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Sample records for sensitive magnolia ovata

  1. Constituents of the leaves of Magnolia ovata.

    PubMed

    Barros, Letícia Ferrari L; Barison, Andersson; Salvador, Marcos José; de Mello-Silva, Renato; Cabral, Elaine C; Eberlin, Marcos N; Stefanello, Maria Elida A

    2009-08-01

    Two new lignans, magnovatins A (1) and B (2), along with nine known compounds, were isolated from the leaves of Magnolia ovata. The known compounds were identified as acuminatin (3), licarin A (4), kadsurenin M, 4-O-demethylkadsurenin M, oleiferin A, oleiferin C, spathulenol, parthenolide, and 11,13-dehydrocompressanolide. In addition, compounds 1 and 2 yielded four new derivatives (1a, 1b, 2a, and 2b). The structures of the new compounds were established on the basis of spectrometric data evaluation. Free-radical scavenging and antimicrobial activities of the major compunds 1, 3, and 4 were investigated.

  2. Essential oil and other constituents from Magnolia ovata fruit.

    PubMed

    Barros, Letícia F L; Ehrenfried, Carlos Augusto; Riva, Dilamara; Barison, Andersson; de Mello-Silva, Renato; Stefanello, Maria Elida A

    2012-10-01

    The volatile and non-volatile constituents of the unripe fruits of Magnolia ovata (A. St.-Hil.) Spreng. (Magnoliaceae) were studied. The essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation of the fruit of two plant populations (A and B) and analyzed by GC/FID and GC/MS. The oil of sample A was rich in sesquiterpenes, mainly spathulenol (19.3%), while the oil of sample B showed a predominance of aliphatic compounds, mainly hexadecanoic acid (52.0%). Extracts of the dried fruit contained fourteen known compounds including nine lignoids (magnovatin A, magnovatin B, acuminatin, licarin A, oleiferin A, oleiferin C, kadsurenin M, 4-O-demethylkadsurenim M and 7-epi-virolin), two sesquiterpene lactones (parthenolide and michelenolide) and three alkaloids (lysicamine, lanuginosine and O-methylmoschatoline). Michelenolide, 7-epi-virolin and lisycamine are reported for the first time in the species, while the remaining compounds have already been reported in the leaves and/or trunk bark o f Magnolia ovata. Acetylation o f oleiferin A yielded a ne wcompound, acetyl oleiferin A, whose NMR data and that of michelenolide are furnished.

  3. Microelectrode array (MEA) platform as a sensitive tool to detect and evaluate Ostreopsis cf. ovata toxicity.

    PubMed

    Alloisio, Susanna; Giussani, Valentina; Nobile, Mario; Chiantore, Mariachiara; Novellino, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    In the last decade, the occurrence of harmful dinoflagellate blooms of the genus Ostreopsis has increased both in frequency and in geographic distribution with adverse impacts on public health and the economy. Ostreopsis species are producers of palytoxin-like toxins (putative palytoxin and ovatoxins) which are among the most potent natural non-protein compounds known to date, exhibiting extreme toxicity in mammals, including humans. Most existing toxicological data are derived from in vivo mouse assay and are related to acute effects of pure palytoxin, without considering that the toxicity mechanism of dinoflagellates can be dependent on the varying composition of complex biotoxins mixture and on the presence of cellular components. In this study, in vitro neuronal networks coupled to microelectrode array (MEA)-based system are proposed, for the first time, as sensitive biosensors for the evaluation of marine alga toxicity on mammalian cells. Toxic effect was investigated by testing three different treatments of laboratory cultured Ostreopsis cf. ovata cells: filtered and re-suspended algal cells; filtered, re-suspended and sonicated algal cells; conditioned growth medium devoid of algal cells. The great sensitivity of this system revealed the mixture of PTLX-complex analogues naturally released in the growth medium and the different potency of the three treatments to inhibit the neuronal network spontaneous electrical activity. Moreover, by means of the multiparametric analysis of neuronal network activity, the approach revealed a different toxicity mechanism of the cellular component compared to the algal conditioned growth medium, highlighting the potential active role of the first treatment.

  4. Anti-Oxidative Abilities of Essential Oils from Atractylodes ovata Rhizome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun-Teng; Chen, Lih-Geeng; Chou, Duen-Suey; Liang, Wen-Li; Wang, Ching-Chiung

    2011-01-01

    The rhizome of Atractylodes ovata De Candolle is rich in essential oils, which are usually removed by processing. In this study, anti-oxidative abilities of essential oils and aqueous extracts of A. ovata rhizome were explored, and the influence of processing on the anti-oxidative abilities was examined. Essential oils and aqueous extracts of A. ovata were extracted by boiling water and steam distillation, respectively. Quality of these two A. ovata samples was controlled by HPLC and GC-MS system, and anti-oxidative abilities were then evaluated. Results showed that surface color of A. ovata turned to brown and chemical components were changed by processing. Contents of both atractylon and atractylenolide II decreased in the essential oils, but only the contents of atractylon decreased by processing. Atractylenolide III increased in both A. ovata samples. However, A. ovata essential oils displayed stronger anti-oxidative abilities than aqueous extracts in DPPH-scavenging, TBH-induced lipid peroxidation and catalase activity assays. Moreover, the bioactivity of essential oils from raw A. ovata was stronger than oils from processed A. ovata. On the other hand, cytotoxicity of A. ovata essential oils was stronger than that of aqueous extracts, and was more sensitive on H9C2 cell than NIH-3T3 and WI-38 cells. In contrast, stir-frying processing method increased cytotoxicity of essential oils, but the cytotoxicity was ameliorated when processed with assistant substances. The results suggested that phytochemical components and bioactivity of A. ovata were changed after processing and the essential oils from raw A. ovata showed better anti-oxidative and fewer cytotoxicity effects. PMID:21799672

  5. Babesia ovata: Taxonomy, phylogeny and epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Igarashi, Ikuo; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2016-10-15

    Babesia ovata, which is transmitted by Haemaphysalis longicornis, is an intraerythrocytic protozoan parasite of cattle. Based on its morphology, B. ovata is classified as a large-type Babesia. The developmental stages of B. ovata have been described both in cattle and the tick vector. In infected adult female ticks, the parasite is transovarially transmitted to the tick eggs. The sexual reproduction of B. ovata has been demonstrated in the tick midgut. The diagnostic tools that are currently available for the specific detection of B. ovata in cattle include microscopy and polymerase chain reaction assays. The development of improved molecular and serological diagnostic tools has been constrained by the limited availability of genetic data. B. ovata has been reported in cattle populations in Japan, Korea, China, Mongolia and Thailand. B. ovata was thought to be a benign parasite; however, infections in immuno compromised or Theileria orientalis-infected animals are clinically significant. Thus, control strategies aimed at minimizing the prevalence of B. ovata are vital. The taxonomy of B. ovata is unclear, and the phylogenetic position has not been well defined. Consequently, non-B. ovata species have sometimes been classified as B. ovata. In this review, we provide an outline of the lifecycle, geographical distribution, and control of B. ovata, and critically discuss the taxonomy and phylogeny of this bovine Babesia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Origin and History of Magnolias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebda, R. J.; Irving, E.

    2004-12-01

    The classic disjunct distribution of living magnolias between southeast Asia and the Americas has been a puzzle for more than a century and a half. We propose a scheme for the origin and history of magnolias to explain this distribution by integrating paleogeographic, paleoclimatic, paleobotanical, and phytogeographic data. Our scheme is based on paleomagnetically determined latitudes. We assume that the moist warm temperate climate favoured by most extant magnolias has always been their preference. Molecular analyses (largely chloroplast DNA) reveal that several North American species are distinct and basal forms suggesting that magnolias likely originated in North America, a conclusion supported by the fossil record. We identify four evolutionary stages: (1) Ancestral magnolias originate in the Late Cretaceous of North America in high mid-latitudes (45° -60° N) at low altitudes under greenhouse climates. (2) During the exceptionally warm climate (super-greenhouse) of the Eocene, magnolias spread eastwards via the Iceland-Faroes isthmuses, to Europe and then across west and central Asia possibly to east Asia, still at low altitudes and high mid-latitudes. (3) With global cooling from the mid-Cenozoic, magnolias shift their core range to lower mid-latitudes (30° -45° N), become extinct in Europe and southern Siberia, breaking the once continuous distribution into two. (4) In the late Cenozoic, as ice-house conditions develop, magnolias diversify rapidly and expand southward into moist warm temperate uplands in newly uplifted mountain ranges of South and Central America, southeast Asia and the High Archipelago between southeast Asia and Australia. The late Cenozoic evolution of magnolias is characterized by the impoverishment of northerly species and diversification of southerly species. Thus, the centre of origin is not the center of diversity today. Disjunction at the generic level likely occurred as part of the mid-Tertiary southward displacement of the

  7. Chemical characterization of Magnolia biondii (Flos Magnoliae, Xin Yi).

    PubMed

    Schühly, Wolfgang; Skarbina, Jeannette; Kunert, Olaf; Nandi, Owi I; Bauer, Rudolf

    2009-02-01

    Samples of Magnolia biondii buds (Xin Yi, Flos Magnoliae) from different sources were subjected to phytochemical analysis and compared to samples of M. denudata and M. liliiflora. Among the compounds found in the flower buds of M. biondii were eight tetrahydrofurofuran lignans as well as the sesquiterpene lactone parthenolide and the sesquiterpene alcohol oplodiol. A rapid TLC-method for the identification of plant material from M. biondii and its distinction from M. liliiflora was developed. Structure elucidation was carried out by means of NMR (1- and 2-D) and LC-MS.

  8. An evaluation of yellow-flowering magnolias and magnolia rootstocks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Yellow-flowering magnolias were evaluated for flower color, bloom duration and growth rate in USDA Hardiness Zone 6b. Of the thirty selections evaluated, all were reported to have yellow blooms; however, tepal color ranged from light pink with some yellow coloration, to creamy yellow to dark yellow....

  9. Montessori for All: Magnolia Montessori

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDUCAUSE, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The founders of Montessori For All, which opened Magnolia Montessori--a PK-8 public charter school in Austin, Texas--created a new school model that blends the best of authentic Montessori schooling (hands-on and self-directed learning) with best practices from high-performing charter schools (basic skills mastery to excel on standardized tests…

  10. Montessori for All: Magnolia Montessori

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDUCAUSE, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The founders of Montessori For All, which opened Magnolia Montessori--a PK-8 public charter school in Austin, Texas--created a new school model that blends the best of authentic Montessori schooling (hands-on and self-directed learning) with best practices from high-performing charter schools (basic skills mastery to excel on standardized tests…

  11. 75 FR 29656 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Magnolia, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Magnolia, AR AGENCY: Federal... Magnolia, AR. Decommissioning of the Magnolia non-directional beacon (NDB) at Magnolia Municipal Airport, Magnolia, AR has made this action necessary to enhance the safety and management of Instrument Flight Rule...

  12. PCR detection of Babesia ovata from questing ticks in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Tattiyapong, Muncharee; Okubo, Kazuhiro; Suganuma, Keisuke; Hayashida, Kyoko; Igarashi, Ikuo; Zakimi, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Kotaro; Inokuma, Hisashi; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2014-04-01

    Babesia ovata is a tick-transmitted hemoprotozoan parasite of cattle. In the present study, we analyzed tick DNA samples (n=1459) prepared from questing ticks collected from various cattle pastures in Hokkaido (Shibecha, Taiki, Otofuke, Memuro, and Shin-Hidaka districts) and Okinawa (Yonaguni Island) prefectures of Japan for B. ovata. When all the tick DNA samples were screened by a previously described B. ovata-specific apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) gene-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, none of the DNA samples was positive. Therefore, we developed a PCR assay based on the protozoan beta-tubulin (β-tubulin) gene to detect B. ovata from ticks in Japan. In the specificity test, the PCR assay amplified the expected 444-bp target gene fragment from B. ovata DNA. No PCR products were amplified from DNA samples from other blood pathogens, bovine blood, or ticks. In addition, the PCR assay detected 100 fg of B. ovata-genomic DNA extracted from an in vitro culture of the parasites. Subsequently, when all the tick DNA samples were screened by this new PCR assay, 18 were positive for B. ovata. Positive samples were found only in the Yonaguni and Memuro areas. In Okinawa, where all the ticks were identified as Haemaphysalis longicornis, 9.7% of the samples were PCR-positive, while a single tick (Ixodes ovatus) from Memuro was infected with B. ovata. When the nucleotide sequences of the PCR amplicons were phylogenetically analyzed, they formed a separate clade containing a previously described β-tubulin gene sequence from B. ovata (Miyake strain), confirming that the PCR assay had detected only B. ovata from the tick DNA samples. This is the first report that describes the PCR detection of B. ovata in ticks. The findings warrant transmission experiments to evaluate I. ovatus as a potential vector of B. ovata. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. 75 FR 5904 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Magnolia, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Magnolia, AR AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E airspace at Magnolia, AR. Decommissioning of the Magnolia non-directional beacon (NDB) at Magnolia Municipal Airport, Magnolia, AR, has made this action necessary for the...

  14. Antitumor-promoting naphthoquinones from Catalpa ovata.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, A; Mori, T; Iida, A; Ueda, S; Hano, Y; Nomura, T; Tokuda, H; Nishino, H

    1998-05-01

    Bioassay-directed fractionation of an extract of the stem-bark of Catalpa ovata led to the isolation of three new naphthoquinones: 8-methoxydehydroiso-alpha-lapachone (1), 9-methoxy-4-oxo-alpha-lapachone (2), and (4S,4aR,10R,10aR)-4, 10-dihydroxy-2,2-dimethyl-2,3,4,4alpha,10, 10alpha-hexahydrobenzo[g]chromen-5-one (3), which is a 1,4-reductive form of 6. The known compounds 3-hydroxydehydroiso-alpha-lapachone (4), 4,9-dihydroxy-alpha-lapachone (5), 4-hydroxy-alpha-lapachone (6), and 9-methoxy-alpha-lapachone (7), and catalpalactone (8) were also isolated. Their structures were elucidated by spectral methods. These compounds all exhibited significant inhibitory activity against 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-induced Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV-EA) activation in Raji cells.

  15. Antimicrobial activity and cytotoxic effects of Magnolia dealbata and its active compounds.

    PubMed

    Jacobo-Salcedo, Maria del Rosario; Gonzalez-Espindola, Luis Angel; Alonso-Castro, Angel Josabad; Gonzalez-Martinez, Marisela del Rocio; Domínguez, Fabiola; Garcia-Carranca, Alejandro

    2011-08-01

    Multi-drug resistance is of great concern for public health worldwide and necessitates the search for new antimicrobials from sources such as plants. Several Magnolia (Magnoliaceae) species have been reported to exert antimicrobial effects on sensitive and multidrug-resistant microorganisms. However, the antimicrobial properties of Magnolia dealbata have not been experimentally evaluated. The antimicrobial effects of an ethanol extract of Magnolia dealbata seeds (MDE) and its active compounds honokiol (HK) and magnolol (MG) were tested against the phytopathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis and several human multi-drug resistant pathogens using the disk-diffusion assay. The effects of MDE and its active compounds on the viability of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were evaluated using MTT assay. MDE and its active compounds had antimicrobial activity (inhibition zone > 10 mm) against C. michiganensis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter lwoffii, Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and Trichosporon belgeii. The results suggest that M. dealbata and its active compounds have selective antimicrobial effects against drug-resistant fungal and Gram (-) bacteria and exert minimal toxic effects on human PMBC.

  16. Antinociceptive effect of methanol extract of Capparis ovata in mice.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Rana; Bektas, Nurcan

    2010-10-01

    Capparis ovata Desf. (Capparaceae) grows widely in Turkey. Flower buds and fruits of the plant are used in folk medicine for their analgesic, antirheumatismal, and diuretic effects. This study evaluated the possible antinociceptive effect of the methanol extract of C. ovata (CME) in mice. The antinociceptive effect of methanol extract, prepared with the C. ovata flower buds, was studied at the doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg (i.p.) using tail-immersion, hot-plate, and writhing tests in mice. Morphine sulfate (5 mg/kg; i.p.) and dipyrone (100 mg/kg; i.p.) were used as reference analgesic agents. Naloxone (5 mg/kg; i.p.) was also tested. It was observed that the C. ovata extract had a significant antinociceptive effect in these tests. In the hot-plate and tail-immersion test results, the doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg increased the percentage of the maximum possible effect (MPE%) value for nociception significantly according to the control value (P < 0.001). All doses of the extract decreased the number of acetic acid-induced abdominal constrictions in mice when compared with control group (P < 0.001). These effects were inhibited by pretreatment with naloxone. Based on the results obtained, it can be concluded that CME is a potentially antinociceptive agent which acts as both at the peripheral and central levels.

  17. First record of Ostreopsis cfr. ovata on macroalgae in the Northern Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Monti, Marina; Minocci, Marco; Beran, Alfred; Ivesa, Ljiljana

    2007-05-01

    Ostreopsis ovata is an epiphytic potentially toxic dinoflagellate. It has a world-wide distribution, normally associated with other epiphytic or benthic dinoflagellates. In tropical seas O. ovata is often associated with the genera Gambierdiscus, Coolia and Prorocentrum, causing cinguatera fish poisoning. Recently, Ostreopsis spp. blooms in the Tyrrhenian and southern Adriatic Sea have been related to human health problems, such as breathing and skin irritation. Here we report the first record of Ostreopsis cfr. ovata in the Northern Adriatic Sea. O. cfr. ovata was isolated from macroalgae in two areas, the Gulf of Trieste (Italy) and close to Rovinj (Croatia). The microalga was identified by scanning electron microscopy and by fluorescence light microscopy. Size range and thecal pore structure were similar to those described for O. cfr. ovata in previous studies. Ostreopsis cfr. ovata was present on all the macroalgae collected, particularly browns and reds. The microalgal association on macroalgae was mostly composed of Ostreopsis sp., Coolia monotis and Coscinodiscus sp.

  18. Antioxidative and Anticanceric Activities of Magnolia (Magnolia denudata) Flower Petal Extract Fermented by Pediococcus acidilactici KCCM 11614.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye; Kim, Hyun-Suk; Eom, Su Jin; Kim, Kee-Tae; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2015-07-03

    In this study, the effects of magnolia (Magnolia (M.) denudata) extract fermentation in increasing the extract's antioxidative and anticancer activities were investigated. Magnolia was fermented by Pediococcus acidilactici KCCM 11614. The total phenolic content was determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu's method and the antioxidative effects by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazy (DPPH) and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) assay. Anticancer activity against cancer and normal cells was determined using 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT). Total phenolic content during fermentation increased from 38.1 to 47.0 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g of solid matter. The radical scavenging activity was 91.4% after 72 h fermentation. Fermented magnolia's antioxidative effect was threefold higher than that of the (non-fermented) control. Fermentation (48 h) increased anticanceric activity against AGS, LoVo, and MCF-7 cancer cells 1.29- to 1.36-fold compared with that of the control, but did not affect MRC-5 (normal) cells, suggesting that fermented magnolia could be used as a natural antioxidative and anticancer agent.

  19. Response of yellow flowering magnolia varieties to powdery mildew, 2015

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Yellow flowering varieties of Magnolia spp. hybrids were planted in April 2008 in a field plot with Waynesboro loam soil at the Otis L. Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, TN. Severity of powdery mildew was determined on 14 Jul, 21 Aug and 15 Oct using a scale of 0-100% foliage affected. ...

  20. [Study of the new settler Beroe ovata in the Black sea].

    PubMed

    Shiganova, T A; Bulgakova, Iu V; Sorokin, P Iu; Lukashev, Iu F

    2000-01-01

    Primary data on population, size, and distribution of a new settler--comb jelly Beroe ovata--in the Black Sea are presented. We studied certain aspects of its nutrition, consumed organisms, and digestion time. Comb jellies Mnemiopsis leidyi and Pleurobachia pileus were established as the nutritional targets of B. ovata. Mnemiopsis proved to be more accessible and assimilable. Preliminary data on metabolic level and threshold oxygen content in B. ovata were obtained; proportions of dry and wet weight of B. ovata were determined. Population changes of new settler Mnemiopsis and other jellylike animals in the Northeast part of the sea induced by B. ovata were analyzed. We observed sharp decrease in population of Mnemiopsis, a species that induced degradation of the Black Sea ecosystem within the last decade.

  1. Ultrastructural features of the benthic dinoflagellate Ostreopsis cf. ovata (Dinophyceae).

    PubMed

    Escalera, Laura; Benvenuto, Giovanna; Scalco, Eleonora; Zingone, Adriana; Montresor, Marina

    2014-05-01

    The toxic benthic dinoflagellate Ostreopsis cf. ovata has considerably expanded its distribution range in the last decade, posing risks to human health. Several aspects of this species are still poorly known. We studied ultrastructural features of cultivated and natural populations of Ostreopsis cf. ovata from the Gulf of Naples (Mediterranean Sea) using confocal laser scanning, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. New information on the morphology and location of several sulcal plates was gained and a new plate designation is suggested that better fits the one applied to other Gonyaulacales. The microtubular component of the cytoskeleton, revealed using an anti-β-tubulin antibody, consisted of a cortical layer of microtubules arranged asymmetrically in the episome and in the hyposome, complemented by a complex inner microtubular system running from the sulcal area towards the internal part of the cell. The conspicuous canal was delimited by two thick, burin-shaped lobes ending in a tubular ventral opening. The canal was surrounded by mucocysts discharging their content into it. A similar structure has been reported in other benthic and planktonic dinoflagellates and may be interpreted as an example of convergent evolution in species producing large amounts of mucus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. [Study of Magnolia grandiflora extracts in guinea pigs cardiac muscle].

    PubMed

    del Valle Mondragón, Leonardo; Tenorio López, Fermín Alejandro; Torres Narváez, Juan Carlos; Zarco Olvera, Gabriela; Pastelín Hernández, Gustavo

    2004-01-01

    Several extracts from diverse Magnolia grandiflora varieties were pharmacological evaluated in the cardiac muscle. From March to July, flowers and leaves from Magnolia grandiflora, native from the National Institute of Cardiology "Ignacio Chávez", from north, west, and orient zones from Mexico City, and from Puebla, Colima and Chiapas states were collected. They were separately processed and the extracts were obtained by maceration with ethanol-water (1:3 v/v) at 4 degrees C during two weeks. Qualitative analysis was accomplished with thin-layer, column and high-performance liquid chromatographies (HPLC). Functional and molecular analysis was made by specific chemical reactivity and by protonic magnetic resonance (RMN 1H). Pharmacological evaluation was completed in isolated and perfused male guinea pigs hearts. Extracts, fractions, and compounds were administrated by serial bolus in a gradual dose-response curves study in which left intraventricular pressure and coronary perfusion pressure were recorded, evaluating by such the positive inotropic and vasodilator effects of Magnolia grandiflora extracts. Vulgarenol and 2-p-hydroxyphenyl-2-hydroxy-ethylamine were isolated and identified, and the obtained results suggest that its positive inotropic and vasodilator effects are owed to these substances, being complemented by magnograndiolide and tyramine.

  3. Ostreopsis cf. ovata (Dinophyta) bloom in an equatorial island of the Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Silvia Mattos; França, Julia Vitor; Gonçalves, José E A; Ferreira, Carlos E L

    2012-05-01

    The epi-benthic dinoflagellate Ostreopsis cf. ovata Fukuyo has an increasingly global distribution. In Brazil there are reports of O. cf. ovata along the coast from 8°S to 27°S latitude and blooms have been registered on the Rio de Janeiro coastline. In the current study, an O. cf. ovata bloom is reported at Saint Paul's Rocks (0°55'10″N; 29°20'33″W), between the southern and northern hemispheres. The Archipelago is not inhabited and not subjected to eutrophication, due to isolation, and sustains a number of endemic species. Therefore, blooms of O. cf. ovata may potentially cause demise to trophic chains by affecting marine invertebrates and vertebrates. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Simulation model of Cryptomonas ovata population dynamics in southern Kootenay Lake, British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, James E.

    1978-01-01

    The model simulates well the timing and magnitude of all observed population changes and, more importantly, it gives insight into the important mechanisms which regulate population density of C. ovata in this natural system.

  5. Capparis ovata modulates brain oxidative toxicity and epileptic seizures in pentylentetrazol-induced epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Akay, Mehmet Berk; Çelik, Ömer; Yıldırım, Muhammed İkbal; Balcı, Erdinç; Yürekli, Vedat Ali

    2013-04-01

    It has been widely suggested that oxidative stress products play an important role in the pathophysiology of epilepsy. Capparis ovata (C. ovata) may useful treatment of epilepsy because it contains antioxidant flavonoids. The current study was designed to determine the effects of C. ovata on lipid peroxidation, antioxidant levels and electroencephalography (EEG) records in pentylentetrazol (PTZ)-induced epileptic rats. Thirty-two rats were randomly divided into four groups. First group was used as control although second group was PTZ group. Oral 100 and 200 mg/kg C. ovata were given to rats constituting the third and fourth groups for 7 days before PTZ administration. Second, third and forth groups received 60 mg/kg PTZ for induction of epilepsy. Three hours after administration of PTZ, EEG records, brain cortex and blood samples were taken all groups. The lipid peroxidation levels of the brain cortex, number of spikes and epileptiform discharges of EEG were higher in PTZ group than in control and C. ovata group whereas they were decreased by C. ovata administration. Vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E and β-carotene concentrations of brain cortex and latency to first spike of EEG were decreased by the PTZ administration although the brain cortex and plasma vitamin concentrations, and brain cortex and erythrocyte glutathione and glutathione peroxidase values were increased in PTZ + 100 and PTZ + 200 mg C. ovata groups. In conclusion, C. ovata administration caused protection against the PTZ-induced brain oxidative toxicity by inhibiting free radical and epileptic seizures, and supporting antioxidant redox system.

  6. Ostreopsis cf. ovata dynamics in the NW Mediterranean Sea in relation to biotic and abiotic factors.

    PubMed

    Carnicer, Olga; Guallar, Carles; Andree, Karl B; Diogène, Jorge; Fernández-Tejedor, Margarita

    2015-11-01

    An expansion of the distribution of Ostreopsis cf. ovata, a dinoflagellate which produces palytoxin-like compounds, has been reported in recent years. Economical and social interests are affected by blooms, as they are responsible for respiratory and skin problems in humans and may cause damage to marine organisms. In order to identify the most influential environmental factors that trigger proliferations of O. cf. ovata in the area of the adjacent shallow rocky coast of the Ebro Delta (NW Mediterranean Sea) a three-year survey was performed on the metaphytic microalgae community growing on the macrophytes Jania rubens and Corallina elongata. Small-size diatoms were more abundant than dinoflagellates; O. cf. ovata was identified as the only species present from the genus. Seawater temperature was the primary driver defining the ecological niche of O. cf. ovata. Freshwater and groundwater fluxes were more pronounced in southern than in northern sites, which may have resulted in a distinct O. cf. ovata spatial distribution, with the highest records of abundance and more frequent blooms in the north. In consequence, negative correlations between the abundance of O. cf. ovata and nitrate concentrations and significant positive correlation with salinity were observed. The temporal pattern of O. cf. ovata dynamics from mid-July to early-November is probably due to the fact that this species is observed only above a certain threshold temperature of seawater. Metaphytic cells of O. cf. ovata were smaller in the northern site than in the south, possibly as a result of an increase in cell division, coinciding with higher abundance, and this could be an indicator of favorable conditions. Toxicity in planktonic cells was negatively correlated with cell abundance in the water column, achieving maximum concentrations of 25pg. PLTX eqcell(-1).

  7. 77 FR 32631 - Lion Oil Trading & Transportation, Inc., Magnolia Pipeline Company, and El Dorado Pipeline...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Lion Oil Trading & Transportation, Inc., Magnolia Pipeline Company, and El... 385.202 (2011), Lion Oil Trading & Transportation, Inc., Magnolia Pipeline Company, and El Dorado Pipeline Company, collectively, Lion Companies, requested that the Commission grant a temporary waiver of...

  8. The Vallarta Botanical Garden's advancements in conserving the diversity of native Mexican oaks and magnolias

    Treesearch

    N.A. Gerlowski; M.A. Muñiz-Castro

    2017-01-01

    Mexico is both an oak (Quercus) biodiversity hotspot (over 160 described species) and the western hemisphere's leader in magnolia (Magnolia) diversity (36 described species). In the face of myriad threats to these groups, including climate change, habitat loss/fragmentation, overharvesting, and plant pests/pathogens, the...

  9. The protective effect of Capparis ovata in acute hepatotoxicity induced by paracetamol.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Nurcan; Akçam, Mustafa; Koca, Tuğba; Kumbul Doğuç, Duygu; Özgöçmen, Meltem

    2016-02-17

    To investigate the efficiency of Capparis ovata as a protective agent against acute paracetamol toxicity of the liver. A total of 36 Wistar albino rats were divided into 4 groups: 1) paracetamol, 2) Capparis ovata + paracetamol, 3) Capparis ovata, and 4) control. Groups 2 and 3 were given Capparis ovata and Groups 1 and 4 distilled water for 8 days. On day 8, 3000 mg kg-1 paracetamol was administered orally to Groups 1 and 2. Samples were taken on day 9. AST, ALT, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, GGT, and ALP levels were assessed. Lipid peroxidation markers and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) levels were measured in the blood and liver. Liver tissues were evaluated histologically. AST, ALT, and total bilirubin levels were lower in Group 2 than in Group 1 (P < 0.05). TBARS levels were lower in Groups 2 (P = 0.000), 3 (P = 0.001), and 4 (P = 0.001) than in Group 1. Degenerative findings were lower in the Capparis ovata + paracetamol group than in the paracetamol group (P < 0.05). It can be concluded that Capparis ovata has a protective effect on the liver, both histopathologically and biochemically, against paracetamol-induced liver injury.

  10. Growth Inhibition of Sporomusa ovata by Incorporation of Benzimidazole Bases into Cobamides

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Kenny C.

    2013-01-01

    Phenolyl cobamides are unique members of a class of cobalt-containing cofactors that includes vitamin B12 (cobalamin). Cobamide cofactors facilitate diverse reactions in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Phenolyl cobamides are structurally and chemically distinct from the more commonly used benzimidazolyl cobamides such as cobalamin, as the lower axial ligand is a phenolic group rather than a benzimidazole. The functional significance of this difference is not well understood. Here we show that in the bacterium Sporomusa ovata, the only organism known to synthesize phenolyl cobamides, several cobamide-dependent acetogenic metabolisms have a requirement or preference for phenolyl cobamides. The addition of benzimidazoles to S. ovata cultures results in a decrease in growth rate when grown on methanol, 3,4-dimethoxybenzoate, H2 plus CO2, or betaine. Suppression of native p-cresolyl cobamide synthesis and production of benzimidazolyl cobamides occur upon the addition of benzimidazoles, indicating that benzimidazolyl cobamides are not functionally equivalent to the phenolyl cobamide cofactors produced by S. ovata. We further show that S. ovata is capable of incorporating other phenolic compounds into cobamides that function in methanol metabolism. These results demonstrate that S. ovata can incorporate a wide range of compounds as cobamide lower ligands, despite its preference for phenolyl cobamides in the metabolism of certain energy substrates. To our knowledge, S. ovata is unique among cobamide-dependent organisms in its preferential utilization of phenolyl cobamides. PMID:23417488

  11. Growth inhibition of Sporomusa ovata by incorporation of benzimidazole bases into cobamides.

    PubMed

    Mok, Kenny C; Taga, Michiko E

    2013-05-01

    Phenolyl cobamides are unique members of a class of cobalt-containing cofactors that includes vitamin B12 (cobalamin). Cobamide cofactors facilitate diverse reactions in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Phenolyl cobamides are structurally and chemically distinct from the more commonly used benzimidazolyl cobamides such as cobalamin, as the lower axial ligand is a phenolic group rather than a benzimidazole. The functional significance of this difference is not well understood. Here we show that in the bacterium Sporomusa ovata, the only organism known to synthesize phenolyl cobamides, several cobamide-dependent acetogenic metabolisms have a requirement or preference for phenolyl cobamides. The addition of benzimidazoles to S. ovata cultures results in a decrease in growth rate when grown on methanol, 3,4-dimethoxybenzoate, H2 plus CO2, or betaine. Suppression of native p-cresolyl cobamide synthesis and production of benzimidazolyl cobamides occur upon the addition of benzimidazoles, indicating that benzimidazolyl cobamides are not functionally equivalent to the phenolyl cobamide cofactors produced by S. ovata. We further show that S. ovata is capable of incorporating other phenolic compounds into cobamides that function in methanol metabolism. These results demonstrate that S. ovata can incorporate a wide range of compounds as cobamide lower ligands, despite its preference for phenolyl cobamides in the metabolism of certain energy substrates. To our knowledge, S. ovata is unique among cobamide-dependent organisms in its preferential utilization of phenolyl cobamides.

  12. [Research on standard of Magnoliae Officinalis Cortex commercial specification and grade].

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Zhang, Cheng-cheng; Guo, Lan-ping; Jin, Yan; Huang, Lu-qi; Yang, Hong-bing

    2015-02-01

    The market and literature were studied to understand the existing situation of Magnoliae Officinalis Cortex goods, and the collected samples were analyzed, combined with the actual production, a new standard of Magnoliae Officinalis Cortex commercial specification and grade was drafted. Magnoliae Officinalis Cortex goods was divided into two categories according to the source in the old standard. Then each category was divided into four kinds of specifications according to the site. Each kind of specification was divided into several grades according to the length and weight. To judge the quality of Magnoliae Officinalis Cortex goods was mainly based on the appearance quality. In the new standard, the classification of commercial specification and grade is based on the thickness, magnolol and honokiol content. The goods of Magnoliae Officinalis Cortex can be divided into three specifications: Tongpu, Genpu and Doupu. Tongpu is divided into three grades, the remaining two are not graded.

  13. Phylogenetic structure of bacterial assemblages co-occurring with Ostreopsis cf. ovata bloom.

    PubMed

    Vanucci, Silvana; Guidi, Flavio; Pistocchi, Rossella; Long, Richard A

    2016-05-01

    Extensive blooms of the toxic epiphytic/benthic dinoflagellate Ostreopsis cf. ovata are being reported with increasing frequency and spatial distribution in temperate coastal regions including the Mediterranean. These blooms are of human and environmental health concern due to the production of isobaric palytoxin and a wide range of ovatoxins by Ostreopsis cf. ovata. Bacterial-microalgal interactions are important regulators in algal bloom dynamics and potentially toxin dynamics. This study investigated the bacterial assemblages co-occurring with O. cf. ovata (OA) and from ambient seawaters (SW) during the early and peak phases of bloom development in NW Adriatic Sea. Fractions of the bacterial assemblages co-occurring with O. cf. ovata (OA) and more closely associated to the mucilage layer (LA) embedding O. cf. ovata cells were also reported. In total, 14 bacterial phyla were detected by targeted 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The dominant bacterial phyla in the OA assemblages were Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes; while at the class level, Alphaproteobacteria were the most abundant (83 and 66%, relative abundance, early and peak bloom phases), followed by Flavobacteria (7 and 19%, early and peak phases). Actinobacteria and Cyanobacteria were of minor importance (<5% of the relative bacterial abundance each). Gammaproteobacteria showed a notably presence in OA assemblage only at the early phase of the bloom (genus Haliea, 13%). The Alphaproteobacteria were predominately composed by the genera Ruegeria, Jannaschia and Erythrobacter which represented about half of the total phylotypes' contribution of OA at both early and peak phases of the O. cf. ovata bloom, suggesting interactions between this consortium and the microalga. Moreover, the highest contribution of Ruegeria (30% of the total phylotypes) was observed at the early phase of the bloom in LA assemblage. Microbial assemblages associated with the ambient seawaters while being also dominated by

  14. Effect of tungstate on acetate and ethanol production by the electrosynthetic bacterium Sporomusa ovata.

    PubMed

    Ammam, Fariza; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Lizak, Dawid M; Zhang, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis (MES) and gas fermentation are bioenergy technologies in which a microbial catalyst reduces CO2 into organic carbon molecules with electrons from the cathode of a bioelectrochemical system or from gases such as H2. The acetogen Sporomusa ovata has the capacity of reducing CO2 into commodity chemicals by both gas fermentation and MES. Acetate is often the only product generated by S. ovata during autotrophic growth. In this study, trace elements in S. ovata growth medium were optimized to improve MES and gas fermentation productivity. Augmenting tungstate concentration resulted in a 2.9-fold increase in ethanol production by S. ovata during H2:CO2-dependent growth. It also promoted electrosynthesis of ethanol in a S. ovata-driven MES reactor and increased acetate production 4.4-fold compared to unmodified medium. Furthermore, fatty acids propionate and butyrate were successfully converted to their corresponding alcohols 1-propanol and 1-butanol by S. ovata during gas fermentation. Increasing tungstate concentration enhanced conversion efficiency for both propionate and butyrate. Gene expression analysis suggested that tungsten-containing aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductases (AORs) and a tungsten-containing formate dehydrogenase (FDH) were involved in the improved biosynthesis of acetate, ethanol, 1-propanol, and 1-butanol. AORs and FDH contribute to the fatty acids re-assimilation pathway and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, respectively. This study presented here shows that optimization of microbial catalyst growth medium can improve productivity and lead to the biosynthesis of different products by gas fermentation and MES. It also provides insights on the metabolism of biofuels production in acetogens and demonstrates that S. ovata has an important untapped metabolic potential for the production of other chemicals than acetate via CO2-converting bioprocesses including MES.

  15. Phenylethanoid glycosides in tepals of Magnolia salicifolia and their occurrence in flowers of Magnoliaceae.

    PubMed

    Porter, Elaine A; Kite, Geoffrey C; Veitch, Nigel C; Geoghegan, Ivey A; Larsson, Sonny; Simmonds, Monique S J

    2015-09-01

    Phenylethanoid glycosides were among the major UV-absorbing components in 80% aq. CH3OH extracts of the tepals of Magnolia salicifolia (Siebold & Zucc.) Maxim. (Magnoliaceae; Magnolia subgenus Yulania). Structural characterisation of isolated compounds by spectroscopic and chemical methods revealed three previously unrecorded examples, yulanoside A, yulanoside B and 2'-rhamnoechinacoside, and the known compounds echinacoside and crassifolioside; chromatographic methods also identified verbascoside in the tepal extract. Yulanoside A is the first reported example of a phenylethanoid pentaglycoside, namely hydroxytyrosol 1-O-{β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→6)-[3,4-dihydroxycinnamoyl-(→4)][α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→3)][α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-D-glucopyranoside}. A survey of Magnolia sensu lato and Liriodendron (the two genera of Magnoliaceae) suggested that yulanoside A and its deglucosyl derivative (yulanoside B) were a feature of the tepal chemistry of Magnolia subgenus Yulania (except Magnolia acuminata, the sole member of section Tulipastrum, which did not accumulate phenylethanoid glycosides). The two species of Liriodendron and examined examples of Magnolia subgenus Magnolia sections Magnolia and Rytidospermum (subsection Oyama) also accumulated phenylethanoid glycosides in their tepals and in these species, and in subgenus Yulania, the major compounds were one or more of echinacoside, 2'-rhamnoechinacoside, crassifolioside and verbascoside. Levels of phenylethanoid glycosides were found to be much lower in species studied from Magnolia sections Gwillimia, Macrophylla and Rytidospermum (subsection Rytidospermum), although yulanoside A was detectable in M. macrophylla and this may have some bearing on the placement of section Macrophylla, which is currently uncertain. In the isolates of yulanoside B and echinacoside, minor phenylethanoid glycosides were determined to be analogues of these compounds with β-D-xylose at C-3' of the

  16. F1 hybrid inviability in eucalyptus: the case of E. ovata x E. globulus.

    PubMed

    Lopez, G A; Potts, B M; Tilyard, P A

    2000-09-01

    The impact of inbreeding and hybridization on fitness was compared in the two co-occurring forest tree species, Eucalyptus ovata and E. globulus, aimed at explaining the rarity of their hybrids in nature. The success of selfing, open-pollination and outcrossing of both species and interspecific hybridization was monitored from seed-set to 10-year's growth in a field trial. There was a unilateral barrier to hybridization with seed-set obtained only with E. ovata females. The F1 hybrids exhibited reduced viability compared to intraspecific cross-types at virtually all stages of the life cycle and are clearly at a selective disadvantage compared with their open-pollinated E. ovata half-sibs with which they would directly compete in nature. Eucalyptus ovata and E. globulus overlap in their flowering time but the F1 hybrids flowered later with virtually no overlap with either species. The asynchronous flowering and reduced reproductive fitness of F1 hybrids would markedly limit the opportunity for advanced generation hybridization. Inbreeding similarly had a deleterious effect on the fitness of both species, and the F1 hybrids were most competitive with the E. ovata selfs. It is argued that changes in inbreeding levels of parental populations may be a key factor affecting the relative fitness of hybrids and their potential to impact on the pure species gene pool. Reduced fitness of the pure species through inbreeding may result in hybridization having its greatest evolutionary impact in small founder or relict populations.

  17. Identification of phenolyl cobamide from the homoacetogenic bacterium Sporomusa ovata.

    PubMed

    Stupperich, E; Eisinger, H J; Kräutler, B

    1989-12-22

    Phenolyl cobamide was isolated from cyanide extractions of the anaerobic eubacterium Sporomusa ovata. The proposed corrinoid structure [Co alpha,Co beta-(monocyano,monoaquo)-phenolyl cobamide] has been deduced from 1H NMR, fast-atom-bombardment mass spectroscopy and ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy data. The complete corrinoid resembled p-cresolyl cobamide [Co alpha,Co beta-(monocyano,monoaquo)-p-cresolyl cobamide], which recently has been obtained from cyanide extractions of the same bacterium. The structures and chemical properties of both cobamides with uncoordinated nucleotides differed significantly from those of vitamin B12 [Co alpha-[alpha-(5,6-dimethylbenzimidazolyl)]-Co beta-cyanocobamide]. Sporomusa synthesized coenzymes of phenolyl cobamide and p-cresolyl cobamide in considerable amounts of 400 nmol/g and 1700 nmol/g dry cells, respectively. More than 90% of the complete corrinoid pool of the homoacetogenic bacterium consisted of these two corrinoids, indicating that they are physiologically important coenzymes of the bacterial metabolism.

  18. Anti-inflammatory neolignans from the roots of Magnolia officinalis.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hung-Cheng; Kuo, Ping-Chung; Wu, Shwu-Jen; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Hung, Hsin-Yi; Shen, De-Yang; Shieh, Po-Chuen; Liao, Yu-Ren; Lee, E-Jian; Gu, Qiong; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Wu, Tian-Shung

    2016-04-01

    Nine neolignan derivatives (1-9) were characterized from the roots of Magnolia officinalis, and their structures were elucidated based on spectroscopic and physicochemical analyses. Among them, houpulins E (1) and M (9) possess novel homo- and trinor-neolignan skeletons. In addition, 15 known compounds (10-24) were identified by comparison of their spectroscopic and physical data with those reported in the literature. Some of the purified constituents were examined for anti-inflammatory activity and, among the tested compounds, houpulins G (3), I (5), J (6), and 2,2'-dihydroxy-3-methoxy-5,5'-di-(2-propenylbiphenyl) (19) significantly inhibited superoxide anion generation and elastase release with IC50 values ranging from 3.54 to 5.48 μM and 2.16 to 3.39 μM, respectively. Therefore, these neolignan derivatives have tremendous potential to be explored as anti-inflammatory agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Anticonvulsant effects of Magnolia grandiflora L. in the rat.

    PubMed

    Bastidas Ramírez, B E; Navarro Ruíz, N; Quezada Arellano, J D; Ruíz Madrigal, B; Villanueva Michel, M T; Garzón, P

    1998-06-01

    The ethyl ether (EE) and hydroalcoholic extract (HE) of Magnolia grandiflora L. (Magnoliaceae) seeds, a popular plant utilized in the Mexican traditional medicine because of its antispasmodic as well as other reported pharmacological effects, were studied in adult male Wistar rats. EE and HE orally administered in a single dose of 250 mg/kg (calculated on lipidic base) and 200 mg/kg, exhibited abolition of the extensor reflex of maximal electric induced-seizure test in 50 and 40% of the experimental animals, respectively. They significantly prolonged the sleeping time induced by pentobarbital and only the ethanol extract induced hypothermia. No neurological deficit was exhibited by either extract according to the gait, stance and righting test. Although ulterior toxicological and pharmacological insight is necessary, these results suggest that the chemical constituents of this plant could have utility in the control of epileptic patients presenting convulsive seizures.

  20. MFE/Magnolia - A joint CNES/NASA mission for the earth magnetic field investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runavot, Josette; Ousley, Gilbert W.

    1988-01-01

    The joint phase B study in the CNES/NASA MFE/Magnolia mission to study the earth's magnetic field are reported. The scientific objectives are summarized and the respective responsibilities of NASA and CNES are outlined. The MFE/Magnolia structure and power systems, mass and power budgets, attitude control system, instrument platform and boom, tape recorders, rf system, propellant system, and scientific instruments are described.

  1. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis of Medicinally Important Plantago ovata Using RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Kotwal, Shivanjali; Kaul, Sanjana; Sharma, Pooja; Gupta, Mehak; Shankar, Rama; Jain, Mukesh; Dhar, Manoj K.

    2016-01-01

    Plantago ovata is an economically and medicinally important plant of the family Plantaginaceae. It is used extensively for the production of seed husk for its application in pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic industries. In the present study, the transcriptome of P. ovata ovary was sequenced using Illumina Genome Analyzer platform to characterize the mucilage biosynthesis pathway in the plant. De novo assembly was carried out using Oases followed by velvet. A total of 46,955 non-redundant transcripts (≥100 bp) using ~29 million high-quality paired end reads were generated. Functional categorization of these transcripts revealed the presence of several genes involved in various biological processes like metabolic pathways, mucilage biosynthesis, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and antioxidants. In addition, simple sequence-repeat motifs, non-coding RNAs and transcription factors were also identified. Expression profiling of some genes involved in mucilage biosynthetic pathway was performed in different tissues of P. ovata using Real time PCR analysis. The study has resulted in a valuable resource for further studies on gene expression, genomics and functional genomics in P. ovata. PMID:26943165

  2. ArsAB, a Novel Enzyme from Sporomusa ovata Activates Phenolic Bases for Adenosylcobamide Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chi Ho; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.

    2011-01-01

    Summary In the homoacetogenic bacterium Sporomusa ovata, phenol and p-cresol are converted into α-ribotides, which are incorporated into biologically active cobamides (Cbas) whose lower ligand bases do not form axial coordination bonds with the cobalt ion of the corrin ring. Here we report the identity of two S. ovata genes that encode an enzyme that transfers the phosphoribosyl group of nicotinate mononucleotide (NaMN) to phenol or p-cresol, yielding α-O-glycosidic ribotides. The alluded genes were named arsA and arsB (for alpha-ribotide synthesis), arsA and arsB were isolated from a genomic DNA library of S. ovata. A positive selection strategy using an Escherichia coli strain devoid of NaMN:5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB) phosphoribosyltransferase (CobT) activity was used to isolate a fragment of S. ovata DNA that contained arsA and arsB, whose nucleotide sequences overlapped by 8 bp. SoArsAB was isolated to homogeneity, shown to be functional as a heterodimer, and to have highest activity at pH 9. SoArsAB also activated DMB to its α-N-glycosidic ribotide. Previously characterized CobT-like enzymes activate DMB but do not activate phenolics. NMR spectroscopy was used to confirm the incorporation of phenol into the cobamide, and mass spectrometry was used to identity of the SoArsAB products. PMID:21696461

  3. ArsAB, a novel enzyme from Sporomusa ovata activates phenolic bases for adenosylcobamide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chi Ho; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C

    2011-08-01

    In the homoacetogenic bacterium Sporomusa ovata, phenol and p-cresol are converted into α-ribotides, which are incorporated into biologically active cobamides (Cbas) whose lower ligand bases do not form axial co-ordination bonds with the cobalt ion of the corrin ring. Here we report the identity of two S. ovata genes that encode an enzyme that transfers the phosphoribosyl group of nicotinate mononucleotide (NaMN) to phenol or p-cresol, yielding α-O-glycosidic ribotides. The alluded genes were named arsA and arsB (for alpha-ribotide synthesis), arsA and arsB were isolated from a genomic DNA library of S. ovata. A positive selection strategy using an Escherichia coli strain devoid of NaMN:5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB) phosphoribosyltransferase (CobT) activity was used to isolate a fragment of S. ovata DNA that contained arsA and arsB, whose nucleotide sequences overlapped by 8 bp. SoArsAB was isolated to homogeneity, shown to be functional as a heterodimer, and to have highest activity at pH 9. SoArsAB also activated DMB to its α-N-glycosidic ribotide. Previously characterized CobT-like enzymes activate DMB but do not activate phenolics. NMR spectroscopy was used to confirm the incorporation of phenol into the cobamide, and mass spectrometry was used to identify SoArsAB reaction products. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Evaluation of the Association Metformin: Plantago ovata Husk in Diabetic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Díez-Láiz, Raquel; García-Vieitez, Juan J.; Diez-Liébana, M. José; Sierra-Vega, Matilde; Sahagún-Prieto, Ana M.; Calle-Pardo, Ángela P.; Fernández-Martínez, Nélida

    2015-01-01

    In this experimental study we have investigated whether the inclusion of the dietary fiber Plantago ovata husk could be recommended as coadjuvant in treatments with oral hypoglycemic drugs. We evaluated the use of Plantago ovata husk-metformin association in diabetic rabbits by determining its effects on glucose and insulin concentrations. Six groups of 6 rabbits were used. Groups 1 to 3 were fed with standard chow and groups 4 to 6 with chow supplemented with Plantago ovata husk (3.5 mg/kg/day). Two groups (numbers 1 and 4) were used as controls (receiving standard or supplemented chow), two groups (numbers 2 and 5) received metformin orally, and the other two (numbers 3 and 6) were treated orally with metformin and psyllium. Plasma glucose concentrations were lower in groups fed with fiber-supplemented chow whereas insulin levels showed important interindividual variations. Glucose pharmacokinetics parameters showed significant differences in Cmax and tmax in relation to fiber intake. Insulin pharmacokinetics parameters after treatment with oral metformin showed an important increase in Cmax, AUC, and tmax in animals fed with fiber. We conclude that Plantago ovata husk intake can contribute to the oral antihyperglycemic treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26576433

  5. The inhibitory effect of magnolol from Magnolia officinalis on glucosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Huang, B B; Fan, M W; Wang, S L; Han, D X; Chen, Z; Bian, Z

    2006-10-01

    Dental caries has been an intractable disease in spite of intense dental research. Glucosyltransferase (GTF) enzyme plays the most important role in the development of dental caries. In our previous studies, magnolol, a compound from Magnolia officinalis Rehder et Wilson (Magnoliaceae), was shown to possess a strong anti-GTF activity. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of magnolol on the functional domains of GTF for the purpose of defining its anti-GTF activity mechanism. GTF-I which was prepared from Streptococcus milleri transformant KSB8 cells expressing the gtfB gene was used. The results demonstrated magnolol reduced total glucan synthesis, depending on the magnolol concentration. There were no significant differences in Michaelis constant (K(m)) values between the presence and absence of magnolol as determined by Lineweaver-Burk plot, and maximum velocity (V(m)) in the presence of magnolol was lower than that in its absence. Magnolol significantly inhibited both sucrose hydrolysis and glucosyl transfer to glucan by GTF-I. Free glucose in the presence of magnolol was reduced by 33-48% as compared to in its absence, while the quantity of glucan was reduced by 75-82%. These findings suggested that magnolol inhibited both two sequential reaction phases of GTF non-competitively by operating on the glucan-binding domain, but not on the catalytic domain. Magnolol could be a valuable resource for the exploration of novel bioactive compounds in natural products.

  6. Cloning of the transketolase gene from erythritol-producing yeast Candida magnoliae.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Boung-Hyuk; Park, Eun-Hee; Seo, Jin-Ho; Kim, Myoung-Dong

    2014-10-01

    The entire nucleotide sequence of the TKL1 gene encoding transketolase (TKL) in an erythritolproducing yeast of Candida magnoliae was determined by degenerate polymerase chain reaction and genome walking. Sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of C. magnoliae TKL1 (CmTKL1) that spans 2,088 bp and encodes 696 amino acids, sharing 61.7% amino acid identity to Kluyveromyces lactis TKL. Functional analysis showed that CmTKL1 complemented a Saccharomyces cerevisiae tkl1 tkl2 double mutant for growth in the absence of aromatic amino acids and restored transketolase activity in this mutant. An enzyme activity assay and RT-PCR revealed that the expression of CmTKL1 is induced by fructose, H2O2, and KCl. The GenBank accession number for C. magnoliae TKL1 is KF751756.

  7. Extracts of Magnolia Species-Induced Prevention of Diabetic Complications: A Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuezhong; Li, Fengsheng; Sun, Wanqing; Gao, Ling; Kim, Ki Soo; Kim, Kyoung Tae; Cai, Lu; Zhang, Zhiguo; Zheng, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic complications are the major cause of mortality for the patients with diabetes. Oxidative stress and inflammation have been recognized as important contributors for the development of many diabetic complications, such as diabetic nephropathy, hepatopathy, cardiomyopathy, and other cardiovascular diseases. Several studies have established the anti-inflammatory and oxidative roles of bioactive constituents in Magnolia bark, which has been widely used in the traditional herbal medicines in Chinese society. These findings have attracted various scientists to investigate the effect of bioactive constituents in Magnolia bark on diabetic complications. The aim of this review is to present a systematic overview of bioactive constituents in Magnolia bark that induce the prevention of obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and diabetic complications, including cardiovascular, liver, and kidney. PMID:27669240

  8. Extracts of Magnolia Species-Induced Prevention of Diabetic Complications: A Brief Review.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuezhong; Li, Fengsheng; Sun, Wanqing; Gao, Ling; Kim, Ki Soo; Kim, Kyoung Tae; Cai, Lu; Zhang, Zhiguo; Zheng, Yang

    2016-09-24

    Diabetic complications are the major cause of mortality for the patients with diabetes. Oxidative stress and inflammation have been recognized as important contributors for the development of many diabetic complications, such as diabetic nephropathy, hepatopathy, cardiomyopathy, and other cardiovascular diseases. Several studies have established the anti-inflammatory and oxidative roles of bioactive constituents in Magnolia bark, which has been widely used in the traditional herbal medicines in Chinese society. These findings have attracted various scientists to investigate the effect of bioactive constituents in Magnolia bark on diabetic complications. The aim of this review is to present a systematic overview of bioactive constituents in Magnolia bark that induce the prevention of obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and diabetic complications, including cardiovascular, liver, and kidney.

  9. Biosynthesis of flat silver nanoflowers: from Flos Magnoliae Officinalis extract to simulation solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xiaolian; Huang, Jiale; Wu, Lingfeng; Sun, Daohua; Li, Qingbiao

    2014-03-01

    Flat Ag nanoflowers were directly synthesized from the bioreduction of AgNO3 using Flos Magnoliae Officinalis extract without any additional stabilizer or protective agent at room temperature. Effects of concentrations of the Flos Magnoliae Officinalis extract on the Ag nanostructures were investigated. The main components containing flavone, polyphenol, protein, and reducing sugar in the plant extract were thoroughly determined before and after the reaction, and the dialysis experiments were also conducted. The results of components analysis and dialysis showed that gallic acid representing polyphenols played an important role in the biosynthesis of silver nanoplates. Trisodium citrate combined gallic acid solution, instead of Flos Magnoliae Officinalis extract, was employed and successfully simulated the biosynthesis process of the flat Ag nanoflowers.

  10. Lignans from the flower buds of Magnolia liliflora Desr.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Shu; Lan, Xiao-Cong; Wu, Hai-Bo; Zhong, Yao-Zhao; Li, Jing; Liu, Ying; Shao, Cong-Cong

    2012-01-01

    Six new lignans, 1- 6, along with six known compounds were obtained from the flower buds of Magnolia liliflora Desr. The new lignans were elucidated as (1 S*,2 R*,5 S*,6 S*)-2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-6-(3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl)-3,7-dioxabicyclo[3.3.0]octane (1), (1 R*,2 R*,5 R*,6 S*)-2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-6-(3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl)-3,7-dioxabicyclo[3.3.0]octane (2), (1 R*, 2 R*,5 R*,6 S*)-2,6-bis (3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-3,7-dioxabicyclo[3.3.0]octane (3), (1 R*,2 S*,5 R*,6 R*)-2-(3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl)-6-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-3,7-dioxabicyclo[3.3.0]octane ( 4), (7' S*,8 R*,8' R*)-3,5'-dimethoxy-3',4,9'-trihydroxy-7',9-epoxy-8,8'-lignan (5), and (7' R*,8' S*)-3,3',4,5'-tetramethoxy-7-en-7',9-epoxy-8,8'-lignan (6), by the analysis of 1D and 2D-NMR as well as HRESIMS data. The capacity of compound 1 to protect against damages to the DNA of rat lymphocyte cells induced by UV irradiation was assessed by the comet assay. It showed stronger antigenotoxicity than ascorbic acid from 6×10(-3) mmol·L(-1) to 6×10(-6) mmol·L(-1). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. The toxic benthic dinoflagellate Ostreopsis ovata: quantification of proliferation along the coastline of Genoa, Italy.

    PubMed

    Mangialajo, L; Bertolotto, R; Cattaneo-Vietti, R; Chiantore, M; Grillo, C; Lemee, R; Melchiorre, N; Moretto, P; Povero, P; Ruggieri, N

    2008-06-01

    Toxic harmful algal bloom (HAB) occurrence is becoming more frequent and problematic in highly urbanized coastal zones. In summer 2005 along the urbanized Genoa coastline (Ligurian Sea, North western Mediterranean Sea), local first aid stations treated about 200 people, who all showed similar symptoms following exposure to marine aerosols. The link with proliferation of Ostreopsis ovata was made, and it highlighted for the first time, the risks that benthic HABs may represent in highly urbanised temperate areas. Subsequently, a specific monitoring plan was designed and implemented in the same area in July 2006, before the first signs of Ostreopsis proliferation were detected. Here we report on this quantification of an Ostreopsis ovata bloom in the Ligurian Sea. Cells were quantified both in the water column and in the epiphytic community on macrophytes. Our results suggest a role of sea water temperature and weather conditions in favouring bloom development.

  12. Contribution of trehalose biosynthetic pathway to drought stress tolerance of Capparis ovata Desf.

    PubMed

    Ilhan, S; Ozdemir, F; Bor, M

    2015-03-01

    Trehalose and the trehalose biosynthetic pathway are important contributors and regulators of stress responses in plants. Among recent findings for trehalose and its metabolism, the role of signalling in the regulation of growth and development and its potential for use as a storage energy source can be listed. The xerophytic plant Capparis ovata (caper) is well adapted to drought and high temperature stress in arid and semi-arid regions of the Mediterranean. The contribution of trehalose and the trehalose biosynthetic pathway to drought stress responses and tolerance in C. ovata are not known. We investigated the effects of PEG-mediated drought stress in caper plants and analysed physiological parameters and trehalose biosynthetic pathway components, trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS), trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (TPP), trehalase activity, trehalose and proline content in drought stress-treated and untreated plants. Our results indicated that trehalose and the trehalose biosynthetic pathway contributed to drought stress tolerance of C. ovata. Overall growth and leaf water status were not dramatically affected by drought, as both high relative growth rate and relative water content were recorded even after 14 days of drought stress. Trehalose accumulation increased in parallel to induced TPS and TPP activities and decreased trehalase activity in caper plants on day 14. Constitutive trehalose levels were 28.75 to 74.75 μg·g·FW(-1) , and drought stress significantly induced trehalose accumulation (385.25 μg·g·FW(-1) on day 14) in leaves of caper. On day 14 of drought, proline levels were lower than on day 7. Under drought stress the discrepancy between trehalose and proline accumulation trends might result from the mode of action of these osmoprotectant molecules in C. ovata. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  13. New Insights on Cytological and Metabolic Features of Ostreopsis cf. ovata Fukuyo (Dinophyceae): A Multidisciplinary Approach

    PubMed Central

    Honsell, Giorgio; Bonifacio, Alois; De Bortoli, Marco; Penna, Antonella; Battocchi, Cecilia; Ciminiello, Patrizia; Dell’Aversano, Carmela; Fattorusso, Ernesto; Sosa, Silvio; Yasumoto, Takeshi; Tubaro, Aurelia

    2013-01-01

    The harmful dinoflagellate Ostreopsis cf. ovata has been causing toxic events along the Mediterranean coasts and other temperate and tropical areas, with increasing frequency during the last decade. Despite many studies, important biological features of this species are still poorly known. An integrated study, using different microscopy and molecular techniques, Raman microspectroscopy and high resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HR LC-MS), was undertaken to elucidate cytological aspects, and identify main metabolites including toxins. The species was genetically identified as O. cf. ovata, Atlantic-Mediterranean clade. The ultrastructural results show unique features of the mucilage network abundantly produced by this species to colonize benthic substrates, with a new role of trichocysts, never described before. The amorphous polysaccharidic component of mucilage appears to derive from pusule fibrous material and mucocysts. In all stages of growth, the cells show an abundant production of lipids. Different developmental stages of chloroplasts are found in the peripheral cytoplasm and in the centre of cell. In vivo Raman microspectroscopy confirms the presence of the carotenoid peridinin in O. cf. ovata, and detects in several specimen the abundant presence of unsaturated lipids structurally related to docosahexaenoic acid. The HR LC-MS analysis reveals that ovatoxin-a is the predominant toxin, together with decreasing amounts of ovatoxin-b, -d/e, -c and putative palytoxin. Toxins concentration on a per cell basis increases from exponential to senescent phase. The results suggest that benthic blooms of this species are probably related to features such as the ability to create a unique mucilaginous sheath covering the sea bottom, associated with the production of potent toxins as palytoxin-like compounds. In this way, O. cf. ovata may be able to rapidly colonize benthic substrates outcompeting other species. PMID:23460837

  14. Inhibitory Effect of a Hot-Water Extract of Leaves of Japanese Big-Leaf Magnolia (Magnolia obovata) on Rotavirus-Induced Diarrhea in Mouse Pups

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Takeshi; Tomono, Takuma; Hamauzu, Yasunori; Tanaka, Katsumi; Yasui, Hisako

    2014-01-01

    The leaf of Japanese big-leaf magnolia (Magnolia obovata Thunb.) has long been used as a natural packaging material for traditional foods in Japan. However, many of the physiological functions of the leaves against oral infection and resultant illness remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a hot-water extract of the leaves of Magnolia obovata on diarrhea induced by rotavirus (RV), a major cause of acute diarrhea. RV strain SA11 was mixed with the M. obovata leaf extract and inoculated orally to neonatal BALB/c mouse pups. Simultaneous inoculation of SA11 with the extract significantly decreased the incidence of diarrhea. In addition, the extract significantly inhibited cytopathic effects and mRNA expression of viral proteins in SA11-infected MA104 cells. Two flavonoid glycosides, quercitrin and rutin, were strongly suggested to be major anti-RV agents in the extract by serial solvent extraction and reversed-phase HPLC-ESI-MS analysis. Our results suggest that the hot-water extract of M. obovata leaves can be used as a medicine or food additive to prevent and ameliorate RV-induced diarrhea in individuals that may have difficulty in benefitting from the RV vaccines. PMID:25580150

  15. Quantitative histopathology of the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis L.) exposed to the harmful dinoflagellate Ostreopsis cf. ovata.

