including alignment with local needs, avoiding persistent dependency, and development of trust. FAIMER fellowship programs, developed for midcareer faculty members in all health professions from around the world, share goals of strengthening knowledge and skills in education leadership, education methods, and project management and evaluation. Building community is another explicit goal that allows participants to support and learn from each other.The author recommends several practices for successful international collaborations based on 13 years of experience with FAIMER fellowships. These include using authentic education projects to maintain alignment with local needs and apply newly acquired knowledge and skills, teaching leadership across cultures with careful communication and adaptation of concepts to local environments, cultivating a strong field of health professions education to promote diffusion of ideas and advocate for policy change, intentionally promoting field development and leadership to reduce dependency, giving generously of time and resources, learning from others as much as teaching others, and recognizing that effective partnerships revolve around personal relationships to build trust. These strategies have enabled the FAIMER fellowship programs to stay aligned with local needs, reduce dependency, and maintain trust.

  15. A Social Capital Perspective on the Mentoring of Undergraduate Life Science Researchers: An Empirical Study of Undergraduate-Postgraduate-Faculty Triads.

    PubMed

    Aikens, Melissa L; Sadselia, Sona; Watkins, Keiana; Evans, Mara; Eby, Lillian T; Dolan, Erin L

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduate researchers at research universities are often mentored by graduate students or postdoctoral researchers (referred to collectively as "postgraduates") and faculty, creating a mentoring triad structure. Triads differ based on whether the undergraduate, postgraduate, and faculty member interact with one another about the undergraduate's research. Using a social capital theory framework, we hypothesized that different triad structures provide undergraduates with varying resources (e.g., information, advice, psychosocial support) from the postgraduates and/or faculty, which would affect the undergraduates' research outcomes. To test this, we collected data from a national sample of undergraduate life science researchers about their mentoring triad structure and a range of outcomes associated with research experiences, such as perceived gains in their abilities to think and work like scientists, science identity, and intentions to enroll in a PhD program. Undergraduates mentored by postgraduates alone reported positive outcomes, indicating that postgraduates can be effective mentors. However, undergraduates who interacted directly with faculty realized greater outcomes, suggesting that faculty interaction is important for undergraduates to realize the full benefits of research. The "closed triad," in which undergraduates, postgraduates, and faculty all interact directly, appeared to be uniquely beneficial; these undergraduates reported the highest gains in thinking and working like a scientist. © 2016 M. L. Aikens et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  16. An Investigation into Mentoring Practices of Faculty Who Mentor Undergraduate Researchers at a Hispanic Serving Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estepp, Christopher M.; Velasco, Joseph G.; Culbertson, Avery L.; Conner, Nathan W.

    2017-01-01

    Research has shown the benefits of undergraduate research; however, few studies have examined mentors of undergraduate researchers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the practices of mentors who have successfully mentored Hispanic undergraduate researchers. Findings from this study suggested that mentors should focus on interacting with…

  17. Which Fringes for Faculty?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, R. Jerry; Cooper, Lloyd G.

    1972-01-01

    This survey of 464 junior college teachers from 60 institutions was designed to determine the relative importance to faculty members of four categories of employee benefits--security, teaching, research, and income supplement. (NF)

  18. Open access behaviours and perceptions of health sciences faculty and roles of information professionals.

    PubMed

    Lwoga, Edda T; Questier, Frederik

    2015-03-01

    This study sought to investigate the faculty's awareness, attitudes and use of open access, and the role of information professionals in supporting open access (OA) scholarly communication in Tanzanian health sciences universities. A cross-sectional survey was conducted. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 librarians, while questionnaires were physically distributed to 415 faculty members in all eight Tanzanian health sciences universities, with a response rate of 71.1%. The study found that most faculty members were aware about OA issues. However, the high level of OA awareness among faculty members did not translate into actual dissemination of faculty's research outputs through OA web avenues. A small proportion of faculty's research materials was made available as OA. Faculty were more engaged with OA journal publishing than with self-archiving practices. Senior faculty with proficient technical skills were more likely to use open access than junior faculty. Major barriers to OA usage were related to ICT infrastructure, awareness, skills, author-pay model, and copyright and plagiarism concerns. Interviews with librarians revealed that there was a strong support for promoting OA issues on campus; however, this positive support with various open access-related tasks did not translate into actual action. It is thus important for librarians and OA administrators to consider all these factors for effective implementation of OA projects in research and academic institutions. This is the first comprehensive and detailed study focusing on the health sciences faculty's and librarians' behaviours and perceptions of open access initiatives in Tanzania and reveals findings that are useful for planning and implementing open access initiatives in other institutions with similar conditions. © 2015 Health Libraries Journal.

  19. A Tool to Assess and Compare Knowledge Mobilization Efforts of Faculties of Education, Research Brokering Organizations, Ministries of Education, and School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    There are few tools that exist to measure knowledge mobilization (KMb), the process of connecting research to policy and practice across diverse organizations and sectors. This article reports on a comparison of KMb efforts of 105 educational organizations: faculties of education (N = 21), research brokering organizations (N = 44), school…

  20. Save Senioritis with Serious Senior Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chmelynski, Carol

    2004-01-01

    From more rigorous courses during the twelfth grade to individual projects and internships, school districts across the country are taking a variety of steps for the purpose of keeping seniors engaged in learning during their senior year of high school. At the same time, they are also warning students about the possibility that students who have…