Science.gov

Sample records for sensitizes lung cancer

  1. Sensitization strategies in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Peiying

    2016-01-01

    The commonly used treatment avenues employed by cancer physicians include surgery, radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy in addition to rapid developmental and confirmatory studies on the efficacy of targeted therapies. However, the success rate in these commonly used treatments remains relatively low due to associated side effects, such as normal cell targeting/toxicity and resistance. In addition, investigators are continuing their efforts to enhance the efficacy of RT and chemotherapy to prevent associated side effects and improve the survival rate of the affected patient in order to increase patient survival. In the present study, we have reviewed the sensitization approaches used to improve chemotherapy and RT sensitivity in tumors. PMID:27900051

  2. Inhibition of Skp2 sensitizes lung cancer cells to paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tonghai; Yang, Lin; Wang, Guangsuo; Ding, Guanggui; Peng, Bin; Wen, Yuxin; Wang, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase and plays an important role in the control of cell cycle progression. Skp2 is upregulated in several cancers, including lung cancers, but the role of Skp2 in the tumorigenesis and anticancer drug resistance in human lung cancer remains to be determined. We report here that Skp2 positively regulated mitotic arrest deficient 2 (MAD2) expression and that inhibition of Skp2 sensitizes human lung cancer cells to paclitaxel. Knockdown of Skp2 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased Mad2 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in A549 and NCI-H1975 cells, accompanied with upregulation of p27 but decrease of the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma (Rb). In contrast, ectopic overexpression of Skp2 increased Mad2 mRNA and protein levels and phosphorylation of Rb, while it decreased p27. Pharmacological inhibition of CDK1/2 by flavopiridol or E2F1 with HLM006474 led to downregulation of Mad2 expression and prevented the increase of Mad2 expression by Skp2. Most importantly, pharmacological inhibition of Skp2 sensitized A549 and NCI-H1299 cells to paclitaxel. Our results demonstrated that SKP2 positively regulates the gene expression of MAD2 through p27-CDKs-E2F1 signaling pathway and that inhibition of Skp2 sensitizes A549 and NCI-H1299 cells to paclitaxel, suggesting that small molecule inhibitors of Skp2 are potential agents for the treatment of lung cancer with upregulation of Skp2. PMID:28176922

  3. Inhibition of Skp2 sensitizes lung cancer cells to paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tonghai; Yang, Lin; Wang, Guangsuo; Ding, Guanggui; Peng, Bin; Wen, Yuxin; Wang, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase and plays an important role in the control of cell cycle progression. Skp2 is upregulated in several cancers, including lung cancers, but the role of Skp2 in the tumorigenesis and anticancer drug resistance in human lung cancer remains to be determined. We report here that Skp2 positively regulated mitotic arrest deficient 2 (MAD2) expression and that inhibition of Skp2 sensitizes human lung cancer cells to paclitaxel. Knockdown of Skp2 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased Mad2 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in A549 and NCI-H1975 cells, accompanied with upregulation of p27 but decrease of the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma (Rb). In contrast, ectopic overexpression of Skp2 increased Mad2 mRNA and protein levels and phosphorylation of Rb, while it decreased p27. Pharmacological inhibition of CDK1/2 by flavopiridol or E2F1 with HLM006474 led to downregulation of Mad2 expression and prevented the increase of Mad2 expression by Skp2. Most importantly, pharmacological inhibition of Skp2 sensitized A549 and NCI-H1299 cells to paclitaxel. Our results demonstrated that SKP2 positively regulates the gene expression of MAD2 through p27-CDKs-E2F1 signaling pathway and that inhibition of Skp2 sensitizes A549 and NCI-H1299 cells to paclitaxel, suggesting that small molecule inhibitors of Skp2 are potential agents for the treatment of lung cancer with upregulation of Skp2.

  4. Lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer.

  5. Highly Sensitive Marker Panel for Guidance in Lung Cancer Rapid Diagnostic Units

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Prieto, Sonia; De Chiara, Loretta; Rodríguez-Girondo, Mar; Vázquez-Iglesias, Lorena; Rodríguez-Berrocal, Francisco Javier; Fernández-Villar, Alberto; Botana-Rial, María Isabel; de la Cadena, María Páez

    2017-01-01

    While evidence for lung cancer screening implementation in Europe is awaited, Rapid Diagnostic Units have been established in many hospitals to accelerate the early diagnosis of lung cancer. We seek to develop an algorithm to detect lung cancer in a symptomatic population attending such unit, based on a sensitive serum marker panel. Serum concentrations of Epidermal Growth Factor, sCD26, Calprotectin, Matrix Metalloproteinases −1, −7, −9, CEA and CYFRA 21.1 were determined in 140 patients with respiratory symptoms (lung cancer and controls with/without benign pathology). Logistic Lasso regression was performed to derive a lung cancer prediction model, and the resulting algorithm was tested in a validation set. A classification rule based on EGF, sCD26, Calprotectin and CEA was established, able to reasonably discriminate lung cancer with 97% sensitivity and 43% specificity in the training set, and 91.7% sensitivity and 45.4% specificity in the validation set. Overall, the panel identified with high sensitivity stage I non-small cell lung cancer (94.7%) and 100% small-cell lung cancers. Our study provides a sensitive 4-marker classification algorithm for lung cancer detection to aid in the management of suspicious lung cancer patients in the context of Rapid Diagnostic Units. PMID:28117344

  6. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Lung Cancer What is Lung Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made ... button on your keyboard.) Two Major Types of Lung Cancer There are two major types of lung ...

  7. A case-control study of wood dust exposure, mutagen sensitivity, and lung cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Wu, X; Delclos, G L; Annegers, J F; Bondy, M L; Honn, S E; Henry, B; Hsu, T C; Spitz, M R

    1995-09-01

    The associations between lung cancer risk, mutagen sensitivity (a marker of cancer susceptibility), and a putative lung carcinogen, wood dust, were assessed in a hospital-based case-control study. There were 113 African -American and 67 Mexican-American cases with newly diagnosed, previously untreated lung cancer and 270 controls, frequency-matched on age, ethnicity, and sex. Mutagen sensitivity ( 1 chromatid break/cell after short-term bleomycin treatment) was associated with statistically significant elevated risk for lung cancer [odds ration (OR) = 4.3; 95% confidence intervals (CI) = 2.3-7.9]. Wood dust exposure was also a significant predictor of risk (overall OR = 3.5; CI = 1.4-8.6) after controlling for smoking and mutagen sensitivity. When stratified by ethnicity, wood dust exposure was s significant risk factor for African-Americans (OR = 5.5; CI = 1.6-18.9) but not for Mexican-Americans (OR = 2.0; CI = 0.5-8.1). The ORs were 3.8 and 4.8 for non-small cell lung cancer in Mexican-Americans (CI = 1.2-18.5). Stratified analysis suggested evidence of strong interactions between wood dust exposure and both mutagen sensitivity and smoking in lung cancer risk.

  8. Artonin E mediates MCL1 down-regulation and sensitizes lung cancer cells to anoikis.

    PubMed

    Wongpankam, Ekkarat; Chunhacha, Preedakorn; Pongrakhananon, Varisa; Sritularak, Boonchoo; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2012-12-01

    Anoikis, or detachment-induced apoptosis, is recognized as a key inhibitory process of cancer metastasis. Since lung cancer cells possess an ability to resist anoikis, resulting in a high rate of metastasis and death, the present study aimed to investigate the possible anoikis-sensitizing effect of artonin E (AE). AE was extracted from bark of Artocarpus gomezianus. Anoikis sensitization of AE was investigated in H460, A549 and H292 human lung cancer cells. The level of anoikis-related proteins was determined by western blot analysis and viable cells were measured by the 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) method. AE was shown to enhance anoikis of H460 cells in a dose-dependent manner. We investigated the underlying mechanisms of AE on anoikis sensitization and found that AE sensitized the cells by down-regulating the anti-apoptotic myeloid leukemia cell sequence-1 (MCL1) protein but had no significant effect on other proteins of the B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL2) family, including BCL2 and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX). Anoikis sensitization of AE was consistently observed in A549 and H292 lung cancer cells. The present study demonstrates a novel activity of AE on lung cancer cell anoikis for the first time which might lead to the development of a new strategy for lung cancer therapy.

  9. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  10. Highly sensitive detection of multiple tumor markers for lung cancer using gold nanoparticle probes and microarrays.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wanlei; Wang, Wentao; Yao, Shihua; Wu, Shan; Zhang, Honglian; Zhang, Jishen; Jing, Fengxiang; Mao, Hongju; Jin, Qinghui; Cong, Hui; Jia, Chunping; Zhang, Guojun; Zhao, Jianlong

    2017-03-15

    Assay of multiple serum tumor markers such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cytokeratin 19 fragment antigen (CYFRA21-1), and neuron specific enolase (NSE), is important for the early diagnosis of lung cancer. Dickkopf-1 (DKK1), a novel serological and histochemical biomarker, was recently reported to be preferentially expressed in lung cancer. Four target proteins were sandwiched by capture antibodies attached to microarrays and detection antibodies carried on modified gold nanoparticles. Optical signals generated by the sandwich structures were amplified by gold deposition with HAuCl4 and H2O2, and were observable by microscopy or the naked eye. The four tumor markers were subsequently measured in 106 lung cancer patients and 42 healthy persons. The assay was capable of detecting multiple biomarkers in serum sample at concentration of <1 ng mL(-1) in 1 h. Combined detection of the four tumor markers highly improved the sensitivity (to 87.74%) for diagnosis of lung cancer compared with sensitivity of single markers. A rapid, highly sensitive co-detection method for multiple biomarkers based on gold nanoparticles and microarrays was developed. In clinical use, it would be expected to improve the early diagnosis of lung cancer.

  11. Regression of Lung Cancer by Hypoxia Sensitizing Ruthenium Polypyridyl Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Abhishek; Janaratne, Thamara; Krishnan, Arthi; Singhal, Sharad S.; Yadav, Sushma; Dayoub, Adam S.; Hawkins, Doyle L.; Awasthi, Sanjay; MacDonnell, Frederick M.

    2013-01-01

    The ruthenium (II) polypyridyl complexes (RPCs) Δ-[(phen)2Ru(tatpp)]Cl2 (Δ-[3]Cl2) and ΔΔ-[(phen)2Ru(tatpp)Ru(phen)2]Cl4 (ΔΔ-[4]Cl4) are a new generation of metal-based anti-tumor agents. These RPCs bind DNA via intercalation of the tatpp ligand which itself is redox-active and easily reduced at biologically relevant potentials. We have previously shown that RPC 44+ cleaves DNA when reduced by glutathione to a radical species, and that this DNA cleavage is potentiated under hypoxic conditions in vitro. Here we show that 32+ also exhibits free-radical mediated DNA cleavage in vitro, and that 32+ and 44+ both exhibit selective cytotoxicity towards cultured malignant cell lines, and marked inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. The murine acute toxicity of RPCs 32+ and 44+ (maximum tolerable doses (MTD’s) ~ 65 µmol/kg) is comparable with that for cisplatin (LD50 ~57 µmol/kg) but unlike cisplatin, RPC’s are generally cleared from the body unchanged via renal excretion without appreciable metabolism or nephrotoxic side effects. RPCs 32+ and 44+ are demonstrated to suppress growth of human non-small cell lung carcinoma (~83%), show potentiated cytotoxicity in vitro under hypoxic conditions, and induce apoptosis through both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. The novel hypoxia-enhanced DNA cleavage activity and biological activity suggest a promising new anti-cancer pharmacophore based on metal complexes with aromatic ligands that are easily reduced at biologically accessible potentials. PMID:23443803

  12. Lung Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Lung Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease ...

  13. MicroRNA-451 sensitizes lung cancer cells to cisplatin through regulation of Mcl-1.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dezhi; Xu, Yi; Sun, Changzheng; He, Zhifeng

    2016-12-01

    As one of the most widely used chemotherapy drugs for lung cancer, chemoresistance of cisplatin (DPP) is one of the major hindrances in treatment of this malignancy. The microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified to mediate chemotherapy drug resistance. MiR-451 as a tumor suppressor has been evaluated its potential effect on the sensitivity of cancer cells to DDP. However, the role of miR-451 in regulatory mechanism of chemosensitivity in lung cancer cells is still largely unknown. In this study, we first constructed a cisplatin-resistant A549 cell line (A549/DPP) accompanied with a decreased expression of miR-451 and an increased expression of Mcl-1in the drug resistant cells compared with the parental cells. Exogenous expression of miR-451 level in A549/DPP was found to sensitize their reaction to the treatment of cisplatin, which coincides with reduced expression of Mcl-1. Interestingly, Mcl-1 knockdown in A549/DPP cells increased the chemosensitivity to DPP, suggesting the dependence of Mcl-1 regulation in miR-451 activity. Moreover, miR-451 can restore cisplatin treatment response in cisplatin-resistant xenografts in vivo, while Mcl-1 protein levels were decreased. Thus, these findings provided that in lung cancer cells, tumor suppressor miR-451 enhanced DPP sensitivity via regulation of Mcl-1 expression, which could be served as a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of chemotherapy resistant in lung cancer.

  14. Anticancer drug clustering in lung cancer based on gene expression profiles and sensitivity database

    PubMed Central

    Gemma, Akihiko; Li, Cai; Sugiyama, Yuka; Matsuda, Kuniko; Seike, Yoko; Kosaihira, Seiji; Minegishi, Yuji; Noro, Rintaro; Nara, Michiya; Seike, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Akinobu; Shionoya, Aki; Kawakami, Akiko; Ogawa, Naoki; Uesaka, Haruka; Kudoh, Shoji

    2006-01-01

    background The effect of current therapies in improving the survival of lung cancer patients remains far from satisfactory. It is consequently desirable to find more appropriate therapeutic opportunities based on informed insights. A molecular pharmacological analysis was undertaken to design an improved chemotherapeutic strategy for advanced lung cancer. Methods We related the cytotoxic activity of each of commonly used anti-cancer agents (docetaxel, paclitaxel, gemcitabine, vinorelbine, 5-FU, SN38, cisplatin (CDDP), and carboplatin (CBDCA)) to corresponding expression pattern in each of the cell lines using a modified NCI program. Results We performed gene expression analysis in lung cancer cell lines using cDNA filter and high-density oligonucleotide arrays. We also examined the sensitivity of these cell lines to these drugs via MTT assay. To obtain our reproducible gene-drug sensitivity correlation data, we separately analyzed two sets of lung cancer cell lines, namely 10 and 19. In our gene-drug correlation analyses, gemcitabine consistently belonged to an isolated cluster in a reproducible fashion. On the other hand, docetaxel, paclitaxel, 5-FU, SN-38, CBDCA and CDDP were gathered together into one large cluster. Conclusion These results suggest that chemotherapy regimens including gemcitabine should be evaluated in second-line chemotherapy in cases where the first-line chemotherapy did not include this drug. Gene expression-drug sensitivity correlations, as provided by the NCI program, may yield improved therapeutic options for treatment of specific tumor types. PMID:16813650

  15. Inhibition of checkpoint kinase 1 sensitizes lung cancer brain metastases to radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Heekyoung; Yoon, Su Jin; Jin, Juyoun; Choi, Seung Ho; Seol, Ho Jun; Lee, Jung-Il; and others

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} The most important therapeutic tool in brain metastasis is radiation therapy. {yields} Radiosensitivity of cancer cells was enhanced with treatment of Chk1 inhibitor. {yields} Depletion of Chk1 in cancer cells showed an enhancement of sensitivity to radiation. {yields} Chk1 can be a good target for enhancement of radiosensitivity. -- Abstract: The most important therapeutic tool in brain metastasis is radiation therapy. However, resistance to radiation is a possible cause of recurrence or treatment failure. Recently, signal pathways about DNA damage checkpoints after irradiation have been noticed. We investigated the radiosensitivity can be enhanced with treatment of Chk1 inhibitor, AZD7762 in lung cancer cell lines and xenograft models of lung cancer brain metastasis. Clonogenic survival assays showed enhancement of radiosensitivity with AZD7762 after irradiation of various doses. AZD7762 increased ATR/ATM-mediated Chk1 phosphorylation and stabilized Cdc25A, suppressed cyclin A expression in lung cancer cell lines. In xenograft models of lung cancer (PC14PE6) brain metastasis, AZD7762 significantly prolonged the median survival time in response to radiation. Depletion of Chk1 using shRNA also showed an enhancement of sensitivity to radiation in PC14PE6 cells. The results of this study support that Chk1 can be a good target for enhancement of radiosensitivity.

  16. Downregulation of miR-21 increases cisplatin sensitivity of non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liyun; Huang, Yanyan; Chen, Dongdong; He, Jianying; Zhu, Wangyu; Zhang, Yongkui; Liu, Xiaoguang

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that plasma miR-21 is a biomarker of chemotherapeutic response in lung cancer, but the influence of miR-21 on the sensitivity of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to cisplatin (DDP) has not been confirmed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of miR-21 in NSCLC sensitivity to DDP in vitro and in vivo. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to detect miR-21 expression in lung cancer cell lines. Synthesized locked nucleic acid (LNA) anti-miR-21 was transiently transfected into A549 cells and pre-miR-21 was transfected into SK-MES-1 cells. We also investigated the effects of miR-21 downregulation and upregulation on growth and colony formation in DDP-treated cells. Finally, the effect of miR-21 downregulation on in vivo sensitivity of A549 cells to DDP was determined in BALB/c nude mice. miR-21 expression was significantly higher in A549 than in other lung cancer cell lines. LNA-based knockdown of miR-21 significantly inhibited growth and induced death in A549 cells, possibly via apoptotic signaling. Pre-miR-21 significantly promoted growth and inhibited death in SK-MES-1 cells. Moreover, ectopic suppression of miR-21 sensitized A549 cells to DDP in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that miR-21 suppression enhances the sensitivity of lung cancer cells to DDP in vitro and in vivo.

  17. What Is Lung Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Graphics Infographic Stay Informed Cancer Home What Is Lung Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... cancer starts in the lungs, it is called lung cancer. Lung cancer begins in the lungs and may ...

  18. Lung Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease ...

  19. REV3L modulates cisplatin sensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer H1299 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjie; Sheng, Wenjiong; Yu, Chenxiao; Cao, Jianping; Zhou, Jundong; Wu, Jinchang; Zhang, Huojun; Zhang, Shuyu

    2015-09-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately 80-85% of all cases of lung cancer. Cisplatin plays a significant role in the management of human lung cancer. Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) is involved in DNA damage repair. DNA polymerase ζ (Pol ζ) is able to mediate the DNA replication bypass of DNA damage, which is suggested to be involved in chemoresistance. REV3L is the catalytic subunit of Pol ζ. Due to its critical role in translesion DNA synthesis, whether REV3L modulates cisplatin response in NSCLC cells remains unknown. In this study, REV3L overexpression and silencing H1299 cell lines were established. The reports showed that cisplatin induced the expression of REV3L by recruiting Sp1 to its promoter. Similar results were obtained when the ability of the cells to express luciferase from a platinated plasmid was measured. Co-transfection of the reporter with the REV3L overexpression vector or REV3L plus REV7L significantly enhanced the reporter activity. Nuclear condensation and fragmentation of shRNA-REV3L H1299 cells were more pronounced than shRNA-NC H1299 cells after cisplatin exposure, indicating that REV3L overexpression abolished cisplatin-induced DNA damage. Moreover, a forced expression of REV3L conferred the resistance of H1299 cells to cisplatin, whereas the knockdown of REV3L sensitized cisplatin efficacy in H1299 cells. Taken together, we demonstrated that inhibition of REV3L sensitized lung cancer H1299 cells to cisplatin treatment. Thus, REV3L may be a novel target for the chemotherapy of NSCLC.

  20. Lung cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sputum test to look for cancer cells Thoracentesis (sampling of fluid buildup around the lung) In most ... quitting, talk with your provider. There are many methods to help you quit, from support groups to ...

  1. Ouabain downregulates Mcl-1 and sensitizes lung cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chanvorachote, Pithi; Pongrakhananon, Varisa

    2013-02-01

    Resistance to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a prerequisite for cancer progression, and TRAIL resistance is prevalent in lung cancer. Ouabain, a recently identified human hormone, has shown therapeutic promise by potentiating the apoptotic response of metastatic lung cancer cells to TRAIL. Nontoxic concentrations of ouabain are shown to increase caspase-3 activation, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, and apoptosis of H292 cells in response to TRAIL. While ouabain had a minimal effect on c-FLIP, Bcl-2, and Bax levels, we show that it possesses an ability to downregulate the antiapoptotic Mcl-1 protein. The present study also reveals that the sensitizing effect of ouabain is associated with its ability to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), and hydrogen peroxide is identified as the principle ROS triggering proteasomal Mcl-1 degradation. In summary, our results indicate a novel function for ouabain in TRAIL-mediated cancer cell death through Mcl-1 downregulation, thereby providing new insight into a potential lung cancer treatment as well as a better understanding of the physiological activity of ouabain.

  2. Inhibition of SREBP increases gefitinib sensitivity in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Jia, Wenzhi; Yang, Hao; Liu, Liu; Zhou, Xiang; Miao, Ping; Sun, Xiaoguang; Song, Shaoli; Zhao, Xiaoping; Liu, Jianjun; Huang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The clinical success of EGFR inhibitors in patients with lung cancer is limited by the inevitable development of treatment resistance. Here, we show that inhibition of SREBP increase gefitinib sensitivity in vitro and in vivo. Interference of SREBP1 binding partner MARVELD1 potentiate the therapeutic effect of gefitinib as well. Mechanistically, SREBP inhibition decreases the cell membrane fluidity, results in a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR. Therefore, targeting lipid metabolism combined with EGFR-TKIs is potentially a novel therapeutic strategies for cancer treatment. PMID:27447558

  3. Calmodulin inhibition contributes to sensitize TRAIL-induced apoptosis in human lung cancer H1299 cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Mi-kyung; Min, Yong Ki; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2009-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) preferentially triggers apoptosis in tumor cells versus normal cells. However, TRAIL alone is not effective in treating TRAIL-resistant tumors. We evaluated the effect of 180 enzyme inhibitors on TRAIL-induced apoptosis in human lung cancer H1299 cells, and found fluphenazine-N-2-chloroethane (a calmodulin (CaM) antagonist) sensitized TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, in the presence of TRAIL, it increased caspase-8 binding to the Fas-associated death domain (FADD), but decreased binding of FADD-like interleukin-1beta-converting enzyme inhibitory proteins (FLIPs). Additionally, its combination with TRAIL inhibited Akt phosphorylation. These results were consistently observed in cells treated with CaM siRNA. We suggested the blockade of CaM could sensitize lung cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in at least 2 ways: (i) it can activate death-inducing signaling complex mediated apoptosis by inhibiting TRAIL-induced binding of FLIP and TRAIL-enhanced binding of caspase-8 to FADD; (ii) it can inhibit Akt phosphorylation, consequently leading to decreased expression of anti-apoptotic molecules such as FLIP and members of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family. This study suggests the combination of CaM antagonists with TRAIL may have the therapeutic potential to overcome the resistance of lung cancers to apoptosis.

  4. Lung Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    Lung cancer screening Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Lung cancer screening is a process that's used to detect the presence ... with a high risk of lung cancer. Lung cancer screening is recommended for older adults who are longtime ...

  5. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  6. A high-throughput and sensitive method to measure global DNA methylation: application in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Anisowicz, Anthony; Huang, Hui; Braunschweiger, Karen I; Liu, Ziying; Giese, Heidi; Wang, Huajun; Mamaev, Sergey; Olejnik, Jerzy; Massion, Pierre P; Del Mastro, Richard G

    2008-08-03

    Genome-wide changes in DNA methylation are an epigenetic phenomenon that can lead to the development of disease. The study of global DNA methylation utilizes technology that requires both expensive equipment and highly specialized skill sets. We have designed and developed an assay, CpGlobal, which is easy-to-use, does not utilize PCR, radioactivity and expensive equipment. CpGlobal utilizes methyl-sensitive restriction enzymes, HRP Neutravidin to detect the biotinylated nucleotides incorporated in an end-fill reaction and a luminometer to measure the chemiluminescence. The assay shows high accuracy and reproducibility in measuring global DNA methylation. Furthermore, CpGlobal correlates significantly with High Performance Capillary Electrophoresis (HPCE), a gold standard technology. We have applied the technology to understand the role of global DNA methylation in the natural history of lung cancer. World-wide, it is the leading cause of death attributed to any cancer. The survival rate is 15% over 5 years due to the lack of any clinical symptoms until the disease has progressed to a stage where cure is limited. Through the use of cell lines and paired normal/tumor samples from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) we show that global DNA hypomethylation is highly associated with the progression of the tumor. In addition, the results provide the first indication that the normal part of the lung from a cancer patient has already experienced a loss of methylation compared to a normal individual. By detecting these changes in global DNA methylation, CpGlobal may have a role as a barometer for the onset and development of lung cancer.

  7. EGFR kinase domain mutation positive lung cancers are sensitive to intrapleural perfusion with hyperthermic chemotherapy (IPHC) complete treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongjuan; Zhan, Cheng; Ke, Ji; Xue, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Aiqun; Xu, Kaifeng; Shen, Zhirong; Yu, Lei; Chen, Liang

    2016-01-19

    Lung cancer is the global leading cause of cancer-related deaths. A significant portion of lung cancer patients harbor kinase domain mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). While EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) effectively shrink tumors harboring mutant EGFR, clinical efficacy is limited by the development of TKI resistance. Effective alternatives are desperately needed in clinic for treating EGFR kinase domain mutation positive lung cancer. In our clinic in treating M1a lung cancer patients through intrapleural perfusion with hyperthermic chemotherapy (IPHC) followed by cycles of systemic chemotherapy (we termed this procedure IPHC complete treatment, IPHC-CT), we found dramatic tumor shrinkage in mutant EGFR-positive patients. We further confirmed the sensitivity of EGFR mutation-positive lung cancer cell lines derived from patients to HC (hyperthermic chemotherapy) treatment. We found that hyperthermia promoted accumulation of cisplatin in lung cancer cells. Hyperthermia and cisplatin synergistically downregulated the EGFR protein level, leading to quenching of signal from EGFR and induction of apoptosis. Our work therefore showed IPHC-CT is an effective treatment for EGFR kinase domain mutation positive lung cancer patients.

  8. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... for Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the ...

  9. The miR-101/RUNX1 feedback regulatory loop modulates chemo-sensitivity and invasion in human lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianghui; Zhao, Yihua; Qian, Haiyun; Huang, Jiangping; Cui, Fenghe; Mao, Zhifu

    2015-01-01

    The deregulation of miR-101 has been implicated in multiple cancer types including lung cancer, but the exact role, mechanisms and how silencing of miR-101 remain elusive. Here we confirmed miR-101 downregulation in lung cancer cell lines and patient tissues. Restored miR-101 expression remarkably sensitized lung cancer cells to chemotherapy and inhibited invasion. Mechanistically, we indicated that miR-101 inversely correlated with RUNX1 expression, and identified RUNX1 as a novel target of miR-101. RUNX1 impaired the effects of miR-101 on chemotherapeutic sensitization and invasion inhibition. Moreover, RUNX1 knockdown resulted into increase of miR-101 expression and elevation of luciferase activity driven by miR-101 promoter in lung cancer cells, suggesting RUNX1 negatively transcriptionally regulated miR-101 expression via physically binding to miR-101 promoter. These findings support that miR-101 downregulation accelerates the progression of lung cancer via RUNX1 dependent manner and suggest that miR-101/RUNX1 feedback axis may have therapeutic value in treating refractory lung cancer. PMID:26628987

  10. [Screening the Drug Sensitivity Genes Related to GEM and CDDP in the Lung Cancer Cell-lines.].

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunyu; Tian, Zhennan; Liu, Wei; Cai, Li

    2009-10-20

    Background and objective Screening of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines with gemcitabine hydrochloride (GEM) and cisplatin (CDDP) related to drug sensitivity gene might clarify the action mechanism of anti-cancer drugs and provide a new clue for overcoming drug resistance and the development of new anti-cancer drugs, and also provide theoretical basis for the clinical treatment of individual. The drug sensitivity of CDDP and GEM in 4 SCLC cell lines and 6 NSCLC cell lines was determined using MTT colorimetric assay, while the cDNA macroarray was applied to detect the gene expression state related to drug sensitivity of 10 lung cancer cell line in 1 291, and the correlation between the two was analysized. There were 6 genes showing significant positive correlation (r>=0.632, P<0.05) with GEM sensitivity; 45 genes positively related to CDDP; another 41 genes related to both GEM and CDDP (r>=+/- 0.4). Lung cancer with GEM and CDDP sensitivity of two types of drugs significantly related genes were Metallothinein (Signal transduction molecules), Cathepsin B (Organization protease B) and TIMP1 (Growth factor); the GEM, CDDP sensitivity associated genes of lung cancer cell lines mainly distributed in Metallothinein, Cathepsin B, growth factor TIMP1 categories. There existed drug-related sensitive genes of GEM, CDDP in SCLC and NSCLC cell lines; of these genes, Metallothinein, Cathepsin B and TIMP1 genes presented a significant positive correlation with GEM drug sensitivity, a significant negative correlation with CDDP drug sensitivity.

  11. KEAP1 loss modulates sensitivity to kinase targeted therapy in lung cancer. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Inhibitors that target the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)/Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway have led to clinical responses in lung and other cancers, but some patients fail to respond and in those that do resistance inevitably occurs (Balak et al., 2006; Kosaka et al., 2006; Rudin et al., 2013; Wagle et al., 2011). To understand intrinsic and acquired resistance to inhibition of MAPK signaling, we performed CRISPR-Cas9 gene deletion screens in the setting of BRAF, MEK, EGFR, and ALK inhibition.

  12. CUL4A overexpression enhances lung tumor growth and sensitizes lung cancer cells to Erlotinib via transcriptional regulation of EGFR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yunshan; Zhang, Pengju; Liu, Ziming; Wang, Qin; Wen, Mingxin; Wang, Yuli; Yuan, Hongtu; Mao, Jian-Hua; Wei, Guangwei

    2014-11-21

    CUL4A has been proposed as oncogene in several types of human cancer, but its clinical significance and functional role in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain unclear. Expression level of CUL4A was examined by RT-PCR and Western blot. Forced expression of CUL4A was mediated by retroviruses, and CUL4A silencing by shRNAs expressing lentiviruses. Growth capacity of lung cancer cells was measured by MTT in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo, respectively. We found that CUL4A was highly expressed in human lung cancer tissues and lung cancer cell lines, and this elevated expression positively correlated with disease progression and prognosis. Overexpression of CUL4A in human lung cancer cell lines increased cell proliferation, inhibited apoptosis, and subsequently conferred resistance to chemotherapy. On other hand, silencing CUL4A expression in NSCLC cells reduced proliferation, promoted apoptosis and resulted in tumor growth inhibition in cancer xenograft model. Mechanistically, we revealed CUL4A regulated EGFR transcriptional expression and activation, and subsequently activated AKT. Targeted inhibition of EGFR activity blocked these CUL4A induced oncogenic activities. In conclusion, our results highlight the significance of CUL4A in NSCLC and suggest that CUL4A could be a promising therapy target and a potential biomarker for prognosis and EGFR target therapy in NSCLC patients.

  13. CUL4A overexpression enhances lung tumor growth and sensitizes lung cancer cells to Erlotinib via transcriptional regulation of EGFR

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yunshan; Zhang, Pengju; Liu, Ziming; ...

    2014-11-21

    CUL4A has been proposed as oncogene in several types of human cancer, but its clinical significance and functional role in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain unclear. Expression level of CUL4A was examined by RT-PCR and Western blot. Forced expression of CUL4A was mediated by retroviruses, and CUL4A silencing by shRNAs expressing lentiviruses. Growth capacity of lung cancer cells was measured by MTT in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo, respectively. We found that CUL4A was highly expressed in human lung cancer tissues and lung cancer cell lines, and this elevated expression positively correlated with disease progression and prognosis. Overexpressionmore » of CUL4A in human lung cancer cell lines increased cell proliferation, inhibited apoptosis, and subsequently conferred resistance to chemotherapy. On other hand, silencing CUL4A expression in NSCLC cells reduced proliferation, promoted apoptosis and resulted in tumor growth inhibition in cancer xenograft model. Mechanistically, we revealed CUL4A regulated EGFR transcriptional expression and activation, and subsequently activated AKT. Targeted inhibition of EGFR activity blocked these CUL4A induced oncogenic activities. In conclusion, our results highlight the significance of CUL4A in NSCLC and suggest that CUL4A could be a promising therapy target and a potential biomarker for prognosis and EGFR target therapy in NSCLC patients.« less

  14. Nutrition for Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... by zip code or Select your state State Lung Cancer www.lung.org > Lung Health and Diseases > ... I Stay Healthy Share this page: Nutrition for Lung Cancer Key Points There is no prescribed diet ...

  15. Risks of Lung Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease ...

  16. Silencing of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase sensitizes lung cancer cells to radiation through the abrogation of DNA damage checkpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Nakadate, Yusuke; Kodera, Yasuo; Kitamura, Yuka; Tachibana, Taro; Tamura, Tomohide; Koizumi, Fumiaki

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Radiosensitization by PARG silencing was observed in multiple lung cancer cells. •PAR accumulation was enhanced by PARG silencing after DNA damage. •Radiation-induced G2/M arrest and checkpoint activation were impaired by PARG siRNA. -- Abstract: Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is a major enzyme that plays a role in the degradation of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). PARG deficiency reportedly sensitizes cells to the effects of radiation. In lung cancer, however, it has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated whether PARG siRNA contributes to an increased radiosensitivity using 8 lung cancer cell lines. Among them, the silencing of PARG induced a radiosensitizing effect in 5 cell lines. Radiation-induced G2/M arrest was largely suppressed by PARG siRNA in PC-14 and A427 cells, which exhibited significantly enhanced radiosensitivity in response to PARG knockdown. On the other hand, a similar effect was not observed in H520 cells, which did not exhibit a radiosensitizing effect. Consistent with a cell cycle analysis, radiation-induced checkpoint signals were not well activated in the PC-14 and A427 cells when treated with PARG siRNA. These results suggest that the increased sensitivity to radiation induced by PARG knockdown occurs through the abrogation of radiation-induced G2/M arrest and checkpoint activation in lung cancer cells. Our findings indicate that PARG could be a potential target for lung cancer treatments when used in combination with radiotherapy.

  17. Inhibition of glutamine utilization sensitizes lung cancer cells to apigenin-induced apoptosis resulting from metabolic and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Mi; Lee, Gibok; Oh, Taek-In; Kim, Byeong Mo; Shim, Do-Wan; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Young Jun; Lim, Beong Ou; Lim, Ji-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown anticancer activity of apigenin by suppressing glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) expression in cultured cancer cells; however, it is not clear whether apigenin can suppress glucose metabolism in lung cancer cells or sensitize them to inhibition of glutamine utilization-mediated apoptosis through metabolic and oxidative stress. We show that apigenin significantly decreases GLUT1 expression in mice. Furthermore, we demonstrate that apigenin induces growth retardation and apoptosis through metabolic and oxidative stress caused by suppression of glucose utilization in lung cancer cells. The underlying mechanisms were defined that the anticancer effects of apigenin were reversed by ectopic GLUT1 overexpression and galactose supplementation, through activation of pentose phosphate pathway-mediated NADPH generation. Importantly, we showed that severe metabolic stress using a glutaminase inhibitor, compound 968, was involved in the mechanism of sensitization by apigenin. Taken together, the combination of apigenin with inhibitors of glutamine metabolism may provide a promising therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment.

  18. Celastrol induces proteasomal degradation of FANCD2 to sensitize lung cancer cells to DNA crosslinking agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gui-Zhen; Liu, Yong-Qiang; Cheng, Xin; Zhou, Guang-Biao

    2015-01-01

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway plays a key role in interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair and maintenance of the genomic stability, while inhibition of this pathway may sensitize cancer cells to DNA ICL agents and ionizing radiation (IR). The active FA core complex acts as an E3 ligase to monoubiquitinate FANCD2, which is a functional readout of an activated FA pathway. In the present study, we aimed to identify FANCD2-targeting agents, and found that the natural compound celastrol induced degradation of FANCD2 through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. We demonstrated that celastrol downregulated the basal and DNA damaging agent-induced monoubiquitination of FANCD2, followed by proteolytic degradation of the substrate. Furthermore, celastrol treatment abrogated the G2 checkpoint induced by IR, and enhanced the ICL agent-induced DNA damage and inhibitory effects on lung cancer cells through depletion of FANCD2. These results indicate that celastrol is a FANCD2 inhibitor that could interfere with the monoubiquitination and protein stability of FANCD2, providing a novel opportunity to develop FA pathway inhibitor and combinational therapy for malignant neoplasms. PMID:25891850

  19. Discovery of New Monocarbonyl Ligustrazine-Curcumin Hybrids for Intervention of Drug-Sensitive and Drug-Resistant Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ai, Yong; Zhu, Bin; Ren, Caiping; Kang, Fenghua; Li, Jinlong; Huang, Zhangjian; Lai, Yisheng; Peng, Sixun; Ding, Ke; Tian, Jide; Zhang, Yihua

    2016-03-10

    The elevation of oxidative stress preferentially in cancer cells by inhibiting thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and/or enhancing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production has emerged as an effective strategy for selectively targeting cancer cells. In this study, we designed and synthesized 21 ligustrazine-curcumin hybrids (10a-u). Biological evaluation indicated that the most active compound 10d significantly inhibited the proliferation of drug-sensitive (A549, SPC-A-1, LTEP-G-2) and drug-resistant (A549/DDP) lung cancer cells but had little effect on nontumor lung epithelial-like cells (HBE). Furthermore, 10d suppressed the TrxR/Trx system and promoted intracellular ROS accumulation and cancer cell apoptosis. Additionally, 10d inhibited the NF-κB, AKT, and ERK signaling, P-gp-mediated efflux of rhodamine 123, P-gp ATPase activity, and P-gp expression in A549/DDP cells. Finally, 10d repressed the growth of implanted human drug-resistant lung cancer in mice. Together, 10d acts a novel TrxR inhibitor and may be a promising candidate for intervention of lung cancer.

  20. Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Akerley, Wallace; Bogner, Paul; Borghaei, Hossein; Chow, Laura QM; Downey, Robert J.; Gandhi, Leena; Ganti, Apar Kishor P.; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Grecula, John C.; Hayman, James; Heist, Rebecca Suk; Horn, Leora; Jahan, Thierry; Koczywas, Marianna; Loo, Billy W.; Merritt, Robert E.; Moran, Cesar A.; Niell, Harvey B.; O’Malley, Janis; Patel, Jyoti D.; Ready, Neal; Rudin, Charles M.; Williams, Charles C.; Gregory, Kristina; Hughes, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors account for approximately 20% of lung cancers; most (≈15%) are small cell lung cancer (SCLC). These NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for SCLC focus on extensive-stage SCLC because it occurs more frequently than limited-stage disease. SCLC is highly sensitive to initial therapy; however, most patients eventually die of recurrent disease. In patients with extensive-stage disease, chemotherapy alone can palliate symptoms and prolong survival in most patients; however, long-term survival is rare. Most cases of SCLC are attributable to cigarette smoking; therefore, smoking cessation should be strongly promoted. PMID:23307984

  1. Small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kalemkerian, Gregory P; Akerley, Wallace; Bogner, Paul; Borghaei, Hossein; Chow, Laura Qm; Downey, Robert J; Gandhi, Leena; Ganti, Apar Kishor P; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Grecula, John C; Hayman, James; Heist, Rebecca Suk; Horn, Leora; Jahan, Thierry; Koczywas, Marianna; Loo, Billy W; Merritt, Robert E; Moran, Cesar A; Niell, Harvey B; O'Malley, Janis; Patel, Jyoti D; Ready, Neal; Rudin, Charles M; Williams, Charles C; Gregory, Kristina; Hughes, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors account for approximately 20% of lung cancers; most (≈15%) are small cell lung cancer (SCLC). These NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for SCLC focus on extensive-stage SCLC because it occurs more frequently than limited-stage disease. SCLC is highly sensitive to initial therapy; however, most patients eventually die of recurrent disease. In patients with extensive-stage disease, chemotherapy alone can palliate symptoms and prolong survival in most patients; however, long-term survival is rare. Most cases of SCLC are attributable to cigarette smoking; therefore, smoking cessation should be strongly promoted.

  2. Collateral sensitivity networks reveal evolutionary instability and novel treatment strategies in ALK mutated non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Andrew; Nichol, Daniel; Kinose, Fumi; Abazeed, Mohamed E; Marusyk, Andriy; Haura, Eric B; Scott, Jacob G

    2017-04-27

    Drug resistance remains an elusive problem in cancer therapy, particularly for novel targeted therapies. Much work is focused upon the development of an arsenal of targeted therapies, towards oncogenic driver genes such as ALK-EML4, to overcome the inevitable resistance that develops over time. Currently, after failure of first line ALK TKI therapy, another ALK TKI is administered, though collateral sensitivity is not considered. To address this, we evolved resistance in an ALK rearranged non-small cell lung cancer line (H3122) to a panel of 4 ALK TKIs, and performed a collateral sensitivity analysis. All ALK inhibitor resistant cell lines displayed significant cross-resistance to all other ALK inhibitors. We then evaluated ALK-inhibitor sensitivities after drug holidays of varying length (1-21 days), and observed dynamic patterns of resistance. This unpredictability led us to an expanded search for treatment options, where we tested 6 further anti-cancer agents for collateral sensitivity among resistant cells, uncovering possibilities for further treatment, including cross-sensitivity to standard cytotoxic therapies, as well as Hsp90 inhibitors. Taken together, these results imply that resistance to targeted therapy in non-small cell lung cancer is highly dynamic, and also one where there are many opportunities to re-establish sensitivities where there was once resistance. Drug resistance in cancer inevitably emerges during treatment; particularly with novel targeted therapies, designed to inhibit specific molecules. A clinically-relevant example of this phenomenon occurs in ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer, where targeted therapies are used to inhibit the ALK-EML4 fusion protein. A potential solution to this may lie in finding drug sensitivities in the resistant population, termed collateral sensitivities, and then using these as second-line agents. This study shows how the evolution of resistance in ALK-positive lung cancer is a dynamic process through

  3. LKB1 inactivation sensitizes non-small cell lung cancer to pharmacological aggravation of ER stress.

    PubMed

    Inge, Landon J; Friel, Jacqueline M; Richer, Amanda L; Fowler, Aaron J; Whitsett, Timothy; Smith, Michael A; Tran, Nhan L; Bremner, Ross M

    2014-10-01

    Five-year survival rates for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have seen minimal improvement despite aggressive therapy with standard chemotherapeutic agents, indicating a need for new treatment approaches. Studies show inactivating mutations in the LKB1 tumor suppressor are common in NSCLC. Genetic and mechanistic analysis has defined LKB1-deficient NSCLC tumors as a phenotypically distinct subpopulation of NSCLC with potential avenues for therapeutic gain. In expanding on previous work indicating hypersensitivity of LKB1-deficient NSCLC cells to 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG), we find that 2DG has in vivo efficacy in LKB1-deficient NSCLC using transgenic murine models of NSCLC. Deciphering of the molecular mechanisms behind this phenotype reveals that loss of LKB1 in NSCLC cells imparts increased sensitivity to pharmacological compounds that aggravate ER stress. In comparison to NSCLC cells with functional LKB1, treatment of NSCLC cells lacking LKB1 with the ER stress activators (ERSA), tunicamycin, brefeldin A or 2DG, resulted in aggravation of ER stress, increased cytotoxicity, and evidence of ER stress-mediated cell death. Based upon these findings, we suggest that ERSAs represent a potential treatment avenue for NSCLC patients whose tumors are deficient in LKB1. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are available to help. HELPFUL WEB SITES ON LUNG CANCER American Lung Association www.lung.org Lungcancer.org www.lungcancer.org Lung Cancer Alliance www.lungcanceralliance.org Lung Cancer Online www. ...

  5. Lung cancer screening update

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Samjot Singh; Loewen, Gregory; Jayaprakash, Vijayvel; Reid, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality globally and the American cancer society estimates approximately 226,160 new cases and 160,340 deaths from lung cancer in the USA in the year 2012. The majority of lung cancers are diagnosed in the later stages which impacts the overall survival. The 5-year survival rate for pathological st age IA lung cancer is 73% but drops to only 13% for stage IV. Thus, early detection through screening and prevention are the keys to reduce the global burden of lung cancer. This article discusses the current state of lung cancer screening, including the results of the National Lung Cancer Screening Trial, the consideration of implementing computed tomography screening, and a brief overview of the role of bronchoscopy in early detection and potential biomarkers that may aid in the early diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:23599684

  6. Mutational landscape determines sensitivity to PD-1 blockade in non–small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Naiyer A.; Hellmann, Matthew D.; Snyder, Alexandra; Kvistborg, Pia; Makarov, Vladimir; Havel, Jonathan J.; Lee, William; Yuan, Jianda; Wong, Phillip; Ho, Teresa S.; Miller, Martin L.; Rekhtman, Natasha; Moreira, Andre L.; Ibrahim, Fawzia; Bruggeman, Cameron; Gasmi, Billel; Zappasodi, Roberta; Maeda, Yuka; Sander, Chris; Garon, Edward B.; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Schumacher, Ton N.; Chan, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors, which unleash a patient’s own T cells to kill tumors, are revolutionizing cancer treatment. To unravel the genomic determinants of response to this therapy, we used whole-exome sequencing of non–small cell lung cancers treated with pembrolizumab, an antibody targeting programmed cell death-1 (PD-1). In two independent cohorts, higher nonsynonymous mutation burden in tumors was associated with improved objective response, durable clinical benefit, and progression-free survival. Efficacy also correlated with the molecular smoking signature, higher neoantigen burden, and DNA repair pathway mutations; each factor was also associated with mutation burden. In one responder, neoantigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses paralleled tumor regression, suggesting that anti–PD-1 therapy enhances neoantigen-specific T cell reactivity. Our results suggest that the genomic landscape of lung cancers shapes response to anti–PD-1 therapy. PMID:25765070

  7. Lung cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Slatore, Christopher; Sockrider, Marianna

    2014-11-15

    Lung cancer is a common form of cancer.There are things you can do to lower your risk of lung cancer. Stop smoking tobacco. Ask your health care provider for help in quitting, including use of medicines to help with nicotine dependence. discuss with your healthcare provider,what you are taking or doing to decrease your risk for lung cancer

  8. Anticancer drug clustering based on proteomic profiles and a sensitivity database in a lung cancer cell line panel

    PubMed Central

    HINO, MITSUNORI; MATSUDA, KUNIKO; MIYANAGA, AKIHIKO; KURIBAYASI, HIDEHIKO; MIZUTANI, HIDEAKI; NORO, RINTARO; MINEGISHI, YUJI; OKANO, TETSUYA; SEIKE, MASAHIRO; KAWAKAMI, AKIKO; YOSHIMURA, AKINOBU; OGAWA, NAOKI; UESAKA, HARUKA; KUDOH, SHOJI; GEMMA, AKIHIKO

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we performed a molecular pharmacological study that applied a combination of DNA microarray-based gene expression profiling and drug sensitivity tests in vitro with a view to designing an improved chemotherapeutic strategy for advanced lung cancer. Utilizing recent key technological advances in proteomics, particularly antibody array-based methodologies, the current study aimed to examine the benefit of protein expression profiling in an analogous molecular pharmacological context. We performed protein expression analysis in a panel of lung cancer cell lines via an antibody array approach. Using a modified NCI program, we related cell line-specific proteomic profiles to the previously determined cytotoxic activity of a selection of commonly used anticancer agents, namely docetaxel, paclitaxel, gemcitabine, vinorelbine, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), SN38, cisplatin (CDDP) and carboplatin (CBDCA). In addition, we compared these results with those obtained from our prior DNA microarray-based transcriptomic study. In our expression-drug correlation analysis using antibody array, gemcitabine consistently belonged to an isolated cluster. Docetaxel, paclitaxel, 5-FU, SN38, CBDCA and CDDP were gathered together into one large cluster. These results coincided with those generated by the prior transcriptomic study. Various genes were commonly listed that differentiated gemcitabine from the others. The identified factors associated with drug sensitivities were different between both analyses. Our proteomic profiling data provided confirmation of the previous transcript expression-drug sensitivity correlation analysis. These results suggest that chemotherapy regimens that include gemcitabine should be evaluated in second-line chemotherapy in cases where the first-line chemotherapy did not include this drug. Protein expression-drug sensitivity correlations in lung cancer cells in vitro may provide useful information in determining the most appropriate therapeutic options

  9. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Malcolm V.; Ford, Jean G.; Samet, Jonathan M.; Spivack, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ever since a lung cancer epidemic emerged in the mid-1900s, the epidemiology of lung cancer has been intensively investigated to characterize its causes and patterns of occurrence. This report summarizes the key findings of this research. Methods: A detailed literature search provided the basis for a narrative review, identifying and summarizing key reports on population patterns and factors that affect lung cancer risk. Results: Established environmental risk factors for lung cancer include smoking cigarettes and other tobacco products and exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke, occupational lung carcinogens, radiation, and indoor and outdoor air pollution. Cigarette smoking is the predominant cause of lung cancer and the leading worldwide cause of cancer death. Smoking prevalence in developing nations has increased, starting new lung cancer epidemics in these nations. A positive family history and acquired lung disease are examples of host factors that are clinically useful risk indicators. Risk prediction models based on lung cancer risk factors have been developed, but further refinement is needed to provide clinically useful risk stratification. Promising biomarkers of lung cancer risk and early detection have been identified, but none are ready for broad clinical application. Conclusions: Almost all lung cancer deaths are caused by cigarette smoking, underscoring the need for ongoing efforts at tobacco control throughout the world. Further research is needed into the reasons underlying lung cancer disparities, the causes of lung cancer in never smokers, the potential role of HIV in lung carcinogenesis, and the development of biomarkers. PMID:23649439

  10. USP7 inhibitors, downregulating CCDC6, sensitize lung neuroendocrine cancer cells to PARP-inhibitor drugs.

    PubMed

    Malapelle, Umberto; Morra, Francesco; Ilardi, Gennaro; Visconti, Roberta; Merolla, Francesco; Cerrato, Aniello; Napolitano, Virginia; Monaco, Roberto; Guggino, Gianluca; Monaco, Guglielmo; Staibano, Stefania; Troncone, Giancarlo; Celetti, Angela

    2017-05-01

    CCDC6 gene product is a tumor-suppressor pro-apoptotic protein, substrate of ATM, involved in DNA damage response and repair. Altered levels of CCDC6 expression are dependent on post-translational modifications, being the de-ubiquitinating enzyme USP7 responsible of the fine tuning of the CCDC6 stability. Thus, our aim was to investigate CCDC6 and USP7 expression levels in Lung-Neuroendocrine Tumors (L-NETs) to verify if they correlate and may be exploited as novel predictive therapeutic markers. Tumor tissues from 29 L-NET patients were investigated on tissue microarrays. CCDC6 levels were scored and correlated with immunoreactivity for USP7. Next generation sequencing (NGS) of a homogenous group of Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma (LCNEC) (N=8) was performed by Ion AmpliSeq NGS platform and the Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel v2. The inhibition of USP7, using P5091, was assayed in vitro to accelerate CCDC6 turnover in order to sensitize the neuroendocrine cancer cells to PARP-inhibitors, alone or in association with cisplatinum. The immunostaining of 29 primary L-NETs showed that the intensity of CCDC6 staining correlated with the levels of USP7 expression (p≤0.05). The NGS analysis of 8 LCNEC revealed mutations in the hot spot regions of the p53 gene (in 6 out of 8). Moreover, gene polymorphisms were identified in the druggable STK11, MET and ALK genes. High intensity of p53 immunostaining was reported in the 6 tissues carrying the TP53 mutations. The inhibition of USP7 by P5091 accelerated the degradation of CCDC6 versus control in cycloheximide treated L-NET cells in vitro and sensitized the cells to PARP-inhibitors alone and in combination with cisplatinum. Our data suggest that CCDC6 and USP7 have a predictive value for the clinical usage of USP7 inhibitors in combination with the PARP-inhibitors in L-NET in addition to standard therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. FGFR1 mRNA and protein expression, not gene copy number, predict FGFR TKI sensitivity across all lung cancer histologies.

    PubMed

    Wynes, Murry W; Hinz, Trista K; Gao, Dexiang; Martini, Michael; Marek, Lindsay A; Ware, Kathryn E; Edwards, Michael G; Böhm, Diana; Perner, Sven; Helfrich, Barbara A; Dziadziuszko, Rafal; Jassem, Jacek; Wojtylak, Szymon; Sejda, Aleksandra; Gozgit, Joseph M; Bunn, Paul A; Camidge, D Ross; Tan, Aik-Choon; Hirsch, Fred R; Heasley, Lynn E

    2014-06-15

    FGFR1 gene copy number (GCN) is being evaluated as a biomarker for FGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) response in squamous cell lung cancers (SCC). The exclusive use of FGFR1 GCN for predicting FGFR TKI sensitivity assumes increased GCN is the only mechanism for biologically relevant increases in FGFR1 signaling. Herein, we tested whether FGFR1 mRNA and protein expression may serve as better biomarkers of FGFR TKI sensitivity in lung cancer. Histologically diverse lung cancer cell lines were submitted to assays for ponatinib sensitivity, a potent FGFR TKI. A tissue microarray composed of resected lung tumors was submitted to FGFR1 GCN, and mRNA analyses and the results were validated with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) lung cancer data. Among 58 cell lines, 14 exhibited ponatinib sensitivity (IC50 values ≤ 50 nmol/L) that correlated with FGFR1 mRNA and protein expression, but not with FGFR1 GCN or histology. Moreover, ponatinib sensitivity associated with mRNA expression of the ligands, FGF2 and FGF9. In resected tumors, 22% of adenocarcinomas and 28% of SCCs expressed high FGFR1 mRNA. Importantly, only 46% of SCCs with increased FGFR1 GCN expressed high mRNA. Lung cancer TCGA data validated these findings and unveiled overlap of FGFR1 mRNA positivity with KRAS and PIK3CA mutations. FGFR1 dependency is frequent across various lung cancer histologies, and FGFR1 mRNA may serve as a better biomarker of FGFR TKI response in lung cancer than FGFR1 GCN. The study provides important and timely insight into clinical testing of FGFR TKIs in lung cancer and other solid tumor types. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. PARP inhibition selectively increases sensitivity to cisplatin in ERCC1-low non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Halmos, Balazs

    2013-01-01

    Platinum compounds are the foundation of chemotherapy regimens for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) despite poor response rates and limited response duration. It has been reported that tumor expression of excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1), a key component in nucleotide excision repair, may correlate with clinical response to platinum agents. We found that most primary lung tumor specimens demonstrated a stronger protein expression of poly (adenosine diphosphate ribose) polymerases 1 (PARP1) than their normal counterparts. Therefore, we hypothesized that combining PARP inhibition with platinum compounds may be an approach to improve platinum-based therapy for NSCLC. Drug combination experiments revealed that two distinct PARP inhibitors, olaparib and veliparib, not only potentiated the cell killing by cisplatin but also conferred cytotoxicity as a single agent specifically in ERCC1-low HCC827 and PC9 but not in ERCC1-high A549 and H157 lung cancer cells. Moreover, small interfering RNA knockdown of ERCC1 in A549 and H157 cells increased their sensitivities to both cisplatin and olaparib in a synergistic manner in our model. Furthermore, mechanistic studies indicated that combined PARP inhibitor and cisplatin could lead to sustained DNA double-strand breaks, prolonged G2/M cell cycle arrest with distinct activation of checkpoint kinase 1 signaling and more pronounced apoptosis preferentially in lung cancer cells with low ERCC1 expression. Collectively, these data suggest that there is a synergistic relationship between PARP inhibition and low ERCC1 expression in NSCLC that could be exploited for novel therapeutic approaches in lung cancer therapy based on tumor ERCC1 expression. PMID:23275151

  13. Inhibition of ceramide glucosylation sensitizes lung cancer cells to ABC294640, a first-in-class small molecule SphK2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shuhong; Liu, Yuan Y; Yan, Tingzan; Zhou, Jun

    2016-08-05

    Sphingosine kinase 2 (SphK2) is proposed as a novel oncotarget for lung cancer. Here, we studied the anti-lung cancer cell activity by ABC294640, a first-in-class SphK2 inhibitor. We showed that ABC294640 suppressed growth of primary and A549 human lung cancer cells, but sparing SphK2-low lung epithelial cells. Inhibition of SphK2 by ABC294640 increased ceramide accumulation, but decreased pro-survival sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) content, leading to lung cancer cell apoptosis activation. Significantly, we show that glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) might be a major resistance factor of ABC294640. The GCS inhibitor 1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PDMP) or GCS shRNA/siRNA knockdown facilitated ABC294640-induced ceramide production and lung cancer cell apoptosis. Reversely, forced overexpression of GCS reduced ABC294640's sensitivity, resulting in decreased ceramide accumulation and apoptosis induction in A549 cells. These findings provide further evidences to support that targeting SphK2 by ABC294640 may be a rational treatment option for lung cancer. Ceramide glucosylation inhibition may further sensitize lung cancer cells to ABC294640. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nedaplatin sensitization of cisplatin-resistant human non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, HUAN; ZHU, XIAOLI; HUANG, JING; CHEN, PINGSHENG; HAN, SHUHUA; YAN, XING

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin (DDP) has been one of the most widely used chemotherapy drugs for advanced non-small cell lung cancer. However, the increase in the number of DDP-resistant cancer cells has become a major impediment in the clinical management of cancer. In the present study, for the first time, the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was used to demonstrate that nedaplatin (NDP) could have a stronger inhibitory effect than DDP alone in DDP-resistant A549 (A549DDP) cells and that it could attenuate the resistance of these cells. Additionally, flow cytometry analysis showed that the apoptosis rate of these resistant cells when exposed to NDP was markedly increased and the number of cells in the G2 stage of the cell cycle was significantly increased. Furthermore, western blot analysis indicated that NDP decreased the protein expression of P-glycoprotein, tumor protein p53 and B-cell lymphoma 2, and increased the expression of Bcl-2-associated X protein, all of which could possibly improve the NDP intracellular drug concentration and promote cell apoptosis. These observations suggested that NDP could have higher efficacy in DDP-resistant lung cancer cells, and further studies applying more detailed analyses are warranted to elucidate the mechanism(s) behind this effect. PMID:27073518

  15. Intracellular glutathione content influences the sensitivity of lung cancer cell lines to methylseleninic acid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengfei; Liu, Hongyu; Li, Ying; Wu, Zhihao; Zhu, Yu; Wang, Ting; Gao, Allen C; Chen, Jun; Zhou, Qinghua

    2012-04-01

    The synthetic selenium compound methylseleninic acid (MSA) is a direct precursor of active methylselenol and appears to be the best candidate for studies on the mechanisms of selenium cancer prevention and therapy in vitro. Reduced glutathione (GSH) is critical to MSA metabolism, in addition to being a protective antioxidant which scavenges reactive oxygen species (ROS) and maintains the stability of intracellular redox status. In this study, we demonstrated that MSA has an anticancer effect in the human lung cancer cell lines L9981 and 95D using growth inhibition detection, cell-cycle analysis, and apoptosis detection. We examined the role of intracellular GSH content and detected the ROS induced by MSA by fluorescence microscopy, and we used flow cytometry to quantify the ROS induced by pretreatment and co-treatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and MSA. We also confirmed oxidative stress in MSA-induced apoptosis. MSA inhibited lung cancer cell lines L9981 and 95-D growth significantly, induced cell-cycle arrest in the G1 phase and induced apoptosis. Compared to the control group, MSA significantly decreased intracellular GSH content in L9981 cells at higher concentrations of MSA (5 and 7.5 µM), while the intracellular GSH level was also dramatically decreased in L9981 cells treated with 5 µM MSA at different time points of 12- and 24-h (decreased to about 50% and 20% of the control, respectively). Pretreatment with either NAC (GSH synthesis precursor) or buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, GSH synthesis inhibitor) in L9981 cells significantly inhibited the anti-proliferative effect of MSA. MSA induced the generation of ROS, which was significantly reduced by NAC pretreatment. Furthermore, we also confirmed these results in another lung cancer cell line 95-D. These results suggest that generation of ROS may be essential for the induction of oxidative stress and apoptosis by MSA in L9981 and 95-D lung cancer cells. The balance between oxidative stress induced by MSA

  16. Multi-target interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization assay increases sensitivity of sputum cytology as a predictor of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Kittelson, John; Schulte, Aline P; Vu, Kieu O; Wolf, Holly J; Zeng, Chan; Hirsch, Fred R; Byers, Tim; Kennedy, Tim; Miller, York E; Keith, Robert L; Franklin, Wilbur A

    2004-01-01

    Survival rates for lung cancer are low because patients have disseminated disease at diagnosis; therefore tests for early diagnosis are highly desirable. This pilot study investigated occurrence of chromosomal aneusomy in sputum from a 33 case-control cohort matched on age, gender, and date of sample collection. Subjects had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and > or = 30 pack-years of tobacco use, and aneusomy was tested using a multi-target DNA FISH assay (LAVysion, Abbott/Vysis). In specimens collected within 12 months of lung cancer diagnosis, abnormality was more frequent among the 18 cases (41%) than the 17 controls (6%; P = 0.04). Aneusomy had no significant association with cytologic atypia, which might indicate that molecular and morphological changes could be independent markers of tumorigenesis. Combining both tests, abnormality was found in 83% of the cases and 20% of the controls (P = 0.0004) suggesting that FISH may improve the sensitivity of cytologic atypia as a predictor of lung cancer.

  17. [Lung cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Sánchez González, M

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is a very important disease, curable in early stages. There have been trials trying to show the utility of chest x-ray or computed tomography in Lung Cancer Screening for decades. In 2011, National Lung Screening Trial results were published, showing a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality in patients with low dose computed tomography screened for three years. These results are very promising and several scientific societies have included lung cancer screening in their guidelines. Nevertheless we have to be aware of lung cancer screening risks, such as: overdiagnosis, radiation and false positive results. Moreover, there are many issues to be solved, including choosing the appropriate group to be screened, the duration of the screening program, intervals between screening and its cost-effectiveness. Ongoing trials will probably answer some of these questions. This article reviews the current evidence on lung cancer screening.

  18. Acid-sensitive lipidated doxorubicin prodrug entrapped in nanoemulsion impairs lung tumor metastasis in a breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Câmara, Ana Lygia; Nagel, Gregor; Tschiche, Harald R; Cardador, Camila Magalhães; Muehlmann, Luis Alexandre; de Oliveira, Daniela Mara; Alvim, Paula Queiroz; Azevedo, Ricardo Bentes; Calderón, Marcelo; Figueiró Longo, João Paulo

    2017-08-01

    To develop an acid-sensitive lipidated, doxorubicin (Dox) prodrug (C16-Dox) to be entrapped in lipid nanoemulsion (NE-C16-Dox) as a nanocarrier to treat breast cancer models (in vitro and in vivo). We report the efficacy of NE-C16-Dox in in vitro experiments, as well as the improved chemotherapeutic index and tumor-control efficacy compared with treatment with free Dox in an in vivo murine 4T1 breast cancer model. In addition, NE-C16-Dox allowed the use of a higher dose of Dox, acceptable biocompatibility and a significant reduction in lung metastasis. Taken together, these results indicate that NE-C16-Dox is promising for breast cancer treatment, thus creating possibilities to translate these nanotechnology concepts to clinical applications.

