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Sample records for sepsis por streptococcus

  1. Clinical analysis of cases of neonatal Streptococcus agalactiae sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, S J; Tang, X S; Zhao, W L; Qiu, H X; Wang, H; Feng, Z C

    2016-06-17

    With the advent of antibiotic resistance, pathogenic bacteria have become a major threat in cases of neonatal sepsis; however, guidelines for treatment have not yet been standardized. In this study, 15 cases of neonatal Streptococcus agalactiae sepsis from our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. Of these, nine cases showed early-onset and six cases showed late-onset sepsis. Pathogens were characterized by genotyping and antibiotic sensitivity tests on blood cultures. Results demonstrated that in cases with early-onset sepsis, clinical manifestations affected mainly the respiratory tract, while late-onset sepsis was accompanied by intracranial infection. Therefore, we suggest including a cerebrospinal fluid examination when diagnosing neonatal sepsis. Bacterial genotyping indicated the bacteria were mainly type Ib, Ia, and III S. agalactiae. We recommend treatment with penicillin or ampicillin, since bacteria were resistant to clindamycin and tetracycline. In conclusion, our results provide valuable information for the clinical treatment of S. agalactiae sepsis in neonatal infants.

  2. A rare case of sepsis in newborn: Streptococcus pneumoniae septicemia.

    PubMed

    Karabayir, Nalan; Hatipoglu, Nevin; Adal, Erdal; Sanli, Kamuran

    2010-11-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a rare cause of sepsis in the newborn. The term baby was admitted on complaint of dyspnea, and antibiotherapy was begun after samples for hemocultures were obtained with the suspicion of sepsis according to the clinical and laboratory data. S. pneumoniae was demonstrated in the vaginal culture of the mother of the patient whose lumbar punction and chest roentgenogram were normal but hemoculture revealed the propagation of S. pneumoniae. The patient, treated with antibiotherapy for 14 days, was discharged without any complications. In preventing the probable complications, it is important to absolutely treat the maternal pneumococcal colonization that can cause severe infections in the newborn and also to treat the newborns even if they are asymptomatic.

  3. Fatal Streptococcus pneumoniae Sepsis in a Patient With Celiac Disease-Associated Hyposplenism

    PubMed Central

    Ouseph, Madhu M.; Simons, Malorie; Treaba, Diana O.; Yakirevich, Evgeny; Green, Peter H.; Bhagat, Govind; Moss, Steven F.

    2016-01-01

    We present a 59-year-old male with poorly controlled celiac disease (CD) and fatal Streptococcus pneumoniae sepsis, describe the morphologic findings, and stress the need for monitoring splenic function and pneumococcal vaccination in these patients. PMID:27761478

  4. Early-onset neonatal group B streptococcus sepsis following national risk-based prevention guidelines.

    PubMed

    Darlow, Brian A; Voss, Lesley; Lennon, Diana R; Grimwood, Keith

    2016-02-01

    Neonatal infection with group B streptococcus (GBS) is an important cause of infant mortality. Intrapartum antibiotics reduce early-onset GBS sepsis, but recommendations vary as to whether they should be offered following antenatal screening or based on risk factors alone. We aimed to determine the incidence of early-onset GBS sepsis in New Zealand five years after the publication of national risk-based GBS prevention guidelines. Prospective surveillance of early-onset GBS sepsis (defined as infection in the first 48 h of life) was undertaken between April 2009 and March 2011 through the auspices of the New Zealand Paediatric Surveillance Unit as part of a survey of infection presenting in the first week of life. There were 29 cases of confirmed early-onset GBS sepsis, including one case of meningitis, giving an incidence rate of 0.23 per 1000 (95% CI 0.16-0.33) live births. Three infants (10.3%) died. In 16 cases (55%), a maternal risk factor qualifying the mother for intrapartum antibiotics was present, but only five (31%) received this intervention. A retrospective review of the major hospital laboratory databases for this period identified two additional cases. A secondary sensitivity analysis taking account of these cases provided an estimated national incidence of 0.26 (95% CI 0.18-0.37) per 1000 live births. Ten years after a similar survey and five years after promoting a single, risk-based prevention protocol nationally, the incidence of early-onset GBS disease in New Zealand has more than halved, but opportunities remain to further reduce the rate. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  5. Sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sepsis syndrome; Systemic inflammatory response syndrome; SIRS; Septic shock ... In sepsis, blood pressure drops, resulting in shock . Major organs ... system may stop working properly because of poor blood flow. ...

  6. Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Karnatovskaia, Lioudmila V.; Festic, Emir

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis represents a major challenge in medicine. It begins as a systemic response to infection that can affect virtually any organ system, including the central and peripheral nervous systems. Akin to management of stroke, early recognition and treatment of sepsis are just as crucial to a successful outcome. Sepsis can precipitate myasthenic crisis and lead to encephalopathy and critical illness neuropathy. Stroke and traumatic brain injury can predispose a patient to develop sepsis, whereas Guillain-Barré syndrome is similarly not uncommon following infection. This review article will first describe the essential principles of sepsis recognition, pathophysiology, and management and will then briefly cover the neurologic aspects associated with sepsis. Vigilant awareness of the clinical features of sepsis and timeliness of intervention can help clinicians prevent progression of this disease to a multisystem organ failure, which can be difficult to reverse even after the original source of infection is under control. PMID:23983879