    PubMed

    Carella, F; Sardo, A; Mangoni, O; Di Cioccio, D; Urciuolo, G; De Vico, G; Zingone, A

    2015-05-01

    Ostreopsis cf. ovata is a benthic dinoflagellate that produces palytoxin-like compounds that adversely affect both marine vertebrates and invertebrates and are reported to be responsible for human intoxication in aerosol form. In this work, a histopathological analysis accompanied by quantitative evaluation of tissue injury in mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) exposed to O. cf. ovata cells under natural and experimental conditions, provided baseline data on the health status of the mussels in terms of defensive and regressive pathological changes. We recorded a total of 15 health parameters in the digestive system, muscle, kidney and gills in mussels exposed to O. cf. ovata both in the laboratory and at sea. Animals exposed to different concentrations of O. cf. ovata cells (300, 500 and 1000cellsml(-)(1)) for 48h showed activation of the inflammatory response, which increased with the cell concentration, mainly characterized by haemocyte aggregates actively enclosing the algae, while mussel mortality was also recorded in some cases. Moreover the use of image analysis for the evaluation of digestive tubule damage revealed a pronounced increase in the lumen in terms of its area, perimeter and circularity, with a shift in a high percentage of tubules from an adsorbing profile to an atrophic profile. Animals collected from the natural environment during a summer bloom of O. cf. ovata in the Gulf of Naples (Italy) showed comparable lesions in terms of types and severity. This is the first quantitative study assessing damage to the digestive epithelia in terms of lumen modifications in mussels exposed to O. cf. ovata. The presented methodology provides a new technique for automating the evaluation of epithelial tubule modifications. Our results highlight the importance of monitoring the presence of O. cf. ovata in this area, taking into account the effects on the residing marine species.

  16. Effects of harmful dinoflagellate Ostreopsis cf. ovata exposure on immunological, histological and oxidative responses of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Gorbi, S; Avio, G C; Benedetti, M; Totti, C; Accoroni, S; Pichierri, S; Bacchiocchi, S; Orletti, R; Graziosi, T; Regoli, F

    2013-09-01

    In the last decade massive blooms of the Ostreopsis cf. ovata have occurred in the Mediterranean basin, posing great concern to both environmental and human health. Biotoxicological and chemical studies demonstrated that O. cf. ovata produces palytoxin and ovatoxins; besides direct respiratory effects on humans due to inhalation of marine toxic aerosols, O. cf. ovata blooms can cause adverse effects on benthic invertebrates. The main aim of this study was to highlight the role of immunological, cellular and oxidative mechanisms in modulating the toxicity induced by O. cf. ovata in mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis. Organisms were exposed in laboratory condition to O. cf. ovata and analysed after 7 and 14 days of exposure. Obtained results demonstrated a clear involvement of the immune system with a significant decrement of granulocytes respect to the hyalinocytes type cells, a diminished phagocytosis activity and a reduced lysosomal membrane stability in haemocytes, after both 7 and 14 days of exposure. Histological analyses showed a decrease of the digestive gland wall thickness, dilatation of the tubules, haemocytes infiltration into the digestive gland and a decrement of neutral lipid levels in exposed mussels; similar results suggest a possible inhibition of the feeding activity, with a consequent induction of authophagic phenomena and utilization of stored reserve products such as neutral lipids. Antioxidant parameters revealed a limited role of O. cf. ovata to induce oxidative stress in mussels exposed under laboratory conditions excepting for a certain increase of catalase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidases activities, and a significantly higher capability to neutralize peroxyl radicals in mussels exposed for 14 days. Although the obtained results suggest a non-specific response of mussels to the O. cf. ovata exposure, observed effects on the general health status of exposed mussels should be adequately considered when assessing the

  17. Molecular and structural characteristics in toxic algae cultures of Ostreopsis ovata and Ostreopsis spp. evidenced by FTIR and FTNIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecozzi, Mauro; Pietroletti, Marco; Tornambè, Andrea

    2011-05-01

    In this article we investigated the compositional and structural characteristics of the principal biomolecules such as carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, nucleic acids and chlorophyll pigments present in biofilm cultures of Ostreopsis spp. and in batch cultures of Ostreopsis ovata. Our approach based on the use of infrared (FTIR) and near infrared (FTNIR) spectroscopy showed the marked differences existing between biofilm cultures and batch cultures. FTIR spectroscopy showed the higher contents of polysaccharides and chlorophyll pigments in O. ovata from batch cultures with respect to Ostreopsis spp. Second derivative FTIR spectroscopy showed different features concerning the secondary structure of proteins because in O. ovata samples the beta sheet and beta turn structures were observed whereas in Ostreopsis spp. samples the alpha helix structure was the most evident. FTNIR spectroscopy showed other structural differences observed existing between O. ovata and Ostreopsis spp. mainly related to hydrogen bond interactions determining more packed structures in the nucleus of O. ovata. In addition, the interpretation of FTIR and FTNIR spectral information was also supported by the application of two statistical methods, the independent component analysis (ICA) and the spectral cross correlation analysis (SCCA). ICA was used as spectral deconvolution technique to separate the effects of the interference bicarbonate ion from algal FTIR spectra so to verify the high similar qualitative composition of the three biofilm samples of Ostreopsis spp. At last, SCCA applied to FTIR and FTNIR spectra was useful to evidence some structural differences involving -CH and CH 2 groups of aliphatic chains in O. ovata and Ostreopsis spp. samples. Though preliminary, these results agree with some previous studies suggesting that the presence of different ecophysiological characteristics in O. ovata and Ostreopsis spp. depending on the parameters related to the condition growth.

  18. 78 FR 56170 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Magnolia, Arkansas; and Oil City, Louisiana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Magnolia, Arkansas; and Oil City, Louisiana AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule; denial of application for review. SUMMARY: In this...

  19. 75 FR 11936 - Unit Structures LLC, Magnolia, AR; Notice of Termination of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Unit Structures LLC, Magnolia, AR; Notice of Termination of Investigation Pursuant to Section 223 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended, an investigation was initiated in...

  20. Proteomic analysis of Magnolia sieboldii K. Koch seed germination.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiu-Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Lin; Mei, Mei; Liu, Guang-Lin; Ma, Bei-Bei

    2016-02-05

    Magnolia sieboldii is a deciduous tree native to China. This species has a deep dormancy characteristic. To better understand seed germination, we used protein analysis of changes in seed protein at 0, 65, 110 and 150 d of stratification. Comparative 2DE analysis of M. sieboldii seed protein profiles at 0, 65, 110 and 150 d of stratification revealed 80 differentially abundance protein species. Comparative analysis showed that ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase small subunit was degraded during germination. In particular, it was degraded almost completely at 110 d of germination. Starch granules in the microstructure decreased after 65 d of stratification. Starch granules provided a sufficient amount of substrates and ATPs for subsequent germination. Four storage protein species were identified, of which all were down accumulated. Spots 44 and 46 had different MW and pI values, spots 36 and 46 had nearly the same MW with pI shift in the 2-DE gels, suggesting that they might be present as different isoforms of the same protein family and the post translational modification. Our results suggested that degradation of starch granules and storage protein species prepared the seed embryo for growth, as well as regulated seed germination. The present proteomics analysis provides novel insights into the mobilisation of nutrient reserves during the germination of M. sieboldii seeds. To better understand seed germination, a complex developmental process, we developed a proteome analysis of M. sieboldii seed. We performed the first comprehensive proteomic and microstructure analysis during different seed stratification stages of M. sieboldii. Among the 80 protein species, 26 were identified, 7 and 14 protein species were up or down accumulated significantly. Many of the identified key proteins were involved in embryo development, starch biosynthesis and energy metabolism, Microstructure of stratification seed analysis revealed degradation of starch was used for preparing the seed

  1. Paenibacillus kyungheensis sp. nov., isolated from flowers of magnolia.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Muhammad Zubair; Siddiqi, Muhammad Hanif; Im, Wan Taek; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2015-11-01

    A Gram-staining-positive, catalase-positive, oxidase-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium designated strain DCY88T, was isolated from flowers of magnolia. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison revealed that the strain formed a distinct lineage within the genus Paenibacillus that was closely related to Paenibacillus hordei RH-N24T (97.8 %). The other most closely related species were Paenibacillus illinoisensis NRRL NRS-1356T (94.3 %), Paenibacillus hunanensis DSM 22170T (94.2 %), Paenibacillus peoriae DSM 8320T (93.9 %), Paenibacillus kribbensis Am49T (93.8 %) and the type species of the genus, Paenibacillus polymyxa ATCC 842T (93.3 %). Cells of the strain were endospore-forming and motile by peritrichous flagella. Strain DCY88T formed pink-pigmented colonies on trypticase soy agar and R2A agar medium. Growth of strain DCY88T occurs at temperatures 5-37 °C, at pH 4-9 and 0.5-5.5 % NaCl (w/v). The menaquinone was MK-7.The cell wall peptidoglycan of strain DCY88T contained meso-diaminopimelic acid. The major fatty acids were anteiso-C15 : 0 (61.0 %) and C16 : 0 (11.0 %). The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and an unidentified polar lipid. The strain DCY88T contained spermidine as the major polyamine. The DNA G+C content was 51.6 mol%. The DNA-DNA hybridization relatedness between strain DCY88T and P. hordei RH-N24T was 48 ± 2 %. The phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic results indicate that the strain DCY88T represents a novel species of the genus Paenibacillus, for which the name Paenibacillus kyungheensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DCY88T ( = JCM 19886T = KCTC 33429T).

  2. First Insights into the Genome of the Gram-Negative, Endospore-Forming Organism Sporomusa ovata Strain H1 DSM 2662

    PubMed Central

    Poehlein, Anja; Gottschalk, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The genome of Sporomusa ovata strain H1 DSM 2662, an anaerobic, Gram-negative endospore-forming bacterium, was sequenced. S. ovata uses N-methyl compounds, primary alcohols, fatty acids, and H2 and CO2 as energy and carbon sources to produce acetate. The genome harbors one chromosome, which encodes proteins typical for sporulation. PMID:24029766

  3. First Insights into the Genome of the Gram-Negative, Endospore-Forming Organism Sporomusa ovata Strain H1 DSM 2662.

    PubMed

    Poehlein, Anja; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Daniel, Rolf

    2013-09-12

    The genome of Sporomusa ovata strain H1 DSM 2662, an anaerobic, Gram-negative endospore-forming bacterium, was sequenced. S. ovata uses N-methyl compounds, primary alcohols, fatty acids, and H2 and CO2 as energy and carbon sources to produce acetate. The genome harbors one chromosome, which encodes proteins typical for sporulation.

  4. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis and some other medicinal plants commonly used in South-East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lai Wah; Cheah, Emily LC; Saw, Constance LL; Weng, Wanyu; Heng, Paul WS

    2008-01-01

    Background Eight medicinal plants were tested for their antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. Different extraction methods were also tested for their effects on the bioactivities of the medicinal plants. Methods Eight plants, namely Herba Polygonis Hydropiperis (Laliaocao), Folium Murraya Koenigii (Jialiye), Rhizoma Arachis Hypogea (Huashenggen), Herba Houttuyniae (Yuxingcao), Epipremnum pinnatum (Pashulong), Rhizoma Typhonium Flagelliforme (Laoshuyu), Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis (Houpo) and Rhizoma Imperatae (Baimaogen) were investigated for their potential antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. Results Extracts of Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis had the strongest activities against M. Smegmatis, C. albicans, B. subtilis and S. aureus. Boiled extracts of Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis, Folium Murraya Koenigii, Herba Polygonis Hydropiperis and Herba Houttuyniae demonstrated greater antioxidant activities than other tested medicinal plants. Conclusion Among the eight tested medicinal plants, Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis showed the highest antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. Different methods of extraction yield different spectra of bioactivities. PMID:19038060

  5. Antinociceptive activity of methanol extract of fruits of Capparis ovata in mice.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Rana; Bektas, Nurcan; Ozturk, Yusuf

    2010-08-19

    Capparis ovata Desf. and Capparis spinosa L. have wide natural distribution in Turkey and they are consumed in pickled form. Flower buds, root bark, and fruits of the plant are used in folk medicine due to their analgesic, wound healing, cell regeneration, tonic, and diuretic effects. In this study, we attempted to identify the possible antinociceptive action of methanol extract prepared from fruits of Capparis ovata. Using tail immersion, hot plate and writhing tests, the antinociceptive effect of the methanol extract of Capparis ovata (MEC) fruits was assessed after intraperitoneal administration into mice. Morphine sulfate (5mg/kg; i.p.) and diclofenac (10mg/kg; i.p.) were used as reference analgesic agents. Naloxone (5mg/kg; i.p.) was also tested. MEC was studied at the doses of 50, 100, and 200mg/kg (i.p.) and exhibited significant antinociceptive activities in all tests used. The above-mentioned doses of the extract reduced the writhing responses by 32.21, 55.70, and 68.36%, respectively. MPE% were increased by 7.27, 12.07, 14.60% in the tail immersion, and 7.88, 11.71, 16.73% in the hot plate test at the tested doses, respectively. Naloxone antagonized antinociceptive effect at the doses of 100 and 200mg/kg whereas partially antagonized the effect of MEC at the dose of 50mg/kg. Based on the results obtained, it can be concluded that MEC has antinociceptive effects both at the peripheral and central levels. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Complex Toxin Profile of French Mediterranean Ostreopsis cf. ovata Strains, Seafood Accumulation and Ovatoxins Prepurification

    PubMed Central

    Brissard, Charline; Herrenknecht, Christine; Séchet, Véronique; Hervé, Fabienne; Pisapia, Francesco; Harcouet, Jocelyn; Lémée, Rodolphe; Chomérat, Nicolas; Hess, Philipp; Amzil, Zouher

    2014-01-01

    Ostreopsis cf. ovata produces palytoxin analogues including ovatoxins (OVTXs) and a putative palytoxin (p-PLTX), which can accumulate in marine organisms and may possibly lead to food intoxication. However, purified ovatoxins are not widely available and their toxicities are still unknown. The aim of this study was to improve understanding of the ecophysiology of Ostreopsis cf. ovata and its toxin production as well as to optimize the purification process for ovatoxin. During Ostreopsis blooms in 2011 and 2012 in Villefranche-sur-Mer (France, NW Mediterranean Sea), microalgae epiphytic cells and marine organisms were collected and analyzed both by LC-MS/MS and hemolysis assay. Results obtained with these two methods were comparable, suggesting ovatoxins have hemolytic properties. An average of 223 μg·kg−1 of palytoxin equivalent of whole flesh was found, thus exceeding the threshold of 30 μg·kg−1 in shellfish recommended by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). Ostreopsis cells showed the same toxin profile both in situ and in laboratory culture, with ovatoxin-a (OVTX-a) being the most abundant analogue (~50%), followed by OVTX-b (~15%), p-PLTX (12%), OVTX-d (8%), OVTX-c (5%) and OVTX-e (4%). Ostreopsis cf. ovata produced up to 2 g of biomass per L of culture, with a maximum concentration of 300 pg PLTX equivalent cell−1. Thus, an approximate amount of 10 mg of PLTX-group toxins may be produced with 10 L of this strain. Toxin extracts obtained from collected biomass were purified using different techniques such as liquid-liquid partition or size exclusion. Among these methods, open-column chromatography with Sephadex LH20 phase yielded the best results with a cleanup efficiency of 93% and recovery of about 85%, representing an increase of toxin percentage by 13 fold. Hence, this purification step should be incorporated into future isolation exercises. PMID:24828292

  7. Magnolia officinalis (Hou Po) bark extract stimulates the Nrf2-pathway in hepatocytes and protects against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Rajgopal, Arun; Missler, Stephen R; Scholten, Jeffery D

    2016-12-04

    The highly aromatic bark of Magnolia officinalis Rehder and EH Wilson, (magnolia bark) has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine where it is known as Hou Po. Historically the bark of the tree has been used for treating variety of disorders the most common use of magnolia bark in traditional prescription has been to treat stress and anxiety disorders. Till date it is not clear regarding the fundamental cellular pathway it modulates. NRF2 signaling has emerged as the central pathway that protects cells from variety of stressors this led us to hypothesize that basis for magnolia bark's effects could be via activating NRF2 pathway. We utilized variety of biochemical procedures like luciferase reporter assay, enzyme induction, gene expression to determine NRF2 inducing activity by magnolia bark extract and its significance. Further we identified the phytochemicals inducing this activity using bio-directed fractionation procedure. In this study, we demonstrate that magnolia bark extract activates Nrf2-dependent gene expression and protects against hydrogen peroxide mediated oxidative stress in hepatocytes. We further identified through HPLC fractionation and mass spectroscopy that magnolol, 4-methoxy honokiol and honokiol are the active phytochemicals inducing the Nrf2-mediated activity. This could be the molecular basis for its numerous beneficial activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a corrinoid protein from Sporomusa ovata.

    PubMed

    Wagner, U G; Stupperich, E; Aulkemeyer, P; Kratky, C

    1994-02-11

    Crystals of a 40 kDa p-cresolyl-cobamide containing protein from Sporomusa ovata have been obtained from polyethyleneglycol solutions at pH 8.5 by the hanging drop technique. The crystals belong to space group C222(1) with cell dimensions a = 110.5(0.2) A, b = 144.0 (0.2) A, c = 110.4 (0.1) A. They diffract to 2.2 A resolution on a rotating anode X-ray source and are suitable for high resolution X-ray diffraction studies.

  9. Erythritol production with minimum by-product using Candida magnoliae mutant.

    PubMed

    Ghezelbash, G R; Nahvi, I; Malekpour, A

    2014-01-01

    In order to enhance erythritol production, mutants of Candida magnoliae DSM70638 were generated by ultraviolet and chemical mutagenesis. Erythritol productivity of samples was analyzed by TLC and HPLC with the refractive index detector. One of the mutants named mutant 12-2 gave a 2.4-fold increase in erythritol (20.32 g/L) and a 5.5-fold decrease in glycerol production compared to the wild strain. A sequence-based map of erythrose reductase gene in this mutant showed a replacement of the A321 by G321 that did not cause any amino acid exchange in protein structure. Therefore, the reason of higher erythritol production in C. magnoliae mutant 12-2 is probably the increase in expression of the open reading frame gene. This study revealed that a mutation or minor change in the sequence of genes involved in a production pathway can lead to a significant increase in protein translation.

  10. Simulation of the interaction of karstic lakes Magnolia and Brooklyn with the upper Floridan Aquifer, southwestern Clay County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, M.L.

    2001-01-01

    first of two calibrated models, recharge to the water table, specified as a monthly rate, was set equal to 40 percent of the monthly rainfall rate. The specified rate of inflow to the uppermost stream segment was set equal to outflows from Lake Lowry estimated from lake stage and the 1994-97 rating table. Leakage to the intermediate and Upper Floridan aquifers was assumed to occur from the surficial aquifer system through the confining layers directly beneath deeper parts of the lake bottom. A leakance coefficient value of 0.001 feet per day per foot of thickness was used beneath Lake Magnolia, and a value of 0.005 feet per day per foot of thickness was used beneath most of Lake Brooklyn. With these values, the conductance through the confining layers beneath Lake Brooklyn was about 19 times that beneath Lake Magnolia. The simulated stages of Lake Brooklyn matched the measured stages reasonably well in the early (1957-72) and later (1990-98) parts of the simulation time period, but the match was unsatisfactory in an intermediate time period (1973-89). To resolve this discrepancy, the hypothesis was proposed that undocumented losses of water from Alligator Creek upstream from Lake Brooklyn or from the lake itself occurred between 1973 and 1989 when there was sufficient streamflow. The resulting simulation of lake stages matched the measured lake stages accurately during the entire simulation time period. The model was then revised to incorporate the assumption that only 20 percent of precipitation recharged the water table (the second calibrated model). Recalibration of the model required that leakance values for the confining units under deeper parts of the lakes also be reduced by nearly 50 percent. The stages simulated with the new parameter assumptions, but retaining the assumption of surface-water losses, were an excellent match of the measured values. The stage of Lake Magnolia was also simulated accurately. The results of sensitivity analyses show that simulated s

  11. Bacterial communities associated with the ctenophores Mnemiopsis leidyi and Beroe ovata.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Camille; Breitbart, Mya

    2012-10-01

    Residing in a phylum of their own, ctenophores are gelatinous zooplankton that drift through the ocean's water column. Although ctenophores are known to be parasitized by a variety of eukaryotes, no studies have examined their bacterial associates. This study describes the bacterial communities associated with the lobate ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi and its natural predator Beroe ovata in Tampa Bay, Florida, USA. Investigations using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes demonstrated that ctenophore bacterial communities were distinct from the surrounding water. In addition, each ctenophore genus contained a unique microbiota. Ctenophore samples contained fewer bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) by T-RFLP and lower diversity communities by 16S rRNA gene sequencing than the water column. Both ctenophore genera contained sequences related to bacteria previously described in marine invertebrates, and sequences similar to a sea anemone pathogen were abundant in B. ovata. Temporal sampling revealed that the ctenophore-associated bacterial communities varied over time, with no single OTU detected at all time points. This is the first report of distinct and dynamic bacterial communities associated with ctenophores, suggesting that these microbial consortia may play important roles in ctenophore ecology. Future work needs to elucidate the functional roles and mode of acquisition of these bacteria.

  12. Comparative growth and toxin profile of cultured Ostreopsis ovata from the Tyrrhenian and Adriatic Seas.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Franca; Pezzolesi, Laura; Feller, Andrea; Riccardi, Manuela; Ciminiello, Patrizia; Dell'Aversano, Carmela; Tartaglione, Luciana; Dello Iacovo, Emma; Fattorusso, Ernesto; Forino, Martino; Pistocchi, Rossella

    2010-01-01

    Massive blooms of the benthic dinoflagellate Ostreopsis ovata Fukuyo have recently occurred along the whole Italian coastlines, both Tyrrhenian and Adriatic, resulting sometimes in benthonic biocenosis sufferings and, occasionally, in human health problems. In this work, two strains of O. ovata collected in 2006 along the Adriatic and Tyrrhenian coastlines and grown in culture were studied to characterize their growth and toxin profile. The two strains showed different cell volumes, the Adriatic strain being nearly twice bigger than the Tyrrhenian, but they had similar slow growth rates. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analyses indicated that both strains produce putative palytoxin (pPLTX) and ovatoxin-a (OVTX-a), a palytoxin-like compound presenting 2 oxygen atoms less than palytoxin. Toxin content was determined at the end of the stationary and exponential growth phases and reached the highest value in the Adriatic strain at the end of the stationary phase, with concentrations of 353.3 microg l(-1) for OVTX-a and 30.4 microg l(-1) for pPLTX. Toxin released in the growth medium was also measured and resulted to be the highest at the end of the stationary phase, suggesting that a long lasting bloom could enhance the toxin content in the water and cause toxic effects in people inhaling the aerosol.

  13. Dactylorhiza maculata, Platanthera bifolia and Listera ovata survive N application under P limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejcman, Michal; Schellberg, Jürgen; Pavlů, Vilém

    2010-11-01

    Increased nutrient availability is generally believed to be harmful for terrestrial orchids. However, no information is available on whether grassland orchids survive decades-long calcium (Ca), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) application. We took advantage of sampling in one of the oldest long-term experiments in the world, the Rengen Grassland Experiment (RGE), which was established in Germany in 1941 on low-productive Violion caninae grassland, and we monitored orchids from 2005 to 2009. Dactylorhiza maculata, Platanthera bifolia and Listera ovata survived decades-long application of Ca and CaN fertilizer, but not CaN together with P. Cover of D. maculata was highest in areas of Ca treatment. The number of flowers per plant of L. ovata was significantly higher in the CaN treatment compared with the control indicating that enhanced N availability stimulated its growth. Long-term N application (NH 4NO 3 at an annual rate of 100 kg N ha -1) was not fatal to the studied orchids if not accompanied by P application. It is more likely that enhanced N availability can cause loss of studied orchids only where the availability of P in soil is high enough to enable the growth of productive species that can better compete for light on eutrophic soils.

  14. Structure of the molybdate/tungstate binding protein mop from Sporomusa ovata.

    PubMed

    Wagner, U G; Stupperich, E; Kratky, C

    2000-11-15

    Transport of molybdenum into bacteria involves a high-affinity ABC transporter system whose expression is controlled by a repressor protein called ModE. While molybdate transport is tightly coupled to utilization in some bacteria, other organisms have molybdenum storage proteins. One class of putative molybdate storage proteins is characterized by a sequence consisting of about 70 amino acids (Mop). A tandem repeat of Mop sequences also constitutes the molybdate binding domain of ModE. We have determined the crystal structure of the 7 kDa Mop protein from the methanol-utilizing anaerobic eubacterium Sporomusa ovata grown in the presence of molybdate and tungstate. The protein occurs as highly symmetric hexamers binding eight oxyanions. Each peptide assumes a so-called OB fold, which has previously also been observed in ModE. There are two types of oxyanion binding sites in Mo at the interface between two or three peptides. All oxyanion binding sites were found to be occupied by WO(4) rather than MoO(4). The biological function of proteins containing only Mop sequences is unknown, but they have been implicated in molybdate homeostasis and molybdopterin cofactor biosynthesis. While there are few indications that the S. ovata Mop binds pterin, the structure suggests that only the type-1 oxyanion binding sites would be sufficiently accessible to bind a cofactor. The observed occupation of the oxyanion binding sites by WO(4) indicates that Mop might also be involved in controlling intracellular tungstate levels.

  15. The protective effect of Capparis ovata on 6-mercaptopurine-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Tülümen, Tuğçe; Ayata, Ali; Özen, Metehan; Sütçü, Recep; Canatan, Duran

    2015-05-01

    Capparis ovata is a member of Capparidacaeae family has been used in phytomedicine with a lot of positive effects such as an antioxidative, antihyperlipidemic, anti-inflammatory, and antihepatotoxic agent. The aim of this study was to research the protective effect of C. ovata on 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) induced to hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats. The rats were divided into 4 groups: control, 6-MP, C. ovataovate, and 6-MP + C. ovata. A complete blood count was performed, liver function test and antioxidant enzymes levels such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and malondialdehyde were measured in blood before and after a 14-day test period. White blood cell and platelet counts were lower in the 6-MP group than other 3 groups (P < 0.005). Hepatic transaminase levels were higher in 6-MP group than the 3 groups (P < 0.05). Superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and CAT levels were lower and malondialdehyde was higher in blood samples in 6-MP group than other 3 groups (P < 0.005). In conclusion, our tests were showed that C. ovata may be useful in patients receiving 6-MP therapy to prevent hepatotoxicity and in order to maintain uninterrupted therapy possibly reducing the risk of relapse. Although additional studies ensure that Capparis does not affect 6-MP antileukemic activity. We believe these results are important contribution to the literature.

  16. Ostreopsis cf. ovata bloom in the northern Adriatic Sea during summer 2009: ecology, molecular characterization and toxin profile.

    PubMed

    Accoroni, Stefano; Romagnoli, Tiziana; Colombo, Federica; Pennesi, Chiara; Di Camillo, Cristina Gioia; Marini, Mauro; Battocchi, Cecilia; Ciminiello, Patrizia; Dell'Aversano, Carmela; Dello Iacovo, Emma; Fattorusso, Ernesto; Tartaglione, Luciana; Penna, Antonella; Totti, Cecilia

    2011-11-01

    Intense blooms of the benthic dinoflagellate Ostreopsis cf. ovata have occurred in the northern Adriatic Sea since 2006. These blooms are associated with noxious effects on human health and with the mortality of benthic organisms because of the production of palytoxin-like compounds. The O. cf. ovata bloom and its relationships with nutrient concentrations at two stations on the Conero Riviera (northern Adriatic Sea) were investigated in the summer of 2009. O. cf. ovata developed from August to November, with the highest abundances in September (1.3×10(6) cells g(-1) fw corresponding to 63.8×10(3) cells cm(-2)). The presence of the single O. cf. ovata genotype was confirmed by a PCR assay. Bloom developed when the seawater temperature was decreasing. Nutrient concentrations did not seem to affect bloom dynamics. Toxin analysis performed by high resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed a high total toxin content (up to 75 pg cell(-1)), including putative palytoxin and all the ovatoxins known so far.

  17. [New settlers comb jellies Mnemiopsis leidyi (A. Agassiz) and Beroe ovata Mayer 1912 and their influence on the pelagic ecosystem of the northeastern part of the Black Sea].

    PubMed

    Shiganova, T A; Musaeva, E I; Bulgakova, Iu V; Mirzoian, Z A; MartynIuk, M L

    2003-01-01

    We analyzed the condition of pelagic ecosystem of northeastern Black Sea influenced by expansion of a new settler Beroe ovata in 1999-2001. Expansion of B. ovata considerably decreased the population of another new settler Mnemiopsis leidyi that deformed the Black Sea ecosystem for over a decade. Reduction of M. leidyi population limited its influence on the ecosystem and, consequently, we observed reestablishment of the main components of the Black Sea pelagic ecosystem--zooplankton and fish, their spawn and larvae. The relationship between annual and seasonal variability of the population and biomass of the both new settlers M. leidyi and B. ovata are discussed.

  18. Protective effect of a polyphenolic rich extract from Magnolia officinalis bark on influenza virus-induced pneumonia in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Ning; Yu, Chen-Huan; Cai, Wei; Hua, Jian; Li, Shi-Qing; Wang, Wei

    2011-03-08

    Magnolia officinalis bark is used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of cough, colds, fever, chronic bronchitis and stomach ailments. To investigate therapeutic effects of polyphenol rich extract from M. officinalis bark (MPE) in influenza virus A-infected mice, and to provide evidence for the inflammation response and immunomodulatory potential during infection. Mice were infected with influenza virus A (IVA) and MPE at doses of 10 and 20mg/kg were orally administrated daily for 5 days after challenge. The levels of serum L-6 and TNF-α were determined by ELISA while protein expressions of NF-κB and TLR3 were detected by western blotting analysis. MPE exhibited significant therapeutical effects on reducing levels of serum NO, IL-6 and TNF-α, inhibiting pneumonia, decreasing lung viral titers and sensitizing IVA-induced apoptosis through down-regulation of NF-κB and TLR3 protein expression in the lung tissue of IVA-infected mice. MPE could exhibit preventive and therapeutical effects on IVA-infected mice as a suppressor of the production of inflammatory mediators, NO and pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-6. These effects appeared to be mediated, at least in part, by an inhibition of TLR3 and NF-κB activation. Therefore, MPE could provide a safe and effective therapeutic approach for influenza and its subsequent viral pneumonia. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Investigation for anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic activities of methanol extract of Capparis ovata buds and fruits.

    PubMed

    Bektas, Nurcan; Arslan, Rana; Goger, Fatih; Kirimer, Nese; Ozturk, Yusuf

    2012-06-26

    Capparis ovata Desf. has wide natural distribution in Turkey and it is consumed in pickled form. Flower buds, root bark, and fruits of the plant are used traditionally due to their analgesic, anti-inflammatory, wound healing, anti-rheumatismal, tonic, and diuretic effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic effects of methanol extracts prepared from flower buds (CBE) and fruits (CFE) of C. ovata. Anti-inflammatory effects of CBE and CFE were assessed using carrageenan-induced and prostaglandin E₂-induced mouse paw edema models. For the anti-thrombotic effect evaluation, carrageenan-induced tail thrombosis model was performed in mice. The extracts were administered intraperitonally (i.p.) at the doses of 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg. The anti-inflammatory effect of Capparis extracts were tested in comparison to 10 mg/kg diclofenac and anti-thrombotic activity to 10 and 100 IU heparin. CBE at the doses of 200, and 300 mg/kg and CFE at the doses of 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg showed significant anti-inflammatory activity and CFE reached therapeutic concentration early than CBE in carrageenan inflammation model. In prostaglandin E₂ inflammation model, CBE and CFE exhibited significant inhibitory effects. The C. ovata extracts did not show remarkable anti-thrombotic effect. Based on the results obtained, it can be concluded that fruits of C. ovata have more potent anti-inflammatory effect than flower buds. It has been suggested that inhibition of cyclooxygenase pathway is one of the mechanisms of the activity. C. ovata may be potentially used as therapeutic agents for inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Phenotypic and biochemical alterations in relation to MT2 gene expression in Plantago ovata Forsk under zinc stress.

    PubMed

    Pramanick, Paulami; Chakraborty, Anindita; Raychaudhuri, Sarmistha Sen

    2017-04-01

    Plantago ovata Forsk is an annual herb with immense medicinal importance, the seed and husk of which is used in the treatment of chronic constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, diarrhea since ancient times. Zinc, an essential metal, is required by plants as they form important components of zinc finger proteins and also aid in synthesis of photosynthetic pigments such as chlorophyll. However, in excess amount Zn causes chlorosis of leaf and shoot tissues and generate reactive oxygen species. The present study is aimed at investigating the changes in expression levels of MT2 gene in Plantago ovata under zinc stress. Data show up to 1.66 fold increase in expression of PoMT2 in 1000 µM ZnSO4·7H2O treated sample. Our study also describes alteration of MT2 gene expressions in Plantago ovata as observed through Real time PCR (qPCR) done by [Formula: see text] method. In this study we have observed an upregulation (or induction) in the PoMT2 gene expression level in 500 and 800 µM ZnSO4·7H2O treated samples but found saturation on further increasing the dose to 1000 µM of ZnSO4·7H2O. Determination of the phenotypic and biochemical changes in Plantago ovata due to exposure to zinc stress of concentrations 500, 800 and 1000 µM revealed oxidative stress. The enhanced expression of MT2 gene in Plantago ovata has a correlation with the increased total antioxidant activity and increased DPPH radical scavenging activity.

  1. Effects of different temperatures and duration on germination of caper (Capparis ovata) seeds.

    PubMed

    Basbag, Mehmet; Toncer, Ozlem; Basbag, Sema

    2009-07-01

    Caperseed has poor germination because of the seed coat dormancy Germination of caperseeds are complex traits affected by a wide range of intemal and environmental influences. The effects of temperature preconditioning and period on germination of Capparis ovata were examined. Experiments were conducted in order to investigate germination behaviour of caperseeds subjected to different temperature and duration. The experiment revealed that the different temperature treatments were effective on mean germination percentage. The highest mean germination were obtained at 0 degree C 29.52% and 10 degrees C with 27.17% and the lowest mean germination were obtained at control seeds with 8.39%. Dry heat treatments effected germination rate, but it was not enough for removing germination obstacle of caper seed completely.

  2. Peroxynitrite-Scavenging Glycosides from the Stem Bark of Catalpa ovata.

    PubMed

    Kil, Yun-Seo; Kim, Seong Min; Kang, Unwoo; Chung, Hae Young; Seo, Eun Kyoung

    2017-08-25

    Ten new glycosides, 6,10-O-di-trans-feruloyl catalpol (1), 6,6'-O-di-trans-feruloyl catalpol (2), 3,4-dihydro-6-O-di-trans-feruloyl catalpol (10), (8R,7'S,8'R)-lariciresinol 9'-O-β-d-(6-O-trans-feruloyl)glucopyranoside (17), and ovatosides A-F (18-22, 24), were isolated from the stem bark of Catalpa ovata along with 19 known compounds. All isolates, except 6 (catalposide) and 9 (6-O-veratroyl catalpol), were found to scavenge peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) formed by 3-morpholinosydnonimine. In particular, 12 compounds showed potent activity, with IC50 values in the range 0.14-2.2 μM.

  3. Hurricane Frederic tidal floods of September 12-13, 1979 along the Gulf Coast, Magnolia Springs quadrangle, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, John C.; Bohman, Larry R.

    1980-01-01

    Shown on the Magnolia Springs topographic map are floodmark elevations and approximate areas flooded by Hurricane Frederic tides of September 12-13, 1979, along Weeks Bay and the northern shore of Bon Secour Bay, along the Fish River to Marlow and along the Magnolia River to Magnolia Springs, Alabama. Many homes and buildings that were constructed at or near the ground level were damaged by floodwater and tidal waves. Many fishing piers along the shores of Mobile Bay and Weeks Bay were damaged. Storm-tide frequency and records of annual maximum tides at Mobile, Ala., since 1772, are presented. Offshore winds reached about 160 miles per hour. A wind-velocity of about 145 miles per hour was recorded near Dauphin Island, Ala. (USGS)

  4. Comparative analysis of essential oil composition from flower and leaf of Magnolia kwangsiensis Figlar & Noot.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan-Fei; Ren, Fan; Liu, Xiong-Min; Lai, Fang; Ma, Li

    2016-07-01

    The essential oils from Magnolia kwangsiensis Figlar & Noot. were obtained using hydrodistillation, and analysed by GC and GC-MS. A total of 31, 27 and 26 constituents were identified in the oils from male flower, female flower and leaf of M. kwangsiensis, and they comprised 99.2, 98.5 and 96.2% of the oils, respectively. Monoterpene hydrocarbons predominated in the oils and accounted for 48.3% of male flower oil, 54.0% of female flower oil and 44.6% of leaf oil. The compositions of flower oils were quite similar but with different content, and were different from those of leaf oil.

  5. Potential use of Magnolia officinalis bark polyphenols in the treatment of cannabis dependence.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Maurizio; Mondola, Raffaella

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, epidemiological data confirm that cannabis-related emergencies, cannabis-use disorders and dependence are significantly increased. Cannabis is generally considered a little dangerous substances of abuse, however, chronic consumption has been associated to the development of mental disorders, cognitive deficits, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, increased risk of myocardial infarction in the hour after use, increased mortality after myocardial infarction, liver inflammation and steatosis in patients affected by hepatitis C. In this article we described the pharmacological characteristics of Magnolia officinalis bark active principles suggesting a potential application in the treatment of both cannabis dependence and cannabis-related disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterization and molecular cloning of mannose-binding lectins from the Orchidaceae species Listera ovata, Epipactis helleborine and Cymbidium hybrid.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, J M; Smeets, K; Torrekens, S; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1994-04-15

    Mannose-binding lectins were purified from the leaves of three Orchidaceae species, namely Listera ovata (twayblade), Epipactis helleborine (broad-leaved helleborine) and Cymbidium hybrid, using affinity chromatography on Mannose - Sepharose-4B. Apparently, the Orchidaceae lectins are dimeric proteins composed of lectin subunits of 12-13 kDa. All of the isolated lectins exhibit exclusive specificity towards mannose. A cDNA library constructed from poly(A) rich RNA isolated from leaves of L. ovata was screened for cDNA clones encoding the lectin using colony hybridization. Since N-terminal sequence analysis of the twayblade lectin revealed some sequence similarity to the previously cloned mannose-binding lectin Hippeastrum hybrid (amaryllis) ovaries, the amaryllis lectin cDNA clone was used as a probe to screen the L. ovata library. Subsequently, the cDNA clone encoding the L. ovata lectin was used to screen the cDNA libraries from the taxonomically related orchid species Cymbidium hybrid and E. helleborine. Sequence analysis of the lectin cDNA clones from different Orchidaceae species revealed approximately 50% sequence similarity both at the nucleotide and amino acid level. The Orchidaceae lectins are apparently translated from mRNAs consisting of approximately 800 nucleotides. The primary translation products are preproproteins which are converted into the mature lectins following post-translational modifications. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA has shown that the lectins are most probably encoded by a family of closely related genes which is in good agreement with the sequence heterogeneity found between different lectin cDNA clones of one species.

  7. Effects Of Myrcia Ovata Cambess. Essential Oil On Planktonic Growth Of Gastrointestinal Microorganisms and Biofilm Formation Of Enterococcus Faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Cândido, Cinthya S.; Portella, Cadmo Silton A.; Laranjeira, Bruno J.; da Silva, Sérgio S.; Arriaga, Angela M.C.; Santiago, Gilvandete M. P.; Gomes, Geovany A.; Almeida, Paulo César; Carvalho, Cibele B. M.

    2010-01-01

    The essential oil from the leaves of Myrcia ovata Cambess., commonly used in Brazil for the treatment of gastric illnesses, was screened for antimicrobial activity and action in the formation of microbial biofilms by Enterococcus faecalis. The oil was obtained by hydrodistillation using a clevenger-type system. Its chemical composition was analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Both MIC and MBC of the essential oil were determined by broth microdilution techniques and agar dilution method. The essential oil showed antimicrobial activity against E. faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella choleraesuis, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Candida parapsilosis. The results showed that the essential oil of M. ovata Cambess. was effective against the formation of biofilm by E. faecalis when compared with the control. Four volatile compounds, representing 92.1 % of the oil, were identified and geranial was the major component (50.4 %). At the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil from leaves of M. ovata. PMID:24031537

  8. Effects of myrcia ovata cambess. Essential oil on planktonic growth of gastrointestinal microorganisms and biofilm formation of enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Cândido, Cinthya S; Portella, Cadmo Silton A; Laranjeira, Bruno J; da Silva, Sérgio S; Arriaga, Angela M C; Santiago, Gilvandete M P; Gomes, Geovany A; Almeida, Paulo César; Carvalho, Cibele B M

    2010-07-01

    The essential oil from the leaves of Myrcia ovata Cambess., commonly used in Brazil for the treatment of gastric illnesses, was screened for antimicrobial activity and action in the formation of microbial biofilms by Enterococcus faecalis. The oil was obtained by hydrodistillation using a clevenger-type system. Its chemical composition was analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Both MIC and MBC of the essential oil were determined by broth microdilution techniques and agar dilution method. The essential oil showed antimicrobial activity against E. faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella choleraesuis, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Candida parapsilosis. The results showed that the essential oil of M. ovata Cambess. was effective against the formation of biofilm by E. faecalis when compared with the control. Four volatile compounds, representing 92.1 % of the oil, were identified and geranial was the major component (50.4 %). At the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil from leaves of M. ovata.

  9. Investigation of protein expression profiles of erythritol-producing Candida magnoliae in response to glucose perturbation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Jin; Lee, Hyeong-Rho; Kim, Chang Sup; Jin, Yong-Su; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2013-08-15

    Protein expression patterns of an erythritol-producing yeast, Candida magnoliae, were analyzed to identify differentially expressed proteins in response to glucose perturbation. Specifically, wild type C. magnoliae was grown under high and low glucose conditions and the cells were harvested at both mid-exponential and erythritol production phases for proteomic studies. In order to analyze intracellular protein abundances from the harvested cells quantitatively, total intracellular proteins were extracted and applied to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis for separation and visualization of individual proteins. Among the proteins distributed in the range of pI 4-7 and molecular weight 29-97kDa, five osmo-responsive proteins were drastically changed in response to glucose perturbation. Hsp60 (Heat-shock protein 60), transaldolase and NADH:quinone oxidoreductase were down-regulated under the high glucose condition and Bro1 (BCK1-like Resistance to Osmotic shock) and Eno1 (enolase1) were up-regulated. These proteins are directly or indirectly related with cellular stress response. Importantly, protein expression patterns of Hsp60, Bro1 and Eno1 were strongly correlated with previous studies identifying the proteins perturbed by osmotic stress for other organisms including Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Inhibition of melanogenesis and antioxidant properties of Magnolia grandiflora L. flower extract

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Magnolia grandiflora L. flower is wildly used in Asian as a traditional herbal medication. The purpose of the study was to investigate the antimelanogenic and antioxidant properties of Magnolia grandiflora L. flower extract. In the study, the inhibitory effects of M. grandiflora L. flower extract on mushroom tyrosinase, B16F10 intracellular tyrosinase activity and melanin content were determined spectrophotometrically. Meanwhile, the antioxidative capacity of the flower extract was also investigated. Results Our results revealed that M. grandiflora L. flower extract inhibit mushroom tyrosinase activity (IC50 =11.1%; v/v), the flower extract also effectively suppressed intracellular tyrosinase activity (IC50 = 13.6%; v/v) and decreased the amount of melanin (IC50 = 25.6%; v/v) in a dose-dependent manner in B16F10 cells. Protein expression level of tyrosinase and tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP-1) were also decreased by the flower extract. Additionally, antioxidant capacities such as ABTS+ free radical scavenging activity, reducing capacity and total phenolic content of the flower extract were increased in a dose-dependent pattern. Conclusions Our results concluded that M. grandiflora L. flower extract decreased the expression of tyrosinase and TRP-1, and then inhibited melanogenesis in B16F10 cells. The flower extract also show antioxidant capacities and depleted cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hence, M. grandiflora L. flower extract could be applied as a type of dermatological whitening agent in skin care products. PMID:22672352

  11. [Comparison of total phenol of magnolia solid dispersion prepared by different methods].

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Di, Liu-qing; Li, Jun-song; Kang, An; Qian, Jing; Wang, Deng-jie

    2015-11-01

    To compare the difference of total phenol of magnolia solid dispersion prepared by different methods. Hot melt extrusion, solvent evaporation method, and fusion-cooling method were used to prepare total phenol of Magnolia accessory solid dispersion, Plastone S-630 and HPC. The drug dispersion state in the prepared solid dispersion was evaluated with DSC and X-ray diffraction; FT-IR method was used to analyze the possible connections between drug and accessories. Finally, accelerated stability-in vivo dissolution test was use to compare the stability differences between these three processes. The results of DSC and X-ray diffraction showed that all of the drug in solid dispersion processed by three processes can exist in amorphous form; FT-IR results also could not distinguish the difference between the three processes; accelerated stability-in vivo dissolution test showed the stability of solid dispersion prepared by HPC was better than Plastone S-630, and the same kinds of materials solid dispersion prepared by hot melt extrusion showed a better stability than the other two processes.

  12. Role of osmotic and salt stress in the expression of erythrose reductase in Candida magnoliae.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Hee; Lee, Ha-Yeon; Ryu, Yeon-Woo; Seo, Jin-Ho; Kim, Myoung-Dong

    2011-10-01

    The osmotolerant yeast, Candida magnoliae, which was isolated from honeycomb, produces erythritol from sugars such as fructose, glucose, and sucrose. Erythrose reductase in C. magnoliae (CmER) reduces erythrose to erythritol with concomitant oxidation of NAD(P)H. Sequence analysis of the 5'-flanking region of the CmER gene indicated that one putative stress response element (STRE, 5'-AGGGG- 3'), found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, exists 72 nucleotides upstream of the translation initiation codon. An enzyme activity assay and semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that the expression of CmER is upregulated under osmotic and salt stress conditions caused by a high concentration of sugar, KCl, and NaCl. However, CmER was not affected by osmotic and oxidative stress induced by sorbitol and H(2)O(2), respectively. The basal transcript level of CmER in the presence of sucrose was higher than that in cells treated with fructose and glucose, indicating that the response of CmER to sugar stress is different from that of GRE3 in S. cerevisiae, which expresses aldose reductase in a sugar-independent manner. It was concluded that regulation of CmER differs from that of other aldose reductases in S. cerevisiae.

  13. Species diversity, structure and dynamics of two populations of an endangered species, Magnolia dealbata (Magnoliaceae).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Velásquez, Lázaro R; Pineda-López, María del Rosario

    2006-09-01

    Little is known about the ecology and demography of the genus Magnolia. Magnolia dealbata Zucc. is an endangered species endemic to Mexico. Two contrasting populations of M. dealbata (one from the grasslands and other from a secondary cloud forest) were studied. We asked the following questions: (a) Are size structure (diameter at breast height, DBH) and infrutescence production significantly different between the two populations? (b) What are the populations' growth rates (lambda) based on an initial 1987 study? (c) Are the associated species diversity indices of these M. dealbata populations significantly different? The results show no significant differences between the population size structure (p=.094); the growth rates of the populations were 0.992 in grassland and 1.053 in secondary cloud forest. The number of infrutescences produced in year 2001 and DBH relationship were significantly linear (p<.001) in both populations, and there was no significant difference (p>.01) between their slopes. The diversity indices were not significantly different (p>.05), and only 54% of the species were common to both sites. Our study suggests that both populations are relatively stable and that the management history could impact more on the species composition than on the diversity indices.

  14. 78 FR 38024 - Magnolia LNG, LLC; Liquefied Natural Gas Limited; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... scoping. The main goal of the scoping process is to focus the analysis in the EIS on the important... stakeholders. The EIS will present our independent analysis of the issues. We will publish and distribute the... by Magnolia. This preliminary list of issues may change based on your comments and our...

  15. Assessment of hormone-like activities in Ginkgo biloba, Elettaria cardamomum and Plantago ovata extracts using in vitro receptor-specific bioassays.

    PubMed

    Real, Macarena; Molina-Molina, José-Manuel; Jimenez, Jesús; Diéguez, Horacio R; Fernández, Mariana F; Olea, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants are widely used for the treatment of diseases and for the development of new drugs. This study was designed to determine the presence of hormone-like activities dependent on the activation of human estrogen receptor alpha (hERa) and/or androgen receptor (hAR) in methanol extracts prepared from three medicinal plants historically and currently used for therapeutic purposes: Ginkgo biloba leaves (GBL), Elettaria cardamomum seeds (ECS) and Plantago ovata seeds (POS). After a solid-liquid extraction (SLE) step, their effects on hERa function were assessed in MCF-7 breast cancer cells using the E-Screen bioassay, and their ability to induce hAR-mediated reporter gene expression was evaluated using the androgen-sensitive stable prostatic PALM cell line. Unlike POS extracts, GBL and ECS extracts showed estrogenic (0.07 and 0.20 nM E2Eq mg(-1), respectively) and anti-estrogenic (0.01 and 0.02 μM ICI182780Eq mg(-1), respectively) activities. ECS extracts evidenced androgenic activity (0.30 nM R1881Eq mg(-1)) and POS extracts anti-androgenic activity (22.30 μM ProcEq mg(-1)). According to these findings, these plant extracts may interfere with the endocrine system via one or more hormonal receptors, and further investigation is warranted into their role as endocrine disrupters in humans.

  16. Self-perceived mouthfeel and physico-chemical surface effects after chewing gums containing sorbitol and Magnolia bark extract.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Stefan W; van der Mei, Henny C; Slomp, Anje M; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Dodds, Michael W J; Busscher, Henk J

    2017-10-01

    The European Food Safety Authority recognizes the contribution of sugar-free chewing gum to oral health through increased salivation, clearance of food debris, and neutralization of biofilm pH. Magnolia bark extract is a gum additive shown to reduce the prevalence of bad-breath bacteria but its effects on self-perceived mouthfeel are unknown. This paper aims to relate the effects of sorbitol-containing chewing gum, with and without Magnolia bark extract, on tooth-surface hydrophobicity and salivary-film composition with self-perceived mouthfeel. In a crossover clinical trial, volunteers chewed sorbitol-containing gum, with or without Magnolia bark extract added, three times daily during a 4-wk time period. A subset of volunteers also chewed Parafilm as a mastication control. Oral moistness and tooth smoothness were assessed using questionnaires, and intra-oral water-contact angles were measured before, immediately after, and 60 min after, chewing. Simultaneously, saliva samples were collected, placed on glass slides, and the compositions of the adsorbed film were measured using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Chewing of gum, regardless of whether or not it contained Magnolia bark extract, improved self-perceived mouthfeel up to 60 min, concurrent with a more hydrophilic tooth surface and an increased amount of O1s electrons bound at 532.6 eV in salivary films. Chewing of Parafilm affected neither tooth-surface hydrophobicity nor salivary-film composition. Accordingly, adsorption of sorbitol, rather than the presence of Magnolia bark extract or increased salivation, is responsible for improved self-perceived mouthfeel. © 2017 Eur J Oral Sci.

  17. Is the toxic dinoflagellate Ostreopsis cf. ovata harmful to Mediterranean benthic invertebrates? Evidences from ecotoxicological tests with the polychaete Dinophilus gyrociliatus.

    PubMed

    Simonini, R; Orlandi, M; Abbate, M

    2011-10-01

    Toxicity tests were performed exposing the polychaete Dinophilus gyrociliatus to seawater samples containing the toxic dinoflagellate Ostreopsis cf. ovata. Experiments were carried out twice in mid summer, when O. cf. ovata bloomed, and twice in late summer, when the dinoflagellate density declined. Each time, four treatments were considered: original sample; reference sample, which always contained 200 O. cf. ovata cells ml(-1); filtered-seawater sample; artificial seawater (control). All the time, almost all worms survived in the controls and filtered-seawater treatments. In mid summer, the mortality of worms in the treatments containing O. cf. ovata was high and density-dependent. On the other hand, mortality in groups exposed to the original and reference samples collected in late summer was negligible. The high per cell toxicity of O. cf. ovata during mid summer could represent an allelopathic response. The test with D. gyrociliatus appears to be a promising tool for assessing the ecological risk of toxic dinoflagellate blooms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Alterations in transcriptome and proteome on metallothioneins following oxidative stress induced by sublethal doses of cadmium and gamma rays in Plantago ovata.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Nirmalya; Talapatra, Shonima; Moulick, Amitava; Chakraborty, Anindita; Raychaudhuri, Sarmistha Sen

    2013-07-01

    To study the oxidative stress-induced changes by sublethal doses of cadmium chloride (CdCl2) and gamma irradiation, two redox-inducing agents, on metallothionein (MT) gene and protein expression in Plantago ovata Forsk (P. ovata). Chlorophyll content was estimated to study the stress response in P. ovata seedlings following exposure to gamma irradiation and CdCl2. Lipid peroxidation and proline content, two oxidative stress markers, were also studied. The level of metallothionein gene and protein expression was further investigated using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry. Three MT genes of P. ovata namely PoMT 1, PoMT 2 and PoMT 3 were isolated, sequenced and characterized and their expressions were found to be altered in the case of both oxidative stresses in a dose-dependent and tissue-specific manner. The results were in agreement with the observations from immunocytochemistry and FACS analysis. The results suggest that both gamma irradiation and CdCl2 alter redox balance in P. ovata. The metallothionein gene may play an important role in metal tolerance and stress balance. It is conjectured that the stress-mediated imbalance is maintained by altered MT gene and protein expression.

  19. Plantago ovata in broiler chicken nutrition: Performance, carcass criteria, intestinal morphology, immunity, and intestinal bacterial population.

    PubMed

    Divani, A; Bagherzadeh-Kasmani, F; Mehri, M

    2017-06-13

    In this experiment, the effect of dietary Plantago ovata (PO) on performance, carcass criteria, intestinal morphology, immunity, and intestinal bacterial population of broiler chickens was evaluated. A total of 250 one-day-old male broiler chicks (Ross 308) were randomly assigned to five treatments containing 0, 5, 10, 15, or 20 g/kg of PO with five replicate pens and 10 birds in each replicate. Dietary PO increased body weight gain and decreased feed conversion ratio in the finisher period, improving the performance index (p < .05). Dietary treatments had no effects on carcass criteria, but breast meat percentage showed an increasing trend with incremental levels of PO in the diet (p = .069). The length of small intestine, especially jejunum section, as well as the villus height, villus width, villus area, and goblet cell numbers were significantly increased with supplemental PO (p < .05). Humoral and cellular immunity parameters, and oxidation stability of meat were improved due to use of dietary PO (p < .05). Dietary PO decreased the CFU of Escherichia coli, whereas the Lactobacilli population was increased (p = .001). Broken-line regression revealed that dietary PO at the rate of 10 g/kg may results in the best performance in broiler chickens. This study showed that PO at the level of 10 g/kg could be considered as a beneficial feed additive in broiler diet. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Acute toxicity studies of a novel excipient arabinoxylan isolated from Ispaghula (Plantago ovata) husk.

    PubMed

    Erum, Alia; Bashir, Sajid; Saghir, Shazia; Tulain, Ume Ruqia; Saleem, Uzma; Nasir, Muhammad; Kanwal, Farina; Hayat Malik, Muhammad Nasir

    2015-01-01

    The arabinoxylan from Ispaghula (Plantago ovata) husk has been proven scientifically as potential excipient. However, toxicity study of the arabinoxylan is still lacking. The present study was done to investigate the acute toxicity of arabinoxylan in two animal species. The mice were exposed to (1 g/kg, 5 g/kg, 10 g/kg) and rabbits (2.5 g/kg, 5 g/kg) of arabinoxylan orally and observed for a period of 14 days. On day 15 hematology, serum biochemistry and necropsy was performed in mice relative organ weight calculated and histological examination was carried out. Primary dermal and eye irritation tests were carried out. Cardiac effects of isolated arabinoxylan were studied on frog heart. The acute administration of the arabinoxylan did not produce mortality or significant changes in, water and food consumption however body weights of mice and rabbits decreased initially with a gradual increase till day 14. Internal organs relative weights were found to be normal. Hematological biochemical and histopathological examination did not show any significant (p < 0.05) change. Primary dermal and eye irritation was not observed in treated rabbits. No change in heart rate and vascular contraction was observed in frog heart. This study has shown that acute administration of arabinoxylan may be safe.

  1. Isolation and biological activities of phenanthroindolizidine and septicine alkaloids from the Formosan Tylophora ovata.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yue-Zhi; Huang, Chun-Wei; Yang, Cheng-Wei; Hsu, Hsing-Yu; Kang, Iou-Jiun; Chao, Yu-Sheng; Chen, Ih-Sheng; Chang, Hwan-You; Lee, Shiow-Ju

    2011-11-01

    An investigation of alkaloids present in the leaves and stems of Tylophora ovata led to the isolation of two new septicine alkaloids and one new phenanthroindolizidine alkaloid, tylophovatines A, B, C (1, 2, and 5), respectively, together with two known septicine and six known phenanthroindolizidine alkaloids. The structures of the new alkaloids 1, 2, and 5 were established by means of spectroscopic analyses. These eleven alkaloids show in vitro anti-inflammatory activities with IC₅₀ values ranging from 84 nM to 20.6 μM through their suppression of nitric oxide production in RAW264.7 cells stimulated by lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ. Moreover, these substances display growth inhibition in HONE-1, NUGC-3, HepG2, SF-268, MCF-7, and NCI-H460 cancer cell lines, with GI₅₀ values ranging from 4 nM to 24.2 μM. In addition, tylophovatine C (5) and 13a(S)-(+)-tylophorine (7) were found to exhibit potent in vivo anti-inflammation activities in a rat paw edema model. Finally, structure–activity relationships were probed by using the isolated phenanthroindolizidines and septicines. Phenanthroindolizidines are suggested to be divided into cytotoxic agents (e.g., 10 and 11) and anti-inflammation based anticancer agents (e.g., 5–9).

  2. Effects of light intensity and temperature on Cryptomonas ovata (Cryptophyceae) growth and nutrient uptake rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, James E.

    1977-01-01

    Specific growth rate of Cryptomonas ovata var. palustris Pringsheim was measured in batch culture at 14 light-temperature combinations. Both the maximum growth rate (μm) and optimum light intensity (Iopt) fit an empirical function that increases exponentially with temperature up to an optimum (Topt), then declines rapidly as temperature exceeds Topt. Incorporation of these functions into Steele's growth equation gives a good estimate of specific growth rate over a wide range of temperature and light intensity. Rates of phosphate, ammonium and nitrate uptake were measured separately at 16 combinations of irradiance and temperature and following a spike addition of all starved cells initially took up nutrient at a rapid rate. This transitory surge was followed by a period of steady, substrate-saturated uptake that persisted until external nutrient concentration fell. Substrate-saturated NO3−-uptake proceeded at very slow rates in the dark and was stimulated by both increased temperature and irradiance; NH4+-uptake apparently proceeded at a basal rate at 8 and l4 C and was also stimulated by increased temperature and irradiance. Rates of NH4−-uptake were much higher than NO3−-uptake at all light-temperature combinations. Below 20 C, PO4−3-uptake was more rapid in dark than in light, but was light enhanced at 26 C.

  3. Purification and characterization of a methanol-induced cobamide-containing protein from Sporomusa ovata.

    PubMed

    Stupperich, E; Aulkemeyer, P; Eckerskorn, C

    1992-01-01

    The major cobamide-containing protein from methanol-utilizing Sporomusa ovata was 8-fold enriched to apparent homogeneity. The protein exhibited a molecular mass of 40 kDa and of 38 kDa determined by gel filtration and by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, respectively. This finding indicates a monomeric protein structure. Monospecific polyclonal antisera raised against the protein did not cross react with another cobamide-containing protein from Sporomusa cells. Only the 40 kDa cobamide-containing protein was induced by methanol, since proteins from cells grown on 3,4-dimethoxybenzoate, betaine H2/CO2, or fructose showed faint or no cross reaction. Hence, the 40 kDa cobamide-containing protein is presumably involved in the methyl-transfer reaction of the methanol metabolism. The purified enzyme revealed 1.1 mol of p-cresolyl cobamide per mol of protein, but it lacked of iron-sulfur centers. Remarkably, the cofactor was firmly bound to its protein.

  4. Polyethylene glycol-based ultrasound-assisted extraction of magnolol and honokiol from Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis.

    PubMed

    He, Lei; Fan, Tao; Hu, Jianguo; Zhang, Lijin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a kind of green solvent named polyethylene glycol (PEG) was developed for the ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) of magnolol and honokiol from Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis. The effects of PEG molecular weight, PEG concentration, sample size, pH, ultrasonic power and extraction time on the extraction of magnolol and honokiol were investigated to optimise the extraction conditions. Under the optimal extraction conditions, the PEG-based UAE supplied higher extraction efficiencies of magnolol and honokiol than the ethanol-based UAE and traditional ethanol-reflux extraction. Furthermore, the correlation coefficient (R(2)), repeatability (relative standard deviation, n = 6) and recovery confirmed the validation of the proposed extraction method, which were 0.9993-0.9996, 3.1-4.6% and 92.3-106.8%, respectively.

  5. Insecticidal activity of raw ethanolic extracts from Magnolia dealbata Zucc on a tephritid pest.

    PubMed

    Flores-Estévez, Norma; Vasquez-Morales, Suria G; Cano-Medina, Tomás; Sánchez-Velásquez, Lázaro R; Noa-Carrazana, Juan C; Díaz-Fleischer, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Ethanolic extracts from Magnolia dealbata (Zucc.) (Magnoliaceae); leaves, bark, seeds, sarcotesta and flowers were evaluated for insecticidal activity against adults of the Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens (Loew) (Diptera: Tephritidae). Using feeding bioassays composed from sugar-extract mixtures, only the extract from sarcotesta indicated insecticidal activity against the flies. The extracts from the other four plant tissues (leaves, bark, seeds and flowers) did not manifest any biological activity. The most effective extract was obtained from oven-dried sarcotesta, whereas extracts from fresh sarcotesta were inactive. Our results suggest that M. dealbata sarcotesta contains secondary metabolites with insecticidal activity against A. ludens adults. These metabolites are as potent as natural pyrethins and represent a potential substance for controlling this type of pest.

  6. The effect of a dentifrice containing Magnolia extract on established plaque and gingivitis in man: a six-month clinical study.

    PubMed

    Hellström, M-K; Ramberg, P

    2014-05-01

    The aim was to evaluate the clinical effect of a dentifrice containing 0.3% Magnolia extract on dental plaque and gingivitis. The trial was a 6-month double-blind, stratified, randomized and 2-armed parallel group study. Forty-six subjects in the test group brushed their teeth with a dentifrice containing 0.3% Magnolia extract and 48 subjects in the control group brushed with a placebo dentifrice. Plaque and gingivitis were assessed at baseline, 3 and 6 months. There was a significantly larger gingivitis reduction in the Magnolia group than in the control group (0.26 ± 0.11 versus 0.11 ± 0.12) (P < 0.001). There was a greater increase in the total number of healthy gingival units Gingival Index (GI score 0) in the Magnolia group than in the control group (149% versus 31%) and a larger reduction in inflamed gingival units (GI score 2/3) (60% versus 30%). Furthermore, at sites with similar amounts of plaque, less clinical signs of gingival inflammation were observed in the Magnolia group than in the control group. Six months' unsupervised use of a dentifrice containing 0.3% Magnolia extract resulted in significantly greater gingivitis reduction than a corresponding control dentifrice. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Glucosinolates and fatty acid, sterol, and tocopherol composition of seed oils from Capparis spinosa Var. spinosa and Capparis ovata Desf. Var. canescens (Coss.) Heywood.