  19. KEAP1 loss modulates sensitivity to kinase targeted therapy in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Krall, Elsa B; Wang, Belinda; Munoz, Diana M; Ilic, Nina; Raghavan, Srivatsan; Niederst, Matthew J; Yu, Kristine; Ruddy, David A; Aguirre, Andrew J; Kim, Jong Wook; Redig, Amanda J; Gainor, Justin F; Williams, Juliet A; Asara, John M; Doench, John G; Janne, Pasi A; Shaw, Alice T; McDonald III, Robert E; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Stegmeier, Frank; Schlabach, Michael R; Hahn, William C

    2017-01-01

    Inhibitors that target the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)/Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway have led to clinical responses in lung and other cancers, but some patients fail to respond and in those that do resistance inevitably occurs (Balak et al., 2006; Kosaka et al., 2006; Rudin et al., 2013; Wagle et al., 2011). To understand intrinsic and acquired resistance to inhibition of MAPK signaling, we performed CRISPR-Cas9 gene deletion screens in the setting of BRAF, MEK, EGFR, and ALK inhibition. Loss of KEAP1, a negative regulator of NFE2L2/NRF2, modulated the response to BRAF, MEK, EGFR, and ALK inhibition in BRAF-, NRAS-, KRAS-, EGFR-, and ALK-mutant lung cancer cells. Treatment with inhibitors targeting the RTK/MAPK pathway increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells with intact KEAP1, and loss of KEAP1 abrogated this increase. In addition, loss of KEAP1 altered cell metabolism to allow cells to proliferate in the absence of MAPK signaling. These observations suggest that alterations in the KEAP1/NRF2 pathway may promote survival in the presence of multiple inhibitors targeting the RTK/Ras/MAPK pathway. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18970.001 PMID:28145866

  20. Lung Cancer Indicators Recurrence

    Cancer.gov

    This study describes prognostic factors for lung cancer spread and recurrence, as well as subsequent risk of death from the disease. The investigators observed that regardless of cancer stage, grade, or type of lung cancer, patients in the study were more

  1. Immunotherapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Steven, Antonius; Fisher, Scott A; Robinson, Bruce W

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of lung cancer remains a challenge, and lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Immunotherapy has previously failed in lung cancer but has recently emerged as a very effective new therapy, and there is now growing worldwide enthusiasm in cancer immunotherapy. We summarize why immune checkpoint blockade therapies have generated efficacious and durable responses in clinical trials and why this has reignited interest in this field. Cancer vaccines have also been explored in the past with marginal success. Identification of optimal candidate neoantigens may improve cancer vaccine efficacy and may pave the way to personalized immunotherapy, alone or in combination with other immunotherapy such as immune checkpoint blockade. Understanding the steps in immune recognition and eradication of cancer cells is vital to understanding why previous immunotherapies failed and how current therapies can be used optimally. We hold an optimistic view for the future prospect in lung cancer immunotherapy.

  2. Increased Sensitivity to Cisplatin in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines after FHIT Gene Transfer1

    PubMed Central

    Andriani, F; Perego, P; Carenini, N; Sozzi, G; Roz, L

    2006-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the relevance of fragile histidine triad (FHIT) status in relation to drug treatment, we analyzed the sensitivity of the Fhit-negative non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line NCI-H460 to different drugs, after treatment with an adenoviral vector expressing the FHIT transgene. Expression of Fhit resulted in reduced sensitivity to etoposide, doxorubicin, and topotecan. This feature was associated with Fhit-induced downregulation of DNA topoisomerases I and II. In contrast, expression of Fhit did not modulate sensitivity to Taxol, but produced a slight increase in sensitivity to cisplatin, as shown by colony-forming assays. Analysis of apoptosis revealed that, after cisplatin exposure, the number of apoptotic cells was two-fold higher in Fhit-expressing H460 cells. Moreover, it appeared that wild-type p53 was required for sensitization to cisplatin because the effect was marginal in A549 and Calu-1 cells, where the p53 pathway is altered and simultaneous restoration of p53 and Fhit in Calu-1 cells increased cisplatin sensitivity. Fhit could also partially restore sensitivity to cisplatin in Bcl-2- and Bcl-xL-overexpressing H460 cells that are normally resistant to this drug. Our results support the possible relevance of FHIT in cisplatin-based chemotherapy as well as in the reversal of drug resistance in NSCLC. PMID:16533421

  3. Knock-Down of Core Proteins Regulating MicroRNA Biogenesis Has No Effect on Sensitivity of Lung Cancer Cells to Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhivotovsky, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies underline the important role of microRNAs (miRNA) in the development of lung cancer. The main regulators of miRNA biogenesis are the ribonucleases Drosha, Dicer and Ago2. Here the role of core proteins of miRNA biogenesis machinery in the response of human non-small and small cell lung carcinoma cell lines to treatment with ionizing radiation was assessed. We found that Drosha and Dicer were expressed at higher levels in radioresistant but not in sensitive cell lines. However, down-regulation of either Dicer or Drosha had no effect on the sensitivity of cells to irradiation. Elimination of components of the RNA-induced silencing complex Ago2 and Tudor staphylococcal nuclease also did not sensitize cells to the same treatment. Thus, modulation of miRNA biogenesis machinery is not sufficient to increase the radiosensitivity of lung tumors and other strategies are required to combat lung cancer. PMID:22479364

  4. Genetics Home Reference: lung cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions lung cancer lung cancer Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Lung cancer is a disease in which certain cells ...

  5. Lung cancer in women

    PubMed Central

    Barrera-Rodriguez, Raúl; Morales-Fuentes, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Recent biological advances in tumor research provide clear evidence that lung cancer in females is different from that in males. These differences appear to have a direct impact on the clinical presentation, histology, and outcomes of lung cancer. Women are more likely to present with lung adenocarcinoma, tend to receive a diagnosis at an earlier age, and are more likely to be diagnosed with localized disease. Women may also be more predisposed to molecular aberrations resulting from the carcinogenic effects of tobacco, but do not appear to be more susceptible than men to developing lung cancer. The gender differences found in female lung cancer make it mandatory that gender stratification is used in clinical trials in order to improve the survival rates of patients with lung cancer. PMID:28210127

  6. Genetic disruption of oncogenic Kras sensitizes lung cancer cells to Fas receptor-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mou, Haiwei; Moore, Jill; Malonia, Sunil K; Li, Yingxiang; Ozata, Deniz M; Hough, Soren; Song, Chun-Qing; Smith, Jordan L; Fischer, Andrew; Weng, Zhiping; Green, Michael R; Xue, Wen

    2017-04-04

    Genetic lesions that activate KRAS account for ∼30% of the 1.6 million annual cases of lung cancer. Despite clinical need, KRAS is still undruggable using traditional small-molecule drugs/inhibitors. When oncogenic Kras is suppressed by RNA interference, tumors initially regress but eventually recur and proliferate despite suppression of Kras Here, we show that tumor cells can survive knockout of oncogenic Kras, indicating the existence of Kras-independent survival pathways. Thus, even if clinical KRAS inhibitors were available, resistance would remain an obstacle to treatment. Kras-independent cancer cells exhibit decreased colony formation in vitro but retain the ability to form tumors in mice. Comparing the transcriptomes of oncogenic Kras cells and Kras knockout cells, we identified 603 genes that were specifically up-regulated in Kras knockout cells, including the Fas gene, which encodes a cell surface death receptor involved in physiological regulation of apoptosis. Antibodies recognizing Fas receptor efficiently induced apoptosis of Kras knockout cells but not oncogenic Kras-expressing cells. Increased Fas expression in Kras knockout cells was attributed to decreased association of repressive epigenetic marks at the Fas promoter. Concordant with this observation, treating oncogenic Kras cells with histone deacetylase inhibitor and Fas-activating antibody efficiently induced apoptosis, thus bypassing the need to inhibit Kras. Our results suggest that activation of Fas could be exploited as an Achilles' heel in tumors initiated by oncogenic Kras.

  7. Fentanyl induces autophagy via activation of the ROS/MAPK pathway and reduces the sensitivity of cisplatin in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jiaqi; Ma, Chi; Gao, Wei; Liang, Jinxiao; Liu, Chang; Yang, Hongfang; Yan, Qiu; Wen, Qingping

    2016-12-01

    Cancer pain is the most common complication of lung carcinoma. Opioid agonist fentanyl is widely used for relieving pain in cancer patients, and cisplatin (DDP)‑based chemotherapy is commonly used for the treatment of advanced lung cancer; these two drugs are always used together in lung carcinoma patients. However, the mechanisms and related biological pathways by which fentanyl influences cisplatin sensitivity are relatively poorly reported. Here, we found that fentanyl reduces the sensitivity of cisplatin in human lung cancer cells and induces autophagy. Fentanyl induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and JNK activation. N-acetyl‑L‑cysteine is a ROS scavenger and antioxidant, and the inhibition of JNK with SP600125 prevented fentanyl‑induced autophagy. We also found that 3-methyladenine (3-MA; an autophagy inhibitor) increased the sensitivity of DDP and weakened the inhibition of fentanyl. In conclusion, fentanyl reduces the sensitivity of cisplatin in lung cancer cells through the ROS-JNK-autophagy pathway, whereas the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA may weaken this effect.

  8. Justice and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Aaron

    2013-04-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths, yet research funding is by far the lowest for lung cancer than for any other cancer compared with respective death rates. Although this discrepancy should appear alarming, one could argue that lung cancer deserves less attention because it is more attributable to poor life choices than other common cancers. Accordingly, the general question that I ask in this article is whether victims of more avoidable diseases, such as lung cancer, deserve to have their needs taken into less consideration than those of less avoidable diseases, on the grounds of either retributive or distributive justice. Such unequal treatment may be the "penalty" one incurs for negligent or reckless behavior. However, I hope to show that such unequal treatment cannot be supported by any coherent accounts of retributive or distributive justice.

  9. Immunotherapy in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Emily H; Horn, Leora

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has not traditionally been viewed as an immune-responsive tumor. However, it is becoming evident that tumor-induced immune suppression is vital to malignant progression. Immunotherapies act by enhancing the patient's innate immune response and hold promise for inducing long-term responses in select patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Immune checkpoint inhibitors, in particular, inhibitors to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 (PD-1) and programmed death receptor ligand 1 (PD-L1) have shown promise in early studies and are currently in clinical trials in both small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer patients. Two large randomized phase III trials recently demonstrated superior overall survival (OS) in patients treated with anti-PD-1 therapy compared to chemotherapy in the second-line setting.

  10. Over expression of miR-200c suppresses invasion and restores methotrexate sensitivity in lung cancer A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Shan, Wulin; Zhang, Xiaolei; Li, Ming; Deng, Fang; Zhang, Jing

    2016-11-30

    MicroRNAs have become recognized as key players in the development of malignancy. MiR-200c can function as a tumor suppressor gene. However, the effect of miR-200c on methotrexate resistance remains unclear to date. This study aims to evaluate the function of miR-200c in lung cancer A549 cells. The data presented in our study demonstrated that the expression of miR-200c was down-regulated in methotrexate-resistant A549 cells. Over expression of miR-200c could significantly inhibit cell proliferation, induce G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and induce cell apoptosis. RT-PCR and Western blot assays showed that the expression of P53 and P21 were significantly increased with miR-200c overexpression. These results indicated that over expression of miR-200c might enhance the sensitivity of A549 cells to methotrexate through the P53/P21 pathway. Furthermore, miR-200c overexpression significantly inhibited cell migration and invasion with increasing the expression of E-cad and decreasing the expression of EZH2. In consequence, we provide a mechanism of acquired resistance to methotrexate that is caused by the loss of miR-200c in lung cancer cells. Along with this, our study demonstrates the complex network of microRNA mediated chemoresistance.

  11. Afatinib increases sensitivity to radiation in non-small cell lung cancer cells with acquired EGFR T790M mutation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shirong; Zheng, Xiaoliang; Huang, Haixiu; Wu, Kan; Wang, Bing; Chen, Xufeng; Ma, Shenglin

    2015-03-20

    Afatinib is a second-generation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor and has shown a significant clinical benefit in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with EGFR-activating mutations. However, the potential therapeutic effects of afatinib combining with other modalities, including ionizing radiation (IR), are not well understood. In this study, we developed a gefitinib-resistant cell subline (PC-9-GR) with a secondary EGFR mutation (T790M) from NSCLC PC-9 cells after chronic exposures to increasing doses of gefitinib. The presence of afatinib significantly increases the cell killing effect of radiation in PC-9-GR cells harboring acquired T790M, but not in H1975 cells with de novo T790M or in H460 cells that express wild-type EGFR. In PC-9-GR cells, afatinib remarkable blocks baseline of EGFR and ERK phosphorylations, and causes delay of IR-induced AKT phosphorylation. Afatinib treatment also leads to increased apoptosis and suppressed DNA damage repair in irradiated PC-9-GR cells, and enhanced tumor growth inhibition when combined with IR in PC-9-GR xenografts. Our findings suggest a potential therapeutic impact of afatinib as a radiation sensitizer in lung cancer cells harboring acquired T790M mutation, providing a rationale for a clinical trial with combination of afatinib and radiation in NSCLCs with EGFR T790M mutation.

  12. Occupational lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Coultas, D.B.; Samet, J.M. )

    1992-06-01

    The overall importance of occupational agents as a cause of lung cancer has been a controversial subject since the 1970s. A federal report, released in the late 1970s, projected a surprisingly high burden of occupational lung cancer; for asbestos and four other agents, from 61,000 to 98,000 cases annually were attributed to these agents alone. Many estimates followed, some much more conservative. For example, Doll and Peto estimated that 15% of lung cancer in men and 5% in women could be attributed to occupational exposures. A number of population-based case-control studies also provide relevant estimates. In a recent literature review, Vineis and Simonato cited attributable risk estimates for occupation and lung cancer that ranged from 4% to 40%; for asbestos alone, the estimates ranged from 1% to 5%. These estimates would be expected to vary across locations and over time. Nevertheless, these recent estimates indicate that occupation remains an important cause of lung cancer. Approaches to Prevention. Prevention of lung cancer mortality among workers exposed to agents or industrial processes that cause lung cancer may involve several strategies, including eliminating or reducing exposures, smoking cessation, screening, and chemo-prevention. For example, changes in industrial processes that have eliminated or reduced exposures to chloromethyl ethers and nickel compounds have provided evidence of reduced risk of lung cancer following these changes. Although occupational exposures are important causes of lung cancer, cigarette smoking is the most important preventable cause of lung cancer. For adults, the work site offers an important location to target smoking cessation efforts. In fact, the work site may be the only place to reach many smokers.

  13. Lung Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Richard M; Sanchez, Rolando

    2017-07-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. More than 80% of these deaths are attributed to tobacco use, and primary prevention can effectively reduce the cancer burden. The National Lung Screening Trial showed that low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening could reduce lung cancer mortality in high-risk patients by 20% compared with chest radiography. The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends annual LDCT screening for persons aged 55 to 80 years with a 30-pack-year smoking history, either currently smoking or having quit within 15 years. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Lung cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Lynn T; Tanner, Nichole T; Gould, Michael K; Silvestri, Gerard A

    2015-01-01

    The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in adults of age 55 to 80 years who have a 30 pack-year smoking history and are currently smoking or have quit within the past 15 years. This recommendation is largely based on the findings of the National Lung Screening Trial. Both policy-level and clinical decision-making about LDCT screening must consider the potential benefits of screening (reduced mortality from lung cancer) and possible harms. Effective screening requires an appreciation that screening should be limited to individuals at high risk of death from lung cancer, and that the risk of harm related to false positive findings, overdiagnosis, and unnecessary invasive testing is real. A comprehensive understanding of these aspects of screening will inform appropriate implementation, with the objective that an evidence-based and systematic approach to screening will help to reduce the enormous mortality burden of lung cancer.

  15. Familial risk for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kanwal, Madiha; Ding, Xiao-Ji; Cao, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer, which has a low survival rate, is a leading cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide. Smoking and air pollution are the major causes of lung cancer; however, numerous studies have demonstrated that genetic factors also contribute to the development of lung cancer. A family history of lung cancer increases the risk for the disease in both smokers and never-smokers. This review focuses on familial lung cancer, in particular on the familial aggregation of lung cancer. The development of familial lung cancer involves shared environmental and genetic factors among family members. Familial lung cancer represents a good model for investigating the association between environmental and genetic factors, as well as for identifying susceptibility genes for lung cancer. In addition, studies on familial lung cancer may help to elucidate the etiology and mechanism of lung cancer, and may identify novel biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis, targeted therapy and improved prevention strategies. This review presents the aetiology and molecular biology of lung cancer and then systematically introduces and discusses several aspects of familial lung cancer, including the characteristics of familial lung cancer, population-based studies on familial lung cancer and the genetics of familial lung cancer. PMID:28356926

  16. Co-dependency of PKCδ and K-Ras: inverse association with cytotoxic drug sensitivity in KRAS mutant lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ohm, A M; Tan, A-C; Heasley, L E; Reyland, M E

    2017-07-27

    Recent studies suggest that the presence of a KRAS mutation may be insufficient for defining a clinically homogenous molecular group, as many KRAS mutant tumors lose reliance on K-Ras for survival. Identifying pathways that support K-Ras dependency may define clinically relevant KRAS subgroups and lead to the identification of new drug targets. We have analyzed a panel of 17 KRAS mutant lung cancer cell lines classified as K-Ras-dependent or -independent for co-dependency on protein kinase C δ (PKCδ). We show that functional dependency on K-Ras and PKCδ co-segregate, and that dependency correlates with a more epithelial-like phenotype. Furthermore, we show that the pro-apoptotic and pro-tumorigenic functions of PKCδ also segregate based on K-Ras dependency, as K-Ras-independent cells are more sensitive to topoisomerase inhibitors, and depletion of PKCδ in this subgroup suppresses apoptosis through increased activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). In contrast, K-Ras-dependent lung cancer cells are largely insensitive to topoisomerase inhibitors, and depletion of PKCδ can increase apoptosis and decrease activation of ERK in this subgroup. We have previously shown that nuclear translocation of PKCδ is necessary and sufficient for pro-apoptotic signaling. Our current studies show that K-Ras-dependent cells are refractive to PKCδ-driven apoptosis. Analysis of this subgroup showed increased PKCδ expression and an increase in the nuclear:cytoplasmic ratio of PKCδ. In addition, targeting PKCδ to the nucleus induces apoptosis in K-Ras-independent, but not K-Ras-dependent non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Our studies provide tools for identification of the subset of patients with KRAS mutant tumors most amenable to targeting of the K-Ras pathway, and identify PKCδ as a potential target in this tumor population. These subgroups are likely to be of clinical relevance, as high PKCδ expression correlates with increased overall survival and

  17. miR-337-3p and Its Targets STAT3 and RAP1A Modulate Taxane Sensitivity in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Du, Liqin; Subauste, Maria C.; DeSevo, Christopher; Zhao, Zhenze; Baker, Michael; Borkowski, Robert; Schageman, Jeoffrey J.; Greer, Rachel; Yang, Chin-Rang; Suraokar, Milind; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Gazdar, Adi F.; Minna, John D.; Pertsemlidis, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer) often exhibits resistance to paclitaxel treatment. Identifying the elements regulating paclitaxel response will advance efforts to overcome such resistance in NSCLC therapy. Using in vitro approaches, we demonstrated that over-expression of the microRNA miR-337-3p sensitizes NCI-H1155 cells to paclitaxel, and that miR-337-3p mimic has a general effect on paclitaxel response in NSCLC cell lines, which may provide a novel adjuvant strategy to paclitaxel in the treatment of lung cancer. By combining in vitro and in silico approaches, we identified STAT3 and RAP1A as direct targets that mediate the effect of miR-337-3p on paclitaxel sensitivity. Further investigation showed that miR-337-3p mimic also sensitizes cells to docetaxel, another member of the taxane family, and that STAT3 levels are significantly correlated with taxane resistance in lung cancer cell lines, suggesting that endogenous STAT3 expression is a determinant of intrinsic taxane resistance in lung cancer. The identification of a miR-337-3p as a modulator of cellular response to taxanes, and STAT3 and RAP1A as regulatory targets which mediate that response, defines a novel regulatory pathway modulating paclitaxel sensitivity in lung cancer cells, which may provide novel adjuvant strategies along with paclitaxel in the treatment of lung cancer and may also provide biomarkers for predicting paclitaxel response in NSCLC. PMID:22723956

  18. A recognition-before-labeling strategy for sensitive detection of lung cancer cells with a quantum dot-aptamer complex.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunlei; Liu, Jianbo; Zhang, Pengfei; Li, Jing; Ji, Haining; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin

    2015-09-07

    A highly specific recognition-before-labeling strategy has been developed for sensitive detection of non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells, by using fluorescent QDs as signal units and DNA aptamers as recognition elements. A QD-aptamer system used for cell imaging and bioanalysis mostly relies on the recognition-after-labeling strategy in which aptamers were firstly labeled with QDs and then the QD-aptamer conjugates as a whole were utilized for specific recognition. Here in our strategy, aptamers were used firstly to recognize target cells, and then fluorescent QDs were sequentially added to bind the aptamers and light the target cells. The proposed recognition-before-labeling strategy didn't require the complex process of QD functionalization, and avoided the possible impact on the aptamer configuration from steric hindrance. Meanwhile, QDs, with strong fluorescence and good photostability, also give this method a high signal-to-background ratio (S/B). The recognition-before-labeling strategy is simple and sensitive, suggesting a new method for in vitro diagnostic assays of cancer cells.

  19. Lung Cancer Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    I, Hoseok; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most frequently occurring cancer in the world and continually leads in mortality among cancers. The overall 5-year survival rate for lung cancer has risen only 4% (from 12% to 16%) over the past 4 decades, and late diagnosis is a major obstacle in improving lung cancer prognosis. Survival of patients undergoing lung resection is greater than 80%, suggesting that early detection and diagnosis of cancers before they become inoperable and lethal will greatly improve mortality. Lung cancer biomarkers can be used for screening, detection, diagnosis, prognosis, prediction, stratification, therapy response monitoring, and so on. This review focuses on noninvasive diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. For that purpose, our discussion in this review will focus on biological fluid-based biomarkers. The body fluids include blood (serum or plasma), sputum, saliva, BAL, pleural effusion, and VOC. Since it is rich in different cellular and molecular elements and is one of the most convenient and routine clinical procedures, serum or plasma is the main source for the development and validation of many noninvasive biomarkers. In terms of molecular aspects, the most widely validated ones are proteins, some of which are used in the clinical sector, though in limited accessory purposes. We will also discuss the lung cancer (protein) biomarkers in clinical trials and currently in the validation phase with hundreds of samples. After proteins, we will discuss microRNAs, methylated DNA, and circulating tumor cells, which are being vigorously developed and validated as potential lung cancer biomarkers. The main aim of this review is to provide researchers and clinicians with an understanding of the potential noninvasive lung cancer biomarkers in biological fluids that have recently been discovered.

  20. Lung Cancer Screening Update.

    PubMed

    Ruchalski, Kathleen L; Brown, Kathleen

    2016-07-01

    Since the release of the US Preventive Services Task Force and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recommendations for lung cancer screening, low-dose chest computed tomography screening has moved from the research arena to clinical practice. Lung cancer screening programs must reach beyond image acquisition and interpretation and engage in a multidisciplinary effort of clinical shared decision-making, standardization of imaging and nodule management, smoking cessation, and patient follow-up. Standardization of radiologic reports and nodule management will systematize patient care, provide quality assurance, further reduce harm, and contain health care costs. Although the National Lung Screening Trial results and eligibility criteria of a heavy smoking history are the foundation for the standard guidelines for low-dose chest computed tomography screening in the United States, currently only 27% of patients diagnosed with lung cancer would meet US lung cancer screening recommendations. Current and future efforts must be directed to better delineate those patients who would most benefit from screening and to ensure that the benefits of screening reach all socioeconomic strata and racial and ethnic minorities. Further optimization of lung cancer screening program design and patient eligibility will assure that lung cancer screening benefits will outweigh the potential risks to our patients.

  1. Highly sensitive detection of epidermal growth factor receptor in lung cancer cells by aptamer-based target-/probe-mediated cyclic signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dandan; Ma, Fei; Zhang, Qianyi; Zhang, Chun-Yang

    2017-10-09

    We develop an antibody-free fluorescence method for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) assay using aptamer-based target-/probe-mediated cyclic signal amplification. The method is highly sensitive with a detection limit of 0.16 fM, and it can be applied to detect EGFR in lung cancer cells, holding great potential in clinical diagnosis.

  2. Fulvestrant increases gefitinib sensitivity in non-small cell lung cancer cells by upregulating let-7c expression.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hua; Liu, Jinyuan; Wang, Rong; Qian, Xu; Xu, Ruitong; Xu, Tongpeng; Li, Qi; Wang, Lin; Shi, Zhumei; Zheng, Jitai; Chen, Qiudan; Shu, Yongqian

    2014-04-01

    Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations benefit from treatment with EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), namely, gefitinib and erlotinib. However, these patients eventually develop resistance to EGFR-TKIs. About 50% of this acquired resistance may be the result of a secondary mutation in the EGFR gene, such as the one corresponding to T790M. In our previous study, we found that combined treatment with fulvestrant and gefitinib decreases the proliferation of H1975 NSCLC cells, compared to treatment with either fulvestrant or gefitinib alone; however, the molecular mechanism for the improved effects of the combination treatment are still unknown. In this study, we confirmed that fulvestrant increases the gefitinib sensitivity of H1975 cells and found that let-7c was most upregulated in the fulvestrant-treated cells. Our data revealed that let-7c increases gefitinib sensitivity by repressing RAS and inactivating the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT and mitogen-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Taken together, our findings suggest that let-7c plays an important role in fulvestrant-induced upregulation of gefitinib sensitivity in H1975 cells.

  3. Lycopene and Lung Cancer

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although epidemiological studies have shown dietary intake of lycopene is associated with decreased risk of lung cancer, the effect of lycopene on lung carcinogenesis has not been well studied. A better understanding of lycopene metabolism and the mechanistic basis of lycopene chemoprevention must ...

  4. Women and Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Horrigan Conners Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, April, ... Lung Cancer in Women: The Differences in Epidemiology, Biology and Treatment Outcomes, Maria Patricia Rivera MD Expert ...

  5. Lung Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... HPV-Associated Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Lung Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) ... incidence data are currently available. Rates of Getting Lung Cancer by State The number of people who ...

  6. Targeted Therapies for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Jill E.; Cascone, Tina; Gerber, David E.; Heymach, John V.; Minna, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Although lung cancer remains the leading cancer killer in the United States, recently a number of developments indicate future clinical benefit. These include evidence that computed tomography–based screening decreases lung cancer mortality, the use of stereotactic radiation for early-stage tumors, the development of molecular methods to predict chemotherapy sensitivity, and genome-wide expression and mutation analysis data that have uncovered oncogene “addictions” as important therapeutic targets. Perhaps the most significant advance in the treatment of this challenging disease is the introduction of molecularly targeted therapies, a term that currently includes monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The development of effective targeted therapeutics requires knowledge of the genes and pathways involved and how they relate to the biologic behavior of lung cancer. Drugs targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor, anaplastic lymphoma kinase, and vascular endothelial growth factor are now U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer. These agents are generally better tolerated than conventional chemotherapy and show dramatic efficacy when their use is coupled with a clear understanding of clinical data, mechanism, patient selection, drug interactions, and toxicities. Integrating genome-wide tumor analysis with drug- and targeted agent-responsive phenotypes will provide a wealth of new possibilities for lung cancer–targeted therapeutics. Ongoing research efforts in these areas as well as a discussion of emerging targeted agents being evaluated in clinical trials are the subjects of this review. PMID:22157296

  7. Glutamine drives glutathione synthesis and contributes to radiation sensitivity of A549 and H460 lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sappington, Daniel R; Siegel, Eric R; Hiatt, Gloria; Desai, Abhishek; Penney, Rosalind B; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Griffin, Robert J; Boysen, Gunnar

    2016-04-01

    Increased glutamine uptake is known to drive cancer cell proliferation, making tumor cells glutamine-dependent. Glutamine provides additional carbon and nitrogen sources for cell growth. The first step in glutamine utilization is its conversion to glutamate by glutaminase (GLS). Glutamate is a precursor for glutathione synthesis, and we investigated the hypothesis that glutamine drives glutathione synthesis and thereby contributes to cellular defense systems. The importance of glutamine for glutathione synthesis was studied in H460 and A549 lung cancer cell lines using glutamine-free medium and bis-2-(5-phenyl-acetamido-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)ethyl sulfide (BPTES) a GLS inhibitor. Metabolic activities were determined by targeted mass spectrometry. A significant correlation between glutamine consumption and glutathione excretion was demonstrated in H460 and A549 tumor cells. Culturing in the presence of [(13)C5]glutamine demonstrated that by 12h >50% of excreted glutathione was derived from glutamine. Culturing in glutamine-free medium or treatment with BPTES, a GLS-specific inhibitor, reduced cell proliferation and viability and abolished glutathione excretion. Treatment with glutathione-ester prevented BPTES-induced cytotoxicity. Inhibition of GLS markedly radiosensitized the lung tumor cell lines, suggesting an important role of glutamine-derived glutathione in determining radiation sensitivity. We demonstrate here for the first time that a significant amount of extracellular glutathione is directly derived from glutamine. This finding adds yet another important function to the already known glutamine dependence of tumor cells and probably tumors as well. Glutamine is essential for synthesis and excretion of glutathione to promote cell growth and viability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The P21-activated kinase expression pattern is different in non-small cell lung cancer and affects lung cancer cell sensitivity to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Si; Dong, Qian-Ze; Jiang, Gui-Yang; Han, Yong; Wang, Liang; Wang, En-Hua

    2016-03-01

    Exploring methods for increasing epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) sensitivity has become a major focus in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Major downstream effectors of the Rho family small guanosine triphosphatases, P21-activated kinases (PAKs) activate the main signaling pathways downstream of EGFR and thus promote tumor cell proliferation. In this study, we explored the expression pattern of phosphorylated PAKs in NSCLC and their potential value as drug targets for treating cancer. The expression and prognostic significance of phosphorylated group I and II PAKs were evaluated in 182 patients with NSCLC. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed low group I PAK expression in normal lung tissues and increased expressed in the cytoplasm, particularly in lung squamous cell carcinoma. Abnormal group I PAK expression was associated with lymph node metastases and high tumor-node-metastases (TNM) stage in NSCLC patients and correlated with poor prognosis. We used group I PAK inhibitor (IPA3) to specifically decrease group I PAK activity in human lung cancer cell lines. Decreased group I PAK activity inhibited cell proliferation and combined IPA3 and EGFR-TKI (gefitinib) treatment inhibited cell proliferation in an obvious manner. Together, our results revealed the PAK expression pattern in NSCLC, and a role for group I PAK in cell proliferation, which provides evidence that decreased PAK activity may have a potential application as a molecular targeted therapy in advanced NSCLC.

  9. Screening for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazzone, Peter J.; Naidich, David P.; Bach, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is by far the major cause of cancer deaths largely because in the majority of patients it is at an advanced stage at the time it is discovered, when curative treatment is no longer feasible. This article examines the data regarding the ability of screening to decrease the number of lung cancer deaths. Methods: A systematic review was conducted of controlled studies that address the effectiveness of methods of screening for lung cancer. Results: Several large randomized controlled trials (RCTs), including a recent one, have demonstrated that screening for lung cancer using a chest radiograph does not reduce the number of deaths from lung cancer. One large RCT involving low-dose CT (LDCT) screening demonstrated a significant reduction in lung cancer deaths, with few harms to individuals at elevated risk when done in the context of a structured program of selection, screening, evaluation, and management of the relatively high number of benign abnormalities. Whether other RCTs involving LDCT screening are consistent is unclear because data are limited or not yet mature. Conclusions: Screening is a complex interplay of selection (a population with sufficient risk and few serious comorbidities), the value of the screening test, the interval between screening tests, the availability of effective treatment, the risk of complications or harms as a result of screening, and the degree with which the screened individuals comply with screening and treatment recommendations. Screening with LDCT of appropriate individuals in the context of a structured process is associated with a significant reduction in the number of lung cancer deaths in the screened population. Given the complex interplay of factors inherent in screening, many questions remain on how to effectively implement screening on a broader scale. PMID:23649455

  10. Expression of LKB1 tumor suppressor in non-small cell lung cancer determines sensitivity to 2-deoxyglucose.

    PubMed

    Inge, Landon J; Coon, Keith D; Smith, Michael A; Bremner, Ross M

    2009-03-01

    Targeted therapy promises to improve patient outcome in non-small cell lung cancer. Biomarkers can direct targeted therapy toward patients who are most likely to respond, thus optimizing benefit. A novel agent with antineoplastic potential is the glucose analog, 2-deoxyglucose. 2-Deoxyglucose targets tumor cells, owing to their increased glucose uptake, inhibiting cellular metabolism and inducing energetic stress, resulting in decreased cellular viability. The tumor suppressor LKB1 is activated by energetic stress, and cells that lack LKB1 fail to respond and undergo cell death, suggesting that LKB1-null non-small cell lung cancer may have an increased susceptibility to 2-deoxyglucose. Inasmuch as somatic loss of LKB1 is a frequent event in non-small cell lung cancer, LKB1 expression could be used as a biomarker for directing 2-deoxyglucose therapy in patients with this type of cancer. LKB1-positive and LKB1-negative non-small cell lung cancer cell lines were evaluated for cell viability, markers of apoptosis, and gene expression after 2-deoxyglucose treatment and compared with vehicle control. LKB1-negative cells treated with 2-deoxyglucose displayed a significant decrease in cell viability compared with LKB1-positive cells. Gene expression profiles of 2-deoxyglucose treated cells revealed changes in apoptotic markers in LKB1-negative cells, correlating with activation of apoptosis. Re-expression of LKB1 prevented 2-deoxyglucose mediated apoptosis, demonstrating the critical role of LKB1 in mediating 2-deoxyglucose toxicity. LKB1 loss increases susceptibility to 2-deoxyglucose treatment in non-small cell lung cancer lines, even at low doses. Thus, determination of LKB1 status may help direct therapy to those patients most likely to benefit from this novel approach, making it useful in the treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

  11. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk depends on the number of cigarettes ...

  12. Co-dependency of PKCδ and K-Ras: Inverse association with cytotoxic drug sensitivity in KRAS mutant lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ohm, Angela M.; Tan, Aik-Choon; Heasley, Lynn E.; Reyland, Mary E.

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the presence of a KRAS mutation may be insufficient for defining a clinically homogenous molecular group, as many KRAS mutant tumors lose reliance on K-Ras for survival. Identifying pathways that support K-Ras dependency may define clinically relevant KRAS sub-groups and lead to the identification of new drug targets. We have analyzed a panel of 17 KRAS mutant lung cancer cell lines classified as K-Ras dependent or independent, for co-dependency on PKCδ. We show that functional dependency on K-Ras and PKCδ co-segregate, and that dependency correlates with a more epithelial-like phenotype. Furthermore, we show that the pro-apoptotic and pro-tumorigenic functions of PKCδ also segregate based on K-Ras dependency, as K-Ras independent cells are more sensitive to topoisomerase inhibitors, and depletion of PKCδ in this sub-group suppresses apoptosis through increased activation of ERK. In contrast, K-Ras dependent lung cancer cells are largely insensitive to topoisomerase inhibitors, and depletion of PKCδ can increase apoptosis and decrease activation of ERK in this sub-group. We have previously shown that nuclear translocation of PKCδ is necessary and sufficient for pro-apoptotic signaling. Our current studies show that K-Ras dependent cells are refractive to PKCδ driven apoptosis. Analysis of this sub-group showed increased PKCδ expression and an increase in the nuclear:cytoplasmic ratio of PKCδ. In addition, targeting PKCδ to the nucleus induces apoptosis in K-Ras independent, but not K-Ras dependent NSCLC cells. Our studies provide tools for identification of the subset of patients with KRAS mutant tumors most amenable to targeting of the K-Ras pathway, and identify PKCδ as a potential target in this tumor population. These sub-groups are likely to be of clinical relevance, as high PKCδ expression correlates with increased overall survival and a more epithelial tumor phenotype in patients with KRAS mutant lung adenocarcinomas

  13. LKB1/KRAS mutant lung cancers constitute a genetic subset of NSCLC with increased sensitivity to MAPK and mTOR signalling inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, C L; Choudhury, B; Davies, H; Edkins, S; Greenman, C; Haaften, G van; Mironenko, T; Santarius, T; Stevens, C; Stratton, M R; Futreal, P A

    2009-01-01

    LKB1/STK11 is a multitasking tumour suppressor kinase. Germline inactivating mutations of the gene are responsible for the Peutz-Jeghers hereditary cancer syndrome. It is also somatically inactivated in approximately 30% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here, we report that LKB1/KRAS mutant NSCLC cell lines are sensitive to the MEK inhibitor CI-1040 shown by a dose-dependent reduction in proliferation rate, whereas LKB1 and KRAS mutations alone do not confer similar sensitivity. We show that this subset of NSCLC is also sensitised to the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. Importantly, the data suggest that LKB1/KRAS mutant NSCLCs are a genetically and functionally distinct subset and further suggest that this subset of lung cancers might afford an opportunity for exploitation of anti-MAPK/mTOR-targeted therapies. PMID:19165201

  14. Up- regulation of miR-328-3p sensitizes non-small cell lung cancer to radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wei; Ma, Chao-nan; Zhou, Nan-nan; Li, Xian-dong; Zhang, Yi-jie

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are believed to be resistant against radiotherapy in certain types of cancers. The aim of our study was to determine the clinical application of miRNAs in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Sixty NSCLC tissue samples and adjacent histologically normal tissues were obtained for miRNAs microarray analysis and validated by RT-qPCR. Correlation between miRNA expression level and clinicopathological features was evaluated. Our study examined the influence of changed miRNA expression on the damaged DNA and its associated radio sensitivity. Luciferase assay was performed to determine potential effects on the targeted gene. Our study identified fifteen altered miRNAs in which miR-328-3p was down regulated in NSCLC tumour tissue as compared to normal tissues. Down-expression of miR-328-3p was positively associated with an enhanced lymph node metastasis, advanced clinical stage and a shortened survival rate. miR-328-3p expression was decreased in A549 cells compared to other NSCLC cell lines. Up-regulation of miR-328-3p demonstrated a survival inhibition effect in A549 and restored NSCLC cells’ sensitivity to radio therapy. An increased miR-328-3p expression promoted irradiation-induced DNA damage in cells. γ-H2AX was identified as the direct target of miR-328-3p. Over-expressed miR-328-3p can improve the radiosensitvity of cells by altering the DNA damage/repair signalling pathways in NSCLC. PMID:27530148

  15. miR-200/ZEB axis regulates sensitivity to nintedanib in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Nobuhiko; Seike, Masahiro; Soeno, Chie; Chiba, Mika; Miyanaga, Akihiko; Noro, Rintaro; Sugano, Teppei; Matsumoto, Masaru; Kubota, Kaoru; Gemma, Akihiko

    2016-03-01

    Nintedanib (BIBF1120) is a multi-targeted angiokinase inhibitor and has been evaluated in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients in clinical studies. In the present study, we evaluated the antitumor effects of nintedanib in 16 NSCLC cell lines and tried to identify microRNA (miRNA) associated with sensitivity to nintedanib. No correlations between FGFR, PDGFR and VEGFR family activation and sensitivity to nintedanib were found. The difference in miRNA expression profiles between 5 nintedanib-sensitive and 5 nintedanib-resistant cell lines was evaluated by miRNA array and quantitative RT-PCR analysis (qRT-PCR). Expression of miR-200b, miR-200a and miR-141 belonging to the miR-200 family which contributes to epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), was significantly lower in 5 nintedanib-resistant than in 5 nintedanib-sensitive cell lines. We examined the protein expression of EMT markers in these 10 NSCLC cell lines. E-cadherin expression was lower, and vimentin and ZEB1 expression were higher in 5 nintedanib-resistant cell lines. PC-1 was the most sensitive of the NSCLC cell lines to nintedanib. We established nintedanib-resistant PC-1 cells (PC-1R) by the stepwise method. PC-1R cells also showed decreased expression of miR-200b, miR-141 and miR-429 and increased expression of ZEB1 and ZEB2. We confirmed that induction of miR-200b or miR-141 enhanced sensitivity to nintedanib in nintedanib-resistant A549 and PC1-R cells. In addition, we evaluated the response to gefitinib in combination with nintedanib after TGF-β1 exposure of A549 cells. Nintedanib was able to reverse TGF-β1-induced EMT and resistance to gefitinib caused by miR-200b and miR-141 upregulation and ZEB1 downregulation. These results suggested that the miR-200/ZEB axis might be predictive biomarkers for sensitivity to nintedanib in NSCLC cells. Furthermore, nintedanib combined with gefitinib might be a novel therapeutic strategy for NSCLC cells with EMT

  16. Silencing of the transcription factor STAT3 sensitizes lung cancer cells to DNA damaging drugs, but not to TNFα- and NK cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kulesza, Dorota W.; Carré, Thibault; Chouaib, Salem; Kaminska, Bozena

    2013-02-15

    Transcription factor STAT3 (Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription 3) is persistently active in human tumors and may contribute to tumor progression. Inhibition of STAT3 expression/activity could be a good strategy to modulate tumor cell survival and responses to cancer chemotherapeutics or immune cytotoxicity. We silenced STAT3 expression in human A549 lung cancer cells to elucidate its role in cell survival and resistance to chemotherapeutics, TNFα and natural killer (NK)-mediated cytotoxicity. We demonstrate that STAT3 is not essential for basal survival and proliferation of A549 cancer cells. Stable silencing of STAT3 expression sensitized A549 cells to DNA damaging chemotherapeutics doxorubicin and cisplatin in a p53-independent manner. Sensitization to DNA damage-inducing chemotherapeutics could be due to down-regulation of the Bcl-xL expression in STAT3 depleted cells. In contrast, knockdown of STAT3 in cancer cells did not modulate responses to TNFα and NK-mediated cytotoxicity. We found that STAT3 depletion increased the NFκB activity likely providing the compensatory, pro-survival signal. The treatment with TNFα, but not doxorubicin, enhanced this effect. We conclude that STAT3 is not crucial for the control of basal cell proliferation and survival of lung carcinoma cells but modulates susceptibility to DNA damaging chemotherapeutics by regulation of intrinsic pro-survival pathways. - Highlights: ► STAT3 silencing is negligent for basal lung cancer cell viability and proliferation. ► STAT3 depletion sensitizes lung cancer cells to DNA damaging chemotherapeutics. ► STAT3 depletion has no effect on susceptibility to extrinsic apoptosis inducers. ► Increased pro-survival NFκB activity may compensate for STAT3 depletion.

  17. The ALCHEMIST Lung Cancer Trial

    Cancer.gov

    A collection of material about the ALCHEMIST lung cancer trial that will examine tumor tissue from patients with early-stage, completely resected lung cancer for gene mutations in the EGFR and ALK genes, and a

  18. Early Lung Cancer Diagnosis by Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuqian; Yang, Dongliang; Weng, Lixing; Wang, Lianhui

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer causes an extreme threat to human health, and the mortality rate due to lung cancer has not decreased during the last decade. Prognosis or early diagnosis could help reduce the mortality rate. If microRNA and tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), as well as the corresponding autoantibodies, can be detected prior to clinical diagnosis, such high sensitivity of biosensors makes the early diagnosis and prognosis of cancer realizable. This review provides an overview of tumor-associated biomarker identifying methods and the biosensor technology available today. Laboratorial researches utilizing biosensors for early lung cancer diagnosis will be highlighted. PMID:23892596

  19. Radiotherapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bleehen, N.M.; Cox, J.D.

    1985-05-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of lung cancer was reviewed at a workshop held in Cambridge, England, in June 1984. It was concluded that there was a continuing role for radiation therapy in the primary management of small cell lung cancer, including the loco-regional treatment for patients with limited disease. Radical radiotherapy for patients with non-small cell carcinoma could be curative for a proportion of patients with limited disease. Careful planning and quality control was essential. Palliative radiotherapy provided useful treatment for many other patients. Other related aspects of treatment are also presented.

  20. High specificity but low sensitivity of mutation-specific antibodies against EGFR mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Bondgaard, Anna-Louise; Høgdall, Estrid; Mellemgaard, Anders; Skov, Birgit G

    2014-12-01

    Determination of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations has a pivotal impact on treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A standardized test has not yet been approved. So far, Sanger DNA sequencing has been widely used. Its rather low sensitivity has led to the development of more sensitive methods including real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Immunohistochemistry with mutation-specific antibodies might be a promising detection method. We evaluated 210 samples with NSCLC from an unselected Caucasian population. Extracted DNA was analyzed for EGFR mutations by RT-PCR (Therascreen EGFR PCR kit, Qiagen, UK; reference method). For immunohistochemistry, antibodies against exon19 deletions (clone 6B6), exon21 mutations (clone 43B2) from Cell Signaling Technology (Boston, USA) and EGFR variantIII (clone 218C9) from Dako (Copenhagen, DK) were applied. Protein expression was evaluated, and staining score (multipum of intensity (graded 0-3) and percentages (0-100%) of stained tumor cells) was calculated. Positivity was defined as staining score >0. Specificity of exon19 antibody was 98.8% (95% confidence interval=95.9-99.9%) and of exon21 antibody 97.8% (95% confidence interval=94.4-99.4%). Sensitivity of exon19 antibody was 63.2% (95% confidence interval=38.4-83.7%) and of exon21 antibody was 80.0% (95% confidence interval=44.4-97.5%). Seven exon19 and four exon21 mutations were false negatives (immunohistochemistry negative, RT-PCR positive). Two exon19 and three exon21 mutations were false positive (immunohistochemistry positive, RT-PCR negative). One false positive exon21 mutation had staining score 300. The EGFR variantIII antibody showed no correlation to EGFR mutation status determined by RT-PCR or to EGFR immunohistochemistry. High specificity of the mutation-specific antibodies was demonstrated. However, sensitivity was low, especially for exon19 deletions, and thus these antibodies cannot yet be used as screening method for EGFR mutations in NSCLC

  1. Lung Cancer Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Sarah B; Contessa, Joseph N; Omay, Sacit B; Chiang, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Brain metastases are common among patients with lung cancer and have been associated with significant morbidity and limited survival. However, the treatment of brain metastases has evolved as the field has advanced in terms of central nervous system imaging, surgical technique, and radiotherapy technology. This has allowed patients to receive improved treatment with less toxicity and more durable benefit. In addition, there have been significant advances in systemic therapy for lung cancer in recent years, and several treatments including chemotherapy, targeted therapy, and immunotherapy exhibit activity in the central nervous system. Utilizing systemic therapy for treating brain metastases can avoid or delay local therapy and often allows patients to receive effective treatment for both intracranial and extracranial disease. Determining the appropriate treatment for patients with lung cancer brain metastases therefore requires a clear understanding of intracranial disease burden, tumor histology, molecular characteristics, and overall cancer prognosis. This review provides updates on the current state of surgery and radiotherapy for the treatment of brain metastases, as well as an overview of systemic therapy options that may be effective in select patients with intracranial metastases from lung cancer.

  2. Downregulation of microRNA-196a enhances the sensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer cells to cisplatin treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Yang, Zailiang; Chen, Mingyan; Liu, Ying

    2016-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) are a class of small, non-coding RNA molecules that play an important role in the pathogenesis of human diseases through the regulation of gene expression. Although miRNA-196a has been implicated in the progression of human lung cancer, its role in enhancing the sensitivity of non‑small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells to cisplatin has not yet been confirmed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of miRNA‑196a on the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to cisplatin in vitro and in vivo. RT-qPCR was used to detect miRNA-196a expression. Synthesized locked nucleic acid (LNA)-anti‑miRNA-196a oligonucleotide was transiently transfected into the SPC‑A‑1 and A549 lung cancer cells to examine the effects of miRNA‑196a on the growth of and colony formation inthe cisplatin‑treated cells. The effects of miRNA-196a on the sensitivity of SPC‑A-1 cells to cisplatin in vivo were determined using BALB/c nude mice. The expression of miRNA‑196a was significantly higher in both the lung cancer tissues and cell lines. The LNA-based knockdown of miRNA-196a significantly inhibited SPC‑A‑1 and A549 cell growth and induced apoptosis. Moreover, the downregulation of miRNA-196a sensitized the SPC‑A‑1 and A549 NSCLC cells to cisplatin in vitro and in vivo, by inducing apoptosis. The findings of this study demonstrate that the administration of cisplatin in combination with miRNA-196a-targeted therapy may be a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of NSCLC.

  3. [Epidemiology of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Becker, N

    2010-08-01

    Lung cancer is by far the most common form of cancer worldwide and in Germany is now "only" still the commonest cause of death from cancer. The most important single risk factor is smoking but in selected population groups, for example in the professional area, other factors can also play a role which cannot be ignored and open up a corresponding potential for prevention. Effective early detection procedures are at present unknown. The most promising, however, is multislice computed tomography (MSCT) which for this reason is presently being tested for effectiveness in several large research projects. The results are not expected for some years. Until then the early detection of lung cancer with MSCT cannot be considered suitable for routine use but can only be justified within the framework of research studies.

  4. [Secondary lung cancers].

    PubMed

    Etienne-Mastroïanni, Bénédicte; Freyer, Gilles; Cordier, Jean-François

    2003-04-01

    Lung is the most common site of metastatic involvement for many malignant tumors. The most frequent abnormalities are solitary or multiple pulmonary nodules (large "cannonball" nodules or diffuse miliary pattern), and lymphangitic carcinomatosis. Pulmonary metastases usually occur in a context of a previously known tumour, but sometimes may reveal a latent tumour. Most patients receive palliative treatment with chemotherapy, or hormone therapy (for metastases of breast cancer, thyroid, endometrial carcinoma or prostatic cancer). Patients may rarely benefit from resection of pulmonary metastases.

  5. Detection of Lung Cancer with Volatile Organic Biomarkers in Exhaled Breath and Lung Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jin; Wang, Di; Wang, Le; Wang, Ping; Hu, Yanjie; Ying, Kejing

    2009-05-01

    In patients with lung cancer, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are excreted in exhaled breath. In this article, exhaled breath of 30 lung cancer paitients and 30 healthy people were collected, preconcentrated by solid-microextraction(SPME) and analyzed with gas chrom-atography and mass spectrometry (GC/MS). A predictive model composed of 5 VOCs out of 16 candidate VOCs detected in the lung cancer patients is constructed by discriminant analysis, with a sensitivity of 76.7% and specificity of 96.7%. We detected exhaled VOCs of 3 different lung cancer cell lines and human bronchial epithelial cell lines. 2-Tridicanone is considered the distinctive marker of lung cancer cells, which is found in lung cancer patients' exhaled breath as well. Compared to healthy people, patients with lung cancer had distinctive VOCs in their exhaled breath. The predictive model can work as diagnosis reference for lung cancer. VOCs found in lung cancer cell line help the cognition of the mechasim VOCs generating in lung cancer patients.

  6. Nutrition aspects of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cranganu, Andreea; Camporeale, Jayne

    2009-12-01

    Lung cancer is the most common type of cancer, excluding nonmelanoma skin cancer, and is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Notable carcinogens involved in the development of lung cancer include smoking, secondhand smoke, and radon. Lung cancer is divided into 2 major types: non-small-cell lung cancer, the most prevalent, and small-cell lung cancer. Treatment includes surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, or a combination of the same. Medical nutrition therapy is often required for nutrition-related side effects of cancer treatment, which include but are not limited to anorexia, nausea and vomiting, and esophagitis. The best protection against lung cancer is avoidance of airborne carcinogens and increased consumption of fruits and vegetables. Studies have shown that smokers taking large amounts of beta-carotene and vitamin A supplements had increased lung cancer incidence and mortality. However, ingestion of beta-carotene from foods, along with a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, has a protective role against lung disease. The use of complementary and alternative medicine by lung cancer patients is prevalent; therefore, clinicians should investigate whether complementary and alternative therapies are used by patients and advise them on the use of these therapies to avoid any potential side effects and interactions with conventional therapies. The article concludes with a case study of a patient with non-small-cell lung cancer and illustrates the use of medical nutrition therapy in relation to cancer treatment side effects.

  7. Chemoprevention of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Eva; Mao, Jenny T.; Lam, Stephen; Reid, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking is the main risk factor. Former smokers are at a substantially increased risk of developing lung cancer compared with lifetime never smokers. Chemoprevention refers to the use of specific agents to reverse, suppress, or prevent the process of carcinogenesis. This article reviews the major agents that have been studied for chemoprevention. Methods: Articles of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention trials were reviewed and summarized to obtain recommendations. Results: None of the phase 3 trials with the agents β-carotene, retinol, 13-cis-retinoic acid, α-tocopherol, N-acetylcysteine, acetylsalicylic acid, or selenium has demonstrated beneficial and reproducible results. To facilitate the evaluation of promising agents and to lessen the need for a large sample size, extensive time commitment, and expense, surrogate end point biomarker trials are being conducted to assist in identifying the most promising agents for later-stage chemoprevention trials. With the understanding of important cellular signaling pathways and the expansion of potentially important targets, agents (many of which target inflammation and the arachidonic acid pathway) are being developed and tested which may prevent or reverse lung carcinogenesis. Conclusions: By integrating biologic knowledge, additional early-phase trials can be performed in a reasonable time frame. The future of lung cancer chemoprevention should entail the evaluation of single agents or combinations that target various pathways while working toward identification and validation of intermediate end points. PMID:23649449

  8. Silicon photonic crystal microarrays for high throughput label-free detection of lung cancer cell line lysates with sensitivity and specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Lai, Wei-Cheng; Zou, Yi; Gemmill, Robert M.; Chen, Ray T.

    2013-03-01

    Detection of biomolecules on microarrays based on label-free on-chip optical biosensors is very attractive since this format avoids complex chemistries caused by steric hindrance of labels. Application areas include the detection of cancers and allergens, and food-borne pathogens to name a few. We have demonstrated photonic crystal microcavity biosensors with high sensitivity down to 1pM concentrations (67pg/ml). High sensitivities were achieved by slow light engineering which reduced the radiation loss and increased the stored energy in the photonic crystal microcavity resonance mode. Resonances with high quality factor Q~26,760 in liquid ambient, coupled with larger optical mode volumes allowed enhanced interaction with the analyte biomolecules which resulted in sensitivities down to 10 cells per micro-liter to lung cancer cell lysates. The specificity of detection was ensured by multiplexed detections from multiple photonic crystal microcavities arrayed on the arms of a multimode interference power splitter. Specific binding interactions and control experiments were performed simultaneously at the same instant of time with the same 60 microliter sample volume. Specificity is further ensured by sandwich assay methods in the multiplexed experiment. Sandwich assay based amplification increased the sensitivity further resulting in the detection of lung cancer cell lysates down to concentrations of 2 cells per micro-liter. The miniaturization enabled by photonic crystal biosensors coupled with waveguide interconnected layout thus offers the potential of high throughput proteomics with high sensitivity and specificity.

  9. Lung cancer in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Algranti, E; Menezes, A M; Achutti, A C

    2001-04-01

    Lung cancer is the second leading cause of death in Brazil, after exclusion of external causes. Registries in the country are not reliable because of under-registration and limited coverage. Incidence rates for Brazil are less then half those for selected areas with good registries. Crude and adjusted incidence and mortality rates for lung cancer are rising, particularly among women. The main reason is the acceleration in tobacco consumption and the spread of smoking among women. At present, approximately 40% of men and 25% of women, 15 years of age or older, are current smokers. In the state of Rio Grande do Sul, where registries are reliable, incidence and mortality for males are similar to US data and the figures for women are rapidly approaching those for men. Occupations associated with risks of exposure to respiratory carcinogens show a rise in the incidence of lung cancer in the industrialized area of São Paulo. The main occupational risk in Brazil is exposure to mineral dusts, silica, or asbestos. Although about 15 million Brazilians are exposed to pesticides, agricultural workers were not a risk group for lung cancer in a case-control study. Pesticides containing arsenic and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) are banned. In recent years, a trend towards a decrease in male smoking has been noted, but there is still a high tobacco exposure burden in both males and females, with a forecast of a further increase in rates of lung cancer incidence and deaths. Control of respiratory carcinogens at work continues to be a problem, particularly in the present scenario of economic and political pressures on Brazil and other developing nations. Semin Oncol 28:143-152. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company.

  10. Lung Cancer Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Pamela; Wistuba, Ignacio I

    2017-02-01

    The molecular characterization of lung cancer has changed the classification and treatment of these tumors, becoming an essential component of pathologic diagnosis and oncologic therapy decisions. Through the recognition of novel biomarkers, such as epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase translocations, it is possible to identify subsets of patients who benefit from targeted molecular therapies. The success of targeted anticancer therapies and new immunotherapy approaches has created a new paradigm of personalized therapy and has led to accelerated development of new drugs for lung cancer treatment. This article focuses on clinically relevant cancer biomarkers as targets for therapy and potential new targets for drug development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Sensitization of retinoids and corticoids to epigenetic drugs in MYC-activated lung cancers by antitumor reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Romero, O A; Verdura, S; Torres-Diz, M; Gomez, A; Moran, S; Condom, E; Esteller, M; Villanueva, A; Sanchez-Cespedes, M

    2017-03-02

    Components of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex, including BRG1 (also SMARCA4), are inactivated in cancer. Among other functions, SWI/SNF orchestrates the response to retinoid acid (RA) and glucocorticoids (GC) involving downregulation of MYC. The epigenetic drugs SAHA and azacytidine, as well as RA and GC, are currently being used to treat some malignancies but their therapeutic potential in lung cancer is not well established. Here we aimed to determine the possible therapeutic effects of azacytidine and SAHA (A/S) alone or in combination with GC plus RA (GC/RA) in lung cancers with either BRG1 inactivation or MYC amplification. In vitro, responses to GC/RA treatment were more effective in MYC-amplified cells. These effects were mediated by BRG1 and involved a reprogramming towards prodifferentiation gene expression signatures and downregulation of MYC. In MYC-amplified cells, administration of GC/RA enhanced the cell growth inhibitory effects of A/S which, in turn, accentuated the prodifferentiation features promoted by GC/RA. Finally, these treatments improved overall survival of mice orthotopically implanted with MYC-amplified, but not BRG1-mutant, cells and reduced tumor cell viability and proliferation. We propose that the combination of epigenetic treatments with retinoids and corticoids of MYC-driven lung tumors constitute a strategy for therapeutic intervention in this otherwise incurable disease.

  12. Adaptive Radiation for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Daniel R.; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-01-01

    The challenges of lung cancer radiotherapy are intra/inter-fraction tumor/organ anatomy/motion changes and the need to spare surrounding critical structures. Evolving radiotherapy technologies, such as four-dimensional (4D) image-based motion management, daily on-board imaging and adaptive radiotherapy based on volumetric images over the course of radiotherapy, have enabled us to deliver higher dose to target while minimizing normal tissue toxicities. The image-guided radiotherapy adapted to changes of motion and anatomy has made the radiotherapy more precise and allowed ablative dose delivered to the target using novel treatment approaches such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy, and proton therapy in lung cancer, techniques used to be considered very sensitive to motion change. Future clinical trials using real time tracking and biological adaptive radiotherapy based on functional images are proposed. PMID:20814539

  13. Combination lung cancer chemotherapy: Design of a pH-sensitive transferrin-PEG-Hz-lipid conjugate for the co-delivery of docetaxel and baicalin.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Wang, Lin; Li, Na; Liu, Yucai; Su, Hui

    2017-08-31

    The aim of the present study is to design a novel dual-ligand lipid based nanoparticle system. It is conducted by a specific ligand and pH sensitive lipid conjugate. Docetaxel (DTX) and baicalein (BA) are co-delivered by this system for combination lung cancer chemotherapy. Firstly, transferrin (Tf)-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-hydrazone (hz)-glyceryl monostearate (GMS), Tf-PEG-hz-GMS, was synthesized. Tf decorated DTX and BA loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (Tf-D/B-SLNs) were prepared by emulsification method. The capability of Tf-D/B-SLNs in suppressing lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo was investigated. The results revealed the better antitumor efficiency of Tf-D/B-SLNs than the non-decorated SLNs and single drug loaded SLNs. Significant synergistic effects were observed in the dual drugs loaded systems. The best tumor inhibition ability and the lowest systemic toxicity also proved the pH-sensitive co-delivery nano-system could be a promising strategy for treatment of lung cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. Histone deacetylase inhibitors sensitize lung cancer cells to hyperthermia: involvement of Ku70/SirT-1 in thermo-protection.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohamed K; Watari, Hidemichi; Salah-Eldin, Alaa-Eldin; Sultan, Ahmed S; Mohamed, Zainab; Fujioka, Yoichiro; Ohba, Yusuke; Sakuragi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the sensitization mechanism to thermal stress by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) in lung cancer cells and shows that Ku70, based on its acetylation status, mediates the protection of lung cancer from hyperthermia (42.5°C, 1-6 hrs). Ku70 regulates apoptosis by sequestering pro-apoptotic Bax. However, its role in thermal stress is not fully understood. The findings showed that, pre-treating lung cancer cells with HDACIs, nicotinamide (NM) or Trichostatin A (TsA) or both significantly enhanced hyperthermia-induced Bax-dependent apoptosis in PC-10 cells. We found that hyperthermia induces SirT-1, Sirtuin, upregulation but not HDAC6 or SirT-3, therefore transfection with dominant negative SirT-1 (Y/H) also eliminated the protection and resulted in more cell death by hyperthermia, in H1299 cells through Bax activation. Hyperthermia alone primed lung cancer cells to apoptosis without prominent death. After hyperthermia Bax was upregulated, Bcl-2 was downregulated, the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio was inversed and Bax/Bcl-2 heterodimer was dissociated. Although hyperthermia did not affect total Ku70 expression level, it stimulated Ku70 deacetylation, which in turn could bind more Bax in the PC-10 cells. These findings suggest an escape mechanism from hyperthermia-induced Bax activation. To verify the role of Ku70 in this protection mechanism, Ku70 was silenced by siRNA. Ku70 silencing significantly sensitized the lung cancer cells to hyperthermia. The Ku70 KD cells underwent cytotoxic G1 arrest and caspase-dependant apoptosis when compared to scrambled transfectants which showed only G2/M cytostatic arrest in the cell lines investigated, suggesting an additional cell cycle-dependent, novel, role of Ku70 in protection from hyperthermia. Taken together, our data show a Ku70-dependent protection mechanism from hyperthermia. Targeting Ku70 and/or its acetylation during hyperthermia may represent a promising therapeutic approach for lung cancer.