  7. Severe sepsis in women with group B Streptococcus in pregnancy: an exploratory UK national case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Kalin, Asli; Acosta, Colleen; Kurinczuk, Jennifer J; Brocklehurst, Peter; Knight, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate the incidence of severe maternal sepsis due to group B Streptococcus (GBS) in the UK, and to investigate the associated outcomes for mother and infant. Design National case–control study. Setting All UK consultant-led maternity units. Participants 30 women with confirmed or suspected severe GBS sepsis, and 757 control women. Main outcome measures Disease incidence, additional maternal morbidity, critical care admission, length of stay, infant infection, mortality. Results The incidences of confirmed and presumed severe maternal GBS sepsis were 1.00 and 2.75 per 100 000 maternities, respectively, giving an overall incidence of 3.75 per 100 000. Compared with controls, severe GBS sepsis was associated with higher odds of additional maternal morbidity (OR 12.35, 95% CI 3.96 to 35.0), requiring level 2 (OR 39.3, 95% CI 16.0 to 99.3) or level 3 (OR 182, 95% CI 21.0 to 8701) care and longer hospital stay (median stay in cases and controls was 7 days (range 3–29 days) and 2 days (range 0–16 days), respectively, p<0.001). None of the women died. Severe maternal GBS sepsis was associated with higher odds of infant sepsis (OR 32.7, 95% CI 8.99 to 119.0); 79% of infants, however, did not develop sepsis. There were no associated stillbirths or neonatal deaths. Conclusions Severe maternal GBS sepsis is a rare occurrence in the UK. It is associated with adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. PMID:26450426

  8. Diagnosis of neonatal group B Streptococcus sepsis by nested-PCR of residual urine samples

    PubMed Central

    Cezarino, Bruno Nicolino; Yamamoto, Lidia; Del Negro, Gilda Maria Barbaro; Rocha, Daisy; Okay, Thelma Suely

    2008-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) remains the most common cause of early-onset sepsis in newborns. Laboratory gold-standard, broth culture methods are highly specific, but lack sensitivity. The aim of this study was to validate a nested-PCR and to determine whether residue volumes of urine samples obtained by non invasive, non sterile methods could be used to confirm neonatal GBS sepsis. The nested-PCR was performed with primers of the major GBS surface antigen. Unavailability of biological samples to perform life supporting exams, as well as others to elucidate the etiology of infections is a frequent problem concerning newborn patients. Nevertheless, we decided to include cases according to strict criteria: newborns had to present with signs and symptoms compatible with GBS infection; at least one of the following biological samples had to be sent for culture: blood, urine, or cerebrospinal fluid; availability of residue volumes of the samples sent for cultures, or of others collected on the day of hospitalization, prior to antibiotic therapy prescription, to be analyzed by PCR; favorable outcome after GBS empiric treatment. In only one newborn GBS infection was confirmed by cultures, while infection was only presumptive in the other three patients (they fulfilled inclusion criteria but were GBS-culture negative). From a total of 12 biological samples (5 blood, 3 CSF and 4 urine specimen), eight were tested by culture methods (2/8 were positive), and 8 were tested by PCR (7/8 were positive), and only 4 samples were simultaneously tested by both methods (1 positive by culture and 3 by PCR). In conclusion, although based on a restricted number of neonates and samples, our results suggest that the proposed nested-PCR might be used to diagnose GBS sepsis as it has successfully amplified the three types of biological samples analyzed (blood, urine and cerebrospinal fluid), and was more sensitive than culture methods as PCR in urine confirmed diagnosis in all four patients

  9. Streptococcus pneumoniae sepsis as the initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Ilknur; Elbasan Omar, Senay; Ali, Ridvan Kara; Gunes, Hayati; Topkaya, Aynur Eren

    2016-01-01

    Objective Infections are among the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but are rare initial presentation of the disease. Therefore, in this study, we describe a case of Streptococcus pneumoniae sepsis in a young woman with previously undiagnosed SLE. Case report A 23-year-old female patient was admitted to our outpatient clinic complaining of high fever (40°C), chills, fatigue, generalized myalgia, and cough with brown sputum for 5 days. Blood cultures grew gram-positive coccus defined as S. pneumoniae using standard procedures. Antinuclear antibody was positive at a titer of 1/1,000, and anti-double-stranded DNA was positive at 984 IU/mL. She was diagnosed with SLE. Her respiratory symptoms and pleural effusion were considered to be due to pulmonary manifestation of SLE. Conclusion The underlying immunosuppression caused by SLE could have predisposed the patient to invasive pneumococcal disease. It may also occur as a primary presenting feature, although a rare condition. PMID:27660485

  10. Validation of the content of the prevention protocol for early sepsis caused by Streptococcus agalactiaein newborns

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Fabiana Alves; Vidal, Cláudia Fernanda de Lacerda; de Araújo, Ednaldo Cavalcante

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to validate the content of the prevention protocol for early sepsis caused by Streptococcus agalactiaein newborns. Method: a transversal, descriptive and methodological study, with a quantitative approach. The sample was composed of 15 judges, 8 obstetricians and 7 pediatricians. The validation occurred through the assessment of the content of the protocol by the judges that received the instrument for data collection - checklist - which contained 7 items that represent the requisites to be met by the protocol. The validation of the content was achieved by applying the Content Validity Index. Result: in the judging process, all the items that represented requirements considered by the protocol obtained concordance within the established level (Content Validity Index > 0.75). Of 7 items, 6 have obtained full concordance (Content Validity Index 1.0) and the feasibility item obtained a Content Validity Index of 0.93. The global assessment of the instruments obtained a Content Validity Index of 0.99. Conclusion: the validation of content that was done was an efficient tool for the adjustment of the protocol, according to the judgment of experienced professionals, which demonstrates the importance of conducting a previous validation of the instruments. It is expected that this study will serve as an incentive for the adoption of universal tracking by other institutions through validated protocols. PMID:26444165