    PubMed

    Matthäus, Bertrand; Ozcan, Musa

    2005-09-07

    Seed oils of 11 samples of Capparis ovata and Capparis spinosa from different locations in Turkey were characterized with regard to the composition of fatty acids, tocopherols, and sterols as well as the content of glucosinolates. The oil content of the seeds ranged from 27.3 to 37.6 g/100 g (C. spinosa) and from 14.6 to 38.0 g/100 g (C. ovata). The dominating fatty acid of both species was linoleic acid, which accounted for 26.9-55.3% in C. ovata seed oils and for 24.6-50.5% in C. spinosa seed oils. Oleic acid and its isomer, vaccenic acid, were both found in the seed oils in concentrations between 10 and 30%, respectively. The seed oils of both species were rich in tocopherols with the following composition: gamma-tocopherol, 124.3-1944.9 mg/100 g; delta-tocopherol, 2.7-269.5 mg/100 g; and alpha-tocopherol, 0.6-13.8 mg/100 g. The concentration of total sterols ranged from 4875.5 to 12189.1 mg/kg (C. ovata) and from 4961.8 to 10009.1 mg/kg (C. spinosa), respectively. In addition to sitosterol, which amounted to approximately 60% of the total amount of sterols, campesterol and stigmasterol accounted for 16 and 10% of the total sterols, respectively. The seed oils showed remarkably high contents of Delta5-avenasterol (between 138.8 and 599.4 mg/kg). The total content of glucosinolates of C. ovata and C. spinosa samples was determined as 34.5-84.6 micromol/g for C. ovata and 42.6-88.9 micromol/g for C. spinosa, respectively, on a dry weight basis, with >95% as glucocapperin.

  8. Dissecting the Genetic Basis for Seed Coat Mucilage Heteroxylan Biosynthesis in Plantago ovata Using Gamma Irradiation and Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Matthew R.; Ma, Chao; Phan, Jana; Neumann, Kylie; Shirley, Neil J.; Hahn, Michael G.; Cozzolino, Daniel; Burton, Rachel A.

    2017-01-01

    Seeds from the myxospermous species Plantago ovata release a polysaccharide-rich mucilage upon contact with water. This seed coat derived mucilage is composed predominantly of heteroxylan (HX) and is utilized as a gluten-free dietary fiber supplement to promote human colorectal health. In this study, a gamma-irradiated P. ovata population was generated and screened using histological stains and Fourier Transform Mid Infrared (FTMIR) spectroscopy to identify putative mutants showing defects in seed coat mucilage HX composition and/or structure. FTMIR analysis of dry seed revealed variation in regions of the IR spectra previously linked to xylan structure in Secale cereale (rye). Subsequent absorbance ratio and PCA multivariate analysis identified 22 putative mutant families with differences in the HX IR fingerprint region. Many of these showed distinct changes in the amount and subtle changes in structure of HX after mucilage extrusion, while 20% of the putative HX mutants identified by FTMIR showed no difference in staining patterns of extruded mucilage compared to wild-type. Transcriptional screening analysis of two putative reduced xylan in mucilage (rxm) mutants, rxm1 and rxm3, revealed that changes in HX levels in rxm1 correlate with reduced transcription of known and novel genes associated with xylan synthesis, possibly indicative of specific co-regulatory units within the xylan biosynthetic pathway. These results confirm that FTMIR is a suitable method for identifying putative mutants with altered mucilage HX composition in P. ovata, and therefore forms a resource to identify novel genes involved in xylan biosynthesis. PMID:28377777

  9. Effects of the bloom of harmful benthic dinoflagellate Ostreopsis cf. ovata on the microphytobenthos community in the northern Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Accoroni, Stefano; Romagnoli, Tiziana; Pichierri, Salvatore; Totti, Cecilia

    2016-05-01

    Composition and temporal variation of the microphytobenthos communities of the Conero Riviera (northern Adriatic Sea) were investigated in the course of an annual cycle, focusing on their relationships with blooms of the benthic dinoflagellate Ostreopsis cf. ovata. Sampling was carried out from March 2009 to March 2010 on undisturbed benthic substrata (macroalgae and pebbles). Samples for the study of microphytobenthos were collected with a monthly frequency, while those for the study of Ostreopsis bloom weekly. Benthic diatoms dominated the microphytobenthos communities for most of the annual cycle (except the summer), both in terms of abundance and biomass. In summer, cyanobacteria were dominant (54.04±9.18 and 24.29±11.11% of total abundance and biomass, respectively), while benthic dinoflagellates were an important component of the community in terms of biomass only at the peak of the Ostreopsis bloom in late summer (up to 91% of the total biomass). Among diatoms, the most abundant forms throughout the year were motile species (77.5±3.71% of the population), while erect diatoms formed the majority of the biomass in winter and spring (48.66±16.66 and 48.05±5.56% of total population, respectively). Diatoms were mainly affected by DIN availability, while the patterns of biomass of O. cf. ovata and cyanobacteria were related to salinity and temperature. The biomass of Ostreopsis was also affected by the availability of phosphorus. The results of this study suggest that the proliferation of Ostreopsis affected the structure of the benthic diatom community: motile diatoms were significantly more abundant during the Ostreopsis bloom peak than during the rest of summer, probably because they benefited from the abundant mucilaginous mat covering the benthic substrata. In the course of the O. cf. ovata bloom the diversity of the microphytobenthos was significantly lower than during the rest of the year, suggesting an influence of both the shading produced by the

  10. [DNA-containing polygonal structures detected in somatic nuclei of Bursaria ovata during preparation to cryptobiosis].

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, G I; Samoshkin, A A

    2002-01-01

    Supramolecular chromatin organization of the somatic nucleus (macronucleus--Ma) was studied in a free-living unicellular eukaryotic organism, the ciliate Bursaria ovata Beers 1952, at two late successive stages of its encystment (in the state of preparation to cryptobiosis). A modified Miller's method (Sergejeva et al., 1987) and the same technique in combination with high resolution DNA autoradiography were used. In chromatin spread preparations of Ma, not labeled by 3H-thymidine, numerous electron dense structures (rounded, stick-like and polygonal) were revealed, along with rarely occurring typical supramolecular chromatin structures, such as nucleosomic and not nucleosomic threads, nucleomeres, chromomeres, rosette-like looping chromatin, and electron dense chromonemes (Fig. 1). For DNA visualizing in the revealed polygonal structures, the vegetative cells (trophonts) of B. ovata were inoculated into the culture medium, containing 3H-thymidine and food (ciliates Paramecium caudatum). Here, the ciliates passed through 3-4 successive cell division cycles, thus progressively accumulating the radioactive DNA precursor in Ma. After washing the ciliates in 3H-thymidine-free culture medium, the process of their encystment was induced, and Ma were isolated by hand from the ciliates being at two late successive stages of encystment. Isolated Ma were dispersed in the low ionic solutions, as described elsewhere (Sergejeva et al., 1987). The carbon shadowed electron grids, that contained spread Ma preparations, were individually coated with photographic emulsion, according to the loop interference method (Angelier et al., 1976a; Bouteille, 1976). After a 6 month exposure at 4 degrees C, thymidine incorporation was revealed in fibril crowds, rosette-like structures (Fig. 2), and crystal-like plates of different size and morphology (Fig. 3). In all our experiments, non-specific localization of radioactive DNA precursor was not observed. The above data confirm undoubtedly our

  11. Physicochemical characterization and evaluation of suspending properties of arabinoxylan from Ispaghula (Plantago ovata) husk.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Sajid; Erum, Alia; Saghir, Shazia; Tulain, Umme Ruqia; Rashid, Ayesha

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of arabinoxylan as potential suspending agent, an effective alternative to commercially used excipients for the preparation of pharmaceutical suspensions. Alkali extraction was done to separate arabinoxylan from ispaghula (Plantago ovata) seed husk by alkali extraction its physicochemical characterization was done and the suspending properties of arabinoxylan isolated were evaluated comparatively with those of bentonite at different concentration ranges of 0.125,0.25,0.5 and 1% in Zinc oxide suspension. The parameters employed for evaluation were sedimentation volume, degree of flocculation, flow rate, density, pH, redispersibility, microbiological evaluation and particle size analysis. Physicochemical characterization of arabinoxylan indicates its suitability as excipient as it has fair flow properties, low moisture content and almost neutral pH. Arabinoxylan at low conc. 0.125% showed sedimentation volume comparable to commercially used suspending agents such as bentonite 1% while suspensions containing higher concentrations such as 0.25% (sedimentation volume 92%), 0.5% (sedimentation volume 94%) and 1% conc. (sedimentation volume 98%) of arabinoxylan remained almost completely suspended during study period of 7 days. Formulations containing 0.125% and 0.25% arabinoxylan as suspending agents are easily redispersible as compared to bentonite containing formulation while formulation containing 0.5% arabinoxylan are moderately redispersible while formulation containing 1% suspending agent gel upon storage and was not redispersible. Furthermore arabinoxylan produces stable, highly flocculated suspension, which fulfilled microbiological, and particle size specifications, however the formulations containing higher arabinoxylan 1% concentration gel upon storage. So it is concluded that arabinoxylan could be used as effective suspending agent at low concentrations in Zinc oxide suspension.

  12. Cytokine changes in gastric and colonic epithelial cell in response to Planta ovata extract.

    PubMed

    Yakoob, Javed; Jafri, Wasim; Mehmood, Malik Hassan; Abbas, Zaigham; Tariq, Kanwal

    2017-03-22

    Background Psyllium (Planta ovata, Ispaghul) seed and husk are used for treatment of altered bowel habit, i. e. constipation and diarrhea. We studied the effect of Ispaghul extract on secretion of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) by AGS (ATCC CRL 1739) and SW480 (ATCC CCL-227) epithelial cell lines and determined whether Ispaghul extract has an effect on IL-1β secretion by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-stimulated AGS cell and Escherichia coli K-12 (E. coli K-12)-stimulated SW480 cells in vitro. Methods The AGS cells and SW480 cells were pretreated with Ispaghul extract in concentrations, i. e. 3.5 and 7 μg/mL prior to infection with H. pylori and E. coli K-12. Results DNA fragmentation in AGS and SW480 cells treated with Ispaghul extract was not significant (2.3±0.8 %) compared with untreated cells (2.2±0.6 %). Ispaghul extract decreased the H. pylori-stimulated secretion of IL-1β by AGS cell (p<0.0001). This effect did not increase as the concentration of extract was increased. Ispaghul extract also decreased E. coli K-12-stimulated IL-1β secretion by SW480 cell (p<0.0001). This effect increased as the concentration of extracts was increased. Conclusions Ispaghul extract had an effect on stimulated secretion of IL-1β by the AGS and SW480 cell. It decreased pro-inflammatory reaction from both cell lines stimulated by bacteria.

  13. Antimicrobial activity of the crude extract, fractions and compounds from stem bark of Ficus ovata (Moraceae).

    PubMed

    Kuete, Victor; Nana, Frédéric; Ngameni, Bathélémy; Mbaveng, Armelle Tsafack; Keumedjio, Félix; Ngadjui, Bonaventure Tchaleu

    2009-07-30

    This study was designed to investigate the antimicrobial activities of the methanol extracts from the stem bark of Ficus ovata (FOB), fractions (FOB1-6) and compounds isolated following bio-guided fractionation [3-friedelanone (1), taraxeryl acetate (2), betulinic acid (3), oleanoïc acid (4), 2-hydroxyisoprunetin (5), 6,7-(2-isopropenyl furo)-5,2,4-trihydroxyisoflavone (6), Cajanin (7) and protocatechuic acid (8)]. The micro-dilution method was used for the determination of the minimal inhibition concentration (MIC) and the minimal microbicidal concentration (MMC) against fungi (two species), gram-positive (three species) and gram-negative bacteria (five species). The results of the MIC determinations indicated that the crude extract (FOB), fractions FOB2 and FOB4 as well as compound 5 were active on the entire studied organisms. Other samples showed selective activity, fractions FOB1, FOB3 and FOB5 being active against 50% of the tested microbial species while FOB6 was active on 40%. Compounds 8, 6, 2 and 7 prevented the growth of 80%, 70%, 50% and 20% of the organisms respectively. The lowest MIC value (156 g/ml) observed with the crude extract was recorded on Streptococcus faecalis, Candida albicans and Microsporum audouinii. The corresponding value for fractions (39 microg/ml) was noted with FOB4 against Staphylococcus aureus, while that of the tested compounds (10 microg/ml) was observed with compound 8 on Microsporum audouinii. The results of the MMC determination suggested that the cidal effect of most of the tested samples on the studied microorganisms could be expected. The overall results provided evidence that the studied plant extract, as well as some of the isolated compounds might be potential sources of new antimicrobial drug.

  14. Biological activity and toxicity of the Chinese herb Magnolia officinalis Rehder & E. Wilson (Houpo) and its constituents

    PubMed Central

    Poivre, Mélanie; Duez, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Traditional Chinese herbal drugs have been used for thousands of years in Chinese pharmacopoeia. The bark of Magnolia officinalis Rehder & E. Wilson, known under the pinyin name “Houpo”, has been traditionally used in Chinese and Japanese medicines for the treatment of anxiety, asthma, depression, gastrointestinal disorders, headache, and more. Moreover, Magnolia bark extract is a major constituent of currently marketed dietary supplements and cosmetic products. Much pharmacological activity has been reported for this herb and its major compounds, notably antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibiotic and antispasmodic effects. However, the mechanisms underlying this have not been elucidated and only a very few clinical trials have been published. In vitro and in vivo toxicity studies have also been published and indicate some intriguing features. The present review aims to summarize the literature on M. officinalis bark composition, utilisation, pharmacology, and safety. PMID:28271656

  15. Effect of Magnolia officinalis and Phellodendron amurense (Relora®) on cortisol and psychological mood state in moderately stressed subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Magnolia (Magnolia officinalis) and Phellodendron (Phellodendron amurense) barks are medicinal plants commonly used as traditional remedies for reducing stress and anxiety. Modern dietary supplements are intended to induce relaxation and reduce stress as well as stress-related eating. Previous studies have shown the combination of Magnolia/Phellodendron (MP) to reduce both cortisol exposure and the perception of stress/anxiety, while improving weight loss in subjects with stress-related eating. Competitive athletes are “stressed” by their intense exercise regimens in addition to their normal activities of daily living and thus may benefit from a natural therapy intended to modulate baseline perceptions of stress and stress hormone exposure. Methods We assessed salivary cortisol exposure and psychological mood state in 56 subjects (35 men and 21 women) screened for moderate stress and supplemented with a standardized/patented MP combination (Relora®, Next Pharmaceuticals) or Placebo for 4 weeks. Results After 4 weeks of supplementation, salivary cortisol exposure was significantly (p<0.05) lower (−18%) in the Relora group compared to Placebo. Compared to Placebo, the Relora group had significantly better (p<0.05) mood state parameters, including lower indices of Overall Stress (−11%), Tension (−13%), Depression (−20%), Anger (−42%), Fatigue (−31%), and Confusion (−27%), and higher indices of Global Mood State (+11%) and Vigor (+18%). Conclusion These results indicate that daily supplementation with a combination of Magnolia bark extract and Phellodendron bark extract (Relora®) reduces cortisol exposure and perceived daily stress, while improving a variety of mood state parameters, including lower fatigue and higher vigor. These results suggest an effective natural approach to modulating the detrimental health effects of chronic stress in moderately stressed adults. Future studies should examine the possible performance and recovery

  16. Influence of Plantago ovata husk (dietary fiber) on the bioavailability and other pharmacokinetic parameters of metformin in diabetic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Díez, Raquel; García, Juan José; Diez, María José; Sierra, Matilde; Sahagun, Ana M; Fernández, Nélida

    2017-06-07

    Metformin is an oral hypoglycemic agent frequently used in patients with type 2 diabetes. In this study, we have investigated the influence of the dietary fiber Plantago ovata husk on the pharmacokinetics of this drug when included in the diet, as well as when administered at the same time as metformin. Six groups of 6 rabbits were used. Groups 1 to 3 were fed with standard chow and groups 4 to 6 with chow supplemented with fiber (3.5 mg/kg/day). Groups 1 and 4 received metformin intravenously (30 mg/kg). Groups 2 and 5 received metfomin orally (30 mg/kg), and number 3 and 6 were treated orally with metformin (30 mg/kg) and fiber (300 mg/kg). The changes caused by the inclusion of fiber in the feeding were more important in groups that received oral metformin. In this way, metformin oral bioavailability showed an increase of 34.42% when rabbits were fed with supplemented chow. Plantago ovata husk increased the amount of absorbed metformin when included in the diet (significant increase in AUC), and delayed its absorption when administered at the same time (significant increase in tmax).

  17. Adaptation of the autotrophic acetogen Sporomusa ovata to methanol accelerates the conversion of CO2 to organic products.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Höglund, Daniel; Koza, Anna; Bonde, Ida; Zhang, Tian

    2015-11-04

    Acetogens are efficient microbial catalysts for bioprocesses converting C1 compounds into organic products. Here, an adaptive laboratory evolution approach was implemented to adapt Sporomusa ovata for faster autotrophic metabolism and CO2 conversion to organic chemicals. S. ovata was first adapted to grow quicker autotrophically with methanol, a toxic C1 compound, as the sole substrate. Better growth on different concentrations of methanol and with H2-CO2 indicated the adapted strain had a more efficient autotrophic metabolism and a higher tolerance to solvent. The growth rate on methanol was increased 5-fold. Furthermore, acetate production rate from CO2 with an electrode serving as the electron donor was increased 6.5-fold confirming that the acceleration of the autotrophic metabolism of the adapted strain is independent of the electron donor provided. Whole-genome sequencing, transcriptomic, and biochemical studies revealed that the molecular mechanisms responsible for the novel characteristics of the adapted strain were associated with the methanol oxidation pathway and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway of acetogens along with biosynthetic pathways, cell wall components, and protein chaperones. The results demonstrate that an efficient strategy to increase rates of CO2 conversion in bioprocesses like microbial electrosynthesis is to evolve the microbial catalyst by adaptive laboratory evolution to optimize its autotrophic metabolism.

  18. Adaptation of the autotrophic acetogen Sporomusa ovata to methanol accelerates the conversion of CO2 to organic products

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Höglund, Daniel; Koza, Anna; Bonde, Ida; Zhang, Tian

    2015-01-01

    Acetogens are efficient microbial catalysts for bioprocesses converting C1 compounds into organic products. Here, an adaptive laboratory evolution approach was implemented to adapt Sporomusa ovata for faster autotrophic metabolism and CO2 conversion to organic chemicals. S. ovata was first adapted to grow quicker autotrophically with methanol, a toxic C1 compound, as the sole substrate. Better growth on different concentrations of methanol and with H2-CO2 indicated the adapted strain had a more efficient autotrophic metabolism and a higher tolerance to solvent. The growth rate on methanol was increased 5-fold. Furthermore, acetate production rate from CO2 with an electrode serving as the electron donor was increased 6.5-fold confirming that the acceleration of the autotrophic metabolism of the adapted strain is independent of the electron donor provided. Whole-genome sequencing, transcriptomic, and biochemical studies revealed that the molecular mechanisms responsible for the novel characteristics of the adapted strain were associated with the methanol oxidation pathway and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway of acetogens along with biosynthetic pathways, cell wall components, and protein chaperones. The results demonstrate that an efficient strategy to increase rates of CO2 conversion in bioprocesses like microbial electrosynthesis is to evolve the microbial catalyst by adaptive laboratory evolution to optimize its autotrophic metabolism. PMID:26530351

  19. Growth and competitive abilities of the federally endangered Lindera melissifolia and the potentially invasive Brunnichia ovata in varying densities, hydrologic regimes, and light availabilities

    Treesearch

    Tracy S. Hawkins; Nathan Schiff; A. Dan Wilson; Theodor D. Leininger; Margaret S. Devall

    2016-01-01

    Brunnichia ovata (Walter) Shinners is a native, perennial, woody vine with the potential to become an aggressive competitor of the federally endangered shrub Lindera melissifolia (Walt.) Blume. Our study simulated habitat disturbances to hydrologic regime and light availability that may occur naturally, or through active...

  20. Cross-adaptation to cadmium stress in Plantago ovata by pre-exposure to low dose of gamma rays: Effects on metallothionein and metal content.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Nirmalya; Talapatra, Shonima; Talukder, Pratik; Sengupta, Mandar; Ray, Suman Kumar; Chakraborty, Anindita; Raychaudhuri, Sarmistha Sen

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the effects of gamma pre-exposure on cadmium accumulation in Plantago ovata seedlings. Metallothionein (MT) localization was also studied following Cadmium (Cd) treatment in P. ovata. DNA damage was determined by alkaline comet assay. MT gene and protein expression were studied by real-time polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometry, respectively, in root and shoot tissues. Metal accumulation (Cd, zinc [Zn], iron [Fe]) was evaluated by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. Cd treatment decreased seed germination rate, biomass and free radical scavenging activity and increased DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. When P. ovata seeds were pre- exposed to 5 Gy gamma dose (prior to Cd treatment) seed germination rate, biomass and free radical scavenging activity increased significantly. MT genes (PoMT1, PoMT2 and PoMT3) and MT protein expression enhanced when 5 Gy gamma-irradiated seeds were grown in Cd containing medium and Cd accumulation also increased in a dose-dependent manner. Higher Cd accumulation in P. ovata seedlings may be attributed to the upregulation of PoMT genes in gamma pretreated seedlings. Localization of metallothionein in cytosol and nucleus indicated its positive role against Cd-mediated cytotoxic and genotoxic effects.

  1. Plantago ovata husks-supplemented diet ameliorates metabolic alterations in obese Zucker rats through activation of AMP-activated protein kinase. Comparative study with other dietary fibers.

    PubMed

    Galisteo, Milagros; Morón, Rocío; Rivera, Leonor; Romero, Rosario; Anguera, Anna; Zarzuelo, Antonio

    2010-04-01

    Our aim was to compare the effects of intake of diets supplemented with different dietary fibers, namely cellulose, methylcellulose or Plantago ovata husks, (insoluble, soluble non-fermentable, and soluble fermentable fiber, respectively), on the abnormalities clustered in the metabolic syndrome. Adult obese Zucker rats were distributed in four groups which were fed respectively a standard, a cellulose-supplemented, a methylcellulose-supplemented or a P. ovata husks-supplemented diet, for ten weeks. Increased body weight, hyperlipidemia, hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia, increased TNF-alpha and reduced adiponectin secretion by adipose tissue found in obese Zucker rats were significantly improved in obese rats fed the P. ovata husks-supplemented diet, together with a lower hepatic lipid content which parallels activation of the signaling pathway of AMP-protein kinase in the liver. The methylcellulose-supplemented diet reduced body weight, hyperlipidemia, circulating free fatty acids concentration and ameliorated adipose tissue secretion of adiponectin and TNF-alpha. Feeding with the cellulose-supplemented diet only reduced free fatty acids circulating levels. The soluble dietary fibers essayed are more beneficial than insoluble fiber in the treatment of metabolic syndrome, being the soluble and fermentable the more efficient to improve metabolic alterations. Fermentation products of P. ovata husks must play an important role in such effects. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  2. Cytotoxicity of the bisphenolic honokiol from Magnolia officinalis against multiple drug-resistant tumor cells as determined by pharmacogenomics and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Mohamed; Kuete, Victor; Kadioglu, Onat; Börtzler, Jonas; Khalid, Hassan; Greten, Henry Johannes; Efferth, Thomas

    2014-10-15

    A main problem in oncology is the development of drug-resistance. Some plant-derived lignans are established in cancer therapy, e.g. the semisynthetic epipodophyllotoxins etoposide and teniposide. Their activity is, unfortunately, hampered by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein. Here, we investigated the bisphenolic honokiol derived from Magnolia officinalis. P-glycoprotein-overexpressing CEM/ADR5000 cells were not cross-resistant to honokiol, but MDA-MB-231 BRCP cells transfected with another ABC-transporter, BCRP, revealed 3-fold resistance. Further drug resistance mechanisms analyzed study was the tumor suppressor TP53 and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). HCT116 p53(-/-) did not reveal resistance to honokiol, and EGFR-transfected U87.MG EGFR cells were collateral sensitive compared to wild-type cells (degree of resistance: 0.34). To gain insight into possible modes of collateral sensitivity, we performed in silico molecular docking studies of honokiol to EGFR and EGFR-related downstream signal proteins. Honokiol bound with comparable binding energies to EGFR (-7.30 ± 0.01 kcal/mol) as the control drugs erlotinib (-7.50 ± 0.30 kcal/mol) and gefitinib (-8.30 ± 0.10 kcal/mol). Similar binding affinities of AKT, MEK1, MEK2, STAT3 and mTOR were calculated for honokiol (range from -9.0 ± 0.01 to 7.40 ± 0.01 kcal/mol) compared to corresponding control inhibitor compounds for these signal transducers. This indicates that collateral sensitivity of EGFR-transfectant cells towards honokiol may be due to binding to EGFR and downstream signal transducers. COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses of microarray-based transcriptomic mRNA expression data of 59 tumor cell lines revealed a specific gene expression profile predicting sensitivity or resistance towards honokiol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Honokiol, a Lignan Biphenol Derived from the Magnolia Tree, Inhibits Dengue Virus Type 2 Infection.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chih-Yeu; Chen, Siang-Jyun; Wu, Huey-Nan; Ping, Yueh-Hsin; Lin, Ching-Yen; Shiuan, David; Chen, Chi-Long; Lee, Ying-Ray; Huang, Kao-Jean

    2015-09-10

    Dengue is the most widespread arbovirus infection and poses a serious health and economic issue in tropical and subtropical countries. Currently no licensed vaccine or compounds can be used to prevent or manage the severity of dengue virus (DENV) infection. Honokiol, a lignan biphenol derived from the Magnolia tree, is commonly used in Eastern medicine. Here we report that honokiol has profound antiviral activity against serotype 2 DENV (DENV-2). In addition to inhibiting the intracellular DENV-2 replicon, honokiol was shown to suppress the replication of DENV-2 in baby hamster kidney (BHK) and human hepatocarcinoma Huh7 cells. At the maximum non-toxic dose of honokiol treatment, the production of infectious DENV particles was reduced >90% in BHK and Huh7 cells. The underlying mechanisms revealed that the expression of DENV-2 nonstructural protein NS1/NS3 and its replicating intermediate, double-strand RNA, was dramatically reduced by honokiol treatment. Honokiol has no effect on the expression of DENV putative receptors, but may interfere with the endocytosis of DENV-2 by abrogating the co-localization of DENV envelope glycoprotein and the early endosomes. These results indicate that honokiol inhibits the replication, viral gene expression, and endocytotic process of DENV-2, making it a promising agent for chemotherapy of DENV infection.

  4. Thermogenesis, flowering and the association with variation in floral odour attractants in Magnolia sprengeri (Magnoliaceae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruohan; Xu, Sai; Liu, Xiangyu; Zhang, Yiyuan; Wang, Jianzhong; Zhang, Zhixiang

    2014-01-01

    Magnolia sprengeri Pamp. is an ornamentally and ecologically important tree that blooms at cold temperatures in early spring. In this study, thermogenesis and variation in the chemical compounds of floral odours and insect visitation in relation to flowering cycles were studied to increase our understanding of the role of floral thermogenesis in the pollination biology of M. sprengeri. There were five distinct floral stages across the floral cycle of this species: pre-pistillate, pistillate, pre-staminate, staminate and post-staminate. Floral thermogenesis during anthesis and consisted of two distinct peaks: one at the pistillate stage and the other at the staminate stage. Insects of five families visited M. sprengeri during the floral cycle, and sap beetles (Epuraea sp., Nitidulidae) were determined to be the most effective pollinators, whereas bees (Apis cerana, Apidae) were considered to be occasional pollinators. A strong fragrance was released during thermogenesis, consisting of 18 chemical compounds. Although the relative proportions of these compounds varied at different floral stages across anthesis, linalool, 1-iodo-2-methylundecane and 2,2,6-trimethyl-6-vinyltetrahydro-2H-pyran-3-ol were dominant. Importantly, we found that the floral blends released during the pistillate and staminate stages were very similar, and coincided with flower visitation by sap beetles and the two thermogenic episodes. Based on these results, we propose that odour acts as a signal for a reward (pollen) and that an odour mimicry of staminate-stage flowers occurs during the pistillate stage.

  5. Furfural and glucose can enhance conversion of xylose to xylitol by Candida magnoliae TISTR 5663.

    PubMed

    Wannawilai, Siwaporn; Lee, Wen-Chien; Chisti, Yusuf; Sirisansaneeyakul, Sarote

    2017-01-10

    Xylitol production from xylose by the yeast Candida magnoliae TISTR 5663 was enhanced by supplementing the fermentation medium with furfural (300mg/L) and glucose (3g/L with an initial mass ratio of glucose to xylose of 1:10) together under oxygen limiting conditions. In the presence of furfural and glucose, the final concentration of xylitol was unaffected relative to control cultures but the xylitol yield on xylose increased by about 5%. Supplementation of the culture medium with glucose alone at an initial concentration of 3g/L, stimulated the volumetric and specific rates of xylose consumption and the rate of xylitol production from xylose. In a culture medium containing 30g/L xylose, 300mg/L furfural and 3g/L glucose, the volumetric production rate of xylitol was 1.04g/L h and the specific production rate was 0.169g/g h. In the absence of furfural and glucose, the volumetric production rate of xylitol was ∼35% lower and the specific production rate was nearly 30% lower. In view of these results, xylose-containing lignocellulosic hydrolysates contaminated with furfural can be effectively used for producing xylitol by fermentation so long as the glucose-to-xylose mass ratio in the hydrolysate does not exceed 1:10 and the furfural concentration is ≤300mg/L.

  6. Honokiol, an Active Compound of Magnolia Plant, Inhibits Growth, and Progression of Cancers of Different Organs.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Ram; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2016-01-01

    Honokiol (C18H18O2) is a biphenolic natural product isolated from the bark and leaves of Magnolia plant spp. During the last decade or more, honokiol has been extensively studied for its beneficial effect against several diseases. Investigations have demonstrated that honokiol possesses anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, anti-angiogenic as well as inhibitory effect on malignant transformation of papillomas to carcinomas in vitro and in vivo animal models without any appreciable toxicity. Honokiol affects multiple signaling pathways, molecular and cellular targets including nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), STAT3, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), cell survival signaling, cell cycle, cyclooxygenase and other inflammatory mediators, etc. Its chemopreventive and/or therapeutic effects have been tested against chronic diseases, such as cancers of different organs. In this chapter, we describe and discuss briefly the effect of honokiol against cancers of different organs, such as melanoma, non-melanoma, lung, prostate, breast, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, urinary bladder cancer, gastric cancer, and neuroblastoma, etc. and describe its mechanism of action including various molecular and cellular targets. Although more rigorous in vivo studies are still needed, however it is expected that therapeutic effects and activities of honokiol may help in the development and designing of clinical trials against chronic diseases in human subjects.

  7. Production of honokiol and magnolol in suspension cultures of Magnolia dealbata Zucc.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Fabiola; Chivez, Marco; Garduñ-Ramírez, Maria Luisa; Chávez-Avila, Víctor M; Mata, Martin; Cruz-Sosa, Francisco

    2009-07-01

    Honokiol and magnolol, important anxiolytic and anti-cancer agents, have been produced in cell-suspension cultures of the endangered Mexican plant Magnolia dealbata Zucc. In vitro cultures of the plant were established, and the accumulation of honokiol and magnolol in callus and cell-suspension cultures was measured. Leaf samples were the best explants for callus establishment and metabolite production, and Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 1 mg/L 2, 4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 1 mg/L kinetin yielded 2.3 mg/g of honokiol and 5.9 mg/g of magnolol. Bacterial and fungal contamination was inhibited with a multiple-step tissue sterilization procedure. Oxidation was inhibited with 1 g/L activated charcoal. Cell-suspension batch cultures derived from friable callus obtained from leaves of this species were grown for 30 days in shaker flasks containing Murashige and Skoog medium. Throughout the growth cycle, honokiol and magnolol levels, fresh and dry weight, and sucrose uptake were determined. The effects of carbon source concentration on biomass accumulation and the synthesis of bioactive compounds were studied. By using 3 mL of inocula supplemented with 3% (w/v) sucrose, maximum yields of honokiol (8.1 mg/g) and magnolol (13.4 mg/g) were obtained after 25 days. These yields were 300% and 382%, respectively, of the yields of honokiol and magnolol obtained from field-grown plants.

  8. Two-stage fermentation process for enhanced mannitol production using Candida magnoliae mutant R9.

    PubMed

    Savergave, Laxman S; Gadre, Ramchandra V; Vaidya, Bhalchandra K; Jogdand, Vitthal V

    2013-02-01

    Mutants of Candida magnoliae NCIM 3470 were generated by treatment of ultra-violet radiations, ethyl methyl sulphonate and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Mutants with higher reductase activity were screened by means of 2,3,5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride agar plate assay. Among the screened mutants, the mutant R9 produced maximum mannitol (i.e. 46 g l(-1)) in liquid fermentation medium containing 250 g l(-1) glucose and hence was selected for further experiments. Preliminary optimization studies were carried out on shake-flask level which increased the mannitol production to 60 g l(-1) in liquid fermentation medium containing 300 g l(-1) glucose. A two-stage fermentation process comprising of growth phase and production phase was employed. During the growth phase, glucose was supplemented and aerobic conditions were maintained. Thereafter, the production phase was initiated by supplementing fructose and switching to anaerobic conditions by discontinuing aeration and decreasing the speed of agitation. The strategy of two-stage fermentation significantly enhanced the production of mannitol up to 240 g l(-1), which is the highest among all fermentative production processes and corresponds to 81 % yield and 4 g l(-1 )h(-1) productivity without formation of any by-product.

  9. Honokiol, a Lignan Biphenol Derived from the Magnolia Tree, Inhibits Dengue Virus Type 2 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chih-Yeu; Chen, Siang-Jyun; Wu, Huey-Nan; Ping, Yueh-Hsin; Lin, Ching-Yen; Shiuan, David; Chen, Chi-Long; Lee, Ying-Ray; Huang, Kao-Jean

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is the most widespread arbovirus infection and poses a serious health and economic issue in tropical and subtropical countries. Currently no licensed vaccine or compounds can be used to prevent or manage the severity of dengue virus (DENV) infection. Honokiol, a lignan biphenol derived from the Magnolia tree, is commonly used in Eastern medicine. Here we report that honokiol has profound antiviral activity against serotype 2 DENV (DENV-2). In addition to inhibiting the intracellular DENV-2 replicon, honokiol was shown to suppress the replication of DENV-2 in baby hamster kidney (BHK) and human hepatocarcinoma Huh7 cells. At the maximum non-toxic dose of honokiol treatment, the production of infectious DENV particles was reduced >90% in BHK and Huh7 cells. The underlying mechanisms revealed that the expression of DENV-2 nonstructural protein NS1/NS3 and its replicating intermediate, double-strand RNA, was dramatically reduced by honokiol treatment. Honokiol has no effect on the expression of DENV putative receptors, but may interfere with the endocytosis of DENV-2 by abrogating the co-localization of DENV envelope glycoprotein and the early endosomes. These results indicate that honokiol inhibits the replication, viral gene expression, and endocytotic process of DENV-2, making it a promising agent for chemotherapy of DENV infection. PMID:26378567

  10. Molecular characterization and expression analyses of an anthocyanin synthase gene from Magnolia sprengeri Pamp.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shou-Guo; Li, Shan-Ju; Kang, Yong-Xiang; Liu, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Anthocyanin synthase (ANS), which catalyzes the conversion of colorless leucoanthocyanins into colored anthocyanins, is a key enzyme in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway. It plays important roles in plant development and defense. An ANS gene designated as MsANS was cloned from Magnolia sprengeri using rapid amplification of complementary DNA (cDNA) ends technology. The full-length MsANS is 1171-bp long and contains a 1080-bp open reading frame encoding a 360 amino acid polypeptide. In a sequence alignment analysis, the deduced MsANS protein showed high identity to ANS proteins from other plants: Prunus salicina var. cordata (74 % identity), Ampelopsis grossedentata (74 % identity), Pyrus communis (73 % identity), and Prunus avium (73 % identity). A structural analysis showed that MsANS belongs to 2-oxoglutarate (2OG)- and ferrous iron-dependent oxygenase family because it contains three binding sites for 2OG. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that the transcript level of MsANS was 26-fold higher in red petals than in white petals. The accumulation of anthocyanins in petals of white, pink, and red M. sprengeri flowers was analyzed by HPLC. The main anthocyanin was cyanidin-3-o-glucoside chloride, and the red petals contained the highest concentration of this pigment.

  11. Phenylethanoid glycosides and phenolic glycosides from stem bark of Magnolia officinalis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhenzhen; Yan, Renyi; Yang, Bin

    2016-07-01

    An investigation of the hydrophilic constituents of the stem bark of Magnolia officinalis was performed and which led to isolation and identification of twenty-one previously unreported glycosides. These included eleven phenylethanoid glycosides, magnolosides F-P, and ten phenolic glycosides, magnolosides Q-Z, along with eight known compounds. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analyses and chemical hydrolysis methods, as well as by comparison with literature data. Most of the phenylethanoid glycosides contained an allopyranose moiety, which is rare in the plant kingdom. Magnolosides I and K as well as 2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) ethanol 1-O-[4-O-caffeoyl-2-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-6-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl]-β-d-glucopyranoside showed more potent α-glucosidase inhibitory effects (IC50 values of 0.13, 0.27, and 0.29mM, respectively) than the positive control, acarbose (IC50 value of 1.09mM) in vitro. Magnolosides H, E and D also showed moderate cytotoxicity against MGC-803 and HepG2 cells with IC50 values of 13.59-17.16μM and 29.53-32.46μM, respectively.

  12. Thermogenesis, Flowering and the Association with Variation in Floral Odour Attractants in Magnolia sprengeri (Magnoliaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruohan; Xu, Sai; Liu, Xiangyu; Zhang, Yiyuan; Wang, Jianzhong; Zhang, Zhixiang

    2014-01-01

    Magnolia sprengeri Pamp. is an ornamentally and ecologically important tree that blooms at cold temperatures in early spring. In this study, thermogenesis and variation in the chemical compounds of floral odours and insect visitation in relation to flowering cycles were studied to increase our understanding of the role of floral thermogenesis in the pollination biology of M. sprengeri. There were five distinct floral stages across the floral cycle of this species: pre-pistillate, pistillate, pre-staminate, staminate and post-staminate. Floral thermogenesis during anthesis and consisted of two distinct peaks: one at the pistillate stage and the other at the staminate stage. Insects of five families visited M. sprengeri during the floral cycle, and sap beetles (Epuraea sp., Nitidulidae) were determined to be the most effective pollinators, whereas bees (Apis cerana, Apidae) were considered to be occasional pollinators. A strong fragrance was released during thermogenesis, consisting of 18 chemical compounds. Although the relative proportions of these compounds varied at different floral stages across anthesis, linalool, 1-iodo-2-methylundecane and 2,2,6-trimethyl-6-vinyltetrahydro-2H-pyran-3-ol were dominant. Importantly, we found that the floral blends released during the pistillate and staminate stages were very similar, and coincided with flower visitation by sap beetles and the two thermogenic episodes. Based on these results, we propose that odour acts as a signal for a reward (pollen) and that an odour mimicry of staminate-stage flowers occurs during the pistillate stage. PMID:24922537

  13. Preparation of nanoparticles of Magnolia bark extract by rapid expansion from supercritical solution into aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    He, Shuai; Zhou, Benjie; Zhang, Shouyao; Lei, Zhengjie; Zhang, Zhongyi

    2011-01-01

    A rapid expansion from supercritical solution into aqueous solution (RESSAS) technology was presented for the micronization of Chinese medicinal material. Magnolia bark extract (MBE) obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO₂) extraction technology was chosen as the experimental material. RESSAS process produced 303.0 nm nanoparticles (size distribution, 243.6-320.5 nm), which was significantly smaller than the 55.3 µm particles (size distribution, 8.3-102.4 µm) prepared by conventional mechanical milling. The effect of process parameters, including extraction temperature (30 °C, 40 °C, 50 °C), extraction pressure (200, 250, 300 bar) and nozzle size (50, 100, 200 µm), on the size distribution of nanoparticles was investigated. The characteristics of nanoparticles and materials were also studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laser light scattering (LLS). This study demonstrates that RESSAS is applicable for preparing nanoparticles of MBE at low operating temperature; the process is simple without any residual solvent.

  14. Antioxidant activity and high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of phenolic compounds during in vitro callus culture of Plantago ovata Forsk. and effect of exogenous additives on accumulation of phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Talukder, Pratik; Talapatra, Shonima; Ghoshal, Nirmalya; Sen Raychaudhuri, Sarmistha

    2016-01-15

    Plantago ovata, commonly called psyllium, is known to be a rich source of polyphenolic compounds. The present study was aimed at determining polyphenol content and studying their antioxidant activities in P. ovata during in vitro callus culture. An attempt was also made to enhance polyphenol content using external additives. The role of PAL gene in polyphenol accumulation was also studied. The study indicated the presence of significant amounts of polyphenols, including flavonoids, in P. ovata callus. A gradual increase in polyphenol and flavonoid content was observed up to the third passage (63 days) of callus culture, which declined at the next passage. The third-passage callus showed highest antioxidant activity. High-performance liquid chromatographic results indicated the presence of high amounts of gallic acid and rutin in P. ovata calli; however, other polyphenols were also present but to a lesser extent. Additive supplementation was effective in enhancing polyphenol production and in increasing antioxidant activity in P. ovata callus. The present research reported accumulation of polyphenols in callus culture of P. ovata, which could be applied to isolation of polyphenols for various beneficial purposes. It also indicated enhancement in the production of several polyphenols and also an increase in antioxidant activity in the additive-treated callus. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Magnolia officinalis L. Fortified Gum Improves Resistance of Oral Epithelial Cells Against Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jessica; Imboeck, Julia Maria; Walker, Joel Michael; Maitra, Amarnath; Haririan, Hady; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui; Dodds, Michael; Inui, Taichi; Somoza, Veronika

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the periodontal tissues are known health problems worldwide. Therefore, anti-inflammatory active compounds are used in oral care products to reduce long-term inflammation. In addition to inducing inflammation, pathogen attack leads to an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may lead to oxidative damage of macromolecules. Magnolia officinalis L. bark extract (MBE) has been shown to possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential in vitro. In the present study, the influence of MBE-fortified chewing gum on the resistance against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation and oxidative stress of oral epithelial cells was investigated in a four-armed parallel designed human intervention trial with 40 healthy volunteers. Ex vivo stimulation of oral epithelial cells with LPS from Porphyromonas gingivalis for 6[Formula: see text]h increased the mRNA expression and release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1[Formula: see text], IL-[Formula: see text], IL-8, MIP-1[Formula: see text], and TNF[Formula: see text]. Chewing MBE-fortified gum for 10[Formula: see text]min reduced the ex vivo LPS-induced increase of IL-8 release by 43.8 [Formula: see text] 17.1% at the beginning of the intervention. In addition, after the two-week intervention with MBE-fortified chewing gum, LPS-stimulated TNF[Formula: see text] release was attenuated by 73.4 [Formula: see text] 12.0% compared to chewing regular control gum. This increased resistance against LPS-induced inflammation suggests that MBE possesses anti-inflammatory activity in vivo when added to chewing gum. In contrast, the conditions used to stimulate an immune response of oral epithelial cells failed to induce oxidative stress, measured by catalase activity, or oxidative DNA damage.

  16. Alternative splicing of the AGAMOUS orthologous gene in double flower of Magnolia stellata (Magnoliaceae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Liu, Zhi-Xiong; Ma, Jiang; Song, Yi; Chen, Fa-Ju

    2015-12-01

    Magnolia stellata is a woody ornamental shrub with more petaloid tepals than related plants from family Magnoliaceae. Recent studies revealed that expression changes in an AGAMOUS (AG) orthologous gene could resulted in double flowers with increased numbers of petals. We isolated three transcripts encoding different isoforms of a single AG orthologous gene, MastAG, mastag_2 and mastag_3, from M. stellata. Sequence alignments and Southern blot analyses suggested that MastAG was a single-copy gene in M. stellata genomes, and that mastag_2 and mastag_3 were abnormally spliced isoforms of MastAG. An 144bp exon skipping in MastAG results in the truncated mastag_2 protein lacking the completely I domain and 18 aa of the K1 subdomain, whereas an 165bp exon skipping of MastAG produces a truncated mastag_3 protein lacking 6 aa of the K3 subdomain and the completely C terminal region. Expression analyses showed that three alternative splicing (AS) isoforms expressed only in developing stamens and carpels. Functional analyses revealed that MastAG could mimic the endogenous AG to specify carpel identity, but failed to regulate stamen development in an Arabidopsis ag-1 mutant. Moreover, the key domain or subdomain deletions represented by mastag_2 and mastag_3 resulted in loss of C-function. However, ectopic expression of mastag_2 in Arabidopsis produced flowers with sepals converted into carpeloid organs, but without petals and stamens, whereas ectopic expression of mastag_3 in Arabidopsis could mimic the flower phenotype of the ag mutant and produced double flowers with homeotic transformation of stamens into petals and carpels into another ag flower. Our results also suggest that mastag_3 holds some potential for biotechnical engineering to create multi-petal phenotypes in commercial ornamental cultivars.

  17. Interpopulation variation in mating system and late-stage inbreeding depression in Magnolia stellata.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Ichiro; Ishida, Kiyoshi; Setsuko, Suzuki; Tomaru, Nobuhiro

    2009-06-01

    Inbreeding has the potential to cause evolutionary changes in populations, although these changes are likely to drive populations to extinction through inbreeding depression and reductions in genetic diversity. We investigated the mating system and late-stage inbreeding depression (delta) in 10 populations of Magnolia stellata using nine microsatellite markers and evaluated the effects of population size and the degree of population isolation through inbreeding and inbreeding depression on the persistence of populations. The outcrossing rates were very similar (approximately 0.7) among populations, but the correlations of paternity, fractions of biparental inbreeding and inbreeding coefficients at the seed stage (F(S)) varied among populations, suggesting that the level of outcrossing was similar among populations, while the quality of it was not. A significant negative correlation was detected between F(S) and population size. The average value of delta was 0.709, and the values in six of the 10 populations were significant. The values of delta differed among populations, although clear relationships with population size and the degree of population isolation were not detected. However, in one population, which was very small and located in the edge of the species' range, we obtained a very low value of delta (-0.096), which may be indicative of purging or the fixation of deleterious alleles. Existing M. stellata populations that are small (and thus might be expected to have higher frequencies of inbreeding) and have large values of delta may be in danger of declining, even if the populations are located within the central region of the species' range.

  18. Nine phenylethanoid glycosides from Magnolia officinalis var. biloba fruits and their protective effects against free radical-induced oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Lanlan; Zhang, Wenhui; Zhou, Gao; Ma, Bingxin; Mo, Qigui; Chen, Yuxin; Wang, Youwei

    2017-01-01

    To systematically study the chemical constituents in Magnolia officinalis var. biloba fruits, nine phenylethanoid glycosides were isolated by solvent extraction, silica gel, and preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Their structures were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR analyses, including COSY, HMQC and HMBC correlations, and HPLC analysis of sugar residue. Nine phenylethanoid glycosides, namely, magnoloside Ia (1), magnoloside Ic (2), crassifolioside (3), magnoloside Ib (4), magnoloside IIIa (5), magnoloside IVa (6), magnoloside IIa (7), magnoloside IIb (8) and magnoloside Va (9), were first isolated from the n-butanol fraction of Magnolia officinalis var. biloba fruits alcohol extract. Free radical scavenging activities of the nine phenylethanoid glycosides were assessed using the DPPH, ABTS, and superoxide anion radical scavenging assays. Simultaneously, protective effects of all compounds against free radical-induced oxidative damage were evaluated by two different kinds of mitochondrial damage model. The protective effects were assessed by mitochondrial swelling, the formations of malondialdehyde (MDA) and lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH), the activities of catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). All phenylethanoid glycosides showed significant protective effects. PMID:28349971

  19. Toxicity and Growth Assessments of Three Thermophilic Benthic Dinoflagellates (Ostreopsis cf. ovata, Prorocentrum lima and Coolia monotis) Developing in the Southern Mediterranean Basin

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Gharbia, Hela; Yahia, Ons Kéfi-Daly; Amzil, Zouher; Chomérat, Nicolas; Abadie, Eric; Masseret, Estelle; Sibat, Manoella; Zmerli Triki, Habiba; Nouri, Habiba; Laabir, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Harmful benthic dinoflagellates, usually developing in tropical areas, are expanding to temperate ecosystems facing water warming. Reports on harmful benthic species are particularly scarce in the Southern Mediterranean Sea. For the first time, three thermophilic benthic dinoflagellates (Ostreopsis cf. ovata, Prorocentrum lima and Coolia monotis) were isolated from Bizerte Bay (Tunisia, Mediterranean) and monoclonal cultures established. The ribotyping confirmed the morphological identification of the three species. Maximum growth rates were 0.59 ± 0.08 d−1 for O. cf. ovata, 0.35 ± 0.01 d−1 for C. monotis and 0.33 ± 0.04 d−1 for P. lima. Toxin analyses revealed the presence of ovatoxin-a and ovatoxin-b in O. cf. ovata cells. Okadaic acid and dinophysistoxin-1 were detected in P. lima cultures. For C. monotis, a chromatographic peak at 5.6 min with a mass m/z = 1061.768 was observed, but did not correspond to a mono-sulfated analogue of the yessotoxin. A comparison of the toxicity and growth characteristics of these dinoflagellates, distributed worldwide, is proposed. PMID:27754462

  20. Analysis of trace elements during different developmental stages of somatic embryogenesis in Plantago ovata Forssk using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Saha, Priyanka; Raychaudhuri, Sarmistha Sen; Sudarshan, Mathummal; Chakraborty, Anindita

    2010-06-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) technique has been used for the determination of trace element profile during different developmental stages of somatic embryogenic callus of an economically important medicinal plant, Plantago ovata Forssk. Somatic embryogenesis is a plant tissue culture-based technique, which is used for plant regeneration and crop improvement. In the present investigation, elemental content was analysed using ED-XRF technique during different developmental stages and also determine the effect of additives--casein hydrolysate and coconut water on the trace elemental profile of embryogenic callus tissue of P. ovata. Subsequent experiments showed significant alteration in the concentration of K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu, Br, and Sr in both the embryogenic and non-embryogenic callus. Higher K, Ca, Fe, Cu, and Zn accumulation was in embryogenic tissue stage compared to other stages, suggesting these elements are crucial for successful embryogenesis. The results suggest that this information could be useful for formulating a media for in vitro embryo induction of P. ovata.

  1. Effect of a sugar-free chewing gum containing magnolia bark extract on different variables related to caries and gingivitis: a randomized controlled intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Campus, G; Cagetti, M G; Cocco, F; Sale, S; Sacco, G; Strohmenger, L; Lingström, P

    2011-01-01

    The effect of magnolia bark extract (MBE) on different variables related to caries and gingivitis administered daily through a sugar-free chewing gum was evaluated. The study was performed with healthy adult volunteers at high risk for caries as a randomized double-blind interventional study. 120 subjects with a salivary mutans streptococci (MS) concentration ≥10(5) CFU/ml and presence of bleeding on probing >25% were enrolled and divided into three groups: magnolia, xylitol and control. The study design included examinations at baseline, after 7 days, after 30 days of gum use and 7 days after the end of gum use. Plaque pH was assessed using the strip method following a sucrose challenge. Area under the curve (AUC(5.7) and AUC(6.2)) was recorded. Whole saliva was collected and the number of salivary MS (CFU/ml) was counted. Bleeding on probing was recorded as a proxy of dental plaque. Data were analyzed using ANOVA repeated measures. Magnolia gum significantly reduced plaque acidogenicity, MS salivary concentration and gingival bleeding compared to xylitol and control gums. Subjects from the magnolia and xylitol groups showed both MS concentration (p = 0.01 and 0.06, respectively) and AUC(5.7) (p = 0.01 and 0.04, respectively) to be significantly lower compared to baseline. Thirty-day use of a chewing gum containing MBE showed beneficial effects on oral health, including reduction of salivary MS, plaque acidogenicity and bleeding on probing.

  2. Mineral composition of different parts of Capparis ovata Desf. var. canescens (Coss.) Heywood growing wild in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Musa

    2005-01-01

    Major and minor mineral contents of young shoots, flower buds, caperberries (fruit), and seeds of Capparis ovata Desf. var. canescens (Coss.) Heywood, used as a pickling product in Turkey, were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Twenty-one minerals were assayed in samples. All materials contained high amounts of Ca, K, Mg, Na, P, Pb, and Zn. The highest levels of Ca (598.34-16,947.1 ppm), K (3,093.1-28,163.9 ppm), Na (57.9-444.3 ppm), P (1,690.5-4,153.9 ppm), and Zn (21.1-35.6 ppm) were found in flower buds. The content of K was high in most cases and ranged from 28,163.9 ppm (flower bud) to 3,093.1 ppm (caper seed). Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Li, Ni, Pb, and Se contents of caper plant organs were found to be very low. Consequently, caper parts were rich in minerals, and they may be valuable for food uses. The results may also be useful for the evaluation of nutritional information.

  3. Discovery, Prevalence, and Persistence of Novel Circular Single-Stranded DNA Viruses in the Ctenophores Mnemiopsis leidyi and Beroe ovata.

    PubMed

    Breitbart, Mya; Benner, Bayleigh E; Jernigan, Parker E; Rosario, Karyna; Birsa, Laura M; Harbeitner, Rachel C; Fulford, Sidney; Graham, Carina; Walters, Anna; Goldsmith, Dawn B; Berger, Stella A; Nejstgaard, Jens C

    2015-01-01

    Gelatinous zooplankton, such as ctenophores and jellyfish, are important components of marine and brackish ecosystems and play critical roles in aquatic biogeochemistry. As voracious predators of plankton, ctenophores have key positions in aquatic food webs and are often successful invaders when introduced to new areas. Gelatinous zooplankton have strong impacts on ecosystem services, particularly in coastal environments. However, little is known about the factors responsible for regulating population dynamics of gelatinous organisms, including biological interactions that may contribute to bloom demise. Ctenophores are known to contain specific bacterial communities and a variety of invertebrate parasites and symbionts; however, no previous studies have examined the presence of viruses in these organisms. Building upon recent studies demonstrating a diversity of single-stranded DNA viruses that encode a replication initiator protein (Rep) in aquatic invertebrates, this study explored the presence of circular, Rep-encoding single-stranded DNA (CRESS-DNA) viruses in the ctenophores Mnemiopsis leidyi and Beroe ovata collected from the Skidaway River Estuary and Savannah River in Georgia, USA. Using rolling circle amplification followed by restriction enzyme digestion, this study provides the first evidence of viruses in ctenophores. Investigation of four CRESS-DNA viruses over an 8-month period using PCR demonstrated temporal trends in viral prevalence and indicated that some of the viruses may persist in ctenophore populations throughout the year. Although future work needs to examine the ecological roles of these ctenophore-associated viruses, this study indicates that viral infection may play a role in population dynamics of gelatinous zooplankton.

  4. Ovatoxin-a and Palytoxin Accumulation in Seafood in Relation to Ostreopsis cf. ovata Blooms on the French Mediterranean Coast

    PubMed Central

    Amzil, Zouher; Sibat, Manoella; Chomerat, Nicolas; Grossel, Hubert; Marco-Miralles, Francoise; Lemee, Rodolphe; Nezan, Elisabeth; Sechet, Veronique

    2012-01-01

    Dinoflagellates of the genus Ostreopsis are known to cause (often fatal) food poisoning in tropical coastal areas following the accumulation of palytoxin (PLTX) and/or its analogues (PLTX group) in crabs, sea urchins or fish. Ostreopsis spp. occurrence is presently increasing in the northern to north western Mediterranean Sea (Italy, Spain, Greece and France), probably in response to climate change. In France, Ostreopsis. cf. ovata has been associated with toxic events during summer 2006, at Morgiret, off the coast of Marseille, and a specific monitoring has been designed and implemented since 2007. Results from 2008 and 2009 showed that there is a real danger of human poisoning, as these demonstrated bioaccumulation of the PLTX group (PLTX and ovatoxin-a) in both filter-feeding bivalve molluscs (mussels) and herbivorous echinoderms (sea urchins). The total content accumulated in urchins reached 450 µg PLTX eq/kg total flesh (summer 2008). In mussels, the maximum was 230 µg eq PLTX/kg (summer 2009) compared with a maximum of 360 µg found in sea urchins during the same period at the same site. This publication brings together scientific knowledge obtained about the summer development of Ostreopsis spp. in France during 2007, 2008 and 2009. PMID:22412814

  5. Effects of constituents from the bark of Magnolia obovata on nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, H; Kageura, T; Oda, M; Morikawa, T; Sakamoto, Y; Yoshikawa, M

    2001-06-01

    The methanolic extract from a Japanese herbal medicine, the bark of Magnolia obovata, was found to inhibit nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages. By bioassay-guided separation, three neolignans (magnolol, honokiol, obovatol) and three sesquiterpenes (alpha-eudesmol, beta-eudesmol, gamma-eudesmol) were obtained as active constituents. A trineolignan (magnolianin), a phenylpropanoid glycoside (syringin), lignan glycosides (liriodendrin, (+)-syringaresinol 4'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside) and a sesquiterpene (caryophyllene oxide) did not show any activity. On the other hand, sesquiterpene-neolignans (eudesmagnolol, clovanemagnolol, caryolanemagnolol, eudeshonokiol A, eudesobovatol A) showed the strong cytotoxic effects. Active constituents (magnolol, honokiol, obovatol) showed weak inhibition for inducible NO synthase (iNOS) enzyme activity, but potent inhibition of iNOS induction and activation of nuclear factor-kappaB.

  6. Denitrification by Pseudomonas stutzeri coupled with CO2 reduction by Sporomusa ovata with hydrogen as an electron donor assisted by solid-phase humin.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhixing; Awata, Takanori; Zhang, Dongdong; Katayama, Arata

    2016-09-01

    A co-culture system comprising an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa ovata DSMZ2662, and a denitrifying bacterium, Pseudomonas stutzeri JCM20778, enabled denitrification using H2 as the sole external electron donor and CO2 as the sole external carbon source. Acetate produced by S. ovata supported the heterotrophic denitrification of P. stutzeri. A nitrogen balance study showed the reduction of nitrate to nitrogen gas without the accumulation of nitrite and nitrous oxide in the co-culture system. S. ovata did not show nitrate reduction to ammonium in the co-culture system. Significant proportions of the consumed H2 were utilized for denitrification: 79.9 ± 4.6% in the co-culture system containing solid-phase humin and 62.9±11.1% in the humin-free co-culture system. The higher utilization efficiency of hydrogen in the humin-containing system was attributed to the higher denitrification activity of P. stutzeri under the acetate deficient conditions. The nitrogen removal rate of the humin-containing co-culture system reached 0.19 kg NO3(-)-N·m(-3)·d(-1). Stable denitrification activity for 61 days of successive sub-culturing suggested the robustness of this co-culture system. This study provides a novel strategy for the in situ enhancement of microbial denitrification. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Non-targeted Metabolite Profiling and Scavenging Activity Unveil the Nutraceutical Potential of Psyllium (Plantago ovata Forsk)

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manish K.; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2016-01-01

    Non-targeted metabolomics implies that psyllium (Plantago ovata) is a rich source of natural antioxidants, PUFAs (ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids) and essential and sulfur-rich amino acids, as recommended by the FAO for human health. Psyllium contains phenolics and flavonoids that possess reducing capacity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activities. In leaves, seeds, and husks, about 76, 78, 58% polyunsaturated, 21, 15, 20% saturated, and 3, 7, 22% monounsaturated fatty acids were found, respectively. A range of FAs (C12 to C24) was detected in psyllium and among different plant parts, a high content of the nutritive indicators ω-3 alpha-linolenic acid (57%) and ω-6 linoleic acid (18%) was detected in leaves. Similarly, total content of phenolics and the essential amino acid valine were also detected utmost in leaves followed by sulfur-rich amino acids and flavonoids. In total, 36 different metabolites were identified in psyllium, out of which 26 (13 each) metabolites were detected in leaves and seeds, whereas the remaining 10 were found in the husk. Most of the metabolites are natural antioxidants, phenolics, flavonoids, or alkaloids and can be used as nutrient supplements. Moreover, these metabolites have been reported to have several pharmaceutical applications, including anti-cancer activity. Natural plant ROS scavengers, saponins, were also detected. Based on metabolomic data, the probable presence of a flavonoid biosynthesis pathway was inferred, which provides useful insight for metabolic engineering in the future. Non-targeted metabolomics, antioxidants and scavenging activities reveal the nutraceutical potential of the plant and also suggest that psyllium leaves can be used as a green salad as a dietary supplement to daily food. PMID:27092153

  8. Discovery, Prevalence, and Persistence of Novel Circular Single-Stranded DNA Viruses in the Ctenophores Mnemiopsis leidyi and Beroe ovata

    PubMed Central

    Breitbart, Mya; Benner, Bayleigh E.; Jernigan, Parker E.; Rosario, Karyna; Birsa, Laura M.; Harbeitner, Rachel C.; Fulford, Sidney; Graham, Carina; Walters, Anna; Goldsmith, Dawn B.; Berger, Stella A.; Nejstgaard, Jens C.

    2015-01-01

    Gelatinous zooplankton, such as ctenophores and jellyfish, are important components of marine and brackish ecosystems and play critical roles in aquatic biogeochemistry. As voracious predators of plankton, ctenophores have key positions in aquatic food webs and are often successful invaders when introduced to new areas. Gelatinous zooplankton have strong impacts on ecosystem services, particularly in coastal environments. However, little is known about the factors responsible for regulating population dynamics of gelatinous organisms, including biological interactions that may contribute to bloom demise. Ctenophores are known to contain specific bacterial communities and a variety of invertebrate parasites and symbionts; however, no previous studies have examined the presence of viruses in these organisms. Building upon recent studies demonstrating a diversity of single-stranded DNA viruses that encode a replication initiator protein (Rep) in aquatic invertebrates, this study explored the presence of circular, Rep-encoding single-stranded DNA (CRESS-DNA) viruses in the ctenophores Mnemiopsis leidyi and Beroe ovata collected from the Skidaway River Estuary and Savannah River in Georgia, USA. Using rolling circle amplification followed by restriction enzyme digestion, this study provides the first evidence of viruses in ctenophores. Investigation of four CRESS-DNA viruses over an 8-month period using PCR demonstrated temporal trends in viral prevalence and indicated that some of the viruses may persist in ctenophore populations throughout the year. Although future work needs to examine the ecological roles of these ctenophore-associated viruses, this study indicates that viral infection may play a role in population dynamics of gelatinous zooplankton. PMID:26733971

  9. Corrinoid-Dependent Methyl Transfer Reactions Are Involved in Methanol and 3,4-Dimethoxybenzoate Metabolism by Sporomusa ovata.