  15. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Sensitize Lung Cancer Cells to Hyperthermia: Involvement of Ku70/SirT-1 in Thermo-Protection

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed K.; Watari, Hidemichi; Salah-eldin, Alaa-eldin; Sultan, Ahmed S.; Mohamed, Zainab; Fujioka, Yoichiro; Ohba, Yusuke; Sakuragi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the sensitization mechanism to thermal stress by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) in lung cancer cells and shows that Ku70, based on its acetylation status, mediates the protection of lung cancer from hyperthermia (42.5°C, 1-6 hrs). Ku70 regulates apoptosis by sequestering pro-apoptotic Bax. However, its role in thermal stress is not fully understood. The findings showed that, pre-treating lung cancer cells with HDACIs, nicotinamide (NM) or Trichostatin A (TsA) or both significantly enhanced hyperthermia-induced Bax-dependent apoptosis in PC-10 cells. We found that hyperthermia induces SirT-1, Sirtuin, upregulation but not HDAC6 or SirT-3, therefore transfection with dominant negative SirT-1 (Y/H) also eliminated the protection and resulted in more cell death by hyperthermia, in H1299 cells through Bax activation. Hyperthermia alone primed lung cancer cells to apoptosis without prominent death. After hyperthermia Bax was upregulated, Bcl-2 was downregulated, the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio was inversed and Bax/Bcl-2 heterodimer was dissociated. Although hyperthermia did not affect total Ku70 expression level, it stimulated Ku70 deacetylation, which in turn could bind more Bax in the PC-10 cells. These findings suggest an escape mechanism from hyperthermia-induced Bax activation. To verify the role of Ku70 in this protection mechanism, Ku70 was silenced by siRNA. Ku70 silencing significantly sensitized the lung cancer cells to hyperthermia. The Ku70 KD cells underwent cytotoxic G1 arrest and caspase-dependant apoptosis when compared to scrambled transfectants which showed only G2/M cytostatic arrest in the cell lines investigated, suggesting an additional cell cycle-dependent, novel, role of Ku70 in protection from hyperthermia. Taken together, our data show a Ku70-dependent protection mechanism from hyperthermia. Targeting Ku70 and/or its acetylation during hyperthermia may represent a promising therapeutic approach for lung cancer. PMID:24728004

  16. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  18. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  19. SMAC mimetic (JP1201) sensitizes non-small cell lung cancers to multiple chemotherapy agents in an IAP dependent but TNFα independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Rachel M.; Peyton, Michael; Larsen, Jill E.; Girard, Luc; Xie, Yang; Gazdar, Adi; Harran, Patrick; Wang, Lai; Brekken, Rolf A.; Wang, Xiaodong; Minna, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) are key regulators of apoptosis and are inhibited by the second mitocondrial activator of caspases (SMAC). Previously, a small subset of TNFα-expressing non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) was found to be sensitive to SMAC mimetics alone. In this study we determined if a SMAC mimetic (JP1201) could sensitize non-responsive NSCLC cell lines to standard chemotherapy. We found that JP1201 sensitized NSCLCs to doxorubicin, erlotinib, gemcitabine, paclitaxel, vinorelbine, and the combination of carboplatin with paclitaxel in a synergistic manner at clinically achievable drug concentrations. Sensitization did not occur with platinum alone. Furthermore, sensitization was specific for tumor compared to normal lung epithelial cells, increased in NSCLCs harvested after chemotherapy treatment, and did not induce TNFα secretion. Sensitization also was enhanced in vivo with increased tumor inhibition and increased survival of mice carrying xenografts. These effects were accompanied by caspase 3, 4, and 9 activation, indicating that both mitochondrial and ER stress-induced apoptotic pathways are activated by the combination of vinorelbine and JP1201. Chemotherapies that induce cell death through the mitochondrial pathway required only inhibition of XIAP for sensitization, while chemotherapies that induce cell death through multiple apoptotic pathways required inhibition of cIAP1, cIAP2, and XIAP. Therefore, the data suggest that IAP-targeted therapy using a SMAC mimetic provides a new therapeutic strategy for synergistic sensitization of NSCLCs to standard chemotherapy agents, which appears to occur independently of TNFα secretion. PMID:22049529

  20. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of Mad2 siRNA-loaded EGFR-targeted chitosan nanoparticles in cisplatin sensitive and resistant lung cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Ana Vanessa; Gattacceca, Florence; Singh, Amit; Bousbaa, Hassan; Ferreira, Domingos; Sarmento, Bruno; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2016-01-01

    Background: The present study focuses on biodistribution profile and pharmacokinetic parameters of EGFR-targeted chitosan nanoparticles (TG CS nanoparticles) for siRNA/cisplatin combination therapy of lung cancer. Material & methods: Mad2 siRNA was encapsulated in EGFR targeted and nontargeted (NTG) CS nanoparticles by electrostatic interaction. The biodistribution of the nanoparticles was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively in cisplatin (DDP) sensitive and resistant lung cancer xenograft model. Results: TG nanoparticles showed a consistent and preferential tumor targeting ability with rapid clearance from the plasma to infiltrate and sustain within the tumor up to 96 h. They exhibit a sixfold higher tumor targeting efficiency compared with the NTG nanoparticles. Conclusion: TG nanoparticles present as an attractive drug delivery platform for RNAi therapeutics against NSCLC. PMID:26980454

  1. Elemene Increases Autophagic Apoptosis and Drug Sensitivity in Human Cisplatin (DDP)-Resistant Lung Cancer Cell Line SPC-A-1/DDP By Inducing Beclin-1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kun; Wang, Liping; Cheng, Ruirui; Liu, Xia; Mao, Shengya; Yan, Yan

    2017-05-23

    Drug resistance is the major obstacle for the successful therapy of lung adenocarcinoma. It was suggested that ß-elemene, a major isoform of elemene, could reverse the drug resistance in lung cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanisms remains poorly known. Here, we aimed to investigate whether elemene is involved in the cisplatin (DDP)-resistance of lung adenocarcinoma cells and further explore the underlying mechanism. The results showed that human lung adenocarcinoma cell line SPC-A-1 and its DDP-resistant strain SPC-A-1/DDP had a similar sensitivity to elemene treatment. Low dose elemene increased the sensitivity of SPC-A-1/DDP cells to DDP, accompanied by a dramatically decrease in expression of multidrug-resistance proteins and cell proliferation, and an increase in cell autophagy and autophagic apoptosis. We found that the expression of Beclin-1, the key regulator of autophagy, was induced by elemene treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, we found that Beclin-1 overexpression had a similar effect with elemene treatment on autophagy and autophagic apoptosis in SPC-A-1/DDP cells. In contrast, Beclin-1 knockdown could significantly rescue elemene-induced autophagic apoptosis and counteract elemene-induced sensitivity in SPC-A-1/DDP cells. Our findings demonstrate that elemene can reverses the drug resistance of SPC-A-1/DDP cells via promotion of Beclin-1-induced autophagy.

  2. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongmei; Liu, Xin; Rice, Shawn J; Belani, Chandra P

    2016-10-01

    Lung cancer remains a challenging disease with high morbidity and mortality despite targeted therapy. Symptom burden related to cancer impairs quality of life and functional status in patients with lung cancer and in survivors. Pulmonary rehabilitation has been recognized as an effective, noninvasive intervention for patients with chronic respiratory disease. It is well established that pulmonary rehabilitation benefits patients with chronic obstruction pulmonary disease through improved exercise capacity and symptoms. Evidence is increasing that the benefit of pulmonary rehabilitation can be applied to patients with lung cancer. Comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation has made its way as a cornerstone of integrated care for patients with lung cancer.

  3. Immunotherapy in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Du, Lingling; Herbst, Roy S; Morgensztern, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    The treatment of patients with good performance status and advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer has been based on the use of first-line platinum-based doublet and second-line docetaxel. Immunotherapy represents a new therapeutic approach with the potential for prolonged benefit. Although the vaccines studied have not shown benefit in patients with non-small cell lung cancer, immune checkpoint inhibitors against the PD-1/PD-L1 axis showed increased overall survival compared with docetaxel in randomized clinical trials, which led to the approval of nivolumab and pembrolizumab. Because only a minority of patients benefit from this class of drugs, there has been an intense search for biomarkers.

  4. Disruption of BASIGIN decreases lactic acid export and sensitizes non-small cell lung cancer to biguanides independently of the LKB1 status

    PubMed Central

    Floch, Renaud Le; Moura, Conceição Souto

    2015-01-01

    Most cancers rely on aerobic glycolysis to generate energy and metabolic intermediates. To maintain a high glycolytic rate, cells must efficiently export lactic acid through the proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporters (MCT1/4). These transporters require a chaperone, CD147/BASIGIN (BSG) for trafficking to the plasma membrane and function. To validate the key role of these transporters in lung cancer, we first analysed the expression of MCT1/4 and BSG in 50 non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. These proteins were specifically upregulated in tumour tissues. We then disrupted BSG in three NSCLC cell lines (A549, H1975 and H292) via ‘Zinc-Finger Nucleases’. The three homozygous BSG−/− cell lines displayed a low MCT activity (10- to 5-fold reduction, for MCT1 and MCT4, respectively) compared to wild-type cells. Consequently, the rate of glycolysis, compared to the wild-type counterpart, was reduced by 2.0- to 3.5-fold, whereas the rate of respiration was stimulated in BSG−/− cell lines. Both wild-type and BSG-null cells were extremely sensitive to the mitochondria inhibitor metformin/phenformin in normoxia. However, only BSG-null cells, independently of their LKB1 status, remained sensitive to biguanides in hypoxia in vitro and tumour growth in nude mice. Our results demonstrate that inhibiting glycolysis by targeting lactic acid export sensitizes NSCLC to phenformin. PMID:25894929

  5. Disruption of BASIGIN decreases lactic acid export and sensitizes non-small cell lung cancer to biguanides independently of the LKB1 status.

    PubMed

    Granja, Sara; Marchiq, Ibtissam; Le Floch, Renaud; Moura, Conceição Souto; Baltazar, Fátima; Pouysségur, Jacques

    2015-03-30

    Most cancers rely on aerobic glycolysis to generate energy and metabolic intermediates. To maintain a high glycolytic rate, cells must efficiently export lactic acid through the proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporters (MCT1/4). These transporters require a chaperone, CD147/BASIGIN (BSG) for trafficking to the plasma membrane and function.To validate the key role of these transporters in lung cancer, we first analysed the expression of MCT1/4 and BSG in 50 non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. These proteins were specifically upregulated in tumour tissues. We then disrupted BSG in three NSCLC cell lines (A549, H1975 and H292) via 'Zinc-Finger Nucleases'. The three homozygous BSG-/- cell lines displayed a low MCT activity (10- to 5-fold reduction, for MCT1 and MCT4, respectively) compared to wild-type cells. Consequently, the rate of glycolysis, compared to the wild-type counterpart, was reduced by 2.0- to 3.5-fold, whereas the rate of respiration was stimulated in BSG-/- cell lines. Both wild-type and BSG-null cells were extremely sensitive to the mitochondria inhibitor metformin/phenformin in normoxia. However, only BSG-null cells, independently of their LKB1 status, remained sensitive to biguanides in hypoxia in vitro and tumour growth in nude mice. Our results demonstrate that inhibiting glycolysis by targeting lactic acid export sensitizes NSCLC to phenformin.

  6. Cholinergic Targets in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Spindel, Eliot R

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancers express an autocrine cholinergic loop in which secreted acetylcholine can stimulate tumor growth through both nicotinic and muscarinic receptors. Because activation of mAChR and nAChR stimulates growth; tumor growth can be stimulated by both locally synthesized acetylcholine as well as acetylcholine from distal sources and from nicotine in the high percentage of lung cancer patients who are smokers. The stimulation of lung cancer growth by cholinergic agonists offers many potential new targets for lung cancer therapy. Cholinergic signaling can be targeted at the level of choline transport; acetylcholine synthesis, secretion and degradation; and nicotinic and muscarinic receptors. In addition, the newly describe family of ly-6 allosteric modulators of nicotinic signaling such as lynx1 and lynx2 offers yet another new approach to novel lung cancer therapeutics. Each of these targets has their potential advantages and disadvantages for the development of new lung cancer therapies which are discussed in this review.

  7. Pain management in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Not only burdened by the limited overall survival, lung cancer patient also suffer from various symptoms, such as pain, that implicated in the quality of life. Cancer pain is a complicated and transiently dynamic symptom that results from multiple mechanisms. This review will describe the pathophysiology of cancer pain and general approach in managing a patient with lung cancer pain. The use of opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and adjuvant analgesia, as part of the pharmacology therapy along with interventional strategy, will also be discussed.

  8. American Cancer Society lung cancer screening guidelines.

    PubMed

    Wender, Richard; Fontham, Elizabeth T H; Barrera, Ermilo; Colditz, Graham A; Church, Timothy R; Ettinger, David S; Etzioni, Ruth; Flowers, Christopher R; Gazelle, G Scott; Kelsey, Douglas K; LaMonte, Samuel J; Michaelson, James S; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Sullivan, Daniel C; Travis, William; Walter, Louise; Wolf, Andrew M D; Brawley, Otis W; Smith, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Findings from the National Cancer Institute's National Lung Screening Trial established that lung cancer mortality in specific high-risk groups can be reduced by annual screening with low-dose computed tomography. These findings indicate that the adoption of lung cancer screening could save many lives. Based on the results of the National Lung Screening Trial, the American Cancer Society is issuing an initial guideline for lung cancer screening. This guideline recommends that clinicians with access to high-volume, high-quality lung cancer screening and treatment centers should initiate a discussion about screening with apparently healthy patients aged 55 years to 74 years who have at least a 30-pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. A process of informed and shared decision-making with a clinician related to the potential benefits, limitations, and harms associated with screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography should occur before any decision is made to initiate lung cancer screening. Smoking cessation counseling remains a high priority for clinical attention in discussions with current smokers, who should be informed of their continuing risk of lung cancer. Screening should not be viewed as an alternative to smoking cessation. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society, Inc.

  9. A novel cytostatic form of autophagy in sensitization of non-small cell lung cancer cells to radiation by vitamin D and the vitamin D analog, EB 1089

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Khushboo; Goehe, Rachel W; Di, Xu; Hicks, Mark Anthony; Torti, Suzy V; Torti, Frank M; Harada, Hisashi; Gewirtz, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The standard of care for unresectable lung cancer is chemoradiation. However, therapeutic options are limited and patients are rarely cured. We have previously shown that vitamin D and vitamin D analogs such as EB 1089 can enhance the response to radiation in breast cancer through the promotion of a cytotoxic form of autophagy. In A549 and H460 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, 1,25-D3 (the hormonally active form of vitamin D) and EB 1089 prolonged the growth arrest induced by radiation alone and suppressed proliferative recovery, which translated to a significant reduction in clonogenic survival. In H838 or H358 NSCLC cells, which lack VDR/vitamin D receptor or functional TP53, respectively, 1,25-D3 failed to modify the extent of radiation-induced growth arrest or suppress proliferative recovery post-irradiation. Sensitization to radiation in H1299 NSCLC cells was evident only when TP53 was induced in otherwise tp53-null H1299 NSCLC cells. Sensitization was not associated with increased DNA damage, decreased DNA repair or an increase in apoptosis, necrosis, or senescence. Instead sensitization appeared to be a consequence of the conversion of the cytoprotective autophagy induced by radiation alone to a novel cytostatic form of autophagy by the combination of 1,25-D3 or EB 1089 with radiation. While both pharmacological and genetic suppression of autophagy or inhibition of AMPK phosphorylation sensitized the NSCLC cells to radiation alone, inhibition of the cytostatic autophagy induced by the combination treatment reversed sensitization. Evidence for selectivity was provided by lack of radiosensitization in normal human bronchial cells and cardiomyocytes. Taken together, these studies have identified a unique cytostatic function of autophagy that appears to be mediated by VDR, TP53, and possibly AMPK in the promotion of an enhanced response to radiation by 1,25-D3 and EB 1089 in NSCLC. PMID:25629933

  10. A novel cytostatic form of autophagy in sensitization of non-small cell lung cancer cells to radiation by vitamin D and the vitamin D analog, EB 1089.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Khushboo; Goehe, Rachel W; Di, Xu; Hicks, Mark Anthony; Torti, Suzy V; Torti, Frank M; Harada, Hisashi; Gewirtz, David A

    2014-01-01

    The standard of care for unresectable lung cancer is chemoradiation. However, therapeutic options are limited and patients are rarely cured. We have previously shown that vitamin D and vitamin D analogs such as EB 1089 can enhance the response to radiation in breast cancer through the promotion of a cytotoxic form of autophagy. In A549 and H460 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, 1,25-D3 (the hormonally active form of vitamin D) and EB 1089 prolonged the growth arrest induced by radiation alone and suppressed proliferative recovery, which translated to a significant reduction in clonogenic survival. In H838 or H358 NSCLC cells, which lack VDR/vitamin D receptor or functional TP53, respectively, 1,25-D3 failed to modify the extent of radiation-induced growth arrest or suppress proliferative recovery post-irradiation. Sensitization to radiation in H1299 NSCLC cells was evident only when TP53 was induced in otherwise tp53-null H1299 NSCLC cells. Sensitization was not associated with increased DNA damage, decreased DNA repair or an increase in apoptosis, necrosis, or senescence. Instead sensitization appeared to be a consequence of the conversion of the cytoprotective autophagy induced by radiation alone to a novel cytostatic form of autophagy by the combination of 1,25-D3 or EB 1089 with radiation. While both pharmacological and genetic suppression of autophagy or inhibition of AMPK phosphorylation sensitized the NSCLC cells to radiation alone, inhibition of the cytostatic autophagy induced by the combination treatment reversed sensitization. Evidence for selectivity was provided by lack of radiosensitization in normal human bronchial cells and cardiomyocytes. Taken together, these studies have identified a unique cytostatic function of autophagy that appears to be mediated by VDR, TP53, and possibly AMPK in the promotion of an enhanced response to radiation by 1,25-D3 and EB 1089 in NSCLC.

  11. American Cancer Society Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Wender, Richard; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.; Barrera, Ermilo; Colditz, Graham A.; Church, Timothy R.; Ettinger, David S.; Etzioni, Ruth; Flowers, Christopher R.; Gazelle, G. Scott; Kelsey, Douglas K.; LaMonte, Samuel J.; Michaelson, James S.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Sullivan, Daniel C.; Travis, William; Walter, Louise; Wolf, Andrew M. D.; Brawley, Otis W.; Smith, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Findings from the National Cancer Institute’s National Lung Screening Trial established that lung cancer mortality in specific high-risk groups can be reduced by annual screening with low-dose computed tomography. These findings indicate that the adoption of lung cancer screening could save many lives. Based on the results of the National Lung Screening Trial, the American Cancer Society is issuing an initial guideline for lung cancer screening. This guideline recommends that clinicians with access to high-volume, high-quality lung cancer screening and treatment centers should initiate a discussion about screening with apparently healthy patients aged 55 years to 74 years who have at least a 30-pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. A process of informed and shared decision-making with a clinician related to the potential benefits, limitations, and harms associated with screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography should occur before any decision is made to initiate lung cancer screening. Smoking cessation counseling remains a high priority for clinical attention in discussions with current smokers, who should be informed of their continuing risk of lung cancer. Screening should not be viewed as an alternative to smoking cessation. PMID:23315954

  12. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for lung cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  13. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the lung cancer and your overall health. Radiation Therapy Radiation is a high-energy X-ray that can ... surgery, chemotherapy or both depending upon the circumstances. Radiation therapy works within cancer cells by damaging their ...

  14. CCR researchers show that blocking the estrogen receptor restores the sensitivity of lung cancer cells to therapy | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Claudia Palena, Ph.D., of CCR’s Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, and her colleagues wondered if it would be possible to identify compounds that could reverse the therapy resistance imparted by the process called epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in lung cancer.

  15. [Asbestos-related lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Lotti, M

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of tumour death and a large percentage of it is associated with tobacco smoking. Epidemiology has shown that asbestos cumulative exposures increase the risk of lung cancer to a variable extent, depending on the manufacturing process and the specific job. The risk appears relatively small (< or = 2) and is detectable after massive exposures only. Clinical diagnosis of asbestos-related lung cancer is based upon medical history (exposures > 25 ff.ml years double the risk), possible lung fibrosis and counts of asbestos bodies and fibers in bronchoalveolar lavage and lung tissues. Pleural plaques do not correlate with the cumulative exposures that are associated with lung cancer. The multiplicative interaction between smoke and asbestos is only detectable when the risk associated with asbestos exposure is increased, i.e. after high exposures.

  16. miR-15a/16 Enhances Radiation Sensitivity of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells by Targeting the TLR1/NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Fengming; Yue, Xiao; Ren, Gang; Li, Hongqi; Ping, Li; Wang, Yingjie; Xia, Tingyi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Many miRNAs have been identified as essential issues and core determining factors in tumor radiation. Recent reports have demonstrated that miRNAs and Toll-like receptors could exert reciprocal effects to control cancer development in various ways. However, a novel role of miR-15a/16 in enhancing radiation sensitivity by directly targeting TLR1 has not been reported, to our knowledge. Methods and Materials: Bioinformatic analyses, luciferase reporter assay, biochemical assays, and subcutaneous tumor establishment were used to characterize the signaling pathways of miRNA-15a/16 in response to radiation treatment. Results: First, an inverse correlation between the expression of miR-15a/16 and TLR1 protein was revealed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and normal lung tissues. Next, we corroborated that miR-15a/16 specifically bound to TLR1 3′UTR and inhibited the expression of TLR1 in H358 and A549 cells. Furthermore, miR-15a/16 downregulated the activity of the NF-κB signaling pathway through TLR1. In addition, overexpression of miR-15a/16 inhibited survival capability and increased radiation-induced apoptosis, resulting in enhancement of radiosensitivity in H358 and A549 cells. Finally, subcutaneous tumor bearing NSCLC cells in a nude mice model was established, and the results showed that combined groups (miR-15a/16 + radiation) inhibited tumor growth more significantly than did radiation alone. Conclusions: We mainly elucidate that miRNA-15a/16 can enhance radiation sensitivity by regulating the TLR1/NF-κB signaling pathway and act as a potential therapeutic approach to overcome radioresistance for lung cancer treatment.

  17. LUNG CANCER AND PULMONARY THROMBOEMBOLISM

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna; Ustamujic, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Malignant diseases including lung cancer are the risk for development of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE). Objective: To show the number of PTE in patients with lung cancer treated in Clinic for pulmonary diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” in three-year period: from 2012-2014. Material and methods: This is the retrospective study in which we present the number of various types of lung cancer treated in three-year period, number and per cent of PTE in different types of lung carcinoma, number and per cent of PTE of all diagnosed PTE in lung carcinoma according to the type of carcinoma. Results: In three-year period (from 2012 to 2014) 1609 patients with lung cancer were treated in Clinic for pulmonary diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” Clinical Centre of Sarajevo University. 42 patients: 25 men middle –aged 64.4 years and 17 women middle- aged 66.7 or 2.61% of all patients with lung cancer had diagnosed PTE. That was the 16. 7% of all patients with PTE treated in Clinic “Podhrastovi “in that three-year period. Of all 42 patients with lung cancer and diagnosed PTE 3 patients (7.14%) had planocellular cancer, 4 patients (9.53%) had squamocellular cancer, 9 (21.43%) had adenocarcinoma, 1 (2.38%) had NSCLC, 3 (7.14 %) had microcellular cancer, 1 (2.38%) had neuroendocrine cancer, 2 (4.76%) had large cell-macrocellular and 19 (45.24%) had histological non-differentiated lung carcinoma. Conclusion: Malignant diseases, including lung cancer, are the risk factor for development of PTE. It is important to consider the including anticoagulant prophylaxis in these patients and so to slow down the course of diseases in these patients. PMID:26622205

  18. Lung Cancer and Hispanics: Know the Facts

    MedlinePlus

    Lung Cancer and Hispanics: Know the Facts By the National Cancer Institute First, the good news: the number of lung cancer cases diagnosed in ... myth from fact when it comes to lung cancer. So what are the facts?  Smoking is the primary cause of lung cancer. ...

  19. SMAC mimetic (JP1201) sensitizes non-small cell lung cancers to multiple chemotherapy agents in an IAP-dependent but TNF-α-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Greer, Rachel M; Peyton, Michael; Larsen, Jill E; Girard, Luc; Xie, Yang; Gazdar, Adi F; Harran, Patrick; Wang, Lai; Brekken, Rolf A; Wang, Xiaodong; Minna, John D

    2011-12-15

    Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAP) are key regulators of apoptosis and are inhibited by the second mitocondrial activator of caspases (SMAC). Previously, a small subset of TNF-α-expressing non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) was found to be sensitive to SMAC mimetics alone. In this study, we determined if a SMAC mimetic (JP1201) could sensitize nonresponsive NSCLC cell lines to standard chemotherapy. We found that JP1201 sensitized NSCLCs to doxorubicin, erlotinib, gemcitabine, paclitaxel, vinorelbine, and the combination of carboplatin with paclitaxel in a synergistic manner at clinically achievable drug concentrations. Sensitization did not occur with platinum alone. Furthermore, sensitization was specific for tumor compared with normal lung epithelial cells, increased in NSCLCs harvested after chemotherapy treatment, and did not induce TNF-α secretion. Sensitization also was enhanced in vivo with increased tumor inhibition and increased survival of mice carrying xenografts. These effects were accompanied by caspase 3, 4, and 9 activation, indicating that both mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptotic pathways are activated by the combination of vinorelbine and JP1201. Chemotherapies that induce cell death through the mitochondrial pathway required only inhibition of X-linked IAP (XIAP) for sensitization, whereas chemotherapies that induce cell death through multiple apoptotic pathways required inhibition of cIAP1, cIAP2, and XIAP. Therefore, the data suggest that IAP-targeted therapy using a SMAC mimetic provides a new therapeutic strategy for synergistic sensitization of NSCLCs to standard chemotherapy agents, which seems to occur independently of TNF-α secretion.

  20. Second lung cancers in patients successfully treated for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B E; Cortazar, P; Chute, J P

    1997-08-01

    The rate of developing second lung cancers and other aerodigestive tumors in patients who have been treated for both small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is approximately 10-fold higher than other adult smokers. The risk of second lung cancers in patients surviving resection of NSCLC is approximately 1% to 2% per year. The series reported show that the patients who develop second NSCLCs tend to have early-stage NSCLC (predominantly stage I and II). The survival of patients after the second resection of lung cancer is similar to that of patients presenting with initial NSCLC. The risk of second lung cancers in patients surviving SCLC is 2% to 14% per patient per year and increases two- to seven-fold with the passage of time from 2 to 10 years. The risk of second lung cancers in patients treated for SCLC appears to be higher than that found in patients with NSCLC who were treated only with surgical resection. In addition, the chances of successful resection of second primary NSCLCs in patients who were treated for SCLC is much less than that for patients with metachronous lung cancers after an initial NSCLC. Patients treated for SCLC who continue to smoke cigarettes increase their rate of developing second lung cancers. The contribution of chest radiation and chemotherapy administration to the risk of developing second lung tumors remain to be defined but may be responsible for some of the increased risk in patients treated for SCLC compared to patients undergoing a surgical resection for NSCLC.

  1. The Use of Antisense Oligonucleotides in Evaluating Survivin as a Therapeutic Target for Radiation Sensitization in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Eric T.; Hallahan, Dennis E.

    2004-01-01

    Elucidating the mechanism of over and under expression of proteins is critical in developing a better understanding of cancer. Multiple techniques are used to examine differential expression of proteins in cells and assess changes in protein expression in response to therapies such as radiation. Reduced expression can be caused by protein inactivation, mRNA instability, or reduced transcription. The following protocol was used to determine the mechanism for the reduced expression of an antiapoptotic factor, survivin, in normal tissues in response to radiation and the defect in cancer cells that prevents this reduction. We also examined ways to overcome survivin over expression in cancer cells in order to sensitize them to radiation. We will focus on the use of antisense oligonucleotides, cell cycle analysis, and luciferase reporter genes. PMID:15514699

  2. SMARCA4-inactivating mutations increase sensitivity to Aurora kinase A inhibitor VX-680 in non-small cell lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Tagal, Vural; Wei, Shuguang; Zhang, Wei; Brekken, Rolf A; Posner, Bruce A; Peyton, Michael; Girard, Luc; Hwang, TaeHyun; Wheeler, David A; Minna, John D; White, Michael A; Gazdar, Adi F; Roth, Michael G

    2017-01-19

    Mutations in the SMARCA4/BRG1 gene resulting in complete loss of its protein (BRG1) occur frequently in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Currently, no single therapeutic agent has been identified as synthetically lethal with SMARCA4/BRG1 loss. We identify AURKA activity as essential in NSCLC cells lacking SMARCA4/BRG1. In these cells, RNAi-mediated depletion or chemical inhibition of AURKA induces apoptosis and cell death in vitro and in xenograft mouse models. Disc large homologue-associated protein 5 (HURP/DLGAP5), required for AURKA-dependent, centrosome-independent mitotic spindle assembly is essential for the survival and proliferation of SMARCA4/BRG1 mutant but not of SMARCA4/BRG1 wild-type cells. AURKA inhibitors may provide a therapeutic strategy for biomarker-driven clinical studies to treat the NSCLCs harbouring SMARCA4/BRG1-inactivating mutations.

  3. Fhit delocalizes annexin a4 from plasma membrane to cytosol and sensitizes lung cancer cells to paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Gaudio, Eugenio; Paduano, Francesco; Spizzo, Riccardo; Ngankeu, Apollinaire; Zanesi, Nicola; Gaspari, Marco; Ortuso, Francesco; Lovat, Francesca; Rock, Jonathan; Hill, Grace A; Kaou, Mohamed; Cuda, Giovanni; Aqeilan, Rami I; Alcaro, Stefano; Croce, Carlo M; Trapasso, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Fhit protein is lost or reduced in a large fraction of human tumors, and its restoration triggers apoptosis and suppresses tumor formation or progression in preclinical models. Here, we describe the identification of candidate Fhit-interacting proteins with cytosolic and plasma membrane localization. Among these, Annexin 4 (ANXA4) was validated by co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy as a partner of this novel Fhit protein complex. Here we report that overexpression of Fhit prevents Annexin A4 translocation from cytosol to plasma membrane in A549 lung cancer cells treated with paclitaxel. Moreover, paclitaxel administration in combination with AdFHIT acts synergistically to increase the apoptotic rate of tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo experiments.

  4. Fhit Delocalizes Annexin A4 from Plasma Membrane to Cytosol and Sensitizes Lung Cancer Cells to Paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Gaudio, Eugenio; Paduano, Francesco; Spizzo, Riccardo; Ngankeu, Apollinaire; Zanesi, Nicola; Gaspari, Marco; Ortuso, Francesco; Lovat, Francesca; Rock, Jonathan; Hill, Grace A.; Kaou, Mohamed; Cuda, Giovanni; Aqeilan, Rami I.; Alcaro, Stefano; Croce, Carlo M.; Trapasso, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Fhit protein is lost or reduced in a large fraction of human tumors, and its restoration triggers apoptosis and suppresses tumor formation or progression in preclinical models. Here, we describe the identification of candidate Fhit-interacting proteins with cytosolic and plasma membrane localization. Among these, Annexin 4 (ANXA4) was validated by co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy as a partner of this novel Fhit protein complex. Here we report that overexpression of Fhit prevents Annexin A4 translocation from cytosol to plasma membrane in A549 lung cancer cells treated with paclitaxel. Moreover, paclitaxel administration in combination with AdFHIT acts synergistically to increase the apoptotic rate of tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo experiments. PMID:24223161

  5. SMARCA4-inactivating mutations increase sensitivity to Aurora kinase A inhibitor VX-680 in non-small cell lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    Tagal, Vural; Wei, Shuguang; Zhang, Wei; Brekken, Rolf A.; Posner, Bruce A.; Peyton, Michael; Girard, Luc; Hwang, TaeHyun; Wheeler, David A.; Minna, John D.; White, Michael A.; Gazdar, Adi F.; Roth, Michael G.

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the SMARCA4/BRG1 gene resulting in complete loss of its protein (BRG1) occur frequently in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Currently, no single therapeutic agent has been identified as synthetically lethal with SMARCA4/BRG1 loss. We identify AURKA activity as essential in NSCLC cells lacking SMARCA4/BRG1. In these cells, RNAi-mediated depletion or chemical inhibition of AURKA induces apoptosis and cell death in vitro and in xenograft mouse models. Disc large homologue-associated protein 5 (HURP/DLGAP5), required for AURKA-dependent, centrosome-independent mitotic spindle assembly is essential for the survival and proliferation of SMARCA4/BRG1 mutant but not of SMARCA4/BRG1 wild-type cells. AURKA inhibitors may provide a therapeutic strategy for biomarker-driven clinical studies to treat the NSCLCs harbouring SMARCA4/BRG1-inactivating mutations. PMID:28102363

  6. Polonium and Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zagà, Vincenzo; Lygidakis, Charilaos; Chaouachi, Kamal; Gattavecchia, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    The alpha-radioactive polonium 210 (Po-210) is one of the most powerful carcinogenic agents of tobacco smoke and is responsible for the histotype shift of lung cancer from squamous cell type to adenocarcinoma. According to several studies, the principal source of Po-210 is the fertilizers used in tobacco plants, which are rich in polyphosphates containing radio (Ra-226) and its decay products, lead 210 (Pb-210) and Po-210. Tobacco leaves accumulate Pb-210 and Po-210 through their trichomes, and Pb-210 decays into Po-210 over time. With the combustion of the cigarette smoke becomes radioactive and Pb-210 and Po-210 reach the bronchopulmonary apparatus, especially in bifurcations of segmental bronchi. In this place, combined with other agents, it will manifest its carcinogenic activity, especially in patients with compromised mucous-ciliary clearance. Various studies have confirmed that the radiological risk from Po-210 in a smoker of 20 cigarettes per day for a year is equivalent to the one deriving from 300 chest X-rays, with an autonomous oncogenic capability of 4 lung cancers per 10000 smokers. Po-210 can also be found in passive smoke, since part of Po-210 spreads in the surrounding environment during tobacco combustion. Tobacco manufacturers have been aware of the alpha-radioactivity presence in tobacco smoke since the sixties. PMID:21772848

  7. Blockade of Hedgehog Signaling Synergistically Increases Sensitivity to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Yang, Su-Qing; An, She-Juan; Chen, Zhi-Hong; Su, Jian; Xie, Zhi; Gou, Lan-Ying; Wu, Yi-Long

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been implicated in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stem-like cell (CSC) maintenance; both processes can result in tumor progression and treatment resistance in several types of human cancer. Hh cooperates with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway in embryogenesis. We found that the Hh signaling pathway was silenced in EGFR-TKI-sensitive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, while it was inappropriately activated in EGFR-TKI-resistant NSCLC cells, accompanied by EMT induction and ABCG2 overexpression. Upregulation of Hh signaling through extrinsic SHH exposure downregulated E-cadherin expression and elevated Snail and ABCG2 expression, resulting in gefitinib tolerance (P < 0.001) in EGFR-TKI-sensitive cells. Blockade of the Hh signaling pathway using the SMO antagonist SANT-1 restored E-cadherin expression and downregulate Snail and ABCG2 in EGFR-TKI-resistant cells. A combination of SANT-1 and gefitinib markedly inhibited tumorigenesis and proliferation in EGFR-TKI-resistant cells (P < 0.001). These findings indicate that hyperactivity of Hh signaling resulted in EGFR-TKI resistance, by EMT introduction and ABCG2 upregulation, and blockade of Hh signaling synergistically increased sensitivity to EGFR-TKIs in primary and secondary resistant NSCLC cells. E-cadherin expression may be a potential biomarker of the suitability of the combined application of an Hh inhibitor and EGFR-TKIs in EGFR-TKI-resistant NSCLCs. PMID:26943330

  8. [MiR-133b Affect the Proliferation and Drug Sensitivity in A549 Lung Cancer Stem Cells by Targeting PKM2].

    PubMed

    Mi, Yonghua; He, Miao; Liu, Beizhong

    2017-06-20

    It has been proven that miR-133b could inhibit cancer cell growth, the expression level of miR-133b was significant reduction in lung cancer tissue and serum of patients, and increase the radiation sensitivity of squamous cell carcinoma by targeting PKM2, but the exist mechanisms is not clear. The aim of this study is to explore the effect of miR-133b on proliferation in A549 lung cancer stem cells and drug sensitivity in DDP, and to explore the relationship between miR-133b and PKM2 gene, as well as the effect of cancer stem cells. Using miRBase and miRNAMap database to sequence comparison miR-133b and PKM2 gene. Using immune magnetic separation method to select the CD133+/CD34+ lung cancer stem cells from A549 cells, and using flow cytometry to detect the purity. The expression of miR-133b mRNA was detected by real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR). Cell proliferation was detected by CCK8 assay. 15 μg/mL DDP was treated to cells which was transfected with miR-133b, and apoptosis was detected by flow Cytometry at 0 h, 12 h, 24 h, 72 h. The expression of PKM2 protein was detected by Western blot. Gene binding site report that PKM2 gene may be the target gene of miR-133b; the results of flow cytometry showed that the purity of CD133+/CD34+ stem cells was (92.15±4.27)%. qRT-PCR results showed that compared with the control group, after overexpression of miR-133b, miR-133b was up-regulated and miR-133b was down regulated after miR-133b inhibition (P<0.05). Compared with the control group, cell proliferation of miR-133b mimics group was significantly decreased (P<0.05), PKM2 protein levels were significantly lower (P<0.05); and cell proliferation of the miR-133b inhibitor group and PKM2 level was increased (P<0.05). The apoptosis of miR-133b mimics group was significantly higher than that of control group (P<0.05) after DDP treatment with 12 h. The expression of PKM2 protein in miR-133b mimics+DDP group was significantly lower than that in control group (P

  9. Ginsenoside Rg3 sensitizes human non-small cell lung cancer cells to γ-radiation by targeting the nuclear factor-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Li, Xiankui; Song, Yi-Min; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Fu-Rui; Yang, Rui; Wang, Hua-Qi; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2015-07-01

    At present, it is elusive how non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) develops resistance to γ-radiation; however, the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and NF-κB-regulated gene products have been proposed as mediators. Ginsenoside Rg3 is a steroidal saponin, which was isolated from Panax ginseng. Ginsenoside Rg3 possesses high pharmacological activity and has previously been shown to suppress NF-κB activation in various types of tumor cell. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine whether Rg3 could suppress NF-κB activation in NSCLC cells and sensitize NSCLC to γ-radiation, using an NSCLC cell line and NSCLC xenograft. A clone formation assay and lung tumor xenograft experiment were used to assess the radiosensitizing effects of ginsenoside Rg3. NF-κB/inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB) modulation was ascertained using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and western blot analysis. NF-κB-regulated gene products were monitored by western blot analysis. The present study demonstrated that ginsenoside Rg3 was able to sensitize A549 and H1299 lung carcinoma cells to γ-radiation and significantly enhance the efficacy of radiation therapy in C57BL/6 mice bearing a Lewis lung carcinoma cell xenograft tumor. Furthermore, ginsenoside Rg3 suppressed NF-κB activation, phosphorylation of IκB protein and expression of NF-κB-regulated gene products (cyclin D1, c-myc, B-cell lymphoma 2, cyclooxygenase-2, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and vascular endothelial growth factor), a number of which were induced by radiation therapy and mediate radioresistance. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that ginsenoside Rg3 may potentiate the antitumor effects of radiation therapy in NSCLC by suppressing NF-κB activity and NF-κB-regulated gene products, leading to the inhibition of tumor progression.

  10. SMARCA4-inactivating mutations increase sensitivity to Aurora kinase A inhibitor VX-680 in non-small cell lung cancers. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Mutations in the SMARCA4/BRG1 gene resulting in complete loss of its protein (BRG1) occur frequently in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Currently, no single therapeutic agent has been identified as synthetically lethal with SMARCA4/BRG1 loss. We identify AURKA activity as essential in NSCLC cells lacking SMARCA4/BRG1. In these cells, RNAi-mediated depletion or chemical inhibition of AURKA induces apoptosis and cell death in vitro and in xenograft mouse models.

  11. Lung cancer among Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y T; Blot, W J; Zheng, W; Ershow, A G; Hsu, C W; Levin, L I; Zhang, R; Fraumeni, J F

    1987-11-15

    A case-control study involving interviews with 672 female lung cancer patients and 735 population-based controls was conducted to investigate the high rates of lung cancer, notably adenocarcinoma, among women in Shanghai. Cigarette smoking was a strong risk factor, but accounted for only about one-fourth of all newly diagnosed cases of lung cancer. Most patients, particularly with adenocarcinoma, were life-long non-smokers. The risks of lung cancer were higher among women reporting tuberculosis and other pre-existing lung diseases. Hormonal factors were suggested by an increased risk associated with late menopause and by a gradient in the risk of adenocarcinoma with decreasing menstrual cycle length, with a 3-fold excess among women who had shorter cycles. Perhaps most intriguing were associations found between lung cancer and measures of exposure to cooking oil vapors. Risks increased with the numbers of meals cooked by either stir frying, deep frying or boiling; with the frequency of smokiness during cooking; and with the frequency of eye irritation during cooking. Use of rapeseed oil, whose volatiles following high-temperature cooking may be mutagenic, was also reported more often by the cancer patients. The findings thus confirm that factors other than smoking are responsible for the high risk of lung cancer among Chinese women and provide clues for further research, including the assessment of cooking practices.

  12. Lower lung cancer mortality in obesity.

    PubMed

    Leung, Chi C; Lam, Tai H; Yew, Wing W; Chan, Wai M; Law, Wing S; Tam, Cheuk M

    2011-02-01

    Malignancy is the leading cause of death in Hong Kong, and lung cancer tops the list of all cancer deaths. A cohort of clients aged ≥65 years, enrolled at 18 elderly health centres in Hong Kong from 2000 to 2003, was followed up prospectively through linkage with the territory-wide death registry for causes of death until 31 December 2008, using the identity card number as unique identifier. All subjects with suspected cancer, significant weight loss of >5% within past 6 months or obstructive lung disease at the baseline were excluded. After a total of 423 061 person-years of follow-up, 932, 690 and 1433 deaths were caused by lung cancer, other tobacco-related malignancies and non-tobacco-related malignancies, respectively. Body mass index (BMI) was independently (and negatively) associated with death from lung cancer after adjustment for other baseline variables, whereas there was only a minor or no effect for other smoking-related malignancies and non-tobacco-related malignancies. Obesity with BMI ≥30 [adjusted hazard ratio (HR), 0.55, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.38-0.80] was associated with reduced lung cancer mortality, which was more prominent than the opposing effect of underweight (adjusted HR, 1.38, 95% CI 1.05-1.79). Consistent effects of BMI were observed after stratification into never-smokers and ever-smokers and in sensitivity analysis after excluding deaths within the first 3 years. Obesity was associated with lower lung cancer mortality in this prospective cohort analysis. As the effect was rather specific for lung cancer, further studies are indicated to explore the underlying mechanism.

  13. Occupational exposure and lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Spyratos, Dionysios; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Dryllis, Georgios; Kallianos, Anastasios; Rapti, Aggeliki; Li, Chen; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death for male and the second most usual cancer for women after breast cancer. Currently there are available several non-specific cytotoxic agents and several targeted agents for lung cancer therapy. However; early stage diagnosis is still unavailable and several efforts are being made towards this direction. Novel biomarkers are being investigated along with new biopsy techniques. The occupational and environmental exposure to carcinogenic agents is an everyday phenomenon. Therefore until efficient early diagnosis is available, avoidance of exposure to carcinogenic agents is necessary. In the current mini-review occupational and environmental carcinogenic agents will be presented. PMID:24102018

  14. [Lung cancer and epigenetic modifications].

    PubMed

    Darılmaz Yüce, Gülbahar; Ortaç Ersoy, Ebru

    2016-06-01

    Epigenetic alterations, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, and noncoding RNA expression, have been reported to play a major role in the genesis of lung cancer. DNA methylation, histone modifications, and RNA expression are epigenetic markers in assesment of early detection, prognosis and evaluation of treatment of lung cancer. In this rewiev we summarize the common epigenetic changes associated with lung cancer to give some clarity to its etiology, and to provide an overview of the potential translational applications of these changes, including applications for early detection, diagnosis, prognostication, and therapeutics.

  15. miR-223 enhances the sensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer cells to erlotinib by targeting the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng-Yi; Han, Jing; Chen, Xie-Wan; Wang, Jiang; Wang, Xu-Dong; Sun, Jian-Guo; Chen, Zheng-Tang

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related fatalities worldwide, and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the main pathological type. MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs, which are involved in tumor initiation and progression. miR‑223 is a tumor suppressor miRNA that has been reported in various types of cancer, including lung cancer. In the present study, to characterize the biological behavior of miR‑223 in NSCLC, we established an miR‑223 overexpression model in erlotinib-resistant PC‑9 (PC‑9/ER) cells by infection with lentivirus to induce the overexpression of miR‑223. As a result, miR‑223 enhanced the sensitivity of the PC‑9/ER cells to erlotinib by inducing apoptosis in vitro. Additionally, in vivo experiments were performed using nude mice which were injected with the cancer cells [either the PC‑9 (not resistant), PC‑9/ER, or the PC‑9/ER cells infected with miR‑223)]. We found that the tumor volumes were reduced in the rats injected with the cells infected with miR‑223. To further explore the underlying mechanisms, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analysis were used to identify the target molecules of miR‑223. miR‑223 was demonstrated to act as a local regulator of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) in the acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Notably, the οverexpression of IGF-1R in NSCLC was downregulated by miR‑223, and the activation of Akt/S6, the downstream pathway, was also inhibited. The inhibition of IGF-1R by miR‑223 was attenuated by exogenous IGF-1 expression. Therefore, miR‑223 may regulate the acquired resistance of PC‑9/ER cells to erlotinib by targeting the IGF-1R/Akt/S6 signaling pathway. The overexpression of miR‑223 may partially reverse the acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor-TKIs, thus, providing a potential therapeutic strategy for TKI

  16. A systematic analysis of the resistance and sensitivity of HER2YVMA receptor tyrosine kinase mutant to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in HER2-positive lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaokun; Chen, Beibei; Ma, Zhaosheng; Xie, Bojian; Cao, Xinguang; Yang, Tiejun; Zhao, Yuzhou; Qin, Jianjun; Li, Jicheng; Cao, Feilin; Chen, Xiaobing

    2016-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) has become a well-established target for the treatment of HER2-positive lung cancer. However, a frequently observed in-frame mutation that inserts amino acid quadruplex Tyr776-Val777-Met778-Ala779 at G776 (G776(YVMA)) in HER2 kinase domain can cause drug resistance and sensitivity, largely limiting the application of reversible tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer therapy. A systematic investigation of the intermolecular interactions between the HER2(YVMA) mutant and clinical small-molecule inhibitors would help to establish a complete picture of drug response to HER2 G776(YVMA) insertion in lung cancer, and to design new tyrosine kinase inhibitors with high potency and selectivity to target the lung cancer-related HER2(YVMA) mutant. Here, we combined homology modeling, ligand grafting, structure minimization, molecular simulation and binding affinity analysis to profile a number of tyrosine kinase inhibitors against the G776(YVMA) insertion in HER2. It is found that the insertion is far away from HER2 active pocket and thus cannot contact inhibitor ligand directly. However, the insertion is expected to induce marked allosteric effect on some regions around the pocket, including A-loop and hinges connecting between the N- and C-lobes of HER2 kinase domain, which may exert indirect influence to inhibitor binding. Most investigated inhibitors exhibit weak binding strength to both wild-type and mutant HER2, which can be attributed to steric hindrance that impairs ligand compatibility with HER2 active pocket. However, the cognate inhibitor lapatinib and the non-cognate inhibitor bosutinib were predicted to have low affinity for wild-type HER2 but high affinity for HER2(YVMA) mutant, which was confirmed by subsequent kinase assay experiments; the inhibitory potencies of bosutinib against wild-type and mutant HER2 were determined to be IC(50) > 1000 and =27 nM, respectively, suggesting that the bosutinib might be

  17. Low-dose gefitinib treatment for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer harboring sensitive epidermal growth factor receptor mutations.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Hironori; Inoue, Akira; Kobayashi, Kunihiko; Maemondo, Makoto; Oizumi, Satoshi; Isobe, Hiroshi; Gemma, Akihiko; Saijo, Yasuo; Yoshizawa, Hirohisa; Hagiwara, Koichi; Nukiwa, Toshihiro

    2011-08-01

    Although standard schedule of gefitinib was the administration of 250 mg tablet every day, many patients need dose reduction because of toxicities. However, the efficacy of such low-dose gefitinib for patients with epidermal growth factor receptor-mutated non-small cell lung cancer has rarely been evaluated. A post hoc comparison of the efficacy (response rate and survival) in patients treated with gefitinib with or without any dose reduction in NEJ002 study was performed. Among 114 patients treated with first-line gefitinib in NEJ002, 61 (54%) continued gefitinib without any dose reduction until their diseases progressed, and 53 (46%) reduced their dose of gefitinib because of some toxicities. There was no significant difference of patient characteristics between the two groups. The progression-free survival of low-dose group tended to be better than that of standard-dose group (median progression-free survival, 11.8 versus 9.9 months; p = 0.144), and the overall survival of low-dose group was also better than that of standard-dose group (median survival time, 32.7 versus 25.3 months; p = 0.049). The results suggest that low-dose gefitinib may be clinically not inferior to standard-dose gefitinib for non-small cell lung cancer with sensitive epidermal growth factor receptor mutations. Prospective study of low-dose gefitinib is warranted especially for frail patients who need less toxic treatment.

  18. Massion 4-marker FISH panel for lung cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The combination of these 4 probes, TP63, MYC, CEP3, and CEP6, offered a sensitivity of 82% for lung cancer and a specificity of 58%. These results indicate that specific cytogenetic alterations present in preinvasive lung lesions are closely associated with the diagnosis of lung cancer and may therefore have value in assessing lung cancer risk.

  19. Metastatic cancer to the lung

    MedlinePlus

    ... lungs may include: Fluid between the lung and chest wall (pleural effusion), which can cause shortness of breath or pain when taking a deep breath Further spread of the cancer Side effects of chemotherapy or radiation therapy When to Contact a Medical Professional Call ...

  20. Lung cancer and tobacco smoking.

    PubMed

    Boyle, P; Maisonneuve, P

    1995-06-01

    The dominant role of tobacco smoking in the causation of lung cancer has been repeatedly demonstrated over the past 50 years. Current lung cancer rates reflect cigarette smoking habits of men and women in the past decades, but not necessarily current smoking patterns, since there is an interval of several decades between the change in smoking habits in a population and its consequences on lung cancer rates. Over 90% of lung cancer may be avoidable simply through avoidance of cigarette smoking. There is at present a huge premature loss of life world-wide caused by smoking. Rates of lung cancer present in central and eastern Europe at the present time are higher than those ever before recorded elsewhere; lung cancer has increased 10-fold in men and eightfold in women in Japan since 1950. There is a world-wide epidemic of smoking among young women which will be translated into increasing rates of tobacco-related disease, including cancer, in the coming decades. There is another epidemic of lung cancer and tobacco-related deaths building up in China as the cohorts of men in whom tobacco smoking became popular reach ages where cancer is an important hazard. Many solutions have been attempted to reduce cigarette smoking and increasingly many countries are enacting legislation to curb this habit. Cigarette smoking remains the number one target for Public Health action aimed at reducing cancer risk in the general population. General practitioners, hospital physicians and everyone working in oncology have a particularly important exemplary role to play in this process.

  1. Suppression of reactive oxygen species-mediated ERK and JNK activation sensitizes dihydromyricetin-induced mitochondrial apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kao, Shang-Jyh; Lee, Wei-Jiunn; Chang, Jer-Hwa; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Chung, Chi-Li; Hung, Wen-Yueh; Chien, Ming-Hsien

    2017-04-01

    Nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer with a high mortality rate and still remains a therapeutic challenge. A strategy for targeting NSCLC is to identify agents that are effective against NSCLC cells while sparing normal cells. Dihydromyricetin (DHM) is the major flavonoid component derived from Ampelopsis grossedentata, which has a long history of use in medicine. Herein, the molecular mechanisms by which DHM exerts its anticancer effects against NSCLC cells were investigated. Results from MTS, colony formation, Western blot, flow cytometric, and JC-1 mitochondrial membrane potential assays revealed that DHM showed a selective cytotoxic effect against NSCLC cells (A549 and H1975), but not against normal lung (WI-38) fibroblasts, by inducing apoptosis. DHM-induced cell apoptosis occurred through Bcl-w suppression-mediated mitochondrial membrane depolarization, caspase-9/-7/-3 activation, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage in A549 and H1975 cells. Moreover, treatment of A549 and H1975 cells with DHM induced increase of intracellular peroxide and sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)1/2, and the reactive oxygen species scavenger, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), reversed DHM-induced ERK and JNK activation. Furthermore, treatment of cells with specific inhibitors of ERK and JNK or NAC significantly promoted the DHM-induced activation of caspase-9/-7/-3 and PARP cleavage and also sensitized the antitumorigenic effect of DHM on NSCLC cells. These findings define and support a novel function of DHM of inducing mitochondrion-derived apoptosis in human NSCLC cells, and a combination of DHM with ERK and JNK inhibitors should be a good strategy for preventing NSCLC proliferation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 1426-1438, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Downregulation of MicroRNA-330 Correlates with the Radiation Sensitivity and Prognosis of Patients with Brain Metastasis from Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li-Peng; Zhu, Zhi-Tu; Zhang, Yue; He, Chun-Yan

    2017-08-16

    The present study sought to explore the role of microRNA-330 (miR-330) in predicting the radiation response and prognosis of patients with brain metastasis (BM) from lung cancer (LC). Patients with BM from LC were identified and classified into radiation-sensitive and radiation-resistant groups according to the overall survival rate, local and distant recurrence rate after conventional whole-brain radiation therapy. Quantitative realtime polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to detect miR-330 expression in serum. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to evaluate the prognostic value of miR-330 for the radiation sensitivity of brain metastasis from LC. Related clinical factors for radiation sensitivity were assessed by logistic regression analysis, and a survival analysis was conducted using COX regression and the Kaplan-Meier method. MiR-330 exhibited lower expression in the radiation-sensitive group than in the radiation-resistant group. The area under the ROC curve of miR-330 for predicting radiation sensitivity was 0.898 (optimal cut-off value, 0.815), with a sensitivity of 71.7% and a specificity of 90.1%. After radiation therapy, patients with low miR-330 expression, compared to patients with high miR-330 expression, displayed a lower survival rate and a median survival time. MiR-330 expression was correlated with extracranial metastasis, maximum BM diameter, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage and node (N) stage. Logistic regression and COX regression analyses revealed that extracranial metastasis, TNM stage, N stage and miR-330 expression were factors that influenced both radiation sensitivity and individual prognostic factors in patients with BM from LC. These findings indicate that the downregulation of miR-330 correlates with radiation sensitivity and poor prognosis in patients with BM from LC. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Specific β-Tubulin Isotypes Can Functionally Enhance or Diminish Epothilone B Sensitivity in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Pei Pei; McCarroll, Joshua A.; Byrne, Frances L.; Garner, James; Kavallaris, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Epothilones are a new class of microtubule stabilizing agents with promising preclinical and clinical activity. Their cellular target is β-tubulin and factors influencing intrinsic sensitivity to epothilones are not well understood. In this study, the functional significance of specific β-tubulin isotypes in intrinsic sensitivity to epothilone B was investigated using siRNA gene knockdown against βII-, βIII- or βIVb-tubulins in two independent non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, NCI-H460 and Calu-6. Drug-treated clonogenic assays showed that sensitivity to epothilone B was not altered following knockdown of βII-tubulin in both NSCLC cell lines. In contrast, knockdown of βIII-tubulin significantly increased sensitivity to epothilone B. Interestingly, βIVb-tubulin knockdowns were significantly less sensitive to epothilone B, compared to mock- and control siRNA cells. Cell cycle analysis of βIII-tubulin knockdown cells showed a higher percentage of cell death with epothilone B concentrations as low as 0.5 nM. In contrast, βIVb-tubulin knockdown cells displayed a decrease in epothilone B-induced G2-M cell cycle accumulation compared to control siRNA cells. Importantly, βIII-tubulin knockdowns displayed a significant dose-dependent increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells upon treatment with epothilone B, as detected using caspase 3/7 activity and Annexin-V staining. Higher concentrations of epothilone B were required to induce apoptosis in the βIVb-tubulin knockdowns compared to control siRNA, highlighting a potential mechanism underlying decreased sensitivity to this agent. This study demonstrates that specific β-tubulin isotypes can influence sensitivity to epothilone B and may influence differential sensitivity to this promising new agent. PMID:21738778

  4. Volatile signature for the early diagnosis of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Gasparri, Roberto; Santonico, Marco; Valentini, Claudia; Sedda, Giulia; Borri, Alessandro; Petrella, Francesco; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Pennazza, Giorgio; D'Amico, Arnaldo; Di Natale, Corrado; Paolesse, Roberto; Spaggiari, Lorenzo

    2016-02-09

    Exhaled breath contains hundreds of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Several independent researchers point out that the breath of lung cancer patients shows a characteristic VOC-profile which can be considered as lung cancer signature and, thus, used for diagnosis. In this regard, the analysis of exhaled breath with gas sensor arrays is a potential non-invasive, relatively low-cost and easy technique for the early detection of lung cancer. This clinical study evaluated the gas sensor array response for the identification of the exhaled breath of lung cancer patients. This study involved 146 individuals: 70 with lung cancer confirmed by computerized tomography (CT) or positron emission tomography-(PET) imaging techniques and histology (biopsy) or with clinical suspect of lung cancer and 76 healthy controls. Their exhaled breath was measured with a gas sensor array composed of a matrix of eight quartz microbalances (QMBs), each functionalized with a different metalloporphyrin. The instrument produces, for each analyzed sample, a vector of signals encoding the breath (breathprint). Breathprints were analyzed with multivariate analysis in order to correlate the sensor signals to the disease. Breathprints of the lung cancer patients were differentiated from those of the healthy controls with a sensitivity of 81% and specificity of 91%. Similar values were obtained in patients with and without metabolic comorbidities, such as diabetes, obesity and dyslipidemia (sensitivity 85%, specificity 88% and sensitivity 76%, specificity 94%, respectively). The device showed a large sensitivity to lung cancer at stage I with respect to stage II/III/IV (92% and 58% respectively). The sensitivity for stage I did not change for patients with or without metabolic comorbidities (90%, 94%, respectively). Results show that this electronic nose can discriminate the exhaled breath of the lung cancer patients from those of the healthy controls. Moreover, the largest sensitivity is observed

  5. Disturbance of DKK1 level is partly involved in survival of lung cancer cells via regulation of ROMO1 and γ-radiation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Seo Yoen; Kim, Hyun A; Kim, Jeong Yul; Lee, Jae Ha; Choi, Soo Im; Han, Jeong Ran; Kim, Kug Chan; Cho, Eun Wie

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •DKK1 was expressed differently among non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines. •DKK1 negatively regulated ROMO1 gene expression. •Disturbance of DKK1 level induced the imbalance of cellular ROS. •DKK1/ROMO1-induced ROS imbalance is involved in cell survival in NSCLC. -- Abstract: Dickkopf1 (DKK1), a secreted protein involved in embryonic development, is a potent inhibitor of the Wnt signaling pathway and has been postulated to be a tumor suppressor or tumor promoter depending on the tumor type. In this study, we showed that DKK1 was expressed differently among non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines. The DKK1 expression level was much higher in A549 cells than in H460 cells. We revealed that blockage of DKK1 expression by silencing RNA in A549 cells caused up-regulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulator (ROMO1) protein, followed by partial cell death, cell growth inhibition, and loss of epithelial–mesenchymal transition property caused by ROS, and it also increased γ-radiation sensitivity. DKK1 overexpression in H460 significantly inhibited cell survival with the decrease of ROMO1 level, which induced the decrease of cellular ROS. Thereafter, exogenous N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, or hydrogen peroxide, a pro-oxidant, partially rescued cells from death and growth inhibition. In each cell line, both overexpression and blockage of DKK1 not only elevated p-RB activation, which led to cell growth arrest, but also inactivated AKT/NF-kB, which increased radiation sensitivity and inhibited cell growth. This study is the first to demonstrate that strict modulation of DKK1 expression in different cell types partially maintains cell survival via tight regulation of the ROS-producing ROMO1 and radiation resistance.

  6. Early detection of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Midthun, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with lung cancer are diagnosed when they present with symptoms, they have advanced stage disease, and curative treatment is no longer an option. An effective screening test has long been desired for early detection with the goal of reducing mortality from lung cancer. Sputum cytology, chest radiography, and computed tomography (CT) scan have been studied as potential screening tests. The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated a 20% reduction in mortality with low-dose CT (LDCT) screening, and guidelines now endorse annual LDCT for those at high risk. Implementation of screening is underway with the desire that the benefits be seen in clinical practice outside of a research study format. Concerns include management of false positives, cost, incidental findings, radiation exposure, and overdiagnosis. Studies continue to evaluate LDCT screening and use of biomarkers in risk assessment and diagnosis in attempt to further improve outcomes for patients with lung cancer. PMID:27158468

  7. Highly sensitive detection of a HER2 12-base pair duplicated insertion mutation in lung cancer using the Eprobe-PCR method

    PubMed Central

    Takase, Yoshiaki; Usui, Kengo; Shimizu, Kimihiro; Kimura, Yasumasa; Ichihara, Tatsuo; Ohkawa, Takahiro; Atsumi, Jun; Enokida, Yasuaki; Nakazawa, Seshiru; Obayashi, Kai; Ohtaki, Yoichi; Nagashima, Toshiteru; Mitani, Yasumasa; Takeyoshi, Izumi

    2017-01-01

    Somatic mutation in human epidermal growth factor receptor-related 2 gene (HER2) is one of the driver mutations in lung cancer. HER2 mutations are found in about 2% of lung adenocarcinomas (ADCs). Previous reports have been based mainly on diagnostic screening by Sanger sequencing or next-generation sequencing (NGS); however, these methods are time-consuming and complicated. We developed a rapid, simple, sensitive mutation detection assay for detecting HER2 12 base pair-duplicated insertion mutation based on the Eprobe-mediated PCR method (Eprobe-PCR) and validated the sensitivity of this assay system for clinical diagnostics. We examined 635 tumor samples and analyzed HER2 mutations using the Eprobe-PCR method, NGS, and Sanger sequencing. In a serial dilution study, the Eprobe-PCR was able to detect mutant plasmid DNA when its concentration was reduced to 0.1% by mixing with wild-type DNA. We also confirmed amplification of the mutated plasmid DNA with only 10 copies per reaction. In ADCs, Eprobe-PCR detected the HER2 mutation in 2.02% (9/446), while Sanger sequencing detected it in 1.57% (7/446). Eprobe-PCR was able to detect the mutation in two samples that were undetectable by Sanger sequencing. All non-ADC samples were wild-type. There were no discrepancies between frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues in the nine samples. HER2 mutations detected by NGS data validated the high sensitivity of the method. Therefore, this new technique can lead to precise molecular-targeted therapies. PMID:28152008

  8. Highly sensitive detection of a HER2 12-base pair duplicated insertion mutation in lung cancer using the Eprobe-PCR method.

    PubMed

    Takase, Yoshiaki; Usui, Kengo; Shimizu, Kimihiro; Kimura, Yasumasa; Ichihara, Tatsuo; Ohkawa, Takahiro; Atsumi, Jun; Enokida, Yasuaki; Nakazawa, Seshiru; Obayashi, Kai; Ohtaki, Yoichi; Nagashima, Toshiteru; Mitani, Yasumasa; Takeyoshi, Izumi

    2017-01-01

    Somatic mutation in human epidermal growth factor receptor-related 2 gene (HER2) is one of the driver mutations in lung cancer. HER2 mutations are found in about 2% of lung adenocarcinomas (ADCs). Previous reports have been based mainly on diagnostic screening by Sanger sequencing or next-generation sequencing (NGS); however, these methods are time-consuming and complicated. We developed a rapid, simple, sensitive mutation detection assay for detecting HER2 12 base pair-duplicated insertion mutation based on the Eprobe-mediated PCR method (Eprobe-PCR) and validated the sensitivity of this assay system for clinical diagnostics. We examined 635 tumor samples and analyzed HER2 mutations using the Eprobe-PCR method, NGS, and Sanger sequencing. In a serial dilution study, the Eprobe-PCR was able to detect mutant plasmid DNA when its concentration was reduced to 0.1% by mixing with wild-type DNA. We also confirmed amplification of the mutated plasmid DNA with only 10 copies per reaction. In ADCs, Eprobe-PCR detected the HER2 mutation in 2.02% (9/446), while Sanger sequencing detected it in 1.57% (7/446). Eprobe-PCR was able to detect the mutation in two samples that were undetectable by Sanger sequencing. All non-ADC samples were wild-type. There were no discrepancies between frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues in the nine samples. HER2 mutations detected by NGS data validated the high sensitivity of the method. Therefore, this new technique can lead to precise molecular-targeted therapies.