  11. Single immunoglobulin interleukin-1 receptor-related molecule impairs host defense during pneumonia and sepsis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Blok, Dana C; van Lieshout, Miriam H P; Hoogendijk, Arie J; Florquin, Sandrine; de Boer, Onno J; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto; van't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of pneumonia and sepsis. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a pivotal role in the host defense against infection. In this study, we sought to determine the role of single immunoglobulin interleukin-1 receptor-related molecule (SIGIRR a.k.a. TIR8), a negative regulator of TLR signaling, in pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis. Wild-type and SIGIRR-deficient (sigirr-/-) mice were infected intranasally (to induce pneumonia) or intravenously (to induce primary sepsis) with S. pneumoniae and euthanized after 6, 24, or 48 h for analyses. Additionally, survival studies were performed. sigirr-/- mice showed delayed mortality during lethal pneumococcal pneumonia. Accordingly, sigirr-/- mice displayed lower bacterial loads in lungs and less dissemination of the infection 24 h after the induction of pneumonia. SIGIRR deficiency was associated with increased interstitial and perivascular inflammation in lung tissue early after infection, with no impact on neutrophil recruitment or cytokine production. sigirr-/- mice also demonstrated reduced bacterial burdens at multiple body sites during S. pneumoniae sepsis. sigirr-/- alveolar macrophages and neutrophils exhibited an increased capacity to phagocytose viable pneumococci. These results suggest that SIGIRR impairs the antibacterial host defense during pneumonia and sepsis caused by S. pneumoniae. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... breathing Abnormal heart pumping function Abdominal pain Septic shock To be diagnosed with septic shock, you must have the signs and symptoms of ... mild sepsis, but the mortality rate for septic shock is nearly 50 percent. Also, an episode of ...

  13. Molecular Analysis of an Outbreak of Lethal Postpartum Sepsis Caused by Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Claire E.; Dryden, Matthew; Holden, Matthew T. G.; Davies, Frances J.; Lawrenson, Richard A.; Farzaneh, Leili; Bentley, Stephen D.; Efstratiou, Androulla

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is now the leading direct cause of maternal death in the United Kingdom, and Streptococcus pyogenes is the leading pathogen. We combined conventional and genomic analyses to define the duration and scale of a lethal outbreak. Two postpartum deaths caused by S. pyogenes occurred within 24 h; one was characterized by bacteremia and shock and the other by hemorrhagic pneumonia. The women gave birth within minutes of each other in the same maternity unit 2 days earlier. Seven additional infections in health care and household contacts were subsequently detected and treated. All cluster-associated S. pyogenes isolates were genotype emm1 and were initially indistinguishable from other United Kingdom emm1 isolates. Sequencing of the virulence gene sic revealed that all outbreak isolates had the same unique sic type. Genome sequencing confirmed that the cluster was caused by a unique S. pyogenes clone. Transmission between patients occurred on a single day and was associated with casual contact only. A single isolate from one patient demonstrated a sequence change in sic consistent with longer infection duration. Transmission to health care workers was traced to single clinical contacts with index cases. The last case was detected 18 days after the first case. Following enhanced surveillance, the outbreak isolate was not detected again. Mutations in bacterial regulatory genes played no detectable role in this outbreak, illustrating the intrinsic ability of emm1 S. pyogenes to spread while retaining virulence. This fast-moving outbreak highlights the potential of S. pyogenes to cause a range of diseases in the puerperium with rapid transmission, underlining the importance of immediate recognition and response by clinical infection and occupational health teams. PMID:23616448

  14. The ScpC protease of Streptococcus pyogenes affects the outcome of sepsis in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Sjölinder, Hong; Lövkvist, Lena; Plant, Laura; Eriksson, Jens; Aro, Helena; Jones, Allison; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2008-09-01

    The ScpC protease of Streptococcus pyogenes degrades interleukin-8 (IL-8), a chemokine that mediates neutrophil transmigration and activation. The ability to degrade IL-8 differs dramatically among clinical isolates of S. pyogenes. Bacteria expressing ScpC overcome immune clearance by preventing the recruitment of neutrophils in soft tissue infection of mice. To study the role of ScpC in streptococcal sepsis, we generated an ScpC mutant that did not degrade IL-8 and thus failed to prevent the recruitment of immune cells as well as to cause disease after soft tissue infection. In a murine model of sepsis, challenge with the ScpC mutant resulted in more severe systemic disease with higher bacteremia levels and mortality than did challenge with the wild-type strain. As expected, the blood level of KC, the murine IL-8 homologue, increased in mice infected with the ScpC mutant. However, the elevated KC levels did not influence neutrophil numbers in blood, as it did in soft tissue, indicating that additional factors contributed to neutrophil transmigration in blood. In addition, the absence of ScpC increased tumor necrosis factor, IL-6, and C5a levels in blood, which contributed to disease severity. Thus, the ScpC mutant triggers high neutrophil infiltration but not lethal outcome after soft tissue infection, whereas intravenous infection leads to highly aggressive systemic disease.

  15. Sepsis Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... associated with infections of the lungs (e.g., pneumonia), urinary tract (e.g., kidney), skin, and gut. Staphylococcus aureus ( staph ), Escherichia coli ( E. coli ), and some types of Streptococcus (strep) are common germs that can cause sepsis. ...