    PubMed

    Stupperich, E; Konle, R

    1993-09-01

    Washed and air-oxidized proteins from Sporomusa ovata cleaved the C-O bond of methanol or methoxyaromatics and transferred the methyl to dl-tetrahydrofolate. The reactions strictly required a reductive activation by titanium citrate, catalytic amounts of ATP, and the addition of dl-tetrahydrofolate. Methylcorrinoid-containing proteins carried the methanol methyl, which was transferred to dl-tetrahydrofolate at a specific rate of 120 nmol h mg of protein. Tetrahydrofolate methylation diminished after the addition of 1-iodopropane or when the methyl donor methanol was replaced by 3,4-dimethoxybenzoate. However, whole Sporomusa cells utilize the methoxyl groups of 3,4-dimethoxybenzoate as a carbon source by a sequential O demethylation to 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoate and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate. The in vitro O demethylation of 3,4-[4-methoxyl-C]dimethoxybenzoate proceeded via two distinct corrinoid-containing proteins to form 5-[C]methyltetrahydrofolate at a specific rate of 200 nmol h mg of protein. Proteins from 3,4-dimethoxybenzoate-grown cells efficiently used methoxybenzoates with vicinal substituents only, but they were unable to activate methanol. These results emphasized that specific enzymes are involved in methanol activation as well as in the activation of various methoxybenzoates and that similar corrinoid-dependent methyl transfer pathways are employed in 5-methyl-tetrahydrofolate formation from these substrates. Methyl-tetrahydrofolate could be demethylated by a distinct methyl transferase. That enzyme activity was present in washed and air-oxidized cell extracts from methanol-grown cells and from 3,4-dimethoxybenzoate-grown cells. It used cob(I)alamin as the methyl acceptor in vitro, which was methylated at a rate of 48 nmol min mg of protein even when ATP was omitted from the assay mixture. This methyl-cob(III)alamin formation made possible a spectrophotometric quantification of the preceding methyl transfers from methanol or methoxybenzoates to dl-tetrahydrofolate.

  10. Polymorphisms in LEP and NPY genes modify the response to soluble fibre Plantago ovata husk intake on cardiovascular risk biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Crescenti, Anna; Solà, Rosa; Valls, Rosa M; Anguera, Anna; Arola, Lluís

    2013-01-01

    The satiating effect of fibre consumption has been related to gut hormones, such as peptide YY and leptin. These peptides may also influence cardiovascular (CVD) risk biomarkers. Nevertheless, there is wide interindividual variation in metabolic responses to fibre consumption. The objective was to investigate differences in the effects of soluble fibre, in the form of Plantago ovata husk (Po-husk) treatment, on CVD risk biomarkers according to selected polymorphisms in genes related to satiety. The study was a multi-centred, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel and randomised trial in mild-moderate hypercholesterolaemic patients (age range: 43-67 years). Eight polymorphisms in three genes related to satiety (LEP, NPY and PYY) were identified in 178 participants; 88 patients in the placebo (microcrystalline cellulose 14 g/day) group and 90 in the Po-husk (14 g/day) group, which had added to a low-saturated-fat diet for 8 weeks. The CVD biomarkers measured included the following: lipid profile, blood pressure (BP), glucose, insulin, hs-CRP, oxidised LDL and IL-6. Relative to the placebo, Po-husk consumption lowered the plasma total cholesterol concentration by 3.3 % according to rs7799039 polymorphism in the LEP gene (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the Po-husk reduced systolic BP (mean [95 % CI]) by -8 mmHg (-14.16; -1.90) and hs-CRP by 24.9 % in subjects with the AA genotype of the rs16147 polymorphism in the NPY gene (32 % of our total population; p < 0.05), which remained significant after Bonferroni correction. In conclusion, polymorphisms in the LEP and NPY genes potentiate the response to Po-husk, particularly the effects on systolic BP and the hs-CRP plasma concentration.

  11. The Magnolia Bioactive Constituent 4-O-Methylhonokiol Protects against High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity and Systemic Insulin Resistance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiguo; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Xin; Wang, Jian; Yan, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Yang; Conklin, Daniel J.; Kim, Ki-Soo; Kim, Ki Ho; Tan, Yi; Kim, Young Heui; Cai, Lu

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is caused by a combination of both genetic and environmental risks. Disruption in energy balance is one of these risk factors. In the present study, the preventive effect on high-fat diet- (HFD-) induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice by Magnolia bioactive constituent 4-O-methylhonokiol (MH) was compared with Magnolia officinalis extract BL153. C57BL/6J mice were fed by normal diet or by HFD with gavage-administered vehicle, BL153, low-dose MH, and high-dose MH simultaneously for 24 weeks, respectively. Either MH or BL153 slightly inhibited body-weight gain of mice by HFD feeding although the food intake had no obvious difference. Body fat mass and the epididymal white adipose tissue weight were also mildly decreased by MH or BL153. Moreover, MH significantly lowered HFD-induced plasma triglyceride, cholesterol levels and activity of alanine transaminase (ALT), liver weight and hepatic triglyceride level, and ameliorated hepatic steatosis. BL153 only significantly reduced ALT and liver triglyceride level. Concurrently, low-dose MH improved HFD-induced hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Furthermore, the infiltration of mast cells in adipose tissue was decreased in MH or in BL153 treatment. These results suggested that Magnolia bioactive constituent MH might exhibit potential benefits for HFD-induced obesity by improvement of lipid metabolism and insulin resistance. PMID:24991305

  12. Analysis of lignans in Magnoliae Flos by turbulent flow chromatography with online solid-phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Chen, Cen; Ye, Xiaolan; Song, Fenyun; Fan, Guorong; Wu, Fuhai

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a method coupling turbulent flow chromatography with online solid-phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry was developed for analyzing the lignans in Magnoliae Flos. By the online pretreatment of turbulent flow chromatography solid-phase extraction, the impurities removal and analytes concentration were automatically processed, and the lignans were separated rapidly and well. Seven lignans of Magnoliae Flos including epieudesmin, magnolin, 1-irioresinol-B-dimethyl ether, epi-magnolin, fargesin aschantin, and demethoxyaschantin were identified by comparing their retention behavior, UV spectra, and mass spectra with those of reference substances or literature data. The developed method was validated, and the good results showed that the method was not only automatic and rapid, but also accurate and reliable. The turbulent flow chromatography with online solid-phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method holds a high potential to become an effective method for the quality control of lignans in Magnoliae Flos and a useful tool for the analysis of other complex mixtures. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. The magnolia bioactive constituent 4-O-methylhonokiol protects against high-fat diet-induced obesity and systemic insulin resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiguo; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Xin; Wang, Jian; Yan, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Yang; Conklin, Daniel J; Kim, Ki-Soo; Kim, Ki Ho; Tan, Yi; Kim, Young Heui; Cai, Lu

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is caused by a combination of both genetic and environmental risks. Disruption in energy balance is one of these risk factors. In the present study, the preventive effect on high-fat diet- (HFD-) induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice by Magnolia bioactive constituent 4-O-methylhonokiol (MH) was compared with Magnolia officinalis extract BL153. C57BL/6J mice were fed by normal diet or by HFD with gavage-administered vehicle, BL153, low-dose MH, and high-dose MH simultaneously for 24 weeks, respectively. Either MH or BL153 slightly inhibited body-weight gain of mice by HFD feeding although the food intake had no obvious difference. Body fat mass and the epididymal white adipose tissue weight were also mildly decreased by MH or BL153. Moreover, MH significantly lowered HFD-induced plasma triglyceride, cholesterol levels and activity of alanine transaminase (ALT), liver weight and hepatic triglyceride level, and ameliorated hepatic steatosis. BL153 only significantly reduced ALT and liver triglyceride level. Concurrently, low-dose MH improved HFD-induced hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Furthermore, the infiltration of mast cells in adipose tissue was decreased in MH or in BL153 treatment. These results suggested that Magnolia bioactive constituent MH might exhibit potential benefits for HFD-induced obesity by improvement of lipid metabolism and insulin resistance.

  14. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis between red and white strains of Magnolia sprengeri pamp.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shou-Guo; Yang, Mei; Zhang, Min; Wang, Ping; Kang, Yong-Xiang; Liu, Jian-Jun

    2014-08-23

    Magnolia sprengeri Pamp is one of the most highly valuable medicinal and ornamental plants of the Magnolia Family. The natural color of M. sprengeri is variable. The complete genome sequence of M. sprengeri is not available; therefore we sequenced the transcriptome of white and red petals of M. sprengeri using Illumina technology. We focused on the identity of structural and regulatory genes encoding the enzymes involved in the determination of flower color. We sequenced and annotated a reference transcriptome for M. sprengeri, and aimed to capture the transcriptional determinanats of flower color. We sequenced a normalized cDNA library of white and red petals using Illumina technology. The resulting reads were assembled into 77,048 unique sequences, of which 28,243 could be annotated by Gene Ontology (GO) analysis, while 48,805 transcripts lacked GO annotation. The main enzymes involved in the flavonoid biosynthesis, such as phenylalanine ammonia-Lyase, cinnamat-4-Hydroxylase, dihydroflavonol-4-reductase, flavanone 3-hydroxylase, flavonoid-3'-hydroxylase, flavonol synthase, chalcone synthase and anthocyanidin synthase, were identified in the transcriptome. A total of 270 transcription factors were sorted into three families, including MYB, bHLH and WD40 types. Among these transcription factors, eight showed 4-fold or greater changes in transcript abundance in red petals compared with white petals. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of anthocyanin compositions showed that the main anthocyanin in the petals of M. sprengeri is cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride and its content in red petals was 26-fold higher than that in white petals. This study presents the first next-generation sequencing effort and transcriptome analysis of a non-model plant from the Family Magnoliaceae. Genes encoding key enzymes were identified and the metabolic pathways involved in biosynthesis and catabolism of M. sprengeri flavonoids were reconstructed. Identification of these

  15. Magnolol and honokiol from Magnolia officinalis enhanced antiviral immune responses against grass carp reovirus in Ctenopharyngodon idella kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaohui; Hu, Yang; Shan, Lipeng; Yu, Xiaobo; Hao, Kai; Wang, Gao-Xue

    2017-04-01

    Medicinal plants have been widely used for a long history. Exploration of pharmacologically active compounds from medicinal plants present a broad prevalent of application. By examining viral mRNA expression in GCRV-infected Ctenopharyngodon idella kidney (CIK) cells treated with thirty kinds of plant extracts, we identified Magnolia officinalis Rehd et Wils. was able to preferably suppress viral replication. Further studies demonstrated that the main ingredients of magnolia bark, namely, magnolol and honokiol presented protective pharmacological function when treated GCRV-infected CIK cells with a concentration of 2.00 μg/ml and 1.25 μg/ml, respectively. Furthermore, reverse transcript quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot showed that both magnolol and honokiol were efficient to restrain the replication of GCRV in CIK cells at non-toxic concentration (2.51 ± 0.51 μg/ml for magnolol, and 3.18 ± 0.61 μg/ml for honokiol). Moreover, it was found that magnolol and honokiol promoted the expression of immune-related genes. Magnolol obviously significantly increased the expression of interferon (IFN) regulatory factor (IRF)7 rather than that of IRF3 in the GCRV-infected cells, leading to the activation of type I IFN (IFN-I). Simultaneously, magnolol drastically facilitated the expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, but failed to induce the molecules in nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathways. Differently, honokiol strikingly motivated not only the expression of IL-1β, but also those of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and NF-κB. Interestingly, though honokiol motivated the expression of IFN-β promoter stimulator 1 (IPS-1), IRF3 and IRF7, it failed to up-regulate the expression of IFN-I, indicating that honokiol enhanced the host innate antiviral response to GCRV infection via NF-κB pathways. Collectively, the present study revealed that magnolol and honokiol facilitated the expression of innate immune-related genes to strengthen the

  16. Appetite Suppression and Antiobesity Effect of a Botanical Composition Composed of Morus alba, Yerba mate, and Magnolia officinalis

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Ping; Hong, Mei; Brownell, Lidia; Lee, Young-Chul; Hyun, Eu-Jin; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Kim, Tae-Woo; Nam, Jeong-Bum; Kim, Mi-Ran; Jia, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Obesity and its comorbidities continue to challenge the world at an alarming rate. Although the long term solution lies on lifestyle changes in the form of dieting and exercising, drug, medical food, or dietary supplement interventions are required for those who are already obese. Here we describe a standardized blend composed of extracts from three medicinal plants: Morus alba, Yerba mate, and Magnolia officinalis for appetite suppression and metabolic disorders management. Method. Extracts were standardized to yield a composition designated as UP601. Appetite suppression activity was tested in acute feed intake rat model. Efficacy was evaluated in C57BL/6J mouse models treated with oral doses of 1.3 g/kg/day for 7 weeks. Orlistat at 40 mg/kg/day was used as a positive control. Body compositions of mice were assessed using a dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). ELISA was done for insulin, leptin, and ghrelin level quantitation. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) scoring was conducted. Results. Marked acute hypophagia with 81.8, 75.3, 43.9, and 30.9% reductions in food intake at 2, 4, 6, and 24 hours were observed for UP601. Decreases in body weight gain (21.5% compared to the HFD at weeks 7 and 8.2% compared to baseline) and calorie intake (40.5% for the first week) were observed. 75.9% and 46.8% reductions in insulin and leptin, respectively, 4.2-fold increase in ghrelin level, and reductions of 18.6% in cholesterol and 59% in low-density lipoprotein were documented. A percentage body fat of 18.9%, 47.8%, 46.1%, and 30.4% was found for mice treated with normal control, HFD, Orlistat, and UP601, respectively. 59.3% less mesenteric fat pad and improved NASH scores were observed for UP601. Conclusion. UP601, a standardized botanical composition from Morus alba, Yerba mate, and Magnolia officinalis could be used as a natural alternative for appetite suppression, maintaining healthy body weight and metabolism management. PMID:27699065

  17. The monomeric and dimeric mannose-binding proteins from the Orchidaceae species Listera ovata and Epipactis helleborine: sequence homologies and differences in biological activities.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Balzarini, J; Smeets, K; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1994-08-01

    The Orchidaceae species Listera ovata and Epipactis helleborine contain two types of mannose-binding proteins. Using a combination of affinity chromatography on mannose-Sepharose-4B and ion exchange chromatography on a Mono-S column eight different mannose-binding proteins were isolated from the leaves of Listera ovata. Whereas seven of these mannose-binding proteins have agglutination activity and occur as dimers composed of lectin subunits of 11-13 kDa, the eighth mannose-binding protein is a monomer of 14 kDa devoid of agglutination activity. Moreover, the monomeric mannose-binding protein does not react with an antiserum raised against the dimeric lectin and, in contrast to the lectins, is completely inactive when tested for antiretroviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and type 2. Mannose-binding proteins with similar properties were also found in the leaves of Epipactis helleborine. However, in contrast to Listera only one lectin was found in Epipactis. Despite the obvious differences in molecular structure and biological activities molecular cloning of different mannose-binding proteins from Listera and Epipactis has shown that these proteins are related and some parts of the sequences show a high degree of sequence homology indicating that they have been conserved through evolution.

  18. Structural insights into the function of the nicotinate mononucleotide:phenol/p-cresol phosphoribosyltransferase (ArsAB) enzyme from Sporomusa ovata.

    PubMed

    Newmister, Sean A; Chan, Chi Ho; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C; Rayment, Ivan

    2012-10-30

    Cobamides (Cbas) are cobalt (Co) containing tetrapyrrole-derivatives involved in enzyme-catalyzed carbon skeleton rearrangements, methyl-group transfers, and reductive dehalogenation. The biosynthesis of cobamides is complex and is only performed by some bacteria and achaea. Cobamides have an upper (Coβ) ligand (5'-deoxyadenosyl or methyl) and a lower (Coα) ligand base that contribute to the axial Co coordinations. The identity of the lower Coα ligand varies depending on the organism synthesizing the Cbas. The homoacetogenic bacterium Sporomusa ovata synthesizes two unique phenolic cobamides (i.e., Coα-(phenolyl/p-cresolyl)cobamide), which are used in the catabolism of methanol and 3,4-dimethoxybenzoate by this bacterium. The S. ovata ArsAB enzyme activates a phenolic lower ligand prior to its incorporation into the cobamide. ArsAB consists of two subunits, both of which are homologous (∼35% identity) to the well-characterized Salmonella enterica CobT enzyme, which transfers nitrogenous bases such as 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB) and adenine, but cannot utilize phenolics. Here we report the three-dimensional structure of ArsAB, which shows that the enzyme forms a pseudosymmetric heterodimer, provide evidence that only the ArsA subunit has base:phosphoribosyl-transferase activity, and propose a mechanism by which phenolic transfer is facilitated by an activated water molecule.

  19. Evidence for a super-reduced cobamide as the major corrinoid fraction in vivo and a histidine residue as a cobalt ligand of the p-cresolyl cobamide in the acetogenic bacterium Sporomusa ovata.

    PubMed

    Stupperich, E; Eisinger, H J; Albracht, S P

    1990-10-05

    The redox state of cobalt in p-cresolyl cobamide and one of its axial ligands were determined by EPR spectroscopy of Sporomusa ovata as harvested. The analyses revealed that less than 2% (less than 30 nmol/g dry cells) of the total corrinoids (greater than 2400 nmol/g dry cells) were in a low-spin Co(II) complex. The amount increased to about 15% (190-450 nmol/g dry cells) upon partial oxidation by air, indicating that the original valence state of cobalt was a Co(I) prior to this treatment. The cob(I)amide was quantified as Co(III)-CH3 after methylation by iodomethane. More than 45% (1100 nmol/g dry cells) of the extractable corrinoids were in the methylated form, whereas non-treated cells revealed less than 1% (less than 15 nmol g dry cells) of light-sensitive corrinoids. EPR spectra of the Co(II) complex exhibited a threefold N-hyperfine splitting in the gz region, which was similar to vitamin B12. Cells grown with [1.3-15N2]histidine showed a twofold N-hyperfine splitting, demonstrating that the axial N ligand of the corrinoid was derived from the imidazole group of histidine. It is concluded that the super-nucleophilic p-cresolyl cob(I)amide is the major corrinoid complex in vivo and that it is stabilized by its protein(s). The Co(II) ion of the prosthetic group was coordinated by one histidine residue of the apoprotein(s).

  20. Isolation and purification of seven lignans from Magnolia sprengeri by high-speed counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Yu, Zongyuan; Duan, Wenjuan; Fang, Lei; Xu, Shuangshuang; Wang, Xiao

    2011-12-01

    Seven lignans including (-)-maglifloenone, futoenone, magnoline, cylohexadienone, fargesone C, fargesone A and fargesone B were isolated and purified from Magnolia sprengeri Pamp. using high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) with two-step separation. In the first step, a stepwise elution mode with the two-phase solvent system composed of petroleum ether-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (1:0.8:0.6:1.2, 1:0.8:0.8:1, v/v) was used and 15.6 mg of (-)-maglifloenone, 19.2 mg of futoenone, 10.8 mg of magnoline, 14.7 mg of cylohexadienone and 217 mg residues were obtained from 370 mg crude extract. In the second step, the residues were successfully separated by HSCCC with the solvent system composed of petroleum ether-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (1:0.8:1.2:0.6, v/v), yielding 33.2 mg of fargesone C, 47.5 mg of fargesone A and 17.7 mg of fargesone B. The purities of the separated compounds were all over 95% determined by HPLC. The chemical structures of these compounds were confirmed by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and ESI-MS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Volatile Compounds with Characteristic Odor of Essential Oil from Magnolia obovata Leaves by Hydrodistillation and Solvent-assisted Flavor Evaporation.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Nakashima, Yoshimi; Nakahashi, Hiroshi; Hara, Nobuyuki; Nakagawa, Hiroki; Usami, Atsushi; Chavasiri, Warinthorn

    2015-01-01

    The present study focuses on the volatile compounds with characteristic odor of essential oil from the leaves of Magnolia obovata by hydrodistillation (HD) and solvent-assisted flavor evaporation (SAFE) method. Eighty-seven compounds, representing 98.0% of the total oil, were identified using HD. The major compounds of HD oil were (E)-β-caryophyllene (23.7%), α-humulene (11.6%), geraniol (9.1%), and borneol (7.0%). In SAFE oil, fifty-eight compounds, representing 99.7% of the total oil, were identified. The main compounds of SAFE oil were (E)-β-caryophyllene (48.9%), α-humulene (15.7%), and bicyclogermacrene (4.2%). In this study, we newly identified eighty-five compounds of the oils from M. obovata leaves. These oils were also subjected to aroma evaluation by gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA). As a result, twenty-four (HD) and twenty-five (SAFE) aroma-active compounds were detected. (E)-β-Caryophyllene, α-humulene, linalool, geraniol, 1,8-cineole, and bicyclogermacrene were found to impart the characteristic odor of M. obovata leaves. These results imply that the oils of M. obovata leaves must be investigated further to clarify their potential application in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

  2. Magnolia Extract (BL153) Ameliorates Kidney Damage in a High Fat Diet-Induced Obesity Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Wenpeng; Wang, Yangwei; Chen, Qiang; Sun, Weixia; Cai, Lu; Tan, Yi; Kim, Ki-Soo; Kim, Ki Ho; Kim, Young Heui

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrated that obesity is a risk factor for renal structural and functional changes, leading to the end-stage renal disease which imposes a heavy economic burden on the community. However, no effective therapeutic method for obesity-associated kidney disease is available. In the present study, we explored the therapeutic potential of a magnolia extract (BL153) for treating obesity-associated kidney damage in a high fat diet- (HFD-) induced mouse model. The results showed that inflammation markers (tumor necrosis factor-α and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) and oxidative stress markers (3-nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal) were all significantly increased in the kidney of HFD-fed mice compared to mice fed with a low fat diet (LFD). Additionally, proteinuria and renal structure changes in HFD-fed mice were much more severe than that in LFD-fed mice. However, all these alterations were attenuated by BL153 treatment, accompanied by upregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and hexokinase II (HK II) expression in the kidney. The present study indicates that BL153 administration may be a novel approach for renoprotection in obese individuals by antiinflammation and anti-oxidative stress most likely via upregulation of PGC-1α and HK II signal in the kidney. PMID:24381715

  3. Scopoletin from the flower buds of Magnolia fargesii inhibits protein glycation, aldose reductase, and cataractogenesis ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun; Kim, Nan Hee; Nam, Joo Won; Lee, Yun Mi; Jang, Dae Sik; Kim, Young Sook; Nam, Sang Hae; Seo, Eun-Kyoung; Yang, Min Suk; Kim, Jin Sook

    2010-09-01

    Five compounds previously known structures, scopoletin (1), northalifoline (2), stigmast-4-en-3-one (3), tiliroside (4), and oplopanone (5) were obtained from the flower buds of Magnolia fargesii using chromatographic separation methods. The structures of 1-5 were identified by the interpretation of their spectroscopic data including 1D- and 2D-NMR as well as by comparison with reported values. Three compounds 1-3 were found from M. fargesii for the first time in this study. All the isolates (1-5) were subjected to in vitro bioassays to evaluate the inhibitory activity on advanced glycation end products formation and rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR). Compound 1 showed a remarkable inhibitory activity on advanced glycation end products formation with IC(50) value of 2.93 μM (aminoguanidine: 961 μM), and showed a significant RLAR inhibitory activity with IC(50) value of 22.5 μM (3.3-tetramethyleneglutaric acid: 28.7 μM). Compound 4 exhibited potent inhibitory activity against RLAR (IC(50) = 14.9 μM). In the further experiment ex vivo, cataractogenesis of rat lenses induced with xylose was significantly inhibited by compound 1 treatment.

  4. Honokiol, a constituent of Magnolia species, inhibits adrenergic contraction of human prostate strips and induces stromal cell death.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Daniel; Schreiber, Andrea; Ciotkowska, Anna; Strittmatter, Frank; Waidelich, Raphaela; Stief, Christian G; Gratzke, Christian; Hennenberg, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Smooth muscle contraction and prostate growth are important targets for medical therapy of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. Honokiol and Magnolol are lignan constituents of Magnolia species, which are used in traditional Asian medicine. Here, we examined effects of honokiol and magnolol on contraction of human prostate tissue and on growth of stromal cells. Prostate tissues were obtained from radical prostatectomy. Contraction of prostate strips was examined in organ bath studies. Effects in stromal cells were assessed in cultured immortalized human prostate stromal cells (WPMY-1). Ki-67 mRNA was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and proliferation by a fluorescence 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine assay. Honokiol (100μM) reduced noradrenaline-induced contractions, which was significant at 10 to 100μM noradrenaline. Honokiol reduced phenylephrine-induced contractions, which was significant at 3 to 100μM phenylephrine. Honokiol reduced electric field stimulation-induced contractions very slightly. In WPMY-1 cells, honokiol (24 hours) induced cell death. Magnolol (100μM) was without effects on contraction, and cellular viability. Honokiol inhibits smooth muscle contraction in the human prostate, and induces cell death in cultured stromal cells. Because prostate smooth muscle tone and prostate growth may cause LUTS, it appears possible that honokiol improves voiding symptoms.

  5. Anti-biofilm and bactericidal effects of magnolia bark-derived magnolol and honokiol on Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Sakaue, Yuuki; Domon, Hisanori; Oda, Masataka; Takenaka, Shoji; Kubo, Miwa; Fukuyama, Yoshiyasu; Okiji, Takashi; Terao, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries affects people of all ages and is a worldwide health concern. Streptococcus mutans is a major cariogenic bacterium because of its ability to form biofilm and induce an acidic environment. In this study, the antibacterial activities of magnolol and honokiol, the main constituents of the bark of magnolia plants, toward planktonic cell and biofilm of S. mutans were examined and compared with those of chlorhexidine. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of magnolol, honokiol and chlorhexidine for S. mutans were 10, 10 and 0.25 µg/mL, respectively. In addition, each agent showed bactericidal activity against S. mutans planktonic cells and inhibited biofilm formation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Magnolol (50 µg/mL) had greater bactericidal activity against S. mutans biofilm than honokiol (50 µg/mL) and chlorhexidine (500 µg/mL) at 5 min after exposure, while all showed scant activity against biofilm at 30 s. Furthermore; chlorhexidine (0.5-500 µg/mL) exhibited high cellular toxicity for the gingival epithelial cell line Ca9-22 at 1 hr, whereas magnolol (50 µg/mL) and honokiol (50 µg/mL) did not. Thus; it was found that magnolol has antimicrobial activities against planktonic and biofilm cells of S. mutans. Magnolol may be a candidate for prevention and management of dental caries. © 2015 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Cloning and characterization of CmGPD1, the Candida magnoliae homologue of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Myoung-Dong; Ryu, Yeon-Woo; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2008-12-01

    Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) plays a central role in glycerol metabolism. A genomic CmGPD1 gene encoding NADH-dependent GPDH was isolated from Candida magnoliae producing a significant amount of glycerol. The gene encodes a polypeptide of 360 amino acids, which shows high homology with known NADH-dependent GPDHs of other species. The CmGPD1 gene was expressed in recombinant Escherichia coli with the maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion system and purified to homogeneity using simple affinity chromatography. The purified CmGpd1p without the MBP fusion displayed an apparent molecular mass of 40 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis. The CmGpd1p enzyme exhibited a K(cat)/K(m) value of 195 min(-1) mM(-1) for dihydroxyacetone phosphate whereas K(cat)/K(m) for glycerol-3-phosphate is 0.385 min(-1) mM(-1). In a complementation study, CmGpd1p rescued the ability of glycerol synthesis and salt tolerance in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae GPD1DeltaGPD2Delta mutant strain. The overall results indicated that CmGPD1 encodes a functional homologue of S. cerevisiae GPDH.

  7. Effect of Chemical Profiling Change of Processed Magnolia officinalis on the Pharmacokinetic Profiling of Honokiol and Magnolol in Rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huiling; Wang, Zhanguo; Hua, Wan; You, Yu; Zou, Liang

    2016-08-01

    The stem of Magnoliae officinalis (MO) cortex is always preliminarily processed before being applied in traditional Chinese medicine. The definite bioavailability of honokiol (HO) and magnolol (MA) in processed MO (PMO) and the effect of chemical profiling change on the pharmacokinetics of HO and MA are always a greater challenge compared with those of MO. Compared with that of MO, the pharmacokinetic profiling of HO and MA in the PMO was significantly changed and the mean Tmax of HO and MA was increased by 31 and 50% (P < 0.05), respectively; the mean AUC0-t and Cmax of HO were increased by 36 and 24% (P < 0.05), respectively. Subsequently, the chemical profiling of MO and PMO was investigated by a simple and rapid LC-Q/TOF-MS coupled with multivariate analysis method. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis of the chromatographic data demonstrated that the chemical profiling of PMO was significantly different from that of MO. Eight marker components including six alkaloids (magnocurarine, magnoflorine, roemerine and three unidentified peaks) and two lignans (obovatol and MA) were screened out by partial least-squares discriminant analysis. The results indicated that the changes of eight marker components of PMO may have an effect on the pharmacokinetic profiles of HO and MA.

  8. Phosphatase activities of a microepiphytic community during a bloom of Ostreopsis cf. ovata in the northern Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Accoroni, Stefano; Totti, Cecilia; Razza, Emanuela; Congestri, Roberta; Campanelli, Alessandra; Marini, Mauro; Ellwood, Neil Thomas William

    2017-09-01

    It is becoming more apparent that increased organic nutrient loads deriving from anthropogenic activities and natural processes frequently cause the eutrophication of coastal waters. Concurrently, an increasing number of phototrophs have been shown to make use of organic nutrients, mainly through indirect studies of surface enzyme activities or through direct studies of growth in media containing organic-only nutrients. The potential utilization of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) by microepiphytic-mats associated with frequently problematic, toxic dinoflagellate Ostreopsis cf. ovata, was investigated throughout a full cycle of a bloom that occurs annually (over the last few decades) during summer along several stretches of the Mediterranean coast. Measurements of phosphomonoesterase (PMEase) and phosphodiesterase (PDEase) activities of the epiphytic mats (including cells and exopolymeric substances) and a range of chemico-physical parameters were made from late summer to early autumn at a eutrophic site. Analyses of ambient nutrient fractions revealed very high aquatic N:P values (TN:TP = 178 ± 50), very low filterable reactive P (FRP) concentrations (13 out 19 under the limits of detection) and DOP concentrations that were on average 85% of the total dissolved P. We recorded a rapid increase in PMEase and PDEase activities in the epiphytic microalgal community that coincided with the onset of a proliferation of the Ostreopsis population. Chromogenic staining of samples showed that activity was closely associated with the Ostreopsis cells, located both extracellularly (cell surface and within the EPS) and intracellularly (ventral cytoplasm). The increase in both phosphatases indicates that Ostreopsis can utilise a wide range of DOP types. The intense activity in the EPS was suggested to aid in the efficient entrapment and processing of high concentration nutrient pulses, for extracellular processing of larger organic materials and to prevent loss of

  9. Corrinoid-Dependent Methyl Transfer Reactions Are Involved in Methanol and 3,4-Dimethoxybenzoate Metabolism by Sporomusa ovata

    PubMed Central

    Stupperich, Erhard; Konle, Ralph

    1993-01-01

    Washed and air-oxidized proteins from Sporomusa ovata cleaved the C-O bond of methanol or methoxyaromatics and transferred the methyl to dl-tetrahydrofolate. The reactions strictly required a reductive activation by titanium citrate, catalytic amounts of ATP, and the addition of dl-tetrahydrofolate. Methylcorrinoid-containing proteins carried the methanol methyl, which was transferred to dl-tetrahydrofolate at a specific rate of 120 nmol h-1 mg of protein-1. Tetrahydrofolate methylation diminished after the addition of 1-iodopropane or when the methyl donor methanol was replaced by 3,4-dimethoxybenzoate. However, whole Sporomusa cells utilize the methoxyl groups of 3,4-dimethoxybenzoate as a carbon source by a sequential O demethylation to 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoate and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate. The in vitro O demethylation of 3,4-[4-methoxyl-14C]dimethoxybenzoate proceeded via two distinct corrinoid-containing proteins to form 5-[14C]methyltetrahydrofolate at a specific rate of 200 nmol h-1 mg of protein-1. Proteins from 3,4-dimethoxybenzoate-grown cells efficiently used methoxybenzoates with vicinal substituents only, but they were unable to activate methanol. These results emphasized that specific enzymes are involved in methanol activation as well as in the activation of various methoxybenzoates and that similar corrinoid-dependent methyl transfer pathways are employed in 5-methyl-tetrahydrofolate formation from these substrates. Methyl-tetrahydrofolate could be demethylated by a distinct methyl transferase. That enzyme activity was present in washed and air-oxidized cell extracts from methanol-grown cells and from 3,4-dimethoxybenzoate-grown cells. It used cob(I)alamin as the methyl acceptor in vitro, which was methylated at a rate of 48 nmol min-1 mg of protein-1 even when ATP was omitted from the assay mixture. This methyl-cob(III)alamin formation made possible a spectrophotometric quantification of the preceding methyl transfers from methanol or

  10. An integrated simultaneous distillation-extraction apparatus for the extraction of essential oils from herb materials and its application in Flos Magnoliae.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuhui; Li, Boxia; Duan, Haogang; Wu, Xin'an; Yao, Xiaojun

    2010-03-01

    A large number of herb materials contain essential oils with extensive bioactivities. In this work, an integrated simultaneous distillation-extraction (ISDE) apparatus was developed. To demonstrate its feasibility, the performance of ISDE was evaluated for the extraction of essential oil from Flos Magnoliae and compared with conventional techniques including steam distillation (SD) and simultaneous distillation-extraction (SDE). According to the product yield, the time consumed and the composition of oil, the essential oils isolated by ISDE were better than that obtained by SD and similar to those obtained by SDE. ISDE was also better than SDE due to its simple operation and lower consumption of energy and organic solvent.

  11. Honokiol, a phytochemical from Magnolia spp., inhibits breast cancer cell migration by targeting nitric oxide and cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Singh, Tripti; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2011-03-01

    In the present study, we report the effects of honokiol, a phytochemical from Magnolia spp., on cancer cell migration capacity and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects using breast cancer cell lines as an in vitro model. Using cell migration assays, we found that the treatment of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) and murine mammary cancer cells (4T1) with honokiol resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of migration of these cells, which was associated with a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) levels. The cell migration capacity was decreased in the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of NO synthase. Honokiol reduced the elevated levels of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in the cells, while the treatment of 4T1 cells with guanylate cyclase (GC) inhibitor 1-H-[1,2,4]oxadiaxolo[4,3-a]quinolalin-1-one (ODQ) reduced the migration of cells and the levels of cGMP. The presence of 8-bromoguanosine 3'5'-cyclic monophosphate, an analogue of cGMP, enhanced the migration of these cells, suggesting a role for GC in the migration of 4T1 cells. Honokiol also inhibited the levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin (PG) E2 in 4T1 cells. The transfection of 4T1 cells with COX-2 siRNA resulted in a reduction in cell migration. ODQ and L-NAME also decreased the levels of PGE2 in 4T1 cells suggesting a role for COX-2/PGE2 in cell migration. Moreover, honokiol inhibited the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), an upstream regulator of COX-2 and iNOS, in 4T1 cells. These results indicate that NO and COX-2 are the key targets of honokiol in the inhibition of breast cancer cell migration, an essential step in invasion and metastasis.

  12. Two ancestral APETALA3 homologs from the basal angiosperm Magnolia wufengensis (Magnoliaceae) can affect flower development of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jing, Danlong; Liu, Zhixiong; Zhang, Bo; Ma, Jiang; Han, Yiyang; Chen, Faju

    2014-03-01

    APETALA3 (AP3) homologs are involved in specifying petal and stamen identities in core eudicot model organisms. In order to investigate the functional conservation of AP3 homologs between core eudicots and basal angiosperm, we isolated and identified two AP3 homologs from Magnolia wufengensis, a woody basal angiosperm belonging to the family Magnoliaceae. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses revealed that both genes are clade members of the paleoAP3 lineage. Moreover, a highly conserved motif of paleoAP3 is found in the C-terminal regions of MAwuAP3_1/2 proteins, but the PI-derived motif, usually present in AP3/DEF-like lineage members, is missing. Semi-quantitative and real time PCR analyses showed that the expression of MAwuAP3_1/2 was restricted to tepals and stamens. However, the MAwuAP3_1 expression was maintained at a high level during the rapid increased in size of tepals and stamens, while MAwuAP3_2 mRNA was only detected at the early stage of tepal and stamen development. Furthermore, the expression of MAwuAP3_1/2 in transgenic Arabidopsis causes phenotypic changes which partly resemble those caused by ectopic expressions of the endogenous AP3 gene. Moreover, the 35S::MAwuAP3_1/2 transgenic Arabidopsis can be used partially to rescue the loss-of-function ap3 mutant (ap3-3) of Arabidopsis. These findings call for a more comprehensive understanding of the B-functional evolution from basal angiosperm to core eudicot clades.

  13. Impact of bio-fertilizers and different levels of cadmium on the growth, biochemical contents and lipid peroxidation of Plantago ovata Forsk

    PubMed Central

    Haneef, Irfana; Faizan, Shahla; Perveen, Rubina; Kausar, Saima

    2014-01-01

    Plantago ovata Forsk. (isabgol) is a valuable medicinal plant; its seeds and shell have a significant role in pharmacy as a laxative compound. Increasing soil contamination with cadmium (Cd) is one of the major concerns and is responsible for toxic effects in plants. This investigation was aimed to analyze the role of biofertilizers in alleviation of cadmium stress, given at the rate of 0, 50, and 100 mg kg−1 of soil. The plants of isabgol, were grown in pots with and without application of AM fungi and Azotobacter (alone and combination). Cadmium showed negative effect on growth and biochemical component whereas proline and MDA content increase with increasing cadmium concentration. Addition of bio-fertilizer showed better growth and higher pigment concentration under cadmium stress as compared to the control. The dual inoculation of AM fungi and Azotobacter was found to be the best in reduction of cadmium stress and promotion of growth parameters. PMID:25183940

  14. Diversity of corrinoids in acetogenic bacteria. P-cresolylcobamide from Sporomusa ovata, 5-methoxy-6-methylbenzimidazolylcobamide from Clostridium formicoaceticum and vitamin B12 from Acetobacterium woodii.

    PubMed

    Stupperich, E; Eisinger, H J; Kräutler, B

    1988-03-01

    The Co beta-cyanocobamides obtained by cyanide extractions from several acetogenic bacteria were structurally characterized by ultraviolet/visible spectra, proton-nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectra and fast-atom-bombardment mass spectra. p-Cresolycobamide was detected as a major corrinoid from Sporomusa ovata. This 'complete' corrinoid was isolated from an organism for the first time. Instead of the common Co alpha bases of the known and biologically active cobamides, p-cresolylcobamide contained a glycosidically bound cresolyl function that was unable to coordinate to the cobalt of the corrin ring. An additional, previously unknown corrinoid from natural sources, Co alpha-[alpha-(5-methoxy-6-methylbenzimidazolyl)]-Co beta-cyanocobamide, was isolated along with vitamin B12 from Clostridium formicoaceticum. Both homoacetogenic eubacteria were grown on methanol and contained high amounts of corrinoids (greater than 950 nmol/g cell dry mass). Less corrinoid was isolated from Acetobacterium woodii and characterized as vitamin B12.

  15. Adding Agnus Castus and Magnolia to Soy Isoflavones Relieves Sleep Disturbances Besides Postmenopausal Vasomotor Symptoms-Long Term Safety and Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    De Franciscis, Pasquale; Grauso, Flavio; Luisi, Anna; Schettino, Maria Teresa; Torella, Marco; Colacurci, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    The effectiveness for vasomotor symptoms and sleep disorders plus the long-term safety of a nutraceutical combination of agnus-castus and magnolia extracts combined with soy isoflavones (SI) and lactobacilli were assessed in postmenopausal women. A controlled study was carried out in menopausal women comparing this nutraceutical combination (ESP group) with a formulation containing isoflavones alone (C group) at the dosage recommended. The Kuppermann index, The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and Short Form 36 (SF-36) were determined at baseline, three, six and 12 months. Endometrial thickness, mammary density and liver function were evaluated at baseline and after 12 months. One hundred and eighty women were enrolled in the study (100 in the ESP group and 80 in the C group). At the end of the treatment, mammary density, endometrial thickness, and hepatic function did not show substantial differences between groups. The Kuppermann index and particularly the tendency for hot flashes progressively and significantly decreased in frequency and severity during ESP versus C treatment. At the same time, a significant increase in sleep quality and psychophysical wellness parameters was observed in the ESP versus C groups. No adverse events were observed. Agnus-castus and magnolia, combined with SI + lactobacilli, can effectively and safely be used in symptomatic postmenopausal women, mainly when quality of sleep is the most disturbing complaint. The endometrium, mammary glands and liver function were unaffected after 12 months of treatment. PMID:28208808

  16. Adding Agnus Castus and Magnolia to Soy Isoflavones Relieves Sleep Disturbances Besides Postmenopausal Vasomotor Symptoms-Long Term Safety and Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    De Franciscis, Pasquale; Grauso, Flavio; Luisi, Anna; Schettino, Maria Teresa; Torella, Marco; Colacurci, Nicola

    2017-02-13

    The effectiveness for vasomotor symptoms and sleep disorders plus the long-term safety of a nutraceutical combination of agnus-castus and magnolia extracts combined with soy isoflavones (SI) and lactobacilli were assessed in postmenopausal women. A controlled study was carried out in menopausal women comparing this nutraceutical combination (ESP group) with a formulation containing isoflavones alone (C group) at the dosage recommended. The Kuppermann index, The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and Short Form 36 (SF-36) were determined at baseline, three, six and 12 months. Endometrial thickness, mammary density and liver function were evaluated at baseline and after 12 months. One hundred and eighty women were enrolled in the study (100 in the ESP group and 80 in the C group). At the end of the treatment, mammary density, endometrial thickness, and hepatic function did not show substantial differences between groups. The Kuppermann index and particularly the tendency for hot flashes progressively and significantly decreased in frequency and severity during ESP versus C treatment. At the same time, a significant increase in sleep quality and psychophysical wellness parameters was observed in the ESP versus C groups. No adverse events were observed. Agnus-castus and magnolia, combined with SI + lactobacilli, can effectively and safely be used in symptomatic postmenopausal women, mainly when quality of sleep is the most disturbing complaint. The endometrium, mammary glands and liver function were unaffected after 12 months of treatment.

  17. Loss of two introns from the Magnolia tripetala mitochondrial cox2 gene implicates horizontal gene transfer and gene conversion as a novel mechanism of intron loss.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, Nancy J; Schmidt, Derek W; Mower, Jeffrey P

    2012-10-01

    Intron loss is often thought to occur through retroprocessing, which is the reverse transcription and genomic integration of a spliced transcript. In plant mitochondria, several unambiguous examples of retroprocessing are supported by the parallel loss of an intron and numerous adjacent RNA edit sites, but in most cases, the evidence for intron loss via retroprocessing is weak or lacking entirely. To evaluate mechanisms of intron loss, we designed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay to detect recent intron losses from the mitochondrial cox2 gene within genus Magnolia, which was previously suggested to have variability in cox2 intron content. Our assay showed that all 22 examined species have a cox2 gene with two introns. However, one species, Magnolia tripetala, contains an additional cox2 gene that lacks both introns. Quantitative PCR showed that both M. tripetala cox2 genes are present in the mitochondrial genome. Although the intronless gene has lost several ancestral RNA edit sites, their distribution is inconsistent with retroprocessing models. Instead, phylogenetic and gene conversion analyses indicate that the intronless gene was horizontally acquired from a eudicot and then underwent gene conversion with the native intron-containing gene. The models are presented to summarize the roles of horizontal gene transfer and gene conversion as a novel mechanism of intron loss.

  18. Fleshy seeds form in the basal Angiosperm Magnolia grandiflora and several MADS-box genes are expressed as fleshy seed tissues develop.

    PubMed

    Lovisetto, Alessandro; Masiero, Simona; Rahim, Md Abdur; Mendes, Marta Adelina Miranda; Casadoro, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    One successful mechanism of seed dispersal in plants involves production of edible fleshy structures which attract frugivorous animals and transfer this task to them. Not only Angiosperms but also Gymnosperms may use the fleshy fruit habit for seed dispersal, and a similar suite of MADS-box genes may be expressed as these structures form. Magnolia grandiflora produces dry follicles which, at maturity, open to reveal brightly colored fleshy seeds. This species thus also employs endozoochory for seed dispersal, although it produces dry fruits. Molecular analysis reveals that genes involved in softening and color changes are expressed at late stages of seed development, when the fleshy seed sarcotesta softens and accumulates carotenoids. Several MADS-box genes have also been studied and results highlight the existence of a basic genetic toolkit which may be common to all fleshy fruit-like structures, independently of their anatomic origin. According to their expression patterns, one of two AGAMOUS genes and the three SEPALLATA genes known so far in Magnolia are of particular interest. Duplication of AGAMOUS already occurs in both Nymphaeales and Magnoliids, although the lack of functional gene analysis prevents comparisons with known duplications in the AGAMOUS lineage of core Eudicots. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Effects of pollen shortage and self-pollination on seed production of an endangered tree, Magnolia stellata.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Kimiko; Ishida, Kiyoshi; Tomaru, Nobuhiro

    2005-05-01

    Pollen limitation is a significant determinant of seed production, and can result from both insufficient pollen quantity (pollen shortage) and quality (mainly relating to self-pollination). For animal-pollinated tree species with large floral displays, pollen limitation may be determined by a balance between increased pollen quantity due to increased attractiveness for pollinators, countered by increased self-pollination due to increased geitonogamy. The contributions of pollen shortage and self-pollination on seed production were quantitatively examined in the natural pollination of an insect-pollinated, dichogamous, endangered tree, Magnolia stellata, which has a large, showy floral display. Manual self- and cross-pollinations were conducted to determine the effects of selfing on seed production. The outcrossing rate was measured using microsatellite analyses of open-pollinated seeds, and the embryo mortality rate caused by self-pollination was indirectly estimated. The frequency of ovule mortality due to pollen shortage was also inferred using the embryo mortality and ovule survival rates from natural pollination. The average fruit set, seed set per fruit, and ovule survival rate per tree from hand cross-pollination were 1.37, 3.15, and 3.34 times higher than those from hand self-pollination, respectively, indicating that self-pollination causes inbreeding depression for fruit and seed set. The multilocus-outcrossing rate (t(m)) was intermediate, 0.632, and the primary selfing rate was 0.657. This indicates that frequent geitonogamous selfing occurs. The ovule mortality rate due to pollen shortage and the embryo mortality rate due to self-pollination were estimated to be 80.8 % and 45.9 %, respectively. It is concluded that seed production of M. stellata is strongly limited by both pollen shortage and self-pollination. Inefficient beetle-pollination and the automimicry system via asynchronous flowering might be responsible for the high level of pollen shortage

  20. Honokiol and magnolol production by in vitro micropropagated plants of Magnolia dealbata, an endangered endemic Mexican species.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Fabiola; Chávez, Marco; Garduño-Ramírez, María Luisa; Chávez-Avila, Víctor M; Mata, Martín; Cruz-Sosa, Francisco

    2010-02-01

    An efficient protocol for the in vitro propagation of Magnolia dealbata Zucc., an important medicinal plant that is the source of the anxiolytic and anticancer compounds honokiol and magnolol, was established. This plant is wild-crafted, and conservationists have expressed concerns with regard to the sustainability of production. In the present work, two factors were found to be of importance for the regeneration of M. dealbata and the production of honokiol and magnolol. These factors were the type of explants and the combination and concentration of plant-growth regulators. Green, compact, nodular organogenic callus was obtained from leaf explants in a medium fortified with Murashige and Skoog salts and supplemented with 1.5 mg/L 2,4-dicholorophenoxyacetic acid and 1.5 mg/L kinetin. Shoots multiplication from callus cultures was achieved in the Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium with 1.5 mg/L thidiazuron (TDZ). Phenol secretion was controlled by the addition of 250 mg/L of activated charcoal. For rooting, shoots were transferred to MS medium supplemented with several auxins. After root induction, the plants were hardened in earthen pots containing sand, soil, and vermiculite. The contents of honokiol (HK) and magnolol (MG) were determined in different plant materials by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode-array detection techniques. This analysis revealed that the honokiol and magnolol content in aerial and underground parts of micropropagated M. dealbata were higher than that observed in wild plants (both 6 months old). Our results suggest that conservation of M. dealbata is possible by means of in vitro multiplication of leaf-derived callus. The usefulness of M. dealbata regeneration and production of HK and MG may be attributed to the proper selection of explant sourcing and identification of the correct growth medium to support adequate growth. This careful selection of explants and growth medium leads to a very useful source of plant material for

  1. An inverse relationship between allelopathic activity and salt tolerance in suspension cultures of three mangrove species, Sonneratia alba, S. caseolaris and S. ovata: development of a bioassay method for allelopathy, the protoplast co-culture method.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Ai; Oyanagi, Tomoya; Minagawa, Reiko; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Sasamoto, Hamako

    2014-11-01

    A bioassay method for allelopathy, the 'protoplast co-culture method' was developed to study the relationship between salt tolerance and allelopathy of three mangrove species, Sonneratia alba, S. caseolaris, and S. ovata. Plants of S. alba grow in the seaward-side high salinity region and plants of the latter two species grow in upstream-side regions of a mangrove forest, respectively. Effects of five sea salts (NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, MgSO4 and CaCl2) on the growth of the suspension cells of the latter two species were first investigated by a small-scale method using 24-well culture plates. S. ovata cells showed higher tolerance than S. caseolaris cells to NaCl and other salts, but were not as halophilic as S. alba cells. Protoplasts isolated from suspension cells were co-cultured with lettuce protoplasts in Murashige and Skoog's (MS) basal medium containing 1 μM 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 0.1 μM benzyladenine, 3% sucrose and 0.6-0.8 M osmoticum. S. caseolaris protoplasts had a higher inhibitory effect on lettuce protoplast cell divisions than S. alba protoplasts at any lettuce protoplast density, and the effect of S. ovata was intermediate between the two. These results were similar to those obtained from a different in vitro bioassay method for allelopathy, the 'sandwich method' with dried leaves. The inverse relationship between allelopathic activity and salt tolerance in suspension cells of Sonneratia mangroves is discussed.

  2. Capparis ovata treatment suppresses inflammatory cytokine expression and ameliorates experimental allergic encephalomyelitis model of multiple sclerosis in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Ozgun-Acar, Ozden; Celik-Turgut, Gurbet; Gazioglu, Isil; Kolak, Ufuk; Ozbal, Seda; Ergur, Bekir U; Arslan, Sevki; Sen, Alaattin; Topcu, Gulacti

    2016-09-15

    Since ancient times, Capparis species have been widely used in traditional medicine to treat various diseases. Our recent investigations have suggested Capparis ovata's potential anti-neuroinflammatory application for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). The present study was designed to precisely determine the underlying mechanism of its anti-neuroinflammatory effect in a mouse model of MS. C. ovata water extract (COWE) was prepared using the plant's fruit, buds, and flower parts (Turkish Patent Institute, PT 2012/04,093). We immunized female C57BL/6J mice with MOG35-55/CFA. COWE was administered at a daily dose of 500mg/kg by oral gavage either from the day of immunization (T1) or at disease onset (T2) for 21days. Gene expression analysis was performed using a Mouse Multiple Sclerosis RT² Profiler PCR Array, and further determinations and validations of the identified genes were performed using qPCR. Whole-genome transcriptome profiling was analyzed using Agilent SurePrint G3 Mouse GE 8X60K microarrays. Immunohistochemical staining was applied to brain sections of the control and treated mice to examine the degree of degeneration. COWE was further fractionated and analyzed phytochemically using the Zivak Tandem Gold Triple Quadrupole LC/MS-MS system. COWE remarkably suppressed the development of EAE in T1, and the disease activity was completely inhibited. In the T2 group, the maximal score was significantly reduced compared with that of the parallel EAE group. The COWE suppression of EAE was associated with a significantly decreased expression of genes that are important in inflammatory signaling, such as TNFα, IL6, NF-κB, CCL5, CXCL9, and CXCK10. On the other hand, the expression of genes involved in myelination/remyelination was significantly increased. Immunohistochemical analysis further supported these effects, showing that the number of infiltrating immune cells was decreased in the brains of COWE-treated animals. In addition, differential

  3. Chemical composition, antioxidant activity and cytotoxicity on tumour cells of the essential oil from flowers of Magnolia grandiflora cultivated in Iran.

    PubMed

    Morshedloo, Mohammad Reza; Quassinti, Luana; Bramucci, Massimo; Lupidi, Giulio; Maggi, Filippo

    2017-03-16

    Magnolia grandiflora (Magnoliaceae) is an evergreen tree with fragrant and showy flowers native to southeastern USA but widely cultivated all over the world and used in cosmetics industry in treatment of skin diseases. Here, we report on the chemical analysis of the essential oil obtained from flowers of plants cultivated in Iran, together with the evaluation of its antioxidant and cytotoxic activities. The essential oil composition was dominated by bioactive sesquiterpenes, namely β-elemene, bicyclogermacrene, germacrene D and (E)-caryophyllene. The oil exhibited moderate radical scavenging activity towards the [Formula: see text] radical, and mild non-selective inhibitory effects against A375, MDA-MB 231 and T98 G tumour cell lines. The latter were influenced by the presence of the anticancer β-elemene. These results provided new insights for potential application of M. grandiflora volatile oil in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industry where only the non-volatile magnolol and honokiol have hitherto been fully exploited.

  4. Magnolia Bioactive Constituent 4-O-Methylhonokiol Prevents the Impairment of Cardiac Insulin Signaling and the Cardiac Pathogenesis in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiguo; Chen, Jing; Zhou, Shanshan; Wang, Shudong; Cai, Xiaohong; Conklin, Daniel J.; Kim, Ki-Soo; Kim, Ki Ho; Tan, Yi; Zheng, Yang; Kim, Young Heui; Cai, Lu

    2015-01-01

    In obesity, cardiac insulin resistance is a putative cause of cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction. In our previous study, we observed that Magnolia extract BL153 attenuated high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced cardiac pathogenic changes. In this study, we further investigated the protective effects of the BL153 bioactive constituent, 4-O-methylhonokiol (MH), against HFD-induced cardiac pathogenesis and its possible mechanisms. C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal diet or a HFD with gavage administration of vehicle, BL153, or MH (low or high dose) daily for 24 weeks. Treatment with MH attenuated HFD-induced obesity, as evidenced by body weight gain, and cardiac pathogenesis, as assessed by the heart weight and echocardiography. Mechanistically, MH treatment significantly reduced HFD-induced impairment of cardiac insulin signaling by preferentially augmenting Akt2 signaling. MH also inhibited cardiac expression of the inflammatory factors tumor necrosis factor-α and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and increased the phosphorylation of nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2) as well as the expression of a Nrf2 downstream target gene heme oxygenase-1. The increased Nrf2 signaling was associated with decreased oxidative stress and damage, as reflected by lowered malondialdehyde and 3-nitrotyrosine levels. Furthermore, MH reduced HFD-induced cardiac lipid accumulation along with lowering expression of cardiac fatty acid translocase/CD36 protein. These results suggest that MH, a bioactive constituent of Magnolia, prevents HFD-induced cardiac pathogenesis by attenuating the impairment of cardiac insulin signaling, perhaps via activation of Nrf2 and Akt2 signaling to attenuate CD36-mediated lipid accumulation and lipotoxicity. PMID:26157343

  5. DNA sequences from Miocene fossils: an ndhF sequence of Magnolia latahensis (Magnoliaceae) and an rbcL sequence of Persea pseudocarolinensis (Lauraceae).

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangtae; Soltis, Douglas E; Soltis, Pamela S; Suh, Youngbae

    2004-04-01

    We report a partial ndhF sequence (1528 bp) of Magnolia latahensis and a partial rbcL sequence (699 bp) of Persea pseudocarolinensis from the Clarkia fossil beds of Idaho, USA (Miocene; 17-20 million years [my] BP). The ndhF sequence from M. latahensis was identical to those of extant M. grandiflora, M. schiediana, M. guatemalensis, and M. tamaulipana. Parsimony analysis of the ndhF sequence of M. latahensis and previously reported ndhF sequences for Magnoliaceae placed M. latahensis within Magnolia as a member of the Theorhodon clade. This result is reasonable considering that: (1) the morphology of M. latahensis is very similar to that of extant M. grandiflora, and (2) a recent molecular phylogenetic study of Magnoliaceae showed that the maximum sequence divergence of ndhF among extant species is very low (1.05% in subfamily Magnolioideae) compared with other angiosperm families. We reanalyzed the previously reported rbcL sequence of M. latahensis with sequences for all major lineages of extant Magnoliales and Laurales. This sequence is sister to Liriodendron, rather than grouped with a close relative of M. grandiflora as predicted by morphology and the results of the ndhF analysis, possibly due to a few erroneous base calls in the sequences. The rbcL sequence of P. pseudocarolinensis differed from rbcL of extant Persea species by 3-6 nucleotides and from rbcL of extant Sassafras albidum by two nucleotides. Phylogenetic analyses of rbcL sequences for all major lineages of Magnoliales and Laurales placed the fossil P. pseudocarolinensis within Lauraceae and as sister to S. albidum. These results reinforce the suggestion that Clarkia and other similar sites hold untapped potential for molecular analysis of fossils.

  6. The protective effects of total phenols in magnolia officinalix rehd. et wils on gastrointestinal tract dysmotility is mainly based on its influence on interstitial cells of cajal

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hui; Huang, Dazhi; Li, Tao; Huang, Lihua; Zheng, Xingguang; Tang, Danxia; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Magnolia officinalix Rehd. et Wils is a kind of herb which is widely used for gastrointestinal tract mobility disorder in Asian countries. In this study, we investigated whether the total phenols of Magnolia officinalix Rehd. et Wils (TPM) treatment improves gastrointestinal tract dysmobility induced by intraperitoneal injection of atropine (5 mg/kg) in rats. Rats were randomly grouped into three units: TPM-pretreated/atropine-treated group, atropinetreated group and control group. TPM were administrated for 7 days. Gastric residual rate and intestinal transit were measured 20 min after atropine injected, and gastrointestinal hormones (including: gastrin (GAS), motilin (MTL), somatostatin (SS) and p substance (PS) levels in serum were also measured by ELISA kits. The number and distribution of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) in stomach were detected by immunohistochemistry analysis, while c-kit and stem cell factor (SCF) expressions in stomach were also measured by western blotting. We found that TPM pretreatment significantly improved atropine-induced gastric residual rate increase, while had no significantly effects on intestinal transit; it also significantly normalized GAS, MTL and PS serum levels. Atropine-induced ICCs numbers decreased in both sinuses ventriculi and body of stomach, which is improved by TPM pretreatment. Western blotting results showed the expressions of c-kit and SCF were down-regulated after atropine injection, which can be reversed with TPM pretreatment. These results above indicates that TPM treatment can significantly protected atropine-induced gastric dysmoblility, which may owed to its regulation on c-kit/SCF signing pathway. PMID:26884941

  7. Mycorrhizal diversity, seed germination and long-term changes in population size across nine populations of the terrestrial orchid Neottia ovata.

    PubMed

    Jacquemyn, Hans; Waud, Michael; Merckx, Vincent S F T; Lievens, Bart; Brys, Rein

    2015-07-01

    In plant species that rely on mycorrhizal symbioses for germination and seedling establishment, seedling recruitment and temporal changes in abundance can be expected to depend on fungal community composition and local environmental conditions. However, disentangling the precise factors that determine recruitment success in species that critically rely on mycorrhizal fungi represents a major challenge. In this study, we used seed germination experiments, 454 amplicon pyrosequencing and assessment of soil conditions to investigate the factors driving changes in local abundance in 28 populations of the orchid Neottia ovata. Comparison of population sizes measured in 2003 and 2013 showed that nearly 60% of the studied populations had declined in size (average growth rate across all populations: -0.01). Investigation of the mycorrhizal fungi in both the roots and soil revealed a total of 68 species of putatively mycorrhizal fungi, 21 of which occurred exclusively in roots, 25 that occurred solely in soil and 22 that were observed in both the soil and roots. Seed germination was limited and significantly and positively related to soil moisture content and soil pH, but not to fungal community composition. Large populations or populations with high population growth rates showed significantly higher germination than small populations or populations declining in size, but no significant relationships were found between population size or growth and mycorrhizal diversity. Overall, these results indicate that temporal changes in abundance were related to the ability of seeds to germinate, but at the same time they provided limited evidence that variation in fungal communities played an important role in determining population dynamics.

  8. A modification on the vector cosine algorithm of Similarity Analysis for improved discriminative capacity and its application to the quality control of Magnoliae Flos.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Zhao, Xin; Fan, Guorong

    2017-08-16

    Chromatographic fingerprint analysis has been widely used in quality control of herbal medicines, and Similarity Analysis (SA) as a well-established method has been applied in the quality control practice as well as publications related to the study of herbal medicines and preparations. However, in some cases the results of SA do not fit well with those of other chemometric approaches and quantitative analysis, and the problem remains unsolved. In this study, a modified SA algorithm has been proposed, with its advantages discussed in theory. The extract of dried flower bud of Magnolia biondii Pamp. obtained by pressurized solvent extraction was then selected as a case to verify the modified algorithm. After identification of the components, fingerprint analysis was performed using different chemometric methods including Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA), Principal Component Analysis (PCA) as well as original and modified SA methods, and the improved discriminative capacity of modified SA algorithm was illustrated. Characteristic chemical markers were then identified using the modified SA approach and then confirmed using PCA method. The quantitative results were then utilized to confirm the advantage of modified SA approach over the original one. The study made a modification to the widely applied SA algorithm, which was possibly a beneficial improvement in fingerprint analysis and quality control practice of herbal medicines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation and discrimination of cortex Magnoliae officinalis produced in Zhejiang Province (Wen-Hou-Po) by UPLC-DAD-TOF-MS fingerprint.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Yuana, Ke; Yu, Wei-Wu; Wang, Jing

    2010-10-01

    An ultra performance liquid chromatography tandem TOF mass spectrometric (UPLC-DAD-TOF-MS) fingerprinting method was developed for the quality control and source discrimination of Cortex magnoliae officinalis produced in Zhejiang Province (Wen-Hou-Po). Twelve samples of Wen-Hou-Po collected from two species in five areas in Zhejiang Province of China were used to establish the fingerprint. Data were evaluated statistically using similarity analysis, hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and discriminant analysis (DA) in order to establish a similarity standard of fingerprint for quality control of Wen-Hou-Po, then to classify the Wen-Hou-Po samples and to identify key categorizing parameters. The similarity indexes were all above 0.95 between the reference chromatogram and that of each sample. By comparing the UV and MS data with those of the authentic standards and literature, nine main peaks in the fingerprints were identified. The result of hierarchical cluster analysis showed that the samples from two species in five areas could be divided into two distinct groups (the same as the groups of the samples divided by their species) based on their compositional fingerprints. A rapid and convenient discriminant function was then established to discriminate the species of unknown Wen-Hou-Po, and the cross validation result was 100%. In this study, the methods established are reliable, and could be used to evaluate the quality and to identify the species of Wen-Hou-Po in the future.