  9. Lung Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing lung cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  10. Carotenoids and lung cancer prevention

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Understanding the molecular actions of carotenoids is critical for human studies involving carotenoids for prevention of lung cancer and cancers at other tissue sites. While the original hypothesis prompting the beta-carotene intervention trials was that beta-carotene exerts beneficial effects thro...

  11. Meta-markers for the differential diagnosis of lung cancer and lung disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-In; Ahn, Jung-Mo; Sung, Hye-Jin; Na, Sang-Su; Hwang, Jaesung; Kim, Yongdai; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2016-10-04

    Misdiagnosis of lung cancer remains a serious problem due to the difficulty of distinguishing lung cancer from other respiratory lung diseases. As a result, the development of serum-based differential diagnostic biomarkers is in high demand. In this study, 198 clinical serum samples from non-cancer lung disease and lung cancer patients were analyzed using nLC-MRM-MS for the levels of seven lung cancer biomarker candidates. When the candidates were assessed individually, only SERPINEA4 showed statistically significant changes in the serum levels. The MRM results and clinical information were analyzed using a logistic regression analysis to select model for the best 'meta-marker', or combination of biomarkers for differential diagnosis. Also, under consideration of statistical interaction, variables having low significance as a single factor but statistically influencing on meta-marker model were selected. Using this probabilistic classification, the best meta-marker was determined to be made up of two proteins SERPINA4 and PON1 with age factor. This meta-marker showed an enhanced differential diagnostic capability (AUC=0.915) for distinguishing the two patient groups. Our results suggest that a statistical model can determine optimal meta-markers, which may have better specificity and sensitivity than a single biomarker and thus improve the differential diagnosis of lung cancer and lung disease patients. Diagnosing lung cancer commonly involves the use of radiographic methods. However, an imaging-based diagnosis may fail to differentiate lung cancer from non-cancerous lung disease. In this study, we examined several serum proteins in the sera of 198 lung cancer and non-cancerous lung disease patients by multiple-reaction monitoring. We then used a combination of variables to generate a meta-marker model that is useful as a differential diagnostic biomarker. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Serum free fatty acid biomarkers of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinbo; Mazzone, Peter J; Cata, Juan P; Kurz, Andrea; Bauer, Maria; Mascha, Edward J; Sessler, Daniel I

    2014-09-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Surgical removal of the tumor at an early stage can be curative. However, lung cancer diagnosis at an early stage remains challenging. There is evidence that free fatty acids play a role in cancer development. Serum samples from 55 patients with lung cancer were propensity matched with samples from 165 similar pulmonary patients without known cancer. Patients were propensity matched on age, sex, smoking history, family history of lung cancer, and chronic diseases that might affect free fatty acid levels. Free fatty acids arachidonic acid (AA) and linoleic acid (LA) and their metabolites hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs)(5-HETE, 11-HETE, 12-HETE, and 15-HETE) were an estimated 1.8- to 3.3-fold greater in 37 patients with adenocarcinoma vs 111 patients without cancer (all P < .001). Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve were significantly > 0.50, discriminating patients with lung cancer and control subjects for six of eight biomarkers and two of seven phospholipids tested, and ranged between 0.69 and 0.82 (all P < .001) for patients with lung cancer vs control subjects. AA, LA, and 15-HETE had observed sensitivity and specificity > 0.70 at the best cutpoint. Concentrations of free fatty acids and their metabolites were similar in 18 patients with squamous cell carcinoma and 54 control subjects without cancer. Serum fatty acids and their metabolites demonstrate good sensitivity and specificity for the identification of adenocarcinoma of the lung.

  13. Knockdown of Oncogenic KRAS in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers Suppresses Tumor Growth and Sensitizes Tumor Cells to Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sunaga, Noriaki; Shames, David S.; Girard, Luc; Peyton, Michael; Larsen, Jill E.; Imai, Hisao; Soh, Junichi; Sato, Mitsuo; Yanagitani, Noriko; Kaira, Kyoichi; Xie, Yang; Gazdar, Adi F.; Mori, Masatomo; Minna, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS is found in >25% of lung adenocarcinomas, the major histologic subtype of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and is an important target for drug development. To this end, we generated four NSCLC lines with stable knockdown selective for oncogenic KRAS. As expected, stable knockdown of oncogenic KRAS led to inhibition of in vitro and in vivo tumor growth in the KRAS mutant NSCLC cells, but not in NSCLC cells that have wild-type KRAS (but mutant NRAS). Surprisingly, we did not see large-scale induction of cell death and the growth inhibitory effect was not complete. To further understand the ability of NSCLCs to grow despite selective removal of mutant KRAS expression, we performed microarray expression profiling of NSCLC cell lines with or without mutant KRAS knockdown and isogenic human bronchial epithelial cell lines (HBECs) with and without oncogenic KRAS. We found that while the MAPK pathway is significantly down-regulated after mutant KRAS knockdown, these NSCLCs showed increased levels of phospho-STAT3 and phospho-EGFR, and variable changes in phospho-Akt. In addition, mutant KRAS knockdown sensitized the NSCLCs to p38 and EGFR inhibitors. Our findings suggest that targeting oncogenic KRAS by itself will not be sufficient treatment but may offer possibilities of combining anti-KRAS strategies with other targeted drugs. PMID:21306997

  14. Knockdown of oncogenic KRAS in non-small cell lung cancers suppresses tumor growth and sensitizes tumor cells to targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Sunaga, Noriaki; Shames, David S; Girard, Luc; Peyton, Michael; Larsen, Jill E; Imai, Hisao; Soh, Junichi; Sato, Mitsuo; Yanagitani, Noriko; Kaira, Kyoichi; Xie, Yang; Gazdar, Adi F; Mori, Masatomo; Minna, John D

    2011-02-01

    Oncogenic KRAS is found in more than 25% of lung adenocarcinomas, the major histologic subtype of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and is an important target for drug development. To this end, we generated four NSCLC lines with stable knockdown selective for oncogenic KRAS. As expected, stable knockdown of oncogenic KRAS led to inhibition of in vitro and in vivo tumor growth in the KRAS-mutant NSCLC cells, but not in NSCLC cells that have wild-type KRAS (but mutant NRAS). Surprisingly, we did not see large-scale induction of cell death and the growth inhibitory effect was not complete. To further understand the ability of NSCLCs to grow despite selective removal of mutant KRAS expression, we conducted microarray expression profiling of NSCLC cell lines with or without mutant KRAS knockdown and isogenic human bronchial epithelial cell lines with and without oncogenic KRAS. We found that although the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway is significantly downregulated after mutant KRAS knockdown, these NSCLCs showed increased levels of phospho-STAT3 and phospho-epidermal growth factor receptor, and variable changes in phospho-Akt. In addition, mutant KRAS knockdown sensitized the NSCLCs to p38 and EGFR inhibitors. Our findings suggest that targeting oncogenic KRAS by itself will not be sufficient treatment, but may offer possibilities of combining anti-KRAS strategies with other targeted drugs.

  15. Cigarette smoke and lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Martonen, T.B.; Hofmann, W.; Lowe, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Cigarette smoke has been implicated in a causal relationship with carcinoma of the lung. An intriguing feature of the disease is the site-selectivity with which bronchogenic cancer manifests itself; most cancers are detected in the main, lobar and segmental bronchi, perhaps specifically at airway bifurcations. The elevated risk of lung cancer to smokers may result from a complex interplay between smoking and exposure to ambient Rn progeny, including the promotional-effect role (as opposed to being the initiating event) of cigarette smoke in tumor development. It has been determined that smokers exposed to average indoor Rn progency levels receive surprisingly high doses at hot spots within bronchial bifurcations.

  16. Comparison of outcomes of tyrosine kinase inhibitor in first- or second-line therapy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients with sensitive EGFR mutations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianlin; Zhang, Xueyan; Yang, Haitang; Ding, Guozheng; Jin, Bo; Lou, Yuqing; Zhang, Yanwei; Wang, Huimin; Han, Baohui

    2016-10-18

    Direct comparisons between the use of first- and second-line EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) in patients with sensitive EGFR mutations are limited. A total of 264 advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with sensitive mutations received EGFR TKI therapy as the first-line therapy, and a total of 187 patients received TKI as the second-line therapy at Shanghai Chest Hospital. First-line EGFR TKI therapy [12.9 months, 95% confidence interval (CI), 10.7-15.2] provided longer progression-free survival (PFS) than did second-line EGFR TKI therapy (9.0 months, 95% CI, 7.7-10.2) [hazard ratio (HR): 0.78, P = 0.034]. The objective response rate (ORR) of first-, and second-line TKI therapy were 67.8% (159/233) and 55.6% (94/169), respectively (P = 0.001). The overall survival (OS) for patients (n = 141) receiving first-line TKI followed by second-line chemotherapy were longer than those for patients (n = 187) receiving first-line chemotherapy followed by second-line TKI (HR: 0.69, P = 0.02).Compared with second-line TKI, first-line therapy achieved a significant and longer PFS, and higher ORR in the sensitive EGFR mutated NSCLC patients. The therapeutic strategy of using TKI followed by chemotherapy achieved longer OS than that using chemotherapy followed by TKI.

  17. Evaluation of azacitidine and entinostat as sensitization agents to cytotoxic chemotherapy in preclinical models of non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vendetti, Frank P.; Topper, Michael; Huang, Peng; Dobromilskaya, Irina; Easwaran, Hariharan; Wrangle, John; Baylin, Stephen B.; Poirier, J. T.; Rudin, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent clinical data in lung cancer suggests that epigenetically targeted therapy may selectively enhance chemotherapeutic sensitivity. There have been few if any studies rigorously evaluating this hypothesized priming effect. Here we describe a series of investigations testing whether epigenetic priming with azacitidine and entinostat increases sensitivity of NSCLC to cytotoxic agents. We noted no differences in chemosensitivity following treatment with epigenetic therapy in in vitro assays of viability and colony growth. Using cell line and patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models, we also observed no change in responsiveness to cisplatin in vivo. In select models, we noted differential responses to irinotecan treatment in vivo. In vitro epigenetic therapy prior to tumor implantation abrogated response of H460 xenografts to irinotecan. Conversely, in vitro epigenetic therapy appeared to sensitize A549 xenografts (tumor growth inhibition 51%, vs. 22% in mock-pretreated control). In vivo epigenetic therapy enhanced the response of adenocarcinoma PDX to irinotecan. Taken together, these data do not support broadly applicable epigenetic priming in NSCLC. Priming effects may be context-specific, dependent on both tumor and host factors. Further preclinical study is necessary to determine whether, and in which contexts, priming with epigenetic therapy has potential to enhance chemotherapeutic efficacy in NSCLC patients. PMID:25474141

  18. Evaluation of azacitidine and entinostat as sensitization agents to cytotoxic chemotherapy in preclinical models of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Vendetti, Frank P; Topper, Michael; Huang, Peng; Dobromilskaya, Irina; Easwaran, Hariharan; Wrangle, John; Baylin, Stephen B; Poirier, J T; Rudin, Charles M

    2015-01-01

    Recent clinical data in lung cancer suggests that epigenetically targeted therapy may selectively enhance chemotherapeutic sensitivity. There have been few if any studies rigorously evaluating this hypothesized priming effect. Here we describe a series of investigations testing whether epigenetic priming with azacitidine and entinostat increases sensitivity of NSCLC to cytotoxic agents. We noted no differences in chemosensitivity following treatment with epigenetic therapy in in vitro assays of viability and colony growth. Using cell line and patient derived xenograft (PDX) models, we also observed no change in responsiveness to cisplatin in vivo. In select models, we noted differential responses to irinotecan treatment in vivo. In vitro epigenetic therapy prior to tumor implantation abrogated response of H460 xenografts to irinotecan. Conversely, in vitro epigenetic therapy appeared to sensitize A549 xenografts (tumor growth inhibition 51%, vs. 22% in mock-pretreated control). In vivo epigenetic therapy enhanced the response of adenocarcinoma PDX to irinotecan. Taken together, these data do not support broadly applicable epigenetic priming in NSCLC. Priming effects may be context-specific, dependent on both tumor and host factors. Further preclinical study is necessary to determine whether, and in which contexts, priming with epigenetic therapy has potential to enhance chemotherapeutic efficacy in NSCLC patients.

  19. Functional imaging in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harders, S W; Balyasnikowa, S; Fischer, B M

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer represents an increasingly frequent cancer diagnosis worldwide. An increasing awareness on smoking cessation as an important mean to reduce lung cancer incidence and mortality, an increasing number of therapy options and a steady focus on early diagnosis and adequate staging have resulted in a modestly improved survival. For early diagnosis and precise staging, imaging, especially positron emission tomography combined with CT (PET/CT), plays an important role. Other functional imaging modalities such as dynamic contrast-enhanced CT (DCE-CT) and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DW-MRI) have demonstrated promising results within this field. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with a brief and balanced introduction to these three functional imaging modalities and their current or potential application in the care of patients with lung cancer. PMID:24289258

  20. Quality of Life in Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy for Primary Lung Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, or Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-23

    Anal Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  1. A sensitive and high throughput TaqMan-based reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay efficiently discriminates ALK rearrangement from overexpression for lung cancer FFPE specimens.

    PubMed

    Lung, Jrhau; Lin, Yu-Ching; Hung, Ming-Szu; Jiang, Yuan Yuan; Lee, Kuan-Der; Lin, Paul Yann; Tsai, Ying Huang

    2016-04-01

    ALK fusion gene is an oncogenic driver in lung cancer with low prevalence, which can be ameliorated by crizotinib. Currently, ALK fusion gene can be diagnosed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC), but inconstistnt results between the two methods are encountered regularly. To make the ALK fusion gene screening more efficient and to provide a simple solution to clarify the discrepancy between FISH and IHC results, a sensitive TaqMan-based reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assay was established. The 3-plex TaqMan-based RT-qPCR assay was established and performed on 102 archived formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) NSCLC samples to detect ALK rearrangement and overexpression. Break-apart FISH and automatic immunohistochemistry based ALK assays were performed side by side using tissue microarray. The RT-qPCR was performed successfully for 80 samples and 10 of them showed positive signals. Three out of the 10 qPCR positive cases were further confirmed by FISH and IHC test. Two others were IHC positive and FISH negative, and expressed full-length ALK transcript. The rest were neither FISH nor IHC positive and their ALK expression level was significantly lower than those FISH or IHC positive cases. Our RT-qPCR assay demonstrates that the capability and reliability of ALK detection is comparable to FISH and IHC, but it is more effective at discriminating ALK rearrangement from overexpression. The RT-qPCR assay easily clarifies the discrepancy between FISH and IHC, and can be incorporated into routine ALK screening for lung cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Impacts of Exercise on Prognostic Biomarkers in Lung Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-18

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Healthy, no Evidence of Disease; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  3. Lung Cancer Epidemiology in Korea.

    PubMed

    Shin, Aesun; Oh, Chang-Mo; Kim, Byung-Woo; Woo, Hyeongtaek; Won, Young-Joo; Lee, Jin-Soo

    2017-07-01

    The current study was undertaken to examine the trends in the lung cancer incidence, mortality, and survival after a diagnosis in Korea. Lung cancer incidence data according to the histologic type and mortality data were obtained from the Korea Central Cancer Registry and the Statistics Korea, respectively. The age-standardized incidence and mortality rates were calculated, and the Joinpoint model and age-period-cohort analyses were used to describe the trends in the rates. The 5-year relative survival rates of lung cancer were also calculated. Although the number of new lung cancer cases increased between 1999 and 2012, the age-standardized incidence rate decreased by 0.9% per year in men, whereas the incidence in women increased by 1.7% per year over the same time. Until 2010, the most common histologic type in men was squamous cell carcinoma, then adenocarcinoma prevailed thereafter. Since 1999, the most frequent histological type in women was adenocarcinoma. The lung cancer mortality started to decrease in 2002, with a more apparent decline for the younger age groups in both men and women. Overall, the 5-year relative survival rates have improved significantly from 11.2% for men and 14.7% for women among patients diagnosed between 1993 and 1997 to 19.3% for men and 28.2% for women among patients diagnosed between 2008 and 2012, respectively. An improvement in survival rate was observed for all major histology groups. The epidemiology of lung cancer in Korea has changed over a short time span, with decreasing mortality and improving survival rates. Further study is warranted to determine the cause of these changes.

  4. Inhibition of mitogen activated protein kinases increases the sensitivity of A549 lung cancer cells to the cytotoxicity induced by a kava chalcone analog.

    PubMed

    Warmka, Janel K; Solberg, Eric L; Zeliadt, Nicholette A; Srinivasan, Balasubramanian; Charlson, Aaron T; Xing, Chengguo; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V

    2012-08-03

    We are interested in investigating the biological activity of chalcones, a major class of compounds found in the beverage kava, in order to develop potent and selective chemopreventive candidates. Consumption of kava in the South Pacific Islands is inversely correlated with cancer incidence, even among smokers. Accordingly, chalcones have anti-cancer activities in animal and cell culture models. To investigate signaling pathways that affect chalcone action we studied a potent analog, (E)-3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-1-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (chalcone-24). Chalcone-24 was selected from a series of chalcone analogs that were synthesized based on the structures derived from flavokawain compounds found in kava, and screened in A549 lung cancer cells for induction of cytotoxicity and inhibition of NF-κB, a transcription factor associated with cell survival. Incubation of A549 cells with chalcone-24 resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell viability, inhibition of NF-κB, activation of caspases, and activation of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK); ERK1/2 and JNK are mitogen activated protein kinases that play central roles in regulating cell fate. Pharmacological inhibitors of ERK1/2 or JNK increased the sensitivity of A549 cells to chalcone-24-induced cytotoxicity, without affecting NF-κB or caspase activity. These results will help refine the synthesis of chalcone analogs to maximize the combination of actions required to prevent and treat cancer.

  5. Lunasin sensitivity in non-small cell lung cancer cells is linked to suppression of integrin signaling and changes in histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Junichi; McConnell, Elizabeth J; Davis, Keith R

    2014-12-18

    Lunasin is a plant derived bioactive peptide with both cancer chemopreventive and therapeutic activity. We recently showed lunasin inhibits non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell proliferation in a cell-line-specific manner. We now compared the effects of lunasin treatment of lunasin-sensitive (H661) and lunasin-insensitive (H1299) NSCLC cells with respect to lunasin uptake, histone acetylation and integrin signaling. Both cell lines exhibited changes in histone acetylation, with H661 cells showing a unique increase in H4K16 acetylation. Proximity ligation assays demonstrated lunasin interacted with integrins containing αv, α5, β1 and β3 subunits to a larger extent in the H661 compared to H1299 cells. Moreover, lunasin specifically disrupted the interaction of β1 and β3 subunits with the downstream signaling components phosphorylated Focal Adhesion Kinase (pFAK), Kindlin and Intergrin Linked Kinase in H661 cells. Immunoblot analyses demonstrated lunasin treatment of H661 resulted in reduced levels of pFAK, phosphorylated Akt and phosphorylated ERK1/2 whereas no changes were observed in H1299 cells. Silencing of αv expression in H661 cells confirmed signaling through integrins containing αv is essential for proliferation. Moreover, lunasin was unable to further inhibit proliferation in αv-silenced H661 cells. This indicates antagonism of integrin signaling via αv-containing integrins is an important component of lunasin's mechanism of action.

  6. Lunasin Sensitivity in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells Is Linked to Suppression of Integrin Signaling and Changes in Histone Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Junichi; McConnell, Elizabeth J.; Davis, Keith R.

    2014-01-01

    Lunasin is a plant derived bioactive peptide with both cancer chemopreventive and therapeutic activity. We recently showed lunasin inhibits non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell proliferation in a cell-line-specific manner. We now compared the effects of lunasin treatment of lunasin-sensitive (H661) and lunasin-insensitive (H1299) NSCLC cells with respect to lunasin uptake, histone acetylation and integrin signaling. Both cell lines exhibited changes in histone acetylation, with H661 cells showing a unique increase in H4K16 acetylation. Proximity ligation assays demonstrated lunasin interacted with integrins containing αv, α5, β1 and β3 subunits to a larger extent in the H661 compared to H1299 cells. Moreover, lunasin specifically disrupted the interaction of β1 and β3 subunits with the downstream signaling components phosphorylated Focal Adhesion Kinase (pFAK), Kindlin and Intergrin Linked Kinase in H661 cells. Immunoblot analyses demonstrated lunasin treatment of H661 resulted in reduced levels of pFAK, phosphorylated Akt and phosphorylated ERK1/2 whereas no changes were observed in H1299 cells. Silencing of αv expression in H661 cells confirmed signaling through integrins containing αv is essential for proliferation. Moreover, lunasin was unable to further inhibit proliferation in αv-silenced H661 cells. This indicates antagonism of integrin signaling via αv-containing integrins is an important component of lunasin’s mechanism of action. PMID:25530619

  7. The Novel miR-9600 Suppresses Tumor Progression and Promotes Paclitaxel Sensitivity in Non–small-cell Lung Cancer Through Altering STAT3 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Cheng-Cao; Li, Shu-Jun; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Ya-Dong; Zuo, Zhen-Yu; Xi, Yong-Yong; Wang, Liang; Li, De-Jia

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs have been identified to be involved in center stage of cancer biology. They accommodate cell proliferation and migration by negatively regulate gene expression either by hampering the translation of targeted mRNAs or by promoting their degradation. We characterized and identified the novel miR-9600 and its target in human non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Our results demonstrated that the miR-9600 were downregulated in NSCLC tissues and cells. It is confirmed that signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), a putative target gene, is directly inhibited by miR-9600. The miR-9600 markedly suppressed the protein expression of STAT3, but with no significant influence in corresponding mRNA levels, and the direct combination of miR-9600 and STAT3 was confirmed by a luciferase reporter assay. miR-9600 inhibited cell growth, hampered expression of cell cycle-related proteins and inhibited cell migration and invasion in human NSCLC cell lines. Further, miR-9600 significantly suppressed tumor growth in nude mice. Similarly, miR-9600 impeded tumorigenesis and metastasis through directly targeting STAT3. Furthermore, we identified that miR-9600 augmented paclitaxel and cisplatin sensitivity by downregulating STAT3 and promoting chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. These data demonstrate that miR-9600 might be a useful and novel therapeutic target for NSCLC. PMID:27845771

  8. Molecular biology of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Wendy A; Lam, David C L; O'Toole, Sandra A; Minna, John D

    2013-10-01

    Lung cancers are characterised by abundant genetic diversity with relatively few recurrent mutations occurring at high frequency. However, the genetic alterations often affect a common group of oncogenic signalling pathways. There have been vast improvements in our understanding of the molecular biology that underpins lung cancer in recent years and this has led to a revolution in the diagnosis and treatment of lung adenocarcinomas (ADC) based on the genotype of an individual's tumour. New technologies are identifying key and potentially targetable genetic aberrations not only in adenocarcinoma but also in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lung. Lung cancer mutations have been identified in v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), BRAF and the parallel phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway oncogenes and more recently in MEK and HER2 while structural rearrangements in ALK, ROS1 and possibly rearranged during transfection (RET) provide new therapeutic targets. Amplification is another mechanism of activation of oncogenes such as MET in adenocarcinoma, fibroblastgrowth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) and discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) in SCC. Intriguingly, many of these genetic alternations are associated with smoking status and with particular racial and gender differences, which may provide insight into the mechanisms of carcinogenesis and role of host factors in lung cancer development and progression. The role of tumour suppressor genes is increasingly recognised with aberrations reported in TP53, PTEN, RB1, LKB11 and p16/CDKN2A. Identification of biologically significant genetic alterations in lung cancer that lead to activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumour suppressor genes has the potential to provide further therapeutic opportunities. It is hoped that these discoveries may make a major contribution to improving outcome for patients with this poor prognosis disease.

  9. Tobacco Smoking and Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Furrukh, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco smoking remains the most established cause of lung carcinogenesis and other disease processes. Over the last 50 years, tobacco refinement and the introduction of filters have brought a change in histology, and now adenocarcinoma has become the most prevalent subtype. Over the last decade, smoking also has emerged as a strong prognostic and predictive patient characteristic along with other variables. This article briefly reviews scientific facts about tobacco, and the process and molecular pathways involved in lung carcinogenesis in smokers and never-smokers. The evidence from randomised trials about tobacco smoking’s impact on lung cancer outcomes is also reviewed. PMID:23984018

  10. Risk Profiling May Improve Lung Cancer Screening

    Cancer.gov

    A new modeling study suggests that individualized, risk-based selection of ever-smokers for lung cancer screening may prevent more lung cancer deaths and improve the effectiveness and efficiency of screening compared with current screening recommendations

  11. Suicide Risk Quadruples After Lung Cancer Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_165864.html Suicide Risk Quadruples After Lung Cancer Diagnosis Doctors, loved ones need to be on ... TUESDAY, May 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with lung cancer have a strikingly higher-than-normal risk of ...

  12. [THE ROLE OF ESTROGENS IN THE CARCINOGENESIS OF LUNG CANCER].

    PubMed

    Uchikova, E; Uchikov, A; Dimitrakova, E; Uchikov, P

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from lung cancer has dramatically increased in women as compared to men over the past few years. Historically, smoking has been considered the major risk factor for lung cancer regardless of gender. Several recent lines of evidence implicate gender differences in the observed differences in prevalence and histologic type which cannot be explained based on the carcinogenic action of nicotine. Several recent studies underscore the importance of reproductive and hormonal factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer Lung cancer morbidity and mortality in Bulgaria was 16.2/100000 women and 14.6/ 100000 women, resp. Lung cancer morbidity in Europe was 39/100000 women. Lung cancer is extremely sensitive to estrogens. The latter act directly or as effect modifiers for the relationship between smoking and lung cancer. Further research examining the relationship between serum estrogen levels and the estrogen receptor expression in normal and tumor lung tissue samples can help elucidate the importance of reproductive and hormonal (exogenous and endogenous) factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer.

  13. Disturbance of DKK1 level is partly involved in survival of lung cancer cells via regulation of ROMO1 and γ-radiation sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Seo Yoen; Kim, Hyun A; Kim, Jeong Yul; Lee, Jae Ha; Choi, Soo Im; Han, Jeong Ran; Kim, Kug Chan; Cho, Eun Wie

    2014-01-03

    Dickkopf1 (DKK1), a secreted protein involved in embryonic development, is a potent inhibitor of the Wnt signaling pathway and has been postulated to be a tumor suppressor or tumor promoter depending on the tumor type. In this study, we showed that DKK1 was expressed differently among non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines. The DKK1 expression level was much higher in A549 cells than in H460 cells. We revealed that blockage of DKK1 expression by silencing RNA in A549 cells caused up-regulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulator (ROMO1) protein, followed by partial cell death, cell growth inhibition, and loss of epithelial-mesenchymal transition property caused by ROS, and it also increased γ-radiation sensitivity. DKK1 overexpression in H460 significantly inhibited cell survival with the decrease of ROMO1 level, which induced the decrease of cellular ROS. Thereafter, exogenous N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, or hydrogen peroxide, a pro-oxidant, partially rescued cells from death and growth inhibition. In each cell line, both overexpression and blockage of DKK1 not only elevated p-RB activation, which led to cell growth arrest, but also inactivated AKT/NF-kB, which increased radiation sensitivity and inhibited cell growth. This study is the first to demonstrate that strict modulation of DKK1 expression in different cell types partially maintains cell survival via tight regulation of the ROS-producing ROMO1 and radiation resistance.

  14. Determining EGFR-TKI sensitivity of G719X and other uncommon EGFR mutations in non-small cell lung cancer: Perplexity and solution

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kaidi; Yang, Maojun; Liang, Naixin; Li, Shanqing

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) play critical roles in the pathogenesis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and they are highly associated with sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). While the pathogenic and pharmacological characteristics of common mutations in EGFR have been thoroughly investigated, those of uncommon mutations remain to be elucidated. Traditional approaches to study common mutations by randomized controlled trials are not feasible for uncommon mutations owing to their rarity. Therefore, by systematically reviewing laboratory and clinical studies of the G719X mutation, one of the uncommon mutations, we concluded that the G719X mutation was intermediately sensitive to TKIs, with an average response rate of 35.1% (47/134). Moreover, accordingly, we proposed a comprehensive model to investigate uncommon mutations in EGFR. The model involves both basic and clinical components, composed of structural analyses, functional alterations, cell viabilities and animal models with various types of clinical studies. In this review, we systematically reviewed studies of the G719X mutation and put forward a research model that could be generalized to explore uncommon mutations in diseases associated with gene mutations. PMID:28184913

  15. Lung Cancer and Eye Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lampaki, Sofia; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Lazaridis, George; Syrigos, Konstantinos; Trakada, Georgia; Kakolyris, Stylianos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Rapti, Aggeliki; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2014-01-01

    It has been observed that lung cancer either non-small cell or small cell is responsible for eye metastases. This form of metastases in several cases was the first manifestation of the disease and further investigation led to the diagnosis of the underlying malignancy. Both types of lung cancer are equally responsible for this demonstration. Furthermore; both chemotherapy and tyrosine kinase inhibitors have shown equal positive results in treating the exophalmos manifestation. Up to date information will be presented in our current work. PMID:25738158

  16. Science, medicine, and the future. Lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, T.

    1997-01-01

    Lung cancer, the most prevalent cancer in the Western world, is mainly caused by smoking. Nevertheless, only 20% of smokers develop lung cancer and while prevention is important, environmental factors are expected to contribute to the predicted rise in the incidence of lung cancer in the next 25 years. Survival of lung cancer is still poor, and new treatments are urgently needed. This review examines potential new therapeutic developments which have arisen from a greater understanding of the molecular and cellular biology of lung cancers. PMID:9066480

  17. Electrochemical treatment of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Y.L.; Xue, F.Z.; Ge, B.S.; Zhao, F.R.; Shi, B.; Zhang, W.

    1997-03-01

    A pilot study of electrochemical treatment (ECT) as a therapy for 386 patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer was undertaken. There were 103 stage 2 cases, 89 stage 3a cases, 122 stage 3b cases, and 72 stage 4 cases. Two ECT methods were used. For peripherally located lung cancer, platinum electrodes were inserted transcutaneously into the tumor under x-ray or CT guidance. For central type lung cancer or for those inoperable during thoracotomy, electrodes were inserted intraoperatively directly into the cancer. Voltage was 6--8 V, current was 40--100 mA, and electric charge was 100 coulombs per cm of tumor diameter. The number of electrodes was determined from the size of cancer mass, because the diameter of effective area around each electrode is approximately 3 cm. The short-term (6 months after ECT) results of the 386 lung cancer cases were: complete response (CR), 25.6% (99/386); partial response (PR), 46.4% (179/386); no change (NC), 15.3% (59/386); and progressive disease (PD), 12.7% (49/386). The total effective rate (CR + PR) was 72% (278/386). The 1, 3, and 5 year overall survival rates were 86.3% (333/386), 58.8% (227/386), and 29.5% (114/386), respectively. The main complication was traumatic pneumothorax, with an incidence rate of 14.8% (57/386). These clinical results show that ECT is simple, safe, effective, and minimally traumatic. ECT provides an alternative method for treating lung cancers that are conventionally inoperable, that are not responsive to chemotherapy or radiotherapy, or that cannot be resected after thoracotomy. Long-term survival rates suggest that ECT warrants further investigation.

  18. Cytogenetic and molecular aspects of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Panani, Anna D; Roussos, Charis

    2006-07-28

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide and its pathogenesis is closely associated with tobacco smoking. Continuous exposure of smoking carcinogens results in the accumulation of several alterations of tumorigenesis related genes leading to neoplastic bronchial lesions. Lung cancer is divided in two main histological groups, non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs) and small cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs). It seems that lung tumorigenesis is a multistep process in which a number of genetic events including alterations of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes have been occurred. Cytogenetic abnormalities in lung cancer are very complex. However, a number of recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities have been identified. Many of these changes are common in both major histological groups of lung cancer while certain chromosomal abnormalities have been correlated with the stage or the grade of the tumors. In addition, several molecular alterations have been constantly found. Some of them are common in different histological subtypes of lung cancer and they appear to play an important role in the pathogenesis of lung cancer. A good understanding of the underlying genetic changes of lung tumorigenesis will provide new perspectives for early diagnosis and screening of high-risk individuals. In addition, a number of genetical prognostic factors have been identified as possibly helpful parameters in the evaluation of lung cancer patients. Further research is required in order to systematically investigate genetical alterations in lung cancer contributing to improvement of lung cancer classification and staging and to development of new molecular targeted therapies.

  19. Update in Cancer Chemotherapy, Part III: Lung Cancer, Part 1

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jane C.

    1985-01-01

    An update in cancer chemotherapy that deals with the various therapies of lung cancer is described. At present, the stage of the disease and cell type are the major factors that determine the treatment. Important differences in the biological behavior and response to treatment exist between small cell and non-small cell cancers. The small cell type is sensitive to many chemotherapeutic agents. Differences in response to chemotherapy and survival have been less among the non-small cell types. The treatment of non-small cell carcinomas including squamous cell, large cell, and adenocarcinoma are reviewed in Part I of this paper. Small cell lung cancer will be described in Part II, which will be published in a future issue of the journal. PMID:2414458

  20. Lung cancer in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Diso, Daniele; Onorati, Ilaria; Anile, Marco; Mantovani, Sara; Rendina, Erino A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a worldwide-accepted evidence of a population shift toward older ages. This shift favors an increased risk of developing lung cancer that is primarily a disease of older populations. Decision making is extremely difficult in elderly patients, since this group is under-represented in clinical trials with only 25% of them historically opening to patients older than 65 years. For all these reasons, a “customized” preoperative assessment to identify physiological or pathological frailty should be encouraged since standard tools may be less reliable. The work already done to improve patient selection for lung surgery in the elderly population clearly shows that surgical resection seems the treatment of choice for early stage lung cancer. Further studies are required to improve outcome by reducing postoperative morbidity and mortality. PMID:27942414

  1. Drug-sensitive FGFR3 mutations in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chandrani, P.; Prabhash, K.; Prasad, R.; Sethunath, V.; Ranjan, M.; Iyer, P.; Aich, J.; Dhamne, H.; Iyer, D. N.; Upadhyay, P.; Mohanty, B.; Chandna, P.; Kumar, R.; Joshi, A.; Noronha, V.; Patil, V.; Ramaswamy, A.; Karpe, A.; Thorat, R.; Chaudhari, P.; Ingle, A.; Choughule, A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths across the world. In this study, we present therapeutically relevant genetic alterations in lung adenocarcinoma of Indian origin. Materials and methods Forty-five primary lung adenocarcinoma tumors were sequenced for 676 amplicons using RainDance cancer panel at an average coverage of 1500 × (reads per million mapped reads). To validate the findings, 49 mutations across 23 genes were genotyped in an additional set of 363 primary lung adenocarcinoma tumors using mass spectrometry. NIH/3T3 cells over expressing mutant and wild-type FGFR3 constructs were characterized for anchorage independent growth, constitutive activation, tumor formation and sensitivity to FGFR inhibitors using in vitro and xenograft mouse models. Results We present the first spectrum of actionable alterations in lung adenocarcinoma tumors of Indian origin, and shows that mutations of FGFR3 are present in 20 of 363 (5.5%) patients. These FGFR3 mutations are constitutively active and oncogenic when ectopically expressed in NIH/3T3 cells and using a xenograft model in NOD/SCID mice. Inhibition of FGFR3 kinase activity inhibits transformation of NIH/3T3 overexpressing FGFR3 constructs and growth of tumors driven by FGFR3 in the xenograft models. The reduction in tumor size in the mouse is paralleled by a reduction in the amounts of phospho-ERK, validating the in vitro findings. Interestingly, the FGFR3 mutations are significantly higher in a proportion of younger patients and show a trend toward better overall survival, compared with patients lacking actionable alterations or those harboring KRAS mutations. Conclusion We present the first actionable mutation spectrum in Indian lung cancer genome. These findings implicate FGFR3 as a novel therapeutic in lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27998968

  2. Molecular Epidemiology of Female Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Seon-Hee; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is still a leading cause of cancer mortality in the world. The incidence of lung cancer in developed countries started to decrease mainly due to global anti-smoking campaigns. However, the incidence of lung cancer in women has been increasing in recent decades for various reasons. Furthermore, since the screening of lung cancer is not as yet very effective, clinically applicable molecular markers for early diagnosis are much required. Lung cancer in women appears to have differences compared with that in men, in terms of histologic types and susceptibility to environmental risk factors. This suggests that female lung cancer can be derived by carcinogenic mechanisms different from those involved in male lung cancer. Among female lung cancer patients, many are non-smokers, which could be studied to identify alternative carcinogenic mechanisms independent from smoking-related ones. In this paper, we reviewed molecular susceptibility markers and genetic changes in lung cancer tissues observed in female lung cancer patients, which have been validated by various studies and will be helpful to understand the tumorigenesis of lung cancer. PMID:24212786

  3. Lung Cancer Staging and Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Gavitt A; Jones, Kirk D; Jablons, David M

    The seventh edition of the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) TNM staging system was developed by the International Association for the Staging of Lung Cancer (IASLC) Lung Cancer Staging Project by a coordinated international effort to develop data-derived TNM classifications with significant survival differences. Based on these TNM groupings, current 5-year survival estimates in NSLCC range from 73 % in stage IA disease to 13 % in stage IV disease. TNM stage remains the most important prognostic factor in predicting recurrence rates and survival times, followed by tumor histologic grade, and patient sex, age, and performance status. Molecular prognostication in lung cancer is an exploding area of research where interest has moved beyond TNM stage and into individualized genetic tumor analysis with immunohistochemistry, microarray, and mutation profiles. However, despite intense research efforts and countless publications, no molecular prognostic marker has been adopted into clinical use since most fail in subsequent cross-validation with few exceptions. The recent interest in immunotherapy for NSCLC has identified new biomarkers with early evidence that suggests that PD-L1 is a predictive marker of a good response to new immunotherapy drugs but a poor prognostic indicator of overall survival. Future prognostication of outcomes in NSCLC will likely be based on a combination of TNM stage and molecular tumor profiling and yield more precise, individualized survival estimates and treatment algorithms.

  4. Capilliposide from Lysimachia capillipes inhibits AKT activation and restores gefitinib sensitivity in human non-small cell lung cancer cells with acquired gefitinib resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shi-rong; Xu, Ya-si; Jin, Er; Zhu, Lu-cheng; Xia, Bing; Chen, Xu-feng; Li, Fan-zhu; Ma, Sheng-lin

    2017-01-01

    Most gefitinib-treated patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) would eventually develop resistance. Lysimachia capillipes (LC) capilliposide extracts from LC Hemsl. show both in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer effects. In this study we investigated whether LC capilliposide in combination with gefitinib could overcome the resistance of NSCLC cells to gefitinib and identified the signaling pathways involved. Treatment with LC capilliposide alone inhibited the growth of a panel of NSCLC cell lines (PC-9, H460, H1975, H1299 and PC-9-GR) sensitive or resistant to gefitinib with IC50 values in the range of μg/mL. In the gefitinib-resistant PC-9-GR cells (which have a T790M EGFR mutation), LC capilliposide (at the IC30, i.e.1.2 μg/mL) markedly enhanced the inhibitory effects of gefitinib with its IC50 value being decreased from 6.80±1.00 to 0.77±0.12 μmol/L. By using the median effect analysis we showed that combination treatment of LC capilliposide and gefitinib could restore gefitinib sensitivity in PC-9-GR cells. Furthermore, LC capilliposide (1.2 μg/mL) significantly increased the apoptotic responses to gefitinib (0.77 μmol/L) in PC-9-GR cells, but did not affect gefitinib-induced G0/G1 arrest. Moreover, LC capilliposide (1.2 μg/mL) in combination with gefitinib (0.77, 1.0 μmol/L) markedly decreased the phosphorylation of the EGFR downstream signaling molecule AKT, which neither LC capilliposide nor gefitinib alone affected. In PC-9-GR cells with siRNA knockdown of AKT, addition of LC capilliposide was unable to increase gefitinib sensitivity. In a PC-9-GR xenograft mouse model, combination treatment with LC capilliposide (15 mg·kg−1·d−1, ip) and gefitinib (50 mg·kg−1·d−1, ip) dramatically enhanced tumor growth suppression (with a TGI of 109.3%), compared with TGIs of 22.6% and 56.6%, respectively, in mice were treated with LC capilliposide or gefitinib alone. LC capilliposide can restore the cells' sensitivity to gefitinib through

  5. The effect of artificial neural network model combined with six tumor markers in auxiliary diagnosis of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Feifei; Wu, Yiming; Wu, Yongjun; Nie, Guangjin; Ni, Ran

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the diagnosis potential of artificial neural network (ANN) model combined with six tumor markers in auxiliary diagnosis of lung cancer, to differentiate lung cancer from lung benign disease, normal control, and gastrointestinal cancers. Serum carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA), gastrin, neurone specific enolase (NSE), sialic acid (SA), Cu/Zn, Ca were measured through different experimental procedures in 117 lung cancer patients, 93 lung benign disease patients, 111 normal control, 47 gastric cancer patients, 50 patients with colon cancer and 50 esophagus cancer patients, 19 parameters of basic information were surveyed among lung cancer, lung benign disease and normal control, then developed and evaluated ANN models to distinguish lung cancer. Using the ANN model with the six serum tumor markers and 19 parameters to distinguish lung cancer from benign lung disease and healthy people, the sensitivity was 98.3%, the specificity was 99.5% and the accuracy was 96.9%. Another three ANN models with the six serum tumor markers were employed to differentiate lung cancer from three gastrointestinal cancers, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of distinguishing lung cancer from gastric cancer by the ANN model of lung cancer-gastric cancer were 100%, 83.3% and 93.5%, respectively; The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of discriminating lung cancer by lung cancer-colon cancer ANN model were 90.0%, 90.0%, and 90.0%; And which were 86.7%, 84.6%, and 86.0%, respectively, by lung cancer-esophagus cancer ANN model. ANN model built with the six serum tumor markers could distinguish lung cancer, not only from lung benign disease and normal people, but also from three common gastrointestinal cancers. And our evidence indicates the ANN model maybe is an excellent and intelligent system to discriminate lung cancer.

  6. Women and lung cancer: waiting to exhale.

    PubMed

    Baldini, E H; Strauss, G M

    1997-10-01

    Lung cancer is now the leading cause of cancer deaths among women. In the United States, 64,300 women are expected to die of lung cancer in 1996. Smoking is responsible for about 80% of lung cancer cases. Unfortunately, the prevalence of smoking among women remains unacceptably high at about 22% and is expected to surpass the rate in men by the year 2000. Smoking rates are highest among young girls and the less educated. Whether lung cancer represents a different disease in women than in men is unclear. Data are conflicting regarding the magnitude of the relative risk of developing lung cancer due to smoking between the genders. There appears to be a difference in the relative distribution of lung cancer histologic features between men and women that is not explained entirely by differences in smoking patterns. Women who smoke appear to be at higher risk of developing small cell lung cancer than squamous cell lung cancer, whereas men who smoke have a similar risk for the two histologic conditions. Furthermore, women smokers are more likely to develop adenocarcinoma of the lung, and estrogens may play a causative role in this phenomenon. Data are unclear regarding whether the outcome of lung cancer treatment differs between genders. Solutions to the lung cancer epidemic among US women include (1) prevention of the disease by reducing smoking rates, (2) improving early detection methods, and (3) exploring new therapeutic strategies.

  7. Thromboprophylaxis in ambulatory lung cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Cavaliere, Loretta

    2013-02-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, are common problems experienced by patients with lung cancer that can impact treatment plans, prognoses, and survival. Patients with lung cancer are at greatest risk for development of VTE in the ambulatory care treatment setting. Literature does exist on VTE management for medical and surgical oncology inpatients, as well as clinical guidelines for inpatient prophylaxis; however, published evidence is lacking on outpatient risk and thromboprophylaxis in medical oncology outpatients, particularly patients with lung cancer. Because patients with lung cancer treated in the ambulatory setting have established risks for VTE, they may benefit from thromboprophylaxis. Clinical guidelines for outpatient thromboprophylaxis direct the clinical practice for thromboprophylaxis in lung cancer treatment. The purpose of the current article is to explore the VTE risks associated with ambulatory lung cancer treatment and to review the recommended guidelines for thromboprophylaxis to guide clinical decision making for patients with lung cancer.

  8. Evaluation of lung flute in sputum samples for molecular analysis of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Anjuman, Nigar; Li, Ning; Guarnera, Maria; Stass, Sanford A; Jiang, Feng

    2013-09-22

    Molecular analysis of sputum provides a promising approach for lung cancer diagnosis, yet is limited by the difficulty in collecting the specimens from individuals who can't spontaneously expectorate sputum. Lung Flute is a small self-powered audio device that can induce sputum by generating sound waves and vibrating in the airways of the lungs. Here we propose to evaluate the usefulness of Lung Flute for sputum sampling to assist diagnosis of lung cancer. Forty-three stage I lung cancer patients and 47 cancer-free individuals who couldn't spontaneously cough sputum were instructed to use Lung Flute for sputum sampling. Expressions of two microRNAs, miRs-31 and 210, were determined in the specimens by qRT-PCR. The results were compared with sputum cytology. Sputum was easily collected from 39 of 43 (90.7%) lung cancer patients and 42 of 47 (89.4%) controls with volume ranges from 1 to 5 ml (median, 2.6 ml). The specimens had less than 4% oral squamous cells, indicating that sputum was obtained from low respiratory tract. Expressions of miRs-31 and 210 in sputum were considerably higher in cancer patients than cancer-free individuals (8.990 vs. 4.514; 0.6847 vs. 0.3317; all P <0.001). Combined use of the two miRNAs produced a significantly higher sensitivity (61.5% vs. 35.9%, P = 0.002) and a slightly lower specificity (90.5% vs. 95.2%, p = 0.03) compared with cytology for lung cancer diagnosis. Lung Flute could potentially be useful in convenient and efficient collection of sputum for molecular diagnosis of lung cancer.

  9. Evaluation of lung flute in sputum samples for molecular analysis of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Molecular analysis of sputum provides a promising approach for lung cancer diagnosis, yet is limited by the difficulty in collecting the specimens from individuals who can’t spontaneously expectorate sputum. Lung Flute is a small self-powered audio device that can induce sputum by generating sound waves and vibrating in the airways of the lungs. Here we propose to evaluate the usefulness of Lung Flute for sputum sampling to assist diagnosis of lung cancer. Methods Forty-three stage I lung cancer patients and 47 cancer-free individuals who couldn’t spontaneously cough sputum were instructed to use Lung Flute for sputum sampling. Expressions of two microRNAs, miRs-31 and 210, were determined in the specimens by qRT-PCR. The results were compared with sputum cytology. Results Sputum was easily collected from 39 of 43 (90.7%) lung cancer patients and 42 of 47 (89.4%) controls with volume ranges from 1 to 5 ml (median, 2.6 ml). The specimens had less than 4% oral squamous cells, indicating that sputum was obtained from low respiratory tract. Expressions of miRs-31 and 210 in sputum were considerably higher in cancer patients than cancer-free individuals (8.990 vs. 4.514; 0.6847 vs. 0.3317; all P <0.001). Combined use of the two miRNAs produced a significantly higher sensitivity (61.5% vs. 35.9%, P = 0.002) and a slightly lower specificity (90.5% vs. 95.2%, p = 0.03) compared with cytology for lung cancer diagnosis. Conclusion Lung Flute could potentially be useful in convenient and efficient collection of sputum for molecular diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:24053570

  10. Guidance molecules in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nasarre, Patrick; Potiron, Vincent; Drabkin, Harry

    2010-01-01

    Guidance molecules were first described in the nervous system to control axon outgrowth direction. They are also widely expressed outside the nervous system where they control cell migration, tissue development and establishment of the vascular network. In addition, they are involved in cancer development, tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. This review is primarily focused on their functions in lung cancer and their involvement in lung development is also presented. Five guidance molecule families and their corresponding receptors are described, including the semaphorins/neuropilins/plexins, ephrins and Eph receptors, netrin/DCC/UNC5, Slit/Robo and Notch/Delta. In addition, the possibility to target these molecules as a therapeutic approach in cancer is discussed. PMID:20139699

  11. A highly specific and sensitive massive parallel sequencer-based test for somatic mutations in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yoshiaki; Shiihara, Jun; Miyazawa, Hitoshi; Ohta, Hiromitsu; Higo, Megumi; Nagai, Yoshiaki; Kobayashi, Kunihiko; Saijo, Yasuo; Tsuchida, Masanori; Nakayama, Mitsuo; Hagiwara, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Molecular targeting therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has clarified the importance of mutation testing when selecting treatment regimens. As a result, multiple-gene mutation tests are urgently needed. We developed a next-generation sequencer (NGS)-based, multi-gene test named the MINtS for investigating driver mutations in both cytological specimens and snap-frozen tissue samples. The MINtS was used to investigate the EGFR, KRAS, BRAF genes from DNA, and the ERBB2, and the ALK, ROS1, and RET fusion genes from RNA. We focused on high specificity and sensitivity (≥0.99) and even included samples with a cancer cell content of 1%. The MINtS enables testing of more than 100 samples in a single run, making it possible to process a large number of samples submitted to a central laboratory, and reducing the cost for a single sample. We investigated 96 cytological samples and 190 surgically resected tissues, both of which are isolated in daily clinical practice. With the cytological samples, we compared the results for the EGFR mutation between the MINtS and the PNA-LNA PCR clamp test, and their results were 99% consistent. In the snap-frozen tissue samples, 188/190 (99%) samples were successfully analyzed for all genes investigated using both DNA and RNA. Then, we used 200 cytological samples that were serially isolated in clinical practice to assess RNA quality. Using our procedure, 196 samples (98%) provided high-quality RNA suitable for analysis with the MINtS. We concluded that the MINtS test system is feasible for analyzing "druggable" genes using cytological samples and snap-frozen tissue samples. The MINtS will fill a needs for patients for whom only cytological specimens are available for genetic testing.

  12. Curcumin and lung cancer--a review.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Hiren J; Patel, Vipul; Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2014-12-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is the most important component of the spice turmeric and is derived from the rhizome of the East Indian plant Curcuma longa. Curcumin has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine for centuries, as it is nontoxic and has a variety of therapeutic properties including antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antiseptic activities. Recently, curcumin has been widely studied for its anticancer properties via its effects on a variety of biological pathways involved in apoptosis, tumor proliferation, chemo- and radiotherapy sensitization, tumor invasion, and metastases. Curcumin can be an effective adjunct in treating solid organ tumors due to its properties of regulating oncogenes like p53, egr-1, c-myc, bcl-XL, etc.; transcription factors like NF-kB, STAT-3, and AP-1; protein kinases like MAPK; and enzymes like COX and LOX. Lung cancer is the most common malignancy worldwide and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Seventy-five percent of lung cancer presents at an advanced stage where the existing treatment is not very effective and may result in tremendous patient morbidity. As a result, there is a significant interest in developing adjunctive chemotherapies to augment currently available treatment protocols, which may allow decreased side effects and toxicity without compromising therapeutic efficacy. Curcumin is one such potential candidate, and this review presents an overview of the current in vitro and in vivo studies of curcumin in lung cancer.

  13. Liquid biopsy in early stage lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Ramírez, Cristina; Robles, Ana I.; Molina, Miguel Ángel; Faus-Dáder, María José; Calleja-Hernández, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths worldwide. Surgery is the standard treatment for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, 30% to 80% of these patients will die within 5 yearS of diagnosis. Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) harbors pathologic characteristics of the original tumor, such as gene mutations or epigenetic alterations. Analysis of cfDNA has revolutionized the clinical care of advanced lung cancer patients undergoing targeted therapies. However, the low concentration of cfDNA in the blood of early-stage NSCLC patients has hampered its use for management of early disease. Continuing development of more specific and sensitive techniques for detection and analysis of cfDNA will soon enable its leverage in early stage and, perhaps, even screening settings. Therefore, cfDNA analysis may become a tool used for routine NSCLC diagnosis and for monitoring tumor burden, as well as for identifying hidden residual disease. In this review, we will focus on the current evidence of cfDNA in patients with early-stage NSCLC, new and upcoming approaches to identify circulating-tumor biomarkers, their clinical applications and future directions. PMID:27826533

  14. Enhancement of Radiation Sensitivity in Lung Cancer Cells by a Novel Small Molecule Inhibitor That Targets the β-Catenin/Tcf4 Interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghao; Gao, Mei; Luo, Guifen; Han, Xiaofeng; Bao, Wenjing; Cheng, Yanyan; Tian, Wang; Yan, Maocai; Yang, Guanlin; An, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important treatment choice for unresectable advanced human lung cancers, and a critical adjuvant treatment for surgery. However, radiation as a lung cancer treatment remains far from satisfactory due to problems associated with radiation resistance in cancer cells and severe cytotoxicity to non-cancer cells, which arise at doses typically administered to patients. We have recently identified a promising novel inhibitor of β-catenin/Tcf4 interaction, named BC-23 (C21H14ClN3O4S), which acts as a potent cell death enhancer when used in combination with radiation. Sequential exposure of human p53-null non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H1299 cells to low doses of x-ray radiation, followed 1 hour later by administration of minimally cytotoxic concentrations of BC-23, resulted in a highly synergistic induction of clonogenic cell death (combination index <1.0). Co-treatment with BC-23 at low concentrations effectively inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling and down-regulates c-Myc and cyclin D1 expression. S phase arrest and ROS generation are also involved in the enhancement of radiation effectiveness mediated by BC-23. BC-23 therefore represents a promising new class of radiation enhancer.

  15. Analysis of Lung Flute-collected Sputum for Lung Cancer Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Su, Jian; Anjuman, Nigar; Guarnera, Maria A; Zhang, Howard; Stass, Sanford A; Jiang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Molecular analysis of sputum can help diagnose lung cancer. We have demonstrated that Lung Flute can be used to collect sputum from individuals who cannot spontaneously expectorate sputum. The objective of this study is to further evaluate the performance of the Lung Flute by comparing the characteristics of parallel samples collected with and without the Lung Flute and the usefulness for diagnosis of lung cancer. Fifty-six early-stage lung cancer patients (40 current smokers and 16 former smokers) and 73 cancer-free individuals (52 current smokers and 21 former smokers) were instructed to spontaneously cough and use Lung Flute for sputum sampling. Sputum cytology and polymerase chain reaction analysis of three miRNAs (miRs-21, 31, and 210) were performed in the specimens. All 92 current smokers and 11 (28.7%) of 37 former smokers spontaneously expectorated sputum and also produced sputum when using the Lung Flute. Twenty-seven former smokers (70.3%) who could not spontaneously expectorate sputum, however, were able to produce sputum when using the Lung Flute. The specimens were of low respiratory origin without contamination from other sources, eg, saliva. There was no difference of sputum volume and cell populations, diagnostic efficiency of cytology, and analysis of the miRNAs in the specimens collected by the two approaches. Analysis of the sputum miRNAs produced 83.93% sensitivity and 87.67% specificity for identifying lung cancer. Therefore, sputum collected by the Lung Flute has comparable features as spontaneously expectorated sputum. Using the Lung Flute enables former smokers who cannot spontaneously expectorate to provide adequate sputum to improve sputum collection for lung cancer diagnosis.

  16. Analysis of Lung Flute–collected Sputum for Lung Cancer Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jian; Anjuman, Nigar; Guarnera, Maria A; Zhang, Howard; Stass, Sanford A; Jiang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Molecular analysis of sputum can help diagnose lung cancer. We have demonstrated that Lung Flute can be used to collect sputum from individuals who cannot spontaneously expectorate sputum. The objective of this study is to further evaluate the performance of the Lung Flute by comparing the characteristics of parallel samples collected with and without the Lung Flute and the usefulness for diagnosis of lung cancer. Fifty-six early-stage lung cancer patients (40 current smokers and 16 former smokers) and 73 cancer-free individuals (52 current smokers and 21 former smokers) were instructed to spontaneously cough and use Lung Flute for sputum sampling. Sputum cytology and polymerase chain reaction analysis of three miRNAs (miRs-21, 31, and 210) were performed in the specimens. All 92 current smokers and 11 (28.7%) of 37 former smokers spontaneously expectorated sputum and also produced sputum when using the Lung Flute. Twenty-seven former smokers (70.3%) who could not spontaneously expectorate sputum, however, were able to produce sputum when using the Lung Flute. The specimens were of low respiratory origin without contamination from other sources, eg, saliva. There was no difference of sputum volume and cell populations, diagnostic efficiency of cytology, and analysis of the miRNAs in the specimens collected by the two approaches. Analysis of the sputum miRNAs produced 83.93% sensitivity and 87.67% specificity for identifying lung cancer. Therefore, sputum collected by the Lung Flute has comparable features as spontaneously expectorated sputum. Using the Lung Flute enables former smokers who cannot spontaneously expectorate to provide adequate sputum to improve sputum collection for lung cancer diagnosis. PMID:26309391

  17. Sensitivity of Image Features to Noise in Conventional and Respiratory-Gated PET/CT Images of Lung Cancer: Uncorrelated Noise Effects.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Jasmine A; Budzevich, Mikalai; Hunt, Dylan; Moros, Eduardo G; Latifi, Kujtim; Dilling, Thomas J; Feygelman, Vladimir; Zhang, Geoffrey

    2016-08-08

    The effect of noise on image features has yet to be studied in depth. Our objective was to explore how significantly image features are affected by the addition of uncorrelated noise to an image. The signal-to-noise ratio and noise power spectrum were calculated for a positron emission tomography/computed tomography scanner using a Ge-68 phantom. The conventional and respiratory-gated positron emission tomography/computed tomography images of 31 patients with lung cancer were retrospectively examined. Multiple sets of noise images were created for each original image by adding Gaussian noise of varying standard deviation equal to 2.5%, 4.0%, and 6.0% of the maximum intensity for positron emission tomography images and 10, 20, 50, 80, and 120 Hounsfield units for computed tomography images. Image features were extracted from all images, and percentage differences between the original image and the noise image feature values were calculated. These features were then categorized according to the noise sensitivity. The contour-dependent shape descriptors averaged below 4% difference in positron emission tomography and below 13% difference in computed tomography between noise and original images. Gray level size zone matrix features were the most sensitive to uncorrelated noise exhibiting average differences >200% for conventional and respiratory-gated images in computed tomography and 90% in positron emission tomography. Image feature differences increased as the noise level increased for shape, intensity, and gray-level co-occurrence matrix features in positron emission tomography and for gray-level co-occurrence matrix and gray-level size zone matrix features in conventional computed tomography. Investigators should be aware of the noise effects on image features.

  18. Molecular determinants of drug-specific sensitivity for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 19 and 20 mutants in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsigelny, Igor F; Wheler, Jennifer J; Greenberg, Jerry P; Kouznetsova, Valentina L; Stewart, David J; Bazhenova, Lyudmila; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2015-03-20

    We hypothesized that aberrations activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) via dimerization would be more sensitive to anti-dimerization agents (e.g., cetuximab). EGFR exon 19 abnormalities (L747_A750del; deletes amino acids LREA) respond to reversible EGFR kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Exon 20 in-frame insertions and/or duplications (codons 767 to 774) and T790M mutations are clinically resistant to reversible/some irreversible TKIs. Their impact on protein function/therapeutic actionability are not fully elucidated.In our study, the index patient with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harbored EGFR D770_P772del_insKG (exon 20). A twenty patient trial (NSCLC cohort) (cetuximab-based regimen) included two participants with EGFR TKI-resistant mutations ((i) exon 20 D770>GY; and (ii) exon 19 LREA plus exon 20 T790M mutations). Structural modeling predicted that EGFR exon 20 anomalies (D770_P772del_insKG and D770>GY), but not T790M mutations, stabilize the active dimer configuration by increasing the interaction between the kinase domains, hence sensitizing to an agent preventing dimerization. Consistent with predictions, the two patients harboring D770_P772del_insKG and D770>GY, respectively, responded to an EGFR antibody (cetuximab)-based regimen; the T790M-bearing patient showed no response to cetuximab combined with erlotinib. In silico modeling merits investigation of its ability to optimize therapeutic selection based on structural/functional implications of different aberrations within the same gene.

  19. Lung Cancer: Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to fight cancer Chromosome: A strand of DNA and related proteins that carries the genes and ... structure, function and pathology ^ back to top D DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid): The part of the cell that ...

  20. Treatment Options by Stage (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  1. Clinical and experimental pathology of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    McVie, J.G.; Bakker, W.; Wagenaar, S.C.; Carney, D.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 17 selections. Some of the titles are: Flow cytometric DNA analysis in the study of small cell carcinoma of the lung; Mechanisms of oncogenesis; Adhesion mechanisms in liver metastasis; Current concepts in the therapy of small cell lung cancer; Application of monoclonal antibodies in imaging and therapy; and Clinical applications of the biologic properties of small cell lung cancer.

  2. EGF-independent activation of cell-surface EGF receptors harboring mutations found in gefitinib-sensitive lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Choi, S H; Mendrola, J M; Lemmon, M A

    2007-03-08

    Several somatic mutations within the tyrosine kinase domain of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have been identified that predict clinical response of non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients to gefitinib. To test the hypothesis that these mutations cause constitutive EGF receptor signaling, and to investigate its mechanistic basis, we expressed representative examples in a null background and analysed their biochemical properties. Each mutation caused significant EGF-independent tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR, and allowed the receptor to promote Ba/F3 cell mitogenesis in the absence of EGF, arguing that these are oncogenic mutations. Active mutated receptors are present at the cell surface and are fully competent to bind EGF. Recent structural studies show that the inactive EGFR tyrosine kinase domain is autoinhibited by intramolecular interactions between its activation loop and alphaC helix. We find that mutations predicted to disrupt this autoinhibitory interaction (including several that have not been described in NSCLC) elevate EGF-independent tyrosine kinase activity, thus providing new insight into how somatic mutations activate EGFR and other ErbB family members.

  3. Lung cancer screening and management.

    PubMed

    Jones, G S; Baldwin, D R

    2015-12-01

    Deaths from lung cancer are greater than for any other type of malignancy. Many people present with advanced stage cancer at diagnosis and survival is limited. Low radiation dose CT (LDCT) screening appears to offer part of the solution to this. The US National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) showed a 20% reduction in cancer related mortality and a 6.7% reduction in all cause mortality in patients who had LDCT compared to chest X-ray. Lung Cancer screening is now being implemented in the US using the NLST screening criteria but many questions remain about the details of the methodology of screening and its cost effectiveness. Many of these questions are being answered by ongoing European trials that are reporting their findings. In this review we objectively analyse current research evidence and explore the issues that need to be resolved before implementation, including technical considerations, selection criteria and effective nodule management protocols. We discuss the potential barriers that will be faced when beginning a national screening programme and possible solutions to them.