  16. Recurrent sepsis and neuroinvasive disease in a neonate culture-positive for a Group B Streptococcus CPS III serotype, hvgA+ strain

    PubMed Central

    Tyrrell, Gregory; Alhhazmi, Areej; Escoredo, Sandra; Hawkes, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Late-onset disease with Group B Streptococcus (GBS LOD) remains a significant problem in neonates. Unlike early-onset disease, rates of GBS LOD have not changed with prenatal testing. Effects of GBS LOD can be severe and thus identifying risk factors for severe GBS LOD, such as hypervirulence genes, may help in managing these infants. Case presentation: We present a case of a neonate with capsular serotype III GBS sepsis without meningitis that recurred 6 days after a 10-day-treatment period with IV ampicillin. The second episode was characterized by sepsis, neuroinvasion, meningitis and subsequent profound encephalomalacia. The short duration between the two episodes suggested recrudescence rather than reinfection. The GBS isolate was ultimately found to be positive for hypervirulence gene hvgA+, which encodes for a protein known to mediate meningeal tropism and neuroinvasion. Conclusion: hvgA positivity may thus potentially serve as an important biomarker for severe and neuroinvasive GBS LOD that can influence treatment decisions. PMID:28348758

  17. Immunization with LytB protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae activates complement-mediated phagocytosis and induces protection against pneumonia and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Corsini, Bruno; Aguinagalde, Leire; Ruiz, Susana; Domenech, Mirian; Antequera, María Luisa; Fenoll, Asunción; García, Pedro; García, Ernesto; Yuste, Jose

    2016-12-07

    The cell wall glucosaminidase LytB of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a surface exposed protein involved in daughter cell separation, biofilm formation and contributes to different aspects of the pathogenesis process. In this study we have characterized the antibody responses after immunization of mice with LytB in the presence of alhydrogel as an adjuvant. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays measuring different subclasses of immunoglobulin G, demonstrated that the antibody responses to LytB were predominantly IgG1 and IgG2b, followed by IgG3 and IgG2a subclasses. Complement-mediated immunity against two different pneumococcal serotypes was investigated using sera from immunized mice. Immunization with LytB increased the recognition of S. pneumoniae by complement components C1q and C3b demonstrating that anti-LytB antibodies trigger activation of the classical pathway. Phagocytosis assays showed that serum containing antibodies to LytB stimulates neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis against S. pneumoniae. Animal models of infection including invasive pneumonia and sepsis were performed with two different clinical isolates. Vaccination with LytB increased bacterial clearance and induced protection demonstrating that LytB might be a good candidate to be considered in a future protein-based vaccine against S. pneumoniae.

  18. Increased Risk for Group B Streptococcus Sepsis in Young Infants Exposed to HIV, Soweto, South Africa, 2004–20081

    PubMed Central

    Schrag, Stephanie J.; Thigpen, Michael C.; Velaphi, Sithembiso C.; Wadula, Jeannette; Adrian, Peter V.; Kuwanda, Locadiah; Groome, Michelle J.; Buchmann, Eckhart; Madhi, Shabir A.

    2015-01-01

    Although group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of severe invasive disease in young infants worldwide, epidemiologic data and knowledge about risk factors for the disease are lacking from low- to middle-income countries. To determine the epidemiology of invasive GBS disease among young infants in a setting with high maternal HIV infection, we conducted hospital-based surveillance during 2004–2008 in Soweto, South Africa. Overall GBS incidence was 2.72 cases/1,000 live births (1.50 and 1.22, respectively, among infants with early-onset disease [EOD] and late-onset [LOD] disease). Risk for EOD and LOD was higher for HIV-exposed than HIV-unexposed infants. GBS serotypes Ia and III accounted for 84.0% of cases, and 16.9% of infected infants died. We estimate that use of trivalent GBS vaccine (serotypes Ia, Ib, and III) could prevent 2,105 invasive GBS cases and 278 deaths annually among infants in South Africa; therefore, vaccination of all pregnant women in this country should be explored. PMID:25812061

  19. Increased risk for group B Streptococcus sepsis in young infants exposed to HIV, Soweto, South Africa, 2004-2008(1).

    PubMed

    Cutland, Clare L; Schrag, Stephanie J; Thigpen, Michael C; Velaphi, Sithembiso C; Wadula, Jeannette; Adrian, Peter V; Kuwanda, Locadiah; Groome, Michelle J; Buchmann, Eckhart; Madhi, Shabir A

    2015-04-01

    Although group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of severe invasive disease in young infants worldwide, epidemiologic data and knowledge about risk factors for the disease are lacking from low- to middle-income countries. To determine the epidemiology of invasive GBS disease among young infants in a setting with high maternal HIV infection, we conducted hospital-based surveillance during 2004-2008 in Soweto, South Africa. Overall GBS incidence was 2.72 cases/1,000 live births (1.50 and 1.22, respectively, among infants with early-onset disease [EOD] and late-onset [LOD] disease). Risk for EOD and LOD was higher for HIV-exposed than HIV-unexposed infants. GBS serotypes Ia and III accounted for 84.0% of cases, and 16.9% of infected infants died. We estimate that use of trivalent GBS vaccine (serotypes Ia, Ib, and III) could prevent 2,105 invasive GBS cases and 278 deaths annually among infants in South Africa; therefore, vaccination of all pregnant women in this country should be explored.