  10. Chemical compositions and antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of the essential oils from Magnolia grandiflora, Chrysactinia mexicana, and Schinus molle found in northeast Mexico.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Boone, Laura; Alvarez-Román, Rocío; Salazar-Aranda, Ricardo; Torres-Cirio, Anabel; Rivas-Galindo, Verónica Mayela; Waksman de Torres, Noemí; González González, Gloria María; Pérez-López, Luis Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    The essential oils from Magnolia grandiflora and Chrysactinia mexicana leaves, and from Schinus molle leaves and fruit, were characterized by gas chromatography/flame-ionization detection and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Twenty-eight compounds from M. grandiflora leaves were identified (representing 93.6% of the total area of the gas chromatogram), with the major component being bornyl acetate (20.9%). Colorless and yellow oils were obtained from the C. mexicana leaves with 18 (86.7%) and 11 (100%) compounds identified, respectively. In both fractions, the principal component was sylvestrene (36.8% and 41.1%, respectively). The essential oils ofS. molle leaves and fruit were each separated into colorless and yellow fractions, in which 14 (98.2) and 20 (99.8%) compounds were identified. The main component was alpha-phellandrene in all fractions (between 32.8% and 45.0%). The M. grandiflora oil displayed antifungal activity against five dermatophyte strains. The oils from S. molle and M. grandiflora leaves had antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, which cause skin infections that potentially may lead to sepsis. However, the antioxidant activities of all oils were small (half maximal effective concentration values >250 microg/mL).

  11. Pollen flow and effects of population structure on selfing rates and female and male reproductive success in fragmented Magnolia stellata populations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fragmentation of plant populations may affect mating patterns and female and male reproductive success. To improve understanding of fragmentation effects on plant reproduction, we investigated the pollen flow patterns in six adjacent local populations of Magnolia stellata, an insect-pollinated, threatened tree species in Japan, and assessed effects of maternal plant (genet) size, local genet density, population size and neighboring population size on female reproductive success (seed production rates), and effects of mating distance, paternal genet size, population size and separation of populations on male reproductive success. Results The seed production rate, i.e. the proportion of ovules that successfully turned into seeds, varied between 1.0 and 6.5%, and increased with increasing population size and neighboring population size, and with decreasing maternal genet size and local genet density. The selfing rate varied between 3.6 and 28.9%, and increased with increasing maternal genet size and with declining local genet density. Male reproductive success increased with increasing paternal genet size, and decreased with increasing mating distance and separation of population. Pollen flow between the populations was low (6.1%) and highly leptocurtic. Conclusions Our results indicate that habitat fragmentation, separation and reduced size of populations, affected mating patterns and reproductive success of M. stellata. Local competition for pollinators and plant display size were likely to alter the reproductive success. PMID:23517612

  12. Quality evaluation of the leaves of Magnolia officinalis var. biloba using high-performance liquid chromatography fingerprint analysis of phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jun; Wu, Jian-Guo; Wu, Jin-Yu; Wu, Yan-Bin

    2016-02-01

    The high-performance liquid chromatography fingerprint method is a simple and reliable technique to evaluate the quality of leaves of Magnolia officinalis Rehd.et Wils. var. biloba Rehd.et Wils. We used the following bioactive phenolic constituents as reference compounds: rutin, afzelin, hyperoside, isoquercitrin, quercetin-3-O-α-l-rhamnoside, honokiol and magnolol. The conditions of an Agilent 1200 HPLC were: YMC-Pack-ODS-AQ column (250 × 4.6 mm id S-5 μm, 12 nm), mobile phase acetonitrile and 0.2% phosphoric acid in a gradient elute mode, flow rate 1.0 mL/min, detection wavelength 280 nm and column temperature 30°C. The analytical method was validated in terms of linearity, stability, repeatability, precision and recovery tests. While performing fingerprint analysis, we identified 11 peaks as characteristic peaks and assessed the similarities of 17 samples collected from different geological regions of China. The peak areas were used to evaluate the variation in the chemical composition of the tested samples. For this purpose, we performed hierarchical cluster analysis of the peak areas. Our results indicate that simultaneous determination of multiple ingredients could be done through chromatographic fingerprint analysis. Therefore, this high-performance liquid chromatography fingerprint method was readily utilized to evaluate the quality of leaves of M. officinalis var.biloba, which are used in several traditional herbal preparations.

  13. Larvicidal activity of Magnolia denudata seed hydrodistillate constituents and related compounds and liquid formulations towards two susceptible and two wild mosquito species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhang-Qian; Perumalsamy, Haribalan; Wang, Mo; Shu, Shaohua; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2016-05-01

    Anopheles sinensis, Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus and Culex pipiens pallens mosquitoes transmit malaria, dengue fever and West Nile virus diseases respectively. This study was conducted to determine the toxicity of 17 constituents from Magnolia denudata seed hydrodistillate (MD-SHD) and four experimental MD-SHD liquid formulations (10-50 mg L(-1) liquid) to third-instar larvae from insecticide-susceptible Cx. p. pallens and Ae. aegypti as well as wild Ae. albopictus and An. sinensis. 2,4-Di-tert-butylphenol was the most toxic constituent (LC50 1.98-3.90 mg L(-1)), followed by linoleic acid (7.19-10.49 mg L(-1)), towards larvae of the four mosquito species. High toxicity was also produced by nerolidol, (±)-limonene, α-terpinene and γ-terpinene (LC50 9.84-36.42 mg L(-1)). The toxicity of these compounds was virtually identical towards larvae of the four mosquito species, even though An. sinensis larvae were resistant to deltamethrin and temephos. The MS-SHD 50 mg L(-1) liquid resulted in 92-100% control towards larvae of the four mosquito species, while commercial temephos 200 g L(-1) emulsifiable concentrate was almost ineffective towards An. sinensis larvae (30% mortality). Reasonable mosquito control in the aquatic environment can be achieved by MD-SHD 50 mg L(-1) liquid as a potential larvicide. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Honokiol, a phytochemical from the Magnolia plant, inhibits photocarcinogenesis by targeting UVB-induced inflammatory mediators and cell cycle regulators: development of topical formulation.

    PubMed

    Vaid, Mudit; Sharma, Som D; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2010-11-01

    To develop newer and more effective chemopreventive agents for skin cancer, we assessed the effect of honokiol, a phytochemical from the Magnolia plant, on ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced skin tumorigenesis using the SKH-1 hairless mouse model. Topical treatment of mice with honokiol in a hydrophilic cream-based topical formulation before or after UVB (180 mJ/cm(2)) irradiation resulted in a significant protection against photocarcinogenesis in terms of tumor multiplicity (28-60%, P < 0.05 to <0.001) and tumor volume per tumor-bearing mouse (33-80%, P < 0.05 to 0.001, n = 20). Honokiol also inhibited and delayed the malignant progression of papillomas to carcinomas. To investigate the in vivo molecular targets of honokiol efficacy, tumors and tumor-uninvolved skin samples from the tumor-bearing mice were analyzed for inflammatory mediators, cell cycle regulators and survival signals using immunostaining, western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Treatment with honokiol significantly inhibited UVB-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E(2) (P < 0.001), proliferating cell nuclear antigen and proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (P < 0.001), interleukin (IL)-1β (P < 0.01) and IL-6 (P < 0.001) in the skin as well as in skin tumors. Western blot analysis revealed that honokiol: (i) inhibited the levels of cyclins D1, D2 and E and associated cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs)2, CDK4 and CDK6, (ii) upregulated Cip/p21 and Kip/p27 and (iii) inhibited the levels of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and the phosphorylation of Akt at Ser(473) in UVB-induced skin tumors. Together, our results indicate that honokiol holds promise for the prevention of UVB-induced skin cancer by targeting inflammatory mediators, cell cycle regulators and cell survival signals in UVB-exposed skin.

  15. Culture-Independent Study of the Late-Stage of a Bloom of the Toxic Dinoflagellate Ostreopsis cf. ovata: Preliminary Findings Suggest Genetic Differences at the Sub-Species Level and Allow ITS2 Structure Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Vitor; Salvi, Daniele; Machado, João Paulo; Vale, Micaela; Azevedo, Joana; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2015-01-01

    Available genomic data for the toxic, bloom-forming, benthic Ostreopsis spp. are traditionally obtained from isolates rather than from individuals originally present in environmental samples. Samples from the final phase of the first reported Ostreopsis bloom in European North Atlantic waters (Algarve, south coast of Portugal) were studied and characterized, using a culture-independent approach. In the first instance, a microscopy-based analysis revealed the intricate complexity of the samples. Then, we evaluated the adequacy of commonly used molecular tools (i.e., primers and nuclear ribosomal markers) for the study of Ostreopsis diversity in natural samples. A PCR-based methodology previously developed to identify/detect common Ostreopsis species was tested, including one new combination of existing PCR primers. Two sets of environmental rRNA sequences were obtained, one of them (1052 bp) with the newly tested primer set. These latter sequences encompass both the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and the D1/D2 domain of the LSU rRNA gene, leading us to an accurate identification of ITS2. In turn, this allowed us to predict and show for the first time the ITS2 secondary structure of Ostreopsis. With 92 bp in length and a two-helix structure, the ITS2 of this genus revealed to be unique among the dinoflagellates. Both the PCR approach as the phylogenetic analyses allowed to place the Ostreopsis cells observed in the samples within the O. cf. ovata phylospecies’ complex, discarding the presence of O. cf. siamensis. The (phylo)genetic results point out a certain level of nucleotide sequence divergence, but were inconclusive in relation to a possible geographic origin of the O. cf. ovata population from the Algarve’s bloom. PMID:26134259

  16. Growth Inhibitory, Bactericidal, and Morphostructural Effects of Dehydrocostus Lactone from Magnolia sieboldii Leaves on Antibiotic-Susceptible and -Resistant Strains of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Song, Ha Eun; Lee, Haeng-Byung; Kim, Cheol-Soo; Koketsu, Mamoru; Thi My Ngan, Luong; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is associated with various diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract, such as gastric inflammation and duodenal and gastric ulcers. The aim of the study was to assess anti-H. pylori effects of the sesquiterpene lactone dehydrocostus lactone (DCL) from Magnolia sieboldii leaves, compared to commercial pure DCL, two previously known sesquiterpene lactones (costunolide and parthenolide), (–)-epigallocatechin gallate, and four antibiotics. The antibacterial activity of natural DCL toward antibiotic-susceptible H. pylori ATCC 700392 and H. pylori ATCC 700824 strains (MIC, 4.9 and 4.4 mg/L) was similar to that of commercial DCL and was more effective than costunolide, parthenolide, and EGCG. The activity of DCL was slightly lower than that of metronidazole (MIC, 1.10 and 1.07 mg/L). The antibacterial activity of DCL was virtually identical toward susceptible and resistant strains, even though resistance to amoxicillin (MIC, 11.1 mg/L for PED 503G strain), clarithromycin (49.8 mg/L for PED 3582GA strain), metronidazole (21.6 mg/L for H. pylori ATCC 43504 strain; 71.1 mg/L for 221 strain), or tetracycline (14.2 mg/L for B strain) was observed. This finding indicates that DCL and the antibiotics do not share a common mode of action. The bactericidal activity of DCL toward H. pylori ATCC 43504 was not affected by pH values examined (4.0–7.0). DCL caused considerable conversion to coccoid form (94 versus 49% at 8 and 4 mg/L of DCL for 48 h). The Western blot analysis revealed that urease subunits (UreA and UreB) of H. pylori ATCC 43504 were not affected by 10 mM of DCL, whereas UreA monomer band completely disappeared at 0.1 mM of (–)-epigallocatechin gallate. Global efforts to reduce the level of antibiotics justify further studies on M. sieboldii leaf-derived materials containing DCL as potential antibacterial products or a lead molecule for the prevention or eradication of drug-resistant H. pylori. PMID:24747984

  17. In vitro cultures of Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill. (Chinese magnolia vine)--a potential biotechnological rich source of therapeutically important phenolic acids.

    PubMed

    Szopa, Agnieszka; Ekiert, Halina

    2012-04-01

    The contents of free phenolic acids and cinnamic acid were determined using an HPLC method in methanolic extracts from biomass of Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill. (Chinese magnolia vine) at different stages of organogenesis, cultured in vitro on a few variants of Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium, containing different concentrations of plant growth regulators 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) (from 0.1 to 3.0 mg/l) and in extracts from overground parts of plants growing in vivo. Six of 12 analysed compounds were detected in all extracts: chlorogenic, p-coumaric, p-hydroxybenzoic, protocatechuic, salicylic and syringic acids. Total contents of the examined metabolites in biomass of shoot-differentiating callus culture cultivated on six MS medium variants were dependent on concentrations of growth regulators in the media and ranged from 14.90 to 60.05 mg/100 g d.w. Total contents of the compounds in biomass extracts from undifferentiating callus culture maintained only on two of six MS medium variants were higher and amounted to 74.54 and 78.24 mg/100 g d.w. Maximum total contents of phenolic acids in both types of in vitro cultures were greater than in fruits (55.73 mg/100 g d.w.) and leaves (4.55 mg/100 g d.w.) of plants gowning in vivo. Chlorogenic acid and salicylic acid were the main compounds identified in biomass extracts of shoot-differentiating callus cultures (max 22.60 and 21.17 mg/100 g d.w., respectively), while chlorogenic acid (max 38.43 mg/100 g d.w.) and protocatechuic acid (max 20.95 mg/100 g d.w.) prevailed in the extracts from undifferentiating callus cultures. Other compounds dominated in fruits, namely p-coumaric acid (23.36 mg/100 g d.w.) and syringic acid (14.96 mg/100 g d.w.). This is the first report on biochemical potential of cells from S. chinensis in vitro cultures to produce the biologically active phenolic acids. These are the first results on the analysis of this group of metabolites in overground parts of

  18. Structure and Novel Biomineralization of Mnemiopsis Leidyi and Beroe Ovata Lithocyte Concretions (lcs) as Revealed by Polarization Lc-Pol Scanning Electron Microscopy (sem) and Electron Dispersion Spectroscopy (eds)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, A.

    2016-02-01

    Ctenophore statocysts have multicellular statoliths borne on the tips of balancer compound cilia (Curr. Biol. 24:R951; Biol. Bull. 227:7). Lithocyte concretions (LCs) were prepared by three methods: 1) statocysts were microsurgically collected and washed w/0.2 µm filtered sea water (FSW), followed by 5 diH2O rinses in a deep well dish (DWD); 2) statocysts were treated with 50% Chlorox/FSW to release the statolith/LCs; 3) statocysts were fixed in 2.5% glutaraldehyde or 1% paraformaldehyde-2.5% glutaraldehyde in 10 mM pH 7.8 HEPES-buffered FSW, and statoliths and LCs microsurgically released. LCs for SEM were glued to stubs, C-stabilized and Pt-coated to a thickness of 8 nm and viewed at 10 kVe. LCs for EDS were applied to carbon tape on aluminum stubs and analyzed by EDS at 3 and 10 kVe. SEM and EDS were performed on a Zeiss Supra 40 VP equipped with an EDS detector controlled by INCA software (Oxford). Results were compared against compounds of known elemental composition. LCs examined by LC-POL revealed no birefringence (BR). LCs viewed by SEM were either a lumpy mass (M. leidyi) or smooth ellipsoid (B. ovata). LCs on carbon tape typically shattered and released overlapping, layered, multi-oriented crystals. EDS of LC crystals from both species collected by all methods lacked Ca, Mn and Mg. Predominant elements were Na, K, O and S in ratios suggesting that LCs contain mixed sodium/potassium sulfates. The unique composition of ctenophore statoliths may have been critical for the 600+ million years persistence of these organisms (J. exp. Biol. 218:592) including survival through multiple global extinctions and related ocean acidifications. Thanks to L. Kerr, R. Oldenbourg, S. Mehta, A. Verma, M. Tran, A. Kuzirian and S. Tamm for stimulating discussion and technical advice. EDS stds compounds were curtesy of L. Amaral-Zettler, J. Huber and K. Gribble (Bay Paul Center/MBL). Funding: AU PIL Program, NSF-EPS-1158862.

  19. Food Sensitivities

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, Paul

    1984-01-01

    Food sensitivities are a common but frequently unrecognized cause of chronic symptomatology in patients with known allergies. Food sensitivities often are not detected by skin testing. This article discusses the controversy surrounding the treatment of food sensitivities; the provocative sublingual and intradermal tests for sensitivities, and the importance of eliciting complete past and family histories from the allergic patient. Because patients with symptoms of food sensitivity are likely to visit their family doctor first, he should be the first to detect and treat them. Usually patients with a food sensitivity obtain relief from symptoms when the offending food(s) are excluded from their diet. PMID:21283500

  20. Gluten Sensitivity

    MedlinePlus

    ... products like medicines, vitamins, and supplements. People with gluten sensitivity have problems with gluten. It is different from ... their small intestine. Some of the symptoms of gluten sensitivity are similar to celiac disease. They include tiredness ...

  1. Tartrazine sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Dipalma, J R

    1990-11-01

    Tartrazine (FD & C Yellow No. 5) is an approved azo dye present in many drugs and food products. During the 1970s, many cases of tartrazine sensitivity were reported. This led to new regulations that required the listing of azo dyes on package inserts of drugs and on packages of food products. Tartrazine sensitivity is most frequently manifested by urticaria and asthma. Although azo dyes have been implicated in accentuating hyperkinetic syndromes, tartrazine is not considered an offender. Vasculitis, purpura and contact dermatitis infrequently occur as manifestations of tartrazine sensitivity. Cross-sensitivity in aspirin-sensitive and NSAID-sensitive patients may also occur. The mechanism of sensitivity is obscure and has been called pseudoallergic. Management consists mainly of avoidance of drugs and food products that contain tartrazine.

  2. Sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Misery, L; Loser, K; Ständer, S

    2016-02-01

    Sensitive skin is a clinical condition defined by the self-reported facial presence of different sensory perceptions, including tightness, stinging, burning, tingling, pain and pruritus. Sensitive skin may occur in individuals with normal skin, with skin barrier disturbance, or as a part of the symptoms associated with facial dermatoses such as rosacea, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Although experimental studies are still pending, the symptoms of sensitive skin suggest the involvement of cutaneous nerve fibres and neuronal, as well as epidermal, thermochannels. Many individuals with sensitive skin report worsening symptoms due to environmental factors. It is thought that this might be attributed to the thermochannel TRPV1, as it typically responds to exogenous, endogenous, physical and chemical stimuli. Barrier disruptions and immune mechanisms may also be involved. This review summarizes current knowledge on the epidemiology, potential mechanisms, clinics and therapy of sensitive skin.

  3. Climate Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Lindzen, Richard

    2011-11-09

    Warming observed thus far is entirely consistent with low climate sensitivity. However, the result is ambiguous because the sources of climate change are numerous and poorly specified. Model predictions of substantial warming aredependent on positive feedbacks associated with upper level water vapor and clouds, but models are notably inadequate in dealing with clouds and the impacts of clouds and water vapor are intimately intertwined. Various approaches to measuring sensitivity based on the physics of the feedbacks will be described. The results thus far point to negative feedbacks. Problems with these approaches as well as problems with the concept of climate sensitivity will be described.

  4. Mastery Learning in the Steel Magnolia Town.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachal, Alice M.

    The Chapter 1 reading and math program in Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana, is designed to meet the needs of educationally disadvantaged kindergarten through eighth-grade students at 11 project sites. Each of the identified 1,972 participating students receives approximately 50 minutes of direct supplemental reading and/or math instruction 5 days…

  5. Sensitivity, Recalculated

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, J. P.

    2016-11-07

    Prior to this study, the sensitivity in nEXO was calculated using an approximate method that does not provide 90% coverage. I find it useful to understand the confidence level of a limit by focusing on the confidence level as a property of the method used to find the limit.A particular method (algorithm,formula) is applied to an experiment to produce a limit. That experiment was conducted in a particular universe with certain values of the physical parameters. We’d like a method than produces a correct limit for 90% of the experiments that could run. We also want that to be true for every universe—that is, regardless of the physical parameter value, the method should still produce a correct limit 90% of the time.

  6. Gluten Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Catassi, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is a syndrome characterized by intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms related to the ingestion of gluten-containing food in subjects who are not affected by either celiac disease (CD) or wheat allergy (WA). The prevalence of NCGS is not clearly defined yet. Indirect evidence suggests that NCGS is slightly more common than CD, the latter affecting around 1% of the general population. NCGS has been mostly described in adults, particularly in females in the age group of 30-50 years; however, pediatric case series have also been reported. Since NCGS may be transient, gluten tolerance needs to be reassessed over time in patients with NCGS. NCGS is characterized by symptoms that usually occur soon after gluten ingestion, disappear with gluten withdrawal, and relapse following gluten challenge within hours/days. The 'classical' presentation of NCGS is a combination of irritable bowel syndrome-like symptoms, including abdominal pain, bloating, bowel habit abnormalities (either diarrhea or constipation), and systemic manifestations such as 'foggy mind', headache, fatigue, joint and muscle pain, leg or arm numbness, dermatitis (eczema or skin rash), depression, and anemia. In recent years, several studies explored the relationship between the ingestion of gluten-containing food and the appearance of neurological and psychiatric disorders/symptoms like ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, schizophrenia, autism, depression, anxiety, and hallucinations (so-called gluten psychosis). The diagnosis of NCGS should be considered in patients with persistent intestinal and/or extraintestinal complaints showing a normal result of the CD and WA serological markers on a gluten-containing diet, usually reporting worsening of symptoms after eating gluten-rich food. NCGS should not be an exclusion diagnosis only. Unfortunately, no biomarker is sensitive and specific enough for diagnostic purposes; therefore, the diagnosis of NCGS is currently based on

  7. Sensitivity Analysis in Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Howard M. (Compiler); Haftka, Raphael T. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    The symposium proceedings presented focused primarily on sensitivity analysis of structural response. However, the first session, entitled, General and Multidisciplinary Sensitivity, focused on areas such as physics, chemistry, controls, and aerodynamics. The other four sessions were concerned with the sensitivity of structural systems modeled by finite elements. Session 2 dealt with Static Sensitivity Analysis and Applications; Session 3 with Eigenproblem Sensitivity Methods; Session 4 with Transient Sensitivity Analysis; and Session 5 with Shape Sensitivity Analysis.

  8. Pressure Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Bencic, T.; Sullivan, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews new advances and applications of pressure sensitive paints in aerodynamic testing. Emphasis is placed on important technical aspects of pressure sensitive paint including instrumentation, data processing, and uncertainty analysis.

  9. Tooth sensitivity and whitening.

    PubMed

    Swift, Edward J

    2005-09-01

    This article presents a review of the basic concepts of tooth sensitivity and how those concepts apply to cervical dentin hypersensitivity and the sensitivity frequently associated with tooth whitening. The etiology and treatment of cervical dentin hypersensitivity are described. The clinical presentation, incidence, and predisposing factors for sensitivity associated with tooth whitening also are discussed.

  10. [Subjective sensitivity to noise].

    PubMed

    Belojević, G

    1991-01-01

    It is likely that individual variations in subjectively estimated noise sensitivity influence different social and psychophysiological reactions of people exposed to noise. Subjective noise sensitivity might be a relatively stable personal characteristic. A correlation have been found between high sensitiveness to noise and some medical symptoms (sleep disturbance, nervousness, depression), and worse work performance in noisy environments. An introvert person with neurotic symptoms is more frequently found in people highly sensitive to noise. Testing for subjective sensitivity to noise might be helpful in professional selection and orientation for noisy work-places as well as in housing advising.

  11. Context Sensitive Modeling of Cancer Drug Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo-Juen; Litvin, Oren; Ungar, Lyle; Pe’er, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Recent screening of drug sensitivity in large panels of cancer cell lines provides a valuable resource towards developing algorithms that predict drug response. Since more samples provide increased statistical power, most approaches to prediction of drug sensitivity pool multiple cancer types together without distinction. However, pan-cancer results can be misleading due to the confounding effects of tissues or cancer subtypes. On the other hand, independent analysis for each cancer-type is hampered by small sample size. To balance this trade-off, we present CHER (Contextual Heterogeneity Enabled Regression), an algorithm that builds predictive models for drug sensitivity by selecting predictive genomic features and deciding which ones should—and should not—be shared across different cancers, tissues and drugs. CHER provides significantly more accurate models of drug sensitivity than comparable elastic-net-based models. Moreover, CHER provides better insight into the underlying biological processes by finding a sparse set of shared and type-specific genomic features. PMID:26274927

  12. Species Sensitivity Distributions - Aquatic | Interspecies ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2016-02-22

    Species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) are probabilistic models that describe the sensitivity of biological species to a chemical. Page provides access to online Species sensitivity distribution for wildlife calculator

  13. Tuned cavity magnetometer sensitivity.

    SciTech Connect

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2009-09-01

    We have developed a high sensitivity (sensitivity levels.

  14. Mentoring Emotionally Sensitive Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.; Self, Elizabeth

    Mentoring individuals who are gifted, talented, and creative, but somewhat emotionally sensitive is a challenging and provocative arena. Several reasons individuals experience heightened sensitivity include: lack of nurturing, abuse, alcoholism in the family, low self-esteem, unrealistic parental expectations, and parental pressure to achieve.…

  15. Are Psychopaths Morally Sensitive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Bruce; Le Sage, Leonie

    2009-01-01

    Philosophical and psychological opinion is divided over whether moral sensitivity, understood as the ability to pick out a situation's morally salient features, necessarily involves emotional engagement. This paper seeks to offer insight into this question. It reasons that if moral sensitivity does draw significantly on affective capacities of…

  16. Are Psychopaths Morally Sensitive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Bruce; Le Sage, Leonie

    2009-01-01

    Philosophical and psychological opinion is divided over whether moral sensitivity, understood as the ability to pick out a situation's morally salient features, necessarily involves emotional engagement. This paper seeks to offer insight into this question. It reasons that if moral sensitivity does draw significantly on affective capacities of…

  17. Career Awareness Units, Magnolia Public Schools, Grades 1-7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnolia School District 14, AR.

    The guide contains career awareness units for grades one through seven. A chart for each grade level lists the unit titles with textbook references, resource speakers, and study trips. Some of the speakers and study trips suggested throughout the guide are specific to the local area. For each unit, concepts to be developed are coordinated in chart…

  18. Sensitive skin: an overview.

    PubMed

    Inamadar, Arun C; Palit, Aparna

    2013-01-01

    Sensitive skin is less tolerant to frequent and prolonged use of cosmetics and toiletries. It is self-diagnosed and typically unaccompanied by any obvious physical signs of irritation. With the change in lifestyle and also with increased opportunity to use many new brands of cosmetics and toiletries, there has been an increase in females complaining of unique sensation in their facial skin. Sensitive skin presents as smarting, burning, stinging, itching, and/or tight sensation in their facial skin. The condition is found in more than 50% of women and 40% of men, creating a sizable demand for products designed to minimize skin sensitivity. Good numbers of invasive and non-invasive tests are designed to evaluate and predict the sensitive skin. Management includes guidelines for selecting suitable cosmetics and toiletries in sensitive skin individuals.

  19. Variable sensitivity moire interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Cole, Helen; Bennewitz, James H.; Gilbert, John A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that optical microlithography can be used to produce a crossed grating which diffracts light into multiple orders sufficient to record moire interferograms with sensitivities ranging from 2.0 to 0.285 micron/fringe. The grating profile produced by the method is analyzed to establish the diffraction efficiency in each diffraction order, and generalized expressions are given for variable sensitivity moire interferometry. Experimental tests are conducted to verify analytical arguments. In one of these tests, two different diffraction order pairs are used simultaneously to verify that surface displacement can be measured at different sensitivities.

  20. Sensitivity of photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Building on its high spatial resolution, deep penetration depth and excellent image contrast, 3D photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has grown tremendously since its first publication in 2005. Integrating optical excitation and acoustic detection, PAM has broken through both the optical diffusion and optical diffraction limits. PAM has 100% relative sensitivity to optical absorption (i.e., a given percentage change in the optical absorption coefficient yields the same percentage change in the photoacoustic amplitude), and its ultimate detection sensitivity is limited only by thermal noise. Focusing on the engineering aspects of PAM, this Review discusses the detection sensitivity of PAM, compares the detection efficiency of different PAM designs, and summarizes the imaging performance of various endogenous and exogenous contrast agents. It then describes representative PAM applications with high detection sensitivity, and outlines paths to further improvement. PMID:25302158

  1. Flyer sensitivity test

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoton, N.O.

    1981-01-01

    This is an interim report on the development of a flyer sensitivity test to be used for characterization of a variety of explosives having a relatively wide range of sensitivities. Included are descriptions of the flyer device design and electrical firing source; preliminary results from HNS I and HNS II threshold tests; flyer planarity data under various conditions of bridge confinement; and velocity calibration data by VISAR measurements.

  2. Sensitive skin: an overview.

    PubMed

    Berardesca, E; Farage, M; Maibach, H

    2013-02-01

    Sensitive skin is a condition of subjective cutaneous hyper-reactivity to environmental factors. Subjects experiencing this condition report exaggerated reactions when their skin is in contact with cosmetics, soaps and sun screens, and they often report worsening after exposure to dry and cold climate. Although no sign of irritation is commonly detected, itching, burning, stinging and a tight sensation are constantly present. Generally substances that are not commonly considered irritants are involved in this abnormal response.Sensitive skin and subjective irritation are widespread but still far from being completely defined and understood. A correlation between sensitive skin and constitutional anomalies and/or other triggering factors such as occupational skin diseases or chronic exposure to irritants has been hypothesized. Recent findings suggest that higher sensitivity can be due to different mechanisms. Hyper-reactors may have a thinner stratum corneum with a reduced corneocyte area causing a higher transcutaneous penetration of water-soluble chemicals. Alterations in vanilloid receptors and changes in neuronal transmission have been described. Monitoring skin parameters such as barrier function, proclivity to irritation, corneocyte size and sensorial transmission can also be useful to identify regional differences in skin sensitivity.

  3. Allergic sensitization: screening methods

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Experimental in silico, in vitro, and rodent models for screening and predicting protein sensitizing potential are discussed, including whether there is evidence of new sensitizations and allergies since the introduction of genetically modified crops in 1996, the importance of linear versus conformational epitopes, and protein families that become allergens. Some common challenges for predicting protein sensitization are addressed: (a) exposure routes; (b) frequency and dose of exposure; (c) dose-response relationships; (d) role of digestion, food processing, and the food matrix; (e) role of infection; (f) role of the gut microbiota; (g) influence of the structure and physicochemical properties of the protein; and (h) the genetic background and physiology of consumers. The consensus view is that sensitization screening models are not yet validated to definitively predict the de novo sensitizing potential of a novel protein. However, they would be extremely useful in the discovery and research phases of understanding the mechanisms of food allergy development, and may prove fruitful to provide information regarding potential allergenicity risk assessment of future products on a case by case basis. These data and findings were presented at a 2012 international symposium in Prague organized by the Protein Allergenicity Technical Committee of the International Life Sciences Institute’s Health and Environmental Sciences Institute. PMID:24739743

  4. New sensitive marginal oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahf, L.

    1981-09-01

    A new type of a sensitive marginal oscillator has been developed for the determination of high magnetic inductions by means of nuclear magnetic resonance. Obtaining a high sensitivity with this measuring principle demands a soft behavior of the oscillator which is a particular feature of the circuit presented. It is shown that this behavior is due to the fact that a very weak positive feedback is established by the inner capacitances of the single field effect transistor used in the circuit. Optimal values for the operation parameters are calculated.

  5. RESRAD parameter sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, J.J.; Yu, C.; Zielen, A.J.

    1991-08-01

    Three methods were used to perform a sensitivity analysis of RESRAD code input parameters -- enhancement of RESRAD by the Gradient Enhanced Software System (GRESS) package, direct parameter perturbation, and graphic comparison. Evaluation of these methods indicated that (1) the enhancement of RESRAD by GRESS has limitations and should be used cautiously, (2) direct parameter perturbation is tedious to implement, and (3) the graphics capability of RESRAD 4.0 is the most direct and convenient method for performing sensitivity analyses. This report describes procedures for implementing these methods and presents a comparison of results. 3 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Sensitivity to People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Henry Clay

    The general purpose of this book is to examine applications of the component approach to sensitivity training. Chapter 2 examines the goals of training and considers each of the components (level of perception, spread of perception, empathy, observation, stereotypes, and the individual), together with interaction studies, filmed and taped…

  7. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, G.R.

    1999-08-03

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system is described which uses passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor. 1 fig.

  8. Sensitization of stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, James P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this experiment is to determine the corrosion rates of 18-8 stainless steels that have been sensitized at various temperatures and to show the application of phase diagrams. The laboratory instructor will assign each student a temperature, ranging from 550 C to 1050 C, to which the sample will be heated. Further details of the experimental procedure are detailed.

  9. High-Sensitivity Spectrophotometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, T. D.

    1982-01-01

    Selected high-sensitivity spectrophotometric methods are examined, and comparisons are made of their relative strengths and weaknesses and the circumstances for which each can best be applied. Methods include long path cells, noise reduction, laser intracavity absorption, thermocouple calorimetry, photoacoustic methods, and thermo-optical methods.…

  10. Sexuality Sensitive Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaughtry, Nate; Dillon, Suzanna; Jones, Elizabeth; Smigell, Sara

    2005-01-01

    American schools, especially their physical education and sport programs, provide some of the most hostile social geographies in all of society for gay youth. With the aim of transforming schools toward more democratic and sexuality sensitive institutions, this paper reviews the literature on sexuality and education. In the review, three themes,…

  11. Visual sensitivity tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, R. F.; Fitzgerald, J. W.; Rositano, S. A.

    1972-01-01

    Testing device uses closed loop film cassettes to project programmed visual stimuli on screen which the observer views through a lens making the stimuli appear to be at optical infinity. Tester is useful for determining changes in glautomatous visual field sensitivity.

  12. High-Sensitivity Spectrophotometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, T. D.

    1982-01-01

    Selected high-sensitivity spectrophotometric methods are examined, and comparisons are made of their relative strengths and weaknesses and the circumstances for which each can best be applied. Methods include long path cells, noise reduction, laser intracavity absorption, thermocouple calorimetry, photoacoustic methods, and thermo-optical methods.…

  13. Sensitization of Parker fittings

    SciTech Connect

    Wilber, W.W.

    1985-09-01

    At your request, ferrules from 316 SS Parker-Hannifen compression fittings at the FFTF have been examined and evaluated to determine the metallurgical condition as related to carbide precipitation in grain boundaries (known as sensitization) and the implications this may have with regard to corrosion resistance. To accomplish this, two ferrules from new stock, two ferrules from old stock and two ferrules that had seen service were examined metallurgically. The samples were prepared for optical metallography. They were viewed in both the etched and unetched condition and analyzed on the scanning electron microscope (SEM) for elemental content. It was confirmed that the ferrules from new stock had a 5 mil thick nitrided layer on the ferrule ID at the lead end and that the 316 SS ferrule material was in the sensitized condition, indicating low resistance to aqueous corrosion. The material from old stock had no nitride layer but was in the sensitized condition indicating low resistance to aqueous corrosion. The ferrules that had seen service had not been nitrided and were not sensitized indicating high resistance to aqueous corrosion.

  14. Sensitivity to Visual Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chipman, Susan F.; And Others

    Described are three experiments which probed children's sensitivity to structure or organization in visual patterns. Each experiment employed a different paradigm (complexity judgment, discrimination learning, recognition learning, and memory) in order to tap different aspects of children's use of structural information. Subjects were children in…

  15. NUV Spectroscopic Sensitivity Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osten, Rachel

    2011-10-01

    Purpose is to monitor sensitivity of each NUV grating mode to detect any change due to contamination or other causes. The same basic strategy as employed in previous cycles is used here, with a few notable exceptions: Two cenwaves of G225M have been dropped {2306 and 2410}, and only the bluest one retained. One cenwave of G285M has been dropped {2739}, and the bluest and reddest have been retained. This is to continue to monitor the wavelength dependence of the G285M sensitivity decline, and monitor the wavelength dependence of the G225M sensitivity decline, which only appears at the shortest wavelengths {stripe A of the 2186 cenwave}. These two gratings are also not used for science exposures in Cycle 19. The G185M grating has the most usage of the NUV gratings, and an additional cenwave is added to ensure the wavelength independence of the sensitivity degradation. For the G230L, the 3360 cenwave is dropped due to the contamination in both stripes B and C from second order light, which does not stretch the wavelength coverage very red compared to the other G230L cenwaves, and this cenwave is costly in terms of exposure time. The exposure time of the G230L/2950 setting was also reduced, since it was apparently overflowing its buffer.

  16. NUV Spectroscopic Sensitivity Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostroem, Azalee

    2013-10-01

    Purpose is to monitor sensitivity of each NUV grating mode to detect any change due to contamination or other causes. The same basic strategy as employed in previous cycles is used here, with a few notable exceptions: Two cenwaves of G225M have been dropped {2306 and 2410}, and only the bluest one retained. One cenwave of G285M has been dropped {2739}, and the bluest and reddest have been retained. This is to continue to monitor the wavelength dependence of the G285M sensitivity decline, and monitor the wavelength dependence of the G225M sensitivity decline, which only appears at the shortest wavelengths {stripe A of the 2186 cenwave}. These two gratings are also not used for science exposures in Cycle 19. The G185M grating has the most usage of the NUV gratings, and an additional cenwave is added to ensure the wavelength independence of the sensitivity degradation. For the G230L, the 3360 cenwave is dropped due to the contamination in both stripes B and C from second order light, which does not stretch the wavelength coverage very red compared to the other G230L cenwaves, and this cenwave is costly in terms of exposure time. The exposure time of the G230L/2950 setting was also reduced, since it was apparently overflowing its buffer.

  17. NUV Spectroscopic Sensitivity Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostroem, Azalee

    2012-10-01

    Purpose is to monitor sensitivity of each NUV grating mode to detect any change due to contamination or other causes. The same basic strategy as employed in previous cycles is used here, with a few notable exceptions: Two cenwaves of G225M have been dropped {2306 and 2410}, and only the bluest one retained. One cenwave of G285M has been dropped {2739}, and the bluest and reddest have been retained. This is to continue to monitor the wavelength dependence of the G285M sensitivity decline, and monitor the wavelength dependence of the G225M sensitivity decline, which only appears at the shortest wavelengths {stripe A of the 2186 cenwave}. These two gratings are also not used for science exposures in Cycle 19. The G185M grating has the most usage of the NUV gratings, and an additional cenwave is added to ensure the wavelength independence of the sensitivity degradation. For the G230L, the 3360 cenwave is dropped due to the contamination in both stripes B and C from second order light, which does not stretch the wavelength coverage very red compared to the other G230L cenwaves, and this cenwave is costly in terms of exposure time. The exposure time of the G230L/2950 setting was also reduced, since it was apparently overflowing its buffer.

  18. The Emotionally Sensitive Adolescent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.; Lehtonen, Kimmo

    This paper provides a list of signs, symptoms, and indicators of emotionally sensitive adolescents includes clinging behavior, withdrawn behavior, shy/inhibited behavior, represses anger, poor reaction to criticism, makes self-disparaging statements, low self-esteem, "can't forgive self or others," ruined by a small critical comment, exploding…

  19. UNITEC SENS-IT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The UniTec Sens-It is a small gas-sensing device that can measure volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This sensor is used to measure VOCs in applications such as urban air quality, roadside pollution, and (solid waste) landfill monitoring. This operating procedure explains what yo...

  20. Sense and Sensitivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keefe, Barbara J.

    1992-01-01

    Maintains that, although there is little substance to the "political correctness" issue, it has lowered the level of discussion of genuinely important issues. Discusses how communication analysis can contribute to the politically sensitive, but specific and distinct, problems subsumed by the struggle over political correctness…

  1. Sexuality Sensitive Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaughtry, Nate; Dillon, Suzanna; Jones, Elizabeth; Smigell, Sara

    2005-01-01

    American schools, especially their physical education and sport programs, provide some of the most hostile social geographies in all of society for gay youth. With the aim of transforming schools toward more democratic and sexuality sensitive institutions, this paper reviews the literature on sexuality and education. In the review, three themes,…

  2. UNITEC SENS-IT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The UniTec Sens-It is a small gas-sensing device that can measure volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This sensor is used to measure VOCs in applications such as urban air quality, roadside pollution, and (solid waste) landfill monitoring. This operating procedure explains what yo...

  3. What Is Sensitivity Training?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seashore, Charles

    1968-01-01

    Sensitivity training is one type of experience-based learning in which participants work together in a small group over an extended period of time learning through analysis of their own experiences. The primary setting is the T Group (T for training) in which a staff member sets up an ambiguous situation which allows participants to choose the…

  4. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    1999-01-01

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system using passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor.

  5. UV-sensitive syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Graciela

    2005-09-04

    UV-sensitive syndrome (UV(S)S) is a human DNA repair-deficiency disorder with mild clinical manifestations. In contrast to other disorders with photosensitivity, no neurological or developmental abnormalities and no predisposition to cancer have been reported. The cellular and biochemical responses of UV(S)S and Cockayne syndrome (CS) cells to UV light are indistinguishable, and result from defective transcription-coupled repair of photoproducts in expressed genes [G. Spivak, T. Itoh, T. Matsunaga, O. Nikaido, P. Hanawalt, M. Yamaizumi, Ultra violet-sensitive syndrome cells are defective in transcription-coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, DNA Repair, 1, 2002, 629-643]. The severe neurological and developmental deficiency characteristic of CS may arise from unresolved blockage of transcription at oxidative DNA lesions, which could result in excessive cell death and/or attenuated transcription. We have proposed that individuals with UV(S)S develop normally because they are proficient in repair of oxidative base damage or in transcriptional bypass of these lesions; consistent with this hypothesis, CS-B cells, but not UV(S)S cells, are deficient in host cell reactivation of plasmids containing oxidative base lesions [G. Spivak, P. Hanawalt, Host cell reactivation of plasmids containing oxidative DNA lesions is defective in Cockayne syndrome but normal in UV-sensitive syndrome, 2005, submitted for publication]. In this review, I will summarize the current understanding of the UV-sensitive syndrome and compare it with the Cockayne syndrome.

  6. Sensitivity to People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Henry Clay

    The general purpose of this book is to examine applications of the component approach to sensitivity training. Chapter 2 examines the goals of training and considers each of the components (level of perception, spread of perception, empathy, observation, stereotypes, and the individual), together with interaction studies, filmed and taped…

  7. New sensitizers for PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Alan R.; Garbo, Greta M.; Krivak, T.; Mastroianni, Marta; Petousis, Nikolaos H.; St Clair, T.; Weisenberger, M.; van Lier, Johan E.

    1991-06-01

    For a number of well-defined reasons, research into the development of alternative photosensitizers to PhotofrinTM, for use in Photodynamic Therapy, continues. The efforts described in this paper cover the study of a number of sensitizers absorbing at different wavelengths, which may have selective applications in the field of photomedicine. In one approach, the use of tetraazoporphyrins (porphyrazines) as sensitizers is studied. Although related tetramacrocyclic systems such as porphyrins and phthalocyanines have been, and continue to be, well studied in this field, porphyrazines have, to-date, received little attention. In a second study, purpurins are examined as possible alternatives to PhotofrinTM. In a recent study, tissue distribution properties of tin etiopurpurin dichloride, as a function of time, were examined. Results indicate that this purpurin continues to show promise for applications in PDT.

  8. Culturally sensitive assessment.

    PubMed

    Edwards, C P; Kumru, A

    1999-04-01

    Issues of cultural interaction and culturally sensitive assessment and treatment of young children have become prominent in recent years for mental health professionals, for reasons having to do with changing demographics, public values, and professional vision. "Culture" refers to the sociocultural adaptation of design for living shared by people as members of a community. Mental health professionals who work with culturally diverse populations need to become culturally self-aware and find abstract and experiential ways to build a useful body of professional knowledge concerning childrearing and discipline practices, health and illness beliefs, communication styles, and expectations about family or professional relations or other group interactions. They also need to learn how to work effectively in intercultural teams, use families as partners and resources, train and work with interpreters, and select and use formal and nonformal assessment procedures in appropriate, culturally sensitive ways.

  9. Scaling in sensitivity analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, W.A.; Doherty, P.F.

    2002-01-01

    Population matrix models allow sets of demographic parameters to be summarized by a single value 8, the finite rate of population increase. The consequences of change in individual demographic parameters are naturally measured by the corresponding changes in 8; sensitivity analyses compare demographic parameters on the basis of these changes. These comparisons are complicated by issues of scale. Elasticity analysis attempts to deal with issues of scale by comparing the effects of proportional changes in demographic parameters, but leads to inconsistencies in evaluating demographic rates. We discuss this and other problems of scaling in sensitivity analysis, and suggest a simple criterion for choosing appropriate scales. We apply our suggestions to data for the killer whale, Orcinus orca.

  10. Integrated Sensitivity Analysis Workflow

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman-Hill, Ernest J.; Hoffman, Edward L.; Gibson, Marcus J.; Clay, Robert L.

    2014-08-01

    Sensitivity analysis is a crucial element of rigorous engineering analysis, but performing such an analysis on a complex model is difficult and time consuming. The mission of the DART Workbench team at Sandia National Laboratories is to lower the barriers to adoption of advanced analysis tools through software integration. The integrated environment guides the engineer in the use of these integrated tools and greatly reduces the cycle time for engineering analysis.

  11. Solving tooth sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michael B

    2010-01-01

    Solving tooth sensitivity requires both you and the patients to be resilient and to understand that if one approach doesn't work, you can try another one that is non-invasive or, at worst, minimally invasive. Much like the clinician who posted the original question, I strongly believe that it is our responsibility to convince patients that jumping to a radical solution could be totally unnecessary--and expensive-- and still might not solve the problem.

  12. CDF's Higgs sensitivity status

    SciTech Connect

    Junk, Tom; /Illinois U., Urbana

    2005-10-01

    The combined sensitivity of CDF's current Standard Model Higgs boson searches is presented. The expected 95% CL limits on the production cross section times the relevant Higgs boson branching ratios are computed for the W{sup {+-}}H {yields} {ell}{sup {+-}}{nu}b{bar b}, ZH {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b}, gg {yields} H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} W{sup {+-}}H {yields} W{sup {+-}}W{sup +}W{sup -} channels as they stand as of the October 2005, using results which were prepared for Summer 2005 conferences and a newer result form the gg {yields} H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} channel. Correlated and uncorrelated systematic uncertainties are taken into account, and the luminosity requirements for 95% CL exclusion, 3{sigma} evidence, and 5{sigma} discovery are computed for median experimental outcomes. A list of improvements required to achieve the sensitivity to a SM Higgs boson as quantified in the Higgs Sensitivity Working Group's report is provided.

  13. Interference and Sensitivity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    VanderWeele, Tyler J.; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J.; Halloran, M. Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Causal inference with interference is a rapidly growing area. The literature has begun to relax the “no-interference” assumption that the treatment received by one individual does not affect the outcomes of other individuals. In this paper we briefly review the literature on causal inference in the presence of interference when treatments have been randomized. We then consider settings in which causal effects in the presence of interference are not identified, either because randomization alone does not suffice for identification, or because treatment is not randomized and there may be unmeasured confounders of the treatment-outcome relationship. We develop sensitivity analysis techniques for these settings. We describe several sensitivity analysis techniques for the infectiousness effect which, in a vaccine trial, captures the effect of the vaccine of one person on protecting a second person from infection even if the first is infected. We also develop two sensitivity analysis techniques for causal effects in the presence of unmeasured confounding which generalize analogous techniques when interference is absent. These two techniques for unmeasured confounding are compared and contrasted. PMID:25620841

  14. Oxygen sensitive microwells.

    PubMed

    Sinkala, Elly; Eddington, David T

    2010-12-07

    Oxygen tension is critical in a number of cell pathways but is often overlooked in cell culture. One reason for this is the difficulty in modulating and assessing oxygen tensions without disturbing the culture conditions. Toward this end, a simple method to generate oxygen-sensitive microwells was developed through embossing polystyrene (PS) and platinum(ii) octaethylporphyrin ketone (PtOEPK) thin films. In addition to monitoring the oxygen tension, microwells were employed in order to isolate uniform clusters of cells in microwells. The depth and width of the microwells can be adapted to different experimental parameters easily by altering the thin film processing or embossing stamp geometries. The thin oxygen sensitive microwell substrate is also compatible with high magnification modalities such as confocal imaging. The incorporation of the oxygen sensor into the microwells produces measurements of the oxygen tension near the cell surface. The oxygen sensitive microwells were calibrated and used to monitor oxygen tensions of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Cells (MDCKs) cultured at high and low densities as a proof of concept. Wells 500 µm in diameter seeded with an average of 330 cells exhibited an oxygen level of 12.6% whereas wells seeded with an average of 20 cells per well exhibited an oxygen level of 19.5%, a 35.7% difference. This platform represents a new tool for culturing cells in microwells in a format amenable to high magnification imaging while monitoring the oxygen state of the culture media.

  15. Sensitivity testing and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Neyer, B.T.

    1991-01-01

    New methods of sensitivity testing and analysis are proposed. The new test method utilizes Maximum Likelihood Estimates to pick the next test level in order to maximize knowledge of both the mean, {mu}, and the standard deviation, {sigma} of the population. Simulation results demonstrate that this new test provides better estimators (less bias and smaller variance) of both {mu} and {sigma} than the other commonly used tests (Probit, Bruceton, Robbins-Monro, Langlie). A new method of analyzing sensitivity tests is also proposed. It uses the Likelihood Ratio Test to compute regions of arbitrary confidence. It can calculate confidence regions, for {mu}, {sigma}, and arbitrary percentiles. Unlike presently used methods, such as the program ASENT which is based on the Cramer-Rao theorem, it can analyze the results of all sensitivity tests, and it does not significantly underestimate the size of the confidence regions. The new test and analysis methods will be explained and compared to the presently used methods. 19 refs., 12 figs.

  16. Kinematic sensitivity of robot manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vuskovic, Marko I.

    1989-01-01

    Kinematic sensitivity vectors and matrices for open-loop, n degrees-of-freedom manipulators are derived. First-order sensitivity vectors are defined as partial derivatives of the manipulator's position and orientation with respect to its geometrical parameters. The four-parameter kinematic model is considered, as well as the five-parameter model in case of nominally parallel joint axes. Sensitivity vectors are expressed in terms of coordinate axes of manipulator frames. Second-order sensitivity vectors, the partial derivatives of first-order sensitivity vectors, are also considered. It is shown that second-order sensitivity vectors can be expressed as vector products of the first-order sensitivity vectors.

  17. SENSITIVE PRESSURE GAUGE

    DOEpatents

    Ball, W.P.

    1961-01-01

    An electron multiplier device is described. It has a plurality of dynodes between an anode and cathode arranged to measure pressure, temperature, or other environmental physical conditions that proportionately iinfuences the quantity of gas molecules between the dynodes. The output current of the device is influenced by the reduction in electron multiplication at the dynodes due to energy reducing collisions of the electrons with the gas molecules between the dynodes. More particularly, the current is inversely proportional to the quantity of gas molecules, viz., the gas pressure. The device is, hence, extremely sensitive to low pressures.

  18. Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Di

    2010-01-01

    Dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is the only solar cell that can offer both the flexibility and transparency. Its efficiency is comparable to amorphous silicon solar cells but with a much lower cost. This review not only covers the fundamentals of DSSC but also the related cutting-edge research and its development for industrial applications. Most recent research topics on DSSC, for example, applications of nanostructured TiO2, ZnO electrodes, ionic liquid electrolytes, carbon nanotubes, graphene and solid state DSSC have all been included and discussed. PMID:20480003

  19. Sensitivity Data File Formats

    SciTech Connect

    Rearden, Bradley T.

    2016-04-01

    The format of the TSUNAMI-A sensitivity data file produced by SAMS for cases with deterministic transport solutions is given in Table 6.3.A.1. The occurrence of each entry in the data file is followed by an identification of the data contained on each line of the file and the FORTRAN edit descriptor denoting the format of each line. A brief description of each line is also presented. A sample of the TSUNAMI-A data file for the Flattop-25 sample problem is provided in Figure 6.3.A.1. Here, only two profiles out of the 130 computed are shown.

  20. Dye sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Di

    2010-03-16

    Dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is the only solar cell that can offer both the flexibility and transparency. Its efficiency is comparable to amorphous silicon solar cells but with a much lower cost. This review not only covers the fundamentals of DSSC but also the related cutting-edge research and its development for industrial applications. Most recent research topics on DSSC, for example, applications of nanostructured TiO(2), ZnO electrodes, ionic liquid electrolytes, carbon nanotubes, graphene and solid state DSSC have all been included and discussed.

  1. Sensitivity and tolerance to tartrazine in aspirin-sensitive asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Grzelewska-Rzymowska, I; Szmidt, M; Kowalski, M L; Roźniecki, J

    1986-01-01

    The occurrence of sensitivity to tartrazine was examined in 51 patients with asthma and aspirin sensitivity. All patients underwent oral challenge tests with aspirin and tartrazine. Sensitivity to tartrazine was found in 16 i.e. 31.4% of tested asthmatics. The symptoms of sensitivity to tartrazine were similar to those of aspirin. Tolerance to tartrazine was induced in 5 aspirin and tartrazine sensitive asthmatics. Sensitivity to both substances was manifested in these 5 persons as dyspnea but 2 of them had additional extrabronchial symptoms. A good tolerance of 40 mg tartrazine was achieved in all the challenged patients who did not refer any dyspnea and extrabronchial symptoms. It was also proven that, being in the aspirin tolerance state the patients could be given tartrazine with no sensitivity symptoms. The authors think that the possibility of inducing tartrazine and aspirin tolerance, as well as the course of sensitivity reaction to both substances, both point to a similar pathogenetic background.

  2. Modeling sensitive elasmobranch habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennino, M. Grazia; Muñoz, Facundo; Conesa, David; López-Quílez, Antonio; Bellido, José Marí; a

    2013-10-01

    Basic information on the distribution and habitat preferences of ecologically important species is essential for their management and protection. In the Mediterranean Sea there is increasing concern over elasmobranch species because their biological (ecological) characteristics make them highly vulnerable to fishing pressure. Their removal could affect the structure and function of marine ecosystems, inducing changes in trophic interactions at the community level due to the selective elimination of predators or prey species, competitors and species replacement. In this study Bayesian hierarchical spatial models are used to map the sensitive habitats of the three most caught elasmobranch species (Galeus melastomus, Scyliorhinus canicula, Etmopterus spinax) in the western Mediterranean Sea, based on fishery-dependent bottom trawl data. Results show that habitats associated with hard substrata and sandy beds, mainly in deep waters and with a high seabed gradient, have a greater probability registering the presence of the studied species than those associated with muddy shallow waters. Temperature and chlorophyll-α concentration show a negative relationship with S. canicula occurrence. Our results identify some of the sensitive habitats for elasmobranchs in the western Mediterranean Sea (GSA06 South), providing essential and easy-to-use interpretation tools, such as predictive distribution maps, with the final aim of improving management and conservation of these vulnerable species.

  3. [Sensitization to Lyral].

    PubMed

    Heras, F; Díaz-Recuero, J L; Cabello, M J; Conde-Salazar, L

    2006-01-01

    Lyral is a fragrance that is present in many cosmetic products. It has turned into an emergent allergen during the last years. In studies carried out in other European countries, the prevalence of sensitization to Lyral has been found to be 1.9-2.7 %, but it is unknown the prevalence in Spain, as well as the need to include it or not in the standard series of the Spanish Group of Contact Dermatitis (GEIDC). We have patch-tested to Lyral all patients with suspicion of contact dermatitis of any origin who attended our Service between April and May-2005. From a total of 170 patients included in our study, 2 of them had a sensitization to Lyral (1.2 %). One of these two patients had an axillae contact dermatitis caused by a deodorant containing Lyral. The other patient was a masseur-woman with a contact dermatitis on both hands, with periods of dissemination to upper extremities and trunk, and who used several cosmetics products for private reasons and during her job. Although the sample of this study is quite small, we think that the results allow to suspect that Lyral is one of the main allergens, or even the most important, in causing allergic contact dermatitis to fragrances in our environment. Therefore, we believe that we must raise the inclusion of Lyral in the standard series of GEIDC, either as independent allergen, or including it in a new mixture of fragrances.

  4. Surveillance Metrics Sensitivity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bierbaum, R; Hamada, M; Robertson, A

    2011-11-01

    In September of 2009, a Tri-Lab team was formed to develop a set of metrics relating to the NNSA nuclear weapon surveillance program. The purpose of the metrics was to develop a more quantitative and/or qualitative metric(s) describing the results of realized or non-realized surveillance activities on our confidence in reporting reliability and assessing the stockpile. As a part of this effort, a statistical sub-team investigated various techniques and developed a complementary set of statistical metrics that could serve as a foundation for characterizing aspects of meeting the surveillance program objectives. The metrics are a combination of tolerance limit calculations and power calculations, intending to answer level-of-confidence type questions with respect to the ability to detect certain undesirable behaviors (catastrophic defects, margin insufficiency defects, and deviations from a model). Note that the metrics are not intended to gauge product performance but instead the adequacy of surveillance. This report gives a short description of four metrics types that were explored and the results of a sensitivity study conducted to investigate their behavior for various inputs. The results of the sensitivity study can be used to set the risk parameters that specify the level of stockpile problem that the surveillance program should be addressing.

  5. Surveillance metrics sensitivity study.

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Michael S.; Bierbaum, Rene Lynn; Robertson, Alix A.

    2011-09-01

    In September of 2009, a Tri-Lab team was formed to develop a set of metrics relating to the NNSA nuclear weapon surveillance program. The purpose of the metrics was to develop a more quantitative and/or qualitative metric(s) describing the results of realized or non-realized surveillance activities on our confidence in reporting reliability and assessing the stockpile. As a part of this effort, a statistical sub-team investigated various techniques and developed a complementary set of statistical metrics that could serve as a foundation for characterizing aspects of meeting the surveillance program objectives. The metrics are a combination of tolerance limit calculations and power calculations, intending to answer level-of-confidence type questions with respect to the ability to detect certain undesirable behaviors (catastrophic defects, margin insufficiency defects, and deviations from a model). Note that the metrics are not intended to gauge product performance but instead the adequacy of surveillance. This report gives a short description of four metrics types that were explored and the results of a sensitivity study conducted to investigate their behavior for various inputs. The results of the sensitivity study can be used to set the risk parameters that specify the level of stockpile problem that the surveillance program should be addressing.

  6. Camera sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlueter, Jonathan; Murphey, Yi L.; Miller, John W. V.; Shridhar, Malayappan; Luo, Yun; Khairallah, Farid

    2004-12-01

    As the cost/performance Ratio of vision systems improves with time, new classes of applications become feasible. One such area, automotive applications, is currently being investigated. Applications include occupant detection, collision avoidance and lane tracking. Interest in occupant detection has been spurred by federal automotive safety rules in response to injuries and fatalities caused by deployment of occupant-side air bags. In principle, a vision system could control airbag deployment to prevent this type of mishap. Employing vision technology here, however, presents a variety of challenges, which include controlling costs, inability to control illumination, developing and training a reliable classification system and loss of performance due to production variations due to manufacturing tolerances and customer options. This paper describes the measures that have been developed to evaluate the sensitivity of an occupant detection system to these types of variations. Two procedures are described for evaluating how sensitive the classifier is to camera variations. The first procedure is based on classification accuracy while the second evaluates feature differences.

  7. Culture-sensitive psychotraumatology

    PubMed Central

    Schnyder, Ulrich; Bryant, Richard A.; Ehlers, Anke; Foa, Edna B.; Hasan, Aram; Mwiti, Gladys; Kristensen, Christian H.; Neuner, Frank; Oe, Misari; Yule, William

    2016-01-01

    Background Although there is some evidence of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) construct's cross cultural validity, trauma-related disorders may vary across cultures, and the same may be true for treatments that address such conditions. Experienced therapists tailor psychotherapy to each patient's particular situation, to the nature of the patient's psychopathology, to the stage of therapy, and so on. In addition, culture-sensitive psychotherapists try to understand how culture enhances the meaning of their patient's life history, the cultural components of their illness and help-seeking behaviors, as well as their expectations with regard to treatment. We cannot take for granted that all treatment-seeking trauma survivors speak our language or share our cultural values. Therefore, we need to increase our cultural competencies. Methods The authors of this article are clinicians and/or researchers from across the globe, working with trauma survivors in various settings. Each author focused on one or more specific cultural aspects of working with trauma survivors and highlighted the following aspects. Results As a result of culture-specific individual and collective meanings linked to trauma and trauma-related disorders survivors may be exposed to (self-)stigma in the aftermath of trauma. Patients who are reluctant to talk about their traumatic experiences may instead be willing to write or use other ways of accessing the painful memories such as drawing. In other cultures, community and family cohesion are crucial elements of recovery. While awareness of culture-specific aspects is important, we also need to beware of premature cultural stereotyping. When disseminating empirically supported psychotherapies for PTSD across cultures, a number of additional challenges need to be taken into account: many low and middle income countries have very limited resources available and suffer from a poor health infrastructure. Conclusions In summary, culture-sensitive

  8. Infant Allergies and Food Sensitivities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size Email Print Share Infant Allergies and Food Sensitivities Page Content Article Body Human breast milk ... tell your pediatrician about your family’s medical history. Food Sensitivities A few mothers notice minor reactions to ...

  9. New sensitivity analysis attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Choubassi, Maha; Moulin, Pierre

    2005-03-01

    The sensitivity analysis attacks by Kalker et al. constitute a known family of watermark removal attacks exploiting a vulnerability in some watermarking protocols: the attacker's unlimited access to the watermark detector. In this paper, a new attack on spread spectrum schemes is designed. We first examine one of Kalker's algorithms and prove its convergence using the law of large numbers, which gives more insight into the problem. Next, a new algorithm is presented and compared to existing ones. Various detection algorithms are considered including correlation detectors and normalized correlation detectors, as well as other, more complicated algorithms. Our algorithm is noniterative and requires at most n+1 operations, where n is the dimension of the signal. Moreover, the new approach directly estimates the watermark by exploiting the simple geometry of the detection boundary and the information leaked by the detector.

  10. Position Sensitive Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadleir, J. E.; Hammock, C.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Stahle, C. K.; Bandler, S.; Saab, T.; Lindeman, M.; Porter, F. S.; Chervenak, J.; Brown, G.

    2004-01-01

    A Position Sensitive Transition-Edge Sensor (PoST) is a microcalorimeter device capable of one-dimensional imaging spectroscopy. The device consists of two Transition-Edge Sensors (TESs) connected to the ends of a long X-ray absorbing strip. The energy of a photon hitting the absorber and the position of the absorption event along the strip is measured from the response in the two sensors by analyzing the relative signal sizes, pulse rise times, and the sum of the pulses measured at each sensor, We report on the recent PoST effort at Goddard for applications to large field of view, high-energy- resolution, X-ray astrophysics.