  4. Pleural involvement in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Agalioti, Theodora; Giannou, Anastasios D; Stathopoulos, Georgios T

    2015-06-01

    The pleural space, a sterile secluded environment in the thoracic cavity, represents an attractive metastatic site for various cancers of lung, breast and gastrointestinal origins. Whereas lung and breast adenocarcinomas could invade the pleural space because of their anatomic proximity, "distant" cancers like ovarian or gastrointestinal tract adenocarcinomas may employ more active mechanisms to the same end. A pleural metastasis is often accompanied by a malignant pleural effusion (MPE), an unfavorable complication that severely restricts the quality of life and expectancy of the cancer patient. MPE is the net "product" of three different processes, namely inflammation, enhanced angiogenesis and vascular leakage. Current efforts are focusing on the identification of cancer cell autocrine (specific mutation spectra and biochemical pathways) and paracrine (cytokine and chemokine signals) characteristics as well as host features (immunological or other) that underlie the MPE phenotype. Herein we examine the pleural histology, cytology and molecular characteristics that make the pleural cavity an attractive metastasis destination for lung adenocarcinoma. Mesothelial and tumor features that may account for the tumor's ability to invade the pleural space are highlighted. Finally, possible therapeutic interventions specifically targeting MPE are discussed.

  5. Pleural involvement in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Giannou, Anastasios D.; Stathopoulos, Georgios T.

    2015-01-01

    The pleural space, a sterile secluded environment in the thoracic cavity, represents an attractive metastatic site for various cancers of lung, breast and gastrointestinal origins. Whereas lung and breast adenocarcinomas could invade the pleural space because of their anatomic proximity, “distant” cancers like ovarian or gastrointestinal tract adenocarcinomas may employ more active mechanisms to the same end. A pleural metastasis is often accompanied by a malignant pleural effusion (MPE), an unfavorable complication that severely restricts the quality of life and expectancy of the cancer patient. MPE is the net “product” of three different processes, namely inflammation, enhanced angiogenesis and vascular leakage. Current efforts are focusing on the identification of cancer cell autocrine (specific mutation spectra and biochemical pathways) and paracrine (cytokine and chemokine signals) characteristics as well as host features (immunological or other) that underlie the MPE phenotype. Herein we examine the pleural histology, cytology and molecular characteristics that make the pleural cavity an attractive metastasis destination for lung adenocarcinoma. Mesothelial and tumor features that may account for the tumor’s ability to invade the pleural space are highlighted. Finally, possible therapeutic interventions specifically targeting MPE are discussed. PMID:26150915

  6. Cryotherapy in Treating Patients With Lung Cancer That Has Spread to the Other Lung or Parts of the Body

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-17

    Advanced Malignant Mesothelioma; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  7. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Stage IIIB or Stage IV Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-04

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  8. Lung cancer: biology and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Omer; Yang, Yi-Wei; Buchanan, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer mortality in men and women in the U.S. and worldwide. About 90% of lung cancer cases are caused by smoking and the use of tobacco products. However, other factors such as radon gas, asbestos, air pollution exposures, and chronic infections can contribute to lung carcinogenesis. In addition, multiple inherited and acquired mechanisms of susceptibility to lung cancer have been proposed. Lung cancer is divided into two broad histologic classes, which grow and spread differently: small-cell lung carcinomas (SCLC) and non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC). Treatment options for lung cancer include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. Therapeutic-modalities recommendations depend on several factors, including the type and stage of cancer. Despite the improvements in diagnosis and therapy made during the past 25 years, the prognosis for patients with lung cancer is still unsatisfactory. The responses to current standard therapies are poor except for the most localized cancers. However, a better understanding of the biology pertinent to these challenging malignancies, might lead to the development of more efficacious and perhaps more specific drugs. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent developments in lung cancer biology and its therapeutic strategies, and discuss the latest treatment advances including therapies currently under clinical investigation. PMID:26297204

  9. Lung cancer: Biology and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Lemjabbar-Alaoui, Hassan; Hassan, Omer Ui; Yang, Yi-Wei; Buchanan, Petra

    2015-12-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer mortality in men and women in the U.S. and worldwide. About 90% of lung cancer cases are caused by smoking and the use of tobacco products. However, other factors such as radon gas, asbestos, air pollution exposures, and chronic infections can contribute to lung carcinogenesis. In addition, multiple inherited and acquired mechanisms of susceptibility to lung cancer have been proposed. Lung cancer is divided into two broad histologic classes, which grow and spread differently: small-cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs) and non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs). Treatment options for lung cancer include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. Therapeutic-modalities recommendations depend on several factors, including the type and stage of cancer. Despite the improvements in diagnosis and therapy made during the past 25 years, the prognosis for patients with lung cancer is still unsatisfactory. The responses to current standard therapies are poor except for the most localized cancers. However, a better understanding of the biology pertinent to these challenging malignancies, might lead to the development of more efficacious and perhaps more specific drugs. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent developments in lung cancer biology and its therapeutic strategies, and discuss the latest treatment advances including therapies currently under clinical investigation.

  10. Hypoxia Potentiates the Radiation-Sensitizing Effect of Olaparib in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Xenografts by Contextual Synthetic Lethality.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanyan; Verbiest, Tom; Devery, Aoife M; Bokobza, Sivan M; Weber, Anika M; Leszczynska, Katarzyna B; Hammond, Ester M; Ryan, Anderson J

    2016-06-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors potentiate radiation therapy in preclinical models of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and other types of cancer. However, the mechanisms underlying radiosensitization in vivo are incompletely understood. Herein, we investigated the impact of hypoxia on radiosensitization by the PARP inhibitor olaparib in human NSCLC xenograft models. NSCLC Calu-6 and Calu-3 cells were irradiated in the presence of olaparib or vehicle under normoxic (21% O2) or hypoxic (1% O2) conditions. In vitro radiosensitivity was assessed by clonogenic survival assay and γH2AX foci assay. Established Calu-6 and Calu-3 subcutaneous xenografts were treated with olaparib (50 mg/kg, daily for 3 days), radiation (10 Gy), or both. Tumors (n=3/group) were collected 24 or 72 hours after the first treatment. Immunohistochemistry was performed to assess hypoxia (carbonic anhydrase IX [CA9]), vessels (CD31), DNA double strand breaks (DSB) (γH2AX), and apoptosis (cleaved caspase 3 [CC3]). The remaining xenografts (n=6/group) were monitored for tumor growth. In vitro, olaparib showed a greater radiation-sensitizing effect in Calu-3 and Calu-6 cells in hypoxic conditions (1% O2). In vivo, Calu-3 tumors were well-oxygenated, whereas Calu-6 tumors had extensive regions of hypoxia associated with down-regulation of the homologous recombination protein RAD51. Olaparib treatment increased unrepaired DNA DSB (P<.001) and apoptosis (P<.001) in hypoxic cells of Calu-6 tumors following radiation, whereas it had no significant effect on radiation-induced DNA damage response in nonhypoxic cells of Calu-6 tumors or in the tumor cells of well-oxygenated Calu-3 tumors. Consequently, olaparib significantly increased radiation-induced growth inhibition in Calu-6 tumors (P<.001) but not in Calu-3 tumors. Our data suggest that hypoxia potentiates the radiation-sensitizing effects of olaparib by contextual synthetic killing, and that tumor hypoxia may be a

  11. Survival of patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer treated with individualized chemotherapy selected by in vitro drug sensitivity testing.

    PubMed

    Cortazar, P; Gazdar, A F; Woods, E; Russell, E; Steinberg, S M; Williams, J; Ihde, D C; Johnson, B E

    1997-05-01

    Our purpose was to study the feasibility of determining individualized chemotherapy regimens by in vitro drug sensitivity testing (DST) for patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and to evaluate patient response and survival. Fifty-four previously untreated patients with limited-stage small cell cancer were studied. Fresh tumor specimens for DST were collected, when possible, from patients' biopsies before the start of treatment. The differential staining cytotoxicity assay was used to determine the in vitro sensitivity of the tumor cells to different drugs. From these results, an in vitro best regimen (IVBR), a three-drug combination of previously proven efficacy of seven active drugs in SCLC, was selected. Patients were initially treated with four cycles of etoposide/cisplatin and concurrent radiotherapy. This was followed by four cycles of either individualized chemotherapy regimens based on the results of DST or, when DST results were not available, four cycles of vincristine, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide. Eighteen patients (33%) underwent biopsy procedures that provided tissue specimens for DST. The biopsy specimens contained tumor cells in 16 of 18 patients. The median duration from diagnosis to start of treatment was 22 days (range, 4-58 days) for the 18 patients who underwent elective thoracic biopsies compared to 21 days (range, 2-74 days) for members of the group that did not (P2 = 0.58). Time from thoracic biopsy to initiation of chemotherapy was a median of 4 days (range, 2-22 days). DST was done in 10 patients, and IVBR was administered to 8 patients. The median actuarial survival of 8 patients treated with their IVBR was 38.5 months compared to 19 months for the 46 patients treated with empiric chemotherapy. Selection of individualized chemotherapy regimens is labor intensive but feasible in limited-stage SCLC. Treatment with an individualized IVBR in our patients was associated with prolonged patient survival; however, because

  12. Lung cancer stem cells—characteristics, phenotype

    PubMed Central

    George, Rachel; Sethi, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide with unfavourable prognosis mainly due to the late stage of disease at presentation. High incidence and disease recurrence rates are a fact despite advances in treatment. Ongoing experimental and clinical observations suggest that the malignant phenotype in lung cancer is sustained by lung cancer stem cells (CSCs) which are putative stem cells situated throughout the airways that have the potential of initiating lung cancer formation. These cells share the common characteristic of increased proliferation and differentiation, long life span and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. This review summarises the current knowledge on their characteristics and phenotype. PMID:27413709

  13. [Cannabis smoking and lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Underner, M; Urban, T; Perriot, J; de Chazeron, I; Meurice, J-C

    2014-06-01

    Cannabis is the most commonly smoked illicit substance in the world. It can be smoked alone in plant form (marijuana) but it is mainly smoked mixed with tobacco. The combined smoking of cannabis and tobacco is a common-place phenomenon in our society. However, its use is responsible for severe pulmonary consequences. The specific impact of smoking cannabis is difficult to assess precisely and to distinguish from the effect of tobacco. Marijuana smoke contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and carcinogens at higher concentration than tobacco smoke. Cellular, tissue, animal and human studies, and also epidemiological studies, show that marijuana smoke is a risk factor for lung cancer. Cannabis exposure doubles the risk of developing lung cancer. This should encourage clinicians to identify cannabis use and to offer patients support in quitting.

  14. Lung Cancer Awareness Week

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glennon, Catherine; Laczko, Lori

    2003-01-01

    Smoking is the most preventable cause of death in our society. Tobacco use is responsible for nearly one in five deaths in the United States and the cause of premature death of approximately 2 million individuals in developed countries. Smoking accounts for at least 30% of all cancer deaths and is a major cause of heart disease, cerebrovascular…

  15. Lung Cancer Awareness Week

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glennon, Catherine; Laczko, Lori

    2003-01-01

    Smoking is the most preventable cause of death in our society. Tobacco use is responsible for nearly one in five deaths in the United States and the cause of premature death of approximately 2 million individuals in developed countries. Smoking accounts for at least 30% of all cancer deaths and is a major cause of heart disease, cerebrovascular…

  16. Vaccine Therapy and Sargramostim With or Without Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Metastatic Lung Cancer or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-28

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  17. LUCIS: lung cancer imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Harders, Stefan Walbom

    2012-11-01

    Pulmonary nodules are of high clinical importance, as they may prove to be an early manifestation of lung cancer. Pulmonary nodules are small, focal opacities that may be solitary or multiple. A solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) is a single, small (= 30 mm in diameter) radiographic opacity. Larger opacities are called masses and are often malignant. As imaging techniques improve and more nodules are detected, the optimal management of SPNs remains unclear. Current strategies include tissue sampling or CT follow-up. The aim of this PhD was to examine current non-invasive methods used to characterise pulmonary nodules and masses in patients with suspected lung cancer and to stage NSCLC. In doing so, this PhD helps to validate the existing methods used to diagnose and stage lung cancer correctly and, hopefully, aids in the development of new methods. In the first study, 213 participants with pulmonary nodules on CT were examined with an additional HRCT. In this study, it was concluded that HRCT of a solitary pulmonary nodule, assessed using attenuation and morphological criteria is a fast, widely available and effective method for diagnosing lung cancer correctly, and especially for ruling out cancer. In the second study, 168 patients with pulmonary lesions on CT were examined with an additional F-18-FDG PET/CT. It was concluded that when used early in the work-up of the lesions, CT raised the prevalence of lung cancer in the population to the point at which further diagnostic imaging examination could be considered redundant. Standard contrast-enhanced CT seems better suited to identify patients with lung cancer than to rule out cancer. Finally, the overall diagnostic accuracy as well as the classification probabilities and predictive values of the two modalities were not significantly different. The reproducibility of the above results was substantial. In the third study, 59 patients with pulmonary nodules or masses on chest radiography were examined with an

  18. Lung Cancer and Interstitial Lung Diseases: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Archontogeorgis, Kostas; Steiropoulos, Paschalis; Tzouvelekis, Argyris; Nena, Evangelia; Bouros, Demosthenes

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) represent a heterogeneous group of more than two hundred diseases of either known or unknown etiology with different pathogenesis and prognosis. Lung cancer, which is the major cause of cancer death in the developed countries, is mainly attributed to cigarette smoking and exposure to inhaled carcinogens. Different studies suggest a link between ILDs and lung cancer, through different pathogenetic mechanisms, such as inflammation, coagulation, dysregulated apoptosis, focal hypoxia, activation, and accumulation of myofibroblasts as well as extracellular matrix accumulation. This paper reviews current evidence on the association between lung cancer and interstitial lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, sarcoidosis, systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis/polymyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and pneumoconiosis. PMID:22900168

  19. Prediction of chemotherapeutic effect on postoperative recurrence by in vitro anticancer drug sensitivity testing in non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Higashiyama, Masahiko; Oda, Kazuyuki; Okami, Jiro; Maeda, Jun; Kodama, Ken; Imamura, Fumio; Minamikawa, Kazuhiko; Takano, Toshikazu; Kobayashi, Hisayuki

    2010-06-01

    The collagen gel droplet embedded culture drug test (CD-DST), is an in vitro anticancer drug sensitivity test. The test has been used with various types of malignant tumors, but the significance of clinical application remains unknown. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the ability of this test to predict the response to chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. From January 2000 through March 2007, CD-DST data using the primary tumor specimens to anticancer drugs such as cisplatin (CDDP), carboplatin (CBDCA), paclitaxel (PAC), docetaxel (TXT), gemcitabine (GEM), and vinorelbine (VNR), was successfully obtained from 382 patients that underwent a radical resection for NSCLC. Eighty-one of those patients received 1st line chemotherapy using a "new generation" of anticancer drugs for postoperative recurrence. The chemotherapy regimen consisted of a CDDP (or CBDCA)-based combination (N=41), non-CDDP-based combination (N=1) and single agent (N=39). The predictability of the chemotherapeutic effect by the CD-DST data was analyzed retrospectively. Partial response (PR) was obtained in 24 patients (response rate=30%), stable disease (SD) in 33 (41%) and progressive disease (PD) in 24 (30%). Forty-two patients underwent chemotherapy with one or more CD-DST-sensitive drugs, 21 of whom showed PR (RR=50%), whereas only 3 (8%) patients showed PR with chemotherapy with regimen including no CD-DST-sensitive drugs. Good predictability was obtained, with a 50% positive predictive value (PPV) for PR and a 92% negative predictive value (NPV) by CD-DST. The predictive accuracy for the response based on the CD-DST data was 70%. Interestingly, a subset analysis according to recurrence site showed that the predictive accuracy was highest (86%) for CD-DST-based chemotherapy for recurrence in the lymph nodes. The application of the CD-DST for "new generation" anticancer drugs using surgically resected specimens of primary lesion in NSCLC patients may be

  20. Circulating miRNAs is a potential marker for gefitinib sensitivity and correlation with EGFR mutational status in human lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qiang; Cao, Jun; Wu, Yi-Chen; Liu, Xiang; Han, Jing; Huang, Xian-Cong; Jiang, Lie-Hao; Hou, Xiu-Xiu; Mao, Wei-Min; Ling, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    miRNA expression is deregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and some miRNAs are associated with gefitinib sensitivity. Here, we investigated if circulating miRNAs could be a useful biomarker for the prediction of EGFR mutation and the patient’s prognosis. The differential miRNAs related to gefitinib sensitivity were screened and identified by microRNA array. Using Taqman-based real-time RT-PCR, we analyzed the expression of selected miRNAs in tumor tissues and plasma of 150 NSCLC patients. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to determine the association between miRNAs expression and survival. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was also performed. Compared with PC9 cell line, 41 microRNAs detected by microarray were significantly differentially expressed in A549 and H1299 cells. The 5 selected hsa-miRNAs were all found differently expressed between wild and mutant EGFR carriers (all P<0.01). Down-regulation of 5 selected miRNAs were independently associated with lymphatic invasion (all P<0.01) and clinical stage (all P<0.01), respectively. Both down-regulation of has-miR-195 (P=0.012) and has-miR-21 (P=0.004) were associated with poor differentiation. All up-regulation of 5 has-miRNAs were associated with smoking (All P<0.05). 5 hsa-miRNAs were up-regulated both in plasma and tissue samples. A model including 4 hsa-miRNAs may predict EGFR mutational status and gefitinib-sensitivity (both AUC: 0.869). Plasma levels of has-miR-125b expression were associated with disease-free survival (P=0.033) and overall survival in the patients (P=0.028). In a word, Circulating 5 selected miRNAs may especially be useful in predicting EGFR mutation, and circulating hsa-miR-125b may have prognostic values in NSCLC patients. PMID:26175938

  1. A systematic profile of clinical inhibitors responsive to EGFR somatic amino acid mutations in lung cancer: implication for the molecular mechanism of drug resistance and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ai, Xinghao; Sun, Yingjia; Wang, Haidong; Lu, Shun

    2014-07-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has become a well-established target for the treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, a large number of somatic mutations in such protein have been observed to cause drug resistance or sensitivity during pathological progression, limiting the application of reversible EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy in NSCLC. In the current work, we describe an integration of in silico analysis and in vitro assay to profile six representative EGFR inhibitors against a panel of 71 observed somatic mutations in EGFR tyrosine kinase domain. In the procedure, the changes in interaction free energy of inhibitors with EGFR upon various mutations were calculated one by one using a rigorous computational scheme, which was preoptimized based on a set of structure-solved, affinity-known samples to improve its performance in characterizing the EGFR-inhibitor system. This method was later demonstrated to be effective in inferring drug response to the classical L858R and G719S mutations that confer constitutive activation for the EGFR kinase. It is found that the Staurosporine, a natural product isolated from the bacterium Streptomyces staurosporeus, exhibits selective inhibitory activity on the T790M and T790M/L858R mutants. This finding was subsequently solidified by in vitro kinase assay experiment; the inhibitory IC50 values of Staurosporine against wild-type, T790M and T790M/L858R mutant EGFR were measured to be 937, 12 and 3 nM, respectively.

  2. BIM Gene Polymorphism Lowers the Efficacy of EGFR-TKIs in Advanced Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer With Sensitive EGFR Mutations: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wu Feng; Liu, Ai Hua; Zhao, Hai Jin; Dong, Hang Ming; Liu, Lai Yu; Cai, Shao Xi

    2015-08-01

    The strong association between bcl-2-like 11 (BIM) triggered apoptosis and the presence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations has been proven in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the relationship between EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor's (TKI's) efficacy and BIM polymorphism in NSCLC EGFR is still unclear.Electronic databases were searched for eligible literatures. Data on objective response rates (ORRs), disease control rates (DCRs), and progression-free survival (PFS) stratified by BIM polymorphism status were extracted and synthesized based on random-effect model. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses were conducted.A total of 6 studies that involved a total of 773 EGFR mutant advanced NSCLC patients after EGFR-TKI treatment were included. In overall, non-BIM polymorphism patients were associated with significant prolonged PFS (hazard ratio 0.63, 0.47-0.83, P = 0.001) compared to patients with BIM polymorphism. However, only marginal improvements without statistical significance in ORR (odds ratio [OR] 1.71, 0.91-3.24, P = 0.097) and DCR (OR 1.56, 0.85-2.89, P = 0.153) were observed. Subgroup analyses showed that the benefits of PFS in non-BIM polymorphism group were predominantly presented in pooled results of studies involving chemotherapy-naive and the others, and retrospective studies. Additionally, we failed to observe any significant benefit from patients without BIM polymorphism in every subgroup for ORR and DCR.For advanced NSCLC EGFR mutant patients, non-BIM polymorphism ones are associated with longer PFS than those with BIM polymorphism after EGFR-TKIs treatment. BIM polymorphism status should be considered an essential factor in studies regarding EGFR-targeted agents toward EGFR mutant patients.

  3. Reactivation of epigenetically silenced miR-512 and miR-373 sensitizes lung cancer cells to cisplatin and restricts tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Adi Harel, S; Bossel Ben-Moshe, N; Aylon, Y; Bublik, D R; Moskovits, N; Toperoff, G; Azaiza, D; Biagoni, F; Fuchs, G; Wilder, S; Hellman, A; Blandino, G; Domany, E; Oren, M

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) regulate a variety of cellular processes, and their impaired expression is involved in cancer. Silencing of tumor-suppressive miRs in cancer can occur through epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation and histone deacetylation. We performed comparative miR profiling on cultured lung cancer cells before and after treatment with 5′aza-deoxycytidine plus Trichostatin A to reverse DNA methylation and histone deacetylation, respectively. Several tens of miRs were strongly induced by such ‘epigenetic therapy'. Two representatives, miR-512-5p (miR-512) and miR-373, were selected for further analysis. Both miRs were secreted in exosomes. Re-expression of both miRs augmented cisplatin-induced apoptosis and inhibited cell migration; miR-512 also reduced cell proliferation. TEAD4 mRNA was confirmed as a direct target of miR-512; likewise, miR-373 was found to target RelA and PIK3CA mRNA directly. Our results imply that miR-512 and miR-373 exert cell-autonomous and non-autonomous tumor-suppressive effects in lung cancer cells, where their re-expression may benefit epigenetic cancer therapy. PMID:25591738

  4. Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    [[{"fid":"180","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","field_folder[und]":"15"},"type":"media","attributes":{"alt":"Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","title":"Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","heigh | Conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of lung and head and neck cancers.

  5. Curbing the burden of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Urman, Alexandra; Hosgood, H Dean

    2016-06-01

    Lung cancer contributes substantially to the global burden of disease and healthcare costs. New screening modalities using low-dose computerized tomography are promising tools for early detection leading to curative surgery. However, the screening and follow-up diagnostic procedures of these techniques may be costly. Focusing on prevention is an important factor to reduce the burden of screening, treatment, and lung cancer deaths. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has identified several lung carcinogens, which we believe can be considered actionable when developing prevention strategies. To curb the societal burden of lung cancer, healthcare resources need to be focused on early detection and screening and on mitigating exposure(s) of a person to known lung carcinogens, such as active tobacco smoking, household air pollution (HAP), and outdoor air pollution. Evidence has also suggested that these known lung carcinogens may be associated with genetic predispositions, supporting the hypothesis that lung cancers attributed to differing exposures may have developed from unique underlying genetic mechanisms attributed to the exposure of interest. For instance, smokingattributed lung cancer involves novel genetic markers of risk compared with HAP-attributed lung cancer. Therefore, genetic risk markers may be used in risk stratification to identify subpopulations that are at a higher risk for developing lung cancer attributed to a given exposure. Such targeted prevention strategies suggest that precision prevention strategies may be possible in the future; however, much work is needed to determine whether these strategies will be viable.

  6. Prognosis of Lung Cancer: Heredity or Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0547 TITLE: Prognosis of Lung Cancer: Heredity or Environment? PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Melinda Aldrich...0547 Prognosis of Lung Cancer: Heredity or Environment? 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Aldrich...DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Lung cancer is the

  7. Attitudes and Stereotypes in Lung Cancer versus Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, N.

    2015-01-01

    Societal perceptions may factor into the high rates of nontreatment in patients with lung cancer. To determine whether bias exists toward lung cancer, a study using the Implicit Association Test method of inferring subconscious attitudes and stereotypes from participant reaction times to visual cues was initiated. Participants were primarily recruited from an online survey panel based on US census data. Explicit attitudes regarding lung and breast cancer were derived from participants’ ratings (n = 1778) regarding what they thought patients experienced in terms of guilt, shame, and hope (descriptive statements) and from participants’ opinions regarding whether patients ought to experience such feelings (normative statements). Participants’ responses to descriptive and normative statements about lung cancer were compared with responses to statements about breast cancer. Analyses of responses revealed that the participants were more likely to agree with negative descriptive and normative statements about lung cancer than breast cancer (P<0.001). Furthermore, participants had significantly stronger implicit negative associations with lung cancer compared with breast cancer; mean response times in the lung cancer/negative conditions were significantly shorter than in the lung cancer/positive conditions (P<0.001). Patients, caregivers, healthcare providers, and members of the general public had comparable levels of negative implicit attitudes toward lung cancer. These results show that lung cancer was stigmatized by patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals, and the general public. Further research is needed to investigate whether implicit and explicit attitudes and stereotypes affect patient care. PMID:26698307

  8. Attitudes and Stereotypes in Lung Cancer versus Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sriram, N; Mills, Jennifer; Lang, Edward; Dickson, Holli K; Hamann, Heidi A; Nosek, Brian A; Schiller, Joan H

    2015-01-01

    Societal perceptions may factor into the high rates of nontreatment in patients with lung cancer. To determine whether bias exists toward lung cancer, a study using the Implicit Association Test method of inferring subconscious attitudes and stereotypes from participant reaction times to visual cues was initiated. Participants were primarily recruited from an online survey panel based on US census data. Explicit attitudes regarding lung and breast cancer were derived from participants' ratings (n = 1778) regarding what they thought patients experienced in terms of guilt, shame, and hope (descriptive statements) and from participants' opinions regarding whether patients ought to experience such feelings (normative statements). Participants' responses to descriptive and normative statements about lung cancer were compared with responses to statements about breast cancer. Analyses of responses revealed that the participants were more likely to agree with negative descriptive and normative statements about lung cancer than breast cancer (P<0.001). Furthermore, participants had significantly stronger implicit negative associations with lung cancer compared with breast cancer; mean response times in the lung cancer/negative conditions were significantly shorter than in the lung cancer/positive conditions (P<0.001). Patients, caregivers, healthcare providers, and members of the general public had comparable levels of negative implicit attitudes toward lung cancer. These results show that lung cancer was stigmatized by patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals, and the general public. Further research is needed to investigate whether implicit and explicit attitudes and stereotypes affect patient care.

  9. Relevance of particle-induced rat lung tumors for assessing lung carcinogenic hazard and human lung cancer risk.

    PubMed Central

    Mauderly, J L

    1997-01-01

    Rats and other rodents are exposed by inhalation to identify agents that might present hazards for lung cancer in humans exposed by inhalation. In some cases, the results are used in attempts to develop quantitative estimates of human lung cancer risk. This report reviews evidence for the usefulness of the rat for evaluation of lung cancer hazards from inhaled particles. With the exception of nickel sulfate, particulate agents thought to be human lung carcinogens cause lung tumors in rats exposed by inhalation. The rat is more sensitive to carcinogenesis from nonfibrous particles than mice or Syrian hamsters, which have both produced false negatives. However, rats differ from mice and nonhuman primates in both the pattern of particle retention in the lung and alveolar epithelial hyperplastic responses to chronic particle exposure. Present evidence warrants caution in extrapolation from the lung tumor response of rats to inhaled particles to human lung cancer hazard, and there is considerable uncertainty in estimating unit risks for humans from rat data. It seems appropriate to continue using rats in inhalation carcinogenesis assays of inhaled particles, but the upper limit of exposure concentrations must be set carefully to avoid false-positive results. A positive finding in both rats and mice would give greater confidence that an agent presents a carcinogenic hazard to man, and both rats and mice should be used if the agent is a gas or vapor. There is little justification for including Syrian hamsters in assays of the intrapulmonary carcinogenicity of inhaled agents. PMID:9400748

  10. Lung cancer: epidemiology, etiology, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Dela Cruz, Charles S; Tanoue, Lynn T; Matthay, Richard A

    2011-12-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States and around the world. A vast majority of lung cancer deaths are attributable to cigarette smoking, and curbing the rates of cigarette smoking is imperative. Understanding the epidemiology and causal factors of lung cancer can provide additional foundation for disease prevention. This article focuses on modifiable risk factors, including tobacco smoking, occupational carcinogens, diet, and ionizing radiation. It also discusses briefly the molecular and genetic aspects of lung carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Combination Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  12. [Lung cancer and lymph drainage].

    PubMed

    Riquet, M

    2007-01-01

    Lung cancer is lymphophile and may involve lymph nodes (LN) belonging to lung lymph drainage. LN metastases are figured within stations numbered 1 to 14. These stations are located along lymph vessels. The lymph vessels and the LN are forming together anatomical chains. Lymph vessels are valved and pulsatile and travel to the cervical venous confluence where they pour the lung lymph into the blood circulation. They may be totally or partly nodeless along their travel, anastomose with each other around the trachea, and connect with the thoracic duct within the mediastinum. Within the anatomical LN chains, LN are variable in number and in size from one individual to another. They may be absent from one or several stations of the international mapping. Stations are located along the anatomical chains: pulmonary ligament (9), tracheal bifurcation(8 and 7), right paratracheal (4R, 2R and 1), preaortic (5 and 6), left paratracheal (4L, 2L and 1). Station 3 is located on 2 differents chains (phrenic and right esophagotracheal). Station 10 are located at the beginning of the mediastinal lymph nodes chains. Each chain connects with the blood circulation, anastomoses with he neighbouring chains and behave as an own entity whatever the number of its LN. International station mapping misknowns this anatomy and occults the true pronostic value of lung lymph drainage.

  13. Screening for lung cancer: Does MRI have a role?

    PubMed

    Biederer, Juergen; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Hatabu, Hiroto; Schiebler, Mark L; van Beek, Edwin J R; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    While the inauguration of national low dose computed tomographic (LDCT) lung cancer screening programs has started in the USA, other countries remain undecided, awaiting the results of ongoing trials. The continuous technical development achieved by stronger gradients, parallel imaging and shorter echo time has made lung magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) an interesting alternative to CT. For the detection of solid lesions with lung MRI, experimental and clinical studies have shown a threshold size of 3-4mm for nodules, with detection rates of 60-90% for lesions of 5-8mm and close to 100% for lesions of 8mm or larger. From experimental work, the sensitivity for infiltrative, non-solid lesions would be expected to be similarly high as that for solid lesions, but the published data for the MRI detection of lepidic growth type adenocarcinoma is sparse. Moreover, biological features such as a longer T2 time of lung cancer tissue, tissue compliance and a more rapid uptake of contrast material compared to granulomatous diseases, in principle should allow for the multi-parametric characterization of lung pathology. Experience with the clinical use of lung MRI is growing. There are now standardized protocols which are easy to implement on current scanner hardware configurations. The image quality has become more robust and currently ongoing studies will help to further contribute experience with multi-center, multi-vendor and multi-platform implementation of this technology. All of the required prerequisites have now been achieved to allow for a dedicated prospective large scale MRI based lung cancer screening trial to investigate the outcomes from using MRI rather than CT for lung cancer screening. This is driven by the hypothesis that MRI would reach a similarly high sensitivity for the detection of early lung cancer with fewer false positive exams (better specificity) than LDCT. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the potential role of lung MRI for the early

  14. [Development of the lung cancer diagnostic system].

    PubMed

    Lv, You-Jiang; Yu, Shou-Yi

    2009-07-01

    To develop a lung cancer diagnosis system. A retrospective analysis was conducted in 1883 patients with primary lung cancer or benign pulmonary diseases (pneumonia, tuberculosis, or pneumonia pseudotumor). SPSS11.5 software was used for data processing. For the relevant factors, a non-factor Logistic regression analysis was used followed by establishment of the regression model. Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 system development platform and VB.Net corresponding language were used to develop the lung cancer diagnosis system. The non-factor multi-factor regression model showed a goodness-of-fit (R2) of the model of 0.806, with a diagnostic accuracy for benign lung diseases of 92.8%, a diagnostic accuracy for lung cancer of 89.0%, and an overall accuracy of 90.8%. The model system for early clinical diagnosis of lung cancer has been established.

  15. Lung Cancer in Never Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer in never smokers (LCINS) has lately been recognized as a unique disease based on rapidly gained knowledge from genomic changes to treatment responses. The focus of this article is on current knowledge and challenges with regard to LCINS expanded from recent reviews highlighting five areas: (1) distribution of LCINS by temporal trends, geographic regions, and populations; (2) three well-recognized environmental risk factors; (3) other plausible environmental risk factors; (4) prior chronic lung diseases and infectious diseases as risk factors; and (5) lifestyles as risk or protective factors. This article will also bring attention to recently published literature in two pioneering areas: (1) histological characteristics, clinical features with emerging new effective therapies, and social and psychological stigma; and (2) searching for susceptibility genes using integrated genomic approaches. PMID:21500120

  16. Enhanced Quitline Intervention in Smoking Cessation for Patients With Non-Metastatic Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Tobacco Use Disorder

  17. Screening and early detection of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Van't Westeinde, Susan C; van Klaveren, Rob J

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer with an estimated 342,000 deaths in 2008 (20% of total) is the most common cause of death from cancer, followed by colorectal cancer (12%), breast cancer (8%), and stomach cancer (7%) in Europe. In former smokers, the absolute lung cancer risk remains higher than in never-smokers; these data therefore call for effective secondary preventive measures for lung cancer in addition to smoking cessation programs. This review presents and discusses the most recent advances in the early detection and screening of lung cancer.An overview of randomized controlled computerized tomography-screening trials is given, and the role of bronchoscopy and new techniques is discussed. Finally, the approach of (noninvasive) biomarker testing in the blood, exhaled breath, sputum, and bronchoscopic specimen is reviewed.

  18. A phase 2 randomized study of TAS-102 versus topotecan or amrubicin in patients requiring second-line chemotherapy for small cell lung cancer refractory or sensitive to frontline platinum-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Scagliotti, Giorgio; Nishio, Makoto; Satouchi, Miyako; Valmadre, Giuseppe; Niho, Seiji; Galetta, Domenico; Cortinovis, Diego; Benedetti, Fabio; Yoshihara, Eiji; Makris, Lukas; Inoue, Akira; Kubota, Kaoru

    2016-10-01

    TAS-102 is an oral combination treatment comprised of an antimetabolite, trifluridine, a thymidine-based nucleoside analog, and tipiracil hydrochloride, at a molar ratio of 1:0.5. This antimetabolite has demonstrated efficacy in clinical trials, including a global phase 3 trial in metastatic colorectal cancer. As this agent has shown activity greater than cisplatin in small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse models, the objective of this study was to evaluate TAS-102 in the second-line treatment of small cell lung cancer. This was a multicenter, open-label, two-arm, randomized phase 2 study designed to compare oral TAS-102 (35mg/m(2)/dose twice daily) versus control (topotecan or amrubicin). Patients requiring second-line chemotherapy for treatment of small cell lung cancer, either refractory or sensitive to frontline platinum-based chemotherapy, were enrolled. Eighteen patients were enrolled. Eight of nine patients receiving TAS-102 discontinued treatment due to progressive disease and one patient died due to clinical progression during the safety follow-up. Unplanned interim futility considerations were made, and the study was terminated early because it was unlikely that superiority of TAS-102 versus comparator could be demonstrated. Six control patients discontinued therapy due to progressive disease and one due to an adverse event. Median progression-free survival was 1.4 months (range 0.9-1.8) versus 2.7 months (range 1.0-6.8) for TAS-102 and control, respectively, with a hazard ratio of 3.76 (80% CI, 1.68-8.40) favoring control. The most common adverse events with TAS-102 were neutropenia, diarrhea, anemia, anorexia, and fatigue, each in three patients. TAS-102 showed no evidence of activity in second-line small cell lung cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Lung cancer stem cells: An epigenetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Samriddhi; Khan, Sajid; Sinha, Sonam; Meeran, Syed Musthapa

    2017-02-05

    Lung cancer remains the major cause of human mortality among all the cancer types despite the colossal amount of efforts to prevent the cancer onset and to provide the appropriate cure. Recent reports have identified that important contributors of lung cancer-related mortality are the drug resistance and aggressive tumor relapse, the characteristics contributed by the presence of lung cancer stem cells (CSCs). The identification of lung CSCs is inherently complex due to the quiescent nature of lung epithelium, which makes the distinction between the normal lung epithelium and lung CSCs difficult. Recently, multiple researches have helped in the identification of lung CSCs based on the presence or absence of certain specific types of stem cell markers. Maintenance of lung CSCs is chiefly mediated through the epigenetic modifications of their genome. In this review, we will discuss about the origin of lung CSCs and the role of epigenetic modifications in their maintenance. We will also discuss in brief the major lung CSC markers and the therapeutic approaches to selectively target this population of cells.

  20. [Radiation-induced modification of human somatic cell chromosome sensitivity to the testing mutagenic exposure of bleomycin in vitro in lung cancer patients in delayed terms following Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Pilinskaia, M A; Dybskiĭ, S S; Dybskaia, E B; Shvaĭko, L I

    2012-01-01

    By using modified "G2-bleomycin sensitivity assay" above background level of cytogenetic effect considered as a marker of hidden chromosome instability (HCI) has been investigated in 3 groups--liquidators of Chernobyl accident (occupational group 1), patients with lung cancer who denied conscious contact--with ionizing radiation (group of comparison), liquidators with lung cancer (occupational group 2). Significant interindividual variations of cytogenetic effects induced with bleomycin and the lack of positive correlation between background and above background frequencies of chromosome aberrations have been shown in all observed groups. It had been established that occupational group 2 was the most burdened group by expression of the above background cytogenetic effect and, accordingly, number of persons with HCI. The data obtained permit to suggest the existence of the association between radiation-induced increase of individual sensitivity to testing mutagenic exposure and the realization of cancer in persons exposed to ionizing radiation. The results show acceptability of "G2-bleomycin sensitivity assay" under the cytogenetic examination of irradiated contingents for determining HCI as one of informative markers of predisposition to oncopathology.

  1. Molecular biology of lung cancer: clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Jill E; Minna, John D

    2011-12-01

    Lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease clinically, biologically, histologically, and molecularly. Understanding the molecular causes of this heterogeneity, which might reflect changes occurring in different classes of epithelial cells or different molecular changes occurring in the same target lung epithelial cells, is the focus of current research. Identifying the genes and pathways involved, determining how they relate to the biological behavior of lung cancer, and their utility as diagnostic and therapeutic targets are important basic and translational research issues. This article reviews current information on the key molecular steps in lung cancer pathogenesis, their timing, and clinical implications. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Cancer Stem Cells in Lung Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kratz, Johannes R.; Yagui-Beltrán, Adam; Jablons, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Although stem cells were discovered more than 50 years ago, we have only recently begun to understand their potential importance in cancer biology. Recent advances in our ability to describe, isolate, and study lung stem cell populations has led to a growing recognition of the central importance cells with stem cell-like properties may have in lung tumorigenesis. This article reviews the major studies supporting the existence and importance of cancer stem cells in lung tumorigenesis. Continued research in the field of lung cancer stem cell biology is vital, as ongoing efforts promise to yield new prognostic and therapeutic targets. PMID:20493987

  3. Context Sensitive Modeling of Cancer Drug Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo-Juen; Litvin, Oren; Ungar, Lyle; Pe’er, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Recent screening of drug sensitivity in large panels of cancer cell lines provides a valuable resource towards developing algorithms that predict drug response. Since more samples provide increased statistical power, most approaches to prediction of drug sensitivity pool multiple cancer types together without distinction. However, pan-cancer results can be misleading due to the confounding effects of tissues or cancer subtypes. On the other hand, independent analysis for each cancer-type is hampered by small sample size. To balance this trade-off, we present CHER (Contextual Heterogeneity Enabled Regression), an algorithm that builds predictive models for drug sensitivity by selecting predictive genomic features and deciding which ones should—and should not—be shared across different cancers, tissues and drugs. CHER provides significantly more accurate models of drug sensitivity than comparable elastic-net-based models. Moreover, CHER provides better insight into the underlying biological processes by finding a sparse set of shared and type-specific genomic features. PMID:26274927

  4. Highly sensitive detection of invasive lung cancer cells by novel antibody against amino-terminal domain of laminin γ2 chain.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Kaoru; Oyanagi, Jun; Sugino, Atsuko; Sato, Hiroki; Yokose, Tomoyuki; Nakayama, Haruhiko; Miyagi, Yohei

    2016-12-01

    The laminin γ2 chain, a subunit of laminin-332 (α3β3γ2), is a molecular marker for invasive cancer cells, but its pathological roles in tumor progression remain to be clarified. It was recently found that the most N-terminal, domain V (dV) of γ2 chain has activities to bind CD44 and stimulate tumor cell migration and vascular permeability. In the present study, we prepared a mAb recognizing γ2 dV. Immunoblotting with this antibody, for the first time, showed that proteolytic fragments containing dV in a range of 15-80 kDa were highly produced in various human cancer cell lines and lung cancer tissues. In immunohistochemistry of adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas of the lung, this antibody immunostained the cytoplasm of invasive tumor cells and adjacent stroma much more strongly than a widely used antibody recognizing the C-terminal core part of the processed γ2 chain. This suggests that the dV fragments are highly accumulated in tumor cells and stroma compared to the processed γ2 protein. The strong tumor cell staining with the dV antibody correlated with the tumor malignancy grade. We also found that the laminin β3 and α3 chains were frequently overexpressed in tumor cells and tumor stroma, respectively. The cytoplasmic dV detection was especially prominent in tumor cells infiltrating stroma, but low in the cells surrounded by basement membranes, suggesting that the active tumor-stroma interaction is critical for the aberrant γ2 expression. The present study suggests important roles of laminin γ2 N-terminal fragments in tumor progression. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  5. Lung Cancer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arabic) سرطان الرئة - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Lung Cancer Karcinom pluća - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Lung Cancer 肺癌 - 简体中文 (Chinese - ...

  6. Lung cancer screening: the way forward

    PubMed Central

    Field, J K; Duffy, S W

    2008-01-01

    To take lung cancer screening into national programmes, we first have to answer the question whether low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening and treatment of early lesions will decrease lung cancer mortality compared with a control group, to accurately estimate the balance of benefits and harms, and to determine the cost-effectiveness of the intervention. PMID:18665179

  7. Lung Cancer Clinical Trials: Advances in Immunotherapy

    Cancer.gov

    New treatments for lung cancer and aspects of joining a clinical trial are discussed in this 30-minute Facebook Live event, hosted by NCI’s Dr. Shakun Malik, head of thoracic oncology therapeutics, and Janet Freeman-Daily, lung cancer patient activist and founding member of #LCSM.

  8. Recent advances in lung cancer biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides an overview of carcinogenesis, especially as related to lung cancers. Various growth factors and their mutated forms as oncogenes are discussed with respect to gene location and their role in the oncogenic process. Finally the data is related to lung cancer induction in uranium miners and exposure to radon.

  9. Human sweat metabolomics for lung cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Santiago, Mónica; Priego-Capote, Feliciano; Turck, Natacha; Robin, Xavier; Jurado-Gámez, Bernabé; Sanchez, Jean C; Luque de Castro, María D

    2015-07-01

    Sweat is one of the less employed biofluids for discovery of markers in spite of its increased application in medicine for detection of drugs or for diagnostic of cystic fibrosis. In this research, human sweat was used as clinical sample to develop a screening tool for lung cancer, which is the carcinogenic disease with the highest mortality rate owing to the advanced stage at which it is usually detected. In this context, a method based on the metabolite analysis of sweat to discriminate between patients with lung cancer versus smokers as control individuals is proposed. The capability of the metabolites identified in sweat to discriminate between both groups of individuals was studied and, among them, a trisaccharide phosphate presented the best independent performance in terms of the specificity/sensitivity pair (80 and 72.7%, respectively). Additionally, two panels of metabolites were configured using the PanelomiX tool as an attempt to reduce false negatives (at least 80% specificity) and false positives (at least 80% sensitivity). The first panel (80% specificity and 69% sensitivity) was composed by suberic acid, a tetrahexose, and a trihexose, while the second panel (69% specificity and 80% sensitivity) included nonanedioic acid, a trihexose, and the monoglyceride MG(22:2). Thus, the combination of the five metabolites led to a single panel providing 80% specificity and 79% sensitivity, reducing the false positive and negative rates to almost 20%. The method was validated by estimation of within-day and between-days variability of the quantitative analysis of the five metabolites.

  10. Indoor radon and lung cancer in China

    SciTech Connect

    Blot, W.J.; Xu, Z.Y.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Zhao, D.Z.; Stone, B.J.; Sun, J.; Jing, L.B.; Fraumeni, J.F. Jr. )

    1990-06-20

    Radon has long been known to contribute to risk of lung cancer, especially in undergound miners who are exposed to large amounts of the carcinogen. Recently, however, lower amounts of radon present in living areas have been suggested as an important cause of lung cancer. In an effort to clarify the relationship of low amounts of radon with lung cancer risk, we placed alpha-track radon detectors in the homes of 308 women with newly diagnosed lung cancer and 356 randomly selected female control subjects of similar age. Measurements were taken after 1 year. All study participants were part of the general population of Shenyang, People's Republic of China, an industrial city in the northeast part of the country that has one of the world's highest rates of lung cancer in women. The median time of residence in the homes was 24 years. The median household radon level was 2.3 pCi/L of air; 20% of the levels were greater than 4 pCi/L. Radon levels tended to be higher in single-story houses or on the first floor of multiple-story dwellings, and they were also higher in houses with increased levels of indoor air pollution from coal-burning stoves. However, the levels were not higher in homes of women who developed lung cancer than in homes of controls, nor did lung cancer risk increase with increasing radon level. No association between radon and lung cancer was observed regardless of cigarette-smoking status, except for a nonsignificant trend among heavy smokers. No positive associations of lung cancer cell type with radon were observed, except for a nonsignificant excess risk of small cell cancers among the more heavily exposed residents. Our data suggest that projections from surveys of miners exposed to high radon levels may have overestimated the overall risks of lung cancer associated with levels typically seen in homes in this Chinese city.

  11. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Improving Lung Function in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-12

    Cachexia; Fatigue; Pulmonary Complications; Radiation Toxicity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  12. E2F3 transcription factor: A promising biomarker in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Al Ahmed, Hala Abdel; Nada, Ola

    2017-01-01

    Many researches aiming to explore the pathogenesis of lung cancer have extensively studied the molecular alteration in such disease. In the present study we measured the blood E2F3 mRNA using real-time RT-PCR technique in order to evaluate its clinical significance in early diagnosis and monitoring of lung cancer. This case-control study included 50 lung cancer patients, 20 patients with benign lung diseases and 20 healthy controls. Relative quantification of blood E2F3 mRNA was done by real-time RT-PCR. Blood E2F3 mRNA levels were significantly higher in lung cancer patients when compared to either patients with benign lung diseases or healthy subjects. This elevation was significant in those with metastatic lung cancer as compared to those with localized lung cancer. At a cutoff^{(2-Δ Δ CT)} 1.5, blood E2F3 mRNA was able to distinguish malignant from benign lung conditions with a diagnostic sensitivity of 100%; while at a cutoff^{(2-Δ Δ CT)} 5.3, blood E2F3 mRNA discriminated localized from metastatic lung cancer with a sensitivity of 93.6%. Blood E2F3 mRNA is a sensitive diagnostic marker in lung cancer; moreover, it is a promising prognostic marker capable of efficiently discriminating early from late stages of the disease.

  13. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zukotynski, Katherine A; Gerbaudo, Victor H

    2017-01-01

    Precision medicine allows tailoring of preventive or therapeutic interventions to avoid the expense and toxicity of futile treatment given to those who will not respond. Lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease functionally and morphologically. PET is a sensitive molecular imaging technique with a major role in the precision medicine algorithm of patients with lung cancer. It contributes to the precision medicine of lung neoplasia by interrogating tumor heterogeneity throughout the body. It provides anatomofunctional insight during diagnosis, staging, and restaging of the disease. It is a biomarker of tumoral heterogeneity that helps direct selection of the most appropriate treatment, the prediction of early response to cytotoxic and cytostatic therapies, and is a prognostic biomarker in patients with lung cancer. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Multitarget FISH analysis in the diagnosis of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Bubendorf, Lukas; Müller, Phaedra; Joos, Ladina; Grilli, Bruno; Vogel, Sandrine; Herzog, Michelle; Barascud, Audrey; Feichter, Georg; Dalquen, Peter; Tamm, Michael

    2005-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the diagnostic usefulness of the multitarget fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) test, LAVysion (Vysis, Downers Grove, IL), for the detection of lung cancer cells in cytologic specimens. Specimens from bronchial washings, bronchial brushings, and transbronchial fine-needle aspirates (TBNAs) from 100 patients with suspected lung cancer and from a control group of 71 patients with nonneoplastic lung disorders were analyzed. FISH positivity was defined as more than 5 cells with gains of at least 2 chromosomes or gene loci. FISH significantly improved the sensitivity of bronchial brushings from 49% to 73%. The specificities of FISH and cytologic examination were 87% and 100%, respectively. In contrast, FISH provided no additional diagnostic information in TBNAs and bronchial washings. There was no increased prevalence of genetic changes in contralateral bronchial washings from patients with lung cancer compared with the control group. The quantity of previous smoking had no effect on the prevalence of chromosomal changes.

  15. Drug delivery and nanodetection in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Badrzadeh, Fariba; Rahmati-Yamchi, Mohammad; Badrzadeh, Kazem; Valizadeh, Alireza; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Farkhani, Samad Mussa; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-01-01

    Lung carcinoma is the most widespread type of cancer worldwide, and is responsible for more deaths than other types of cancer. Lung cancer remains the chief cause of cancer-related deaths in both men and women worldwide, and is increasingly common in women. Each year, the number of deaths from lung cancer is greater than the number due to breast and colorectal cancer combined. Lung cancer accounted for 13% (1.6 million) of the total cases and 18% (1.4 million) of the deaths in 2008. In Iran, lung cancer is one of the five leading tumors. Among females, it was the fourth most commonly diagnosed cancer, and the second leading cause of cancer death. Nanotechnology can be defined as the science and engineering involved in the design, characterization, and application of materials and devices whose smallest functional organization in at least one dimension is on the nanometer scale, i.e. one billionth of a meter. It is an exciting multidisciplinary field that involves the design and engineering of nano objects or nanotools with diameters less than 500 nanometers (nm), and it is one of the most interesting fields of the 21st century. Nanotechnology also offers the ability to detect diseases, such as tumors, much earlier than ever imaginable. This article presents nano devices for lung cancer detection and drug delivery systems.

  16. Early diagnosis of lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccomanno, Geno; Bechtel, Joel J.

    1991-06-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of death in the United States. Although the incidence of cigarette smoking is decreasing in the United States it appears to be increasing worldwide. The five-year survival rate has not improved in cases with advanced disease, but several articles have indicated that survival can be improved in cases diagnosed early by sputum cytology and chest x-ray. In cases diagnosed while the lesion is in the in-situ stage or measures less than 1 cm in diameter, surgical excision and/or radiation therapy improves survival; therefore, the early diagnosis of high-risk patients should be vigorously pursued. A recent study at a community hospital in Grand Junction, Colorado, presented 45 lung cancer cases diagnosed with positive sputum cytology and negative chest x-ray, and indicates that early diagnosis does improve survival. This study has been conducted during the past six years; 16 cases have survived three years and six cases show five-year survival.

  17. The Impact of the Cancer Genome Atlas on Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jeremy Tzu-Huai; Lee, Yee-Ming; Huang, R. Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) has profiled over 10,000 samples derived from 33 types of cancer to date, with the goal of improving our understanding of the molecular basis of cancer and advancing our ability to diagnose, treat, and prevent cancer. This review focuses on lung cancer as it is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide in both men and women. Particularly, non-small cell lung cancers (including lung adenocarcinoma and lung squamous cell carcinoma) were evaluated. Our goal is to demonstrate the impact of TCGA on lung cancer research under four themes: namely, diagnostic markers, disease progression markers, novel therapeutic targets, and novel tools. Examples were given related to DNA mutation, copy number variation, mRNA, and microRNA expression along with methylation profiling. PMID:26318634

  18. Study of Ponatinib in Patients With Lung Cancer Preselected Using Different Candidate Predictive Biomarkers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-07

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  19. New Immunotherapy and Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sánchez de Cos Escuín, Julio

    2017-08-17

    Recent research on the relationship between the immune system and cancer has revealed the molecular mechanisms by which cancer cells co-opt certain T cell receptors which block the cytotoxic response to defend themselves from the antitumor immune attack. These findings have helped identify specific targets (T cell receptors or their corresponding ligands) for the design of monoclonal antibodies that can unlock the immune response. These drugs, known as immune checkpoint inhibitors, have shown efficacy in metastatic melanoma and kidney cancer, and have been successfully tested in non-small cell lung cancer in recent trials. Immune checkpoint inhibitors were included in clinical practice as a second-line option after an initial chemotherapy (CT) regimen, and in the last year positive results have been reported from randomized trials in which they were compared in first line with standard CT. Responses have been surprising and durable, but less than 20%-25% in unselected patients, so it is essential that factors predicting efficacy be identified. One such biomarker is PD-L1, but the different methods used to detect it have produced mixed results. This non-systematic review discusses the results of the latest trials, the possibilities of incorporating these drugs in first-line regimens, the criteria for patient selection, adverse effects, and the prospects of combinations with conventional treatment modalities, such as CT, radiation therapy, and antiangiogenic agents. Copyright © 2017 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional drug-gene interactions in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Smida, Michal; Nijman, Sebastian M B

    2012-04-01

    Despite the dawn of the genomic information era, the challenges of cancer treatment remain formidable. Particularly for the most prevalent cancer types, including lung cancer, successful treatment of metastatic disease is rare and escalating costs for modern targeted drugs place an increasing strain on healthcare systems. Although powerful diagnostic tools to characterize individual tumor samples in great molecular detail are becoming rapidly available, the transformation of this information into therapy provides a major challenge. A fundamental difficulty is the molecular complexity of cancer cells that often causes drug resistance, but can also render tumors exquisitely sensitive to targeted agents. By using lung cancer as an example, we outline the principles that govern drug sensitivity and resistance from a genetic perspective and discuss how in vitro chemical-genetic screens can impact on patient stratification in the clinic.

  1. Nasal Swab Shows Promise in Confirming Lung Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... 163805.html Nasal Swab Shows Promise in Confirming Lung Cancers Simple technique is based on cancer DNA ... 27, 2017 MONDAY, Feb. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Lung cancer remains by far the leading cancer killer ...

  2. Frizzled-8 as a putative therapeutic target in human lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hua-qing; Xu, Mei-lin; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Yi; Xie, Cong-hua

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fzd-8 is over-expressed in human lung cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knock-down of Fzd-8 inhibits proliferation and Wnt pathway in lung cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knock-down of Fzd-8 suppresses tumor growth in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knock-down Fzd-8 sensitizes lung cancer cells to chemotherapy Taxotere. -- Abstract: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. It is necessary to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung cancer in order to develop more effective therapeutics for the treatment of this disease. Recent reports have shown that Wnt signaling pathway is important in a number of cancer types including lung cancer. However, the role of Frizzled-8 (Fzd-8), one of the Frizzled family of receptors for the Wnt ligands, in lung cancer still remains to be elucidated. Here in this study we showed that Fzd-8 was over-expressed in human lung cancer tissue samples and cell lines. To investigate the functional importance of the Fzd-8 over-expression in lung cancer, we used shRNA to knock down Fzd-8 mRNA in lung cancer cells expressing the gene. We observed that Fzd-8 shRNA inhibited cell proliferation along with decreased activity of Wnt pathway in vitro, and also significantly suppressed A549 xenograft model in vivo (p < 0.05). Furthermore, we found that knocking down Fzd-8 by shRNA sensitized the lung cancer cells to chemotherapy Taxotere. These data suggest that Fzd-8 is a putative therapeutic target for human lung cancer and over-expression of Fzd-8 may be important for aberrant Wnt activation in lung cancer.

  3. Nutritional aspects regarding lung cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Thanopoulou, E; Baltayiannis, N; Lykogianni, V

    2006-01-01

    Lung cancer is still one of the major causes of cancer-related deaths and its mortality figures argue powerfully for new approaches to control this leading cancer threat. Chemoprevention can be defined as the use of specific agents to reverse, or prevent premalignancy from progressing to invasive cancer. The use of foods and dietary supplements present a safe chemopreventive strategy. Data for this review were identified by searches of PubMed and references from relevant articles. Articles were identified by use of the search terms "lung cancer", "chemoprevention", "carcinogenesis", and "retinoids". Only papers published in English were included. Trials in lung cancer chemoprevention have so far produced either neutral or harmful primary endpoint results, whether in the primary, secondary, or tertiary settings. Lung cancer was not prevented by beta-carotene, alpha-tocopherol, retinol, retinyl palmitate, N-acetylcysteine, or isotretinoin in smokers. Ongoing trials may help define new avenues for chemoprevention. The concept of chemoprevention in lung cancer is still in its infancy, but in the future it may have a significant impact on the incidence and mortality of lung cancer. In addition to epidemiologic studies, basic science research to detect mechanisms and evaluate the chemopreventive potential of food components is necessary. The overwhelming evidence of a major role of nutrition in carcinogenesis, the many leads that nutritional intervention may reduce cancer incidence, and the growth and increasing sophistication of clinical trials networks point to a very promising future for nutritional intervention trials leading to substantial public benefit.

  4. Noninvasive detection of lung cancer by analysis of exhaled breath

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of death in Europe and the western world. At present, diagnosis of lung cancer very often happens late in the course of the disease since inexpensive, non-invasive and sufficiently sensitive and specific screening methods are not available. Even though the CT diagnostic methods are good, it must be assured that "screening benefit outweighs risk, across all individuals screened, not only those with lung cancer". An early non-invasive diagnosis of lung cancer would improve prognosis and enlarge treatment options. Analysis of exhaled breath would be an ideal diagnostic method, since it is non-invasive and totally painless. Methods Exhaled breath and inhaled room air samples were analyzed using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and solid phase microextraction with subsequent gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME-GCMS). For the PTR-MS measurements, 220 lung cancer patients and 441 healthy volunteers were recruited. For the GCMS measurements, we collected samples from 65 lung cancer patients and 31 healthy volunteers. Lung cancer patients were in different disease stages and under treatment with different regimes. Mixed expiratory and indoor air samples were collected in Tedlar bags, and either analyzed directly by PTR-MS or transferred to glass vials and analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). Only those measurements of compounds were considered, which showed at least a 15% higher concentration in exhaled breath than in indoor air. Compounds related to smoking behavior such as acetonitrile and benzene were not used to differentiate between lung cancer patients and healthy volunteers. Results Isoprene, acetone and methanol are compounds appearing in everybody's exhaled breath. These three main compounds of exhaled breath show slightly lower concentrations in lung cancer patients as compared to healthy volunteers (p < 0.01 for isoprene and acetone, p = 0.011 for methanol; PTR

  5. Noninvasive detection of lung cancer by analysis of exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Bajtarevic, Amel; Ager, Clemens; Pienz, Martin; Klieber, Martin; Schwarz, Konrad; Ligor, Magdalena; Ligor, Tomasz; Filipiak, Wojciech; Denz, Hubert; Fiegl, Michael; Hilbe, Wolfgang; Weiss, Wolfgang; Lukas, Peter; Jamnig, Herbert; Hackl, Martin; Haidenberger, Alfred; Buszewski, Bogusław; Miekisch, Wolfram; Schubert, Jochen; Amann, Anton

    2009-09-29

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of death in Europe and the western world. At present, diagnosis of lung cancer very often happens late in the course of the disease since inexpensive, non-invasive and sufficiently sensitive and specific screening methods are not available. Even though the CT diagnostic methods are good, it must be assured that "screening benefit outweighs risk, across all individuals screened, not only those with lung cancer". An early non-invasive diagnosis of lung cancer would improve prognosis and enlarge treatment options. Analysis of exhaled breath would be an ideal diagnostic method, since it is non-invasive and totally painless. Exhaled breath and inhaled room air samples were analyzed using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and solid phase microextraction with subsequent gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME-GCMS). For the PTR-MS measurements, 220 lung cancer patients and 441 healthy volunteers were recruited. For the GCMS measurements, we collected samples from 65 lung cancer patients and 31 healthy volunteers. Lung cancer patients were in different disease stages and under treatment with different regimes. Mixed expiratory and indoor air samples were collected in Tedlar bags, and either analyzed directly by PTR-MS or transferred to glass vials and analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). Only those measurements of compounds were considered, which showed at least a 15% higher concentration in exhaled breath than in indoor air. Compounds related to smoking behavior such as acetonitrile and benzene were not used to differentiate between lung cancer patients and healthy volunteers. Isoprene, acetone and methanol are compounds appearing in everybody's exhaled breath. These three main compounds of exhaled breath show slightly lower concentrations in lung cancer patients as compared to healthy volunteers (p < 0.01 for isoprene and acetone, p = 0.011 for methanol; PTR-MS measurements). A comparison

  6. Mass Spectrometry–based Proteomic Profiling of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ocak, Sebahat; Chaurand, Pierre; Massion, Pierre P.

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to further our understanding of lung cancer biology and to identify new candidate biomarkers to be used in the management of lung cancer, we need to probe these tissues and biological fluids with tools that address the biology of lung cancer directly at the protein level. Proteins are responsible of the function and phenotype of cells. Cancer cells express proteins that distinguish them from normal cells. Proteomics is defined as the study of the proteome, the complete set of proteins produced by a species, using the technologies of large-scale protein separation and identification. As a result, new technologies are being developed to allow the rapid and systematic analysis of thousands of proteins. The analytical advantages of mass spectrometry (MS), including sensitivity and high-throughput, promise to make it a mainstay of novel biomarker discovery to differentiate cancer from normal cells and to predict individuals likely to develop or recur with lung cancer. In this review, we summarize the progress made in clinical proteomics as it applies to the management of lung cancer. We will focus our discussion on how MS approaches may advance the areas of early detection, response to therapy, and prognostic evaluation. PMID:19349484

  7. Genomic heterogeneity of multiple synchronous lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Jianjun; Li, Lin; Yin, Guangliang; Zhang, Jianhua; Zheng, Shan; Cheung, Hannah; Wu, Ning; Lu, Ning; Mao, Xizeng; Yang, Longhai; Zhang, Jiexin; Zhang, Li; Seth, Sahil; Chen, Huang; Song, Xingzhi; Liu, Kan; Xie, Yongqiang; Zhou, Lina; Zhao, Chuanduo; Han, Naijun; Chen, Wenting; Zhang, Susu; Chen, Longyun; Cai, Wenjun; Li, Lin; Shen, Miaozhong; Xu, Ningzhi; Cheng, Shujun; Yang, Huanming; Lee, J. Jack; Correa, Arlene; Fujimoto, Junya; Behrens, Carmen; Chow, Chi-Wan; William, William N.; Heymach, John V.; Hong, Waun Ki; Swisher, Stephen; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Wang, Jun; Lin, Dongmei; Liu, Xiangyang; Futreal, P. Andrew; Gao, Yanning

    2016-01-01

    Multiple synchronous lung cancers (MSLCs) present a clinical dilemma as to whether individual tumours represent intrapulmonary metastases or independent tumours. In this study we analyse genomic profiles of 15 lung adenocarcinomas and one regional lymph node metastasis from 6 patients with MSLC. All 15 lung tumours demonstrate distinct genomic profiles, suggesting all are independent primary tumours, which are consistent with comprehensive histopathological assessment in 5 of the 6 patients. Lung tumours of the same individuals are no more similar to each other than are lung adenocarcinomas of different patients from TCGA cohort matched for tumour size and smoking status. Several known cancer-associated genes have different mutations in different tumours from the same patients. These findings suggest that in the context of identical constitutional genetic background and environmental exposure, different lung cancers in the same individual may have distinct genomic profiles and can be driven by distinct molecular events. PMID:27767028

  8. Retrospective Analysis of Lung Transplant Recipients Found to Have Unexpected Lung Cancer in Explanted Lungs.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Takahiro; Cypel, Marcelo; de Perrot, Marc; Pierre, Andrew; Waddell, Tom; Singer, Lianne; Roberts, Heidi; Keshavjee, Shaf; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Unexpected lung cancer is sometimes found in explanted lungs. The objective of this study was to review these patients and their outcomes to better understand and optimize management protocols for lung transplant candidates with pulmonary nodules. Retrospective analysis of pretransplant imaging and clinicopathologic characteristics of patients who were found to have lung cancer in their explanted lungs was performed. From January 2003 to December 2012, 13 of 853 lung transplant recipients were found to have unexpected lung cancer in their explanted lung (1.52%). Of them, 9 cases were for interstitial lung disease (2.8%; 9/321 recipients) and 4 cases were for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (1.57%; 4/255 recipients). The median period between computed tomographic scan and lung transplantation was 2.40 months (range: 0.5-19.2). On computed tomographic scan, only 3 cases were shown to possibly have a neoplasm by the radiologist. The staging of these lung cancers was as follows: 3 cases of IA, 1 case of IB, 5 cases of IIA, 1 case of IIIA, and 3 cases of IV. Of 13 cases, 9 died owing to cancer progression. On the contrary, only 1 stage I case with small cell lung cancer showed cancer recurrence. The median survival time was 339 days, and the 3-year survival rate was 11.0%. In conclusion, most of the patients with unexpected lung cancer showed poor prognosis except for the early-stage disease. The establishment of proper protocol for management of such nodules is important to improve the management of candidates who are found to have pulmonary nodules on imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Stanniocalcin-2 (STC2): A potential lung cancer biomarker promotes lung cancer metastasis and progression.