  20. Influence of synbiotic containing Lactobacillus acidophilus La5, Bifidobacterium lactis Bb 12, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus bulgaricus and oligofructose on gut barrier function and sepsis in critically ill patients: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jain, Prashant K; McNaught, Clare E; Anderson, Alexander D G; MacFie, John; Mitchell, Charles J

    2004-08-01

    Infective complications are a common cause of mortality and morbidity in critically ill patients. Many factors affect sepsis, one of which is gut barrier function. The aim of this study was to determine whether the oral administration of a synbiotic preparation could alter gut barrier function in critically ill patients and thus reduce sepsis. A total of 90 patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) were randomised to receive either synbiotic or placebo preparations (45 into each group). The synbiotic preparation consisted of Lactobacillus acidophilus La5, Bifidobacterium lactis Bb 12, Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus (probiotics) with oligofructose (prebiotic). Gut barrier function was assessed by measurement of intestinal permeability (lactulose/rhamnose test) and culture of nasogastric aspirate on days 1 and 8. All septic complications and mortality were recorded. There were no differences between the groups in terms of age, sex, APACHE II or POSSUM scores. After 1 week of therapy, patients in the synbiotic group had a significantly lower incidence of potentially pathogenic bacteria (43% versus 75%, P = 0.05) and multiple organisms (39% versus 75%, P = 0.01) in their nasogastric aspirates than controls. There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of intestinal permeability, septic complications or mortality. The administration of synbiotic in critically ill patients favourably altered the microbial composition of the upper gastrointestinal tract but had no effect on intestinal permeability and was not associated with measurable clinical benefit. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Epidemiology and outcome of sepsis in adult patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in a Norwegian county 1993-2011: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Askim, Åsa; Mehl, Arne; Paulsen, Julie; DeWan, Andrew T; Vestrheim, Didrik F; Åsvold, Bjørn Olav; Damås, Jan Kristian; Solligård, Erik

    2016-05-23

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is responsible for significant mortality and morbidity worldwide. There are however few longitudinal studies on the changes in case fatality rate of IPD in recent years. We carried out a prospective observational study of patients with IPD in Nord Trøndelag county in Norway from 1993 to 2011 to study the clinical variables and disease outcome. The main outcome was all-cause mortality after 30 and 90 days. Patients with positive blood cultures were registered prospectively by the microbiology laboratory and clinical variables were registered retrospectively from patients' hospital records. The severity of sepsis was assigned according to the 2001 International Sepsis Definition Conference criteria. The association between mortality and predictive factors was studied using a logistic regression model. The total number of patients was 414 with mean age of 67 years and 53 % were male. Comorbidity was assessed by the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). A CCI-score of 0 was registered in 144 patients (34.8 %), whereas 190 had a score of 1-2 (45.9 %) and 80 (19.3 %) had a score ≥3. 68.8 % of the patients received appropriate antibiotics within the first 6 h. The 30-day mortality risk increased by age and was 3-fold higher for patients aged ≥80 years (24.9, 95 % CI 16.4-33.4 %) compared to patients aged <70 (8.0, 95 % CI 3.5-12.4 %). 110 patients, (26.6 %) had severe sepsis and 37 (8.9 %) had septic shock. The 30 day all-cause mortality risk for those with sepsis without organ failure was 5.4 % (95 % CI 2.7-8.0 %), 20.2 % (95 % CI 13.5-27.4 %) for those with severe sepsis and 35.0 % (95 % CI 21.6-49.0 %) for those with septic shock. The mortality risk did not differ between the first and the second halves of the study period with a 30-day mortality risk of 13.5 % (95 % CI 7.9-19.2 %) for 1993-2002 versus 11.8 % (95 % CI 8.2-15.3 %) for 2003-2011. IPD carries a high mortality despite early and appropriate

  2. Pediatric Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Prusakowski, Melanie K; Chen, Audrey P

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric sepsis is distinct from adult sepsis in its definitions, clinical presentations, and management. Recognition of pediatric sepsis is complicated by the various pediatric-specific comorbidities that contribute to its mortality and the age- and development-specific vital sign and clinical parameters that obscure its recognition. This article outlines the clinical presentation and management of sepsis in neonates, infants, and children, and highlights some key populations who require specialized care.

  3. Neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Stefanovic, Iva Mihatov

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is the most common cause of neonatal deaths with high mortality despite treatment. Neonatal sepsis can be classified into two subtypes depending upon onset of symptoms. There are many factors that make neonates more susceptable to infection. Signs of sepsis in neonates are often non-specific and high degree of suspicion is needed for early diagnosis. Some laboratory parameters can be helpful for screening of neonates with neonatal sepsis, but none of it is specific and sensitive enough to be used singly. Diagnostic approach mostly focuses on history and review of non specific signs and symptoms. Antibiotic treatment is the mainstay of treatment and supportive care is equally important. The aim of this review is to give an overview of neonatal sepsis, including incidence, etiology, clinical picture, diagnostics and therapy.

  4. Neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Birju A; Padbury, James F

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis continues to be a common and significant health care burden, especially in very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBW <1500 g). Though intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis has decreased the incidence of early-onset group B streptococcal infection dramatically, it still remains a major cause of neonatal sepsis. Moreover, some studies among VLBW preterm infants have shown an increase in early-onset sepsis caused by Escherichia coli. As the signs and symptoms of neonatal sepsis are nonspecific, early diagnosis and prompt treatment remains a challenge. There have been a myriad of studies on various diagnostic markers like hematological indices, acute phase reactants, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, cytokines, and cell surface markers among others. Nonetheless, further research is needed to identify a biomarker with high diagnostic accuracy and validity. Some of the newer markers like inter α inhibitor proteins have shown promising results thereby potentially aiding in early detection of neonates with sepsis. In order to decrease the widespread, prolonged use of unnecessary antibiotics and improve the outcome of the infants with sepsis, reliable identification of sepsis at an earlier stage is paramount. PMID:24185532

  5. Dental sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mueller, P O; Lowder, M Q

    1998-08-01

    Dental sepsis or periapical abscess formation constitutes a large percentage of dental conditions that afflict horses. Dental sepsis occurs when the pulp chamber of the tooth is exposed to the oral cavity or external environment, allowing bacterial localization with resulting infection. Although acute, primary, septic pulpitis in horses is rare, dental sepsis often results from colonization of the pulp chamber with pathogenic bacteria secondary to maleruption or impaction of teeth with secondary alveolar bone lysis, primary fractures of the tooth, mandible, or maxilla, periodontal disease, or infundibular necrosis. The sequela to pulpal infection are extensions into the periradicular tissues and mandibular or maxillary periapical abscess formation.