  11. Neonatal sensitization to latex.

    PubMed

    Worth, J

    2000-05-01

    Babies born in delivery rooms of hospitals are exposed to latex through skin and mucous membrane contact with prepowdered latex gloves worn by midwives and doctors, and through the inhalation of latex-bound starch powder in the air of the delivery room. This paper examines the hypothesis that they are at risk for latex sensitization, and that part of the sharp increase of childhood asthma, eczema and anaphylaxis in the past 30-40 years may be linked. These possibilities seem hitherto unsuspected. In over 700 papers on latex allergy no mention of neonatal exposure to latex has been found. Even obstetric papers discussing the risks for an atopic mother (atopy - a tendency to develop allergies) do not seem to anticipate any risk for the baby, who might also be atopic. Latex allergy is primarily regarded as an occupational hazard. This paper suggests that it is a hazard for every baby handled by latex gloves at birth. Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  12. The Sensitive Skin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lev-Tov, Hadar; Maibach, Howard I

    2012-01-01

    Sensitive skin syndrome (SSS) is a common and challenging condition, yet little is known about its underlying pathophysiology. Patients with SSS often present with subjective complaints of severe facial irritation, burning, and/or stinging after application of cosmetic products. These complaints are out of proportion to the objective clinical findings. Defined as a self-diagnosed condition lacking any specific objective findings, SSS is by definition difficult to quantify and, therefore, the scientific community has yet to identify an acceptable objective screening test. In this overview we review recent epidemiological studies, present current thinking on the pathophysiology leading to SSS, discuss the challenges SSS presents, and recommend a commonsense approach to management. PMID:23248357

  13. Culture-sensitive psychotraumatology.

    PubMed

    Schnyder, Ulrich; Bryant, Richard A; Ehlers, Anke; Foa, Edna B; Hasan, Aram; Mwiti, Gladys; Kristensen, Christian H; Neuner, Frank; Oe, Misari; Yule, William

    2016-01-01

    Although there is some evidence of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) construct's cross cultural validity, trauma-related disorders may vary across cultures, and the same may be true for treatments that address such conditions. Experienced therapists tailor psychotherapy to each patient's particular situation, to the nature of the patient's psychopathology, to the stage of therapy, and so on. In addition, culture-sensitive psychotherapists try to understand how culture enhances the meaning of their patient's life history, the cultural components of their illness and help-seeking behaviors, as well as their expectations with regard to treatment. We cannot take for granted that all treatment-seeking trauma survivors speak our language or share our cultural values. Therefore, we need to increase our cultural competencies. The authors of this article are clinicians and/or researchers from across the globe, working with trauma survivors in various settings. Each author focused on one or more specific cultural aspects of working with trauma survivors and highlighted the following aspects. As a result of culture-specific individual and collective meanings linked to trauma and trauma-related disorders survivors may be exposed to (self-)stigma in the aftermath of trauma. Patients who are reluctant to talk about their traumatic experiences may instead be willing to write or use other ways of accessing the painful memories such as drawing. In other cultures, community and family cohesion are crucial elements of recovery. While awareness of culture-specific aspects is important, we also need to beware of premature cultural stereotyping. When disseminating empirically supported psychotherapies for PTSD across cultures, a number of additional challenges need to be taken into account: many low and middle income countries have very limited resources available and suffer from a poor health infrastructure. In summary, culture-sensitive psychotraumatology means assuming an

  14. Pharmacogenetics: detecting sensitive populations.

    PubMed Central

    Shields, P G

    1994-01-01

    Risk assessment models strive to predict risks to humans from toxic agents. Safety factors and assumptions are incorporated into these models to allow a margin of error. In the case of cancer, substantial evidence shows that the carcinogenic process is a multistage process driven by the interaction of exogenous carcinogenic exposures, genetic traits, and other endogenous factors. Current risk assessment models fail to consider genetic predispositions that make people more sensitive or resistant to exogenous exposures and endogenous processes. Several cytochrome P450 enzymes, responsible for metabolically activating carcinogens and medications, express wide interindividual variation whose genetic coding has now been identified as polymorphic and linked to cancer risk. For example, a restriction fragment-length polymorphism for cytochrome P4501A1, which metabolizes polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and cytochrome P4502E1, which metabolizes N-nitrosamines and benzene, is linked to lung cancer risk. Cytochrome P4502D6, responsible for metabolizing many clinically important medications, also is linked to lung cancer risk. The frequency for each of these genetic polymorphisms vary among different ethnic and racial groups. In addition to inherited factors for the detection of sensitive populations, determining the biologically effective doses for carcinogenic exposures also should quantitatively and qualitatively enhance the risk assessment process. Levels of carcinogen-DNA adducts reflect the net effect of exposure, absorption, metabolic activation, detoxification, and DNA repair. These effects are genetically predetermined, inducibility notwithstanding. The combination of adduct and genotyping assays provide an assessment of risk that reflects recent exogenous exposure as well as one's lifetime ability to activate and detoxify carcinogens. PMID:7737047

  15. Near-infrared sensitization in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinhyung; Viscardi, Guido; Barolo, Claudia; Barbero, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) are a low cost and colorful promising alternative to standard silicon photovoltaic cells. Though many of the highest efficiencies have been associated with sensitizers absorbing only in the visible portion of the solar radiation, there is a growing interest for NIR sensitization. This paper reviews the efforts made so far to find sensitizers able to absorb efficiently in the far-red NIR region of solar light. Panchromatic sensitizers as well as dyes absorbing mainly in the 650-920 nm region have been considered.

  16. Stratospheric Airship Design Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ira Steve; Fortenberry, Michael; Noll, . James; Perry, William

    2012-07-01

    The concept of a stratospheric or high altitude powered platform has been around almost as long as stratospheric free balloons. Airships are defined as Lighter-Than-Air (LTA) vehicles with propulsion and steering systems. Over the past five (5) years there has been an increased interest by the U. S. Department of Defense as well as commercial enterprises in airships at all altitudes. One of these interests is in the area of stratospheric airships. Whereas DoD is primarily interested in things that look down, such platforms offer a platform for science applications, both downward and outward looking. Designing airships to operate in the stratosphere is very challenging due to the extreme high altitude environment. It is significantly different than low altitude airship designs such as observed in the familiar advertising or tourism airships or blimps. The stratospheric airship design is very dependent on the specific application and the particular requirements levied on the vehicle with mass and power limits. The design is a complex iterative process and is sensitive to many factors. In an effort to identify the key factors that have the greatest impacts on the design, a parametric analysis of a simplified airship design has been performed. The results of these studies will be presented.

  17. Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Roque, Maria; Oxentenko, Amy S

    2015-09-01

    Nonceliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is the clinical term used to describe gastrointestinal (GI) and/or extraintestinal symptoms associated with gluten ingestion. The prevalence of NCGS is unknown. The condition has clinical features that overlap with those of celiac disease (CD) and wheat allergy (WA). The pathophysiologic process in NCGS is thought to be through an innate immune mechanism, whereas CD and WA are autoimmune- and allergen-mediated, respectively. However, dietary triggers other than gluten, such as the fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols, have been implicated. Currently, no clinical biomarker is available to diagnose NCGS. Exclusion of CD and WA is necessary in the evaluation of a patient suspected to have NCGS. The onset of symptoms in patients with NCGS can occur within hours or days of gluten ingestion. Patients with NCGS have GI and extraintestinal symptoms that typically disappear when gluten-containing grains are eliminated from their diets. However, most patients suspected to have NCGS have already initiated a gluten-free diet at the time of an evaluation. A gluten elimination diet followed by a monitored open challenge of gluten intake to document recurrence of GI and/or extraintestinal symptoms can sometimes be helpful. If NCGS is strongly suggested, then a skilled dietitian with experience in counseling on gluten-free diets can provide proper patient education. Additional research studies are warranted to further our understanding of NCGS, including its pathogenesis and epidemiology, and to identify a biomarker to facilitate diagnosis and patient selection for proper management.

  18. Nonceliac gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Alessio; Sapone, Anna; Zevallos, Victor; Schuppan, Detlef

    2015-05-01

    During the past decade there has been an impressive increase in popularity of the gluten-free diet (GFD)-now the most trendy alimentary habit in the United States and other countries. According to recent surveys, as many as 100 million Americans will consume gluten-free products within a year. Operating under the concept that the GFD benefits only individuals with celiac disease, health care professionals have struggled to separate the wheat from the chaff; there are claims that eliminating gluten from the diet increases health and helps with weight loss, or even that gluten can be harmful to every human being. However, apart from unfounded trends, a disorder related to ingestion of gluten or gluten-containing cereals, namely nonceliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), has resurfaced in the literature, fueling a debate on the appropriateness of the GFD for people without celiac disease. Although there is clearly a fad component to the popularity of the GFD, there is also undisputable and increasing evidence for NCGS. However, we require a better understanding of the clinical presentation of NCGS, as well as its pathogenesis, epidemiology, management, and role in conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, chronic fatigue, and autoimmunity. Before we can begin to identify and manage NCGS, there must be agreement on the nomenclature and definition of the disorder based on proper peer-reviewed scientific information. We review the most recent findings on NCGS and outline directions to dissipate some of the confusion related to this disorder.

  19. Three sensitive species

    SciTech Connect

    Calix, R.E.; Diener, D.

    1995-12-31

    MEC Analytical Systems, Inc., has conducted marine monitoring of a large ocean wastewater outfall since 1985. This EPA mandated monitoring program was designed to measure the spatial and temporal variability of the biological communities and assess the impact associated with the discharge. The ostracod Euphilomedes carcarodonta, has shown enhanced abundances centered at the outfall since the late 70`s. While flow rates continue to increase the concentration of solids and contaminants has been decreasing with improve treatment levels. However the abundance and spatial distribution of this species has remain relatively unchanged. It is hypothesized that this species feeds on the small organic particles. In contrast, the abundance of the polychaete Capitella capitata, an indicator of disturbed habitat and organic enrichment, has decreased significantly. This decrease correlates with decreasing concentrations of wastewater solids and decreasing sediment organic carbon concentrations. The brittle star, Amphiodia urtica, has been found to be one of the most sensitive species to wastewater discharges and its abundance was significantly decreased over a large area in the 70`s. Since 1985 this species has shown a steady recovery of abundance to areas near the discharge. This recovery correlates with lower sediment contaminant levels and decreased solid concentrations, and indicates that the environmental quality near the discharge is similar to reference areas.

  20. Bloch-Sensitive Nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Talbot A.

    2005-03-01

    Documented condensed matter nuclear science includes Fleischmann and Pons radiationless dd fusion reactions, Iwamura alpha-addition transmutations, and Oriani MeV particle showers. All require partitioned coherent matter in which fractions of each single ``wave like" particle are entangledootnotetextT. A. Chubb, ``Bloch Nuclides, Iwamura Transmutations, and Oriani Showers", ICCF11 Abstract. If the work required to bring side-by-side deuterons into contact is somehow reduced enough, an energy-minimizing 2-body anti-correlation form of wave function replaces the "molecule" configuration, allowing cold fusion. In the Iwamura process, a second fusion step fuses 2 spin-zero ^4He^2^+Bloch ions to form ^8Be^4^+Bloch. The nuclear ground state energy of the product nucleus is a function of the number of fragments into which it is partitioned. It is ``Bloch sensitive", i.e., its energy level is a function of Nwell, the number of potential wells into which the ^8Be^4^+Bloch is partitioned. The dependence of energy on lattice parameter Nwell strongly couples nuclear and electromagnetic forces at the boundary of the coherently ordered volume, causing energy transfer to the lattice.

  1. Chlorophyll sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, D. F.

    1984-06-01

    The photovoltaic properties of the green plant pigment chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) were investigated in photoelectrochemical and solid state solar cells. Both types of cells utilized a thin film of Chl-a electro-deposited on a SnO2 optically transparent electrode. Solid state cells were fabricated by vapor depositing a thin layer of metal on top of the Chl-A to produce a SnO2/Chl-a/metal sandwich cell. Photoelectrochemical cells were assembled by immersing the SnO2/Chl-a electrode in an aqueous electrolyte solution along with a counter electrode. Both types of Chl-a cells were generally characterized by a strong dependence of he photoactivity on the other cell components and a surprisingly large photovoltage. Photoelectrochemical cells of SnO2/l-a/aq.AlCl3 were seen to produce photovoltages as high as 1.1 V and photocurrents of 1.1 micro A/sq cm while a solid state cell of SnO2/Chl-a/Al could produce 1.4 V and an initial photocurrent of 200 micro A/sq cm. This photoactivity was strongly time dependent in both configurations. Despite this fact, these cells are the most powerful Chl-a sensitized solar cells yet reported.

  2. Non Celiac Gluten Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bardella, Maria Teresa; Elli, Luca; Ferretti, Francesca

    2016-12-01

    A new syndrome responding to gluten-free diet and defined non-celiac gluten sensitivity entered the spectrum of gluten-related disorders, together with celiac disease and wheat allergy. However, its definition, prevalence, diagnosis, pathogenesis, treatment, and follow up are still controversial. The purpose of the review is to summarize the evidence and problems emerging from the current literature. Direct implication of gluten in the onset of symptoms is often unproved as a low fermentable oligo-, di- and mono-saccharides and polyols diet or other components of cereals as wheat amylase trypsin inhibitor could be similarly involved. To date, no specific biomarkers or histological abnormalities confirm diagnosis, and only the self-reported response to gluten-free diet as well as a positive double blind placebo-gluten challenge characterizes these non-celiac, non-wheat allergic patients. Critical revision of published studies can offer practical indications in approaching this clinical topic and useful suggestions to standardize scientific researches.

  3. Sodium salicylate sensitivity in an asthmatic patient with aspirin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Park, H S; Lim, Y S; Suh, J E; Rhu, N S; Cho, D I; Kim, J W

    1991-06-01

    Non-acetylated salicylates have been recommended for use as alternatives to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in aspirin and/or tartrazine-sensitive patients. We experienced a case of an aspirin-sensitive asthmatic patient who developed a broncho-obstructive reaction after taking 100 mg of sodium salicylate. The result of this study suggests that sodium salicylate may cross-react with aspirin in aspirin-and tartrazine-sensitive patients.

  4. Sodium salicylate sensitivity in an asthmatic patient with aspirin sensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Park, H. S.; Lim, Y. S.; Suh, J. E.; Rhu, N. S.; Cho, D. I.; Kim, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    Non-acetylated salicylates have been recommended for use as alternatives to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in aspirin and/or tartrazine-sensitive patients. We experienced a case of an aspirin-sensitive asthmatic patient who developed a broncho-obstructive reaction after taking 100 mg of sodium salicylate. The result of this study suggests that sodium salicylate may cross-react with aspirin in aspirin-and tartrazine-sensitive patients. PMID:1751016

  5. Pathophysiological Study of Sensitive Skin.

    PubMed

    Buhé, Virginie; Vié, Katell; Guéré, Christelle; Natalizio, Audrey; Lhéritier, Céline; Le Gall-Ianotto, Christelle; Huet, Flavien; Talagas, Matthieu; Lebonvallet, Nicolas; Marcorelles, Pascale; Carré, Jean-Luc; Misery, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Sensitive skin is a clinical syndrome characterized by the occurrence of unpleasant sensations, such as pruritus, burning or pain, in response to various factors, including skincare products, water, cold, heat, or other physical and/or chemical factors. Although these symptoms suggest inflammation and the activation of peripheral innervation, the pathophysiogeny of sensitive skin remains unknown. We systematically analysed cutaneous biopsies from 50 healthy women with non-sensitive or sensitive skin and demonstrated that the intraepidermal nerve fibre density, especially that of peptidergic C-fibres, was lower in the sensitive skin group. These fibres are involved in pain, itching and temperature perception, and their degeneration may promote allodynia and similar symptoms. These results suggest that the pathophysiology of skin sensitivity resembles that of neuropathic pruritus within the context of small fibre neuropathy, and that environmental factors may alter skin innervation.

  6. A wideband sensitive holographic photopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mingju; Wang, Sulian; Wang, Airong; Gong, Qiaoxia; Gan, Fuxi

    2005-05-01

    A novel wideband sensitive dry holographic photopolymer sensitized by rose bengal (RB) and methylene blue (MB) is fabricated, the holographic storage characteristics of which are investigated under different exposure wavelengths. The result shows that the sensitive spectral band exceeds 200 nm in visible light range, the maximum diffraction efficiency under different exposure wavelengths is more than 40% and decreases with the decrease of exposure wavelength, the exposure sensitivity is not change with the exposure wavelength. This photopolymer is appropriate for wavelength multiplexing or multi-wavelength recording in digital holographic storage.

  7. Sensitivity to punishment and sensitivity to reward and traffic violations.

    PubMed

    Castellà, Josep; Pérez, Jorge

    2004-11-01

    The aim of our study consists of contributing information on the relationship between the personality variables derived from Gray's model and the conduct that accompanies the infringement of the road traffic rules. Seven hundred and ninety-two adults of both sexes took part in the study (389 men and 403 women), all of whom had driving licences and drove frequently. The subjects answered "The Sensitivity to Punishment and Sensitivity to Reward Questionnaire", a scale of monotony avoidance, and two Likert scales of attitude and behaviour in connection with traffic violations. We found a high positive relationship between attitude and behaviour, with the men infringing the rules more than the women. Hypotheses regarding a relationship between traffic offences and sensibility to reward and monotony avoidance were confirmed. Those people with high scores in sensitivity to punishment and low ones in sensitivity to reward were those who drove within the law, while those with low sensitivity to punishment and high sensitivity to reward were those who broke it more. Sensitivity to reward was a stronger determinant in encouraging infringement of the rules than was sensitivity to punishment in discouraging the subjects to do so.

  8. 32 CFR 154.13 - Sensitive positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... be categorized, with respect to security sensitivity, as either nonsensitive, noncritical-sensitive... shall designate each position within their jurisdiction as to its security sensitivity and maintain...

  9. 32 CFR 154.13 - Sensitive positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... be categorized, with respect to security sensitivity, as either nonsensitive, noncritical-sensitive... shall designate each position within their jurisdiction as to its security sensitivity and maintain...

  10. Sensitization to palladium in Europe.

    PubMed

    Muris, Joris; Goossens, An; Gonçalo, Margarida; Bircher, Andreas J; Giménez-Arnau, Ana; Foti, Caterina; Bruze, Magnus; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Rustemeyer, Thomas; Feilzer, Albert J; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J

    2015-01-01

    Recently, sodium tetrachloropalladate (Na2 PdCl4 ) was found to be a more sensitive palladium patch test allergen than palladium dichloride (PdCl2 ). To determine the optimal test concentration of Na2 PdCl4 , to evaluate the prevalence of palladium sensitization with Na2 PdCl4 and PdCl2 , and to compare the results with nickel sensitization in a European multicentre study. In addition to the European or national baseline series including NiSO4 ·6H2 0 5% pet., consecutive patients were tested with PdCl2 and Na2 PdCl4 2%, 3% and 4% pet. in eight European dermatology clinics. The age and sex distributions were also evaluated in patients sensitized to nickel and palladium. In total, 1651 patients were tested. Relative to 3% Na2 PdCl4 , 4% Na2 PdCl4 did not add any information. Two per cent Na2 PdCl4 resulted in more doubtful reactions and showed suboptimal reactivity. The prevalence of palladium sensitization doubled with Na2 PdCl4 and was similar to that of nickel. Interestingly, in contrast to nickel sensitization, palladium sensitization was not related to female sex. Three per cent Na2 PdCl4 pet. is the most suitable patch test concentration. Sensitization to palladium is almost as prevalent as sensitization to nickel. The sex distribution is different between nickel-sensitized and palladium-sensitized patients, suggesting different sources of exposure. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Antibiotic sensitivity of Proteus species

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Mary; Waterworth, Pamela M.

    1964-01-01

    A study has been made of the antibiotic sensitivity pattern of 96 strains of Proteus isolated from clinical material and a further 29 strains kindly supplied by Dr. Patricia Carpenter. The results have been analysed in relation to the different species. The effect of electrolytes on the penicillin sensitivity of Proteus species has also been examined. PMID:14100008

  12. Covert Sensitization Treatment with Alcoholics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleiger, D. L.; Zingle, H. W.

    1973-01-01

    An attempt was made to determine whether a behaviorally oriented conditioning approach, "covert sensitization," is more effective in the treatment of alcoholism than the commonly used problem-solving approach; and whether female counselors employing covert sensitization are more successful than males. Appropriate statistical analysis of…

  13. Radiation Sensitization in Cancer Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstock, Clive L.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses various aspects of radiation damage to biological material, including free radical mechanisms, radiation sensitization and protection, tumor hypoxia, mechanism of hypoxic cell radiosensitization, redox model for radiation modification, sensitizer probes of cellular radiation targets, pulse radiolysis studies of free radical kinetics,…

  14. Covert Sensitization Treatment with Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleiger, D. L.

    An attempt is made to determine whether a behaviorally-oriented conditioning approach, "covert sensitization," is more effective in the treatment of alcoholism than the commonly used problem-solving approach, and whether female counselors employing covert sensitization were more successful than males. Thirty-two subjects selected on admission to…

  15. Sensitizing ESL Learners to Genre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swami, Jasti Appa

    2008-01-01

    This article evaluates the efficacy of explicit genre-based instruction by sensitizing the ESL learners to the concept of genre. The main questions addressed are: How does sensitizing ESL learners to the rhetorical move structure of a genre, the communicative purposes of these moves, and linguistic features that realize these moves help them to…

  16. Radiation Sensitization in Cancer Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstock, Clive L.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses various aspects of radiation damage to biological material, including free radical mechanisms, radiation sensitization and protection, tumor hypoxia, mechanism of hypoxic cell radiosensitization, redox model for radiation modification, sensitizer probes of cellular radiation targets, pulse radiolysis studies of free radical kinetics,…

  17. NCLEX fairness and sensitivity review.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Anne; Kenny, Lorraine; Riley, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    The National Council Licensing Examination is an examination that is used for the purpose of licensing registered nurses and practical/vocational nurses. To help ensure that the examination questions (items) are fair and unbiased, all items undergo a fairness and sensitivity review as part of the item development process. This article focuses on the fairness and sensitivity review.

  18. Cheat sensitive quantum bit commitment.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Lucien; Kent, Adrian

    2004-04-16

    We define cheat sensitive cryptographic protocols between mistrustful parties as protocols which guarantee that, if either cheats, the other has some nonzero probability of detecting the cheating. We describe an unconditionally secure cheat sensitive nonrelativistic bit commitment protocol which uses quantum information to implement a task which is classically impossible; we also describe a simple relativistic protocol.

  19. Benzalphthalide sensitizers in thermal coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Tomoo; Semler, John R.

    1990-07-01

    Benzalphthalide and a number of its analogues significantly enhance the sensitivity of thermal coatings. These sensitizers are effective in coatings developed by benzyl-p-hydroxybenzoate (benzylparaben) , 2 , 2 -bis (p-hydroxyphenyl) propane (bisphenol A) and bis-(3-allyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)sulfone in combination with a variety of leuco dyes. The background stability of the coatings depends upon the specific benzalphthalide employed.

  20. [Sensitive skin: a complex syndrome].

    PubMed

    Escalas-Taberner, J; González-Guerra, E; Guerra-Tapia, A

    2011-10-01

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that ever larger numbers of people report having sensitive skin, for which a European prevalence of 50% is estimated. Sensitive skin is characterized by hyperreactivity, with manifestations varying in relation to many factors. The pathogenesis of this disorder is poorly understood, although studies point to a biophysical mechanism. Objective diagnosis of sensitive skin is difficult, as information comes mainly from the patient's report of symptoms in the absence of effective, strongly predictive tests because of great interindividual variability in skin sensitivity. Substances that trigger a reaction in hypersensitive skin also vary greatly. The impact of this syndrome on quality of life is considerable and patients often present psychiatric symptoms; therefore, dermatologists should explore this possibility when taking a patient's history. Patient cooperation and physician persistence are both essential for treating sensitive skin.

  1. Highly sensitive plasmonic silver nanorods.

    PubMed

    Jakab, Arpad; Rosman, Christina; Khalavka, Yuriy; Becker, Jan; Trügler, Andreas; Hohenester, Ulrich; Sönnichsen, Carsten

    2011-09-27

    We compare the single-particle plasmonic sensitivity of silver and gold nanorods with similar resonance wavelengths by monitoring the plasmon resonance shift upon changing the environment from water to 12.5% sucrose solution. We find that silver nanoparticles have 1.2 to 2 times higher sensitivity than gold, in good agreement with simulations based on the boundary-elements-method (BEM). To exclude the effect of particle volume on sensitivity, we test gold rods with increasing particle width at a given resonance wavelength. Using the Drude-model of optical properties of metals together with the quasi-static approximation (QSA) for localized surface plasmons, we show that the dominant contribution to higher sensitivity of silver is the lower background polarizability of the d-band electrons and provide a simple formula for the sensitivity. We improve the reversibility of the silver nanorod sensors upon repeated cycles of environmental changes by blocking the high energy parts of the illumination light.

  2. New understanding of gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Volta, Umberto; De Giorgio, Roberto

    2012-02-28

    Among gluten-related disorders, gluten sensitivity is an emerging entity that is characterized by a wide array of manifestations. In particular, patients complain of IBS-like symptoms and extraintestinal manifestations that occur shortly after the ingestion of gluten. Symptoms improve or disappear when gluten is withdrawn from the diet, and recur if gluten is reintroduced. Laboratory tests are usually unhelpful for diagnosis, although ~50% of patients are positive for IgG antigliadin antibodies. The natural history of gluten sensitivity is unknown; in particular, it is still to be clarified whether this disorder is permanent or transient and whether it is linked to autoimmunity. The pathogenesis of gluten sensitivity is unclear; data so far demonstrate a predominant activation of innate immune responses. Further research is necessary to establish the main clinicopathological features of gluten sensitivity, thus enabling physicians to improve their management of the increasing number of patients who are sensitive to dietary gluten.

  3. Dye Sensitizers for Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ormond, Alexandra B.; Freeman, Harold S.

    2013-01-01

    Photofrin® was first approved in the 1990s as a sensitizer for use in treating cancer via photodynamic therapy (PDT). Since then a wide variety of dye sensitizers have been developed and a few have been approved for PDT treatment of skin and organ cancers and skin diseases such as acne vulgaris. Porphyrinoid derivatives and precursors have been the most successful in producing requisite singlet oxygen, with Photofrin® still remaining the most efficient sensitizer (quantum yield = 0.89) and having broad food and drug administration (FDA) approval for treatment of multiple cancer types. Other porphyrinoid compounds that have received approval from US FDA and regulatory authorities in other countries include benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD-MA), meta-tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (m-THPC), N-aspartyl chlorin e6 (NPe6), and precursors to endogenous protoporphyrin IX (PpIX): 1,5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), methyl aminolevulinate (MAL), hexaminolevulinate (HAL). Although no non-porphyrin sensitizer has been approved for PDT applications, a small number of anthraquinone, phenothiazine, xanthene, cyanine, and curcuminoid sensitizers are under consideration and some are being evaluated in clinical trials. This review focuses on the nature of PDT, dye sensitizers that have been approved for use in PDT, and compounds that have entered or completed clinical trials as PDT sensitizers. PMID:28809342

  4. Enhancing Sensitivity to Visual Motion and Enhancing Visual Sensitivity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    R., and Harp , S.A (1982) Contrast sensitivity predicts pilots’ performance in aircraft simulators, American Journal of Optometry & Physiological...Fortunately, these problems were resolved, allowing us to conduct a full-scale study at Williams AFB [reported in Ginsburg, Evans, Sekuler and Harp ...Display 21 219-227. Ginsburg, A.P., Evans, D.W., Sekuler, R., and Harp , S.A (1982) Contrast sensitivity predicts pilots’ performance in aircraft

  5. Sensitive Interviewing in Qualitative Research.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Laura; Dowling, Maura; Larkin, Philip; Murphy, Kathy

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we focus on important considerations when planning and conducting qualitative interviews on sensitive topics. Drawing on experiences of conducting interviews with dementia caregivers, a framework of essential elements in qualitative interviewing was developed to emphasize study participants' needs while also providing guidance for researchers. Starting with a definition of sensitive research, the framework includes preparing for interviews, interacting with gatekeepers of vulnerable groups, planning for interview timing, and location, building relationships and conducting therapeutic interactions, protecting ethically vulnerable participants, and planning for disengagement. This framework has the potential to improve the effectiveness of sensitive interviewing with vulnerable groups. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Chemical sensitivity: the scientific literature.

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, N; Kipen, H

    1997-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the scientific literature in which chemically sensitive patients have been directly evaluated. For that purpose, consideration of various case definitions is offered along with summaries of subjects' demographic profiles, exposure characteristics, and symptom profiles across studies. Controlled investigations of chemically sensitive subjects without other organic illnesses are reviewed. To date, psychiatric, personality, cognitive/neurologic, immunologic, and olfactory studies have been conducted comparing subjects with primary chemical sensitivity to various control groups. Thus far, the most consistent finding is that chemically sensitive patients have a higher rate of psychiatric disorders across studies and relative to diverse comparison groups. However, since these studies are cross-sectional, causality cannot be implied. Demonstrating the role of low-level chemical exposure in a controlled environment has yet to be undertaken with this patient group and is crucial to the understanding of this phenomenon. PMID:9167974

  7. Sensitive skin: mechanisms and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Primavera, G; Berardesca, E

    2005-02-01

    Sensitive skin is a condition of subjective cutaneous hyperreactivity to environmental factors. Subjects experiencing this condition report exaggerated reactions when their skin is in contact with cosmetics, soaps and sunscreens, and they often report worsening after exposure to dry and cold climate. Although no sign of irritation is commonly detected, itching, burning, stinging and a tight sensation are constantly present. Generally substances that are not commonly considered irritants are involved in this abnormal response. They include many ingredients of cosmetics such as: dimethyl sulfoxide, benzoyl peroxide preparations, salicylic acid, propylene glycol, amyldimethylaminobenzoic acid and 2-ethoxyethyl methoxycinnamate. Sensitive skin and subjective irritation are widespread but still far from being completely defined and understood. The aim of this paper is to summarize the relevant literature in order to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of sensitive skin and the best testing methodologies for investigation of sensitive skin.

  8. Mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Lewis, Patrick R.

    2007-01-30

    A microfabricated mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator actively measures the mass of a sample on an acoustic microbalance during the collection process. The microbalance comprises a chemically sensitive interface for collecting the sample thereon and an acoustic-based physical transducer that provides an electrical output that is proportional to the mass of the collected sample. The acoustic microbalance preferably comprises a pivot plate resonator. A resistive heating element can be disposed on the chemically sensitive interface to rapidly heat and release the collected sample for further analysis. Therefore, the mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  9. Ringberg15: Earth's Climate Sensitivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Bjorn; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Bony, Sandrine; Hegerl, Gabi; Schmidt, Gavin; Sherwood, Steven; Webb, Mark

    2015-01-01

    To assess gaps in understanding of Earth's climate sensitivities a workshop was organised under the auspices of the WCRP (World Climate Research Programme) Grand Science Challenge on Clouds, Circulation and Climate Sensitivity (Ringberg15). The workshop took place in March 2015 and gathered together over thirty experts from around the world for one week. Attendees each gave short presentations and participated in moderated discussions of specific questions related to understanding Earth's climate sensitivities. Most of the time was focused on understanding of the equilibrium climate sensitivity, defined as the equilibrium near-surface warming associated with a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide. The workshop produced nine recommendations, many of them focusing on specific research avenues that could be exploited to advance understanding of climate sensitivity. Many of these dealt, in one fashion or another, with the need to more sharply focus research on identifying and testing story lines for a high (larger than 4 degrees Kelvin) or low (less than 2 degrees Kelvin) equilibrium climate sensitivity. Additionally, a subset of model intercomparison projects (CFMIP (Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project), PMIP (Palaeoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project), PDRMIP (Precipitation Driver and Response Model Intercomparison Project), RFMIP (Radiative Forcing Model Intercomparison Project) and VolMIP (Volcanic Forcings Model Intercomparison Project)) that have been proposed for inclusion within CMIP were identified as being central to resolving important issues raised at the workshop; for this reason modelling groups were strongly encouraged to participate in these projects. Finally the workshop participants encouraged the WCRP to initiate and support an assessment process lead by the Grand Science Challenge on Clouds, Circulation and Climate Sensitivity on the topic of Earth's Climate Sensitivities, culminating in a report that will be published in 2019

  10. Ringberg15: Earth's Climate Sensitivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Bjorn; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Bony, Sandrine; Hegerl, Gabi; Schmidt, Gavin; Sherwood, Steven; Webb, Mark

    2015-01-01

    To assess gaps in understanding of Earth's climate sensitivities a workshop was organised under the auspices of the WCRP (World Climate Research Programme) Grand Science Challenge on Clouds, Circulation and Climate Sensitivity (Ringberg15). The workshop took place in March 2015 and gathered together over thirty experts from around the world for one week. Attendees each gave short presentations and participated in moderated discussions of specific questions related to understanding Earth's climate sensitivities. Most of the time was focused on understanding of the equilibrium climate sensitivity, defined as the equilibrium near-surface warming associated with a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide. The workshop produced nine recommendations, many of them focusing on specific research avenues that could be exploited to advance understanding of climate sensitivity. Many of these dealt, in one fashion or another, with the need to more sharply focus research on identifying and testing story lines for a high (larger than 4 degrees Kelvin) or low (less than 2 degrees Kelvin) equilibrium climate sensitivity. Additionally, a subset of model intercomparison projects (CFMIP (Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project), PMIP (Palaeoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project), PDRMIP (Precipitation Driver and Response Model Intercomparison Project), RFMIP (Radiative Forcing Model Intercomparison Project) and VolMIP (Volcanic Forcings Model Intercomparison Project)) that have been proposed for inclusion within CMIP were identified as being central to resolving important issues raised at the workshop; for this reason modelling groups were strongly encouraged to participate in these projects. Finally the workshop participants encouraged the WCRP to initiate and support an assessment process lead by the Grand Science Challenge on Clouds, Circulation and Climate Sensitivity on the topic of Earth's Climate Sensitivities, culminating in a report that will be published in 2019

  11. D2PC sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, D.P.

    1992-08-01

    The Chemical Hazard Prediction Model (D2PC) developed by the US Army will play a critical role in the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program by predicting chemical agent transport and dispersion through the atmosphere after an accidental release. To aid in the analysis of the output calculated by D2PC, this sensitivity analysis was conducted to provide information on model response to a variety of input parameters. The sensitivity analysis focused on six accidental release scenarios involving chemical agents VX, GB, and HD (sulfur mustard). Two categories, corresponding to conservative most likely and worst case meteorological conditions, provided the reference for standard input values. D2PC displayed a wide variety of sensitivity to the various input parameters. The model displayed the greatest overall sensitivity to wind speed, mixing height, and breathing rate. For other input parameters, sensitivity was mixed but generally lower. Sensitivity varied not only with parameter, but also over the range of values input for a single parameter. This information on model response can provide useful data for interpreting D2PC output.

  12. Evolving Sensitivity Balances Boolean Networks

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jamie X.; Turner, Matthew S.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of Boolean Networks (BNs) to mutations. We are interested in Boolean Networks as a model of Gene Regulatory Networks (GRNs). We adopt Ribeiro and Kauffman’s Ergodic Set and use it to study the long term dynamics of a BN. We define the sensitivity of a BN to be the mean change in its Ergodic Set structure under all possible loss of interaction mutations. Insilico experiments were used to selectively evolve BNs for sensitivity to losing interactions. We find that maximum sensitivity was often achievable and resulted in the BNs becoming topologically balanced, i.e. they evolve towards network structures in which they have a similar number of inhibitory and excitatory interactions. In terms of the dynamics, the dominant sensitivity strategy that evolved was to build BNs with Ergodic Sets dominated by a single long limit cycle which is easily destabilised by mutations. We discuss the relevance of our findings in the context of Stem Cell Differentiation and propose a relationship between pluripotent stem cells and our evolved sensitive networks. PMID:22586459

  13. HLA sensitization in islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rickels, Michael R; Kearns, Jane; Markmann, Eileen; Palanjian, Maral; Markmann, James F; Naji, Ali; Kamoun, Malek

    2006-01-01

    Islet transplantation is an emerging therapy for poorly controlled type 1 diabetes. Currently, islets isolated from multiple donors not HLA-matched to recipients are usually required to achieve insulin-independence. Subsequent HLA sensitization is common following a reduction or discontinuation of immunosuppressive drugs and may be responsible for deterioration in islet graft function. Based on the evidence available to date concerning HLA sensitization in islet transplant recipients, we recommend that future islet transplantation protocols consider the following: (1) minimizing the number of islet donors by, for example, infusing high quality islet preparations of sufficient yield from a single donor rather than pooling islet preparations from multiple donors since a greater number of HLA class I mismatches appears to be associated with increased risk for sensitization; (2) ensuring negative cross-matching of donor lymphocytes and recipient sera by testing prior to islet infusions; (3) avoiding donor-recipient antigen mismatches when an identifiable alloantibody is present pre-transplant (i.e., in the case of a positive PRA pretransplant) but excluding potential recipients who are highly sensitized (e.g., have a PRA > or = 20%); and (4) performing an assessment for HLA sensitization using a sensitive flow cytometric method for alloantibody detection any time there is a reduction in immunosuppressant drug levels or worsening of metabolic control.

  14. Metal-Free Sensitizers for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Sumit; Lin, Jiann T

    2016-06-01

    This review focuses on our work on metal-free sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Sensitizers based on D-A'-π-A architecture (D is a donor, A is an acceptor, A' is an electron-deficient entity) exhibit better light harvesting than D-π-A-type sensitizers. However, appropriate molecular design is needed to avoid excessive aggregation of negative charge at the electron-deficient entity upon photoexcitation. Rigidified aromatics, including aromatic segments comprising fused electron-excessive and -deficient units in the spacer, allow effective electronic communication, and good photoinduced charge transfer leads to excellent cell performance. Sensitizers with two anchors/acceptors, D(-π-A)2 , can more efficiently harvest light, inject electrons, and suppress dark current compared with congeners with a single anchor. Appropriate incorporation of heteroaromatic units in the spacer is beneficial to DSSC performance. High-performance, aqueous-based DSSCs can be achieved with a dual redox couple comprising imidazolium iodide and 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-N-oxyl, and/or using dyes of improved wettability through the incorporation of a triethylene oxide methyl ether chain.

  15. The new numbers contrast sensitivity chart for contrast sensitivity measurement

    PubMed Central

    Khambhiphant, Bharkbhum; Tulvatana, Wasee; Busayarat, Mathu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop and assess the agreement between the 3 newly made numbers contrast sensitivity charts and the MARS contrast sensitivity chart (MARS) in contrast sensitivity measurement. Methods We developed 3 numbers contrast sensitivity charts for right, left and both eyes. Two hundred subjects were assigned to read numbers 0-9 for determining the degree of difficulty. Selected seven numbers were randomly arranged and the contrast of each number was decreased by the constant factor of 0.04 log units in the units as in the MARS. We assigned 112 subjects with visual acuity range from 20/480 to 20/20 to test once with the new chart and then with MARS Chart monocularly and binocularly by random order. Bland-Altman analysis for comparing two charts was performed. Results Bland-Altman analysis between 2 charts showed the mean differences were 0.04, 0.03, 0.04 log CS and the 95% limit of agreement (LOA) of the bias were (+0.26, −0.19), (+0.26, −0.20), (+0.25, −0.17) log CS for right, left and binocular. The Bland-Altman plot indicates a good concordance in 3 charts. Conclusions These charts show reasonable agreement and can be used interchangeably with the MARS. It is helpful for Thai people who can only read numbers in doing the test. We can use them in routinely contrast sensitivity measurement.

  16. Latent sensitization: a model for stress-sensitive chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Marvizon, Juan Carlos; Walwyn, Wendy; Minasyan, Ani; Chen, Wenling; Taylor, Bradley K

    2015-04-01

    Latent sensitization is a rodent model of chronic pain that reproduces both its episodic nature and its sensitivity to stress. It is triggered by a wide variety of injuries ranging from injection of inflammatory agents to nerve damage. It follows a characteristic time course in which a hyperalgesic phase is followed by a phase of remission. The hyperalgesic phase lasts between a few days to several months, depending on the triggering injury. Injection of μ-opioid receptor inverse agonists (e.g., naloxone or naltrexone) during the remission phase induces reinstatement of hyperalgesia. This indicates that the remission phase does not represent a return to the normal state, but rather an altered state in which hyperalgesia is masked by constitutive activity of opioid receptors. Importantly, stress also triggers reinstatement. Here we describe in detail procedures for inducing and following latent sensitization in its different phases in rats and mice. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. Latent Sensitization: a model for stress-sensitive chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Marvizon, Juan Carlos; Walwyn, Wendy; Minasyan, Ani; Chen, Wenling; Taylor, Bradley K.

    2015-01-01

    Latent sensitization is a rodent model of chronic pain that reproduces both its episodic nature and its sensitivity to stress. It is triggered by a wide variety of injuries ranging from injection of inflammatory agents to nerve damage. It follows a characteristic time course in which a hyperalgesic phase is followed by a phase of remission. The hyperalgesic phase lasts between a few days to several months, depending of the triggering injury. Injection of μ-opioid receptor inverse agonists (i.e., naloxone, naltrexone) during the remission phase induces reinstatement of hyperalgesia. This indicates that the remission phase does not represent a return to the normal state, but rather an altered state in which hyperalgesia is masked by constitutive activity of opioid receptors. Importantly, stress also triggers reinstatement. Here we describe in detail the procedures to induce and follow latent sensitization in its different phases in rats and mice. PMID:25829356

  18. Some More Sensitive Measures of Sensitivity and Response Bias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    In this article, the author proposes a new pair of sensitivity and response bias indices and compares them to other measures currently available, including d' and Beta of signal detection theory. Unlike d' and Beta, these new performance measures do not depend on specific distributional assumptions or assumptions about the transformation from stimulus information to a discrimination judgment with simulated and empirical data, the new sensitivity index is shown to be more accurate than d' and 16 other indices when these measures are used to compare the sensitivity levels of 2 experimental conditions. Results from a perceptual discrimination experiment demonstrate the feasibility of the new distribution-free bias index and suggest that biases of the type defined within the signal detection theory framework (i.e., the placement of a decision criterion) do not exist, even under an asymmetric payoff manipulation.

  19. Dye-sensitized solar cells based on purple corn sensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phinjaturus, Kawin; Maiaugree, Wasan; Suriharn, Bhalang; Pimanpaeng, Samuk; Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya; Swatsitang, Ekaphan

    2016-09-01

    Natural dye extracted from husk, cob and silk of purple corn, were used for the first time as photosensitizers in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The dye sensitized solar cells fabrication process has been optimized in terms of solvent extraction. The resulting maximal efficiency of 1.06% was obtained from purple corn husk extracted by acetone. The ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and incident photon-to-current efficiency (IPCE) were employed to characterize the natural dye and the DSSCs.

  20. Climate Sensitivity in the Anthropocene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Previdi, M.; Liepert, B. G.; Peteet, Dorothy M.; Hansen, J.; Beerling, D. J.; Broccoli, A. J.; Frolking, S.; Galloway, J. N.; Heimann, M.; LeQuere, C.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Climate sensitivity in its most basic form is defined as the equilibrium change in global surface temperature that occurs in response to a climate forcing, or externally imposed perturbation of the planetary energy balance. Within this general definition, several specific forms of climate sensitivity exist that differ in terms of the types of climate feedbacks they include. Based on evidence from Earth's history, we suggest here that the relevant form of climate sensitivity in the Anthropocene (e.g. from which to base future greenhouse gas (GHG) stabilization targets) is the Earth system sensitivity including fast feedbacks from changes in water vapour, natural aerosols, clouds and sea ice, slower surface albedo feedbacks from changes in continental ice sheets and vegetation, and climate-GHG feedbacks from changes in natural (land and ocean) carbon sinks. Traditionally, only fast feedbacks have been considered (with the other feedbacks either ignored or treated as forcing), which has led to estimates of the climate sensitivity for doubled CO2 concentrations of about 3 C. The 2×CO2 Earth system sensitivity is higher than this, being approx. 4-6 C if the ice sheet/vegetation albedo feedback is included in addition to the fast feedbacks, and higher still if climate-GHG feedbacks are also included. The inclusion of climate-GHG feedbacks due to changes in the natural carbon sinks has the advantage of more directly linking anthropogenic GHG emissions with the ensuing global temperature increase, thus providing a truer indication of the climate sensitivity to human perturbations. The Earth system climate sensitivity is difficult to quantify due to the lack of palaeo-analogues for the present-day anthropogenic forcing, and the fact that ice sheet and climate-GHG feedbacks have yet to become globally significant in the Anthropocene. Furthermore, current models are unable to adequately simulate the physics of ice sheet decay and certain aspects of the natural carbon and

  1. Risk-sensitive reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yun; Tobia, Michael J; Sommer, Tobias; Obermayer, Klaus

    2014-07-01

    We derive a family of risk-sensitive reinforcement learning methods for agents, who face sequential decision-making tasks in uncertain environments. By applying a utility function to the temporal difference (TD) error, nonlinear transformations are effectively applied not only to the received rewards but also to the true transition probabilities of the underlying Markov decision process. When appropriate utility functions are chosen, the agents' behaviors express key features of human behavior as predicted by prospect theory (Kahneman & Tversky, 1979 ), for example, different risk preferences for gains and losses, as well as the shape of subjective probability curves. We derive a risk-sensitive Q-learning algorithm, which is necessary for modeling human behavior when transition probabilities are unknown, and prove its convergence. As a proof of principle for the applicability of the new framework, we apply it to quantify human behavior in a sequential investment task. We find that the risk-sensitive variant provides a significantly better fit to the behavioral data and that it leads to an interpretation of the subject's responses that is indeed consistent with prospect theory. The analysis of simultaneously measured fMRI signals shows a significant correlation of the risk-sensitive TD error with BOLD signal change in the ventral striatum. In addition we find a significant correlation of the risk-sensitive Q-values with neural activity in the striatum, cingulate cortex, and insula that is not present if standard Q-values are used.

  2. 78 FR 15710 - Strong Sensitizer Guidance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... supplemental definition of ``strong sensitizer'' due to advancements in the science of sensitization that have... sensitization and made recommendations for proposed changes to the current definition, which eliminate... sensitization characteristics of substances, rank the criteria for classification of strong sensitizers in order...

  3. Radiation sensitization in cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Greenstock, C.L.

    1981-02-01

    One possible benefit of stimulated oxygen consumption rendering aerobic cancer cells hypoxic, and the reductive sensitizer drug metabolism which has been found to be selective for hypoxic tissue, is that the resulting reductive metabolites are selectively toxic and may be useful in chemotherapy to kill sensitive hypoxic tumor cells. Radiation chemical, biochemical and pharmacological studies are continuing to provide additional information on drug delivery, metabolism and cytotoxicity, in order to select and evaluate clinically acceptable sensitizer drugs. Radiation chemical studies over the past decade have led to the development and selection of the nitroimidazoles, metronidazole and misonidazole for clinical evaluation in terms of improved cancer treatments. The results of ongoing clinical trials will, within the next few years, indicate how successful this application of basic radiation chemical research has been. 39 references are included. (JMT)

  4. Phase-sensitive flow cytometer

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, J.A.

    1992-12-31

    This report describes phase-sensitive flow cytometer (FCM) which provides additional FCM capability to use the fluorescence lifetime of one or more fluorochromes bound to single cells to provide additional information regarding the cells. The resulting fluorescence emission can be resolved into individual fluorescence signals if two fluorochromes are present or can be converted directly to a decay lifetime from a single fluorochrome. The excitation light for the fluorochromes is modulated to produce an amplitude modulated fluorescence pulse as the fluorochrome is excited in the FCM. The modulation signal also forms a reference signal that is phase-shifted a selected amount for subsequent mixing with the output modulated fluorescence intensity signal in phase-sensitive detection circuitry. The output from the phase-sensitive circuitry is then an individual resolved fluorochrome signal or a single fluorochrome decay lifetime, depending on the applied phase shifts.

  5. High sensitivity RNA pseudoknot prediction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaolu; Ali, Hesham

    2007-01-01

    Most ab initio pseudoknot predicting methods provide very few folding scenarios for a given RNA sequence and have low sensitivities. RNA researchers, in many cases, would rather sacrifice the specificity for a much higher sensitivity for pseudoknot detection. In this study, we introduce the Pseudoknot Local Motif Model and Dynamic Partner Sequence Stacking (PLMM_DPSS) algorithm which predicts all PLM model pseudoknots within an RNA sequence in a neighboring-region-interference-free fashion. The PLM model is derived from the existing Pseudobase entries. The innovative DPSS approach calculates the optimally lowest stacking energy between two partner sequences. Combined with the Mfold, PLMM_DPSS can also be used in predicting complicated pseudoknots. The test results of PLMM_DPSS, PKNOTS, iterated loop matching, pknotsRG and HotKnots with Pseudobase sequences have shown that PLMM_DPSS is the most sensitive among the five methods. PLMM_DPSS also provides manageable pseudoknot folding scenarios for further structure determination.

  6. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.C.; Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.

    1993-04-01

    Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project staff are developing mathematical models to be used to estimate the radiation dose that individuals may have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. An uncertainty and sensitivity analyses plan is essential to understand and interpret the predictions from these mathematical models. This is especially true in the case of the HEDR models where the values of many parameters are unknown. This plan gives a thorough documentation of the uncertainty and hierarchical sensitivity analysis methods recommended for use on all HEDR mathematical models. The documentation includes both technical definitions and examples. In addition, an extensive demonstration of the uncertainty and sensitivity analysis process is provided using actual results from the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes (HEDRIC). This demonstration shows how the approaches used in the recommended plan can be adapted for all dose predictions in the HEDR Project.

  7. Making Sense of Palaeoclimate Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohling, E. J.; Sluijs, A.; DeConto, R.; Drijfhout, S. S.; Fedorov, A.; Foster, G. L.; Ganopolski, A.; Hansen, J.; Honisch, B.; Hooghiemstra, H.; Huber, M.; Huybers, P.; Dijkstra, H. A.; Knutti, R.; Lea, D. W.; Lourens, L. J.; Lunt, D.; Masson-Delmotte, V.; Medina-Elizalde, M.; Otto-Bliesner, B.; Pagani, M.; Palike, H.; Renssen, H.; Koehler, P.; Royer, D. L.; Siddall, M.; Valdes, P.; Zachos, J. C.; Zeebe, R. E.; vandeWal, R. S. W.; vonderHeydt, A. S.; Beerling, D. J.; Berger, A.; Bijl, P. K.; Crucifix, M.

    2012-01-01

    Many palaeoclimate studies have quantified pre-anthropogenic climate change to calculate climate sensitivity (equilibrium temperature change in response to radiative forcing change), but a lack of consistent methodologies produces a wide range of estimates and hinders comparability of results. Here we present a stricter approach, to improve intercomparison of palaeoclimate sensitivity estimates in a manner compatible with equilibrium projections for future climate change. Over the past 65 million years, this reveals a climate sensitivity (in K W-1 m2) of 0.3-1.9 or 0.6-1.3 at 95% or 68% probability, respectively. The latter implies a warming of 2.2-4.8 K per doubling of atmospheric CO2, which agrees with IPCC estimates.

  8. Phase-sensitive flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Steinkamp, J.A.

    1993-12-14

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer (FCM) provides additional FCM capability to use the fluorescence lifetime of one or more fluorochromes bound to single cells to provide additional information regarding the cells. The resulting fluorescence emission can be resolved into individual fluorescence signals if two fluorochromes are present or can be converted directly to a decay lifetime from a single fluorochrome. The excitation light for the fluorochromes is modulated to produce an amplitude modulated fluorescence pulse as the fluorochrome is excited in the FCM. The modulation signal also forms a reference signal that is phase-shifted a selected amount for subsequent mixing with the output modulated fluorescence intensity signal in phase-sensitive detection circuitry. The output from the phase-sensitive circuitry is then an individual resolved fluorochrome signal or a single fluorochrome decay lifetime, depending on the applied phase shifts. 15 figures.

  9. Tooth sensitivity: mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, K

    1993-08-01

    Tooth sensitivity is a common complaint encountered in clinical practice. Exposed superficial dentin is free of nerve endings, yet sensitive. Experimental evidence indicates that stimuli, such as probing the dentin surface and air blasts, induce fluid movements in the dentinal tubules and these fluid movements, in turn, activate the intradental nerves. The condition of the dentin surface is critically important in allowing this process. In addition, the internal environment of the pulp may influence nerve excitability. Therapies for tooth sensitivity include both agents that obstruct the dentinal tubules and agents that can decrease the excitability of the intradental nerves. The exact treatment used depends on the etiology of the individual's problem and the extent of dentinal tissue damage.

  10. Dye Sensitized Tandem Photovoltaic Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, Greg D.

    2009-12-21

    This work provided a new way to look at photoelectrochemical cells and their performance. Although thought of as low efficiency, a the internal efficiency of a 9% global efficiency dye sensitized solar cell is approximately equal to an 18% efficient silicon cell when each is compared to their useful spectral range. Other work undertaken with this contract also reported the first growth oriented titania and perovskite columns on a transparent conducting oxide. Other work has shown than significant performance enhancement in the performance of dye sensitized solar cells can be obtained through the use of coupling inverse opal photonic crystals to the nanocrystalline dye sensitized solar cell. Lastly, a quick efficient method was developed to bond titanium foils to transparent conducting oxide substrates for anodization.

  11. Selective sensitivity in Kerr microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, I. V.; Schäfer, R.

    2017-07-01

    A new technique for contrast separation in wide-field magneto-optical Kerr microscopy is introduced. Utilizing the light from eight light emitting diodes, guided to the microscope by glass fibers and being switched synchronously with the camera exposure, domain images with orthogonal in-plane sensitivity can be displayed simultaneously at real-time, and images with pure in-plane or polar contrast can be obtained. The benefit of this new method of contrast separation is demonstrated for Permalloy films, a NdFeB sinter magnet, and a cobalt crystal. Moreover, the new technique is shown to strongly enhance the sensitivity of Kerr microscopy by eliminating parasitic contrast contributions occurring in conventional setups. A doubling of the in-plane domain contrast and a sensitivity to Kerr rotations as low as 0.6 mdeg is demonstrated.

  12. Phase-sensitive flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Steinkamp, John A.

    1993-01-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer (FCM) provides additional FCM capability to use the fluorescence lifetime of one or more fluorochromes bound to single cells to provide additional information regarding the cells. The resulting fluorescence emission can be resolved into individual fluorescence signals if two fluorochromes are present or can be converted directly to a decay lifetime from a single fluorochrome. The excitation light for the fluorochromes is modulated to produce an amplitude modulated fluorescence pulse as the fluorochrome is excited in the FCM. The modulation signal also forms a reference signal that is phase-shifted a selected amount for subsequent mixing with the output modulated fluorescence intensity signal in phase-sensitive detection circuitry. The output from the phase-sensitive circuitry is then an individual resolved fluorochrome signal or a single fluorochrome decay lifetime, depending on the applied phase shifts.

  13. Nano-textured high sensitivity ion sensitive field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hajmirzaheydarali, M.; Sadeghipari, M.; Akbari, M.; Shahsafi, A.; Mohajerzadeh, S.

    2016-02-07

    Nano-textured gate engineered ion sensitive field effect transistors (ISFETs), suitable for high sensitivity pH sensors, have been realized. Utilizing a mask-less deep reactive ion etching results in ultra-fine poly-Si features on the gate of ISFET devices where spacing of the order of 10 nm and less is achieved. Incorporation of these nano-sized features on the gate is responsible for high sensitivities up to 400 mV/pH in contrast to conventional planar structures. The fabrication process for this transistor is inexpensive, and it is fully compatible with standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor fabrication procedure. A theoretical modeling has also been presented to predict the extension of the diffuse layer into the electrolyte solution for highly featured structures and to correlate this extension with the high sensitivity of the device. The observed ultra-fine features by means of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy tools corroborate the theoretical prediction.

  14. Lessening Sensitivity: Student Experiences of Teaching and Learning Sensitive Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Pam

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing interest in learning and teaching as emotional activities, there is still very little research on experiences of sensitive issues. Using qualitative data from students from a range of social science disciplines, this study investigates student's experiences. The paper highlights how, although they found it difficult and distressing…

  15. Associations between sensitivity to punishment, sensitivity to reward, and gambling.

    PubMed

    Gaher, Raluca M; Hahn, Austin M; Shishido, Hanako; Simons, Jeffrey S; Gaster, Sam

    2015-03-01

    The majority of individuals gamble during their lifetime; however only a subset of these individuals develops problematic gambling. Gray's Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory may be relevant to understanding gambling problems. Differences in sensitivity to punishments and rewards can influence an individual's behavior and may be pertinent to the development of gambling problems. This study examined the functional associations between sensitivity to punishment (SP), sensitivity to reward (SR), and gambling problems in a sample of 2254 college students. Zero-inflated negative binomial regression was used to predict gambling problems as well as the absence of gambling problems. Gambling problems were hypothesized to be positively associated with SR and inversely associated with SP. In addition, SP was hypothesized to moderate the association between SR and gambling problems, attenuating the strength of the association. As hypothesized, SR was positively associated with gambling problems. However, SP did not moderate the relationship between SR and gambling problems. SP did, however, moderate the relationship between SR and the likelihood of never experiencing gambling problems. The results demonstrate that individual differences in SP and SR are functionally associated with gambling problems.

  16. Porphyrin-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu-Lin; Diau, Eric Wei-Guang

    2013-01-07

    Nature has chosen chlorophylls in plants as antennae to harvest light for the conversion of solar energy in complicated photosynthetic processes. Inspired by natural photosynthesis, scientists utilized artificial chlorophylls - the porphyrins - as efficient centres to harvest light for solar cells sensitized with a porphyrin (PSSC). After the first example appeared in 1993 of a porphyrin of type copper chlorophyll as a photosensitizer for PSSC that achieved a power conversion efficiency of 2.6%, no significant advance of PSSC was reported until 2005; beta-linked zinc porphyrins were then reported to show promising device performances with a benchmark efficiency of 7.1% reported in 2007. Meso-linked zinc porphyrin sensitizers in the first series with a push-pull framework appeared in 2009; the best cell performed comparably to that of a N3-based device, and a benchmark 11% was reported for a porphyrin sensitizer of this type in 2010. With a structural design involving long alkoxyl chains to envelop the porphyrin core to suppress the dye aggregation for a push-pull zinc porphyrin, the PSSC achieved a record 12.3% in 2011 with co-sensitization of an organic dye and a cobalt-based electrolyte. The best PSSC system exhibited a panchromatic feature for light harvesting covering the visible spectral region to 700 nm, giving opportunities to many other porphyrins, such as fused and dimeric porphyrins, with near-infrared absorption spectral features, together with the approach of molecular co-sensitization, to enhance the device performance of PSSC. According to this historical trend for the development of prospective porphyrin sensitizers used in PSSC, we review systematically the progress of porphyrins of varied kinds, and their derivatives, applied in PSSC with a focus on reports during 2007-2012 from the point of view of molecular design correlated with photovoltaic performance.

  17. [Non-celiac gluten sensitivity].

    PubMed

    Hoffmanová, Iva; Sánchez, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity has recently been recognized by the scientific community as a part of gluten-related disorders, and is defined as a condition with gastrointestinal and/or extra-intestinal symptoms triggered by gluten ingestion in the absence of celiac disease and wheat allergy. Currently, there is no specific serological marker and non-celiac gluten sensitivity remains a diagnosis of exclusion: testing for celiac disease and wheat allergy must be negative, symptoms must improve with a gluten-free diet, and diagnosis must be confirmed by the gluten challenge. In this article, we discuss current knowledge of pathophysiology, clinical and epidemilogical spectrum, diagnosis, and treatment of NCGS.

  18. Predicting radiation sensitivity of polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osullivan, D.; Price, P. B.; Kinoshita, K.; Willson, C. G.

    1982-01-01

    Recently two independent applications have emerged for highly radiation-sensitive polymers: as resists for production of microelectronic circuitry and as materials to record the tracks of energetic nuclear particles. The relief images used for masking in resist materials are generated by radiation-induced differential dissolution rates, whereas the techniques used in recording nuclear particle tracks employ differential etching processes, that is, development by a chemical etchant that actually degrades the polymer. It is found that the sensitivity of materials to these very different processes is related to their gamma-ray scission efficiency. This correlation provides a predictive capability.

  19. Light Sensitivity of Diamond Monocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentele, Benjamin; Cumalat, John; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Steve

    2010-10-01

    We are investigating the use of diamonds as a low density, radiation-hard sensor for nuclear and particle research. Using a radioactive source, we have studied the response of minimum ionizing particles as a function of voltage, polarity, and time stability. While it is well known that polycrystalline diamond is light-sensitive, little is known about the light sensitivity of single crystal diamond. We will report on our studies of the diamond's electronic response to light and the diamond's internal ``polarization'' effect. We also describe our future plans.

  20. Baroreceptor sensitivity and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rowaiye, Olumide Olatubosun; Jankowska, Ewa Anita; Ponikowska, Beata

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a disease of increasing incidence and prevalence. Arterial baroreceptors are stretch-sensitive receptors, which in a reflex manner are involved in the homeostatic control of arterial blood pressure. Diabetic subjects have depressed baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), although the exact pathomechanisms are unclear. In this review, we discuss the features, clinicaland prognostic implications of reduced BRS for diabetic patients and the potential involvement of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and atherosclerosis. Finally, we demonstrate evidence on interventions (e.g. pioglitazone, alpha-lipoic acid, leptin, fluvastatin, physicaltraining etc.) which could improve BRS and ameliorate cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in diabetic patients.

  1. Burst Populations and Detector Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.

    2003-01-01

    The F(sub T) (peak bolometric photon flux) vs. E(sub p) (peak energy) plane is a powerful tool to compare the burst populations detected by different detectors. Detector sensitivity curves in this plane demonstrate which burst populations the detectors will detect. For example, future CZT-based detectors will show the largest increase in sensitivity for soft bursts, and will be particularly well- suited to study X-ray rich bursts and X-ray Flashes. Identical bursts at different redshifts describe a track in the F(sub T)-E(sub p) plane.

  2. Sensitization strategies in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Peiying

    2016-01-01

    The commonly used treatment avenues employed by cancer physicians include surgery, radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy in addition to rapid developmental and confirmatory studies on the efficacy of targeted therapies. However, the success rate in these commonly used treatments remains relatively low due to associated side effects, such as normal cell targeting/toxicity and resistance. In addition, investigators are continuing their efforts to enhance the efficacy of RT and chemotherapy to prevent associated side effects and improve the survival rate of the affected patient in order to increase patient survival. In the present study, we have reviewed the sensitization approaches used to improve chemotherapy and RT sensitivity in tumors. PMID:27900051

  3. Shock Sensitivity of energetic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K.

    1980-01-01

    Viscoplastic deformation is examined as the principal source of hot energy. Some shock sensitivity data on a proposed model is explained. A hollow sphere model is used to approximate complex porous matrix of energetic materials. Two pieces of shock sensitivity data are qualitatively compared with results of the proposed model. The first is the p2 tau law. The second is the desensitization of energetic materials by a ramp wave applied stress. An approach to improve the model based on experimental observations is outlined.

  4. Burst Populations and Detector Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.

    2003-01-01

    The F(sub T) (peak bolometric photon flux) vs. E(sub p) (peak energy) plane is a powerful tool to compare the burst populations detected by different detectors. Detector sensitivity curves in this plane demonstrate which burst populations the detectors will detect. For example, future CZT-based detectors will show the largest increase in sensitivity for soft bursts, and will be particularly well- suited to study X-ray rich bursts and X-ray Flashes. Identical bursts at different redshifts describe a track in the F(sub T)-E(sub p) plane.

  5. Sensitive, Selective Test For Hydrazines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roundbehler, David; Macdonald, Stephen

    1993-01-01

    Derivatives of hydrazines formed, then subjected to gas chromatography and detected via chemiluminescence. In method of detecting and quantifying hydrazine vapors, vapors reacted with dinitro compound to enhance sensitivity and selectivity. Hydrazine (HZ), monomethyl hydrazine, (MMH), and unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively, either alone or in mixtures. Vapors collected and reacted with 2,4-dinitrobenzaldehyde, (DNB), making it possible to concentrate hydrazine in derivative form, thereby increasing sensitivity to low initial concentrations. Increases selectivity because only those constituents of sample reacting with DNB concentrated for analysis.