    PubMed

    Na, Sang-su; Aldonza, Mark Borris; Sung, Hye-Jin; Kim, Yong-In; Son, Yeon Sung; Cho, Sukki; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2015-06-01

    The homodimeric glycoprotein, stanniocalcin 2 (STC2) is previously known to be involved in the regulation of calcium and phosphate transport in the kidney and also reported to play multiple roles in several cancers. However, its function and clinical significance in lung cancer have never been reported and still remain uncertain. Here, we investigated the possibility of STC2 as a lung cancer biomarker and identified its potential role in lung cancer cell growth, metastasis and progression. Proteomic analysis of secretome of primary cultured lung cancer cells revealed higher expression of STC2 in cancers compared to that of adjacent normal cells. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses showed higher mRNA and protein expressions of STC2 in lung cancer tissues compared to the adjacent normal tissues. Knockdown of STC2 in H460 lung cancer cells slowed down cell growth progression and colony formation. Further analysis revealed suppression of migration, invasion and delayed G0/G1 cell cycle progression in the STC2 knockdown cells. STC2 knockdown also attenuated the H202-induced oxidative stress on H460 cell viability with a subsequent increase in intracellular ROS levels, which suggest a protective role of STC2 in redox regulatory system of lung cancer. These findings suggest that STC2 can be a potential lung cancer biomarker and plays a positive role in lung cancer metastasis and progression. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Medical Proteomics. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. [Determination of thirty three elements in lung cancer tissues of patients with lung cancer by microwave digestion-ICP-MS].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin-Lin; Ma, Qian-Li; Huang, Yun-Chao; Wu, Guo-Ping; Wei, Fu-Sheng

    2009-12-01

    A method for determining 33 elements in lung tissues of patients with lung cancer was developed by using vacuum freeze-drying microwave digestion-ICP-MS. The lung tissue samples were treated by vacuum freeze-drying equipment. After microwave digestion in HNO3-H2O2 solution system, the samples were diluted with the method of constant volume. Under the optimized conditions the samples were analyzed by ICP-MS. The double internal standard elements Rh and Re were used to compensate for matrix suppression effect and sensitivity drift. The analytical results showed that the detection limits of the 33 elements were 0.01-0.45 ng x mL(-1). The national standard reference material GBW(E)080193 bovine liver was analyzed by the described method and the measured element values accorded with the standard values or the reference values. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the method was 2.1%-14.3%. The recovery rates of the studied elements were 90.1%-117.5%. The contents of 33 elements in lung cancer tissues, paracancerous lung tissues and benign lung tissues of 6 patients with lung cancer were determined by the method. It was indicated that the method is rapid, simple and accurate for determining multi-elements in human lung tissue and other biological samples.

  11. Lung Cancer in HIV-Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Mena, Álvaro; Meijide, Héctor; Marcos, Pedro J

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of HAART for persons living with HIV since 1996 has resulted in a dramatic decline in AIDS-related mortality. However, other comorbidities are increasing, such as metabolic disturbances or cancers, including solid organ malignancies. Among the latest, lung cancer, especially the adenocarcinoma subtype, is on the rise. HIV infection, even controlling for smoking, is an independent risk factor for developing lung cancer. HIV could promote lung cancers through immunosuppression, chronic inflammation, and a direct oncogenic effect. Smoking, lung infections, and chronic pulmonary diseases are risk factors for lung cancer. All may contribute to the cumulative incidence of lung cancer in persons living with HIV. It is double that in the general population. The role of HAART in lung cancer development in persons living with HIV is not well established. Although data supporting it could be too preliminary, persons living with HIV should be considered within high-risk groups that could benefit from screening strategies with low-dose computed tomography, especially those with airway obstruction and emphysema. Current evidence suggests that quitting smoking strategies in persons living with HIV achieve abstinence rates comparable to those in healthy HIV-negative smokers.

  12. Lung Cancer:Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatments & Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Lung Cancer Lung Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatments & Research Past Issues / Winter ... lung cancer are given intravenously or by mouth. Lung Cancer Research The large-scale National Lung Screening ...

  13. Lung cancer disparities and African-Americans.

    PubMed

    Sin, Mo-Kyung

    2017-07-01

    African-Americans, as historically disadvantaged minorities, have more advanced stages of cancer when diagnosed, lower survival rates, and lower rates of accessing timely care than do Caucasians. Lung cancer incidence and mortality, in particular, are high among African-Americans. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recently released an evidence-based lung cancer screening technology called low-dose computerized tomography. High-risk African-Americans might benefit greatly from such screening but not many are aware of this technology. Public health nurses can play a key role in increasing awareness of the technology among African-American communities and encouraging qualified African-Americans to obtain screening. This study discusses issues with lung cancer and smoking among African-Americans, a recently released evidence-based lung cancer screening technology, and implications for public health nurses to enhance uptake of the new screening technology among high-risk African-Americans. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The liquid biopsy in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Junaid; Yun, Jungmi W; Kompelli, Anvesh R; Moufarrej, Youmna E; Alexander, Jonathan S; Herrera, Guillermo A; Shackelford, Rodney E

    2016-11-01

    The incidence of lung cancer has significantly increased over the last century, largely due to smoking, and remains the most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. This is often due to lung cancer first presenting at late stages and a lack of curative therapeutic options at these later stages. Delayed diagnoses, inadequate tumor sampling, and lung cancer misdiagnoses are also not uncommon due to the limitations of the tissue biopsy. Our better understanding of the tumor microenvironment and the systemic actions of tumors, combined with the recent advent of the liquid biopsy, may allow molecular diagnostics to be done on circulating tumor markers, particularly circulating tumor DNA. Multiple liquid biopsy molecular methods are presently being examined to determine their efficacy as surrogates to the tumor tissue biopsy. This review will focus on new liquid biopsy technologies and how they may assist in lung cancer detection, diagnosis, and treatment.

  15. The liquid biopsy in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Junaid; Yun, Jungmi W.; Kompelli, Anvesh R.; Moufarrej, Youmna E.; Alexander, Jonathan S.; Herrera, Guillermo A.; Shackelford, Rodney E.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of lung cancer has significantly increased over the last century, largely due to smoking, and remains the most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. This is often due to lung cancer first presenting at late stages and a lack of curative therapeutic options at these later stages. Delayed diagnoses, inadequate tumor sampling, and lung cancer misdiagnoses are also not uncommon due to the limitations of the tissue biopsy. Our better understanding of the tumor microenvironment and the systemic actions of tumors, combined with the recent advent of the liquid biopsy, may allow molecular diagnostics to be done on circulating tumor markers, particularly circulating tumor DNA. Multiple liquid biopsy molecular methods are presently being examined to determine their efficacy as surrogates to the tumor tissue biopsy. This review will focus on new liquid biopsy technologies and how they may assist in lung cancer detection, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:28191282

  16. 3-Dimensional Patient-Derived Lung Cancer Assays Reveal Resistance to Standards-of-Care Promoted by Stromal Cells but Sensitivity to Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Onion, David; Argent, Richard H; Reece-Smith, Alexander M; Craze, Madeleine L; Pineda, Robert G; Clarke, Philip A; Ratan, Hari L; Parsons, Simon L; Lobo, Dileep N; Duffy, John P; Atherton, John C; McKenzie, Andrew J; Kumari, Rajendra; King, Peter; Hall, Brett M; Grabowska, Anna M

    2016-04-01

    There is a growing recognition that current preclinical models do not reflect the tumor microenvironment in cellular, biological, and biophysical content and this may have a profound effect on drug efficacy testing, especially in the era of molecular-targeted agents. Here, we describe a method to directly embed low-passage patient tumor-derived tissue into basement membrane extract, ensuring a low proportion of cell death to anoikis and growth complementation by coculture with patient-derived cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF). A range of solid tumors proved amenable to growth and pharmacologic testing in this 3D assay. A study of 30 early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) specimens revealed high levels of de novo resistance to a large range of standard-of-care agents, while histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and their combination with antineoplastic drugs displayed high levels of efficacy. Increased resistance was seen in the presence of patient-derived CAFs for many agents, highlighting the utility of the assay for tumor microenvironment-educated drug testing. Standard-of-care agents showed similar responses in the 3D ex vivo and patient-matched in vivo models validating the 3D-Tumor Growth Assay (3D-TGA) as a high-throughput screen for close-to-patient tumors using significantly reduced animal numbers. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(4); 753-63. ©2016 AACR.

  17. Targeted therapies for lung cancer: clinical experience and novel agents.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Jill E; Cascone, Tina; Gerber, David E; Heymach, John V; Minna, John D

    2011-01-01

    Although lung cancer remains the leading cancer killer in the United States, recently a number of developments indicate future clinical benefit. These include evidence that computed tomography-based screening decreases lung cancer mortality, the use of stereotactic radiation for early-stage tumors, the development of molecular methods to predict chemotherapy sensitivity, and genome-wide expression and mutation analysis data that have uncovered oncogene "addictions" as important therapeutic targets. Perhaps the most significant advance in the treatment of this challenging disease is the introduction of molecularly targeted therapies, a term that currently includes monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The development of effective targeted therapeutics requires knowledge of the genes and pathways involved and how they relate to the biologic behavior of lung cancer. Drugs targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor, anaplastic lymphoma kinase, and vascular endothelial growth factor are now U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer. These agents are generally better tolerated than conventional chemotherapy and show dramatic efficacy when their use is coupled with a clear understanding of clinical data, mechanism, patient selection, drug interactions, and toxicities. Integrating genome-wide tumor analysis with drug- and targeted agent-responsive phenotypes will provide a wealth of new possibilities for lung cancer-targeted therapeutics. Ongoing research efforts in these areas as well as a discussion of emerging targeted agents being evaluated in clinical trials are the subjects of this review.

  18. The Canadian Lung Cancer Conference 2016

    PubMed Central

    Melosky, B.; Ho, C.

    2016-01-01

    Each February, the Canadian Lung Cancer Conference brings together lung cancer researchers, clinicians, and care professionals who are united in their commitment to improve the care of patients with lung cancer. This year’s meeting, held 11–12 February, featured a resident education session, a welcome dinner, networking sessions, lectures, breakout sessions, debates, and a satellite symposium. Key themes from this year’s meeting included innovations across the care spectrum and results of recent clinical trials with targeted agents, immuno-oncology agents, and novel drug combinations.

  19. Lung cancer surgery: an up to date

    PubMed Central

    Baltayiannis, Nikolaos; Chandrinos, Michail; Anagnostopoulos, Dimitrios; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andreas; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Courcoutsakis, Nikolaos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    According to the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) GLOBOCAN World Cancer Report, lung cancer affects more than 1 million people a year worldwide. In Greece according to the 2008 GLOBOCAN report, there were 6,667 cases recorded, 18% of the total incidence of all cancers in the population. Furthermore, there were 6,402 deaths due to lung cancer, 23.5% of all deaths due to cancer. Therefore, in our country, lung cancer is the most common and deadly form of cancer for the male population. The most important prognostic indicator in lung cancer is the extent of disease. The Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC) and the American Joint Committee for Cancer Staging (AJCC) developed the tumour, node, and metastases (TNM) staging system which attempts to define those patients who might be suitable for radical surgery or radical radiotherapy, from the majority, who will only be suitable for palliative measures. Surgery has an important part for the therapy of patients with lung cancer. “Lobectomy is the gold standard treatment”. This statement may be challenged in cases of stage Ia cancer or in patients with limited pulmonary function. In these cases an anatomical segmentectomy with lymph node dissection is an acceptable alternative. Chest wall invasion is not a contraindication to resection. En-bloc rib resection and reconstruction is the treatment of choice. N2 disease represents both a spectrum of disease and the interface between surgical and non-surgical treatment of lung cancer Evidence from trials suggests that multizone or unresectable N2 disease should be treated primarily by chemoradiotherapy. There may be a role for surgery if N2 is downstaged to N0 and lobectomy is possible, but pneumonectomy is avoidable. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is considered a systemic disease at diagnosis, because the potential for hematogenous and lymphogenic metastases is very high. The efficacy of surgical intervention for SCLC is not clear. Lung cancer

  20. Other cancers in lung cancer families are overwhelmingly smoking-related cancers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongyao; Frank, Christoph; Hemminki, Akseli; Sundquist, Kristina; Hemminki, Kari

    2017-04-01

    Familial risks of lung cancer are well-established, but whether lung cancer clusters with other discordant cancers is less certain, particularly beyond smoking-related sites, which may provide evidence on genetic contributions to lung cancer aetiology. We used a novel approach to search for familial associations in the Swedish Family-Cancer Database. This involved assessment of familial relative risk for cancer X in families with increasing numbers of lung cancer patients and, conversely, relative risks for lung cancer in families with increasing numbers of patients with cancers X. However, we lacked information on smoking. The total number of lung cancers in the database was 125 563. We applied stringent statistical criteria and found that seven discordant cancers were associated with lung cancer among family members, and six of these were known to be connected with smoking: oesophageal, upper aerodigestive tract, liver, cervical, kidney and urinary bladder cancers. A further novel finding was that cancer of unknown primary also associated with lung cancer. We also factored in histological evidence and found that anal and connective tissue cancers could be associated with lung cancer for reasons other than smoking. For endometrial and prostate cancers, suggestive negative associations with lung cancer were found. Although we lacked information on smoking it is prudent to conclude that practically all observed discordant associations of lung cancer were with cancers for which smoking is a risk factor.

  1. Serological proteome analysis approach-based identification of ENO1 as a tumor-associated antigen and its autoantibody could enhance the sensitivity of CEA and CYFRA 21-1 in the detection of non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Liping; Qu, Yanhong; Li, Jitian; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Kaijuan; Wang, Peng; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Zhang, Jianying

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Lung cancer (LC) is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths for both male and female worldwide. Early detection of LC could improve five-year survival rate up to 48.8% compared to 3.3% of late/distant stage. Autoantibodies to tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) have been described as being present before clinical symptoms in lung and other cancers. We aimed to identify more TAAs to improve the performance for discovering non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients from healthy individuals. Methods Two independent sets were included in this study. Serological proteome analysis (SERPA) was used to identify TAAs from NSCLC cell line H1299 in a discovery set. In validation study, anti-ENO1 autoantibody was examined by immunoassay in sera from 242 patients with NSCLC and 270 normal individuals. Results A 47 KDa protein was identified to be alpha-enolase (ENO1) by using SERPA. Analysis of sera from 512 participants by ELISA showed significantly higher frequency of anti-ENO1 autoantibodies in NSCLC sera compared with the sera from normal individuals, with AUC (95%CI) of 0.589 (0.539-0.638, P=0.001). There was no significant difference in frequency of anti-ENO1 in different stages, histological or metastasis status of NSCLC. When anti-ENO1 detection was combined with other two tumor protein biomarkers (CEA and CYFRA 21-1), the sensitivity of NSCLC increased to 84%. Conclusions ENO1 can elicit humoral immune response in NSCLC and its autoantibody has association with the tumorigenesis of NSCLC. Furthermore, these intriguing results suggest the possibility of autoantibody against ENO1 serving as a potential diagnostic biomarker in NSCLC and have implications for defining novel histological determinants of NSCLC. PMID:28456790

  2. Missed lung cancer: when, where, and why?

    PubMed Central

    del Ciello, Annemilia; Franchi, Paola; Contegiacomo, Andrea; Cicchetti, Giuseppe; Bonomo, Lorenzo; Larici, Anna Rita

    2017-01-01

    Missed lung cancer is a source of concern among radiologists and an important medicolegal challenge. In 90% of the cases, errors in diagnosis of lung cancer occur on chest radiographs. It may be challenging for radiologists to distinguish a lung lesion from bones, pulmonary vessels, mediastinal structures, and other complex anatomical structures on chest radiographs. Nevertheless, lung cancer can also be overlooked on computed tomography (CT) scans, regardless of the context, either if a clinical or radiologic suspect exists or for other reasons. Awareness of the possible causes of overlooking a pulmonary lesion can give radiologists a chance to reduce the occurrence of this eventuality. Various factors contribute to a misdiagnosis of lung cancer on chest radiographs and on CT, often very similar in nature to each other. Observer error is the most significant one and comprises scanning error, recognition error, decision-making error, and satisfaction of search. Tumor characteristics such as lesion size, conspicuity, and location are also crucial in this context. Even technical aspects can contribute to the probability of skipping lung cancer, including image quality and patient positioning and movement. Albeit it is hard to remove missed lung cancer completely, strategies to reduce observer error and methods to improve technique and automated detection may be valuable in reducing its likelihood. PMID:28206951

  3. RB loss in resistant EGFR mutant lung adenocarcinomas that transform to small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Niederst, Matthew J.; Sequist, Lecia V.; Poirier, John T.; Mermel, Craig H.; Lockerman, Elizabeth L.; Garcia, Angel R.; Katayama, Ryohei; Costa, Carlotta; Ross, Kenneth N.; Moran, Teresa; Howe, Emily; Fulton, Linnea E.; Mulvey, Hillary E.; Bernardo, Lindsay A.; Mohamoud, Farhiya; Miyoshi, Norikatsu; VanderLaan, Paul A.; Costa, Daniel B.; Jänne, Pasi A.; Borger, Darrell R.; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Shioda, Toshi; Iafrate, Anthony J.; Getz, Gad; Rudin, Charles M.; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are effective treatments for non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations. However, relapse typically occurs after an average of 1 year of continuous treatment. A fundamental histological transformation from NSCLC to small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is observed in a subset of the resistant cancers, but the molecular changes associated with this transformation remain unknown. Analysis of tumour samples and cell lines derived from resistant EGFR mutant patients revealed that Retinoblastoma (RB) is lost in 100% of these SCLC transformed cases, but rarely in those that remain NSCLC. Further, increased neuroendocrine marker and decreased EGFR expression as well as greater sensitivity to BCL2 family inhibition are observed in resistant SCLC transformed cancers compared with resistant NSCLCs. Together, these findings suggest that this subset of resistant cancers ultimately adopt many of the molecular and phenotypic characteristics of classical SCLC. PMID:25758528

  4. RB loss in resistant EGFR mutant lung adenocarcinomas that transform to small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Niederst, Matthew J; Sequist, Lecia V; Poirier, John T; Mermel, Craig H; Lockerman, Elizabeth L; Garcia, Angel R; Katayama, Ryohei; Costa, Carlotta; Ross, Kenneth N; Moran, Teresa; Howe, Emily; Fulton, Linnea E; Mulvey, Hillary E; Bernardo, Lindsay A; Mohamoud, Farhiya; Miyoshi, Norikatsu; VanderLaan, Paul A; Costa, Daniel B; Jänne, Pasi A; Borger, Darrell R; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Shioda, Toshi; Iafrate, Anthony J; Getz, Gad; Rudin, Charles M; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Engelman, Jeffrey A

    2015-03-11

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are effective treatments for non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations. However, relapse typically occurs after an average of 1 year of continuous treatment. A fundamental histological transformation from NSCLC to small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is observed in a subset of the resistant cancers, but the molecular changes associated with this transformation remain unknown. Analysis of tumour samples and cell lines derived from resistant EGFR mutant patients revealed that Retinoblastoma (RB) is lost in 100% of these SCLC transformed cases, but rarely in those that remain NSCLC. Further, increased neuroendocrine marker and decreased EGFR expression as well as greater sensitivity to BCL2 family inhibition are observed in resistant SCLC transformed cancers compared with resistant NSCLCs. Together, these findings suggest that this subset of resistant cancers ultimately adopt many of the molecular and phenotypic characteristics of classical SCLC.

  5. Pharmacoeconomics of systemic therapies for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Louise

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the economics of systemic therapies for the treatment of lung cancer. Lung cancer treatment is moderately expensive. The overall cost to society is significant given its high incidence. Most analyses in patients with small cell lung cancer focus on supportive care measures. The economics of chemotherapy in patients with advanced small cell lung cancer, as assessed in one study, shows alternating chemotherapy to be cost effective. Numerous economic analyses of chemotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been completed using varying methodologies in a number of countries. In patients with advanced NSCLC, third generation chemotherapy in the first-line setting can be administered within reasonable incremental cost effectiveness. Single-agent docetaxel chemotherapy in the second-line setting has also been shown to fall within a reasonable cost-effective range. Based on this review, systemic therapies for lung cancer are, for the most part, cost effective. Information on the cost-utility of systemic therapies is more limited. In a population of cancer patients with poor prognosis, the inclusion of quality indicators in the calculation of costs (i.e. cost-utility analyses) will be of great importance to refine our understanding of costs and benefits using a more global approach. Future economic analyses of adjuvant chemotherapy and novel targeted therapies will be of great interest.

  6. Physical activity and lung cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Emaus, Aina; Thune, Inger

    2011-01-01

    Since lung cancer is among the cancers with the highest incidence and has the highest mortality rate of cancer worldwide, the means of reducing its impact are urgently needed. Emerging evidence shows that physical activity plays an etiological role in lung cancer risk reduction. The majority of studies support the fact that total and recreational physical activity reduces lung cancer risk by 20-30% for women and 20-50% for men, and there is evidence of a dose-response effect. The biological mechanisms operating between physical activity and lung cancer are likely complex and influenced by many factors including inherited or acquired susceptibility genes, gender, smoking, and other environmental factors. Several plausible biological factors and mechanisms have been hypothesized linking physical activity to reduced lung cancer risk including: improved pulmonary function, reduced concentrations of carcinogenic agents in the lungs, enhanced immune function, reduced inflammation, enhanced DNA repair capacity, changes in growth factor levels and possible gene-physical activity interactions. Future research should target the possible subgroup effects and the biologic mechanisms that may be involved.

  7. Plasma immunoreactive calcitonin in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Roos, B A; Lindall, A W; Baylin, S B; O'Neil, J; Frelinger, A L; Birnbaum, R S; Lambert, P W

    1979-01-01

    We have measured plasma calcitonin in 135 untreated eucalemic men with lung cancer and a control/smoker population. Calcitonin levels were determined by radioimmunoassay and validated by immunoextraction. Plasma immunoreactive calcitonin moieties were purified by immunoadsorbent chromatography, treated with mercaptoethanol and urea, and characterized by gel filtration. Artifacts in human calcitonin radioimmunoassays of cancer-patient plasmas were detected by parallel plasma incubations in a salmon calcitonin radioimmunoassay system which does not detect human calcitonin and by immunoprecipitation of tracer at the end of radioimmunoassay incubations. Heating fresh plasmas to 65 degrees C for 1.5 hours reduced radioimmunoassay artifacts without loss of calcitonin moieties. Such characterization of hypercalcitoninemia in each of the histopathological types of lung cancer has raised some important questions about the interpretation of plasma calcitonin radioimmunoassay measurements in lung cancer. Based on inhibition of tracer-antibody binding, plasma calcitonin seemed to be elevated in 18% (14/80) of basal plasma samples obtained from patients with epidermoid or with anaplastic lung cancer. Unequivocal hypercalcitoninemia (heat stable, causing no inhibition of antibody-tracer binding in the salmon calcitonin radioimmunoassays, and immunoextractable with human calcitonin antibodies) was not found in any of the apparently hypercalcitoninemic plasmas from persons with epidermoid or anaplastic lung cancer. By contrast, unequivocal hypercalcitoninemia was found in 27% (15/55) of plasmas from patients with small cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma. Most of the immunoreactive calcitonin recovered from small cell and adenocarcinoma lung cancer plasmas with unequivocally elevated calcitonin is much larger than calcitonin monomer.

  8. Suppression for lung metastasis by depletion of collagen I and lysyl oxidase via losartan assisted with paclitaxel-loaded pH-sensitive liposomes in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Yang; Xia, Tai; Yu, Qianwen; Zhang, Qianyu; Yang, Yuting; Cun, Xingli; Lu, Libao; Gao, Huile; Zhang, Zhirong; He, Qin

    2016-10-01

    Tumor metastasis would seriously impair the efficacy of chemotherapy. Our previous studies showed losartan combined with paclitaxel-loaded pH-sensitive cleavable liposomes (PTX-Cl-Lip) facilitated paclitaxel accumulation and led to enhanced antitumor efficacy in 4T1 bearing mice. Since losartan could inhibit the level of collagen I which was related to tumor metastasis, this strategy was further applied to suppress tumor metastasis this time. Our in vivo anti-metastatic study manifested losartan could lower the colonies occupied in lungs by 76.4% compared with that of saline group. When losartan and PTX-Cl-Lip were combined, anti-metastatic efficiency reached to 88.2%, which was the best among all the groups. In vitro 3D tumor spheroids studies proved losartan could significantly suppress the invasion of tumor cells. Losartan plus PTX-Cl-Lip could further weaken the metastasis of tumor cells. Mechanism study showed the declination of collagen I level via losartan was caused by inhibition of active transforming growth factor-β1. Western-blot study showed losartan could decrease the level of lysyl oxidase, then inhibit the cross-linking of collagen I, finally weakened the cell signaling transmit via integrin and the metastasis of tumor cells was restrained. All above studies illustrated this combined tactic could achieve favorable effect on suppression of lung tumor metastasis.

  9. Cigarette smoke radioactivity and lung cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Karagueuzian, Hrayr S; White, Celia; Sayre, James; Norman, Amos

    2012-01-01

    To determine the tobacco industry's policy and action with respect to radioactive polonium 210 ((210)Po) in cigarette smoke and to assess the long-term risk of lung cancer caused by alpha particle deposits in the lungs of regular smokers. Analysis of major tobacco industries' internal secret documents on cigarette radioactivity made available online by the Master Settlement Agreement in 1998. The documents show that the industry was well aware of the presence of a radioactive substance in tobacco as early as 1959. Furthermore, the industry was not only cognizant of the potential "cancerous growth" in the lungs of regular smokers but also did quantitative radiobiological calculations to estimate the long-term (25 years) lung radiation absorption dose (rad) of ionizing alpha particles emitted from the cigarette smoke. Our own calculations of lung rad of alpha particles match closely the rad estimated by the industry. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the industry's and our estimate of long-term lung rad of alpha particles causes 120-138 lung cancer deaths per year per 1,000 regular smokers. Acid wash was discovered in 1980 to be highly effectively in removing (210)Po from the tobacco leaves; however, the industry avoided its use for concerns that acid media would ionize nicotine converting it into a poorly absorbable form into the brain of smokers thus depriving them of the much sought after instant "nicotine kick" sensation. The evidence of lung cancer risk caused by cigarette smoke radioactivity is compelling enough to warrant its removal.

  10. [Lung cancer screening and management of small pulmonary nodules].

    PubMed

    Schulz, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Worldwide lung cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer. Most lung cancers are diagnosed at an advanced stage, so survival after lung cancer is generally poor. Diagnosis of lung cancer at earlier stages may be associated with an increased survival rate. This indicates that the implementation of lung cancer screening programs at the population level by means of low dose computed tomography might helpful to improve the outcome and mortality of lung cancer patients. By means of rapid advances in imaging technologies over the last decades it became possible to detect small lung nodules as small as a couple of millimeters. This recent developments require management algorithms to guide the clinical management of suspicious and indeterminate lung nodules found in computer tomography during lung cancer screening or by incidental finding.This review will focus on both, the recent advances in lung cancer screening and the guidelines for the management of small pulmonary nodules.

  11. Exercise therapy across the lung cancer continuum.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lee W; Eves, Neil D; Waner, Emily; Joy, Anil A

    2009-07-01

    A lung cancer diagnosis and associated therapeutic management are associated with unique and varying degrees of adverse physical/functional impairments that dramatically reduce patients' ability to tolerate exercise. Poor exercise capacity predisposes to increased susceptibility to other common age-related diseases, poor quality of life, and likely premature death. This article reviews the literature investigating the role of exercise as an adjunct therapy across the lung cancer continuum (ie, prevention to palliation). The current evidence suggests that exercise training is a safe and feasible adjunct therapy for patients with operable lung cancer both before and after pulmonary resection. Among patients with inoperable disease, feasibility and safety studies of carefully prescribed exercise training are warranted. Preliminary evidence in this area suggests that exercise therapy may be an important consideration in multidisciplinary management of patients diagnosed with lung cancer.

  12. Physical activity and lung cancer survivorship.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lee W

    2011-01-01

    A lung cancer diagnosis and associated therapeutic management is associated with unique and varying degrees of adverse physical/functional impairments that dramatically reduce a patient's ability to tolerate exercise. Poor exercise tolerance predisposes to increased susceptibility to other common age-related diseases, poor quality of life (QOL), and likely premature death. Here we review the putative literature investigating the role of exercise as an adjunct therapy across the lung cancer continuum (i.e., diagnosis to palliation). The current evidence suggests that exercise training is a safe and feasible adjunct therapy for operable lung cancer patients both before and after pulmonary resection. Among patients with inoperable disease, feasibility and safety studies of carefully prescribed exercise training are warranted. Preliminary evidence in this area supports that exercise therapy may be an important consideration in multidisciplinary management of patients diagnosed with lung cancer.

  13. Lung cancer in the Indian subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Noronha, Vanita; Pinninti, Rakesh; Patil, Vijay M.; Joshi, Amit; Prabhash, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Smoking tobacco, both cigarettes and beedis, is the principal risk factor for causation of lung cancer in Indian men; however, among Indian women, the association with smoking is not strong, suggesting that there could be other risk factors besides smoking. Despite numerous advances in recent years in terms of diagnostic methods, molecular changes, and therapeutic interventions, the outcomes of the lung cancer patients remain poor; hence, a better understanding of the risk factors may impact the preventive measures to be implemented at the community level. There is a lack of comprehensive data on lung cancer in India. In this review, we attempt to collate the available data on lung cancer from India. PMID:27606290

  14. Phase 1b trial of proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib with irinotecan in lung cancer and other irinotecan-sensitive malignancies that have progressed on prior therapy (Onyx IST reference number: CAR-IST-553).

    PubMed

    Arnold, Susanne M; Chansky, Kari; Leggas, Markos; Thompson, Michael A; Villano, John L; Hamm, John; Sanborn, Rachel E; Weiss, Glen J; Chatta, Gurkamal; Baggstrom, Maria Q

    2017-02-16

    Introduction Proteasome inhibition is an established therapy for many malignancies. Carfilzomib, a novel proteasome inhibitor, was combined with irinotecan to provide a synergistic approach in relapsed, irinotecan-sensitive cancers. Materials and Methods Patients with relapsed irinotecan-sensitive cancers received carfilzomib (Day 1, 2, 8, 9, 15, and 16) at three dose levels (20/27 mg/m2, 20/36 mg/m2 and 20/45 mg/m2/day) in combination with irinotecan (Days 1, 8 and 15) at 125 mg/m2/day. Key eligibility criteria included measurable disease, a Zubrod PS of 0 or 1, and acceptable organ function. Patients with stable asymptomatic brain metastases were eligible. Dose escalation utilized a standard 3 + 3 design. Results Overall, 16 patients were enrolled to three dose levels, with four patients replaced. Three patients experienced dose limiting toxicity (DLT) and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was exceeded in Cohort 3. The RP2 dose was carfilzomib 20/36 mg/m(2) (given on Days 1, 2, 8, 9, 15, and 16) and irinotecan 125 mg/m2 (Days 1, 8 and 15). Common Grade (Gr) 3 and 4 toxicities included fatigue (19%), thrombocytopenia (19%), and diarrhea (13%). Conclusions Irinotecan and carfilzomib were well tolerated, with common toxicities of fatigue, thrombocytopenia and neutropenic fever. Objective clinical response was 19% (one confirmed partial response (PR) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and two unconfirmed); stable disease (SD) was 6% for a disease control rate (DCR) of 25%. The recommended phase II dose was carfilzomib 20/36 mg/m(2) and irinotecan125 mg/m2. The phase II evaluation is ongoing in relapsed small cell lung cancer.

  15. Resisting Resistance: Targeted Therapies in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jessica J.; Shaw, Alice T.

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance inevitably limits the efficacy of all targeted therapies including tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Understanding the biological underpinnings of TKI resistance is key to the successful development of future therapeutic strategies. Traditionally, mechanisms of TKI resistance have been viewed under a dichotomous lens. Tumor cells are TKI-sensitive or TKI-refractory, exhibit intrinsic or acquired resistance, and accumulate alterations within or outside the target to promote their survival. Such classifications facilitate our comprehension of an otherwise complex biology, but are likely an oversimplification. Recent studies underscore the multifaceted, genetically heterogeneous nature of TKI resistance, which evolves dynamically with changes in therapy. In this Review, we provide a broad framework for understanding the diverse mechanisms of resistance at play in oncogene-driven lung cancers. PMID:27819059

  16. Dark tobacco and lung cancer in Cuba.

    PubMed

    Joly, O G; Lubin, J H; Caraballoso, M

    1984-01-01

    A retrospective case control study of lung cancer was conducted in Havana, Cuba to investigate whether Cuban high lung cancer mortality rates could be explained by cigarette and cigar consumption habits, including the smoking of dark tobacco cigarettes. The cases were drawn from patients admitted from 1978 to 1980 to the city's 12 main general hospitals with a tentative diagnosis of lung cancer. Only patients whose final diagnosis was confirmed by cytology and/ or histology according to the World Health Organization's Classification of Lung Cancer were included. A hospital control selected from patients with a current admission for a nonsmoking-related disease was matched to each case by sex, age, hospital of admission, and admission date. Data on 826 confirmed lung cancer cases (219 females and 607 males), 979 hospital controls, and 539 neighborhood controls were analyzed with procedures for matched and unmatched studies. Lung cancer patients ranged in age from 23 to 89 years; approximately 1/2 were females and 2/3 of the males were 60 years or older at diagnosis. Education level was similar in all groups. 167 of the 219 female cases (76.3%) and 595 of the 607 male cases (98%) ever smoked regularly, compared with 31% and 80.3%, respectively, of female and male controls. The corresponding proportions for female hospital and neighborhood controls were 30.5 and 31.8%, whereas for males they were 80.5% and 80.1%. The overall relative risk (RR) of lung cancer in cigarette smokers was 7.3 for females and 14.1 for males. Most smokers consumed the local dark tobacco ciagrettes exclusively. There were increased risks of lung cancer in both sexes associated with smoking both tobaccos, but the excess was greater for dark tobacco. The differences were reduced after adjustment for amount smoked. With either dark or light tobacco, the longer the duration of smoking or the greater the total number of cigarettes consumed, the higher the risk, all trends being highly significant

  17. Dichloroacetate alters Warburg metabolism, inhibits cell growth, and increases the X-ray sensitivity of human A549 and H1299 NSC lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Allen, Kah Tan; Chin-Sinex, Helen; DeLuca, Thomas; Pomerening, Joseph R; Sherer, Jeremy; Watkins, John B; Foley, John; Jesseph, Jerry M; Mendonca, Marc S

    2015-12-01

    We investigated whether altering Warburg metabolism (aerobic glycolysis) by treatment with the metabolic agent dichloroacetate (DCA) could increase the X-ray-induced cell killing of the radiation-resistant human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines A549 and H1299. Treatment with 50mM DCA decreased lactate production and glucose consumption in both A549 and H1299, clear indications of attenuated aerobic glycolysis. In addition, we found that DCA treatment also slowed cell growth, increased population-doubling time, and altered cell cycle distribution. Furthermore, we report that treatment with 50mM DCA significantly increased single and fractionated X-ray-induced cell killing of A549 and H1299 cells. Assay of DNA double-strand break repair by neutral comet assays demonstrated that DCA inhibited both the fast and the slow kinetics of X-ray-induced DSB repair in both A549 and H1299 NSCL cancer cells. Taken together the data suggest a correlation between an attenuated aerobic glycolysis and enhanced cytotoxicity and radiation-induced cell killing in radiation-resistant NSCLC cells.

  18. Genome Wide Methylome Alterations in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mullapudi, Nandita; Ye, Bin; Suzuki, Masako; Fazzari, Melissa; Han, Weiguo; Shi, Miao K; Marquardt, Gaby; Lin, Juan; Wang, Tao; Keller, Steven; Zhu, Changcheng; Locker, Joseph D; Spivack, Simon D

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant cytosine 5-methylation underlies many deregulated elements of cancer. Among paired non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), we sought to profile DNA 5-methyl-cytosine features which may underlie genome-wide deregulation. In one of the more dense interrogations of the methylome, we sampled 1.2 million CpG sites from twenty-four NSCLC tumor (T)-non-tumor (NT) pairs using a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme- based HELP-microarray assay. We found 225,350 differentially methylated (DM) sites in adenocarcinomas versus adjacent non-tumor tissue that vary in frequency across genomic compartment, particularly notable in gene bodies (GB; p<2.2E-16). Further, when DM was coupled to differential transcriptome (DE) in the same samples, 37,056 differential loci in adenocarcinoma emerged. Approximately 90% of the DM-DE relationships were non-canonical; for example, promoter DM associated with DE in the same direction. Of the canonical changes noted, promoter (PR) DM loci with reciprocal changes in expression in adenocarcinomas included HBEGF, AGER, PTPRM, DPT, CST1, MELK; DM GB loci with concordant changes in expression included FOXM1, FERMT1, SLC7A5, and FAP genes. IPA analyses showed adenocarcinoma-specific promoter DMxDE overlay identified familiar lung cancer nodes [tP53, Akt] as well as less familiar nodes [HBEGF, NQO1, GRK5, VWF, HPGD, CDH5, CTNNAL1, PTPN13, DACH1, SMAD6, LAMA3, AR]. The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate methylation sites in both PR and GB regions not previously identified in NSCLC, and many non-canonical relationships to gene expression. These DNA methylation features could potentially be developed as risk or diagnostic biomarkers, or as candidate targets for newer methylation locus-targeted preventive or therapeutic agents.

  19. Genome Wide Methylome Alterations in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masako; Fazzari, Melissa; Han, Weiguo; Shi, Miao K.; Marquardt, Gaby; Lin, Juan; Wang, Tao; Keller, Steven; Zhu, Changcheng; Locker, Joseph D.; Spivack, Simon D.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant cytosine 5-methylation underlies many deregulated elements of cancer. Among paired non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), we sought to profile DNA 5-methyl-cytosine features which may underlie genome-wide deregulation. In one of the more dense interrogations of the methylome, we sampled 1.2 million CpG sites from twenty-four NSCLC tumor (T)–non-tumor (NT) pairs using a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme- based HELP-microarray assay. We found 225,350 differentially methylated (DM) sites in adenocarcinomas versus adjacent non-tumor tissue that vary in frequency across genomic compartment, particularly notable in gene bodies (GB; p<2.2E-16). Further, when DM was coupled to differential transcriptome (DE) in the same samples, 37,056 differential loci in adenocarcinoma emerged. Approximately 90% of the DM-DE relationships were non-canonical; for example, promoter DM associated with DE in the same direction. Of the canonical changes noted, promoter (PR) DM loci with reciprocal changes in expression in adenocarcinomas included HBEGF, AGER, PTPRM, DPT, CST1, MELK; DM GB loci with concordant changes in expression included FOXM1, FERMT1, SLC7A5, and FAP genes. IPA analyses showed adenocarcinoma-specific promoter DMxDE overlay identified familiar lung cancer nodes [tP53, Akt] as well as less familiar nodes [HBEGF, NQO1, GRK5, VWF, HPGD, CDH5, CTNNAL1, PTPN13, DACH1, SMAD6, LAMA3, AR]. The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate methylation sites in both PR and GB regions not previously identified in NSCLC, and many non-canonical relationships to gene expression. These DNA methylation features could potentially be developed as risk or diagnostic biomarkers, or as candidate targets for newer methylation locus-targeted preventive or therapeutic agents. PMID:26683690

  20. Exhaled breath analysis for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Dent, Annette G; Sutedja, Tom G; Zimmerman, Paul V

    2013-10-01

    Early diagnosis of lung cancer results in improved survival compared to diagnosis with more advanced disease. Early disease is not reliably indicated by symptoms. Because investigations such as bronchoscopy and needle biopsy have associated risks and substantial costs, they are not suitable for population screening. Hence new easily applicable tests, which can be used to screen individuals at risk, are required. Biomarker testing in exhaled breath samples is a simple, relatively inexpensive, non-invasive approach. Exhaled breath contains volatile and non-volatile organic compounds produced as end-products of metabolic processes and the composition of such compounds varies between healthy subjects and subjects with lung cancer. Many studies have analysed the patterns of these compounds in exhaled breath. In addition studies have also reported that the exhaled breath condensate (EBC) can reveal gene mutations or DNA abnormalities in patients with lung cancer. This review has summarised the scientific evidence demonstrating that lung cancer has distinct chemical profiles in exhaled breath and characteristic genetic changes in EBC. It is not yet possible to accurately identify individuals with lung cancer in at risk populations by any of these techniques. However, analysis of both volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath and of EBC have great potential to become clinically useful diagnostic and screening tools for early stage lung cancer detection.

  1. Exhaled breath analysis for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sutedja, Tom G.; Zimmerman, Paul V.

    2013-01-01

    Early diagnosis of lung cancer results in improved survival compared to diagnosis with more advanced disease. Early disease is not reliably indicated by symptoms. Because investigations such as bronchoscopy and needle biopsy have associated risks and substantial costs, they are not suitable for population screening. Hence new easily applicable tests, which can be used to screen individuals at risk, are required. Biomarker testing in exhaled breath samples is a simple, relatively inexpensive, non-invasive approach. Exhaled breath contains volatile and non-volatile organic compounds produced as end-products of metabolic processes and the composition of such compounds varies between healthy subjects and subjects with lung cancer. Many studies have analysed the patterns of these compounds in exhaled breath. In addition studies have also reported that the exhaled breath condensate (EBC) can reveal gene mutations or DNA abnormalities in patients with lung cancer. This review has summarised the scientific evidence demonstrating that lung cancer has distinct chemical profiles in exhaled breath and characteristic genetic changes in EBC. It is not yet possible to accurately identify individuals with lung cancer in at risk populations by any of these techniques. However, analysis of both volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath and of EBC have great potential to become clinically useful diagnostic and screening tools for early stage lung cancer detection. PMID:24163746

  2. Lung Cancer Screening with Low Dose CT

    PubMed Central

    Caroline, Chiles

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The announcement of the results of the NLST, showing a 20% reduction in lung-cancer specific mortality with LDCT screening in a high risk population, marked a turning point in lung cancer screening. This was the first time that a randomized controlled trial had shown a mortality reduction with an imaging modality aimed at early detection of lung cancer. Current guidelines endorse LDCT screening for smokers and former smokers ages 55 to 74, with at least a 30 pack year smoking history. Adherence to published algorithms for nodule follow-up is strongly encouraged. Future directions for screening research include risk stratification for selection of the screening population, and improvements in the diagnostic follow-up for indeterminate pulmonary nodules. As with screening for other malignancies, screening for lung cancer with LDCT has revealed that there are indolent lung cancers which may not be fatal. More research is necessary if we are to maximize the risk-benefit ratio in lung cancer screening. PMID:24267709

  3. Indoor radon and lung cancer in China.

    PubMed

    Blot, W J; Xu, Z Y; Boice, J D; Zhao, D Z; Stone, B J; Sun, J; Jing, L B; Fraumeni, J F

    1990-06-20

    Radon has long been known to contribute to risk of lung cancer, especially in undergound miners who are exposed to large amounts of the carcinogen. Recently, however, lower amounts of radon present in living areas have been suggested as an important cause of lung cancer. In an effort to clarify the relationship of low amounts of radon with lung cancer risk, we placed alpha-track radon detectors in the homes of 308 women with newly diagnosed lung cancer and 356 randomly selected female control subjects of similar age. Measurements were taken after 1 year. All study participants were part of the general population of Shenyang, People's Republic of China, an industrial city in the northeast part of the country that has one of the world's highest rates of lung cancer in women. The median time of residence in the homes was 24 years. The median household radon level was 2.3 pCi/L of air; 20% of the levels were greater than 4 pCi/L. Radon levels tended to be higher in single-story houses or on the first floor of multiple-story dwellings, and they were also higher in houses with increased levels of indoor air pollution from coal-burning stoves. However, the levels were not higher in homes of women who developed lung cancer than in homes of controls, nor did lung cancer risk increase with increasing radon level. No association between radon and lung cancer was observed regardless of cigarette-smoking status, except for a nonsignificant trend among heavy smokers. No positive associations of lung cancer cell type with radon were observed, except for a nonsignificant excess risk of small cell cancers among the more heavily exposed residents. Our data suggest that projections from surveys of miners exposed to high radon levels may have overestimated the overall risks of lung cancer associated with levels typically seen in homes in this Chinese city. However, further studies in other population groups are needed to clarify the carcinogenic potential of indoor radon.

  4. Customizing Therapies for Lung Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in both men and women. Although there have been modest improvements in short-term survival over the last few decades, five-year survival rates for lung cancer remain low at only 16 percent. Treatment for lung cancer depends on the stage of the disease at diagnosis, but generally consists of some combination of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. Increasing attention has been paid in recent years to customizing therapies based on the molecular characteristics of patients’ tumors. Some of these targeted regimens have already been integrated into the treatment arsenal for lung cancer and others are still being studied in clinical trials, including several being conducted by researchers at NCI’s Center for Cancer Research.

  5. The early diagnosis of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deeley, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    Earlier diagnosis of malignant disease in the lung may bring about improvements in the treatment. This article discusses the effects of early diagnosis on the prognosis. Cancer of the lung may be associated with other lung pathology, thus increasing the problems of diagnosis. Diagnosis depends on radiological examination, cytology of the sputum, radio-isotope lung scanning and mediastinoscopy: an account is given of how these may be used to diagnose the condition whilst it is still at an early stage and suitable for radical treatment. PMID:4552427

  6. Mineral particles, mineral fibers, and lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Churg, A.; Wiggs, B.

    1985-08-01

    The total fibrous and nonfibrous mineral content of the lung has been analyzed in a series of 14 men with lung cancer but no history of occupational dust exposure, and in a series of 14 control men matched for age, smoking history, and general occupational class. The lung cancer patients had an average of 525 +/- 369 X 10(6) exogenous mineral particles and 17.4 +/- 19.6 X 10(6) exogenous mineral fibers/g dry lung, while the controls had averages of 261 +/- 175 mineral particles and 4.7 +/- 3.2 X 10(6) mineral fibers/g dry lung. These differences are statistically significant for both particles and fibers. Kaolinite, talc, mica, feldspars, and crystalline silica comprised the majority of particles of both groups. Approximately 90% of the particles were smaller than 2 micron in diameter and approximately 60% smaller than 1 micron. In both groups, patients who had smoked more than 35 pack years had greater numbers of particles than patients who had smoked less than 35 pack years. It is concluded that, in this study, lungs from patients with lung cancer had statistically greater numbers of mineral particles and fibers than lungs from controls, and that smoking influences total long-term retention of particles from all sources.

  7. [The new TNM classification in lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Wrona, Anna; Jassem, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the new TNM classification in lung cancer and its history. Seventh edition of tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) classification in lung cancer has been published by the International Union Against Cancer (UICC) and the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) at the beginning of 2009. The changes were based upon the results of the international project of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC). The database included 81.495 patients from the entire world (68.463 with non-small cell lung cancer and 13.032 with small cell lung cancer) treated with various modalities between 1990 and 2000. The collected data were validated internally and externally. The tumor size was considered of prognostic relevance: T1 tumors were subdivided into T1a (≤ 2 cm) and T1b (〉 2 cm - ≤ 3 cm), T2 tumors into T2a (〉 3 cm - ≤ 5 cm) and T2b (〉 5 cm - ≤ 7 cm), and T2 tumors 〉 7 cm were reclassified as T3. Tumors with the additional nodules in the same lobe as the primary tumor were classified as T3, those with additional nodules in another ipsilateral lobe - as T4. There were no changes in N category. In the M category, M1 was subclassified into M1a (contralateral lung nodules and pleural dissemination) and M1b (distant metastasis). Large T2 tumors (T2bN0M0) were upstaged from IB to IIA, small T2 tumors (T2aN1M0) were downstaged from the IIB to IIA and T4N0-N1M0 - from IIIB to IIIA. The TNM classification was also recommended for small cell lung cancer instead of previously used categories of limited and extensive disease.

  8. CAXII Is a Sero-Diagnostic Marker for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Makoto; Matsumoto, Toshihide; Ryuge, Shinichiro; Yanagita, Kengo; Nagashio, Ryo; Kawakami, Yoshitaka; Goshima, Naoki; Jiang, Shi-Xu; Saegusa, Makoto; Iyoda, Akira; Satoh, Yukitoshi; Masuda, Noriyuki; Sato, Yuichi

    2012-01-01

    To develop sero-diagnostic markers for lung cancer, we generated monoclonal antibodies using pulmonary adenocarcinoma (AD)-derived A549 cells as antigens by employing the random immunization method. Hybridoma supernatants were immunohistochemically screened for antibodies with AMeX-fixed and paraffin-embedded A549 cell preparations. Positive clones were monocloned twice through limiting dilutions. From the obtained monoclonal antibodies, we selected an antibody designated as KU-Lu-5 which showed intense membrane staining of A549 cells. Based on immunoprecipitation and MADLI TOF/TOF-MS analysis, this antibody was recognized as carbonic anhydrase XII (CAXII). To evaluate the utility of this antibody as a sero-diagnostic marker for lung cancer, we performed dot blot analysis with a training set consisting of sera from 70 lung cancer patients and 30 healthy controls. The CAXII expression levels were significantly higher in lung cancer patients than in healthy controls in the training set (P<0.0001), and the area under the curve of ROC was 0.794, with 70.0% specificity and 82.9% sensitivity. In lung cancers, expression levels of CAXII were significantly higher in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) than with AD (P = 0.035). Furthermore, CAXII was significantly higher in well- and moderately differentiated SCCs than in poorly differentiated ones (P = 0.027). To further confirm the utility of serum CAXII levels as a sero-diagnostic marker, an additional set consisting of sera from 26 lung cancer patients and 30 healthy controls was also investigated by dot blot analysis as a validation study. Serum CAXII levels were also significantly higher in lung cancer patients than in healthy controls in the validation set (P = 0.030). Thus, the serum CAXII levels should be applicable markers discriminating lung cancer patients from healthy controls. To our knowledge, this is the first report providing evidence that CAXII may be a novel sero-diagnostic marker for

  9. Racial and Ethnic Differences in the Epidemiology of Lung Cancer and the Lung Cancer Genome

    PubMed Central

    Schabath, Matthew B.; Cress, W. Douglas; Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita

    2017-01-01

    Background Globally and in the United States, lung cancer has been the most common cancer for the past several decades. In addition to the well-established geographical- and sex-specific differences in lung cancer incidence, mortality and survival, there is also growing evidence for racial and ethnic differences. Methods Based on available published data, we present a summary of the current knowledge and substantive findings related to racial and ethnic differences in lung cancer. Results Although this report is not a systematic review, we summarized the current knowledge and substantive findings related to racial and ethnic differences in lung cancer with a particular focus on lung cancer statistics(incidence, mortality, and survival), cigarette smoking, prevention and early detection, and the lung cancer genome. Finally, we summarize some the systems-level and provider-related issues that likely contribute to racial and ethnic-specific health disparities and provide some suggestions for future strategies that may reduce the disproportionate burden of lung cancer. Conclusions Although lung carcinogenesis is a multifactorial process driven by exogenous exposures (e.g., cigarette smoking), inherited genetic variations, and an accumulation of somatic genetic events, this multifactorial process appears to have racial and ethnic differences which in turn impacts the observed epidemiologic differences in incidence, mortality, and survival. PMID:27842323

  10. Cullin7 is required for lung cancer cell proliferation and is overexpressed in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Men, Xuelin; Wang, Lingcheng; Yu, Wenfei; Ju, Yuanrong

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin ligase Cullin7 has been identified as an oncogene in some malignant diseases such as choriocarcinoma and neuroblastoma. However, the role of Cullin7 in lung cancer carcinogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we explored the functional role of Cullin7 in lung cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis and determined its expression profile in lung cancer. Knocking down Cullin7 expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) in lung cancer cells inhibited cell proliferation and elevated the expression of p53, p27, and p21 proteins. The enhanced p53 expression resulted from activation of the DNA damage response pathway. Cullin7 knockdown markedly suppressed xenograft tumor growth in vivo in mice. Moreover, Cullin7 expression was increased in primary lung cancer tissues of humans. Thus, Cullin7 is required for sustained proliferation and survival of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo, and its aberrant expression may contribute to the pathogenesis of lung cancer. Thus, our study provided evidence that Cullin7 functions as a novel oncogene in lung cancer and may be a potential therapeutic target for lung cancer management.

  11. Mortality due to lung cancer in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ruíz-Godoy, L; Rizo Rios, P; Sánchez Cervantes, F; Osornio-Vargas, A; García-Cuellar, C; Meneses García, A

    2007-11-01

    The highest mortality due to cancer worldwide for both genders corresponds to lung cancer (1,179,000 deaths). In Mexico, the crude mortality rate due to lung cancer was of 5.01 per 10(5) inhabitants in 1979. The most important risk factor is smoking. The present study was aimed at analyzing the mortality due to lung cancer in Mexico, assessing data from each of the states constituting the Mexican Republic during the 1998-2004 period. Data were obtained from the National Institute of Statistics, Geography and Informatics (INEGI, for its initials in Spanish) corresponding to deaths due to lung cancer (1998-2004). We estimated the mean annual mortality rate (MAMR) for each of the 32 states of Mexico. We used the "World Population Standard". The MAMR was standardized according to age (ARS) direct method, and the standard error was determined by Poisson's approximation at a 95% confidence interval. To know the excess risk due to mortality, we calculated the standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) of ARS for each federal state, using the national rate as reference. In this period, 397,400 deaths due to malignant neoplasms were recorded, corresponding 45,578 (11.5%) to lung cancer; for men, 31,025 (68.1%) with MAMR of 8.9 and the respective ARS of 13.2 both x10(5) inhabitants. For women, results were 4553 (31.9%) deaths with MAMR of 4.1 and ARS of 5.4 both x10(5) inhabitants. The highest mortality rates due to lung cancer in both genders were observed in the north of Mexico, whereas for women this was observed in the central states. Although smoking is the main risk for lung cancer, there are other factors such as environmental pollution or exposure to toxicants that could be associated to this cancer. The years potentially lost due to lung cancer were 258,550 for men and 133,315 for women, with a total of 391,865 according to histopathology registry neoplasm malignant RHNM (1985-1995). Studies focused on the characterization and measurement of polluting agents would be a

  12. A combinatorial strategy for treating KRAS-mutant lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Manchado, Eusebio; Weissmueller, Susann; Morris, John P; Chen, Chi-Chao; Wullenkord, Ramona; Lujambio, Amaia; de Stanchina, Elisa; Poirier, John T; Gainor, Justin F; Corcoran, Ryan B; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Rudin, Charles M; Rosen, Neal; Lowe, Scott W

    2016-06-30

    Therapeutic targeting of KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinoma represents a major goal of clinical oncology. KRAS itself has proved difficult to inhibit, and the effectiveness of agents that target key KRAS effectors has been thwarted by activation of compensatory or parallel pathways that limit their efficacy as single agents. Here we take a systematic approach towards identifying combination targets for trametinib, a MEK inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, which acts downstream of KRAS to suppress signalling through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. Informed by a short-hairpin RNA screen, we show that trametinib provokes a compensatory response involving the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) that leads to signalling rebound and adaptive drug resistance. As a consequence, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of FGFR1 in combination with trametinib enhances tumour cell death in vitro and in vivo. This compensatory response shows distinct specificities: it is dominated by FGFR1 in KRAS-mutant lung and pancreatic cancer cells, but is not activated or involves other mechanisms in KRAS wild-type lung and KRAS-mutant colon cancer cells. Importantly, KRAS-mutant lung cancer cells and patients’ tumours treated with trametinib show an increase in FRS2 phosphorylation, a biomarker of FGFR activation; this increase is abolished by FGFR1 inhibition and correlates with sensitivity to trametinib and FGFR inhibitor combinations. These results demonstrate that FGFR1 can mediate adaptive resistance to trametinib and validate a combinatorial approach for treating KRAS-mutant lung cancer.

  13. A combinatorial strategy for treating KRAS mutant lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Manchado, Eusebio; Weissmueller, Susann; Morris, John P.; Chen, Chi-Chao; Wullenkord, Ramona; Lujambio, Amaia; de Stanchina, Elisa; Poirier, John T.; Gainor, Justin F.; Corcoran, Ryan B.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Rudin, Charles M.; Rosen, Neal; Lowe, Scott W.

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic targeting of KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinoma represents a major goal of clinical oncology. KRAS itself has proven difficult to inhibit, and the effectiveness of agents that target key KRAS effectors has been thwarted by activation of compensatory or parallel pathways that limit their efficacy as single agents. Here we take a systematic approach towards identifying combination targets for trametinib, an FDA-approved MEK inhibitor that acts downstream of KRAS to suppress signaling through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. Informed by a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) screen, we show that trametinib provokes a compensatory response involving the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) that leads to signaling rebound and adaptive drug resistance. As a consequence, genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of FGFR1 in combination with trametinib enhances tumor cell death in vitro and in vivo. This compensatory response shows distinct specificities – it is dominated by FGFR1 in KRAS mutant lung and pancreatic cancer cells, but is not activated or involves other mechanisms in KRAS wild-type lung and KRAS-mutant colon cancer cells. Importantly, KRAS-mutant lung cancer cells and patient tumors treated with trametinib show an increase in FRS2 phosphorylation, a biomarker of FGFR activation; this increase is abolished by FGFR1 inhibition and correlates with sensitivity to trametinib and FGFR inhibitor combinations. These results demonstrate that FGFR1 can mediate adaptive resistance to trametinib and validate a combinatorial approach for treating KRAS-mutant lung cancer. PMID:27338794

  14. Quercetin suppresses lung cancer growth by targeting Aurora B kinase.

    PubMed

    Xingyu, Zhu; Peijie, Ma; Dan, Peng; Youg, Wang; Daojun, Wang; Xinzheng, Chen; Xijun, Zhang; Yangrong, Song

    2016-11-01

    aurora B kinase is highly expressed in several cancer cells and promotes tumorigenesis and progression, and therefore, it is an important target for drug to treat tumors. Quercetin was identified to be an antitumor agent. Herein, we report for the first time that quercetin inhibited aurora B activities by directly binding with aurora B in vitro and in vivo. Ex vivo studies showed that quercetin inhibited aurora B activities in JB6 Cl41 cells and A549 lung cancer cells. Moreover, knockdown of aurora B in A549 cells decreased their sensitivities to quercetin. In vivo study demonstrated that injection of quercetin in A549 tumor-bearing mice effectively suppressed cancer growth. The phosphorylation of histone 3 in tumor tissues was also decreased after quercetin treatment. In short, quercetin can suppress growth of lung cancer cells as an aurora B inhibitor both in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Risk of lung cancer in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xin; Luo, Xiaoguang; Xie, Mingliang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Recently, growing evidence has revealed the significant association between Parkinson's disease (PD) and cancer. However, controversy still exists concerning the association between PD and lung cancer. A comprehensive article search for relevant studies published was performed using the following online databases: PubMed, Web of Science and Embase up to August 31, 2016. The pooled risk ratio (RR) and their 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using the method of inverse variance with the random-effects model. Fifteen studies comprising 348,780 PD patients were included in this study. The pooled result indicated that patients with PD were significantly associated with a decreased risk of lung cancer (RR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.41−0.70, P < 0.001). In addition, subgroup analyses performed in Western population also confirmed the significant inverse relationship between PD and risk of lung cancer (RR: 0.48, 95% CI: 0.39−0.60, P < 0.001). In the subgroup analysis, a reduced risk of lung cancer in PD patients from Western population was consistent regardless of study design, gender, or study quality. In conclusion, PD patients were significantly associated with a reduced risk of lung cancer in Western population. The relationship between them in Asian population needs to be confirmed by future studies. PMID:27801674

  16. Treatment options for small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Todd; Gillenwater, Heidi H

    2004-07-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) comprises 15% to 25% of all lung cancers. The leading cause of lung cancer remains smoking, and rates of smoking continue to rise in women, whereas rates in other subgroups have slowed. In this article we review recent advances in the treatment of limited-stage as well as extensive-stage small cell lung cancer. In limited-stage disease, the best survival results are observed when patients are treated with twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy given concurrently with chemotherapy. Patients who have been successful in smoking cessation during therapy for limited-stage disease may have a survival benefit over those who are unable to quit smoking during treatment. In extensive-stage disease, the most significant trial is one comparing irinotecan plus cisplatin and etoposide plus cisplatin, showing a survival advantage for the irinotecan arm. This trial may change the standard of care for patients with extensive-stage disease. A similar ongoing trial in the United States is attempting to confirm these results.