  6. Streptococcus iniae and Streptococcus agalactiae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Streptococcus iniae and S. agalactiae are economically important Gram positive bacterial pathogens of cultured and wild fish with a worldwide distribution. Both bacteria are potential zoonotic pathogens and have been associated most often with infections in immunocompromised people. Streptococcus in...

  7. Neonatal sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... better the outcome. Possible Complications Complications may include: Disability Death When to Contact a Medical Professional Seek medical help right away for an infant that shows symptoms of neonatal sepsis. Prevention Pregnant women may need preventive antibiotics if they have: Chorioamnionitis ...

  8. [Application of pyrosequencing in detection of common pathogens in sepsis].

    PubMed

    Hu, Ziyou; Han, Hui; Zeng, Yong; Wu, Bingyi

    2013-07-01

    To apply pyrosequencing technique in the detection of the common pathogens in sepsis. The primers for amplification and sequencing in pyrosequencing were designed according to alignment of the bacterial 16S rRNA sequence. Bacterial genomic DNA was extracted for pyrosequencing, and the pathogen species were determined according to the sequencing data obtained. Pyrosequencing effectively yielded the sequencing data of the 28 bp sequences of the pathogens and clearly distinguished the pathogen species of Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumonia, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumonia, Neisseria meningitides, and Salmonella, but failed to distinguish Staphylococcus epidermidis from Staphylococcus aureus. Pyrosequencing technique can effectively distinguish the common pathogens in sepsis at the species level.

  9. Sepsis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... newborns and infants. Bacteria such as group B streptococcus (GBS) , Escherichia coli , Listeria monocytogenes , Neisseria meningitidis , Streptococcus pneumoniae , Haemophilus influenzae type b, and Salmonella are ...

  10. Early-Onset Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Simonsen, Kari A.; Anderson-Berry, Ann L.; Delair, Shirley F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Early-onset sepsis remains a common and serious problem for neonates, especially preterm infants. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is the most common etiologic agent, while Escherichia coli is the most common cause of mortality. Current efforts toward maternal intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis have significantly reduced the rates of GBS disease but have been associated with increased rates of Gram-negative infections, especially among very-low-birth-weight infants. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is based on a combination of clinical presentation; the use of nonspecific markers, including C-reactive protein and procalcitonin (where available); blood cultures; and the use of molecular methods, including PCR. Cytokines, including interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and cell surface antigens, including soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM) and CD64, are also being increasingly examined for use as nonspecific screening measures for neonatal sepsis. Viruses, in particular enteroviruses, parechoviruses, and herpes simplex virus (HSV), should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Empirical treatment should be based on local patterns of antimicrobial resistance but typically consists of the use of ampicillin and gentamicin, or ampicillin and cefotaxime if meningitis is suspected, until the etiologic agent has been identified. Current research is focused primarily on development of vaccines against GBS. PMID:24396135

  11. Neonatal sepsis of vertical transmission: an epidemiological study from the "Grupo de Hospitales Castrillo".

    PubMed

    López Sastre, J B; Coto Cotallo, G D; Fernández Colomer, B

    2000-01-01

    A prospective multicenter study was designed to assess the epidemiology of neonatal sepsis of vertical transmission in Spain. The study was carried out by the "Grupo de Hospitales Castrillo" that included the neonatal services of 19 tertiary care (reference) hospitals and 9 secondary care hospitals. Prospective data from infants with culture-proved neonatal sepsis, clinical sepsis and bacteremia were recorded for 1995 to 1997. In a total of 203,288 neonates, proven sepsis was diagnosed in 515 (rate of 2.5 per 1000 live births), clinical sepsis in 724 (rate of 3.6 per 1000 live births), and bacteremia of vertical transmission in 155 (rate of 0.76 per 1000 live births). Very low birth weight (VLBW) infants (< or = 1500 g) showed a significantly higher incidence of confirmed sepsis (26.5 per 1000 live births) and clinical sepsis (32.4 per 1000 live births) than infants weighing > 1500 g. Streptococcus agalactiae was the most frequent causative pathogen in cases of proven sepsis (51%) and bacteremia (33%), but Escherichia coli was the most frequently recovered organism in the VLBW group. The mortality rate of proven sepsis was significantly higher than that of clinical sepsis (8.7% versus 4.3%) (P < 0.01). In the VLBW cohort, there were no significant differences in the mortality rate between proven sepsis and clinical sepsis. In conclusion, clinical sepsis was the most frequent diagnosis, probably related to intrapartum chemoprophylaxis. Streptococcus agalactiae was the most frequent causative pathogen of culture-positive sepsis and bacteremia, whereas E. coli was the most significant in VLBW infants.

  12. Sepsis Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... after the episode. 3 , 4 What is the economic cost of sepsis? Treatment for sepsis often involves ... Accessibility Disclaimers FOIA U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health: NIH...Turning Discovery ...