  6. Sensitization of hypoxic normal tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Hendry, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    The radiosensitization by misonidazole of three normal tissues in the unanaeshtetized mouse (femoral marrow, intestinal crypts and the target tissue for tail necrosis) has been studied. At 1 mg/g body weight, no sensitization was observed for the former two tissues, and no cytotoxicity for marrow was demonstrated. Sensitization of fully anoxic marrow or tail shown, by a factor of 1.8--1.9, in comparison with normal tails (factor 1.5). Clamping experiments revealed the homogenous nature of the natural hypoxia in the tissue responsible for tail necrosis, and an effective increase in the oxygenation was seen at Day 7 after a large priming dose. PMID:277235

  7. Drought sensitivity predicts habitat size sensitivity in an aquatic ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Amundrud, Sarah L; Srivastava, Diane S

    2015-07-01

    Species and trophic richness often increase with habitat size. Although many ecological processes have been evoked to explain both patterns, the environmental stress associated with small habitats has rarely been considered. We propose that larger habitats may be species rich simply because their environmental conditions are within the fundamental niche of more species; larger habitats may also have more trophic levels if traits of predators render them vulnerable to environmental stress. We test this hypothesis using the aquatic insect larvae in water-filled bromeliads. In bromeliads, the probability of desiccation is greatest in small plants. For the 10 most common bromeliad insect taxa, we ask whether differences in drought tolerance and regional abundances between taxa predict community and trophic composition over a gradient of bromeliad size. First, we used bromeliad survey data to calculate the mean habitat size of occurrence of each taxon. Comparing the observed mean habitat size of occurrence to that expected from random species assembly based on differences in their regional abundances allowed us to obtain habitat size sensitivity indices (as Z scores) for the various insect taxa. Second, we obtained drought sensitivity indices by subjecting individual insects to drought and measuring the effects on relative growth rates in a mesocosm experiment. We found that drought sensitivity strongly, predicts habitat size sensitivity in bromeliad insects. However, an increase in trophic richness with habitat size could not be explained by an increased sensitivity of predators to drought, but rather by sampling effects, as predators were rare compared to lower trophic levels. This finding suggests that physiological tolerance to environmental stress can be relevant in explaining the universal increase in species with habitat size.

  8. High-Sensitivity Microwave Optics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunn, W. M., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a 3.33-cm wavelength (9 GHz) microwave system that achieves a high overall signal sensitivity and a well-collimated beam with moderate-size equipment. The system has been used to develop microwave versions of the Michelson interferometer, Bragg reflector, Brewster's law and total internal reflection, and Young's interference experiment.…

  9. A Primer of Covert Sensitization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Albert J.

    2006-01-01

    Covert sensitization is the first of a family of behavior therapy procedures called covert conditioning initially developed by Joseph Cautela in the 1960s and 1970s. The covert conditioning procedures involve the use of visualized imagery and are designed to work according to operant conditioning principles. When working with cooperative clients…

  10. Contamination Sensitivity in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegal, Michael; Share, David L.

    1990-01-01

    Revealed that children were able to indicate that an apparently safe substance such as juice may be contaminated by contact with a foreign body such as a cockroach. Supported the hypothesis that early sensitivity to substances that contain invisible contaminates may be guided by knowledge of a distinction between appearance and reality. (RH)

  11. Identifying School Psychologists' Intercultural Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puyana, Olivia E.; Edwards, Oliver W.

    2016-01-01

    School psychologists are encouraged to analyze their intercultural sensitivity because they may be subject to personal attitudes and beliefs that pejoratively influence their work with students and clients who are culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD). However, gaps remain in the literature regarding whether school psychologists are prepared…

  12. Coeliac disease and gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Troncone, R; Jabri, B

    2011-06-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is a systemic immune-mediated disorder elicited by gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The common factor for all patients with CD is the presence of a variable combination of gluten-dependent clinical manifestations, specific autoantibodies (anti-tissue transglutaminase/anti-endomysium), HLA-DQ2 and/or DQ8 haplotypes and different degrees of enteropathy. Recently, gluten sensitivity has received much interest, although the limits and possible overlap between gluten sensitivity and CD remain poorly defined. At present, a number of morphological, functional and immunological disorders that are lacking one or more of the key CD criteria (enteropathy, associated HLA haplotypes and presence of anti-transglutaminase two antibodies) but respond to gluten exclusion are included under the umbrella of gluten sensitivity. The possible immunological mechanisms underlying these conditions are discussed. Emphasis is given to specific autoantibodies as markers of the coeliac spectrum and to the hypothesis that innate epithelial stress can exist independently from adaptive intestinal immunity in gluten sensitivity.

  13. A Primer of Covert Sensitization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Albert J.

    2006-01-01

    Covert sensitization is the first of a family of behavior therapy procedures called covert conditioning initially developed by Joseph Cautela in the 1960s and 1970s. The covert conditioning procedures involve the use of visualized imagery and are designed to work according to operant conditioning principles. When working with cooperative clients…

  14. Non-coeliac gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Peter R; Skodje, Gry I; Lundin, Knut E A

    2017-03-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome-like symptoms in response to wheat ingestion is common and well described, but whether the reaction is due to gluten (i.e., non-coeliac gluten sensitivity), other wheat proteins, or FODMAPs (mostly fructans) alone or in combinations has not been clearly defined. Exclusion of coeliac disease in the presence of negative serology, and normal villous architecture but increased density of intraepithelial lymphocytes on duodenal biopsies, is difficult. Furthermore, the confidence by which a positive diagnosis is made or non-coeliac gluten sensitivity is excluded by blinded placebo-controlled rechallenge with wheat protein is reduced by strong nocebo responses generally found in patients with self-reported non-coeliac gluten sensitivity. The absence of a clear biological mechanism of action and difficulties with the design and interpretation of research studies have plunged this entity into even deeper controversy. In the absence of clarity in its diagnosis, the epidemiology, prognosis, and therapeutic approaches to a patient who may be gluten sensitive remain to be determined. Adequate understanding of the issues surrounding the controversy and further research will slowly unravel the truth behind the problem. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. High-Sensitivity Microwave Optics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunn, W. M., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a 3.33-cm wavelength (9 GHz) microwave system that achieves a high overall signal sensitivity and a well-collimated beam with moderate-size equipment. The system has been used to develop microwave versions of the Michelson interferometer, Bragg reflector, Brewster's law and total internal reflection, and Young's interference experiment.…

  16. Spiritual Sensitivity in Gifted Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovecky, Deirdre V.

    1998-01-01

    Explores the concept of spiritual sensitivity in children, noting that some gifted children show early evidence of an understanding of spiritual concepts. It examines the role of asynchrony in the development of spiritual concerns and offers examples of how gifted children experience these concerns in their everyday lives. (DB)

  17. Metal Coat Increases Output Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janesick, James R.

    1989-01-01

    Charge-coupled photodetector optimized for maximum quantum efficiency (QE), high charge-collection efficiency, and ultralow read noise. Called "flash-coupled" photodetector, sensor delivers high quantum-efficiency sensitivity in spectral range extending from soft x ray to near infrared.

  18. Pathophysiology of salt sensitivity hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ando, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Toshiro

    2012-06-01

    Dietary salt intake is the most important factor contributing to hypertension, but the salt susceptibility of blood pressure (BP) is different in individual subjects. Although the pathogenesis of salt-sensitive hypertension is heterogeneous, it is mainly attributable to an impaired renal capacity to excrete sodium (Na(+) ). We recently identified two novel mechanisms that impair renal Na(+) -excreting function and result in an increase in BP. First, mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) activation in the kidney, which facilitates distal Na(+) reabsorption through epithelial Na(+) channel activation, causes salt-sensitive hypertension. This mechanism exists not only in models of high-aldosterone hypertension as seen in conditions of obesity or metabolic syndrome, but also in normal- or low-aldosterone type of salt-sensitive hypertension. In the latter, Rac1 activation by salt excess causes MR stimulation. Second, renospecific sympathoactivation may cause an increase in BP under conditions of salt excess. Renal beta2 adrenoceptor stimulation in the kidney leads to decreased transcription of the gene encoding WNK4, a negative regulator of Na(+) reabsorption through Na(+) -Cl (-) cotransporter in the distal convoluted tubules, resulting in salt-dependent hypertension. Abnormalities identified in these two pathways of Na(+) reabsorption in the distal nephron may present therapeutic targets for the treatment of salt-sensitive hypertension.

  19. Sensitivity Training for Professional Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Hollie, Jr.; Williams, Susan J.

    Eleven female students, in a graduate education course entitled "Mental Health and Human Interaction," participated in a single 24-hour sensitivity training group and were studied to identify personality changes resulting from the session. During the marathon session, an aura of warmth, acceptance, and security was maintained, creating an open…

  20. Tactile Sensitivity in Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne; Tavassoli, Teresa; Calo, Susana; Thomas, Richard M.; Catmur, Caroline; Frith, Uta; Haggard, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    People with autism and Asperger syndrome are anecdotally said to be hypersensitive to touch. In two experiments, we measured tactile thresholds and suprathreshold tactile sensitivity in a group of adults with Asperger syndrome. In the first experiment, tactile perceptual thresholds were measured. Two frequencies of vibrotactile stimulation were…

  1. Tactile Sensitivity in Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne; Tavassoli, Teresa; Calo, Susana; Thomas, Richard M.; Catmur, Caroline; Frith, Uta; Haggard, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    People with autism and Asperger syndrome are anecdotally said to be hypersensitive to touch. In two experiments, we measured tactile thresholds and suprathreshold tactile sensitivity in a group of adults with Asperger syndrome. In the first experiment, tactile perceptual thresholds were measured. Two frequencies of vibrotactile stimulation were…

  2. Towards Context Sensitive Information Inference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, D.; Bruza, P. D.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses information inference from a psychologistic stance and proposes an information inference mechanism that makes inferences via computations of information flow through an approximation of a conceptual space. Highlights include cognitive economics of information processing; context sensitivity; and query models for information retrieval.…

  3. Antidiabetic plants improving insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Eddouks, Mohamed; Bidi, Amina; El Bouhali, Bachir; Hajji, Lhoussain; Zeggwagh, Naoufel Ali

    2014-09-01

    Globally, the prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing at an alarming rate. This chronic pathology gravely troubled the human health and quality of life. Both insulin deficiency and insulin resistance are involved in the pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus. Moreover, insulin resistance is being diagnosed nowadays in a growing population of diabetic and obese patients, especially in industrialized societies. There are lots of conventional agents available to control and to treat diabetes, but total recovery from this disorder has not been reported up to this date. Plants provided a potential source of hypoglycemic drugs and are widely used in several traditional systems of medicine to prevent diabetes. A few reviews with less attention paid to mechanisms of action have been published on antidiabetic plants. The present review focuses on the various plants that have been reported to be effective in improving insulin sensitivity associated with diabetes. In this work, an updated systematic review of the published literature has been conducted to review the antidiabetic plants improving insulin sensitivity and 111 medicinal plants have been reported to have a beneficial effect on insulin sensitivity using several in-vitro and in-vivo animal models of diabetes. The different metabolic and cellular effects of the antidiabetic plants improving insulin sensitivity are reported indicating the important role of medicinal plants as potential alternative or complementary use in controlling insulin resistance associated with diabetes mellitus. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  4. Contamination Sensitivity in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegal, Michael; Share, David L.

    1990-01-01

    Revealed that children were able to indicate that an apparently safe substance such as juice may be contaminated by contact with a foreign body such as a cockroach. Supported the hypothesis that early sensitivity to substances that contain invisible contaminates may be guided by knowledge of a distinction between appearance and reality. (RH)

  5. Contextual sensitivity in scientific reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Van Bavel, Jay J; Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Brady, William J; Reinero, Diego A

    2016-06-07

    In recent years, scientists have paid increasing attention to reproducibility. For example, the Reproducibility Project, a large-scale replication attempt of 100 studies published in top psychology journals found that only 39% could be unambiguously reproduced. There is a growing consensus among scientists that the lack of reproducibility in psychology and other fields stems from various methodological factors, including low statistical power, researcher's degrees of freedom, and an emphasis on publishing surprising positive results. However, there is a contentious debate about the extent to which failures to reproduce certain results might also reflect contextual differences (often termed "hidden moderators") between the original research and the replication attempt. Although psychologists have found extensive evidence that contextual factors alter behavior, some have argued that context is unlikely to influence the results of direct replications precisely because these studies use the same methods as those used in the original research. To help resolve this debate, we recoded the 100 original studies from the Reproducibility Project on the extent to which the research topic of each study was contextually sensitive. Results suggested that the contextual sensitivity of the research topic was associated with replication success, even after statistically adjusting for several methodological characteristics (e.g., statistical power, effect size). The association between contextual sensitivity and replication success did not differ across psychological subdisciplines. These results suggest that researchers, replicators, and consumers should be mindful of contextual factors that might influence a psychological process. We offer several guidelines for dealing with contextual sensitivity in reproducibility.

  6. Sensitivity Training for Professional Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Hollie, Jr.; Williams, Susan J.

    Eleven female students, in a graduate education course entitled "Mental Health and Human Interaction," participated in a single 24-hour sensitivity training group and were studied to identify personality changes resulting from the session. During the marathon session, an aura of warmth, acceptance, and security was maintained, creating an open…

  7. [Gravitation sensitivity of human endothelium].

    PubMed

    Romanov, Iu A; Kabaeva, N V; Buravkova, L B

    2000-01-01

    Experiments on the effects of hypogravity (clinostatting) on growth and formation of monolayer of cultivated endothelium cells of the human umbilical vein demonstrated sensitivity of endothelium to the gravitational stimulus as it responded by a significant reduction of the proliferative activity of cells in culture. The most favorable conditions for cultivating endothelium cells under extended (15-d) hypogravity in vitro were determined.

  8. Myopathy associated with gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Chattopadhyay, Arup K; Grünewald, Richard A; Jarratt, John A; Kandler, Rosalind H; Rao, D G; Sanders, D S; Wharton, S B; Davies-Jones, G A B

    2007-04-01

    Ataxia and peripheral neuropathy are the most common neurological manifestations of gluten sensitivity. Myopathy is a less common and poorly characterized additional neurological manifestation of gluten sensitivity. We present our experience with 13 patients who presented with symptoms and signs suggestive of a myopathy and in whom investigation led to the diagnosis of gluten sensitivity. Three of these patients had a neuropathy with or without ataxia in addition to the myopathy. The mean age at onset of the myopathic symptoms was 54 years. Ten patients had neurophysiological evidence of myopathy. Inflammatory myopathy was the most common finding on neuropathological examination. One patient had basophilic rimmed vacuoles suggestive of inclusion-body myositis. Six patients received immunosuppressive treatment in addition to starting on a gluten-free diet; five improved and one remained unchanged. Among seven patients not on immunosuppressive treatment, four showed clinical improvement of the myopathy with a gluten-free diet. The improvement was also associated with reduction or normalization of serum creatine kinase level. The myopathy progressed in one patient who refused the gluten-free diet. Myopathy may be another manifestation of gluten sensitivity and is likely to have an immune-mediated pathogenesis. A gluten-free diet may be a useful therapeutic intervention.

  9. Noise sensitivity: A neurophenomenological perspective.

    PubMed

    Dzhambov, Angel M

    2015-11-01

    This paper addresses the current limitations of noise sensitivity research and the benefit of undertaking a neurophenomenological approach of investigation. It begins by questioning the invariance of noise sensitivity across different studies and contexts and argues that these are issues associated with the psychometric construct rather than the underlying reaction patterns. It suggest that our definition and operationalization of noise sensitivity might have been misspecified and that it needs to be revised on the basis of heuristically derived first-person data about our experiences of noise. It then shows why the basic principles of the neurophenomenological program are applicable to psychoacoustic research. Namely, it argues that phenomenological training leading to reflexive introspection and verbalization of our susceptibility to noise might have three-fold implication - (i) it will generate deeper understanding of noise sensitivity which will then allow us to deduce a hierarchical structure of meaning and concepts to supplement and be fed to quantitative research, (ii) it will provide better interpretation of neuroimaging and electroencephalographic data related to noise reaction and perception, which in turn will allow a process of reciprocal validation, (iii) and, most importantly, it presents a promising technique for emotional regulation of noise processing via modulation of the amygdalar function, when a state of awareness of this processing has been achieved.

  10. Alcohol-Sensitive Generalized Dystonia.

    PubMed

    Micheli, Federico; Uribe-Roca, Claudia; Saenz-Farret, Michel

    We report the case of a 29-year-old male patient with a generalized and progressive dystonia that led him unable to stand. Multiple antidystonic treatments were tried without benefit. Alcohol test was positive with a dramatic improvement. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of generalized dystonia without other clinical manifestations sensitive to alcohol.

  11. Sensitivity Training in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Brent

    1970-01-01

    Sensitivity training in the classroom can help children cope with and adapt to their environment--family, peer group, friends, school, and teachers--and get them to talk honestly and openly about emotional, social, and intellectual feelings and concepts. Some techniques of encouraging students to explore, to become involved with and aware of…

  12. The polarization sensitivity of GRETINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiens, Andreas; Gretina Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The new tracking array GRETINA provides position information of the individual interactions of γ rays within the active Ge detector material. The position knowledge of the first two interaction points enables the calculation of the Compton scattering angle, which is sensitive to the linear polarization. Measuring the angular distribution and the linear polarization can help determine the electromagnetic character of a transition and its parity. Inelastic proton scattering on Mg (24 Mg (p , p ' γ)) provides highly polarized γ rays which we used to characterize the polarization sensitivity of GRETINA. We have studied the angular distribution and the azimuthal Compton scattering angle of the 1368 keV gamma transition after signal-decomposition and tracking, which were normalized with the unpolarized results derived from 60 Co . The a2 and a4 coefficients from the Legendre Polynomial fit of the angular distribution confirmed the high degree of polarization. We will report on the asymmetry in the azimuthal Compton scattering angle distribution which is in good agreement with a cos (2 φ) fit. We will discuss the energy dependance of the polarization sensitivity and compare the results with a GEANT4 simulation. The new tracking array GRETINA provides position information of the individual interactions of γ rays within the active Ge detector material. The position knowledge of the first two interaction points enables the calculation of the Compton scattering angle, which is sensitive to the linear polarization. Measuring the angular distribution and the linear polarization can help determine the electromagnetic character of a transition and its parity. Inelastic proton scattering on Mg (24 Mg (p , p ' γ)) provides highly polarized γ rays which we used to characterize the polarization sensitivity of GRETINA. We have studied the angular distribution and the azimuthal Compton scattering angle of the 1368 keV gamma transition after signal-decomposition and tracking

  13. Sensitive detection of narrowband pulses.

    PubMed

    Cullers, D K

    1986-01-01

    Highly monochromatic signals, such as TV carriers, can be detected sensitively by using a narrow filter (b < or = 1 Hz) and performing power accumulation on its output. If instead a low-duty-cycle pulsed signal of the same total energy is present, the sensitivity of a square law device, followed by a thresholding operation (to eliminate most samples containing only noise), followed by the algorithm to be described, is greater by about 7 dB in typical cases. This is particularly interesting to SETI because such a pulsed signal is exactly what is sent by a rotating beacon with a directional antenna. Such a pulsed signal is, therefore, a good candidate for an extraterrestrial beacon. Software for detecting this signal type is now ready for field testing with the NASA Multichannel Spectrum Analyzer (MCSA).

  14. Structural optimization with approximate sensitivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, S. N.; Hopkins, D. A.; Coroneos, R.

    1994-01-01

    Computational efficiency in structural optimization can be enhanced if the intensive computations associated with the calculation of the sensitivities, that is, gradients of the behavior constraints, are reduced. Approximation to gradients of the behavior constraints that can be generated with small amount of numerical calculations is proposed. Structural optimization with these approximate sensitivities produced correct optimum solution. Approximate gradients performed well for different nonlinear programming methods, such as the sequence of unconstrained minimization technique, method of feasible directions, sequence of quadratic programming, and sequence of linear programming. Structural optimization with approximate gradients can reduce by one third the CPU time that would otherwise be required to solve the problem with explicit closed-form gradients. The proposed gradient approximation shows potential to reduce intensive computation that has been associated with traditional structural optimization.

  15. Accuracy of Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Guille, M.; Sullivan, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    Uncertainty in pressure sensitive paint (PSP) measurement is investigated from a standpoint of system modeling. A functional relation between the imaging system output and luminescent emission from PSP is obtained based on studies of radiative energy transports in PSP and photodetector response to luminescence. This relation provides insights into physical origins of various elemental error sources and allows estimate of the total PSP measurement uncertainty contributed by the elemental errors. The elemental errors and their sensitivity coefficients in the error propagation equation are evaluated. Useful formulas are given for the minimum pressure uncertainty that PSP can possibly achieve and the upper bounds of the elemental errors to meet required pressure accuracy. An instructive example of a Joukowsky airfoil in subsonic flows is given to illustrate uncertainty estimates in PSP measurements.

  16. Moire interferometry with increased sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bongtae; Post, Daniel

    The basic sensitivity of moire interferometry was increased beyond the previously conceived theoretical limit. This was accomplished by creating the virtual reference grating inside a refractive medium instead of air, thus shortening the wavelength of light. A very compact four-beam moire interferometer in a refractive medium was developed for microscopic viewing, which produced a basic sensitivity of 208 nm per fringe order, corresponding to moire with 4800 lines per mm. Its configuration made it inherently stable and relatively insensitive to environmental disturbances. An optical microscope was employed as the image recording system to obtain high spatial resolution. The method was demonstrated for deformation of a thick graphite/epoxy composite at the 0/90 deg ply interface.

  17. Accuracy of Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Guille, M.; Sullivan, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    Uncertainty in pressure sensitive paint (PSP) measurement is investigated from a standpoint of system modeling. A functional relation between the imaging system output and luminescent emission from PSP is obtained based on studies of radiative energy transports in PSP and photodetector response to luminescence. This relation provides insights into physical origins of various elemental error sources and allows estimate of the total PSP measurement uncertainty contributed by the elemental errors. The elemental errors and their sensitivity coefficients in the error propagation equation are evaluated. Useful formulas are given for the minimum pressure uncertainty that PSP can possibly achieve and the upper bounds of the elemental errors to meet required pressure accuracy. An instructive example of a Joukowsky airfoil in subsonic flows is given to illustrate uncertainty estimates in PSP measurements.

  18. Sensitivity of VIIRS Polarization Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    The design of an optical system typically involves a sensitivity analysis where the various lens parameters, such as lens spacing and curvatures, to name two parameters, are (slightly) varied to see what, if any, effect this has on the performance and to establish manufacturing tolerances. A sinular analysis was performed for the VIIRS instruments polarization measurements to see how real world departures from perfectly linearly polarized light entering VIIRS effects the polarization measurement. The methodology and a few of the results of this polarization sensitivity analysis are presented and applied to the construction of a single polarizer which will cover the VIIRS VIS/NIR spectral range. Keywords: VIIRS, polarization, ray, trace; polarizers, Bolder Vision, MOXTEK

  19. Vibrotactile Sensitivity of the Head

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    tissue in the skull, via vibrators mounted on the head, which stimulates the cochlea (resulting in an auditory sensation) while bypassing the external...are compatible with the sensitivity of the user. The extent to which vibrotactile* stimulation of the head is viable as a method of communication...cycle fraction of 0.25, and three repetitions extending the stimulation period of the signal to 750 ms (figure 5). Furthermore, the signal was divided

  20. Staircase Methods of Sensitivity Testing,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1946-03-21

    were only interested in the number of explosions. 5. Rcconmended M4ethods. a. Suma . Seven methods of sensitivity testing and appropriate methods of...investigation for a step size of one half the standard deviation (e’) of the underlying distribution. Having done this, we pick out the best of these...a consequence, the "best" tests will be picked out with- out much attention being devoted to the average level which they estimate. After determining

  1. Light sensitivity of methanogenic archaebacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, K.D.; McMahon, C.W.; Wolfe, R.S. )

    1991-09-01

    Representatives of four families of methanogenic archaebacteria (archaea), Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum {Delta}H, Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum Marburg, Methanosarcina acetivorans, Methanococcus voltae, and Methanomicrobium mobile, were found to be light sensitive. The facultative anaerobic eubacteria Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, however, were tolerant of light when grown anaerobically under identical light conditions. Interference filters were used to show that the growth of the methanogens is inhibited by light in the blue end of the visible spectrum (370 to 430 nm).

  2. Digital holography with ultimate sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Gross, M; Atlan, M

    2007-04-15

    We propose a variant of the heterodyne holography scheme that combines the properties of off-axis and phase-shifting holography. This scheme makes it possible to filter off numerically the zero-order image alias and the technical noise of the reference. It is then possible to record and reconstruct holographic images at an extremely low signal level. We show experimentally that the sensitivity of the method is limited only by the quantum nature of photons.

  3. Enhancing Sensitivity to Visual Motion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    observers. Among the historical reasons for this emphasis are explanatory models based on optical and neural factors which are assumed to be quite...MITCHELL & MILLODOT, 1972). There is reason to believe that this relative deprivation, based on an optical error, leads to neural alterations of the...for certain amblyopes, repeated testing enhianced sensitivity several fold. Amblyopia refers to any of a class of diseases in which there is a loss in

  4. A simple, high sensitivity torquemeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanders, P. J.; Wu, G.

    1999-06-01

    A simple torquemeter has been developed with a sensitivity exceeding 10-13 Nm when using a 13-μm-diam glass fiber and a low-mass suspension. The maximum twist angle of the fiber is constrained by the choice of its diameter to ˜1°. This angle is measured using a light, mirror, and split silicon photodetector, and is proportional to the torque on a sample in a rotating dc magnetic field.

  5. Tellurium: A new sensitive test

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lakin, H.W.; Thompson, C.E.

    1963-01-01

    A new, extremely sensitive method for the quantitative determination of tellurium is based on the induced precipitation of elemental gold from a 6N HCl solution containing gold chloride, cupric chloride, and hypophosphorous acid; the amount of gold reduced is proportional to the amount of tellurium present. As little as 1 nanogram (1 ?? 70-9 g) of tellurium gives a measurable reaction with 1 mg of gold in 50 ml of solution.

  6. Contextual sensitivity in scientific reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Van Bavel, Jay J.; Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Brady, William J.; Reinero, Diego A.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, scientists have paid increasing attention to reproducibility. For example, the Reproducibility Project, a large-scale replication attempt of 100 studies published in top psychology journals found that only 39% could be unambiguously reproduced. There is a growing consensus among scientists that the lack of reproducibility in psychology and other fields stems from various methodological factors, including low statistical power, researcher’s degrees of freedom, and an emphasis on publishing surprising positive results. However, there is a contentious debate about the extent to which failures to reproduce certain results might also reflect contextual differences (often termed “hidden moderators”) between the original research and the replication attempt. Although psychologists have found extensive evidence that contextual factors alter behavior, some have argued that context is unlikely to influence the results of direct replications precisely because these studies use the same methods as those used in the original research. To help resolve this debate, we recoded the 100 original studies from the Reproducibility Project on the extent to which the research topic of each study was contextually sensitive. Results suggested that the contextual sensitivity of the research topic was associated with replication success, even after statistically adjusting for several methodological characteristics (e.g., statistical power, effect size). The association between contextual sensitivity and replication success did not differ across psychological subdisciplines. These results suggest that researchers, replicators, and consumers should be mindful of contextual factors that might influence a psychological process. We offer several guidelines for dealing with contextual sensitivity in reproducibility. PMID:27217556

  7. Trace Elements and Chemotherapy Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihui; Yang, Weiping; Long, Gang; Wei, Changyuan

    2016-10-01

    Trace elements might be associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the efficacy of chemotherapy against HCC. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the association between trace elements and efficacy of chemotherapy in patients with HCC. Cancer, cancer-adjacent, and cancer-free tissues were collected intraoperatively from 55 patients with HCC between January 2001 and April 2004 at the Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University in Guangxi (China), a high HCC incidence area in the world. Trace element levels were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. In vitro sensitivity of cancer cells to five chemotherapeutic drugs (5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin, cisplatin, carboplatin, and mitomycin) was tested using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay in cancer cells from 32 patients. Zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium levels had the same gradient distribution in different liver tissues: cancer < cancer-adjacent < cancer-free tissues. Copper levels of cancer tissues were negatively correlated with body weight (r = -0.278, P = 0.027), while manganese and selenium levels were negatively correlated with age (r = -0.297, P = 0.015; r = -0.285, P = 0.018, respectively). Simple correlation analyses revealed that the carboplatin sensitivity was negatively correlated with selenium levels of cancer tissues, while doxorubicin sensitivity was negatively correlated with manganese levels (r = -0.497, P = 0.004). Partial correlation analyses showed that doxorubicin sensitivity only was negatively correlated with manganese levels (r = -0.450, P = 0.014). These results suggest that the selenium and manganese content in primary HCC tissues could influence the response of the HCC cells to carboplatin and doxorubicin. These preliminary results provide a basis for future studies.

  8. Modulated orientation sensitive terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rohit

    The energies of protein correlated motions lie in the far infrared or THz frequency range (lambda = 1 cm -- 50 mm, f = 0.03 -- 6 THz). The existence of correlated motions has been confirmed by neutron and inelastic x-ray scattering measurements. These techniques require large sample volumes and specialized facilities, limiting their application to systematic studies of changes in correlated motions with functional state and allosteric interactions. Standard terahertz time domain spectroscopy measurements have shown sensitivity to protein-ligand binding, oxidation state, conformation, temperature and hydration. However, the response is broad, in part from the large vibrational density of states and in part from the dielectric response contribution from surface water and side-chains. As an overall strategy to measure the correlated structural motions in protein, we use anisotropic and birefringent behavior of molecular crystals to develop a new technique called MOSTS (Modulated Orientation Sensitive Terahertz Spectroscopy). We achieve high sensitivity and mode separation, by using single molecular crystal such as sucrose and oxalic acid, and rapid modulation of the relative alignment of the terahertz polarization and the crystal axes by rotating the sample. By locking into the signal at the rotation frequency, we determine the polarization sensitive signal and map out the optically active vibrational resonances. To illustrate the technique, we compare our measured spectra with the calculated, and find a close agreement. We measure dielectric properties of oxalic acid, sucrose and protein crystals and polycarbonate sheet using standard terahertz time domain spectroscopy. We determine the absorbances in oxalic acid and sucrose crystals, using MOSTS technique. We compare the resonances in these two distinct methods. Then, we develop a protein model sample by sticking together two thin plates of sucrose and polycarbonate. We carry out standard THz-TDS and MOSTS

  9. Sensitivity of coded mask telescopes.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Gerald K

    2008-05-20

    Simple formulas are often used to estimate the sensitivity of coded mask x-ray or gamma-ray telescopes, but these are strictly applicable only if a number of basic assumptions are met. Complications arise, for example, if a grid structure is used to support the mask elements, if the detector spatial resolution is not good enough to completely resolve all the detail in the shadow of the mask, or if any of a number of other simplifying conditions are not fulfilled. We derive more general expressions for the Poisson-noise-limited sensitivity of astronomical telescopes using the coded mask technique, noting explicitly in what circumstances they are applicable. The emphasis is on using nomenclature and techniques that result in simple and revealing results. Where no convenient expression is available a procedure is given that allows the calculation of the sensitivity. We consider certain aspects of the optimization of the design of a coded mask telescope and show that when the detector spatial resolution and the mask to detector separation are fixed, the best source location accuracy is obtained when the mask elements are equal in size to the detector pixels.

  10. Sensitized Liquid Hydrazine Detonation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathgeber, K. A.; Keddy, C. P.; Bunker, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    Vapor-phase hydrazine (N2H4) is known to be very sensitive to detonation while liquid hydrazine is very insensitive to detonation, theoretically requiring extremely high pressures to induce initiation. A review of literature on solid and liquid explosives shows that when pure explosive substances are infiltrated with gas cavities, voids, and/or different phase contaminants, the energy or shock pressure necessary to induce detonation can decrease by an order of magnitude. Tests were conducted with liquid hydrazine in a modified card-gap configuration. Sensitization was attempted by bubbling helium gas through and/or suspending ceramic microspheres in the liquid. The hydrazine was subjected to the shock pressure from a 2 lb (0.9 kg) Composition C-4 explosive charge. The hydrazine was contained in a 4 in. (10.2 cm) diameter stainless steel cylinder with a 122 in(sup 3) (2 L) volume and sealed with a polyethylene cap. Blast pressures from the events were recorded by 63 high speed pressure transducers located on three radial legs extending from 4 to 115 ft (1.2 to 35.1 in) from ground zero. Comparison of the neat hydrazine and water baseline tests with the "sensitized" hydrazine tests indicates the liquid hydrazine did not detonate under these conditions.

  11. Sensitivity of coded mask telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Gerald K

    2008-05-20

    Simple formulas are often used to estimate the sensitivity of coded mask x-ray or gamma-ray telescopes, but these are strictly applicable only if a number of basic assumptions are met. Complications arise, for example, if a grid structure is used to support the mask elements, if the detector spatial resolution is not good enough to completely resolve all the detail in the shadow of the mask, or if any of a number of other simplifying conditions are not fulfilled. We derive more general expressions for the Poisson-noise-limited sensitivity of astronomical telescopes using the coded mask technique, noting explicitly in what circumstances they are applicable. The emphasis is on using nomenclature and techniques that result in simple and revealing results. Where no convenient expression is available a procedure is given that allows the calculation of the sensitivity. We consider certain aspects of the optimization of the design of a coded mask telescope and show that when the detector spatial resolution and the mask to detector separation are fixed, the best source location accuracy is obtained when the mask elements are equal in size to the detector pixels.

  12. Zebrafish Sensitivity to Botulinum Neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Chatla, Kamalakar; Gaunt, Patricia S.; Petrie-Hanson, Lora; Ford, Lorelei; Hanson, Larry A.

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are the most potent known toxins. The mouse LD50 assay is the gold standard for testing BoNT potency, but is not sensitive enough to detect the extremely low levels of neurotoxin that may be present in the serum of sensitive animal species that are showing the effects of BoNT toxicity, such as channel catfish affected by visceral toxicosis of catfish. Since zebrafish are an important animal model for diverse biomedical and basic research, they are readily available and have defined genetic lines that facilitate reproducibility. This makes them attractive for use as an alternative bioassay organism. The utility of zebrafish as a bioassay model organism for BoNT was investigated. The 96 h median immobilizing doses of BoNT/A, BoNT/C, BoNT/E, and BoNT/F for adult male Tübingen strain zebrafish (0.32 g mean weight) at 25 °C were 16.31, 124.6, 4.7, and 0.61 picograms (pg)/fish, respectively. These findings support the use of the zebrafish-based bioassays for evaluating the presence of BoNT/A, BoNT/E, and BoNT/F. Evaluating the basis of the relatively high resistance of zebrafish to BoNT/C and the extreme sensitivity to BoNT/F may reveal unique functional patterns to the action of these neurotoxins. PMID:27153088

  13. [Stimuli-sensitive polymer systems].

    PubMed

    Le Cerf, D

    2014-11-01

    The polymers can be found in different forms in solution (particles, capsules, pseudo-micelles, hydrogels…) or on surface with important prospects in many field applications. These polymer systems are particularly very good candidates to entrap, transport and deliver an active substance in biomedical applications however with many limitations on control of release of a given target. The stimuli-sensitive polymers, also called smart or environmentally sensitive polymers, present physical or chemical changes under the action of small variations of an external stimulus. This signal acts as a stimulus which causes the change of conformation and/or solvation of the macromolecular chains by modifying their various interactions. The stimuli are classified into two broad categories: physical or external stimuli: temperature, mechanical stress, light, magnetic and electric fields; chemical and biochemical or internal stimuli: pH, ionic strength, chemical molecule (glucose, redox) or biochemical (enzymes, antigens…). The use of stimuli-sensitive pathway is widely used in the literature to enhance or trigger the release of an active compound. In this paper, we present the different stimuli addressing the theoretical aspects, polymers corresponding to these stimuli. Some examples illustrate these systems for the controlled release of active compounds.

  14. Dye-sensitized solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, T.A.

    1980-03-04

    A low-cost dye-sensitized Schottky barrier solar cell is comprised of a substrate of semiconductor with an ohmic contact on one face, a sensitizing dye adsorbed onto the opposite face of the semiconductor, a transparent thin-film layer of a reducing agent over the dye, and a thin-film layer of metal over the reducing agent. The ohmic contact and metal layer constitute electrodes for connection to an external circuit and one or the other or both are made transparent to permit light to penetrate to the dye and be absorbed therein for generating electric current. The semiconductor material chosen to be the substrate is one having a wide bandgap and which therefore is transparent; the dye selected is one having a ground state within the bandgap of the semiconductor to generate carriers in the semiconductor, and a first excited state above the conduction band edge of the semiconductor to readily conduct electrons from the dye to the semiconductor; the reducing agent selected is one having a ground state above the ground state of the sensitizer to provide a plentiful source of electrons to the dye during current generation and thereby enhance the generation; and the metal for the thin-film layer of metal is selected to have a Fermi level in the vicinity of or above the ground state of the reducing agent to thereby amply supply electrons to the reducing agent. 3 figs.

  15. Sensitized Liquid Hydrazine Detonation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathgeber, K. A.; Keddy, C. P.; Bunker, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    Vapor-phase hydrazine (N2H4) is known to be very sensitive to detonation while liquid hydrazine is very insensitive to detonation, theoretically requiring extremely high pressures to induce initiation. A review of literature on solid and liquid explosives shows that when pure explosive substances are infiltrated with gas cavities, voids, and/or different phase contaminants, the energy or shock pressure necessary to induce detonation can decrease by an order of magnitude. Tests were conducted with liquid hydrazine in a modified card-gap configuration. Sensitization was attempted by bubbling helium gas through and/or suspending ceramic microspheres in the liquid. The hydrazine was subjected to the shock pressure from a 2 lb (0.9 kg) Composition C-4 explosive charge. The hydrazine was contained in a 4 in. (10.2 cm) diameter stainless steel cylinder with a 122 in(sup 3) (2 L) volume and sealed with a polyethylene cap. Blast pressures from the events were recorded by 63 high speed pressure transducers located on three radial legs extending from 4 to 115 ft (1.2 to 35.1 in) from ground zero. Comparison of the neat hydrazine and water baseline tests with the "sensitized" hydrazine tests indicates the liquid hydrazine did not detonate under these conditions.

  16. Dye-sensitized solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, Terje A. [Berkeley, CA

    1980-03-04

    A low-cost dye-sensitized Schottky barrier solar cell comprised of a substrate of semiconductor with an ohmic contact on one face, a sensitizing dye adsorbed onto the opposite face of the semiconductor, a transparent thin-film layer of a reducing agent over the dye, and a thin-film layer of metal over the reducing agent. The ohmic contact and metal layer constitute electrodes for connection to an external circuit and one or the other or both are made transparent to permit light to penetrate to the dye and be absorbed therein for generating electric current. The semiconductor material chosen to be the substrate is one having a wide bandgap and which therefore is transparent; the dye selected is one having a ground state within the bandgap of the semiconductor to generate carriers in the semiconductor, and a first excited state above the conduction band edge of the semiconductor to readily conduct electrons from the dye to the semiconductor; the reducing agent selected is one having a ground state above the ground state of the sensitizer to provide a plentiful source of electrons to the dye during current generation and thereby enhance the generation; and the metal for the thin-film layer of metal is selected to have a Fermi level in the vicinity of or above the ground state of the reducing agent to thereby amply supply electrons to the reducing agent.

  17. Tropical convection and climate sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ian Nobuo

    Surface temperature has become a popular measure of climate change, but it does not provide the most critical test of climate models. This thesis presents new methods to evaluate climate models based on processes determining the climate sensitivity to radiative forcing from atmospheric greenhouse gases. Cloud radiative feedbacks depend on temperature and relative humidity profiles in addition to surface temperature, through the dependence of cloud type on boundary layer buoyancy. Buoyancy provides a reference to which the onset of deep convection is invariant, and gives a compact description of sea surface temperature changes and cloud feedbacks suitable for diagnostics and as a basis for simplified climate models. This thesis also addresses uncertainties in climate sensitivity involving terrestrial ecosystem responses to global warming. Different diagnostics support different conclusions about atmospheric transport model errors that could imply either stronger or weaker northern terrestrial carbon sinks. Equilibrium boundary layer concepts were previously used in idealized tropical climate models, and are extended here to develop a diagnostic of boundary layer trace gas transport and mixing. Hypotheses linking surface temperature to climate and precipitation sensitivity were tested in this thesis using comprehensive and idealized climate model simulations, and observational datasets. The results do not support the thermostat hypothesis that predicts deep cloud cover will increase with radiative forcing and limit sea surface temperatures to the maximum present-day warm pool temperature. Warm pool temperatures increased along with or even faster than the tropical average over the past several decades, while diagnosed deep cloud cover has not significantly increased, in agreement with global warming simulations. Precipitation sensitivity also depends on more than surface temperature alone, including thermodynamic profiles and air-sea temperature differences. The

  18. Evaluation of prebiotic potential of refined psyllium (Plantago ovata) fiber in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Elli, Marina; Cattivelli, Daniela; Soldi, Sara; Bonatti, Marzia; Morelli, Lorenzo

    2008-09-01

    To assess the effects of the consumption of psyllium seed husk on fecal bifidobacteria in healthy women and the ability of fecal bifidobacteria to metabolize psyllium seed husk in vitro. Poor microbiologic evidences are nowadays available concerning the ability of psyllium seed husk to promote the growth of bifidobacteria in human gut. Eleven healthy women consumed 7.0 g/d of psyllium seed husk for 1 month. Viability of bifidobacteria in feces was assessed at different time points. In vivo results showed that the average fecal content of viable bifidobacteria was not significantly affected even if fecal counts were found to increase significantly after treatment in 6 out of 11 women having low initial concentration. In vitro trials conducted on bifidobacteria strains isolated from treated women failed to confirm the prebiotic potential of undigested psyllium seed husk, whereas treatment with simulated gastric and pancreatic juices and mimicking physical and chemical alterations during human gut transit allowed fecal Bifidobacterium isolates to metabolize psyllium seed husk as carbon source in a growth medium deprived of sugar. Psyllium seed husk can be metabolized by bifidobacteria only after partial hydrolysis. Bifidogenic potential can be detected in healthy women only in case of low level of fecal bifidobacteria before treatment.

  19. Anaerobic O-demethylations of methoxynaphthols, methoxyfuran, and fluoroanisols by Sporomusa ovata.

    PubMed

    Stupperich, E; Konle, R; Eckerskorn, C

    1996-06-25

    In vitro experiments with 3,4-dimethoxybenzoate-induced Sporomusa enzymes a broad O-methyl ether cleavage capacity. The O-demethylase activity hydrolized the methyl-oxygen linkages of methoxynaphtholes of the heterocycles 2-methoxyfuran or 2-methoxythiophene as well as of several dimethoxy and monomethoxy aryls under anaerobic conditions. Also, fluoro and chloro substituents of anisoles enhanced the O-demethylation rate, indicating that an electron delocalized aromatic structure supported the methyl ether activation mechanism. Monomethoxy aromatics with additional chargeable groups, however, were less effectively transformed by the O-demethylase activity. No transformations into hydroxylated products occurred with 4-(trifluoromethoxy)benzyl alcohol, 4-(trifluoromethoxy)fluorobenzene, 2,5-dimethoxytetrahydrofuran, or alkyl-O-methyl ethers. The inert ethers did not affect the 3,4-dimethoxybenzoate metabolism. Ether activation or the following methyl transfer to the methyl acceptor tetrahydrofolate involved a prominent 31 kDa peptide from the cytoplasmic cell fraction, because this particular peptide was lacking in cells grown with methanol, betaine or fructose.

  20. Response of chaparral shrubs to below-freezing temperatures: acclimation, ecotypes, seedlings vs. adults.

    PubMed

    Boorse, G C; Ewers, F W; Davis, S D

    1998-09-01

    Leaf death due to freezing was examined for four, co-occurring species of chaparral shrubs from the Santa Monica Mountains of southern California, Rhus laurina (= Malosma laurina), R. ovata, Ceanothus megacarpus, and C. spinosus. Measurements were made on seedlings vs. adults for all species, and for Rhus spp. in winter vs. summer, and at a warm vs. a cold site. We used four methods to determine the temperature for 50% change in activity or cell death (LT(50)) of leaves: (1) electrical conductivity (electrolyte leakage into a bathing solution), (2) photosynthetic fluorescent capacity (Fv/Fm), (3) percentage of palisade mesophyll cells stained by fluorescein diacetate vital stain, and (4) visual score of leaf color (Munsell color chart). In all four species seedlings were found to be more sensitive to freezing temperatures than were adults by 1°-3°C. For adults the LT(50) ranged from -5°C for Rhus laurina in the summer to -16°C for Rhus ovata in the winter. The LT(50) of R. ovata located at a colder inland site was 4C lower than R. ovata at the warmer coastal site just 4 km apart, suggesting ecotypic differences between R. ovata at the two sites. Both R. laurina and R. ovata underwent significant winter hardening. At the cold site, R. ovata acclimated by 6°C on average, while R. laurina acclimated by only 3°C. These results were consistent with species distributions and with field observations of differential shoot dieback between these two congeneric species after a natural freeze-thaw event in the Santa Monica Mountains.

  1. Using Temperature Sensitive Paint Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamner, M. P.; Popernack, T. G., Jr.; Owens, L. R.; Wahls, R. A.

    2002-01-01

    New facilities and test techniques afford research aerodynamicists many opportunities to investigate complex aerodynamic phenomena. For example, NASA Langley Research Center's National Transonic Facility (NTF) can hold Mach number, Reynolds number, dynamic pressure, stagnation temperature and stagnation pressure constant during testing. This is important because the wing twist associated with model construction may mask important Reynolds number effects associated with the flight vehicle. Beyond this, the NTF's ability to vary Reynolds number allows for important research into the study of boundary layer transition. The capabilities of facilities such as the NTF coupled with test techniques such as temperature sensitive paint yield data that can be applied not only to vehicle design but also to validation of computational methods. Development of Luminescent Paint Technology for acquiring pressure and temperature measurements began in the mid-1980s. While pressure sensitive luminescent paints (PSP) were being developed to acquire data for aerodynamic performance and loads, temperature sensitive luminescent paints (TSP) have been used for a much broader range of applications. For example, TSP has been used to acquire surface temperature data to determine the heating due to rotating parts in various types of mechanical systems. It has been used to determine the heating pattern(s) on circuit boards. And, it has been used in boundary layer analysis and applied to the validation of full-scale flight performance predictions. That is, data acquired on the same model can be used to develop trends from off design to full scale flight Reynolds number, e.g. to show the progression of boundary layer transition. A discussion of issues related to successfully setting-up TSP tests and using TSP systems for boundary layer studies is included in this paper, as well as results from a variety of TSP tests. TSP images included in this paper are all grey-scale so that similar to

  2. Stab Sensitivity of Energetic Nanolaminates

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, A; Barbee, T; Cervantes, O

    2006-05-22

    This work details the stab ignition, small-scale safety, and energy release characteristics of bimetallic Al/Ni(V) and Al/Monel energetic nanolaminate freestanding thin films. The influence of the engineered nanostructural features of the energetic multilayers is correlated with both stab initiation and small-scale energetic materials testing results. Structural parameters of the energetic thin films found to be important include the bi-layer period, total thickness of the film, and presence or absence of aluminum coating layers. In general the most sensitive nanolaminates were those that were relatively thick, possessed fine bi-layer periods, and were not coated. Energetic nanolaminates were tested for their stab sensitivity as freestanding continuous parts and as coarse powders. The stab sensitivity of mock M55 detonators loaded with energetic nanolaminate was found to depend strongly upon both the particle size of the material and the configuration of nanolaminate material, in the detonator cup. In these instances stab ignition was observed with input energies as low as 5 mJ for a coarse powder with an average particle dimension of 400 {micro}m. Selected experiments indicate that the reacting nanolaminate can be used to ignite other energetic materials such as sol-gel nanostructured thermite, and conventional thermite that was either coated onto the multilayer substrate or pressed on it. These results demonstrate that energetic nanolaminates can be tuned to have precise and controlled ignition thresholds and can initiate other energetic materials and therefore are viable candidates as lead-free impact initiated igniters or detonators.

  3. Instrumentation for Sensitive Gas Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OKeefe, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    An improved instrument for optical absorption spectroscopy utilizes off-axis paths in an optical cavity in order to increase detection sensitivity while suppressing resonance effects. The instrument is well suited for use in either cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) [in which one pulses an incident light beam and measures the rate of decay of light in the cavity] or integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) [in which one uses a continuous-wave incident light beam and measures the power of light in the cavity as a function of wavelength]. Typically, in optical absorption spectroscopy, one seeks to measure absorption of a beam of light in a substance (usually a gas or liquid) in a sample cell. In CRDS or ICOS, the sample cell is placed in (or consists of) an optical cavity, so that one can utilize multiple reflections of the beam to increase the effective optical path length through the absorbing substance and thereby increase the sensitivity for measuring absorption. If an absorbing substance is not present in the optical cavity, one can utilize the multiple passes of the light beam to increase the sensitivity for measuring absorption and scattering by components of the optical cavity itself. It is desirable to suppress the effects of resonances in the cavity in order to make the spectral response of the cavity itself as nearly constant as possible over the entire wavelength range of interest. In the present instrument, the desired flattening of the spectral response is accomplished by utilizing an off-axis beam geometry to effectively decrease the frequency interval between longitudinal electromagnetic modes of the cavity, such that the resulting transmission spectrum of the cavity is nearly continuous: in other words, the cavity becomes a broad-band optical device.

  4. Fast Neutron Sensitivity with HPGe

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, Allen; Hensley, Walter K.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Pitts, W. K.

    2008-01-22

    In addition to being excellent gamma-ray detectors, germanium detectors are also sensitive to fast neutrons. Incident neutrons undergo inelastic scattering {Ge(n,n')Ge*} off germanium nuclei and the resulting excited states emit gamma rays or conversion electrons. The response of a standard 140% high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector with a bismuth germanate (BGO) anti-coincidence shield was measured for several neutron sources to characterize the ability of the HPGe detector to detect fast neutrons. For a sensitivity calculation performed using the characteristic fast neutron response peak that occurs at 692 keV, the 140% germanium detector system exhibited a sensitivity of ~175 counts / kg of WGPumetal in 1000 seconds at a source-detector distance of 1 meter with 4 in. of lead shielding between source and detector. Theoretical work also indicates that it might be possible to use the shape of the fast-neutron inelastic scattering signatures (specifically, the end-point energy of the long high energy tail of the resulting asymmetric peak) to gain additional information about the energy distribution of the incident neutron spectrum. However, the experimentally observed end-point energies appear to be almost identical for each of the fast neutron sources counted. Detailed MCNP calculations show that the neutron energy distributions impingent on the detector for these sources are very similar in this experimental configuration, due to neutron scattering in a lead shield (placed between the neutron source and HPGe detector to reduce the gamma ray flux), the BGO anti-coincidence detector, and the concrete floor.

  5. Slope sensitivities for optical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, John R.

    2015-09-01

    Setting a tolerance for the slope errors of an optical surface (e.g., surface form errors of the "mid-spatial-frequencies") requires some knowledge of how those surface errors affect the final image of the system. While excellent tools exist for simulating those effects on a surface-by-surface basis, considerable insight may be gained by examining, for each surface, a simple sensitivity parameter that relates the slope error on the surface to the ray displacement at the final image plane. Snell's law gives a relationship between the slope errors of a surface and the angular deviations of the rays emerging from the surface. For a singlet or thin doublet acting by itself, these angular deviations are related to ray deviations at the image plane by the focal length of the lens. However, for optical surfaces inside an optical system having a substantial axial extent, the focal length of the system is not the correct multiplier, as the sensitivity is influenced by the optical surfaces that follow. In this paper, a simple expression is derived that relates the slope errors at an arbitrary optical surface to the ray deviation at the image plane. This expression is experimentally verified by comparison to a real-ray perturbation analysis. The sensitivity parameter relates the RMS slope errors to the RMS spot radius, and also relates the peak slope error to the 100% spot radius, and may be used to create an RSS error budget for slope error. Application to various types of system are shown and discussed.

  6. Molecularly sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Bredfeldt, Jeremy S; Vinegoni, Claudio; Marks, Daniel L; Boppart, Stephen A

    2005-03-01

    Molecular contrast in optical coherence tomography (OCT) is demonstrated by use of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) for molecular sensitivity. Femtosecond laser pulses are focused into a sample by use of a low-numerical-aperture lens to generate CARS photons, and the backreflected CARS signal is interferometrically measured. With the chemical selectivity provided by CARS and the advanced imaging capabilities of OCT, this technique may be useful for molecular contrast imaging in biological tissues. CARS can be generated and interferometrically measured over at least 600 microm of the depth of field of a low-numerical-aperture objective.

  7. Functional Oxygen Sensitivity of Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Angelova, Plamena R.; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Christie, Isabel; Sheikhbahaei, Shahriar; Turovsky, Egor; Marina, Nephtali; Korsak, Alla; Zwicker, Jennifer; Teschemacher, Anja G.; Ackland, Gareth L.; Funk, Gregory D.; Kasparov, Sergey; Abramov, Andrey Y.

    2015-01-01

    In terrestrial mammals, the oxygen storage capacity of the CNS is limited, and neuronal function is rapidly impaired if oxygen supply is interrupted even for a short period of time. However, oxygen tension monitored by the peripheral (arterial) chemoreceptors is not sensitive to regional CNS differences in partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) that reflect variable levels of neuronal activity or local tissue hypoxia, pointing to the necessity of a functional brain oxygen sensor. This experimental animal (rats and mice) study shows that astrocytes, the most numerous brain glial cells, are sensitive to physiological changes in PO2. Astrocytes respond to decreases in PO2 a few millimeters of mercury below normal brain oxygenation with elevations in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i). The hypoxia sensor of astrocytes resides in the mitochondria in which oxygen is consumed. Physiological decrease in PO2 inhibits astroglial mitochondrial respiration, leading to mitochondrial depolarization, production of free radicals, lipid peroxidation, activation of phospholipase C, IP3 receptors, and release of Ca2+ from the intracellular stores. Hypoxia-induced [Ca2+]i increases in astrocytes trigger fusion of vesicular compartments containing ATP. Blockade of astrocytic signaling by overexpression of ATP-degrading enzymes or targeted astrocyte-specific expression of tetanus toxin light chain (to interfere with vesicular release mechanisms) within the brainstem respiratory rhythm-generating circuits reveals the fundamental physiological role of astroglial oxygen sensitivity; in low-oxygen conditions (environmental hypoxia), this mechanism increases breathing activity even in the absence of peripheral chemoreceptor oxygen sensing. These results demonstrate that astrocytes are functionally specialized CNS oxygen sensors tuned for rapid detection of physiological changes in brain oxygenation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Most, if not all, animal cells possess mechanisms that allow them to detect

  8. Ophthalmic Light Sensitive Nanocarrier Systems

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Jennifer G.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2008-01-01

    The eye is afflicted by chronic vision debilitating neovascular disorders, such as age-related macular degeneration, proliferative diabetic retinopathy and corneal angiogenesis. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an innovative, evolving approach for treating neovascular diseases of the eye. PDT refers to the process of activating a light sensitive agent or carrier with non-thermal light to induce chemical reactions that ameliorate a pathological condition. Key components of PDT include a photosensitizer, a colloidal carrier or formulation and a light source. This article summarizes currently available clinical PDTs, desirable features of PDTs and photosensitizers, useful light sources for PDT and investigational nanosystems and colloidal carriers for PDT. PMID:18275910

  9. Functional Oxygen Sensitivity of Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Angelova, Plamena R; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Christie, Isabel; Sheikhbahaei, Shahriar; Turovsky, Egor; Marina, Nephtali; Korsak, Alla; Zwicker, Jennifer; Teschemacher, Anja G; Ackland, Gareth L; Funk, Gregory D; Kasparov, Sergey; Abramov, Andrey Y; Gourine, Alexander V

    2015-07-22

    In terrestrial mammals, the oxygen storage capacity of the CNS is limited, and neuronal function is rapidly impaired if oxygen supply is interrupted even for a short period of time. However, oxygen tension monitored by the peripheral (arterial) chemoreceptors is not sensitive to regional CNS differences in partial pressure of oxygen (PO2 ) that reflect variable levels of neuronal activity or local tissue hypoxia, pointing to the necessity of a functional brain oxygen sensor. This experimental animal (rats and mice) study shows that astrocytes, the most numerous brain glial cells, are sensitive to physiological changes in PO2 . Astrocytes respond to decreases in PO2 a few millimeters of mercury below normal brain oxygenation with elevations in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i). The hypoxia sensor of astrocytes resides in the mitochondria in which oxygen is consumed. Physiological decrease in PO2 inhibits astroglial mitochondrial respiration, leading to mitochondrial depolarization, production of free radicals, lipid peroxidation, activation of phospholipase C, IP3 receptors, and release of Ca(2+) from the intracellular stores. Hypoxia-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases in astrocytes trigger fusion of vesicular compartments containing ATP. Blockade of astrocytic signaling by overexpression of ATP-degrading enzymes or targeted astrocyte-specific expression of tetanus toxin light chain (to interfere with vesicular release mechanisms) within the brainstem respiratory rhythm-generating circuits reveals the fundamental physiological role of astroglial oxygen sensitivity; in low-oxygen conditions (environmental hypoxia), this mechanism increases breathing activity even in the absence of peripheral chemoreceptor oxygen sensing. These results demonstrate that astrocytes are functionally specialized CNS oxygen sensors tuned for rapid detection of physiological changes in brain oxygenation. Significance statement: Most, if not all, animal cells possess mechanisms that allow them to

  10. Sensitivity studies of crystalline beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Sessler, A.M.

    1996-07-01

    The equations of motion are presented, appropriate to interacting charged particles of diverse charge and mass, subject to the external forces produced by various kinds of magnetic fields and rf electric fields in storage rings. These equations have been employed in the molecular dynamics simulations for sensitivity studies of crystalline beams. The two necessary conditions for the formation and maintenance of crystalline beams are summarized. Effects of lattice shear and AG focusing, magnetic field imperfection, and ion neutralization on crystalline beam heating is presented.

  11. Sensitivity Assessment of Ozone Models

    SciTech Connect

    Shorter, Jeffrey A.; Rabitz, Herschel A.; Armstrong, Russell A.

    2000-01-24

    The activities under this contract effort were aimed at developing sensitivity analysis techniques and fully equivalent operational models (FEOMs) for applications in the DOE Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). MRC developed a new model representation algorithm that uses a hierarchical, correlated function expansion containing a finite number of terms. A full expansion of this type is an exact representation of the original model and each of the expansion functions is explicitly calculated using the original model. After calculating the expansion functions, they are assembled into a fully equivalent operational model (FEOM) that can directly replace the original mode.

  12. High sensitivity radon emanation measurements.

    PubMed

    Zuzel, G; Simgen, H

    2009-05-01

    The presented radon detection technique employs miniaturized ultra-low background proportional counters. (222)Rn samples are purified, mixed with a counting gas and filled into a counter using a special glass vacuum line. The absolute sensitivity of the system is estimated to be 40 microBq (20 (222)Rn atoms). For emanation investigations two metal sealed stainless steel vessels and several glass vials are available. Taking into account their blank contributions, measurements at a minimum detectable activity of about 100 microBq can be performed.

  13. Allosteric sensitization of proapoptotic BAX.

    PubMed

    Pritz, Jonathan R; Wachter, Franziska; Lee, Susan; Luccarelli, James; Wales, Thomas E; Cohen, Daniel T; Coote, Paul; Heffron, Gregory J; Engen, John R; Massefski, Walter; Walensky, Loren D

    2017-09-01

    BCL-2-associated X protein (BAX) is a critical apoptotic regulator that can be transformed from a cytosolic monomer into a lethal mitochondrial oligomer, yet drug strategies to modulate it are underdeveloped due to longstanding difficulties in conducting screens on this aggregation-prone protein. Here, we overcame prior challenges and performed an NMR-based fragment screen of full-length human BAX. We identified a compound that sensitizes BAX activation by binding to a pocket formed by the junction of the α3-α4 and α5-α6 hairpins. Biochemical and structural analyses revealed that the molecule sensitizes BAX by allosterically mobilizing the α1-α2 loop and BAX BH3 helix, two motifs implicated in the activation and oligomerization of BAX, respectively. By engaging a region of core hydrophobic interactions that otherwise preserve the BAX inactive state, the identified compound reveals fundamental mechanisms for conformational regulation of BAX and provides a new opportunity to reduce the apoptotic threshold for potential therapeutic benefit.

  14. Fast, high sensitivity dewpoint hygrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A dewpoint/frostpoint hygrometer that uses a surface moisture-sensitive sensor as part of an RF oscillator circuit with feedback control of the sensor temperature to maintain equilibrium at the sensor surface between ambient water vapor and condensed water/ice. The invention is preferably implemented using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) device in an RF oscillator circuit configured to generate a condensation-dependent output signal, a temperature sensor to measure the temperature of the SAW device and to distinguish between condensation-dependent and temperature-dependent signals, a temperature regulating device to control the temperature of the SAW device, and a feedback control system configured to keep the condensation-dependent signal nearly constant over time in the presence of time-varying humidity, corrected for temperature. The effect of this response is to heat or cool the surface moisture-sensitive device, which shifts the equilibrium with respect to evaporation and condensation at the surface of the device. The equilibrium temperature under feedback control is a measure of dewpoint or frostpoint.

  15. [Celiac disease and "gluten sensitivity"].

    PubMed

    Tronconi, G M; Parma, B; Barera, G

    2010-01-01

    It is known that celiac disease is characterized by a huge variety of clinical forms ranging from classical ones to silent forms, potential ones and to an increased number of cases of gluten-sensitivity. The latter is an abnormal non-allergic sensibility to gluten. Clinical manifestations can be very different without a severe intestinal damage (Marsh/Oberhuber 0-I) and this condition seems to benefit from a gluten free diet. Cases of gluten-sensitivity appear very interesting in the search of histological markers with elevated specificity, which are able to identify slight and early gluten dependent enteropathy, especially in at risk patients for celiac disease even before classical autoantibodies appear: for instance, this is the case of intraepithelial lymphocytes T-cell receptor gamma delta and mucosal deposits of class IgA anti transglutaminase antibodies. Other studies are investigating transglutaminase isoenzimes (different from tissue one), that can be identified in patients with gluten dependent symptoms without classical autoantibodies. Forms of gluten allergy have a different pathogenesis from celiac disease and are represented by "backer's asthma" or by classical allergy to wheat proteins. Clinical manifestations can vary from anaphylactic reactions to dermatological, respiratory and intestinal symptoms. Also in these cases the therapeutic approach is based on gluten free diet.