  17. Paraneoplastic syndromes associated with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kanaji, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Naoki; Kita, Nobuyuki; Bandoh, Shuji; Tadokoro, Akira; Ishii, Tomoya; Dobashi, Hiroaki; Matsunaga, Takuya

    2014-01-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes are signs or symptoms that occur as a result of organ or tissue damage at locations remote from the site of the primary tumor or metastases. Paraneoplastic syndromes associated with lung cancer can impair various organ functions and include neurologic, endocrine, dermatologic, rheumatologic, hematologic, and ophthalmological syndromes, as well as glomerulopathy and coagulopathy (Trousseau’s syndrome). The histological type of lung cancer is generally dependent on the associated syndrome, the two most common of which are humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy in squamous cell carcinoma and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion in small cell lung cancer. The symptoms often precede the diagnosis of the associated lung cancer, especially when the symptoms are neurologic or dermatologic. The proposed mechanisms of paraneoplastic processes include the aberrant release of humoral mediators, such as hormones and hormone-like peptides, cytokines, and antibodies. Treating the underlying cancer is generally the most effective therapy for paraneoplastic syndromes, and treatment soon after symptom onset appears to offer the best potential for symptom improvement. In this article, we review the diagnosis, potential mechanisms, and treatments of a wide variety of paraneoplastic syndromes associated with lung cancer. PMID:25114839

  18. Retinoids in lung cancer chemoprevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Toma, S; Raffo, P; Isnardi, L; Palumbo, R

    1999-01-01

    In this review, we aim to synthesize the emerging picture of retinoids in lung cancer through a summary of ongoing investigations in biology, chemoprevention and therapy settings, in an attempt to clarify the possible role of these agents in such a disease. Early work in head and neck cancer has evidenced the capability of retinoids to interrupt field carcinogenesis by reversing premalignant lesions and decreasing the incidence of second primary tumors (SPTs). At this time, the completed randomized trials in lung cancer have failed to demonstrate an evident chemopreventive effect of the tested agents on different study end points, although both a marginally significant benefit of retinol palmitate in time-to-development rates for smoke-related SPTs and a potential preventive effect of retinol supplementation against mesothelioma in selected populations of asbestos-exposed workers have been recently reported. Concerning the role of retinoids in lung cancer treatment, a moderate activity of 13-cis-retinoic acid (13cRA) or all-transretinoic acid (ATRA) as single agents has been reported in small series of advanced, mostly pretreated lung cancer patients. More encouraging findings derive from combination studies, in which retinoids, especially ATRA, are added to either alpha-interferon or chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Major recent advances have been made towards the understanding of retinoids mechanisms of action; at this regard, the role of RAR-beta basal or treatment-induced levels seems to be of particular interest as intermediate end point and/or independent prognostic factor, besides their known importance in lung carcinogenesis. Future research for chemopreventive and therapeutic programs with retinoids in lung cancer should be focused on the investigation of new generation compounds with a specificity for individual retinoid nuclear receptors. Such selective molecules may have a greater activity against lung cancer, with a more favourable toxicity profile, as

  19. Combination Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  20. New molecularly targeted therapies for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Sophie; Schiller, Joan H; Spinola, Monica; Minna, John D

    2007-10-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The disease is particularly difficult to detect, and patients often present at an advanced stage. Current treatments have limited effectiveness, and unfortunately, the prognosis remains poor. Recent insights into the molecular pathogenesis and biologic behavior of lung cancer have led to the development of rationally designed methods of early detection, prevention, and treatment of this disease. This article will review the important clinical implications of these advances, with a focus on new molecularly targeted therapies currently in development.

  1. New molecularly targeted therapies for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Sophie; Schiller, Joan H.; Spinola, Monica; Minna, John D.

    2007-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The disease is particularly difficult to detect, and patients often present at an advanced stage. Current treatments have limited effectiveness, and unfortunately, the prognosis remains poor. Recent insights into the molecular pathogenesis and biologic behavior of lung cancer have led to the development of rationally designed methods of early detection, prevention, and treatment of this disease. This article will review the important clinical implications of these advances, with a focus on new molecularly targeted therapies currently in development. PMID:17909619

  2. Is obesity a preventive factor for lung cancer?

    PubMed

    Kollarova, H; Machova, L; Horakova, D; Cizek, L; Janoutova, G; Janout, V

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer is a disease with multifactorial etiology, smoking playing the most important role among its risk factors. Some studies, however, indicate an inverse association between increased body-mass index (BMI) and the risk of lung cancer. In this paper, the association between BMI and lung cancer risk is analysed in two independent studies. In the first study, 751 lung cancer patients were compared to 30 058 controls. In the second study, 91 lung cancer patients were matched to 91 healthy controls. An inversed association was found between increased BMI and lung cancer risk. The inverse association remained significant after adjustment for age, sex, and smoking.

  3. 28 CFR 79.54 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.54... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To prove...

  4. 28 CFR 79.45 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.45... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To prove...

  5. 28 CFR 79.64 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.64... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical...

  6. 28 CFR 79.45 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.45... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To prove...

  7. 28 CFR 79.64 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.64... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical...

  8. 28 CFR 79.54 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.54... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To prove...

  9. Molecular understanding of lung cancers-A review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Chinnappan Ravinder; Kathiresan, Kandasamy

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is considered to be the most common cancer in the world. The purpose of this paper is to review scientific evidence, particularly epidemiologic evidence of overall lung cancer burden in the world. And molecular understanding of lung cancer at various levels by dominant and suppressor oncogenes. PMID:25183110

  10. Tumor-Induced CD8+ T-Cell Dysfunction in Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Prado-Garcia, Heriberto; Romero-Garcia, Susana; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores; Meneses-Flores, Manuel; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide and one of the most common types of cancers. The limited success of chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimes have highlighted the need to develop new therapies like antitumor immunotherapy. CD8+ T-cells represent a major arm of the cell-mediated anti-tumor response and a promising target for developing T-cell-based immunotherapies against lung cancer. Lung tumors, however, have been considered to possess poor immunogenicity; even so, lung tumor-specific CD8+ T-cell clones can be established that possess cytotoxicity against autologous tumor cells. This paper will focus on the alterations induced in CD8+ T-cells by lung cancer. Although memory CD8+ T-cells infiltrate lung tumors, in both tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and malignant pleural effusions, these cells are dysfunctional and the effector subset is reduced. We propose that chronic presence of lung tumors induces dysfunctions in CD8+ T-cells and sensitizes them to activation-induced cell death, which may be associated with the poor clinical responses observed in immunotherapeutic trials. Getting a deeper knowledge of the evasion mechanisms lung cancer induce in CD8+ T-cells should lead to further understanding of lung cancer biology, overcome tumor evasion mechanisms, and design improved immunotherapeutic treatments for lung cancer. PMID:23118782

  11. Tumor-induced CD8+ T-cell dysfunction in lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Prado-Garcia, Heriberto; Romero-Garcia, Susana; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores; Meneses-Flores, Manuel; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide and one of the most common types of cancers. The limited success of chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimes have highlighted the need to develop new therapies like antitumor immunotherapy. CD8+ T-cells represent a major arm of the cell-mediated anti-tumor response and a promising target for developing T-cell-based immunotherapies against lung cancer. Lung tumors, however, have been considered to possess poor immunogenicity; even so, lung tumor-specific CD8+ T-cell clones can be established that possess cytotoxicity against autologous tumor cells. This paper will focus on the alterations induced in CD8+ T-cells by lung cancer. Although memory CD8+ T-cells infiltrate lung tumors, in both tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and malignant pleural effusions, these cells are dysfunctional and the effector subset is reduced. We propose that chronic presence of lung tumors induces dysfunctions in CD8+ T-cells and sensitizes them to activation-induced cell death, which may be associated with the poor clinical responses observed in immunotherapeutic trials. Getting a deeper knowledge of the evasion mechanisms lung cancer induce in CD8+ T-cells should lead to further understanding of lung cancer biology, overcome tumor evasion mechanisms, and design improved immunotherapeutic treatments for lung cancer.

  12. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia and colonization in patients with advanced lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    TOGASHI, YOSUKE; MASAGO, KATSUHIRO; ITO, YUTAKA; SAKAMORI, YUICHI; OKUDA, CHIYUKI; FUKUHARA, AKIKO; NAGAI, HIROKI; KIM, YOUNG HAK; MISHIMA, MICHIAKI

    2013-01-01

    Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP) has long been recognized as a cause of mortality in immuno-compromised populations, including those with advanced lung cancer. Although Pneumocystis colonization has only recently been described due to the development of more sensitive molecular techniques, including polymerase chain reaction (PCR), it is unknown whether Pneumocystis colonization leads to the development of PCP. In the present study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of Pneumocystis colonization in advanced lung cancer patients. Furthermore, the association between PCP and Pneumocystis colonization was also investigated. Advanced lung cancer patients with no indication of PCP were evaluated to determine the prevalence of Pneumocystis colonization. We analyzed their oral wash (OW) samples and retrospectively evaluated advanced lung cancer patients with PCP by analyzing their sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lung tissues obtained following a diagnosis of lung cancer. Pneumocystis colonization was determined by a PCR test for Pneumocystis jiroveci (P. jiroveci). No P. jiroveci was detected by PCR in the OW samples of 47 advanced lung cancer patients with no indication of PCP, or in the lung tissues of four advanced lung cancer patients with PCP. These results indicate that PCP is not associated with Pneumocystis colonization in advanced lung cancer patients, although this study is limited since this was a cross-sectional and retrospective study. PMID:23420670

  13. Infectious complications in patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Akinosoglou, K S; Karkoulias, K; Marangos, M

    2013-01-01

    Infections remain a part of the natural course of cancer. During the course of their disease, patients with lung cancer frequently present with an infection that can ultimately be fatal. Pathogenesis of infectious syndromes is usually determined by the underlying disease, as well as, the iatrogenic manipulations that occur during its management. Hence, lung cancer infections include lower respiratory tract infections in the context of COPD, aspiration, obstruction and opportunistic infections due to immunosuppression. Moreover, treatment-related infectious syndromes including post operative pneumonia, febrile neutropenia and superimposed infection following radiation/chemotherapy toxicity is common. Importantly, diagnosis of infection in the febrile lung cancer patient is challenging and requires a high index of suspicion in order to distinguish from other causes of fever, including malignant disease and pulmonary embolism. Prompt initiation of treatment is pivotal to avoid increased mortality. Careful consideration of infection pathogenesis can predict most likely pathogens and guide antibiotic management, thus, ensuring most favourable outcome.

  14. Asbestosis and lobar site of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, W.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the evidence for the hypothesis that lung cancer has a predilection for the lower lobes in workers with asbestosis.
METHOD—A review of the available literature with relevant information.
RESULTS—Six published reports were analysed. In four studies limited to series of cases with diagnoses of asbestosis, three showed lower lobe predominance of lung cancer whereas the fourth study included cases in which the radiographic readings did not meet the usual criterion of profusion for asbestosis. One cohort study showed lower lobe predominance; the other reported only 33% lower lobe cancers compared with 20% in unexposed controls.
CONCLUSION—There is some support for the hypothesis but more studies are needed.


Keywords: asbestos; asbestosis; lung cancer PMID:10769303

  15. Lung cancer nanomedicine: potentials and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Bölükbas, Deniz Ali; Meiners, Silke

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is by far the most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. Nanoparticle-based therapies enable targeted drug delivery for lung cancer treatment with increased therapeutic efficiency and reduced systemic toxicity. At the same time, nanomedicine has the potential for multimodal treatment of lung cancer that may involve 'all-in-one' targeting of several tumor-associated cell types in a timely and spatially controlled manner. Therapeutic approaches, however, are hampered by a translational gap between basic scientists, clinicians and pharma industry due to suboptimal animal models and difficulties in scale-up production of nanoagents. This calls for a disease-centered approach with interdisciplinary basic and clinical research teams with the support of pharma industries.

  16. Recent advances in personalized lung cancer medicine

    PubMed Central

    Okimoto, Ross A; Bivona, Trever G

    2014-01-01

    The identification of molecular subtypes of non-small-cell lung cancer has transformed the clinical management of this disease. This is best exemplified by the clinical success of targeting the EGFR or ALK with tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the front-line setting. Our ability to further improve patient outcomes with biomarker-based targeted therapies will depend on a more comprehensive genetic platform that can rationally interrogate the cancer genome of an individual patient. Novel technologies, including multiplex genotyping and next-generation sequencing are rapidly evolving and will soon challenge the oncologist with a wealth of genetic information for each patient. Although there are many barriers to overcome, the integration of these genetic platforms into clinical care has the potential to transform the management of lung cancer through improved molecular categorization, patient stratification, and drug development, thereby, improving clinical outcomes through personalized lung cancer medicine. PMID:25506379

  17. Does lung cancer attract greater stigma than other cancer types?

    PubMed

    Marlow, Laura A V; Waller, Jo; Wardle, Jane

    2015-04-01

    Cancer stigma can have widespread effects, influencing the behaviour and wellbeing of patients as well as the community and even research funding. Patients with lung cancer report feeling particularly stigmatised because of the association with a behaviour (smoking) that is perceived to be personally controllable. However, there are other dimensions of cancer stigma, that might be more severe for other cancers. The present study therefore examined differences in attitudes towards lung cancer and four other cancer types, using a multidimensional measure of cancer stigma, to extend findings beyond personal responsibility attributions. Participants were a non-patient sample (n=1205) who were randomised to complete a survey online relating to one of five cancer types (lung, colorectal, skin, breast and cervical). Stigma was assessed using the Cancer Stigma Scale (CASS). There were significant differences across the five cancer types on all CASS subscales: awkwardness (F(4, 1009)=5.16, p<0.001), severity (F(4, 984)=26.24, p<0.001), avoidance (F(4, 1008)=5.38, p<0.001), policy opposition (F(4, 1009)=8.38, p<0.001), personal responsibility (F(4, 995)=31.67, p<0.001) and financial discrimination (F(4, 957)=9.45, p<0.001). Lung cancer attracted higher stigma scores than breast and cervical cancer on all subscales. Lung cancer was similar to skin cancer on personal responsibility, avoidance, and policy opposition, but attracted higher stigma in the domains of awkwardness, severity and financial discrimination. Lung cancer was similar to colorectal cancer for awkwardness, but significantly higher on all other subscales. Lung cancer stigma extends beyond personal responsibility attributions to other dimensions, particularly perceived severity of the disease and tolerance of financial discrimination against patients with the disease. Future work is needed to develop and evaluate interventions designed to limit cancer stigma for patients, health professionals and the community

  18. Lung cancer risk prediction: a tool for early detection.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Adrian; Duffy, Stephen W; Myles, Jonathan P; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Field, John K

    2007-01-01

    Although 45% of men and 39% of women will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime, it is difficult to predict which individuals will be affected. For some cancers, substantial progress in individual risk estimation has already been made. However, relatively few models have been developed to predict lung cancer risk beyond effects of age and smoking. This paper reviews published models for lung cancer risk prediction, discusses their potential contribution to clinical and research settings and suggests improvements to the risk modeling strategy for lung cancer. The sensitivity and specificity of existing cancer risk models is less than optimal. Improvement in individual risk prediction is important for selection of individuals for prevention or early detection interventions. In addition to smoking, factors related to occupational exposure, personal medical history and family history of cancer can add to the predictive power. A good risk prediction model is one that can identify a small fraction of the population in which a large proportion of the disease cases will occur. In the future, genetic and other biological markers are likely to be useful, although they will require rigorous evaluation. Validation is essential to establish the predictive effect and for ongoing monitoring of the model's continued relevance.

  19. Isolating and Testing Circulating Tumor DNA and Soluble Immune Markers During the Course of Treatment for Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-12

    Lung Cancer; Lung Neoplasms; Cancer of Lung; Cancer of the Lung; Neoplasms, Lung; Neoplasms, Pulmonary; Pulmonary Cancer; Pulmonary Neoplasms; Carcinoma, Non-small-cell Lung; Adenocarcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  20. Intermediate endpoint biomarkers for lung cancer chemoprevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAulay, Calum E.; Lam, Stephen; Klein-Parker, Helga; Gazdar, Adi; Guillaud, Martial; Payne, Peter W.; Le Riche, Jean C.; Dawe, Chris; Band, Pierre; Palcic, Branko

    1998-04-01

    Given the demographics of current and ex-smoking populations in North America, lung cancer will be a major problem in the foreseeable future. Early detection and treatment of lung cancer holds great promise for the management of this disease. Unlike cervical cancer, the physical, complete removal/destruction of all dysplastic lesions in the bronchial tree is not possible; however, treatment of the lesions using a chemopreventive agent is. Intermediate biomarkers have been used to screen promising chemopreventive agents for larger population studies. We have examined the natural history of lung cancer development by following a group of subjects at high risk of developing lung cancer using fluorescence endoscopy to identify the areas of abnormality for biopsy. Approximately 900 biopsies have been collected in this fashion and graded by at least two experienced, expert pathologists. Using an interactive version of the Cyto-Savant (Oncometrics Imaging Corp.), cytometric and tissue architectural data were collected from these biopsies. Using only the data from the normal and invasive cancer biopsies, quantitative morphometric and architectural indices were generated and calculated for all the collected biopsies. These indices were compared with Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) of ten sites commonly associated with cancer. These results and the application of these quantitative measures to two small chemoprevention studies will be reported.

  1. Does diesel exhaust cause human lung cancer?

    PubMed

    Cox, L A

    1997-12-01

    Recent reviews of epidemiological evidence on the relation between exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) and lung cancer risk have reached conflicting conclusions, ranging from belief that there is sufficient evidence to conclude that DE is a human lung carcinogen (California EPA, 1994) to conclusions that there is inadequate evidence to support a causal association between DE and human lung cancer (Muscat and Wynder, 1995). Individual studies also conflict, with both increases and decreases in relative risks of lung cancer mortality being cited with 95% statistical confidence. On balance, reports of elevated risk outnumber reports of reduced risk. This paper reexamines the evidence linking DE exposures to lung cancer risk. After briefly reviewing animal data and biological mechanisms, it surveys the relevant epidemiological literature and examines possible explanations for the discrepancies. These explanations emphasize the distinction between statistical associations, which have been found in many studies, and causal associations, which appear not to have been established. Methodological threats to valid causal inference are identified and new approaches for controlling them are proposed using recent techniques from artificial intelligence (AI) and computational statistics. These threats have not been adequately controlled for in previous epidemiological studies. They provide plausible noncausal explanations for the reported increases in relative risks, making it impossible to infer causality between DE exposure and lung cancer risk from these studies. A key contribution is to show how recent techniques developed in the AI-and-statistics literature can help clarify the causal interpretation of complex multivariate data sets used in epidemiological risk assessments. Applied to the key study of Garshick et al. (1988), these methods show that DE concentration has no positive causal association with occupational lung cancer mortality risk.

  2. Association between Patient-Provider Communication and Lung Cancer Stigma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Megan Johnson; Hamann, Heidi A.; Thomas, Anna J.; Ostroff, Jamie S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The majority (95%) of lung cancer patients report stigma, with 48% of lung cancer patients specifically reporting feeling stigmatized by their medical providers. Typically associated with the causal link to smoking and the historically poor prognosis, lung cancer stigma can be seen as a risk factor for poor psychosocial and medical outcomes in the context of lung cancer diagnosis and treatment. Thus, modifiable targets for lung cancer stigma-reducing interventions are needed. The present study sought to test the hypothesis that good patient-provider communication is associated with lower levels of lung cancer stigma. Methods Lung cancer patients (n=231) across varying stages of disease, participated in a cross-sectional, multi-site study designed to understand lung cancer stigma. Patients completed several survey measures, including demographic and clinical characteristics, a measure of patient-provider communication (Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Program or CAHPS), and a measure of lung cancer stigma (Cataldo Lung Cancer Stigma Scale). Results As hypothesized, results indicated that good patient-provider communication was associated with lower levels of lung cancer stigma (r=-.18, p<.05). These results remained significant, even when controlling for relevant demographic and clinical characteristics (Stan. Β = −.15, p<.05). Conclusions Results indicate that good patient-provider communication is associated with lower levels of lung cancer stigma, suggesting that improving patient-provider communication may be a good intervention target for reducing lung cancer stigma. PMID:26553030

  3. Association between patient-provider communication and lung cancer stigma.

    PubMed

    Shen, Megan Johnson; Hamann, Heidi A; Thomas, Anna J; Ostroff, Jamie S

    2016-05-01

    The majority (95 %) of lung cancer patients report stigma, with 48 % of lung cancer patients specifically reporting feeling stigmatized by their medical providers. Typically associated with the causal link to smoking and the historically poor prognosis, lung cancer stigma can be seen as a risk factor for poor psychosocial and medical outcomes in the context of lung cancer diagnosis and treatment. Thus, modifiable targets for lung cancer stigma-reducing interventions are needed. The present study sought to test the hypothesis that good patient-provider communication is associated with lower levels of lung cancer stigma. Lung cancer patients (n = 231) across varying stages of disease participated in a cross-sectional, multisite study designed to understand lung cancer stigma. Patients completed several survey measures, including demographic and clinical characteristics, a measure of patient-provider communication (Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Program or CAHPS), and a measure of lung cancer stigma (Cataldo Lung Cancer Stigma Scale). As hypothesized, results indicated that good patient-provider communication was associated with lower levels of lung cancer stigma (r = -0.18, p < 0.05). These results remained significant, even when controlling for relevant demographic and clinical characteristics (Stan. β = -0.15, p < 0.05). Results indicate that good patient-provider communication is associated with lower levels of lung cancer stigma, suggesting that improving patient-provider communication may be a good intervention target for reducing lung cancer stigma.

  4. The early diagnosis of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Petty, T L

    2001-06-01

    Lung cancer is the most common fatal malignancy in both men and women, both in the United States and elsewhere in the world. Today, lung cancer is most often diagnosed on the basis of symptoms of advanced disease or when chest x-rays are taken for a variety of purposes unrelated to lung cancer detection. Unfortunately, in the United States no society or governmental agency recommends screening, even for patients with high risks, such as smokers with airflow obstruction or people with occupational exposures, including asbestos. The origins of this negative attitude toward lung cancer screening are found in 3 studies sponsored by the National Cancer Institute in the mid-1970s and conducted at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, the Mayo Clinic, and the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Center. These studies concluded that early identification of lung cancer through chest x-rays and cytologic diagnosis of sputum did not alter disease-specific mortality. However, patients with earlier stage disease were found through screening, which resulted in a higher resectability rate and improved survival in the screening group compared with a control group of patients receiving ordinary care. Patients in the control group often received annual chest x-rays during the course of this study, which was the standard of care at the time. Thus no true nonscreening control group resulted. The patients at highest risk were not enrolled in this study. No specific amount of pack-years of smoking intensity was required. Only men were screened. The studies were inadequately powered to show an improvement in mortality rate of less than 50%. Ninety percent of lung cancer occurs in smokers. The prevalence of lung cancer is 4 to 6 times greater when smokers have airflow obstruction than with normal airflow, when all other background factors, including smoking history, occupational risk, and family history, are the same. Screening heavy smokers (ie, > or = 30 pack-years) with airflow obstruction

  5. A Risk Model for Lung Cancer Incidence

    PubMed Central

    Hoggart, Clive; Brennan, Paul; Tjonneland, Anne; Vogel, Ulla; Overvad, Kim; Østergaard, Jane Nautrup; Kaaks, Rudolf; Canzian, Federico; Boeing, Heiner; Steffen, Annika; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Bamia, Christina; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Johansson, Mattias; Palli, Domenico; Krogh, Vittorio; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Panico, Salvatore; Boshuizen, Hendriek; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Peeters, Petra H.M.; Lund, Eiliv; Gram, Inger Torhild; Braaten, Tonje; Rodríguez, Laudina; Agudo, Antonio; Sanchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Arriola, Larraitz; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Barricarte, Aurelio; Rasmuson, Torgny; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas; Allen, Naomi E.; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Risk models for lung cancer incidence would be useful for prioritizing individuals for screening and participation in clinical trials of chemoprevention. We present a risk model for lung cancer built using prospective cohort data from a general population which predicts individual incidence in a given time period. We build separate risk models for current and former smokers using 169,035 ever smokers from the multicenter European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) and considered a model for never smokers. The data set was split into independent training and test sets. Lung cancer incidence was modeled using survival analysis, stratifying by age started smoking, and for former smokers, also smoking duration. Other risk factors considered were smoking intensity, 10 occupational/environmental exposures previously implicated with lung cancer, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms at two loci identified by genome-wide association studies of lung cancer. Individual risk in the test set was measured by the predicted probability of lung cancer incidence in the year preceding last follow-up time, predictive accuracy was measured by the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC). Using smoking information alone gave good predictive accuracy: the AUC and 95% confidence interval in ever smokers was 0.843 (0.810–0.875), the Bach model applied to the same data gave an AUC of 0.775 (0.737–0.813). Other risk factors had negligible effect on the AUC, including never smokers for whom prediction was poor. Our model is generalizable and straightforward to implement. Its accuracy can be attributed to its modeling of lifetime exposure to smoking. PMID:22496387

  6. Association between diet and lung cancer location.

    PubMed

    Lee, B W; Wain, J C; Kelsey, K T; Wiencke, J K; Christiani, D C

    1998-10-01

    Lung cancers occur more commonly in the upper lobes than in the lower lobes, but its pathophysiologic basis is not well understood. Because numerous studies have reported a consistent inverse relationship between lung cancer risk and intake of certain vegetables and fruits, we hypothesized that the balance between diet-derived protective substances delivered via the circulation and cigarette-derived carcinogenic substances delivered via the airways would be less favorable in the upper lobes compared with the lower lobes, hence accounting for the upper lobe predominance of tumors among smokers. Thus, we examined the association between diet and tumor location in 328 patients with lung cancer. The ratio of upper to lower lobe tumors was 2.5:1.0. In univariate analysis, age, height, weight, sex, race, family history of cancer, education level, tumor histology, calories consumed per day, and intake of animal fat did not differ significantly between patients with upper versus lower lobe tumors. Predictors of tumor location in univariate analysis were family history of lung cancer; smoking history; history of asbestos exposure; and intakes of yellow-orange vegetables, alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and vitamins A, C, and E. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, the independent predictors of upper lobe tumor location were family history of lung cancer (p = 0.03), history of asbestos exposure (p = 0.02), less intake of yellow-orange vegetables (p < 0.04), and less intake of vitamin E (p = 0.05). Our results show a strong inverse association between upper lobe location of lung cancer and intake of yellow-orange vegetables and vitamin E.

  7. Serum Insulin, Glucose, Indices of Insulin Resistance, and Risk of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Argirion, Ilona; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Männistö, Satu; Albanes, Demetrius; Mondul, Alison M

    2017-07-11

    Background: Although insulin may increase the risk of some cancers, few studies have examined fasting serum insulin and lung cancer risk.Methods: We examined serum insulin, glucose, and indices of insulin resistance [insulin:glucose molar ratio and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)] and lung cancer risk using a case-cohort study within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study of Finnish men. A total of 196 cases and 395 subcohort members were included. Insulin and glucose were measured in fasting serum collected 5 to 12 years before diagnosis. Cox proportional hazards models were utilized to estimate the relative risk of lung cancer.Results: The average time between blood collection and lung cancer was 9.6 years. Fasting serum insulin levels were 8.7% higher in subcohort members than cases. After multivariable adjustment, men in the fourth quartile of insulin had a significantly higher risk of lung cancer than those in the first quartile [HR = 2.10; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12-3.94]. A similar relationship was seen with HOMA-IR (HR = 1.83; 95% CI, 0.99-3.38). Risk was not strongly associated with glucose or the insulin:glucose molar ratio (Ptrend = 0.55 and Ptrend = 0.27, respectively).Conclusions: Higher fasting serum insulin concentrations, as well as the presence of insulin resistance, appear to be associated with an elevated risk of lung cancer development.Impact: Although insulin is hypothesized to increase risk of some cancers, insulin and lung cancer remain understudied. Higher insulin levels and insulin resistance were associated with increased lung cancer risk. Although smoking cessation is the best method of lung cancer prevention, other lifestyle changes that affect insulin concentrations and sensitivity may reduce lung cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(10); 1-6. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. TMEM45B, up-regulated in human lung cancer, enhances tumorigenicity of lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Rui; Hu, Fengqing; Xie, Xiao; Wang, Lei; Li, Guoqing; Qiao, Tong; Wang, Mingsong; Xiao, Haibo

    2016-09-01

    Transmembrane protein 45B (TMEM45B) is a member of TMEMs. Altered expression of TMEMs is frequently observed in a variety of human cancers, but the expression and functional roles of TMEM45B in lung cancer is not reported. In the present study, levels of mRNA expression of TMEM45B in lung cancer tissues were assessed using re-analyzing expression data of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) lung cancer cohort and real-time PCR analysis on our own cohort. Lung cancer cells, A549 and NCI-H1975, infected with TMEM45B short hairpin RNA were examined in cell proliferation, cell cycle, cell apoptosis, wound-healing, and cell invasion assays as well as mouse xenograft models. Here, we demonstrated that TMEM45B was overexpressed in lung cancer and its expression correlated with overall survival of patients. In addition, silencing of TMEM45B expression reduced cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, induced cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis, and blocked cell migration and invasion. Moreover, knockdown of TMEM45B significantly suppressed G1/S transition, induced cell apoptosis, and inhibited cell invasion via regulating the expression of cell cycle-related proteins (CDK2, CDC25A, and PCNA), cell apoptosis-related proteins (Bcl2, Bax, and Cleaved Caspase 3), and metastasis-related proteins (MMP-9, Twist, and Snail), respectively. Thus, TMEM45B is a potential prognostic marker and cancer-selective therapeutic target in lung cancer.

  9. Glucocorticoid Receptor Status is a Principal Determinant of Variability in the Sensitivity of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells to Pemetrexed

    PubMed Central

    Patki, Mugdha; Gadgeel, Shirish; Huang, Yanfang; McFall, Thomas; Shields, Anthony F.; Matherly, Larry H.; Bepler, Gerold; Ratnam, Manohar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pemetrexed is an S-phase targeted drug in front-line or maintenance therapy of advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but methods are needed for predicting the drug response. Dexamethasone is typically administered the day before, the day of and the day after pemetrexed. As dexamethasone strongly regulates many genes including p53 through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), we hypothesized that dexamethasone influences tumor response to pemetrexed. Methods Eight non-squamous NSCLC cell line models with varied p53 and GRα/GRβ status were used for gene expression and cell cycle analyses and for loss/gain-of-function experiments. Results In three cell lines dexamethasone profoundly, but reversibly, suppressed the fraction of S-phase cells. Dexamethasone also reversibly repressed expression of thymidylate synthase and dihydrofolate reductase which are primary targets of pemetrexed but are also quintessential S-phase enzymes as well as the S-phase dependent expression of thymidine kinase 1. Dexamethasone also decreased expression of the major pemetrexed transporters, the reduced folate carrier and the proton coupled folate transporter. Only cells expressing relatively high GRα showed these dexamethasone effects, regardless of p53 status. In cells expressing low GRα, the dexamethasone response was rescued by ectopic GRα. Further, depletion of p53 did not attenuate the dexamethasone effects. The presence of dexamethasone during pemetrexed treatment protected against pemetrexed cytotoxicity, in only the dexamethasone responsive cells. Conclusions The results predict that in non-squamous NSCLC tumors, reversible S-phase suppression by dexamethasone, possibly combined with a reduction in the drug transporters, attenuates responsiveness to pemetrexed and that GR status is a principal determinant of tumor variability of this response. PMID:24736075

  10. Plasma secretory phospholipase A2-IIa as a potential biomarker for lung cancer in patients with solitary pulmonary nodules

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Five-year survival for lung cancer has remained at 16% over last several decades largely due to the fact that over 50% of patients are diagnosed with locally-advanced or metastatic disease. Diagnosis at an earlier and potentially curable stage is crucial. Solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) are common, but the difficulty lies in the determination of which SPN is malignant. Currently, there is no convenient and reliable biomarker effective for early diagnosis. Secretory phospholipase A2-IIa (sPLA2-IIa) is secreted into the circulation by cancer cells and may allow for an early detection of lung cancer. Methods Plasma samples from healthy donors, patients with only benign SPN, and patients with lung cancer were analyzed. Expression of sPLA2-IIa protein in lung cancer tissues was also determined. Results We found that the levels of plasma sPLA2-IIa were significantly elevated in lung cancer patients. The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, comparing lung cancer patients to patients with benign nodules, revealed an optimum cutoff value for plasma sPLA2-IIa of 2.4 ng/ml to predict an early stage cancer with 48% sensitivity and 86% specificity and up to 67% sensitivity for T2 stage lung cancer. Combined sPLA2-IIa, CEA, and Cyfra21.1 tests increased the sensitivity for lung cancer prediction. High level of plasma sPLA2-IIa was associated with a decreased overall cancer survival. sPLA2-IIa was overexpressed in almost all non-small cell lung cancer and in the majority of small cell lung cancer by immunohistochemistry analysis. Conclusion Our finding strongly suggests that plasma sPLA2-IIa is a potential lung biomarker to distinguish benign nodules from lung cancer and to aid lung cancer diagnosis in patients with SPNs. PMID:22151235

  11. Lung cancer in the meat industry.

    PubMed Central

    Coggon, D; Pannett, B; Pippard, E C; Winter, P D

    1989-01-01

    Routine statistics of occupational mortality and incidence of cancer have consistently shown high rates of lung cancer in butchers. Possible explanations include infection by carcinogenic papilloma viruses, exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrites in the preservation of meat, or a confounding effect of tobacco. To explore these possibilities, we have examined the mortality of 1610 men employed at three British companies processing pork, beef, lamb, bacon, and other meat products. The overall death rate was less than in the national population (271 deaths observed, 310 expected) but there was an excess of deaths from cancer (87 observed, 80 expected), and in particular from lung cancer (42 observed, 32 expected). The risk of lung cancer was concentrated in subjects exposed to recently slaughtered meat, especially after an interval of 10 or more years. These findings increase suspicions of a risk of lung cancer in butchers, although further information is needed about smoking habits in the meat industry. If there is a hazard infection by a papilloma virus would seem the most likely cause. PMID:2930728

  12. MicroRNAs in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Pooja; Middleton, Justin; Jeon, Young-Jun; Garofalo, Michela

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs have become recognized as key players in the development of cancer. They are a family of small non-coding RNAs that can negatively regulate the expression of cancer-related genes by sequence-selective targeting of mRNAs, leading to either mRNA degradation or translational repression. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide with a substantially low survival rate. MicroRNAs have been confirmed to play roles in lung cancer development, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and response to therapy. They are also being studied for their future use as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and as potential therapeutic targets. In this review we focus on the role of dysregulated microRNA expression in lung tumorigenesis. We also discuss the role of microRNAs in therapeutic resistance and as biomarkers. We further look into the progress made and challenges remaining in using microRNAs for therapy in lung cancer. PMID:25332906

  13. Measuring stigma in people with lung cancer: psychometric testing of the cataldo lung cancer stigma scale.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Janine K; Slaughter, Robert; Jahan, Thierry M; Pongquan, Voranan L; Hwang, Won Ju

    2011-01-01

    to develop an instrument to measure the stigma perceived by people with lung cancer based on the HIV Stigma Scale. psychometric analysis. online survey. 186 patients with lung cancer. an exploratory factor analysis with a common factor model using alpha factor extraction. lung cancer stigma, depression, and quality of life. four factors emerged: stigma and shame, social isolation, discrimination, and smoking. Inspection of unrotated first-factor loadings showed support for a general stigma factor. Construct validity was supported by relationships with related constructs: self-esteem, depression, social support, and social conflict. Coefficient alphas ranging from 0.75-0.97 for the subscales (0.96 for stigma and shame, 0.97 for social isolation, 0.9 for discrimination, and 0.75 for smoking) and 0.98 for the 43-item Cataldo Lung Cancer Stigma Scale (CLCSS) provided evidence of reliability. The final version of the CLCSS was 31 items. Coefficient alpha was recalculated for the total stigma scale (0.96) and the four subscales (0.97 for stigma and shame, 0.96 for social isolation, 0.92 for discrimination, and 0.75 for smoking). the CLCSS is a reliable and valid measure of health-related stigma in this sample of people with lung cancer. the CLCSS can be used to identify the presence and impact of lung cancer stigma and allow for the development of effective stigma interventions for patients with lung cancer.

  14. Fluorescence imaging of early lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Stephen; MacAulay, Calum E.; Le Riche, Jean C.; Ikeda, Norihiko; Palcic, Branko

    1995-01-01

    The performance of a fluorescence imaging device was compared with conventional white-light bronchoscopy in 100 patients with lung cancer, 46 patients with resected State I nonsmall cell lung cancer, 10 patients with head and neck cancer, and 67 volunteers who had smoked at least one pack of cigarettes per day for twenty-five years or more. Using differences in tissue autofluorescence between premalignant, malignant and normal tissues, fluorescence bronchoscopy was found to detect more than twice as many moderate-severe dysplasia and carcinoma in situ sites than conventional white-light bronchoscopy. The use of fluorescence imaging to detect small peripheral lung nodules was investigated in a micro metastatic lung model of mice implanted with Lewis lung tumor cells. Fluorescence imaging was found to be able to detect small malignant lung lesions. The use of (delta) -aminolevulinic acid (ALA) to enhance fluorescence detection of CIS was investigated in a patient after oral administration of 60 mg/kg of ALA four hours prior to bronchoscopy, although ALA enhanced the tumor's visibility, multiple sites of false positive fluorescence were observed in areas of inflammation or metaplasia.

  15. The T393C polymorphism of GNAS1 as a predictor for chemotherapy sensitivity and survival in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with gemcitabine plus platinum.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fa-Jun; Zhao, Peng; Kou, Jun-Yan; Hong, Wei; Fu, Li; Hu, Lin; Hong, Dan; Su, Dan; Gao, Yun; Zhang, Yi-Ping

    2012-06-01

    The GNAS1 gene is linked to proapoptotic signaling and correlates closely with clinical outcomes in many human cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the T393C polymorphism of the GNAS1 gene could be used as a chemotherapy sensitivity and prognosis predictive marker of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with gemcitabine plus platinum (GP). In this study, we performed the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay to examine the genotypes of the GNAS1 T393C polymorphism in 131 peripheral blood DNA specimens from advanced NSCLC patients with GP treatment. The frequencies of the CC, CT, and TT genotypes in 131 advanced NSCLC cases were 25.2, 47.4, and 26.7%, respectively. The favorable TT genotype was significantly correlated with better overall survival (OS; P < 0.05) and longer progress-free survival (PFS; P < 0.05) compared with the CT or CC genotype. In the multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, the GNAS1 T393C polymorphism was independently associated with overall survival after adjusting the clinicopathological factors (P < 0.05). This study suggests that the TT genotype of the GNAS1 T393C polymorphism could be an independent prognostic marker to predict chemotherapy sensitivity, favorable OS and PFS in advanced NSCLC patients with GP treatment.

  16. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Aftab, Blake T.; Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John; Rudin, Charles M.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Hales, Russell K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of KrasG12D-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radio-sensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:23182391

  17. Narcissus, the Beam, and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Gaetano

    2016-08-01

    In the management of lung cancer, the rules of engagement of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) are not clearly defined. The potential for SABR to affect to an unprecedented level current protocols and in all disease stages emerges vehemently from the literature. However, in a time when the role of surgery is being reassessed, surgeons need to take a closer look at the evidence for the use of SABR in lung cancer patients and clearly define their indisputable role within the context of multidisciplinary teams. The myth of Narcissus exemplified in the absolute masterpiece by Caravaggio seems to represent an ideal metaphor to explain the ever-evolving interaction between surgery and SABR in lung cancer management. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. New genes linked to lung cancer susceptibility in Asian women

    Cancer.gov

    An international group of scientists has identified three genes that predispose Asian women who have never smoked to lung cancer. The discovery of specific genetic variations, which have not previously been associated with lung cancer risk in other popul

  19. Too Few Current, Former Smokers Screened for Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Too Few Current, Former Smokers Screened for Lung Cancer Such testing could cut death rate by ... the United States don't get screened for lung cancer even though they're at increased risk ...

  20. Delaying Chemo After Lung Cancer Surgery? Better Late Than Never

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_162926.html Delaying Chemo After Lung Cancer Surgery? Better Late Than Never Patient recovery may ... 6, 2017 FRIDAY, Jan. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Lung cancer chemotherapy that's been delayed due to slow recovery ...

  1. [Esophageal cancer developing 13 years after radiotherapy of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Okazaki, A; Matsuura, M; Noda, M; Katsumata, Y; Maehara, T; Tamura, S; Uzawa, T; Ishiko, T

    1988-05-01

    This paper reports on an autopsied case manifesting an esophageal cancer that had developed 13 years after radiotherapy for lung cancer. The patient was a 61-year-old man. He was found to have a squamous cell carcinoma of the right lower bronchus with a swelling of the mediastinal and left supraclavicular lymph nodes in July of 1973. He received 60 Gy of irradiation in the right lung, the mediastinum, and the left supraclavicular region. Later, after doing well until August of 1986, a squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus was found at the upper intrathoracic site. Thus, he also received additional radiotherapy but died of pneumonia after this local recurrence 7 months later. At autopsy, no local recurrence of the primary lung cancer was found. The site of esophageal cancer was far from that of the primary lung cancer though it was included in the previous treatment ports. This suggests the possibility that the primary esophageal cancer had been induced by therapeutic irradiation. So far as we know, this is the first report of esophageal cancer that may have developed after irradiation for lung cancer.

  2. Nanomedicine for Treatment of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Sajid

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the second most common cancer and the primary cause of cancer-related death in both men and women in the United States and rest of the world. Due to diagnosis at an advanced stage, it is associated with a high mortality in a majority of patients. In recent years, enormous advances have occurred in the development and application of nanotechnology in the detection, diagnosis, and therapy of cancer. This progress has led to the development of the emerging field of "cancer nanomedicine." Nanoparticle-based therapeutic systems have gained immense popularity due to their bioavailability, in vivo stability, intestinal absorption, solubility, sustained and targeted delivery, and therapeutic effectiveness of several anticancer agents. Currently, a plethora of nanocarrier formulations are utilized including lipid-based, polymeric and branched polymeric, metal-based, magnetic, and mesoporous silica. In lung cancer, nanoparticle-based therapeutics is paving the way in the diagnosis, imaging, screening, and treatment of primary and metastatic tumors. The application and expansion of novel nanocarriers for drug delivery is an exciting and challenging research filed, in particular for the delivery of emerging cancer therapies. Some of the current progress and challenges in nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems for lung cancer treatment are discussed.

  3. Lung cancer risk from radon in Ontario, Canada: how many lung cancers can we prevent?

    PubMed

    Peterson, Emily; Aker, Amira; Kim, JinHee; Li, Ye; Brand, Kevin; Copes, Ray

    2013-11-01

    To calculate the burden of lung cancer illness due to radon for all thirty-six health units in Ontario and determine the number of radon-attributable lung cancer deaths that could be prevented. We calculated the population attributable risk percent, excess life-time risk ratio, life-years lost, the number of lung cancer deaths due to radon, and the number of deaths that could be prevented if all homes above various cut-points were effectively reduced to background levels. It is estimated that 13.6 % (95 % CI 11.0, 16.7) of lung cancer deaths in Ontario are attributable to radon, corresponding to 847 (95 % CI 686, 1,039) lung cancer deaths each year, approximately 84 % of these in ever-smokers. If all homes above 200 Bq/m(3), the current Canadian guideline, were remediated to background levels, it is estimated that 91 lung cancer deaths could be prevented each year, 233 if remediation was performed at 100 Bq/m(3). There was important variation across health units. Radon is an important contributor to lung cancer deaths in Ontario. A large portion of radon-attributable lung cancer deaths are from exposures below the current Canadian guideline, suggesting interventions that install effective radon-preventive measures into buildings at build may be a good alternative population prevention strategy to testing and remediation. For some health units, testing and remediation may also prevent a portion of radon-related lung cancer deaths. Regional attributable risk estimates can help with local public health resource allocation and decision making.

  4. [Adenocarcinoma of lung cancer with solitary metastasis to the stomach].

    PubMed

    Koh, Sung Ae; Lee, Kyung Hee

    2014-09-25

    Although hematogenous metastasis of cancer to the gastrointestinal track is rare, it sometime has been reported in patients with malignant melanoma and breast cancer. However, it is extremely rare for lung cancer to metastasize to the stomach, not to mention solitary gastric metastasis. Herein, the authors report a case of a 69-year-old man who was initially diagnosed with lung cancer with synchronous primary gastric cancer which proved to be lung cancer with solitary gastric metastasis after the operation.

  5. [Diagnostic and therapeutic biomarkers for lung cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Seike, Masahiro; Gemma, Akihiko

    2012-05-01

    Identification of sensitive biomarkers predictive of diagnosis, prognosis and drug sensitivity could have a clinically significant impact on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment strategies. Recently, molecular-targeted therapies have been developed for NSCLC treatment. NSCLC patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations have shown a dramatic response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKI) such as gefitinib and erlotinib. In addition, target therapies against echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) fusion protein present in approximately 5% of the Japanese patients with adenocarcinomas are currently under development. In this paper, we reviewed diagnostic and therapeutic biomarkers for lung cancer patients.

  6. Knockdown of Merm1/Wbscr22 attenuates sensitivity of H460 non-small cell lung cancer cells to SN-38 and 5-FU without alteration to p53 expression levels.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dongmei; Zheng, Xiaoliang; Tu, Linglan; Jia, Jing; Li, Qin; Cheng, Liyan; Wang, Xiaoju

    2015-01-01

    Merm1/Wbscr22 is a novel metastasis promoter that has been shown to be involved in tumor metastasis, viability and apoptosis. To the best of our knowledge, there are currently no studies suggesting the possible correlation between the expression of Merm1/Wbscr22 in tumor cells and chemosensitivity to antitumor agents. In the present study, two human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, H1299 and H460, were used to investigate whether Merm1/Wbscr22 affects chemosensitivity to antitumor agents, including cisplatin (CDDP), doxorubicin (ADM), paclitaxel (PTX), mitomycin (MMC), 7-Ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38; the active metabolite of camptothecin) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Merm1/Wbscr22 knockdown cell lines (H1299-shRNA and H460-shRNA) and negative control cell lines (H1299-NC and H460-NC) were established by stable transfection, and the efficiency of Merm1/Wbscr22 knockdown was confirmed by western blotting, immunofluorescence microscopy and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results demonstrated that shRNA-mediated knockdown of Merm1/Wbscr22 did not affect cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The H460 cells harboring wild type p53 were markedly more sensitive to all six antitumor agents as compared with the p53-null H1299 cells. Downregulation of Merm1/Wbscr22 did not affect H1299 sensitivity to any of the six antitumor agents, whereas attenuated H460 sensitivity to SN-38 and 5-FU, without significant alteration in p53 at both mRNA and protein levels, was identified. The reduced H460 sensitivity to SN-38 was further confirmed in vivo. SN-38 demonstrated significant tumor growth inhibitory activity in both H460 and H460‑NC tumor xenograft models, but only marginally suppressed the H460-shRNA xenograft tumor growth. Furthermore, CDDP (4, 10, 15 µg/ml)-resistant human non-small lung cancer cells A549 (A549-CDDPr-4, 10, 15) expressed significant amounts of Merm1/Wbscr22 protein, as compared with the parental A549 cells. In conclusion, sh

  7. Small RNA combination therapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wen; Dahlman, James E; Tammela, Tuomas; Khan, Omar F; Sood, Sabina; Dave, Apeksha; Cai, Wenxin; Chirino, Leilani M; Yang, Gillian R; Bronson, Roderick; Crowley, Denise G; Sahay, Gaurav; Schroeder, Avi; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Jacks, Tyler

    2014-08-26

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and siRNAs have enormous potential as cancer therapeutics, but their effective delivery to most solid tumors has been difficult. Here, we show that a new lung-targeting nanoparticle is capable of delivering miRNA mimics and siRNAs to lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and to tumors in a genetically engineered mouse model of lung cancer based on activation of oncogenic Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Kras) and loss of p53 function. Therapeutic delivery of miR-34a, a p53-regulated tumor suppressor miRNA, restored miR-34a levels in lung tumors, specifically down-regulated miR-34a target genes, and slowed tumor growth. The delivery of siRNAs targeting Kras reduced Kras gene expression and MAPK signaling, increased apoptosis, and inhibited tumor growth. The combination of miR-34a and siRNA targeting Kras improved therapeutic responses over those observed with either small RNA alone, leading to tumor regression. Furthermore, nanoparticle-mediated small RNA delivery plus conventional, cisplatin-based chemotherapy prolonged survival in this model compared with chemotherapy alone. These findings demonstrate that RNA combination therapy is possible in an autochthonous model of lung cancer and provide preclinical support for the use of small RNA therapies in patients who have cancer.

  8. MALDI Profiling of Human Lung Cancer Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Nistal, Manuel; Calvo, Enrique; Madero, Rosario; Díaz, Esther; Camafeita, Emilio; de Castro, Javier; López, Juan Antonio; González-Barón, Manuel; Espinosa, Enrique; Fresno Vara, Juan Ángel

    2009-01-01

    Background Proteomics is expected to play a key role in cancer biomarker discovery. Although it has become feasible to rapidly analyze proteins from crude cell extracts using mass spectrometry, complex sample composition hampers this type of measurement. Therefore, for effective proteome analysis, it becomes critical to enrich samples for the analytes of interest. Despite that one-third of the proteins in eukaryotic cells are thought to be phosphorylated at some point in their life cycle, only a low percentage of intracellular proteins is phosphorylated at a given time. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work, we have applied chromatographic phosphopeptide enrichment techniques to reduce the complexity of human clinical samples. A novel method for high-throughput peptide profiling of human tumor samples, using Parallel IMAC and MALDI-TOF MS, is described. We have applied this methodology to analyze human normal and cancer lung samples in the search for new biomarkers. Using a highly reproducible spectral processing algorithm to produce peptide mass profiles with minimal variability across the samples, lineal discriminant-based and decision tree–based classification models were generated. These models can distinguish normal from tumor samples, as well as differentiate the various non–small cell lung cancer histological subtypes. Conclusions/Significance A novel, optimized sample preparation method and a careful data acquisition strategy is described for high-throughput peptide profiling of small amounts of human normal lung and lung cancer samples. We show that the appropriate combination of peptide expression values is able to discriminate normal lung from non-small cell lung cancer samples and among different histological subtypes. Our study does emphasize the great potential of proteomics in the molecular characterization of cancer. PMID:19890392

  9. Dark tobacco and lung cancer in Cuba.

    PubMed

    Joly, O G; Lubin, J H; Caraballoso, M

    1983-06-01

    A retrospective epidemiologic study of 826 cytologically and/or histologically confirmed lung cancer cases (219 females and 607 males), 979 hospital controls, and 539 neighborhood controls was undertaken in Havana, Cuba, to investigate whether the high lung cancer mortality rates in this country could be explained by the cigarette and cigar consumption habits, including the smoking of dark-tobacco cigarettes. Relative risk(s)(RR) of lung cancer among cigarette smokers were 7.3 in women and 14.1 in men and increased consistently with various measures of exposure to smoke. The findings suggested that duration of smoking, daily number of cigarettes consumed, and inhalation practices have independent effects. Most Cubans smoked dark tobacco. RR were higher for dark-tobacco users than for light-tobacco users (RR = 8.6 vs. 4.6 for women and 14.3 vs. 11.3 for men), but the differences were reduced after adjustment for amount smoked. Cigarette smoking was associated with all histologic types of lung cancer, although the risk for adenocarcinoma was lower than that for the other types. Men who smoked exclusively cigars had a fourfold risk of lung cancer. Mixed smokers (i.e., cigar and cigarette smoker) had a greater RR than cigarette-only smokers (15.0 vs. 14.1), which was perhaps related to the unusually deep and frequent inhalation of cigar smoke. The data support the hypothesis that smoking patterns account for the higher lung cancer mortality in Cuba than in other Latin American countries.

  10. The lung cancer nurse role in the management of paraneoplastic syndromes in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) associated with lung cancer are well recognised, are often complex to diagnose, and have minimal evidence to promote nursing and medical management. This paper aims to help guide lung cancer nurses to identify the most common and rarer PNS together with basic clinical management advice to help develop nursing assessments and interventions. The issues regarding the pathway of care at diagnosis together with palliative and supportive care requirements will be addressed and will aim to promote best practice in patients diagnosed with PNS and lung cancer. PMID:27413699

  11. Using a chemiresistor-based alkane sensor to distinguish exhaled breaths of lung cancer patients from subjects with no lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jiunn-Liang; Yong, Zheng-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background Breath alkanes are reported to be able to discriminate lung cancer patients from healthy people. A simple chemiresistor-based sensor was designed to respond to alkanes by a change in resistance measured by a digital multimeter connected to the sensor. In preclinical experiments, the sensor response was found to have a strong positive linear relationship with alkane compounds and not responsive to water. This study aimed to determine the ability of the alkane sensor to distinguish the exhaled breaths of lung cancer patients from that of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and control subjects without lung cancer. Methods In this cross-sectional study, 12 treatment-naive patients with lung cancer, 12 ex- or current smokers with COPD and 13 never-smokers without lung disease were asked to exhale through a drinking straw into a prototype breath-in apparatus made from an empty 125 mL Vitagen® bottle with the chemiresistor sensor attached at its inside bottom to measure the sensor peak output (percentage change of baseline resistance measured before exhalation to peak resistance) and the time taken for the baseline resistance to reach peak resistance. Results Analysis of multivariate variance and post-hoc Tukey test revealed that the peak output and the time to peak values for the lung cancer patients were statistically different from that for both the COPD patients and the controls without lung disease, Pillai’s Trace =0.393, F=3.909, df = (4, 64), P=0.007. A 2.20% sensor peak output and a 90-s time to peak gave 83.3% sensitivity and 88% specificity in diagnosing lung cancer. Tobacco smoking did not affect the diagnostic accuracy of the sensor. Conclusions The alkane sensor could discriminate patients with lung cancer from COPD patients and people without lung disease. Its potential utility as a simple, cheap and non-invasive test for early lung cancer detection needs further studies. PMID:27867553

  12. Using a chemiresistor-based alkane sensor to distinguish exhaled breaths of lung cancer patients from subjects with no lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jiunn-Liang; Yong, Zheng-Xin; Liam, Chong-Kin

    2016-10-01

    Breath alkanes are reported to be able to discriminate lung cancer patients from healthy people. A simple chemiresistor-based sensor was designed to respond to alkanes by a change in resistance measured by a digital multimeter connected to the sensor. In preclinical experiments, the sensor response was found to have a strong positive linear relationship with alkane compounds and not responsive to water. This study aimed to determine the ability of the alkane sensor to distinguish the exhaled breaths of lung cancer patients from that of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and control subjects without lung cancer. In this cross-sectional study, 12 treatment-naive patients with lung cancer, 12 ex- or current smokers with COPD and 13 never-smokers without lung disease were asked to exhale through a drinking straw into a prototype breath-in apparatus made from an empty 125 mL Vitagen(®) bottle with the chemiresistor sensor attached at its inside bottom to measure the sensor peak output (percentage change of baseline resistance measured before exhalation to peak resistance) and the time taken for the baseline resistance to reach peak resistance. Analysis of multivariate variance and post-hoc Tukey test revealed that the peak output and the time to peak values for the lung cancer patients were statistically different from that for both the COPD patients and the controls without lung disease, Pillai's Trace =0.393, F=3.909, df = (4, 64), P=0.007. A 2.20% sensor peak output and a 90-s time to peak gave 83.3% sensitivity and 88% specificity in diagnosing lung cancer. Tobacco smoking did not affect the diagnostic accuracy of the sensor. The alkane sensor could discriminate patients with lung cancer from COPD patients and people without lung disease. Its potential utility as a simple, cheap and non-invasive test for early lung cancer detection needs further studies.

  13. EGFR exon 20 insertion mutation in Japanese lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hidefumi; Endo, Katsuhiko; Takada, Minoru; Kawahara, Masaaki; Kitahara, Naoto; Tanaka, Hisaichi; Okumura, Meinoshin; Matsumura, Akihide; Iuchi, Keiji; Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Kawano, Osamu; Yukiue, Haruhiro; Yokoyama, Tomoki; Yano, Motoki; Fujii, Yoshitaka

    2007-12-01

    Mutations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene have been reported in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), especially in female, never smoker patients with adenocarcinoma. Some common somatic mutations in EGFR, including deletion mutations in exon 19 and leucine to arginine substitution at amino acid position 858 (L858R) in exon 21, have been examined for their ability to predict sensitivity to gefitinib or erlotinib. On the other hand, previous report has shown that the insertion mutation at exon 20 is related to gefitinib resistance. We investigated the exon 20 EGFR mutation statuses in 322 surgically treated non-small cell lung cancer cases. Two hundred and five adenocarcinoma cases were included. The presence or absence of EGFR mutations of kinase domains was analyzed by direct sequences. EGFR insertion mutations at exon 20 were found from 7 of 322 (2.17%) lung cancer patients. We also detected the 18 deletion type mutations in exon 19, and 25 L858R type mutations in exon 21. There was a tendency towards higher exon 20 insertion ratio in never smoker (never smoker 4.4% versus smoker 1.3%, p=0.0996) and female (female 4.5% versus male 1.3%, p=0.0917). Two exon 20 insertion cases were treated with gefitinib and failed to response. EGFR insertion mutation in exon 20 could not be ignored from Japanese lung cancers.

  14. Lung Cancer Screening Based on Type-different Sensor Arrays.

    PubMed

    Li, Wang; Liu, Hongying; Xie, Dandan; He, Zichun; Pi, Xititan

    2017-05-16

    In recent years, electronic nose (e-nose) systems have become a focus method for diagnosing pulmonary diseases such as lung cancer. However, principles and patterns of sensor responses in traditional e-nose systems are relatively homogeneous. Less study has been focused on type-different sensor arrays. In this paper, we designed a miniature e-nose system using 14 gas sensors of four types and its subsequent analysis of 52 breath samples. To investigate the performance of this system in identifying and distinguishing lung cancer from other respiratory diseases and healthy controls, five feature extraction algorithms and two classifiers were adopted. Lastly, the influence of type-different sensors on the identification ability of e-nose systems was analyzed. Results indicate that when using the LDA fuzzy 5-NN classification method, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of discriminating lung cancer patients from healthy controls with e-nose systems are 91.58%, 91.72% and 91.59%, respectively. Our findings also suggest that type-different sensors could significantly increase the diagnostic accuracy of e-nose systems. These results showed e-nose system proposed in this study was potentially practicable in lung cancer screening with a favorable performance. In addition, it is important for type-different sensors to be considered when developing e-nose systems.

  15. Survivorship Care Planning in Patients With Colorectal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-16

    Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  16. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor and Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsay, Junchieh J.; Tchou-Wong, Kam-Meng; Greenberg, Alissa K.; Pass, Harvey; Rom, William N.

    2013-01-01

    The leading cause of lung cancer is exposure to cigarette smoke and other environmental pollutants, which include formaldehyde, acrolein, benzene, dioxin, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAHs and dioxins are exogenous ligands that directly bind to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a transcription factor that activates xenobiotic metabolism, histone modification (an important step in DNA methylation), and, ultimately, tumorigenesis. Here we summarize the current understanding of AhR and its role in the development of lung cancer, including its influence on cell proliferation, angiogenesis, inflammation, and apoptosis. PMID:23564762

  17. [MANAGEMENT OF LUNG CANCER IN ELDERLY].

    PubMed

    Leduc, Charlotte; Quoix, Elisabeth

    2015-09-01

    In France, more than 50% of patients diagnosed with lung cancer are elderly but recommendations about their management are scant. Several patient characteristics, as comorbidities, age-related physiological variations of the main body functions, or eventual long-term treatments, are predictive of survival and must consider for therapeutic decision. The Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) is the best tool to evaluate elderly with lung cancer and to identify fit patients who are more likely to benefit from standard treatment from frail ones who are candidates for supportive care.

  18. Lung cancer of radiochemical industry workers

    SciTech Connect

    Khokhryakov, V.F.; Romanov, S.A.

    1993-12-31

    The frequency of lung cancers among 2346 radiochemical industry workers exposed to combined external {beta}-{gamma} and internal incorporated plutonium irradiation has been investigated. The results of observation were analyzed assuming the linear relative risk model taking into account prolongation of exposure. On the basis of the obtained data it was shown that life span incidence, of radiation-induced lung cancer is several times greater than 8.5 x 10{sup -3}Sv{sup -1}, which is recommended by ICRP Publication 60 to estimate the carcinogenic risk of organ exposure.

  19. Collateral sensitivity to gemcitabine (2',2'-difluorodeoxycytidine) and cytosine arabinoside of daunorubicin- and VM-26-resistant variants of human small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bergman, A M; Munch-Petersen, B; Jensen, P B; Sehested, M; Veerman, G; Voorn, D A; Smid, K; Pinedo, H M; Peters, G J

    2001-06-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR), characterized by a cross-resistance to many natural toxin-related compounds, may be caused either by overexpression of a drug efflux pump such as P-glycoprotein, (P-gP), multidrug resistance proteins MRP1-3, or BCRP/MXR or, in the case of DNA topoisomerase II active drugs, by a decrease in the enzymatic activity of the target molecule termed altered topoisomerase MDR (at-MDR). However, human small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) cell lines showed a collateral sensitivity to 2',2'-difluorodeoxycytidine (gemcitabine, dFdC) and 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C). H69/DAU, a daunorubicin (DAU)-resistant variant of H69 with a P-gP overexpression, and NYH/VM, a VM-26 (teniposide)-resistant variant of NYH with an at-MDR, were both 2-fold more sensitive to gemcitabine and 7- and 2-fold more sensitive to ara-C, respectively. MDR variants had a 4.3- and 2.0-fold increased activity of deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), respectively. dCK catalyzes the first rate-limiting activation step of both gemcitabine and ara-C. In addition, deoxycytidine deaminase, responsible for inactivation of dFdC and ara-C, was 9.0-fold lower in H69/DAU cells. The level of thymidine kinase 2, a mitochondrial enzyme that can also phosphorylate deoxycytidine and gemcitabine, was not significantly different between the variants. These differences most likely caused an increased accumulation of the active metabolites (dFdCTP, 2.1- and 1.6-fold in NYH/VM and H69/DAU cells, respectively) and of ara-CTP (1.3-fold in NYH/VM cells). Ara-CTP accumulation was not detectable in either H69 variant. The pools of all ribonucleoside and deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates were at least 3- to 4-fold higher in the NYH variants compared to the H69 variants; for dCTP and dGTP this difference was even larger. The higher ribonucleotide pools might explain the >10-fold higher accumulation of dFdCTP in NYH compared to H69 variants. Since dCTP is low, H69 cells might not need a high ara-CTP accumulation

  20. Knockdown of cullin 4A inhibits growth and increases chemosensitivity in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; You, Liang; Jablons, David M; Li, Ya-Chin; Mao, Jian-Hua; Xu, Zhidong; Lung, Jr-Hau; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Liu, Shih-Tung

    2016-07-01

    Cullin 4A (Cul4A) has been observed to be overexpressed in various cancers. In this study, the role of Cul4A in the growth and chemosensitivity in lung cancer cells were studied. We showed that Cul4A is overexpressed in lung cancer cells and tissues. Knockdown of the Cul4A expression by shRNA in lung cancer cells resulted in decreased cellular proliferation and growth in lung cancer cells. Increased sensitivity to gemcitabine, a chemotherapy drug, was also noted in those Cul4A knockdown lung cancer cells. Moreover, increased expression of p21, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β inducible early gene-1 (TIEG1) and TGF beta-induced (TGFBI) was observed in lung cancer cells after Cul4A knockdown, which may be partially related to increased chemosensitivity to gemcitabine. G0/G1 cell cycle arrest was also noted after Cul4A knockdown. Notably, decreased tumour growth and increased chemosensitivity to gemcitabine were also noted after Cul4A knockdown in lung cancer xenograft nude mice models. In summary, our study showed that targeting Cul4A with RNAi or other techniques may provide a possible insight to the development of lung cancer therapy in the future.