  13. Aetiology of neonatal sepsis in Blantyre, Malawi: 1996-2001.

    PubMed

    Milledge, J; Calis, J C J; Graham, S M; Phiri, A; Wilson, L K; Soko, D; Mbvwinji, M; Walsh, A L; Rogerson, S R; Molyneux, M E; Molyneux, E M

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to report causes, antibiotic resistance and outcome of neonatal sepsis (often fatal in developing countries) in Malawi. All blood and cerebrospinal fluid isolates collected between January 1996 and December 2001 from inpatients aged 0-30 days with suspected sepsis at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi were reviewed. In vitro resistance to antibiotics commonly used in Malawi was assessed. Case fatality rate was analysed with respect to age, bacterial pathogen and infection site. A total of 801 bacteria were isolated from 784 neonates over 6 years-599 isolates from blood and 202 from cerebrospinal fluid. Overall, 54% of bacteria were gram-positive and 46% gram-negative. The commonest causes of neonatal sepsis were group B Streptococcus (17%) and non-typhoidal Salmonella (14%). In vitro antibiotic susceptibility to the first-line antibiotic combination of penicillin and gentamicin was 78% for all isolates, but in vitro sensitivities to gentamicin for Klebsiella spp and non-typhoidal Salmonella were only 33% and 53%, respectively. In-hospital case fatality rate was known for only 301 cases and was high at 48%. Group B Streptococcus was associated with the best outcome. Mortality was significantly higher if presentation was in the 1st week of life or if sepsis was caused by gram-negative bacteria. The causes of neonatal sepsis in this population show a different pattern from other studies in developing countries.

  14. Changing Definitions of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Gül, Fethi; Arslantaş, Mustafa Kemal; Cinel, İsmail; Kumar, Anand

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients despite the use of modern antibiotics and resuscitation therapies. Outcomes in sepsis have improved overall, probably because of an enhanced focus on early diagnosis and other improvements in supportive care, but mortality rates still remain unacceptably high. The diagnosis and definition of sepsis is a critical problem due to the heterogeneity of this disease process. Although it is apparent that much more needs to be done to advance our understanding, sepsis and related terms remain difficult to define. A 1991 consensus conference developed initial definitions that systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) to infection would be called sepsis. Definitions of sepsis and septic shock were revised in 2001 to incorporate the threshold values for organ damage. In early 2016, the new definitions of sepsis and septic shock have changed dramatically. Sepsis is now defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. The consensus document describes organ dysfunction as an acute increase in total Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score two points consequently to the infection. A significant change in the new definitions is the elimination of any mention of SIRS. The Sepsis-3 Task Force also introduced a new bedside index, called the qSOFA, to identify outside of critical care units patients with suspected infection who are likely to develop sepsis. Recently updated the consensus definitions improved specificity compared with the previous descriptions. PMID:28752002

  15. Introduction to Pediatric Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Derek S

    2011-10-07

    Sepsis is a significant health problem in both critically ill children and adults. While the mortality rate from sepsis is much lower in children, sepsis is directly responsible for over 4,000 childhood deaths per year in the United States alone. At face value, this number suggests that more children die per year in the United States from sepsis as the primary cause than from cancer. Unfortunately, there are few studies on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management of sepsis in children. Moreover, extrapolation of adult data to critically ill children is probably not appropriate due to several key developmental differences in the host response to infection and response to therapy. Therefore, additional studies targeting sepsis in the pediatric population are urgently required.

  16. Sepsis biomarkers: a review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Biomarkers can be useful for identifying or ruling out sepsis, identifying patients who may benefit from specific therapies or assessing the response to therapy. Methods We used an electronic search of the PubMed database using the key words "sepsis" and "biomarker" to identify clinical and experimental studies which evaluated a biomarker in sepsis. Results The search retrieved 3370 references covering 178 different biomarkers. Conclusions Many biomarkers have been evaluated for use in sepsis. Most of the biomarkers had been tested clinically, primarily as prognostic markers in sepsis; relatively few have been used for diagnosis. None has sufficient specificity or sensitivity to be routinely employed in clinical practice. PCT and CRP have been most widely used, but even these have limited ability to distinguish sepsis from other inflammatory conditions or to predict outcome. PMID:20144219

  17. Neutrophil Dysfunction in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Liu, An-Lei; Gao, Shuang; Ma, Shui; Guo, Shu-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Sepsis is defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction due to a dysregulated host response to infection. In this article, we reviewed the correlation between neutrophil dysfunction and sepsis. Data Sources: Articles published up to May 31, 2016, were selected from the PubMed databases, with the keywords of “neutrophil function”, “neutrophil dysfunction”, and “sepsis”. Study Selection: Articles were obtained and reviewed to analyze the neutrophil function in infection and neutrophil dysfunction in sepsis. Results: We emphasized the diagnosis of sepsis and its limitations. Pathophysiological mechanisms involve a generalized circulatory, immune, coagulopathic, and/or neuroendocrine response to infection. Many studies focused on neutrophil burst or cytokines. Complement activation, impairment of neutrophil migration, and endothelial lesions are involved in this progress. Alterations of cytokines, chemokines, and other mediators contribute to neutrophil dysfunction in sepsis. Conclusions: Sepsis represents a severe derangement of the immune response to infection, resulting in neutrophil dysfunction. Neutrophil dysfunction promotes sepsis and even leads to organ failure. Mechanism studies, clinical practice, and strategies to interrupt dysregulated neutrophil function in sepsis are desperately needed. PMID:27824008