  16. Position-sensitive superconductor detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurakado, M.; Taniguchi, K.

    2016-12-01

    Superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detectors and superconducting transition- edge sensors (TESs) are representative superconductor detectors having energy resolutions much higher than those of semiconductor detectors. STJ detectors are thin, thereby making it suitable for detecting low-energy X rays. The signals of STJ detectors are more than 100 times faster than those of TESs. By contrast, TESs are microcalorimeters that measure the radiation energy from the change in the temperature. Therefore, signals are slow and their time constants are typically several hundreds of μs. However, TESs possess excellent energy resolutions. For example, TESs have a resolution of 1.6 eV for 5.9-keV X rays. An array of STJs or TESs can be used as a pixel detector. Superconducting series-junction detectors (SSJDs) comprise multiple STJs and a single-crystal substrate that acts as a radiation absorber. SSJDs are also position sensitive, and their energy resolutions are higher than those of semiconductor detectors. In this paper, we give an overview of position-sensitive superconductor detectors.

  17. Phase-sensitive flow cytometer

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Martin, J.C.; Crissman, H.A. )

    1993-01-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed that combines flow cytometry and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells. Stained cells are analyzed as they intersect an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser beam. Fluorescence is measured using only a collecting lens, a longpass filter, and a photomultiplier tube detector. Signals are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes. Results have demonstrated: (1) signal phase shift and amplitude demodulation on fluorospheres and PI-stained cells; (2) a detection threshold of 800-300 fluorescein molecules equivalence for excitation frequencies 10 to 30 MHz; (3) measurement precision of 1.5% on fluorospheres and 4.0% on Pi-stained cells; (4) the resolution of Pi and FITC signals based on differences in their lifetimes; and (5) the measurement of single decay lifetimes by the two-phase ratio method. The significance of this new technology is that the number of fluorochromes usable in multilabeling experiments will be increased; background interferences (autofluorescence, unbound dye, nonspecific staining, Raman scatter) will be eliminated; and fluorescence lifetime can be quantified to study the interaction of fluorochrome binding.

  18. Arctic Sea ice model sensitivities.

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana Stefanova

    2010-12-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and, due to feedback effects, the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice state to internal model parameters. A new sea ice model that holds some promise for improving sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of this MPM sea ice code and compare it with the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness,and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

  19. Disrupting sensitization of TRPV4.

    PubMed

    Mack, Konrad; Fischer, Michael J M

    2017-06-03

    TRPV4 ion channels have a broad expression profile and were shown to contribute to enhanced pain sensation in inflammation. Directly blocking TRPV4 might run the risk of interfering with normal physiology, and has prompted to explore the interaction with the scaffolding protein AKAP79, an approach successfully used for TRPV1 channels. HEK293t cells express AKAP79, additional transfection did not sensitize human TRPV4. Application of trypsin facilitated responses to TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A. Using a specific protease-activated receptor 2 agonist, involvement of an A-kinase anchoring protein in TRPV4 activation was demonstrated by inhibition with AKAP inhibitor peptide Ht31. TRPV4 has substantial sequence similarity to TRPV1 in the range interacting with AKAP79. A synthetic peptide, resembling these amino acids and extended by a positive region for transmembrane uptake, was tested. Sensitization of TRPV4 responses could be reduced after exposure to this 771-781::TAT peptide but not by a scrambled control peptide. This validates the concept of targeting the interaction between TRPV4 and AKAP79 and controlling increased TRPV4 activity. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Economic modeling and sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Hay, J W

    1998-09-01

    The field of pharmacoeconomics (PE) faces serious concerns of research credibility and bias. The failure of researchers to reproduce similar results in similar settings, the inappropriate use of clinical data in economic models, the lack of transparency, and the inability of readers to make meaningful comparisons across published studies have greatly contributed to skepticism about the validity, reliability, and relevance of these studies to healthcare decision-makers. Using a case study in the field of lipid PE, two suggestions are presented for generally applicable reporting standards that will improve the credibility of PE. Health economists and researchers should be expected to provide either the software used to create their PE model or a multivariate sensitivity analysis of their PE model. Software distribution would allow other users to validate the assumptions and calculations of a particular model and apply it to their own circumstances. Multivariate sensitivity analysis can also be used to present results in a consistent and meaningful way that will facilitate comparisons across the PE literature. Using these methods, broader acceptance and application of PE results by policy-makers would become possible. To reduce the uncertainty about what is being accomplished with PE studies, it is recommended that these guidelines become requirements of both scientific journals and healthcare plan decision-makers. The standardization of economic modeling in this manner will increase the acceptability of pharmacoeconomics as a practical, real-world science.

  1. Farnesyltransferase inhibitors as radiation sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Brunner, T B; Gupta, A K; Shi, Y; Hahn, S M; Muschel, R J; McKenna, W G; Bernhard, E J

    2003-07-01

    The inhibition of activated Ras combined with radiotherapy was identified as a potential method for radiosensitization. Immunoblotting was used to control for prenylation inhibition of the respective Ras isoforms and for changes in activity of downstream proteins. Clonogenic assays with human and rodent tumour cell lines and transfected cell lines served for the testing of radiosensitivity. Xenograft tumours were treated with farnesyl transferase inhibitors and radiation and assayed for ex vivo plating efficiency, regrowth of tumours and EF5 staining for detection of hypoxia. Concurrent treatment with L-778,123 and radiotherapy was performed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Blocking the prenylation of Ras proteins in cell lines with Ras activated by mutations or receptor signalling resulted in radiation sensitization in in vitro and in vivo. The PI3 kinase downstream pathway was identified as a contributor to Ras-mediated radiation resistance. Additionally, increased oxygenation of xenograft tumours was observed after FTI treatment. Combined treatment in a phase I study was safe and effective in NSCLC and HNC. Tumour cells with activated Ras were sensitized to radiation. Unravelling the underlying mechanisms promises to lead to even more specific drugs with higher potency and safety.

  2. Naval Waste Package Design Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    T. Schmitt

    2006-12-13

    The purpose of this calculation is to determine the sensitivity of the structural response of the Naval waste packages to varying inner cavity dimensions when subjected to a comer drop and tip-over from elevated surface. This calculation will also determine the sensitivity of the structural response of the Naval waste packages to the upper bound of the naval canister masses. The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of through-wall stress intensities in the outer corrosion barrier. This calculation is intended for use in support of the preliminary design activities for the license application design of the Naval waste package. It examines the effects of small changes between the naval canister and the inner vessel, and in these dimensions, the Naval Long waste package and Naval Short waste package are similar. Therefore, only the Naval Long waste package is used in this calculation and is based on the proposed potential designs presented by the drawings and sketches in References 2.1.10 to 2.1.17 and 2.1.20. All conclusions are valid for both the Naval Long and Naval Short waste packages.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: UV-sensitive syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... by sensitivity to the ultraviolet (UV) rays in sunlight. Even a small amount of sun exposure can ... syndrome Merck Manual Home Health Edition: Overview of Sunlight and Skin Damage Orphanet: UV-sensitive syndrome World ...

  4. Recent developments in structural sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments are reviewed in two major areas of structural sensitivity analysis: sensitivity of static and transient response; and sensitivity of vibration and buckling eigenproblems. Recent developments from the standpoint of computational cost, accuracy, and ease of implementation are presented. In the area of static response, current interest is focused on sensitivity to shape variation and sensitivity of nonlinear response. Two general approaches are used for computing sensitivities: differentiation of the continuum equations followed by discretization, and the reverse approach of discretization followed by differentiation. It is shown that the choice of methods has important accuracy and implementation implications. In the area of eigenproblem sensitivity, there is a great deal of interest and significant progress in sensitivity of problems with repeated eigenvalues. In addition to reviewing recent contributions in this area, the paper raises the issue of differentiability and continuity associated with the occurrence of repeated eigenvalues.

  5. Tackifier Dispersions to Make Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    Development of new processes for tackifier dispersion could improve the production of pressure sensitive adhesives. Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) have the ability to adhere to different surfaces with manual or finger pressure.

  6. Experimental Sensitization of Guinea Pigs with Neoarsphenamine,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    neoarsphenamine (NOVAR) in a solution of TWEEN - 80 three weeks before sensitization delayed the development of contact allergic skin reactions for a period of up to 140 days from the beginning of sensitization.

  7. SEM probe of IC radiation sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauthier, M. K.; Stanley, A. G.

    1979-01-01

    Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) used to irradiate single integrated circuit (IC) subcomponent to test for radiation sensitivity can localize area of IC less than .03 by .03 mm for determination of exact location of radiation sensitive section.

  8. Sensitive fiber-optic immunoassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Irene M.; Love, Walter F.; Slovacek, Rudolf E.

    1991-07-01

    The principles of evanescent wave theory were applied to an immunological sensor for detecting the cardiac-specific isoenzyme creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB). The detection of the CK-MB isoenzyme is used in conjunction with the total CK measurement in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. The clinical range for CK-MB is from 2-100 ng/ml. Previous work which utilized the fluorophor, Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), was able to discriminate between 0 and 3 ng/ml CK-MB. Use of the fluorophor B-phycoerythrin (BPE) increased the assay sensitivity to 0.1 ng/ml CK-MB. The data was collected for 15 minutes using an optical launch and collection angle of 25 degree(s). This fiber optic based system is homogeneous and requires no subsequent washing, handling, or processing steps after exposure to the sample.

  9. ROE Acid-Sensitive Waters

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The polygon dataset represents areas with acid-sensitive waters in the contiguous United States. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA??s Office of Atmospheric Programs and are taken from a publication documenting how surface waters have responded to reduced air emissions of acid rain precursors (U.S. EPA, 2003) and from more recent unpublished results (U.S. EPA, 2014). Trends are based on data collected in two networks: the TIME project and the LTM project. Because both networks are operated by numerous collaborators in state agencies, academic institutions, and other federal agencies, the monitoring data are not available in a single publication or database. The trend data in this indicator are based on observations documented in several publications (see pages 15-17 of U.S. EPA, 2003).

  10. Cryogenic High-Sensitivity Magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Peter; Chui, Talso; Goodstein, David

    2005-01-01

    A proposed magnetometer for use in a cryogenic environment would be sensitive enough to measure a magnetic-flux density as small as a picogauss (10(exp -16) Tesla). In contrast, a typical conventional flux-gate magnetometer cannot measure a magnetic-flux density smaller that about 1 microgauss (10(exp -10) Tesla). One version of this device, for operation near the low end of the cryogenic temperature range, would include a piece of a paramagnetic material on a platform, the temperature of which would be controlled with a periodic variation. The variation in temperature would be measured by use of a conventional germanium resistance thermometer. A superconducting coil would be wound around the paramagnetic material and coupled to a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer.

  11. Reinforcement sensitivity theory and personality.

    PubMed

    Corr, Philip J

    2004-05-01

    A fully fledged neuroscience of personality is beginning to emerge, shaped and guided in large measure by the seminal work of Jeffrey A. Gray over a period of 40 years. In this Festschrift, I trace the theoretical development of Gray's approach--now known as Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST)--out of the Eysenckian tradition to its most recent articulation. Experimental attempts to test RST are reviewed and the theoretical problems raised by this literature discussed. Also presented are data relating to a recent clarification of RST, viz. the joint subsystems hypothesis, which postulates a fundamental interdependence of appetitive and aversive systems in the typical human laboratory. The value of Gray's general approach to building behavioural theories on the bases of both the conceptual nervous system and the real nervous system is validated in personality, which has long been thought a philosophical mystery rather than a standard problem to be tackled by scientific method.

  12. Solvent sensitive polymer composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappini, A.; Armellini, C.; Carpentiero, A.; Minati, L.; Righini, G. C.; Ferrari, M.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we describe a composite system based on polystyrene colloidal nanoparticles assembled and embedded in an elastomeric matrix (polymer colloidal crystal, PCC), in the specific we have designed a PCC structure which displays an iridescent green color that can be attributed to the photonic crystal effect. This effect has been exploited to create a chemical sensor, in fact optical measurements have evidenced that the composite structure presents a different optical response as a function of the solvent applied on the surface. In particular we have demonstrated that the PCC possess, for specific solvents: (i) high sensitivity, (ii) fast response (less than 1s), and (iii) reversibility of the signal change. Finally preliminary results on the PCC have shown that this system can be also used as optical writing substrate using a specific solvent as ink, moreover an erasing procedure is also reported and discussed.

  13. Pressure sensitive conductive rubber blends

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, H.H. ); Abdel-Bary, E.M. ); El-Mansy, M.K.; Khodair, H.A. )

    1989-12-01

    Butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber (NBR) was blended with polychloroprene (CR) according to standard techniques. The blend was mixed with different concentrations of ZnO. The vulcanized sample was subjected to electrical conductivity ({sigma}) measurements while different values of static pressure were applied on the sample. It was found that samples containing 7.5 phr ZnO showed a reasonable pressure sensitive increase of {sigma}. Furthermore, the {sigma} vs pressure relationship of rubber blend mixed with different concentrations of Fast Extrusion Furnace black (FEF) was investigated. It was found that rubber vulcanizate containing 40 phr FEF resulted in a negative value of the pressure coefficient of conductivity {approx equal} {minus} 4.5 KPa{sup {minus}1}.

  14. Nanocomposite enables sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuyal, Dibya D.

    Dye Sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are a promising candidate for next generation photovoltaic panels due to their low cost, easy fabrication process, and relative high efficiency. Despite considerable effort on the advancement of DSSCs, the efficiency has been stalled for nearly a decade due to the complex interplay among various DSSC components. DSSCs consist of a photoanode on a conducting substrate, infiltrated dye for light absorption and electron injection, and an electrolyte to regenerate the dye. On the photoanode is a high band-gap semiconducting material, primarily of a nanostructure morphology of titanium (II) dioxide (TiO2), dye molecules whose molar absorption is typically in the visible spectrum, are adsorbed onto the surface of TiO 2. To improve the current DSSCs, there are many parameters that can be investigated. In a conventional DSSC, a thick semiconducting layer such as the nanoparticle TiO2 layer induces charge separation efficiently while concurrently increasing the charge transport distance, leading the cell to suffer from more charge recombination and deterioration in charge collection efficiency. To improve on this limitation, TiO2 nanowires (NW) and nanotubes (NT) are explored to replace the nanoparticle photoanode. One-dimensional nanostructures are known for the excellent electron transport properties as well as maintaining a relatively high surface area. Hence one of the focuses of this thesis explores at using different morphologies and composition of TiO2 nanostructures to enhance electron collection efficiency. Another challenge in conventional DSSCs is the limit in light absorption of solar irradiation. Dyes are limited to absorption only in the visible range, and have a low molar absorption coefficient in the near infrared (NIR). Tuning dyes is extremely complicated and may have more disadvantages than simply by extending light harvesting. Therefore our strategy is to incorporate quantum dots to replace the dye, as well as prepare a

  15. Measurement of visual contrast sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vongierke, H. E.; Marko, A. R.

    1985-04-01

    This invention involves measurement of the visual contrast sensitivity (modulation transfer) function of a human subject by means of linear or circular spatial frequency pattern on a cathode ray tube whose contrast is automatically decreasing or increasing depending on the subject pressing or releasing a hand-switch button. The threshold of detection of the pattern modulation is found by the subject by adjusting the contrast to values which vary about the subject's threshold thereby determining the threshold and also providing by the magnitude of the contrast fluctuations between reversals some estimate of the variability of the subject's absolute threshold. The invention also involves the slow automatic sweeping of the spatial frequency of the pattern over the spatial frequencies after preset time intervals or after threshold has been defined at each frequency by a selected number of subject-determined threshold crossings; i.e., contrast reversals.

  16. Sensitivity of Pulsar Timing Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemens, Xavier

    2015-08-01

    For the better part of the last decade, the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) has been using the Green Bank and Arecibo radio telescopes to monitor millisecond pulsars. NANOGrav, along with similar international collaborations, the European Pulsar Timing Array and the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array in Australia, form a consortium of consortia: the International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA). The goal of the IPTA is to directly detect low-frequency gravitational waves which cause small changes to the times of arrival of radio pulses from millisecond pulsars. In this talk I will discuss the work of NANOGrav and the IPTA as well as our sensitivity to gravitational waves from astrophysical sources. I will show that a detection is possible by the end of the decade.

  17. Sensitivity to volcanic field boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Melody; Bebbington, Mark; Cronin, Shane; Lindsay, Jan; Rashad Moufti, Mohammed

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic hazard analyses are desirable where there is potential for future volcanic activity to affect a proximal population. This is frequently the case for volcanic fields (regions of distributed volcanism) where low eruption rates, fertile soil, and attractive landscapes draw populations to live close by. Forecasting future activity in volcanic fields almost invariably uses spatial or spatio-temporal point processes with model selection and development based on exploratory analyses of previous eruption data. For identifiability reasons, spatio-temporal processes, and practically also spatial processes, the definition of a spatial region is required to which volcanism is confined. However, due to the complex and predominantly unknown sub-surface processes driving volcanic eruptions, definition of a region based solely on geological information is currently impossible. Thus, the current approach is to fit a shape to the known previous eruption sites. The class of boundary shape is an unavoidable subjective decision taken by the forecaster that is often overlooked during subsequent analysis of results. This study shows the substantial effect that this choice may have on even the simplest exploratory methods for hazard forecasting, illustrated using four commonly used exploratory statistical methods and two very different regions: the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand, and Harrat Rahat, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. For Harrat Rahat, sensitivity of results to boundary definition is substantial. For the Auckland Volcanic Field, the range of options resulted in similar shapes, nevertheless, some of the statistical tests still showed substantial variation in results. This work highlights the fact that when carrying out any hazard analysis on volcanic fields, it is vital to specify how the volcanic field boundary has been defined, assess the sensitivity of boundary choice, and to carry these assumptions and related uncertainties through to estimates of future activity and

  18. Arctic Sea Ice Model Sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, K. J.; Bochev, P.; Paskaleva, B.

    2010-12-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and, due to feedback effects, the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice state to internal model parameters. A new sea ice model that holds some promise for improving sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of this MPM sea ice code and compare it with the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness,and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U. S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94-AL85000.

  19. The Limit of Photoreceptor Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Holcman, David; Korenbrot, Juan I.

    2005-01-01

    Detection threshold in cone photoreceptors requires the simultaneous absorption of several photons because single photon photocurrent is small in amplitude and does not exceed intrinsic fluctuations in the outer segment dark current (dark noise). To understand the mechanisms that limit light sensitivity, we characterized the molecular origin of dark noise in intact, isolated bass single cones. Dark noise is caused by continuous fluctuations in the cytoplasmic concentrations of both cGMP and Ca2+ that arise from the activity in darkness of both guanylate cyclase (GC), the enzyme that synthesizes cGMP, and phosphodiesterase (PDE), the enzyme that hydrolyzes it. In cones loaded with high concentration Ca2+ buffering agents, we demonstrate that variation in cGMP levels arise from fluctuations in the mean PDE enzymatic activity. The rates of PDE activation and inactivation determine the quantitative characteristics of the dark noise power density spectrum. We developed a mathematical model based on the dynamics of PDE activity that accurately predicts this power spectrum. Analysis of the experimental data with the theoretical model allows us to determine the rates of PDE activation and deactivation in the intact photoreceptor. In fish cones, the mean lifetime of active PDE at room temperature is ∼55 ms. In nonmammalian rods, in contrast, active PDE lifetime is ∼555 ms. This remarkable difference helps explain why cones are noisier than rods and why cone photocurrents are smaller in peak amplitude and faster in time course than those in rods. Both these features make cones less light sensitive than rods. PMID:15928405

  20. Iterative methods for design sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belegundu, A. D.; Yoon, B. G.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for design sensitivity analysis, using an iterative-method reanalysis of the structure generated by a small perturbation in the design variable; a forward-difference scheme is then employed to obtain the approximate sensitivity. Algorithms are developed for displacement and stress sensitivity, as well as for eignevalues and eigenvector sensitivity, and the iterative schemes are modified so that the coefficient matrices are constant and therefore decomposed only once.

  1. Sleep deprivation sensitizes human craniofacial muscles.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, Eva Szuchy; Nielsen, Louise Skou; Christensen, Siv Sofie; Botvid, Sofia Hedvig Christina; Nørgaard Poulsen, Jeppe; Gazerani, Parisa

    2017-06-01

    It is unknown whether and how sleep deprivation influences craniofacial muscle sensitivity in healthy humans. We investigated whether total sleep deprivation (TSD) and one night of recovery sleep (RS) can alter mechanical pain sensitivity in temporal and masseter muscles. Fifteen healthy volunteers participated in three consecutive sessions. Pressure pain thresholds were measured on the temporal and masseter muscles. Both temporal and masseter muscles became sensitized after 24 h of TSD. RS reversed the muscle sensitization.

  2. Using Dynamic Sensitivity Analysis to Assess Testability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voas, Jeffrey; Morell, Larry; Miller, Keith

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses sensitivity analysis and its relationship to random black box testing. Sensitivity analysis estimates the impact that a programming fault at a particular location would have on the program's input/output behavior. Locations that are relatively \\"insensitive" to faults can render random black box testing unlikely to uncover programming faults. Therefore, sensitivity analysis gives new insight when interpreting random black box testing results. Although sensitivity analysis is computationally intensive, it requires no oracle and no human intervention.

  3. Longitudinal Genetic Analysis of Anxiety Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zavos, Helena M. S.; Gregory, Alice M.; Eley, Thalia C.

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety sensitivity is associated with both anxiety and depression and has been shown to be heritable. Little, however, is known about the role of genetic influence on continuity and change of symptoms over time. The authors' aim was to examine the stability of anxiety sensitivity during adolescence. By using a genetically sensitive design, the…

  4. 40 CFR 798.4100 - Dermal sensitization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dermal sensitization. 798.4100 Section... sensitization. (a) Purpose. In the assessment and evaluation of the toxic characteristics of a substance, determination of its potential to provoke skin sensitization reactions is important. Information derived from...

  5. 40 CFR 798.4100 - Dermal sensitization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dermal sensitization. 798.4100 Section... sensitization. (a) Purpose. In the assessment and evaluation of the toxic characteristics of a substance, determination of its potential to provoke skin sensitization reactions is important. Information derived from...

  6. 40 CFR 798.4100 - Dermal sensitization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dermal sensitization. 798.4100 Section... sensitization. (a) Purpose. In the assessment and evaluation of the toxic characteristics of a substance, determination of its potential to provoke skin sensitization reactions is important. Information derived from...

  7. 40 CFR 798.4100 - Dermal sensitization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dermal sensitization. 798.4100 Section... sensitization. (a) Purpose. In the assessment and evaluation of the toxic characteristics of a substance, determination of its potential to provoke skin sensitization reactions is important. Information derived from...

  8. 40 CFR 798.4100 - Dermal sensitization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Dermal sensitization. 798.4100 Section... sensitization. (a) Purpose. In the assessment and evaluation of the toxic characteristics of a substance, determination of its potential to provoke skin sensitization reactions is important. Information derived from...

  9. Spatial contrast sensitivity in clinical neurology.

    PubMed

    Bulens, C; Meerwaldt, J D; van der Wildt, G J; Keemink, C J

    1988-01-01

    We studied contrast sensitivity function in normal subjects and in three illustrative cases with various neurological disorders. This was done by measuring contrast sensitivity over a range of spatial frequencies for vertical sinewave grating stimuli. It is demonstrated that contrast sensitivity function can give information about visual function not obtainable by conventional test procedures.

  10. Finnish Secondary School Students' Interreligious Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holm, Kristiina; Nokelainen, Petri; Tirri, Kirsi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the self-evaluations of Finnish secondary school students' (N?=?549) interreligious sensitivity. The data were collected from 12-16-year-old young people with a 15-item Interreligious Sensitivity Scale Questionnaire (IRRSSQ). The IRRSSQ is based on Abu-Nimer's Developmental Model of Interreligious Sensitivity,…

  11. A Measure of Spiritual Sensitivity for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoyles, Gerard John; Stanford, Bonnie; Caputi, Peter; Keating, Alysha-Leigh; Hyde, Brendan

    2012-01-01

    Spirituality is an essential influence in a child's development. However, an age-appropriate measure of child's spiritual sensitivity is not currently available in the literature. This paper describes the development of a measure of children's spiritual sensitivity, the Spiritual Sensitivity Scale for Children (SSSC). Statistical analyses…

  12. A Measure of Spiritual Sensitivity for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoyles, Gerard John; Stanford, Bonnie; Caputi, Peter; Keating, Alysha-Leigh; Hyde, Brendan

    2012-01-01

    Spirituality is an essential influence in a child's development. However, an age-appropriate measure of child's spiritual sensitivity is not currently available in the literature. This paper describes the development of a measure of children's spiritual sensitivity, the Spiritual Sensitivity Scale for Children (SSSC). Statistical analyses…

  13. Finnish Secondary School Students' Interreligious Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holm, Kristiina; Nokelainen, Petri; Tirri, Kirsi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the self-evaluations of Finnish secondary school students' (N?=?549) interreligious sensitivity. The data were collected from 12-16-year-old young people with a 15-item Interreligious Sensitivity Scale Questionnaire (IRRSSQ). The IRRSSQ is based on Abu-Nimer's Developmental Model of Interreligious Sensitivity,…

  14. Longitudinal Genetic Analysis of Anxiety Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zavos, Helena M. S.; Gregory, Alice M.; Eley, Thalia C.

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety sensitivity is associated with both anxiety and depression and has been shown to be heritable. Little, however, is known about the role of genetic influence on continuity and change of symptoms over time. The authors' aim was to examine the stability of anxiety sensitivity during adolescence. By using a genetically sensitive design, the…

  15. Sensitivity Analysis of Multidisciplinary Rotorcraft Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Li; Diskin, Boris; Biedron, Robert T.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Bauchau, Olivier A.

    2017-01-01

    A multidisciplinary sensitivity analysis of rotorcraft simulations involving tightly coupled high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics and comprehensive analysis solvers is presented and evaluated. An unstructured sensitivity-enabled Navier-Stokes solver, FUN3D, and a nonlinear flexible multibody dynamics solver, DYMORE, are coupled to predict the aerodynamic loads and structural responses of helicopter rotor blades. A discretely-consistent adjoint-based sensitivity analysis available in FUN3D provides sensitivities arising from unsteady turbulent flows and unstructured dynamic overset meshes, while a complex-variable approach is used to compute DYMORE structural sensitivities with respect to aerodynamic loads. The multidisciplinary sensitivity analysis is conducted through integrating the sensitivity components from each discipline of the coupled system. Numerical results verify accuracy of the FUN3D/DYMORE system by conducting simulations for a benchmark rotorcraft test model and comparing solutions with established analyses and experimental data. Complex-variable implementation of sensitivity analysis of DYMORE and the coupled FUN3D/DYMORE system is verified by comparing with real-valued analysis and sensitivities. Correctness of adjoint formulations for FUN3D/DYMORE interfaces is verified by comparing adjoint-based and complex-variable sensitivities. Finally, sensitivities of the lift and drag functions obtained by complex-variable FUN3D/DYMORE simulations are compared with sensitivities computed by the multidisciplinary sensitivity analysis, which couples adjoint-based flow and grid sensitivities of FUN3D and FUN3D/DYMORE interfaces with complex-variable sensitivities of DYMORE structural responses.

  16. Long-Term Associations of Justice Sensitivity, Rejection Sensitivity, and Depressive Symptoms in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Bondü, Rebecca; Sahyazici-Knaak, Fidan; Esser, Günter

    2017-01-01

    Depressive symptoms have been related to anxious rejection sensitivity, but little is known about relations with angry rejection sensitivity and justice sensitivity. We measured rejection sensitivity, justice sensitivity, and depressive symptoms in 1,665 9-to-21-year olds at two points of measurement. Participants with high T1 levels of depressive symptoms reported higher anxious and angry rejection sensitivity and higher justice sensitivity than controls at T1 and T2. T1 rejection, but not justice sensitivity predicted T2 depressive symptoms; high victim justice sensitivity, however, added to the stabilization of depressive symptoms. T1 depressive symptoms positively predicted T2 anxious and angry rejection and victim justice sensitivity. Hence, sensitivity toward negative social cues may be cause and consequence of depressive symptoms and requires consideration in cognitive-behavioral treatment of depression. PMID:28955257

  17. A guide to unclassified sensitive information protection

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, S.C.

    1996-11-14

    This document is a reference guide for CIC-Division employees who lead or participate in projects that use and/or produce unclassified sensitive information. It is intended for use on a case by case basis to develop project specific sensitive information handling procedures and standards. It contains criteria for identifying sensitive information and determining levels of sensitivity, and describes cost effective measures for protecting various levels of sensitive information. The goal of this document is to help establish good business practices that benefit both the Laboratory and its customers. Division personnel are encouraged to apply these guidelines.

  18. [International comparison of sensitizing chemical substances].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tomoe; Oyma, Tsunehiro; Isse, Toyohi; Narai, Rie; Kanaoka, Maki; Pham, Thi-Thu-Phuong; Kawamoto, Toshihiro

    2007-09-01

    Some occupational and environmental chemicals cause allergic diseases. To prevent chemical allergies, it is essential to identify the chemical substances that cause sensitization and to eliminate such sensitizers from daily life. As an occupational countermeasure, information for evaluating sensitization of chemical substances is needed. The aims of this article are to compare the criteria for sensitizers among national organizations in various countries and international organizations, and to make out a list of these chemical substances. The definition of sensitizing chemicals and the designation of respective sensitizers according to the PRTR law, Japan Society for Occupational Health (JSHO), American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), European Union (EU), Deutsche Forschungsgemeinshaft (DFG) and Japanese Society of Occupational and Environmental Allergy were studied. There are 1,389 chemical substances which are designated as sensitizers by any of the laws and five organizations. We specify each chemical substance in the list.

  19. High-sensitivity magnetic profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Unterberger, R.R.

    1983-05-01

    A high sensitivity rubidium 87 magnetometer, designed and built by the author, is used at sea to make magnetic profiles over subsurface structures of interest. The Texas AandM University Research Vessel GYRE was used to launch, tow and recover a nonmagnetic fiberglass skiff that carried the magnetometer. To avoid magnetic field disturbances of the GYRE, the skiff with the magnetometer was towed 600 ft behind the ship. Loran C, and sometimes SATNAV, position data were used to determine the ship location. Two recording depth finders using 3.5 kHz and 12 kHz respectively were used to profile the bottom. Time marks were plotted on the magnetic and sonar data in accordance with WWV time signals received on 10 MHz. (15 MHz and 5 MHz were also available if there happened to be poor radio transmission at 10 MHz). Magnetic data were recorded in digital form on a strip chart recorder, using the last two digits of the six digit resonance frequency of the Rb 87 atoms.

  20. Receptor sensitivity in bacterial chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sourjik, Victor; Berg, Howard C.

    2002-01-01

    Chemoreceptors in Escherichia coli are coupled to the flagella by a labile phosphorylated intermediate, CheY~P. Its activity can be inferred from the rotational bias of flagellar motors, but motor response is stochastic and limited to a narrow physiological range. Here we use fluorescence resonance energy transfer to monitor interactions of CheY~P with its phosphatase, CheZ, that reveal changes in the activity of the receptor kinase, CheA, resulting from the addition of attractants or repellents. Analyses of cheR and/or cheB mutants, defective in receptor methylation/demethylation, show that response sensitivity depends on the activity of CheB and the level of receptor modification. In cheRcheB mutants, the concentration of attractant that generates a half-maximal response is equal to the dissociation constant of the receptor. In wild-type cells, it is 35 times smaller. This amplification, together with the ultrasensitivity of the flagellar motor, explains previous observations of high chemotactic gain.

  1. Characteristics of severe asthma with fungal sensitization.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Katsunori; Fukunaga, Koichi; Matsusaka, Masako; Kabata, Hiroki; Tanosaki, Takae; Mochimaru, Takao; Kamatani, Takashi; Ohtsuka, Kengo; Baba, Rie; Ueda, Soichiro; Suzuki, Yusuke; Sakamaki, Fumio; Oyamada, Yoshitaka; Inoue, Takashi; Oguma, Tsuyoshi; Sayama, Koichi; Koh, Hidefumi; Nakamura, Morio; Umeda, Akira; Kamei, Katsuhiko; Izuhara, Kenji; Asano, Koichiro; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    2017-09-01

    Some patients with severe asthma also have fungal sensitization and are considered to have severe asthma with fungal sensitization. However, there is limited information on the clinical features of SAFS. To investigate the clinical characteristics of severe asthma with fungal sensitization. The present study enrolled 124 patients with severe asthma. We evaluated clinical aspects, such as various serum cytokines, fractional exhaled nitric oxide, pulmonary function, and serum immunoglobulin E (IgE). Fungal sensitization was assessed by determining serum levels of IgE specific to fungal allergens (Aspergillus, Alternaria, Candida, Cladosporium, Penicillium, and Trichophyton species and Schizophyllum commune). The protocol was registered at a clinical trial registry (www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index-j.htm; UMIN 000002980). Thirty-six patients (29%) showed sensitization to at least 1 fungal allergen. The most common species were Candida (16%), Aspergillus (11%), and Trichophyton (11%). The rate of early-onset asthma (<16 years of age) was higher in patients with fungal sensitization than in those without fungal sensitization (45% vs 25%; P = .02). Interleukin-33 levels were higher in patients with fungal sensitization than in those without fungal sensitization. Of patients with atopic asthma, Asthma Control Test scores were worse in patients with multiple fungal sensitizations than in patients with a single fungal sensitization or those without fungal sensitization. Severe asthma with fungal sensitization is characterized by early onset of disease and high serum levels of interleukin-33. Multiple fungal sensitizations are associated with poor asthma control. UMIN Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN-CTR; www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index-j.htm): UMIN 000002980. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Clinical evaluation of force-sensitive probe in the examination of tooth sensitivity].

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Lin, Q; Cao, C

    1995-11-01

    Two methods were tested for measuring the sensitivity of dentin to mechanical (force-sensitive probe) and cold air stimuli. Of the 212 sensitive teeth in 71 patients, 94.8% were sensitive to probe, with a mean threshold of 22.79g; 89.6% were sensitive to cold air. These two methods were significantly correlated (P < 0.001). The occlusal sites were less sensitive than the buccal sites measured by probe and cold air. It suggests that force-sensitive probe is a simple, quantitative method of measuring tooth hypersensitivity.

  3. Food Approach and Food Avoidance in Young Children: Relation with Reward Sensitivity and Punishment Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Vandeweghe, Laura; Vervoort, Leentje; Verbeken, Sandra; Moens, Ellen; Braet, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that individual differences in Reward Sensitivity and Punishment Sensitivity may determine how children respond to food. These temperamental traits reflect activity in two basic brain systems that respond to rewarding and punishing stimuli, respectively, with approach and avoidance. Via parent-report questionnaires, we investigate the associations of the general motivational temperamental traits Reward Sensitivity and Punishment Sensitivity with Food Approach and Food Avoidance in 98 preschool children. Consistent with the conceptualization of Reward Sensitivity in terms of approach behavior and Punishment Sensitivity in terms of avoidance behavior, Reward Sensitivity was positively related to Food Approach, while Punishment Sensitivity was positively related to Food Avoidance. Future research should integrate these perspectives (i.e., general temperamental traits Reward Sensitivity and Punishment Sensitivity, and Food Approach and Avoidance) to get a better understanding of eating behavior and related body weight. PMID:27445898

  4. Food Approach and Food Avoidance in Young Children: Relation with Reward Sensitivity and Punishment Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vandeweghe, Laura; Vervoort, Leentje; Verbeken, Sandra; Moens, Ellen; Braet, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that individual differences in Reward Sensitivity and Punishment Sensitivity may determine how children respond to food. These temperamental traits reflect activity in two basic brain systems that respond to rewarding and punishing stimuli, respectively, with approach and avoidance. Via parent-report questionnaires, we investigate the associations of the general motivational temperamental traits Reward Sensitivity and Punishment Sensitivity with Food Approach and Food Avoidance in 98 preschool children. Consistent with the conceptualization of Reward Sensitivity in terms of approach behavior and Punishment Sensitivity in terms of avoidance behavior, Reward Sensitivity was positively related to Food Approach, while Punishment Sensitivity was positively related to Food Avoidance. Future research should integrate these perspectives (i.e., general temperamental traits Reward Sensitivity and Punishment Sensitivity, and Food Approach and Avoidance) to get a better understanding of eating behavior and related body weight.

  5. Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, B. Hyle; de Boer, Johannes F.

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an interferometric technique capable of noninvasive high-resolution cross-sectional imaging by measuring the intensity of light reflected from within tissue [1]. This results in a noncontact imaging modality that provides images similar in scale and geometry to histology. Just as different stains can be used to enhance the contrast in histology, various extensions of OCT allow for visualization of features not readily apparent in traditional OCT. For example, optical Doppler tomography [2] can enable depth-resolved imaging of flow by observing differences in phase between successive depth scans [3-5]. This chapter will focus on polarization-sensitive OCT (PS-OCT), which utilizes depth-dependent changes in the polarization state of detected light to determine the light-polarization changing properties of a sample [6-11]. These properties, including birefringence, dichroism, and optic axis orientation, can be determined directly by studying the depth evolution of Stokes parameters [7-10, 12-16] or indirectly by using the changing reflected polarization states to first determine Jones or Mueller matrices [11, 17-21]. PS-OCT has been used in a wide variety of applications, including correlating burn depth with a decrease in birefringence [14], measuring the birefringence of the retinal nerve fiber layer [22, 23], and monitoring the onset and progression of caries lesions [24]. In this chapter, a discussion of polarization theory and its application to PS-OCTwill be followed by clinical uses of the technology and will conclude with mentionof more recent work and future directions of PS-OCT.

  6. How Sensitive Is Genetic Data?

    PubMed

    Sariyar, Murat; Suhr, Stephanie; Schlünder, Irene

    2017-09-07

    The rising demand to use genetic data for research goes hand in hand with an increased awareness of privacy issues related to its use. Using human genetic data in a legally compliant way requires an examination of the legal basis as well as an assessment of potential disclosure risks. Focusing on the relevant legal framework in the European Union, we discuss open questions and uncertainties around the handling of genetic data in research, which can result in the introduction of unnecessary hurdles for data sharing. First, we discuss defining features and relative disclosure risks of some DNA-related biomarkers, distinguishing between the risk for disclosure of (1) the identity of an individual, (2) information about an individual's health and behavior, including previously unknown phenotypes, and (3) information about an individual's blood relatives. Second, we discuss the European legal framework applicable to the use of DNA-related biomarkers in research, the implications of including both inherited and acquired traits in the legal definition, as well as the issue of "genetic exceptionalism"-the notion that genetic information has inherent characteristics that require different considerations than other health and medical information. Finally, by mapping the legal to specific technical definitions, we draw some initial conclusions concerning how sensitive different types of "genetic data" may actually be. We argue that whole genome sequences may justifiably be considered "exceptional" and require special protection, whereas other genetic data that do not fulfill the same criteria should be treated in a similar manner to other clinical data. This kind of differentiation should be reflected by the law and/or other governance frameworks as well as agreed Codes of Conduct when using the term "genetic data."

  7. Cockroach sensitization in laboratory workers.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, D R; Bernstein, D I; Gallagher, J S; Arlian, L; Bernstein, I L

    1987-10-01

    Six laboratory workers who were exposed to American cockroaches (AC) and German cockroaches (GC) while they were performing immunologic experiments were evaluated for cockroach hypersensitivity. Prick skin testing and RAST were performed with whole body extracts (1:20 wt/vol) of AC, brown-banded (BB), and GC species as well as hemolymph and fecal (F) extracts of AC. Three of six workers reported work-related nasal and ocular symptoms associated with xenografting and bleeding of cockroaches. All three symptomatic workers exhibited cutaneous reactivity to at least one cockroach antigen. Elevated RAST binding was observed in one of the three symptomatic workers. A nasal provocation to AC was positive in the most symptomatic worker at a provocative dose of 3.2 X 10(-3) mg causing a 50% decrease of nasal flow rate from baseline. After pretreatment with nasal cromolyn, the provocative dose causing a 50% decrease from baseline increased to 2.6 X 10(-1) mg. Nasal provocation with the same concentrations of AC were negative in two skin test negative subjects. RAST-inhibition studies demonstrated cross inhibition of the serum-specific IgE binding to AC-hemolymph by AC, GC, and BB whole body extracts. However, specific IgE binding to AC-F was inhibited by AC-F and AC but not by GC or BB whole body extracts, suggesting there was greater specificity of the F allergens. This study demonstrated that cockroach allergens elicit IgE-dependent upper respiratory sensitization in the workplace.

  8. Systematic review: noncoeliac gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Molina-Infante, J; Santolaria, S; Sanders, D S; Fernández-Bañares, F

    2015-05-01

    Noncoeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is a controversial emerging disorder. Despite reported symptoms related to the ingestion of gluten, NCGS remains a diagnosis based on the exclusion of coeliac disease, given the absence of reliable biomarkers. To evaluate the prevalence, diagnostic exclusion of coeliac disease and the efficacy of a gluten-free diet (GFD) for NCGS patients. A PubMed search was performed up to December 2014. According to consensus diagnostic criteria, NCGS was defined as self-reported gluten intolerance, negative coeliac serology and absence of villous atrophy. Studies evaluating the impact of a GFD on patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were also included. Prevalence rates of NCGS (0.5-13%) differed widely. Seventeen studies, including 1561 patients (26 children), met the inclusion criteria for NCGS. HLA haplotypes could not be linked to histology [normal or lymphocytic enteritis (LE)] in 1123 NCGS patients. HLADQ2/DQ8 haplotypes were present in 44% of NCGS patients. After advanced diagnostic techniques in 189 NCGS patients combining LE and HLADQ2/DQ8 haplotypes, 39 (20%) were reclassified as coeliac disease. There was a higher than expected family history of coeliac disease and autoimmune disorders in NCGS patients. A GFD resulted in variable results for variable, but significantly improved stool frequency in HLADQ2 positive diarrhoea-predominant IBS patients. Prevalence rates for NCGS are extremely variable. A subset of NCGS patients might belong in the so-called 'coeliac-lite' disease. The benefit of a GFD for NCGS patients is currently controversial. HLADQ2 positive diarrhoea-type IBS patients might gain symptom improvement from a GFD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Sensitivity in risk analyses with uncertain numbers.

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, W. Troy; Ferson, Scott

    2006-06-01

    Sensitivity analysis is a study of how changes in the inputs to a model influence the results of the model. Many techniques have recently been proposed for use when the model is probabilistic. This report considers the related problem of sensitivity analysis when the model includes uncertain numbers that can involve both aleatory and epistemic uncertainty and the method of calculation is Dempster-Shafer evidence theory or probability bounds analysis. Some traditional methods for sensitivity analysis generalize directly for use with uncertain numbers, but, in some respects, sensitivity analysis for these analyses differs from traditional deterministic or probabilistic sensitivity analyses. A case study of a dike reliability assessment illustrates several methods of sensitivity analysis, including traditional probabilistic assessment, local derivatives, and a ''pinching'' strategy that hypothetically reduces the epistemic uncertainty or aleatory uncertainty, or both, in an input variable to estimate the reduction of uncertainty in the outputs. The prospects for applying the methods to black box models are also considered.

  10. New sensitive seismic cable with imbedded geophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomov, Alex; Pisano, Dan; Goldburt, Tim

    2005-10-01

    Seismic detection systems for homeland security applications are an important additional layer to perimeter and border protection and other security systems. General Sensing Systems has been developing low mass, low cost, highly sensitive geophones. These geophones are being incorporated within a seismic cable. This article reports on the concept of a seismic sensitive cable and seismic sensitive ribbon design. Unlike existing seismic cables with sensitivity distributed along their lengths, the GSS new cable and ribbon possesses high sensitivity distributed in several points along the cable/ribbon with spacing of about 8-12 to 100 meters between geophones. This cable/ribbon is highly suitable for design and installation in extended perimeter protection systems. It allows the use of a mechanical cable layer for high speed installation. We show that any installation mistakes in using the GSS seismic sensitive cable/ribbon have low impact on output seismic signal value and detection range of security systems.

  11. Benchmark On Sensitivity Calculation (Phase III)

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, Tatiana; Laville, Cedric; Dyrda, James; Mennerdahl, Dennis; Golovko, Yury; Raskach, Kirill; Tsiboulia, Anatoly; Lee, Gil Soo; Woo, Sweng-Woong; Bidaud, Adrien; Patel, Amrit; Bledsoe, Keith C; Rearden, Bradley T; Gulliford, J.

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivities of the keff eigenvalue to neutron cross sections have become commonly used in similarity studies and as part of the validation algorithm for criticality safety assessments. To test calculations of the sensitivity coefficients, a benchmark study (Phase III) has been established by the OECD-NEA/WPNCS/EG UACSA (Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment). This paper presents some sensitivity results generated by the benchmark participants using various computational tools based upon different computational methods: SCALE/TSUNAMI-3D and -1D, MONK, APOLLO2-MORET 5, DRAGON-SUSD3D and MMKKENO. The study demonstrates the performance of the tools. It also illustrates how model simplifications impact the sensitivity results and demonstrates the importance of 'implicit' (self-shielding) sensitivities. This work has been a useful step towards verification of the existing and developed sensitivity analysis methods.

  12. Rational elicitation of cold-sensitive phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Baliga, Chetana; Majhi, Sandipan; Mondal, Kajari; Bhattacharjee, Antara; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2016-01-01

    Cold-sensitive phenotypes have helped us understand macromolecular assembly and biological phenomena, yet few attempts have been made to understand the basis of cold sensitivity or to elicit it by design. We report a method for rational design of cold-sensitive phenotypes. The method involves generation of partial loss-of-function mutants, at either buried or functional sites, coupled with selective overexpression strategies. The only essential input is amino acid sequence, although available structural information can be used as well. The method has been used to elicit cold-sensitive mutants of a variety of proteins, both monomeric and dimeric, and in multiple organisms, namely Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Drosophila melanogaster. This simple, yet effective technique of inducing cold sensitivity eliminates the need for complex mutations and provides a plausible molecular mechanism for eliciting cold-sensitive phenotypes. PMID:27091994

  13. Privacy Protection on Multiple Sensitive Attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Ye, Xiaojun

    In recent years, a privacy model called k-anonymity has gained popularity in the microdata releasing. As the microdata may contain multiple sensitive attributes about an individual, the protection of multiple sensitive attributes has become an important problem. Different from the existing models of single sensitive attribute, extra associations among multiple sensitive attributes should be invested. Two kinds of disclosure scenarios may happen because of logical associations. The Q&S Diversity is checked to prevent the foregoing disclosure risks, with an α Requirement definition used to ensure the diversity requirement. At last, a two-step greedy generalization algorithm is used to carry out the multiple sensitive attributes processing which deal with quasi-identifiers and sensitive attributes respectively. We reduce the overall distortion by the measure of Masking SA.

  14. Theoretical shock sensitivity index for explosives.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, D

    2012-02-23

    On the basis of simple physical arguments, the ratio of the weakest bond dissociation energy of nitro compounds to their decomposition enthalpy per covalent bond is put forward as a practical shock sensitivity index. Without any empirical fitting, it correlates remarkably well (R ≥ 0.95) with shock sensitivity data reported for 16 molecules spanning the most significant families of explosive compounds. This result supports the underlying assumption that this property depends on the ability of decomposition events to propagate into the material. It demonstrates that sensitivity-structure relationships should take the energy content of the material into account. A linear regression against the present sensitivity index yields a predictive method with better performance than previous ones. Its sounder physical bases provide new insight into the molecular determinants of sensitivity and a compelling explanation for the sensitivity values reported for TATB and FOX-7. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  15. Nanoparticles for Enhanced Sensitivity in Electrochemical Immunoassays

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hua; Wu, Hong; Tang, Zhiwen

    2008-10-12

    In this manuscript, we report on electrochemical biosensors based on various nanoparticles (NPs) as labels for sensitive detection of protein biomarkers. We used silica nanoparticle as a carrier to loading a large amount of electroactive species such as poly(guanine) for sensitive immunoassay of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a). We took the advantages of the unique hollow structure and reconstruction properties of apoferritin to prepare Cd3(PO4)2 nanoparticles as labels for sensitive assay of TNF-a. A novel immunochromatographic/electro-chemical biosensor based on quantum dots as labels has also been developed for rapid and sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in human serum. These biosensors are quite sensitive with the detection limit at pM level and these approaches based on nanoparticle labels offer a new avenue for sensitive detection of protein biomarkers.

  16. Sensitivity Analysis for Multidisciplinary Systems (SAMS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    AFRL-RQ-WP-TM-2017-0017 SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS FOR MULTIDISCIPLINARY SYSTEMS (SAMS) Richard D. Snyder Design & Analysis Branch Aerospace Vehicles...February 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS FOR MULTIDISCIPLINARY SYSTEMS (SAMS) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A 5c...comprising an interim briefing for this work effort. PA Case Number 88ABW-2016-6159; Clearance Date: 30 Nov 2016. 14. ABSTRACT The Sensitivity Analysis

  17. Factors Influencing Odor Sensitivity in the Dog

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Natsual Techuical Imfwmatmi Suuwie AD-A024 267 FACTORS INFLUENCING ODOR SENSITIVITY IN THE DOG PENNSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY...PREPARED FOR AIR FORCE OFFICE OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH OCTOBER 1975 138097 FACTORS INFLUENCING ODOR SENSITIVITY IN THE DOG Final report - October, 1975...Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT 6 PERIOD COVERED FACTORS INFLUENCING ODOR SENSITIVITY IN FIP.1 Scientific Report TlE DOG "Ś. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7

  18. Spectroscopic Sensitivity Workout: First-order modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Thomas

    2001-07-01

    This program is the basic sensitivity measurement for all supported MAMA and CCD first-order spectroscopic modes. It is run once in Cycle 10. Sensitivity measurements are done for all supported tilts of the gratings, at a S/N suitable to any particular setting, in order to get all measurements done in a reasonable number of orbits but still get a very accurate sensitivity measurement. Data for the newly available "pseudo-apertures" near CCD row 900 are also taken.

  19. Sensitivity analysis of hydrodynamic stability operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Peter J.; Henningson, Dan S.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Malik, Mujeeb R.

    1992-01-01

    The eigenvalue sensitivity for hydrodynamic stability operators is investigated. Classical matrix perturbation techniques as well as the concept of epsilon-pseudoeigenvalues are applied to show that parts of the spectrum are highly sensitive to small perturbations. Applications are drawn from incompressible plane Couette, trailing line vortex flow and compressible Blasius boundary layer flow. Parametric studies indicate a monotonically increasing effect of the Reynolds number on the sensitivity. The phenomenon of eigenvalue sensitivity is due to the non-normality of the operators and their discrete matrix analogs and may be associated with large transient growth of the corresponding initial value problem.

  20. Structural sensitivity analysis: Methods, applications and needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, H. M.; Haftka, R. T.; Camarda, C. J.; Walsh, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Innovative techniques applicable to sensitivity analysis of discretized structural systems are reviewed. The techniques include a finite difference step size selection algorithm, a method for derivatives of iterative solutions, a Green's function technique for derivatives of transient response, simultaneous calculation of temperatures and their derivatives, derivatives with respect to shape, and derivatives of optimum designs with respect to problem parameters. Computerized implementations of sensitivity analysis and applications of sensitivity derivatives are also discussed. Some of the critical needs in the structural sensitivity area are indicated along with plans for dealing with some of those needs.

  1. Structural sensitivity analysis: Methods, applications, and needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, H. M.; Haftka, R. T.; Camarda, C. J.; Walsh, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Some innovative techniques applicable to sensitivity analysis of discretized structural systems are reviewed. These techniques include a finite-difference step-size selection algorithm, a method for derivatives of iterative solutions, a Green's function technique for derivatives of transient response, a simultaneous calculation of temperatures and their derivatives, derivatives with respect to shape, and derivatives of optimum designs with respect to problem parameters. Computerized implementations of sensitivity analysis and applications of sensitivity derivatives are also discussed. Finally, some of the critical needs in the structural sensitivity area are indicated along with Langley plans for dealing with some of these needs.

  2. Putative neuronal mechanisms of sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Ständer, Sonja; Schneider, Stefan W; Weishaupt, Carsten; Luger, Thomas A; Misery, Laurent

    2009-05-01

    According to epidemiological studies, up to 50% of adults report facial sensitivity with various distinctive symptoms, such as prickling, burning, tingling, pain or itching. This is termed sensitive skinand represents a syndrome of physiological reactions rather than a disease entity. In this review, we discuss the currently available literature on this syndrome and describe the possible underlying neuronal pathomechanisms. The sensory receptors expressed on unmyelinated nerve fibres and keratinocytes involved in nociception, such as TRPV1 and endothelin receptors, are hypothesized to play a role in the induction of sensitive skin. Furthermore, we discuss the role of neurotrophins and the influence of stress on sensitive skin.

  3. A review of sensitivity analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hamby, D.M.

    1993-12-31

    Mathematical models are utilized to approximate various highly complex engineering, physical, environmental, social, and economic phenomena. Model parameters exerting the most influence on model results are identified through a {open_quotes}sensitivity analysis.{close_quotes} A comprehensive review is presented of more than a dozen sensitivity analysis methods. The most fundamental of sensitivity techniques utilizes partial differentiation whereas the simplest approach requires varying parameter values one-at-a-time. Correlation analysis is used to determine relationships between independent and dependent variables. Regression analysis provides the most comprehensive sensitivity measure and is commonly utilized to build response surfaces that approximate complex models.

  4. The Negative Affect Hypothesis of Noise Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Daniel; Heinonen-Guzejev, Marja; Heikkilä, Kauko; Dirks, Kim N.; Hautus, Michael J.; Welch, David; McBride, David

    2015-01-01

    Some studies indicate that noise sensitivity is explained by negative affect, a dispositional tendency to negatively evaluate situations and the self. Individuals high in such traits may report a greater sensitivity to other sensory stimuli, such as smell, bright light and pain. However, research investigating the relationship between noise sensitivity and sensitivity to stimuli associated with other sensory modalities has not always supported the notion of a common underlying trait, such as negative affect, driving them. Additionally, other explanations of noise sensitivity based on cognitive processes have existed in the clinical literature for over 50 years. Here, we report on secondary analyses of pre-existing laboratory (n = 74) and epidemiological (n = 1005) data focusing on the relationship between noise sensitivity to and annoyance with a variety of olfactory-related stimuli. In the first study a correlational design examined the relationships between noise sensitivity, noise annoyance, and perceptual ratings of 16 odors. The second study sought differences between mean noise and air pollution annoyance scores across noise sensitivity categories. Results from both analyses failed to support the notion that, by itself, negative affectivity explains sensitivity to noise. PMID:25993104

  5. Sensitivities of Radiative-Convective Climate Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chýlek, Petr; Kiehl, J. T.

    1981-05-01

    We have compared sensitivities of four different radiative-convective climate models. Although surface temperature sensitivities with respect to changes in solar constant and atmospheric CO2, concentration are almost the same in all models, sensitivity with respect to some other climate variables varies up to a factor of 2. We have found that the surface, temperature sensitivity with respect to changes of the lapse rate is high in all models, and we emphasize the importance of a lapse rate-surface temperature feedback.

  6. Geometric sensitivity of ClearPET™ Neuro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlich, Brigitte; Weber, Simone

    2007-02-01

    ClearPET™ Neuro is a small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner dedicated to brain studies on rats and primates. The design of ClearPET™ Neuro leads to a specific geometric sensitivity, characterized by inhomogeneous and, depending on the measurement setup, even incomplete data. With respect to reconstruction techniques, homogeneous and complete data sets are a 'must' for analytical reconstruction methods, whereas iterative methods take the geometrical sensitivity into account during the reconstruction process. Nevertheless, here a homogeneous geometric sensitivity over the field of view is highly desirable. Therefore, this contribution aims at studying the impact of different scanner geometries and measurement setups on the geometric sensitivity. A data set of coincident events is computed for certain settings that contains each possible crystal combination once. The lines of response are rebinned into normalizing sinograms and backprojected into sensitivity images. Both, normalizing sinograms and sensitivity images mirror the geometric sensitivity and therefore, provide information which setting enables most complete and homogeneous data sets. An optimal measurement setup and scanner geometry in terms of homogeneous geometric sensitivity is found by analyzing the sensitivity images.

  7. Stiff DAE integrator with sensitivity analysis capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Serban, R.

    2007-11-26

    IDAS is a general purpose (serial and parallel) solver for differential equation (ODE) systems with senstivity analysis capabilities. It provides both forward and adjoint sensitivity analysis options.

  8. The ISS Sensitizing Agents Data Bank (BDS).

    PubMed

    Brunetto, Barbara; Binetti, Roberto; Ceccarelli, Federica; Costamagna, Francesca Marina; D'Angiolini, Antonella; Fabri, Alessandra; Ferri, Maurizio; Marcello, Ida; Riva, Giovanni; Roazzi, Paolo; Trucchi, Daniela; Tinghino, Raffaella

    2008-01-01

    The Istituto Superiore Sanità has developed a data bank on sensitizing substances (Banca Dati Sensibilizzanti, BDS), available on website (www.iss.it/bdse/), sharing complete, controlled and updated information coming from different sources, such as scientific publications, international agencies and governmental or non governmental organizations. It is worthwhile that the main objective of the BDS is not the classification of sensitizing or potentially sensitizing agents within specific risk classes, but it is essentially to provide concise and non confidential information related to this endpoint. At present, the BDS includes: all the substances officially classified by European Union, (Annex I to Directive 67/548/EEC), some substances listed in I (Directive 67/548/EEC) for endpoints different than "sensitization" but indicated as sensitizers by other relevant institutions, all the substances indicated as sensitizers by relevant agencies or institutions (ACGIH, DFG), some substances indicted as sensitizers by industry and other non-governmental organizations (ETAD and HERA), all the substances regarded as "potentially sensitizing dyes" by the Commission of the European Community for the award of the eco-label to textile products, some substances for which, even in the absence of any categorization by Union, ACGIH or DFG, it is not possible to exclude a sensitizing potential on the basis of reliable documents.

  9. "Feeling Books" Develop Social and Personal Sensitivities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cianciolo, Patricia

    1975-01-01

    Professional educators should expose children to "feeling books" which will help children learn about ". . . people's motivations, their strengths and frailties, their sensitivities and their hopes and dreams." (JH)

  10. Environmental sensitivities of quartz crystal oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walls, Fred L.

    1990-01-01

    The frequency, amplitude, and noise of the output signal of a quartz crystal controlled oscillator is affected by a large number of environmental effects. The physical basis for the sensitivity of precision oscillators to temperature, humidity, pressure, vibration, magnetic field, electric field, load, and radiation is discussed. The sensitivity of crystal oscillators to radiation is a very complex topic and poorly understood. Therefore only a few general results are mentioned. The sensitivity to most external influences often varies significantly from one oscillator type to another and from one unit of given type to another. For a given unit, the sensitivity to one parameter often depends on the value of other parameters and history.

  11. Determination of pole sensitivities by Danilevskii's method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nail, J. B.; Mitchell, J. R.; Mcdaniel, W. L., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    In control theory, a synonymous term for pole sensitivity is eigenvalue sensitivity. Existing methods of calculating eigenvalues are cumbersome, and cannot be trusted for systems roughly greater than tenth order. The method proposed in the present paper is applicable to high-order system. (It has been routinely used to generate eigenvalue sensitivities for systems up to 26th order, using a UNIVAC 1106.) Danilevskii's method is shown to be suitable for performing the necessary evaluations. The result is a rational function that can be used to evaluate the sensitivities for all distinct poles.

  12. Extended Forward Sensitivity Analysis for Uncertainty Quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Vincent A. Mousseau

    2011-09-01

    Verification and validation (V&V) are playing more important roles to quantify uncertainties and realize high fidelity simulations in engineering system analyses, such as transients happened in a complex nuclear reactor system. Traditional V&V in the reactor system analysis focused more on the validation part or did not differentiate verification and validation. The traditional approach to uncertainty quantification is based on a 'black box' approach. The simulation tool is treated as an unknown signal generator, a distribution of inputs according to assumed probability density functions is sent in and the distribution of the outputs is measured and correlated back to the original input distribution. The 'black box' method mixes numerical errors with all other uncertainties. It is also not efficient to perform sensitivity analysis. Contrary to the 'black box' method, a more efficient sensitivity approach can take advantage of intimate knowledge of the simulation code. In these types of approaches equations for the propagation of uncertainty are constructed and the sensitivities are directly solved for as variables in the simulation. This paper presents the forward sensitivity analysis as a method to help uncertainty qualification. By including time step and potentially spatial step as special sensitivity parameters, the forward sensitivity method is extended as one method to quantify numerical errors. Note that by integrating local truncation errors over the whole system through the forward sensitivity analysis process, the generated time step and spatial step sensitivity information reflect global numerical errors. The discretization errors can be systematically compared against uncertainties due to other physical parameters. This extension makes the forward sensitivity method a much more powerful tool to help uncertainty qualification. By knowing the relative sensitivity of time and space steps with other interested physical parameters, the simulation is allowed

  13. Travel-Time and Amplitude Sensitivity Kernels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    amplitude sensitivity kernels shown in the lower panels concentrate about the corresponding eigenrays . Each 3D kernel exhibits a broad negative...in 2 and 3 dimensions have similar 11 shapes to corresponding travel-time sensitivity kernels (TSKs), centered about the respective eigenrays

  14. 32 CFR 154.13 - Sensitive positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Noncritical-sensitive. (A) Access to Secret or Confidential information. (B) Security police/provost marshal...) Critical-sensitive. (A) Access to Top Secret information. (B) Development or approval of plans, policies... report required in subpart K. (e) Billet control system for Top Secret. (1) To standardize and control...

  15. 32 CFR 154.13 - Sensitive positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Noncritical-sensitive. (A) Access to Secret or Confidential information. (B) Security police/provost marshal...) Critical-sensitive. (A) Access to Top Secret information. (B) Development or approval of plans, policies... report required in subpart K. (e) Billet control system for Top Secret. (1) To standardize and control...

  16. The Sensitization Process Of Dichromated Gelatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billard, Thomas C.; Pawluczyk, Romuald; Hockley, Bernard S.

    1989-05-01

    The effects of varying the concentration of the ammonium dichromate sensitizing solution on the gelatin film properties were investigated quantitatively. The film thicknesses were measured following preparation, sensitization and processing. The refractive indices of the film surfaces were measured following sensitization and processing. The absorbances of the films were measured following sensitization. The results indicated that following sensitization the refractive indices of the films increased and the film thicknesses decreased for low ammonium dichromate concentrations and increased for high concentrations. Subsequent to processing, the refractive indices decreased and the film thicknesses increased for films sensitized at low concentrations and decreased for films sensitized at high concentrations. The expected shifts in the reconstruction wavelengths were determined from the changes in the film thicknesses and refractive indices and were found to agree well with the wavelength shifts measured using a spectrophotometer. The reconstruction wavelengths were determined to vary linearly with the specific absorbance. The diffraction efficiencies and bandwidths of the holograms produced increased as the concentration of the ammonium dichromate in the sensitizing bath was increased. The implications of the results for the production of highly efficient volume holograms were discussed.

  17. 49 CFR 236.56 - Shunting sensitivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Shunting sensitivity. 236.56 Section 236.56 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION...: All Systems Track Circuits § 236.56 Shunting sensitivity. Each track circuit controlling home signal...

  18. 49 CFR 234.229 - Shunting sensitivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Shunting sensitivity. 234.229 Section 234.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION..., Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.229 Shunting sensitivity. Each highway-rail grade...

  19. 40 CFR 766.18 - Method sensitivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Method sensitivity. 766.18 Section 766.18 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS General Provisions § 766.18 Method sensitivity. The target level of...

  20. 49 CFR 236.56 - Shunting sensitivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Shunting sensitivity. 236.56 Section 236.56 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION...: All Systems Track Circuits § 236.56 Shunting sensitivity. Each track circuit controlling home signal...