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Serum in Lung Cancer Induced by 3-Methylcholanthrene

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minhua; Ye, Bo; Zhang, Yuxia; Chen, Honglei; Xia, Dong; Liu, Mingqiu; Yang, Fei

    2009-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Early detection of lung cancer is problematic due to the lack of a marker with high diagnosis sensitivity and specificity. To determine the differently expressed proteins in the serum of lung cancer and figure out the function of the proteins, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) were used to screen the serum proteins of lung cancer model induced by 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA). From optimized 2DE image, 455 spots in the normal sera and 716 spots in the lung cancers sera were detected. Among them, 141 protein spots were differentially expressed when comparing the serum from normal rat and serum from lung cancer model, including 82 overexpressed proteins and 59 underexpressed proteins. Changes of haptoglobin, transthyretin, and TNF superfamily member 8 (TNFRS8) were confirmed in sera from lung cancer by MALDI-TOF-MS. Proteomics technology leads to identify changes of haptoglobin, transthyretin, and TNFRS8 in serum of rat lung cancer model and represents a powerful tool in searching for candidate proteins as biomarkers. PMID:19794824

  2. Magnitude of asbestos-related lung cancer mortality in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Marinaccio, A; Scarselli, A; Binazzi, A; Mastrantonio, M; Ferrante, P; Iavicoli, S

    2008-01-01

    An ecological study, based on a data set containing all lung and pleural cancer deaths in each Italian municipality in the period 1980–2001, was performed. The pleural to lung cancer ratio was estimated to be 1 : 1 and 3% (around 700) of all male lung cancer deaths were found to be asbestos-related. PMID:18577986

  3. 28 CFR 79.45 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.45... EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Miners § 79.45 Proof of primary lung cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following...

  4. 28 CFR 79.54 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.54... EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Millers § 79.54 Proof of primary lung cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following...

  5. 28 CFR 79.54 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.54... EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Millers § 79.54 Proof of primary lung cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following...

  6. 28 CFR 79.64 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.64... EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Ore Transporters § 79.64 Proof of primary lung cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following...

  7. 28 CFR 79.54 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.54... EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Millers § 79.54 Proof of primary lung cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following...

  8. 28 CFR 79.45 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.45... EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Miners § 79.45 Proof of primary lung cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following...

  9. 28 CFR 79.64 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.64... EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Ore Transporters § 79.64 Proof of primary lung cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following...

  10. 28 CFR 79.45 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.45... EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Miners § 79.45 Proof of primary lung cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following...

  11. 28 CFR 79.64 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.64... EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Ore Transporters § 79.64 Proof of primary lung cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following...

  12. Integrating smoking cessation into lung cancer screening programs.

    PubMed

    Pua, Bradley B; Dou, Eda; O'Connor, Katherine; Crawford, Carolyn B

    2016-01-01

    Early detection through low-dose computed tomographic screening for lung cancer and implementation of smoking cessation can reduce mortality related to lung cancer. While studies delineating the relationship between smoking cessation strategies and lung cancer screening programs remain sparse, we aim to review available data on their importance both individually and synergistically. Strategies and obstacles for implementation are also discussed.

  13. Lung cancer: the immune system and radiation.

    PubMed

    Mendes, F; Antunes, C; Abrantes, A M; Gonçalves, A C; Nobre-Gois, I; Sarmento, A B; Botelho, M F; Rosa, M S

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer has a known relationship with smoking and is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Although the number of studies discussing lung cancer is vast, treatment efficacy is still suboptimal due to the wide range of factors that affect patient outcome. This review aims to collect information on lung cancer treatment, specially focused on radiation therapy. It also compiles information regarding the influence of radiotherapy on the immune system and its response to tumour cells. It evaluates how immune cells react after radiation exposure and the influence of their cytokines in the tumour microenvironment. The literature analysis points out that the immune system is a very promising field of investigation regarding prognosis, mostly because the stromal microenvironment in the tumour can provide some information about what can succeed in the future concerning treatment choices and perspectives. T cells (CD4+ and CD8+), interleukin-8, vascular endothelial growth factor and transforming growth factor-β seem to have a key role in the immune response after radiation exposure. The lack of large scale studies means there is no common consensus in the scientific community about the role of the immune system in lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Clarification of the mechanism behind the immune response after radiation can lead to better treatments and better quality life for patients.

  14. Chemoprevention of lung cancer by tea.

    PubMed

    Clark, Julie; You, Ming

    2006-02-01

    Tea is the second only to water as the most consumed beverage in the world. Both green and black teas have been studied for their health benefits for a variety of diseases, particularly cancer. Lung cancer is the predominant cause of cancer mortality in developed countries. Smokers' risk of lung cancer is 20 times that of persons who have never smoked. Epidemiological studies on the cancer-preventive effects of tea produce inconsistent results, which could in part be attributed to the lack of a universal standard for tea preparations. However, most animal studies indicate that tea has strong chemopreventive effects against lung tumorigenesis. The reported mechanisms for chemopreventive activity of green tea are antioxidation, induction of phase II enzymes, inhibition of TNFalpha expression and release, inhibition of cell proliferation, and induction of apoptosis. Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induced by green tea are probably the two most significant factors. Future studies are needed to determine how green tea affects the genes associated with cell cycle regulation and apoptosis during the mouse lung carcinogenesis process.

  15. Lung Cancer Gene Signatures and Clinical Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kuner, Ruprecht

    2013-01-01

    Microarrays have been used for more than two decades in preclinical research. The tumor transcriptional profiles were analyzed to select cancer-associated genes for in-deep functional characterization, to stratify tumor subgroups according to the histopathology or diverse clinical courses, and to assess biological and cellular functions behind these gene sets. In lung cancer—the main type of cancer causing mortality worldwide—biomarker research focuses on different objectives: the early diagnosis of curable tumor diseases, the stratification of patients with prognostic unfavorable operable tumors to assess the need for further therapy regimens, or the selection of patients for the most efficient therapies at early and late stages. In non-small cell lung cancer, gene and miRNA signatures are valuable to differentiate between the two main subtypes’ squamous and non-squamous tumors, a discrimination which has further implications for therapeutic schemes. Further subclassification within adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma has been done to correlate histopathological phenotype with disease outcome. Those tumor subgroups were assigned by diverse transcriptional patterns including potential biomarkers and therapy targets for future diagnostic and clinical applications. In lung cancer, none of these signatures have entered clinical routine for testing so far. In this review, the status quo of lung cancer gene signatures in preclinical and clinical research will be presented in the context of future clinical perspectives. PMID:27605195

  16. Bromodomain and hedgehog pathway targets in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurmeet; Reinhart, Russell A; Monks, Anne; Evans, David; Morris, Joel; Polley, Eric; Teicher, Beverly A

    2016-02-28

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an extremely aggressive cancer that frequently recurs. Twenty-three human SCLC lines were selected representing varied Myc status. Gene expression of lung cancer, stem-like, hedgehog pathway, and notch pathway genes were determined by RT(2)-PCR array and Exon 1.0 ST array. Etoposide and topotecan concentration response was examined. The IC50's for etoposide and topotecan ranged over nearly 3 logs upon 96 hrs exposure to the drugs. Myc status, TOP2A, TOP2B and TOP1 mRNA expression or topoisomerase 1 and topoisomerase 2 protein did not account for the range in the sensitivity to the drugs. γ-secretase inhibitors, RO429097 and PF-03084014, had little activity in the SCLC lines over ranges covering the clinical Cmax concentrations. MYC amplified lines tended to be more sensitive to the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1. The Smo antagonists, erismodegib and vismodegib and the Gli antagonists, HPI1 and SEN-450 had a trend toward greater sensitivity of the MYC amplified line. Recurrent SCLC is among the most recalcitrant cancers and drug development efforts in this cancer are a high priority.

  17. Radiation Therapy, Chemotherapy, and Soy Isoflavones in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-23

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  18. Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  19. Biopsy of the sentinel node in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Uribe-Etxebarria Lugariza-Aresti, Naia; Barceló Galíndez, Ramón; Pac Ferrer, Joaquín; Méndez Martín, Jaime; Genollá Subirats, Jose; Casanova Viudez, Juan

    2017-03-22

    Mediastinal lymph node involvement can be understaged in cases of lung cancer (up to 20% in stage i). Sentinel node detection is a standard technique recommended in breast cancer and melanoma action guidelines, and could also be useful in cases of lung cancer. Considering the detection of the sentinel node in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as feasible, a prospective cohort study was carried out on 48 patients with resectable NSCLC, using the intraoperative injection of colloid sulphate technetium-99. The radioisotope migrated in all cases. The procedure's sensitivity was 88.24%, its accuracy was 95.83%, its negative predictive value was 93.94% and the false negative rate was 11.76%. No complications were associated with this technique. The detection of a sentinel node in NSCLC with the intraoperative injection of the isotope is feasible and safe, and allows for detection and sensitivity rates comparable to those of other tumour types. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is a functional molecular target in human lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Qian, Ming D.; Salameh, Ahmad; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Edwards, Julianna K.; Cimino, Daniel F.; Moeller, Benjamin J.; Kelly, Patrick; Nunez, Maria I.; Tang, Ximing; Liu, Diane D.; Lee, J. Jack; Hong, Waun Ki; Ferrara, Fortunato; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.; Lobb, Roy R.; Edelman, Martin J.; Sidman, Richard L.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2015-03-20

    Lung cancer is often refractory to radiotherapy, but molecular mechanisms of tumor resistance remain poorly defined. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is specifically overexpressed in lung cancer and is involved in regulating cellular responses to genotoxic insult. In the absence of EphA5, lung cancer cells displayed a defective G1/S cell cycle checkpoint, were unable to resolve DNA damage, and became radiosensitive. Upon irradiation, EphA5 was transported into the nucleus where it interacted with activated ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) at sites of DNA repair. In conclusion, we demonstrate that a new monoclonal antibody against human EphA5 sensitized lung cancer cells and human lung cancer xenografts to radiotherapy and significantly prolonged survival, thus suggesting the likelihood of translational applications.

  1. Non-targeted and targeted metabolomics approaches to diagnosing lung cancer and predicting patient prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Zhu, Xinyue; Wang, Caihong; Zhang, Haixia; Cai, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in China. We characterized metabolic alterations in lung cancer using two analytical platforms: a non-targeted metabolic profiling strategy based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy and a targeted metabolic profiling strategy based on rapid resolution liquid chromatography (RRLC). Changes in serum metabolite levels during oncogenesis were evaluated in 25 stage I lung cancer patients and matched healthy controls. We identified 25 metabolites that were differentially regulated between the lung cancer patients and matched controls. Of those, 16 were detected using the non-targeted approach and 9 were identified using the targeted approach. Both groups of metabolites could differentiate between lung cancer patients and healthy controls with 100% sensitivity and specificity. The principal metabolic alternations in lung cancer included changes in glycolysis, lipid metabolism, choline phospholipid metabolism, one-carbon metabolism, and amino acid metabolism. The targeted metabolomics approach was more sensitive, accurate, and specific than the non-targeted metabolomics approach. However, our data suggest that both metabolomics strategies could be used to detect early-stage lung cancer and predict patient prognosis. PMID:27566571

  2. Radiation sensitization in cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Greenstock, C.L.

    1981-02-01

    One possible benefit of stimulated oxygen consumption rendering aerobic cancer cells hypoxic, and the reductive sensitizer drug metabolism which has been found to be selective for hypoxic tissue, is that the resulting reductive metabolites are selectively toxic and may be useful in chemotherapy to kill sensitive hypoxic tumor cells. Radiation chemical, biochemical and pharmacological studies are continuing to provide additional information on drug delivery, metabolism and cytotoxicity, in order to select and evaluate clinically acceptable sensitizer drugs. Radiation chemical studies over the past decade have led to the development and selection of the nitroimidazoles, metronidazole and misonidazole for clinical evaluation in terms of improved cancer treatments. The results of ongoing clinical trials will, within the next few years, indicate how successful this application of basic radiation chemical research has been. 39 references are included. (JMT)

  3. Male tobacco smoke load and non-lung cancer mortality associations in Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Leistikow, Bruce N; Kabir, Zubair; Connolly, Gregory N; Clancy, Luke; Alpert, Hillel R

    2008-01-01

    Background Different methods exist to estimate smoking attributable cancer mortality rates (Peto and Ezzati methods, as examples). However, the smoking attributable estimates using these methods cannot be generalized to all population sub-groups. A simpler method has recently been developed that can be adapted and applied to different population sub-groups. This study assessed cumulative tobacco smoke damage (smoke load)/non-lung cancer mortality associations across time from 1979 to 2003 among all Massachusetts males and ages 30–74 years, using this novel methodology. Methods Annual lung cancer death rates were used as smoke load bio-indices, and age-adjusted lung/all other (non-lung) cancer death rates were analyzed with linear regression approach. Non-lung cancer death rates include all cancer deaths excluding lung. Smoking-attributable-fractions (SAFs) for the latest period (year 2003) were estimated as: 1-(estimated unexposed cancer death rate/observed rate). Results Male lung and non-lung cancer death rates have declined steadily since 1992. Lung and non-lung cancer death rates were tightly and steeply associated across years. The slopes of the associations analyzed were 1.69 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.35–2.04, r = 0.90), and 1.36 (CI 1.14–1.58, r = 0.94) without detected autocorrelation (Durbin-Watson statistic = 1.8). The lung/non-lung cancer death rate associations suggest that all-sites cancer death rate SAFs in year 2003 were 73% (Sensitivity Range [SR] 61–82%) for all ages and 74% (SR 61–82%) for ages 30–74 years. Conclusion The strong lung/non-lung cancer death rate associations suggest that tobacco smoke load may be responsible for most prematurely fatal cancers at both lung and non-lung sites. The present method estimates are greater than the earlier estimates. Therefore, tobacco control may reduce cancer death rates more than previously noted. PMID:19025639

  4. Non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Gridelli, Cesare; Rossi, Antonio; Carbone, David P; Guarize, Juliana; Karachaliou, Niki; Mok, Tony; Petrella, Francesco; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-05-21

    Lung cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers and is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a heterogeneous class of tumours, represents approximately 85% of all new lung cancer diagnoses. Tobacco smoking remains the main risk factor for developing this disease, but radon exposure and air pollution also have a role. Most patients are diagnosed with advanced-stage disease owing to inadequate screening programmes and late onset of clinical symptoms; consequently, patients have a very poor prognosis. Several diagnostic approaches can be used for NSCLC, including X-ray, CT and PET imaging, and histological examination of tumour biopsies. Accurate staging of the cancer is required to determine the optimal management strategy, which includes surgery, radiochemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted approaches with anti-angiogenic monoclonal antibodies or tyrosine kinase inhibitors if tumours harbour oncogene mutations. Several of these driver mutations have been identified (for example, in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)), and therapy continues to advance to tackle acquired resistance problems. Also, palliative care has a central role in patient management and greatly improves quality of life. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/rWYFgg.

  5. Interventional Analgesic Management of Lung Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hochberg, Uri; Elgueta, Maria Francisca; Perez, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the four most prevalent cancers worldwide. Comprehensive patient care includes not only adherence to clinical guidelines to control and when possible cure the disease but also appropriate symptom control. Pain is one of the most prevalent symptoms in patients diagnosed with lung cancer; it can arise from local invasion of chest structures or metastatic disease invading bones, nerves, or other anatomical structures potentially painful. Pain can also be a consequence of therapeutic approaches like surgery, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy. Conventional medical management of cancer pain includes prescription of opioids and coadjuvants at doses sufficient to control the symptoms without causing severe drug effects. When an adequate pharmacological medical management fails to provide satisfactory analgesia or when it causes limiting side effects, interventional cancer pain techniques may be considered. Interventional pain management is devoted to the use of invasive techniques such as joint injections, nerve blocks and/or neurolysis, neuromodulation, and cement augmentation techniques to provide diagnosis and treatment of pain syndromes resistant to conventional medical management. Advantages of interventional approaches include better analgesic outcomes without experiencing drug-related side effects and potential for opioid reduction thus avoiding central side effects. This review will describe various pain syndromes frequently described in lung cancer patients and those interventional techniques potentially indicated for those cases. PMID:28261561

  6. Expression of pleiotrophin in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, H Q; Wang, J

    2015-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a kind of heparin binding growth factor closely related to tumor progression. This study aimed to discuss the significance of the expression of PTN in benign and malignant lung cancer tissues, especially small cell lung cancer. Lung cancer samples were collected for study and lung tissue samples with benign lesions were taken as controls. The expression of PTN was detected using tissue chip combined with the immunohistochemical method, and the differences of small cell lung cancer with non-small cell lung cancer and benign lesion tissue were compared. It was found that PTN expression was mainly located in the cytoplasm and membrane of cells; PTN expression in the lung cancer group was higher than that in the control group (p < 0.01), and PTN expression in the small cell cancer group was higher than that in the squamous carcinoma group and glandular cancer group (p < 0.05). In addition, PTN expression quantity in patients with lung cancer were in close correlation with TNM staging, pathological type and tumor differentiation degree (p < 0.05). PTN was found to express abnormally high in lung cancer, especially small cell lung cancer tissue. PTN is most likely to be a new tumor marker for diagnosis and prognosis of lung cancer.

  7. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care.

    PubMed

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David; Beckett, Paul; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Gaga, Mina; Gamarra, Fernando; Grigoriu, Bogdan; Hansen, Niels C G; Hubbard, Richard; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Jakobsen, Erik; Jovanovic, Dragana; Konsoulova, Assia; Kollmeier, Jens; Massard, Gilbert; McPhelim, John; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Milroy, Robert; Paesmans, Marianne; Peake, Mick; Putora, Paul-Martin; Scherpereel, Arnaud; Schönfeld, Nicolas; Sitter, Helmut; Skaug, Knut; Spiro, Stephen; Strand, Trond-Eirik; Taright, Samya; Thomas, Michael; van Schil, Paul E; Vansteenkiste, Johan F; Wiewrodt, Rainer; Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2014-05-01

    Lung cancer is the commonest cause of cancer-related death worldwide and poses a significant respiratory disease burden. Little is known about the provision of lung cancer care across Europe. The overall aim of the Task Force was to investigate current practice in lung cancer care across Europe. The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a feasibility study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed wide variation in content and scope, as well as methodological quality but at the same time there was relevant duplication. The feasibility study demonstrated that it is, in principle, feasible to collect prospective demographic and clinical data on patients with lung cancer. Legal obligations vary among countries. The European Initiative for Quality Management in Lung Cancer Care has provided the first comprehensive snapshot of lung cancer care in Europe.

  8. Targeted Magnetic Hyperthermia for Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    demand response. Magnetic hyperthermia is particularly suitable for the treatment of lung cancer since unlike the abdomen , the thoracic region, where...When a nucleus of spin 1/2, 505such as 1H of water or fat molecules, is placed in a time 506invariant magnetic field (Bo), the z-component of the nucle

  9. Outdoor air pollution and lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, A J

    2000-01-01

    In the 1950s evidence of an ongoing epidemic of lung cancer in the United States and Western Europe led researchers to examine the role of outdoor air pollution, which was considered by some to be a likely cause. Although epidemiologic research quickly identified the central role of cigarette smoking in this epidemic, and despite progress in reducing outdoor air pollution in Western industrialized countries, concerns that ambient air pollution is causing lung cancer have persisted to the present day. This concern is based on the fact that known carcinogens continue to be released into outdoor air from industrial sources, power plants, and motor vehicles, and on a body of epidemiologic research that provides some evidence for an association between outdoor air pollution and lung cancer. This article reviews the epidemiologic evidence for this association and discusses the limitations of current studies for estimating the lung cancer risk in the general population. It also identifies research needs and suggests possible approaches to addressing outstanding questions. PMID:10931793

  10. Gene variant linked to lung cancer risk

    Cancer.gov

    A variation of the gene NFKB1, called rs4648127, is associated with an estimated 44 percent reduction in lung cancer risk. When this information, derived from samples obtained as part of a large NCI-sponsored prevention clinical trial, was compared with d

  11. [Stereotactic ablative irradiation for lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Antoni, D; Srour, I; Noël, G; Mornex, F

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy for lung cancer is a technique that is now well established in the therapeutic arsenal. Protocols are effective, with very high local control rate and an acceptable rate of survival if one takes into account the patient's age and comorbidities. Complications are rare. This review of the literature analyses the whole process of the therapeutic indications and future prospects.

  12. Lung cancer from passive smoking at work.

    PubMed Central

    Wells, A J

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken to determine whether exposure at work to environmental tobacco smoke is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. METHODS: Data from 14 studies providing information on lung cancer and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke at work were examined. Six quality criteria were developed for determining usable data. A meta-analysis was performed to obtain a combined risk for those data that met the quality restrictions. RESULTS: Five studies met the quality standards. Their combined relative risk was 1.39 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.15, 1.68) based on 835 lung cancer cases. In various meta-analyses prepared by tobacco industry employees or consultants, no increase in risk was found. The main reason for this difference is that the earlier analysts failed to find errors in 2 underlying studies that resulted in overweighting of the odds ratios from those studies, both of which were less than unity. CONCLUSIONS: When appropriate cognizance is taken of the quality of data inputs, the increase in lung cancer risk from workplace exposure to environmental tobacco smoke is about the same as that from household exposure. PMID:9663148

  13. Comparative analysis of cell morphology in sputum samples homogenized with dithiothreitol, N-acetyl-L cysteine, Cytorich(®) red preservative and in cellblock preparations to enhance the sensitivity of sputum cytology for the diagnosis of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Saraswathy Veena, Vamadevan; Sara George, Preethi; Jayasree, Kattoor; Sujathan, Kunjuraman

    2015-07-01

    Lung cancer claims highest rate of cancer related mortality worldwide, mainly due to late diagnosis and distant metastasis. Sputum cytology is the simplest, non-invasive and cost effective technique but it has low sensitivity due to lack of robust processing methods to retrieve all the diagnostic materials clogged in mucus, inflammatory exudates and blood. This study have compared conventional pick and smear method of sputum processing with samples prepared by homogenization methods using N-acetyl-l-cysteine, Dithiothreitol (DTT), CytoRich red solution and cell blocks (CBs) with respect to screening time, quality of staining, cellularity, smear background, nuclear and cytoplasmic morphology preservation, and diagnostic efficacy. The significance of CB prepared from homogenised samples for immunocytochemistry, protein extraction, Genomic DNA and RNA extraction were also evaluated on a cohort 3,185 samples. The significance of the morphological features in each of the techniques was statistically analysed using SPSS 11 software. The smear background clarity, staining quality and diagnostic efficacy of samples processed in red solution was found to be superior to the conventional method (P < 0.0001), where as samples homogenized in DTT showed a better cellularity (P < 0.0001). CBs prepared from samples homogenized in red solution were found to be very significant (P < 0.0001) in increasing the diagnostic efficacy compared to other two methods. Immunocytochemistry and DNA extraction were found possible in CBs as well as from the cell suspension. A combined analysis of smears and CBs found to improve the sensitivity of sputum cytology. The study suggests homogenization of sputum in CytoRich ® red solution and cellblock preparations routinely for all samples to improve the sensitivity of sputum cytology. IHC and DNA extraction can be performed in sputum samples suggesting the role of sputum samples for ancillary techniques. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Breath gas aldehydes as biomarkers of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Patricia; Loeseken, Christian; Schubert, Jochen K; Miekisch, Wolfram

    2010-06-01

    There is experimental evidence that volatile substances in human breath can reflect presence of neoplasma. Volatile aldehydes were determined in exhaled breath of 12 lung cancer patients, 12 smokers and 12 healthy volunteers. Alveolar breath samples were collected under control of expired CO(2). Reactive aldehydes were transformed into stable oximes by means of on-fiber-derivatization (SPME-OFD). Aldehyde concentrations in the ppt and ppb level were determined by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Exhaled concentrations were corrected for inspired values. Exhaled C(1)-C(10) aldehydes could be detected in all healthy volunteers, smokers and lung cancer patients. Concentrations ranged from 7 pmol/l (161 pptV) for butanal to 71 nmol/l (1,582 ppbV) for formaldehyde. Highest inspired concentrations were found for formaldehyde and acetaldehyde (0-55 nmol/l and 0-13 nmol/l, respectively). Acetaldehyde, propanal, butanal, heptanal and decanal concentrations showed no significant differences for cancer patients, smokers and healthy volunteers. Exhaled pentanal, hexanal, octanal and nonanal concentrations were significantly higher in lung cancer patients than in smokers and healthy controls (p(pentanal) = 0.001; p(hexanal) = 0.006; p(octanal) = 0.014; p(nonanal) = 0.025). Sensitivity and specificity of this method were comparable to the diagnostic certitude of conventional serum markers and CT imaging. Lung cancer patients could be identified by means of exhaled pentanal, hexanal, octanal and nonanal concentrations. Exhaled aldehydes reflect aspects of oxidative stress and tumor-specific tissue composition and metabolism. Noninvasive recognition of lung malignancies may be realized if analytical skills, biochemical knowledge and medical expertise are combined into a joint effort.

  15. Multimodal imaging of lung cancer and its microenvironment (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri, Lida P.; Niederst, Matthew J.; Mulvey, Hillary; Adams, David C.; Hu, Haichuan; Chico Calero, Isabel; Szabari, Margit V.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Bouma, Brett E.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Despite significant advances in targeted therapies for lung cancer, nearly all patients develop drug resistance within 6-12 months and prognosis remains poor. Developing drug resistance is a progressive process that involves tumor cells and their microenvironment. We hypothesize that microenvironment factors alter tumor growth and response to targeted therapy. We conducted in vitro studies in human EGFR-mutant lung carcinoma cells, and demonstrated that factors secreted from lung fibroblasts results in increased tumor cell survival during targeted therapy with EGFR inhibitor, gefitinib. We also demonstrated that increased environment stiffness results in increased tumor survival during gefitinib therapy. In order to test our hypothesis in vivo, we developed a multimodal optical imaging protocol for preclinical intravital imaging in mouse models to assess tumor and its microenvironment over time. We have successfully conducted multimodal imaging of dorsal skinfold chamber (DSC) window mice implanted with GFP-labeled human EGFR mutant lung carcinoma cells and visualized changes in tumor development and microenvironment facets over time. Multimodal imaging included structural OCT to assess tumor viability and necrosis, polarization-sensitive OCT to measure tissue birefringence for collagen/fibroblast detection, and Doppler OCT to assess tumor vasculature. Confocal imaging was also performed for high-resolution visualization of EGFR-mutant lung cancer cells labeled with GFP, and was coregistered with OCT. Our results demonstrated that stromal support and vascular growth are essential to tumor progression. Multimodal imaging is a useful tool to assess tumor and its microenvironment over time.

  16. Lung cancer in HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, R; Lebrón, J; Guerrero-León, M; Del Arco, A; Colmenero, J; Márquez, M; Santos, J

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Several studies have shown that HIV patients are at higher risk of lung cancer. Our aim is to analyse the prevalence and features of lung cancer in HIV-infected patients. Methods The clinical charts of 4,721 HIV-infected patients seen in three hospitals of southeast Spain (study period 1992–2012) were reviewed, and all patients with a lung cancer were analysed. Results There were 61 lung cancers, giving a prevalence of 1.2%. There was a predominance of men (82.0%), and smokers (96.6%; mean pack-years 35.2), with a median age of 48.0 (41.7–52.9) years, and their distribution according to risk group for HIV was: intravenous drug use 58.3%, homosexual 20.0%, and heterosexual 16.7%. Thirty-four (56.7%) patients were Aids cases, and 29 (47.5%) had prior pulmonar events: tuberculosis 16, bacterial pneumonia 9, and P. jiroveci pneumonia 4. The median nadir CD4 count was 149/mm3 (42–232), the median CD4 count at the time of diagnosis of the lung cancer was 237/mm3 (85–397), and 66.1%<350/mm3. 66.7% were on ART, and 70% of them had undetectable HIV viral load. The most common histological types of lung cancer were adenocarcinoma and epidermoid, with 24 (40.0%) and 23 (38.3%) cases, respectively. There were 49 (80.3%) cases with advanced stages (III and IV) at diagnosis. The distribution of treatments was: only palliative 23 (39.7%), chemotherapy 14 (24.1%), surgery and chemotherapy 8 (13.8%), radiotherapy 7 (12.1%), surgery 4 (6.9%), and other combined treatments 2 (3.4%). Forty-six (76.7%) patients died, with a median survival time of 3 months. The Kaplan-Meier survival rate at 6 months was 42.7% (at 12 months 28.5%). Conclusions The prevalence of lung cancer in this cohort of HIV-patients is high. People affected are mainly men, smokers, with transmission of HIV by intravenous drug use, and around half of them with prior opportunistic pulmonary events. Most patients had low nadir CD4 count, and were immunosuppressed at the time of diagnosis. Adenocarcinoma

  17. Lung Cancer Risk Models for Screening (R package: lcrisks)

    Cancer.gov

    In both the absence and presence of screening, the R package lcrisks, calculates individual risks of lung cancer and lung cancer death based on covariates: age, education, sex, race, smoking intensity/duration/quit-years, Body Mass Index, family history of lung-cancer, and self-reported emphysema. In the presence of CT screening akin to the NLST (3 yearly screens, 5 years of follow-up), it uses the covariates to estimate risk of false-positive CT screen as well as the reduction in risk of lung cancer death and increase in risk of lung cancer screening.

  18. Age and the treatment of lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J S; Eraut, D; Trask, C; Davison, A G

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The average age of patients with lung cancer is increasing and there are large numbers of elderly symptomatic patients with this common disease. However, there are few data on how the treatment of this group differs from that of younger patients. METHODS: From 1 January 1990 information was collected for the Southend Lung Cancer Registry on all patients with a diagnosis of lung cancer in a geographically well defined health district of the UK with a population of 325,000. Every effort was made to find new cases from all departments of the hospital, including all clinical diagnoses, histopathological and cytological reports, and necropsies. All death certificates in the district were examined, irrespective of age, for any diagnosis of lung cancer. This therefore included any patient not seen by the hospital services. The differences in initial treatment have been analysed for three age groups: under 65, 65-74 years, and over 75. RESULTS: The 563 cases of lung cancer diagnosed during a 30 month period were included in the study, of whom 240 (43%) were aged over 75 years. The overall mean age was 71 years (range 31-95). The incidence of lung cancer in the general population was 69 per 100,000, but in men over 75 years of age it rose to 751 per 100,000. For all patients the active treatment rate (chemotherapy, surgery, or radiotherapy) was 49%, but for patients not reviewed by a chest physician (n = 86) it was only 21%. There were large differences in initial treatment between age groups. For patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) reviewed by a chest physician, surgery was undertaken in 18% of those under 65, 12% of the 65-74 age group, and 2.1% of those over 75. For patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) reviewed by a chest physician, 79% of those aged under 65, 64% of the 65-74 age group, and 41% of patients aged over 75 received chemotherapy. In patients with NSCLC reviewed by a chest physician, chemotherapy was given to 21% under 65, 6

  19. Quantification of serum MET in non-small-cell lung cancer and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Li, Detao; Li, Fengzeng; Wu, Yanfeng; Zhou, Dandan; Chen, Hui

    2015-02-01

    Mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (MET) plays a critical role in the development and progression of lung cancer. We aimed to quantify the level of serum MET DNA, analyze its diagnostic value, and provide a novel biomarker for lung cancer. Serum MET DNA was extracted from 95 patients with lung cancer, 10 with benign lung diseases, and 34 healthy volunteers. MET DNA was quantified using real-time fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR). Data were analyzed using statistical software SPSS 17.0. Serum MET DNA level in the lung cancer group was higher than in the healthy group and benign lung diseases group. Serum MET DNA level was higher in lung cancers patients with smoking, squamous cell carcinoma, advanced TNM stage, and increased tumor size. The difference in serum MET DNA level was not related to sex, age, and lymph node metastasis among the lung cancer patients. The receiver operating characteristic curve showed a sensitivity of 72.6% and specificity of 90.9% for the ability of serum MET DNA to detect lung cancer at the cutoff value of 1.30 × 10(4) copies/μL. The association of serum MET DNA level with existing clinical lung tumor markers was analyzed, including neuron-specific enolase, squamous cell carcinoma antigen, and cytokeratin fragment 21-1. With the combination of serum MET DNA, the sensitivity was raised from 39.1%, 24.9%, 66.1% to 83.3%, 79.4% and 90.7%, respectively. Quantification of serum MET DNA by FQ-PCR may serve as a novel accessible diagnostic tool for the clinical screening and detection of lung cancer. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Lung Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  1. Lung Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  2. Digital tomosynthesis in lung cancer: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Viti, Andrea; Terzi, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a limited angle image tomography, which improves the visibility of anatomy compared with radiographic imaging. Due to the limited acquisition angle of CDT, it has the potential to significantly increase the temporal resolution of patient surveillance at the cost of reduced resolution in one direction. CDT is 3 times more effective in identifying pulmonary nodules compared to conventional radiography and at lower doses and cost compared with routine chest computed tomography (CT) examinations. There is only one report in which CDT was used in a single-arm observational study for lung cancer detection in at-risk population while a few studies suggested that CDT sensitivity is superior to radiography but inferior to CT in detecting lung nodules, other studies on the accuracy of CDT suggest that the specificity is much closer to CT than radiography. Therefore, large-scale randomized controlled trial would be needed to confirm benefits of CDT and identify where it is best used in the clinical setting. CDT seems to be a cost-effectiveness first-line lung cancer screening tool to detect potential lung cancer nodule. PMID:26207232

  3. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Colon, Pancreatic, or Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer

  4. Deaths in Canada from lung cancer due to involuntary smoking.

    PubMed Central

    Wigle, D T; Collishaw, N E; Kirkbride, J; Mao, Y

    1987-01-01

    Recently published evidence indicates that involuntary smoking causes an increased risk of lung cancer among nonsmokers. Information was compiled on the proportion of people who had never smoked among victims of lung cancer, the risk of lung cancer for nonsmokers married to smokers and the prevalence of such exposure. On the basis of these data we estimate that 50 to 60 of the deaths from lung cancer in Canada in 1985 among people who had never smoked were caused by spousal smoking; about 90% occurred in women. The total number of deaths from lung cancer attributable to exposure to tobacco smoke from spouses and other sources (mainly the workplace) was derived by applying estimated age- and sex-specific rates of death from lung cancer attributable to such exposure to the population of Canadians who have never smoked; about 330 deaths from lung cancer annually are attributable to such exposure. PMID:3567810

  5. Breath sensors for lung cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Adiguzel, Yekbun; Kulah, Haluk

    2015-03-15

    The scope of the applications of breath sensors is abundant in disease diagnosis. Lung cancer diagnosis is a well-fitting health-related application of this technology, which is of utmost importance in the health sector, because lung cancer has the highest death rate among all cancer types, and it brings a high yearly global burden. The aim of this review is first to provide a rational basis for the development of breath sensors for lung cancer diagnostics from a historical perspective, which will facilitate the transfer of the idea into the rapidly evolving sensors field. Following examples with diagnostic applications include colorimetric, composite, carbon nanotube, gold nanoparticle-based, and surface acoustic wave sensor arrays. These select sensor applications are widened by the state-of-the-art developments in the sensors field. Coping with sampling sourced artifacts and cancer staging are among the debated topics, along with the other concerns like proteomics approaches and biomimetic media utilization, feature selection for data classification, and commercialization.

  6. Smoking, p53 mutation, and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Don L; Byers, Lauren A; Kurie, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    This issue marks the 50th anniversary of the release of the U.S. Surgeon General's Report on Smoking and Health. Perhaps no other singular event has done more to highlight the effects of smoking on the development of cancer. Tobacco exposure is the leading cause of cancers involving the oral cavity, conductive airways, and the lung. Owing to the many carcinogens in tobacco smoke, smoking-related malignancies have a high genome-wide burden of mutations, including in the gene encoding for p53. The p53 protein is the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor in cancer, responsible for a range of critical cellular functions that are compromised by the presence of a mutation. Herein, we review the epidemiologic connection between tobacco exposure and cancer, the molecular basis of p53 mutation in lung cancer, and the normal molecular and cellular roles of p53 that are abrogated during lung tumor development and progression as defined by in vitro and in vivo studies. We also consider the therapeutic potential of targeting mutant p53 in a clinical setting based upon the cellular role of mutant p53 and data from genetic murine models.

  7. Integrative radiogenomic profiling of squamous cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abazeed, Mohamed E.; Adams, Drew J.; Hurov, Kristen E.; Tamayo, Pablo; Creighton, Chad J.; Sonkin, Dmitriy; Giacomelli, Andrew O.; Du, Charles; Fries, Daniel F.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Mesirov, Jill P.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Meyerson, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy is one of the mainstays of anti-cancer treatment, but the relationship between the radiosensitivity of cancer cells and their genomic characteristics is still not well-defined. Here we report the development of a high-throughput platform for measuring radiation survival in vitro and its validation by comparison to conventional clonogenic radiation survival analysis. We combined results from this high-throughput assay with genomic parameters in cell lines from squamous cell lung carcinoma, which is standardly treated by radiation therapy, to identify parameters that predict radiation sensitivity. We showed that activation of NFE2L2, a frequent event in lung squamous cancers, confers radiation resistance. An expression-based, in silico screen nominated inhibitors of PI3K as NFE2L2 antagonists. We showed that the selective PI3K inhibitor, NVP-BKM120, both decreased NRF2 protein levels and sensitized NFE2L2 or KEAP1 mutant cells to radiation. We then combined results from this high-throughput assay with single-sample gene set enrichment analysis (ssGSEA) of gene expression data. The resulting analysis identified pathways implicated in cell survival, genotoxic stress, detoxification, and innate and adaptive immunity as key correlates of radiation sensitivity. The integrative, high-throughput methods shown here for large-scale profiling of radiation survival and genomic features of solid-tumor derived cell lines should facilitate tumor radiogenomics and the discovery of genotype-selective radiation sensitizers and protective agents. PMID:23980093

  8. Evaluating efficacy of current lung cancer screening guidelines.

    PubMed

    Nemesure, Barbara; Plank, April; Reagan, Lisa; Albano, Denise; Reiter, Michael; Bilfinger, Thomas V

    2017-01-01

    Objective Current lung cancer screening criteria based primarily on outcomes from the National Lung Screening Trial may not adequately capture all subgroups of the population at risk. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of lung cancer screening criteria recommended by the United States Preventive Services Task Force, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network in identifying known cases of lung cancer. Methods An investigation of the Stony Brook Cancer Center Lung Cancer Evaluation Center's database identified 1207 eligible, biopsy-proven lung cancer cases diagnosed between January 1996 and March 2016. Age at diagnosis, smoking history, and other known risk factors for lung cancer were used to determine the proportion of cases that would have met current United States Preventive Services Task Force, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, and National Comprehensive Cancer Network eligibility requirements for lung cancer screening. Results Of the 1046 ever smokers in the study, 40% did not meet the National Lung Screening Trial age requirements, 20% did not have a ≥30 pack year smoking history, and approximately one-third quit smoking >15 years before diagnosis, thus deeming them ineligible for screening. Applying the United States Preventive Services Task Force, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, and National Comprehensive Cancer Network eligibility criteria to the Stony Brook Cancer Center's Lung Cancer Evaluation Center cases, 49.2, 46.3, and 69.8%, respectively, would have met the current lung cancer screening guidelines. Conclusions The United States Preventive Services Task Force and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services eligibility criteria for lung cancer screening captured less than 50% of lung cancer cases in this investigation. These findings highlight the need to reevaluate the efficacy of current guidelines and may have major public health implications.

  9. Steroid receptor coactivator-3 expression in lung cancer and its role in the regulation of cancer cell survival and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Di; Shames, David S; Raso, Maria Gabriela; Xie, Yang; Kim, Young H; Pollack, Jonathan R; Girard, Luc; Sullivan, James P; Gao, Boning; Peyton, Michael; Nanjundan, Meera; Byers, Lauren; Heymach, John; Mills, Gordon; Gazdar, Adi F; Wistuba, Ignacio; Kodadek, Thomas; Minna, John D

    2010-08-15

    Steroid receptor coactivator-3 (SRC-3) is a histone acetyltransferase and nuclear hormone receptor coactivator, located on 20q12, which is amplified in several epithelial cancers and well studied in breast cancer. However, its possible role in lung cancer pathogenesis is unknown. We found SRC-3 to be overexpressed in 27% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients (n = 311) by immunohistochemistry, which correlated with poor disease-free (P = 0.0015) and overall (P = 0.0008) survival. Twenty-seven percent of NSCLCs exhibited SRC-3 gene amplification, and we found that lung cancer cell lines expressed higher levels of SRC-3 than did immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC), which in turn expressed higher levels of SRC-3 than did cultured primary human HBECs. Small interfering RNA-mediated downregulation of SRC-3 in high-expressing, but not in low-expressing, lung cancer cells significantly inhibited tumor cell growth and induced apoptosis. Finally, we found that SRC-3 expression is inversely correlated with gefitinib sensitivity and that SRC-3 knockdown results in epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant lung cancers becoming more sensitive to gefitinib. Taken together, these data suggest that SRC-3 may be an important oncogene and therapeutic target for lung cancer. (c)2010 AACR.

  10. LUNG CANCER IN NEVER SMOKERS: MOLECULAR PROFILES AND THERAPEUTIC IMPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Rudin, Charles M.; Avila-Tang, Erika; Harris, Curtis C.; Herman, James G.; Hirsch, Fred R.; Pao, William; Schwartz, Ann G.; Vahakangas, Kirsi H.; Samet, Jonathan M.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of lung cancers are caused by long term exposure to the several classes of carcinogens present in tobacco smoke. While a significant fraction of lung cancers in never smokers may also be attributable to tobacco, many such cancers arise in the absence of detectable tobacco exposure, and may follow a very different cellular and molecular pathway of malignant transformation. Recent studies summarized here suggest that lung cancers arising in never smokers have a distinct natural history, profile of oncogenic mutations, and response to targeted therapy. The majority of molecular analyses of lung cancer have focused on genetic profiling of pathways responsible for metabolism of primary tobacco carcinogens. Limited research has been conducted evaluating familial aggregation and genetic linkage of lung cancer, particularly among never smokers in whom such associations might be expected to be strongest. Data emerging over the past several years demonstrates that lung cancers in never smokers are much more likely to carry activating mutations of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR), a key oncogenic factor and direct therapeutic target of several newer anti-cancer drugs. EGFR mutant lung cancers may represent a distinct class of lung cancers, enriched in the never smoking population, and less clearly linked to direct tobacco carcinogenesis. These insights followed initial testing and demonstration of efficacy of EGFR-targeted drugs. Focused analysis of molecular carcinogenesis in lung cancers in never smokers is needed, and may provide additional biologic insight with therapeutic implications for lung cancers in both ever smokers and never smokers. PMID:19755392

  11. Cutaneous manifestations of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Owen, Cindy England

    2016-06-01

    Skin findings can serve as a clue to internal disease. In this article, cutaneous manifestations of underlying lung malignancy are reviewed. Paraneoplastic dermatoses are rare, but when recognized early, can lead to early diagnosis of an underlying neoplasm. Malignancy-associated dermatoses comprise a broad group of hyperproliferative and inflammatory disorders, disorders caused by tumor production of hormonal or metabolic factors, autoimmune connective tissue diseases, among others. In this review, paraneoplastic syndromes associated with lung malignancy are discussed, including ectopic ACTH syndrome, bronchial carcinoid variant syndrome, secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy/digital clubbing, erythema gyratum repens, malignant acanthosis nigricans, sign of Leser-Trélat, tripe palms, hypertrichosis lanuginosa, acrokeratosis paraneoplastica, and dermatomyositis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Air pollution affects lung cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Eckel, Sandrah P; Cockburn, Myles; Shu, Yu-Hsiang; Deng, Huiyu; Lurmann, Frederick W; Liu, Lihua; Gilliland, Frank D

    2016-10-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollutants has been associated with increased lung cancer incidence and mortality, but due to the high case fatality rate, little is known about the impacts of air pollution exposures on survival after diagnosis. This study aimed to determine whether ambient air pollutant exposures are associated with the survival of patients with lung cancer. Participants were 352 053 patients with newly diagnosed lung cancer during 1988-2009 in California, ascertained by the California Cancer Registry. Average residential ambient air pollutant concentrations were estimated for each participant's follow-up period. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate HRs relating air pollutant exposures to all-cause mortality overall and stratified by stage (localised only, regional and distant site) and histology (squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, small cell carcinoma, large cell carcinoma and others) at diagnosis, adjusting for potential individual and area-level confounders. Adjusting for histology and other potential confounders, the HRs associated with 1 SD increases in NO2, O3, PM10, PM2.5 for patients with localised stage at diagnosis were 1.30 (95% CI 1.28 to 1.32), 1.04 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.05), 1.26 (95% CI 1.25 to 1.28) and 1.38 (95% CI 1.35 to 1.41), respectively. Adjusted HRs were smaller in later stages and varied by histological type within stage (p<0.01, except O3). The largest associations were for patients with early-stage non-small cell cancers, particularly adenocarcinomas. These epidemiological findings support the hypothesis that air pollution exposures after lung cancer diagnosis shorten survival. Future studies should evaluate the impacts of exposure reduction. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Osimertinib making a breakthrough in lung cancer targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haijun

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are the evidence-based first-line treatment for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer that harbors sensitizing EGFR mutations (EGFRm+) such as exon 19 deletions and L858R substitutions in exon 21. However, acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs is mostly driven by a second-site EGFR T790M mutation, which negates their inhibitory activity. Osimertinib (AZD9291, Tagrisso™), an oral, third-generation EGFR TKI, has been designed to target the EGFR T790M mutation, while sparing wild-type EGFR. In this up-to-date review, focus is not only on the structure, mechanisms, and pharmacokinetics of osimertinib but also on summarizing clinical trials and making recommendations of osimertinib for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. PMID:27660466

  14. Osimertinib making a breakthrough in lung cancer targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haijun

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are the evidence-based first-line treatment for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer that harbors sensitizing EGFR mutations (EGFRm(+)) such as exon 19 deletions and L858R substitutions in exon 21. However, acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs is mostly driven by a second-site EGFR T790M mutation, which negates their inhibitory activity. Osimertinib (AZD9291, Tagrisso™), an oral, third-generation EGFR TKI, has been designed to target the EGFR T790M mutation, while sparing wild-type EGFR. In this up-to-date review, focus is not only on the structure, mechanisms, and pharmacokinetics of osimertinib but also on summarizing clinical trials and making recommendations of osimertinib for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer.

  15. Treatment of brain metastasis from lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Takuya; Phi, Ji Hoon; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Kim, Dong Gyu; Barfod, Bierta E; Urakawa, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    Brain metastasis from lung cancer occupies a significant portion of all brain metastases. About 15-20% of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) develop brain metastasis during the course of the disease. The prognosis of brain metastasis is poor with median survival of less than 1 year. Whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is widely used for the treatment of brain metastasis. WBRT can also be used as adjuvant treatment along with surgery and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS).Surgery provides a rapid relief of mass effects and may be the best choice for a large single metastasis. SRS confers local control rates comparable to those for surgery with minimal toxicities and versatility that makes it applicable to multiple lesions, deep-seated lesions, and to patients with poor medical conditions. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) classes are widely used for prognostic stratification. However, the validity of RPA classes, especially for NSCLC, has been questioned and other scoring systems are being developed. Synchronous presentation of primary NSCLC and brain metastases is a special situation in which surgery for the lung lesion and surgery or SRS for brain lesions are recommended if the thoracic disease is in early stages. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has a higher likelihood for brain metastasis than NSCLC and prophylactic cranial irradiation and subsequent WBRT are usually recommended. Recently, SRS for brain metastasis from SCLC has been tried, but requires further verification.

  16. The Utility of Exercise Testing in Patients with Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ha, Duc; Mazzone, Peter J; Ries, Andrew L; Malhotra, Atul; Fuster, Mark

    2016-09-01

    The harm associated with lung cancer treatment include perioperative morbidity and mortality and therapy-induced toxicities in various organs, including the heart and lungs. Optimal treatment therefore entails a need for risk assessment to weigh the probabilities of benefits versus harm. Exercise testing offers an opportunity to evaluate a patient's physical fitness/exercise capacity objectively. In lung cancer, it is most often used to risk-stratify patients undergoing evaluation for lung cancer resection. In recent years, its use outside this context has been described, including in nonsurgical candidates and lung cancer survivors. In this article we review the physiology of exercise testing and lung cancer. Then, we assess the utility of exercise testing in patients with lung cancer in four contexts (preoperative evaluation for lung cancer resection, after lung cancer resection, lung cancer prognosis, and assessment of efficiency of exercise training programs) after systematically identifying original studies involving the most common forms of exercise tests in this patient population: laboratory cardiopulmonary exercise testing and simple field testing with the 6-minute walk test, shuttle walk test, and/or stair-climbing test. Lastly, we propose a conceptual framework for risk assessment of patients with lung cancer who are being considered for therapy and identify areas for further studies in this patient population.

  17. PPARGC1A is upregulated and facilitates lung cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Dong; Feng, Qing-Chuan; Qi, Yu; Cui, Guanghui; Zhao, Song

    2017-10-15

    Lung cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related mortality, with metastatic progression remaining the single largest cause of lung cancer mortality. Hence it is imperative to determine reliable biomarkers for lung cancer prognosis. We performed quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis to explore epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) inducers that regulate EMT process in three patients with advanced lung cancer disease. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARGC1A) was uniformly the topmost overexpressed gene in all three human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient samples. Further evaluation in human normal lung and metastatic lung cancer cell lines revealed that the expression of PPARGC1A was upregulated in metastatic lung cancer cell lines. Metagenomic analysis revealed direct correlation among PPARGC1A, zinc-finger transcription factor snail homolog 1 (SNAI1), and metastatic lung disease. Upregulation of PPARGC1A transcript expression was independent of a differential upregulation of the upstream AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) activation or steady state expression of the silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1). Xenograft tail vein colonization assays proved that the high expression of PPARGC1A was a prerequisite for metastatic progression of lung cancer to brain. Our results indicate that PPARGC1A might be a potential biomarker for lung cancer prognosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Targeting SALL4 by entinostat in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Clarice Kit Yee; Zhao, Wenxiu; Wang, Fei; Tatetsu, Hiro; Yan, Benedict; Qi, Lihua; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Yang, Henry; Soo, Ross

    2016-01-01

    The overall survival of lung cancer patients remains dismal despite the availability of targeted therapies. Oncofetal protein SALL4 is a novel cancer target. We herein report that SALL4 was aberrantly expressed in a subset of lung cancer patients with poor survival. SALL4 silencing by RNA interference or SALL4 peptide inhibitor treatment led to impaired lung cancer cell growth. Expression profiling of SALL4-knockdown cells demonstrated that both the EGFR and IGF1R signaling pathways were affected. Connectivity Map analysis revealed the HDAC inhibitor entinostat as a potential drug in treating SALL4-expressing cancers, and this was confirmed in 17 lung cancer cell lines. In summary, we report for the first time that entinostat can target SALL4-positive lung cancer. This lays the foundation for future clinical studies evaluating the therapeutic efficacy of entinostat in SALL4-positive lung cancer patients. PMID:27705911

  19. Inflammation in the development of lung cancer: epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Engels, Eric A

    2008-04-01

    The lung is a site for repeated or chronic inflammatory insults. Epidemiologic research has provided evidence to support the hypothesis that tissue damage caused by inflammation can initiate or promote the development of lung cancer, possibly in conjunction with tobacco use. For example, some studies suggest an increased risk of lung cancer among persons with lung infections, such as tuberculosis, bacterial pneumonia, or inflammatory lung diseases. Elevated serum levels of C-reactive protein, an inflammation marker, are associated with heightened lung cancer risk. Recent studies also demonstrate increased lung cancer risk among immunosuppressed individuals infected with HIV. Other research indicates an association between genetic polymorphisms in the inflammation pathway, which might modulate the inflammatory response and lung cancer risk.

  20. SWIFT MRI Enhances Detection of Breast Cancer Metastasis to the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Naoharu; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Corum, Curt; Weber, Joseph; Garwood, Michael; Sachdev, Deepali

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the capability of longitudinal MR scans using sweep imaging with Fourier transformation (SWIFT) to detect breast cancer metastasis to the lung in mice. Methods Mice with breast cancer metastatic to the lung were generated by tail vein injection of MDA-MB-231-LM2 cells. Thereafter, MR imaging was performed every week using three different pulse sequences: SWIFT (TE~3 μs), concurrent dephasing and excitation (CODE; TE~300 μs), and 3D gradient echo (GRE; TE=2.2 ms). Motion during the long SWIFT MR scans was compensated for by rigid-body motion correction. Maximum intensity projection (MIP) images were generated to visualize changes in lung vascular structures during the development and growth of metastases. Results SWIFT MRI was more sensitive to signals from the lung parenchyma than CODE or 3D GRE MRI. Metastatic tumor growth in the lungs induced a progressive increase in intensity of parenchymal signals in SWIFT images. MIP images from SWIFT clearly visualized lung vascular structures and their disruption due to progression of breast cancer metastases in the lung. Conclusion SWIFT MRI’s sensitivity to fast-decaying signals and tolerance of magnetic susceptibility enhances its effectiveness at detecting structural changes in lung parenchyma and vasculature due to breast cancer metastases in the lung. PMID:24919566

  1. Predicting lung cancer deaths from smoking prevalence data.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Volker; Ng, Nawi; Tesfaye, Fikru; Becher, Heiko

    2011-11-01

    Reliable data on lung cancer burden is not available from most developing countries as cancer registration is lacking. In a previously proposed model to estimate lung cancer deaths in those countries using smoking prevalence data, we estimated the current yearly number of lung cancer deaths in Ethiopia as 3356, a figure far above the WHO estimate of 1343 and the GLOBOCAN of 748. Our aim was to further develop and validate our estimation procedure. We included additional data on risk estimates for lung cancer mortality of ex-smokers and an approximation of duration of smoking into our model and reanalysed study results on non-smoker mortality, thus building two improved models. For validation the number of lung cancer deaths in Germany (2006), the UK (2006), Canada (2004), and Utah, USA (2000) were estimated based on all three models and compared to the observed number of deaths in these countries. We found that the refined model with a modified estimate of lung cancer mortality rates in non-smokers and a more detailed incorporation of smoking dose categories estimates rather well the observed lung cancer deaths in the above countries. With this model, the updated estimate of yearly lung cancer deaths in Ethiopia is 2946 deaths, close to the previous reported estimate. If Ethiopian lung cancer mortality rates in never-smokers and smoking relative risks are the same as in industrialised countries, our models suggests that WHO lung cancer deaths may be underestimated in Ethiopia.

  2. Differential Activity of Nivolumab, Pembrolizumab and MPDL3280A according to the Tumor Expression of Programmed Death-Ligand-1 (PD-L1): Sensitivity Analysis of Trials in Melanoma, Lung and Genitourinary Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Carbognin, Luisa; Pilotto, Sara; Milella, Michele; Vaccaro, Vanja; Brunelli, Matteo; Caliò, Anna; Cuppone, Federica; Sperduti, Isabella; Giannarelli, Diana; Chilosi, Marco; Bronte, Vincenzo; Scarpa, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    Background The potential predictive role of programmed death-ligand-1 (PD-L1) expression on tumor cells in the context of solid tumor treated with checkpoint inhibitors targeting the PD-1 pathway represents an issue for clinical research. Methods Overall response rate (ORR) was extracted from phase I-III trials investigating nivolumab, pembrolizumab and MPDL3280A for advanced melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and genitourinary cancer, and cumulated by adopting a fixed and random-effect model with 95% confidence interval (CI). Interaction test according to tumor PD-L1 was accomplished. A sensitivity analysis according to adopted drug, tumor type, PD-L1 cut-off and treatment line was performed. Results Twenty trials (1,475 patients) were identified. A significant interaction (p<0.0001) according to tumor PD-L1 expression was found in the overall sample with an ORR of 34.1% (95% CI 27.6-41.3%) in the PD-L1 positive and 19.9% (95% CI 15.4-25.3%) in the PD-L1 negative population. ORR was significantly higher in PD-L1 positive in comparison to PD-L1 negative patients for nivolumab and pembrolizumab, with an absolute difference of 16.4% and 19.5%, respectively. A significant difference in activity of 22.8% and 8.7% according to PD-L1 was found for melanoma and NSCLC, respectively, with no significant difference for genitourinary cancer. Conclusion Overall, the three antibodies provide a significant differential effect in terms of activity according to PD-L1 expression on tumor cells. The predictive value of PD-L1 on tumor cells seems to be more robust for anti-PD-1 antibody (nivolumab and pembrolizumab), and in the context of advanced melanoma and NSCLC. PMID:26086854

  3. Differential Activity of Nivolumab, Pembrolizumab and MPDL3280A according to the Tumor Expression of Programmed Death-Ligand-1 (PD-L1): Sensitivity Analysis of Trials in Melanoma, Lung and Genitourinary Cancers.

    PubMed

    Carbognin, Luisa; Pilotto, Sara; Milella, Michele; Vaccaro, Vanja; Brunelli, Matteo; Caliò, Anna; Cuppone, Federica; Sperduti, Isabella; Giannarelli, Diana; Chilosi, Marco; Bronte, Vincenzo; Scarpa, Aldo; Bria, Emilio; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-01-01

    The potential predictive role of programmed death-ligand-1 (PD-L1) expression on tumor cells in the context of solid tumor treated with checkpoint inhibitors targeting the PD-1 pathway represents an issue for clinical research. Overall response rate (ORR) was extracted from phase I-III trials investigating nivolumab, pembrolizumab and MPDL3280A for advanced melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and genitourinary cancer, and cumulated by adopting a fixed and random-effect model with 95% confidence interval (CI). Interaction test according to tumor PD-L1 was accomplished. A sensitivity analysis according to adopted drug, tumor type, PD-L1 cut-off and treatment line was performed. Twenty trials (1,475 patients) were identified. A significant interaction (p<0.0001) according to tumor PD-L1 expression was found in the overall sample with an ORR of 34.1% (95% CI 27.6-41.3%) in the PD-L1 positive and 19.9% (95% CI 15.4-25.3%) in the PD-L1 negative population. ORR was significantly higher in PD-L1 positive in comparison to PD-L1 negative patients for nivolumab and pembrolizumab, with an absolute difference of 16.4% and 19.5%, respectively. A significant difference in activity of 22.8% and 8.7% according to PD-L1 was found for melanoma and NSCLC, respectively, with no significant difference for genitourinary cancer. Overall, the three antibodies provide a significant differential effect in terms of activity according to PD-L1 expression on tumor cells. The predictive value of PD-L1 on tumor cells seems to be more robust for anti-PD-1 antibody (nivolumab and pembrolizumab), and in the context of advanced melanoma and NSCLC.

  4. Genome and transcriptome sequencing of lung cancers reveal diverse mutational and splicing events

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinfeng; Lee, William; Jiang, Zhaoshi; Chen, Zhongqiang; Jhunjhunwala, Suchit; Haverty, Peter M.; Gnad, Florian; Guan, Yinghui; Gilbert, Houston N.; Stinson, Jeremy; Klijn, Christiaan; Guillory, Joseph; Bhatt, Deepali; Vartanian, Steffan; Walter, Kimberly; Chan, Jocelyn; Holcomb, Thomas; Dijkgraaf, Peter; Johnson, Stephanie; Koeman, Julie; Minna, John D.; Gazdar, Adi F.; Stern, Howard M.; Hoeflich, Klaus P.; Wu, Thomas D.; Settleman, Jeff; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Gentleman, Robert C.; Neve, Richard M.; Stokoe, David; Modrusan, Zora; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Shames, David S.; Zhang, Zemin

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease in terms of both underlying genetic lesions and response to therapeutic treatments. We performed deep whole-genome sequencing and transcriptome sequencing on 19 lung cancer cell lines and three lung tumor/normal pairs. Overall, our data show that cell line models exhibit similar mutation spectra to human tumor samples. Smoker and never-smoker cancer samples exhibit distinguishable patterns of mutations. A number of epigenetic regulators, including KDM6A, ASH1L, SMARCA4, and ATAD2, are frequently altered by mutations or copy number changes. A systematic survey of splice-site mutations identified 106 splice site mutations associated with cancer specific aberrant splicing, including mutations in several known cancer-related genes. RAC1b, an isoform of the RAC1 GTPase that includes one additional exon, was found to be preferentially up-regulated in lung cancer. We further show that its expression is significantly associated with sensitivity to a MAP2K (MEK) inhibitor PD-0325901. Taken together, these data present a comprehensive genomic landscape of a large number of lung cancer samples and further demonstrate that cancer-specific alternative splicing is a widespread phenomenon that has potential utility as therapeutic biomarkers. The detailed characterizations of the lung cancer cell lines also provide genomic context to the vast amount of experimental data gathered for these lines over the decades, and represent highly valuable resources for cancer biology. PMID:23033341

  5. Cannabis smoking and lung cancer risk: Pooled analysis in the International Lung Cancer Consortium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li Rita; Morgenstern, Hal; Greenland, Sander; Chang, Shen-Chih; Lazarus, Philip; Teare, M Dawn; Woll, Penella J; Orlow, Irene; Cox, Brian; Brhane, Yonathan; Liu, Geoffrey; Hung, Rayjean J

    2015-02-15

    To investigate the association between cannabis smoking and lung cancer risk, data on 2,159 lung cancer cases and 2,985 controls were pooled from 6 case-control studies in the US, Canada, UK, and New Zealand within the International Lung Cancer Consortium. Study-specific associations between cannabis smoking and lung cancer were estimated using unconditional logistic regression adjusting for sociodemographic factors, tobacco smoking status and pack-years; odds-ratio estimates were pooled using random effects models. Subgroup analyses were done for sex, histology and tobacco smoking status. The shapes of dose-response associations were examined using restricted cubic spline regression. The overall pooled OR for habitual versus nonhabitual or never users was 0.96 (95% CI: 0.66-1.38). Compared to nonhabitual or never users, the summary OR was 0.88 (95%CI: 0.63-1.24) for individuals who smoked 1 or more joint-equivalents of cannabis per day and 0.94 (95%CI: 0.67-1.32) for those consumed at least 10 joint-years. For adenocarcinoma cases the ORs were 1.73 (95%CI: 0.75-4.00) and 1.74 (95%CI: 0.85-3.55), respectively. However, no association was found for the squamous cell carcinoma based on small numbers. Weak associations between cannabis smoking and lung cancer were observed in never tobacco smokers. Spline modeling indicated a weak positive monotonic association between cumulative cannabis use and lung cancer, but precision was low at high exposure levels. Results from our pooled analyses provide little evidence for an increased risk of lung cancer among habitual or long-term cannabis smokers, although the possibility of potential adverse effect for heavy consumption cannot be excluded. © 2014 UICC.

  6. Testing lung cancer drugs and therapies in mice

    Cancer.gov

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) investigators have designed a genetically engineered mouse for use in the study of human lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). SCC is a type of non-small cell lung carcinoma, one of the most common types of lung cancer, with

  7. Lung cancer: Current status and prospects for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Mountain, C.F.; Carr, D.T.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 32 papers. Some of the titles are: Activation of cellular ras genes in human neoplasms; The valve of definitive radiation therapy of unresectable squamous cell carcinoma, large cell carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma of the lung; Current concepts of chemotherapy and radiotherapy for small cell lung cancer, and Current status of immunotherapy for lung cancer.

  8. Endobronchial Photoacoustic Microscopy for Staging of Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Microscopy for Staging of Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Huabei Jiang CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Florida Gainsville, FL 32611...TYPE Annual report 3. DATES COVERED 1 Jun 2014 - 31 May 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Endobronchial Photoacoustic Microscopy for Staging of Lung ...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This project is to propose an endoscopic photoacoustic imaging method for lung cancer staging. In order

  9. The terminal care of patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Twycross, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    Lung cancer is the commonest form of malignant disease seen at St Christopher's Hospice. More than 35% of the male and about 8% of the female cancer patients are admitted with this diagnosis. This means that each year approximately 100 patients with lung cancer are amitted and cared for at the hospice. The more common symptoms experienced by 185 consecutive terminal lung cancer patients admitted to St Christopher's Hospice are listed in Table 1. PMID:4132166

  10. Lung cancer: a rare indication for, but frequent complication after lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Robin; Yserbyt, Jonas; Decaluwe, Herbert; De Leyn, Paul; Verleden, Ge