  18. THE ENDOTHELIUM IN SEPSIS

    PubMed Central

    Ince, Can; Mayeux, Philip R.; Nguyen, Trung; Gomez, Hernando; Kellum, John A.; Ospina-Tascón, Gustavo A.; Hernandez, Glenn; Murray, Patrick; De Backer, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis affects practically all aspects of endothelial cell (EC) function and is thought to be the key factor in the progression from sepsis to organ failure. Endothelial functions affected by sepsis include vasoregulation, barrier function, inflammation, and hemostasis. These are among other mechanisms often mediated by glycocalyx shedding, such as abnormal nitric oxide metabolism, up-regulation of reactive oxygen species generation due to down-regulation of endothelial-associated antioxidant defenses, transcellular communication, proteases, exposure of adhesion molecules, and activation of tissue factor. This review covers current insight in EC-associated hemostatic responses to sepsis and the EC response to inflammation. The endothelial cell lining is highly heterogeneous between different organ systems and consequently also in its response to sepsis. In this context, we discuss the response of the endothelial cell lining to sepsis in the kidney, liver, and lung. Finally, we discuss evidence as to whether the EC response to sepsis is adaptive or maladaptive. This study is a result of an Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative XIV Sepsis Workgroup meeting held in Bogota, Columbia, between October 12 and 15, 2014. PMID:26871664

  19. THE ENDOTHELIUM IN SEPSIS.

    PubMed

    Ince, Can; Mayeux, Philip R; Nguyen, Trung; Gomez, Hernando; Kellum, John A; Ospina-Tascón, Gustavo A; Hernandez, Glenn; Murray, Patrick; De Backer, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Sepsis affects practically all aspects of endothelial cell (EC) function and is thought to be the key factor in the progression from sepsis to organ failure. Endothelial functions affected by sepsis include vasoregulation, barrier function, inflammation, and hemostasis. These are among other mechanisms often mediated by glycocalyx shedding, such as abnormal nitric oxide metabolism, up-regulation of reactive oxygen species generation due to down-regulation of endothelial-associated antioxidant defenses, transcellular communication, proteases, exposure of adhesion molecules, and activation of tissue factor. This review covers current insight in EC-associated hemostatic responses to sepsis and the EC response to inflammation. The endothelial cell lining is highly heterogeneous between different organ systems and consequently also in its response to sepsis. In this context, we discuss the response of the endothelial cell lining to sepsis in the kidney, liver, and lung. Finally, we discuss evidence as to whether the EC response to sepsis is adaptive or maladaptive. This study is a result of an Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative XIV Sepsis Workgroup meeting held in Bogota, Columbia, between October 12 and 15, 2014.

  20. Rapid diagnosis of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Bloos, Frank; Reinhart, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    Fast and appropriate therapy is the cornerstone in the therapy of sepsis. However, the discrimination of sepsis from non-infectious causes of inflammation may be difficult. Biomarkers have been suggested to aid physicians in this decision. There is currently no biochemical technique available which alone allows a rapid and reliable discrimination between sepsis and non-infectious inflammation. Procalcitonin (PCT) is currently the most investigated biomarker for this purpose. C-reactive protein and interleukin 6 perform inferior to PCT in most studies and their value in diagnosing sepsis is not defined. All biomarkers including PCT are also released after various non-infectious inflammatory impacts. This shortcoming needs to be taken into account when biomarkers are used to aid the physician in the diagnosis of sepsis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based pathogen detection may improve time to adequate therapy but cannot rule out the presence of infection when negative. PMID:24335467

  1. Implementing sepsis bundles

    PubMed Central

    Jozwiak, Mathieu; Monnet, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis bundles represent key elements of care regarding the diagnosis and treatment of patients with septic shock and allow ones to convert complex guidelines into meaningful changes in behavior. Sepsis bundles endorsed the early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) and their implementation resulted in an improved outcome of septic shock patients. They induced more consistent and timely application of evidence-based care and reduced practice variability. These benefits mainly depend on the compliance with sepsis bundles, highlighting the importance of dedicated performance improvement initiatives, such as multifaceted educational programs. Nevertheless, the interest of early goal directed therapy in septic shock patients compared to usual care has recently been questioned, leading to an update of sepsis bundles in 2015. These new sepsis bundles may also exhibit, as the previous bundles, some limits and pitfalls and the effects of their implementation still needs to be evaluated. PMID:27713890

  2. Sepsis pathophysiology and anesthetic consideration.

    PubMed

    Yuki, Koichi; Murakami, Naoka

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis remains to be a significant health care issue associated with high mortality and healthcare cost, despite the extensive effort to better understand the pathophysiology of the sepsis. Recently updated clinical guideline for severe sepsis and septic shock, "Surviving Sepsis Campaign 2012", emphasizes the importance of early goal-directed therapy, which can be implemented in intraoperative management of sepsis patients. Herein, we review the updates of current guideline and discuss its application to anesthesic management. Furthermore, we review the recent advance in knowledge of sepsis pathophysiology, focusing on immune modulation, which may lead to new clinical therapeutic approach to sepsis.

  3. Sepsis Pathophysiology and Anesthetic Consideration

    PubMed Central

    Yuki, Koichi; Murakami, Naoka

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis remains to be a significant health care issue associated with high mortality and healthcare cost, despite the extensive effort to better understand the pathophysiology of the sepsis. Recently updated clinical guideline for severe sepsis and septic shock, “Surviving Sepsis Campaign 2012”, emphasizes the importance of early goal-directed therapy, which can be implemented in intraoperative management of sepsis patients. Herein, we review the updates of current guideline and discuss its application to anesthesic management. Furthermore, we review the recent advance in knowledge of sepsis pathophysiology, focusing on immune modulation, which may lead to new clinical therapeutic approach to sepsis. PMID:25567335

  4. [Clinical analysis of severe burn patients with sepsis during shock stage].

    PubMed

    Cao, Yong-Qian; Wang, De-Chang

    2004-06-01

    To investigate the pathogenesis, management and prognosis of severe burn patients with sepsis during shock stage. Fourty-four patients inflicted with over 60% TBSA burn injury and admitted to our hospital within 48 hours after injury during the past 8 years were enrolled in the study. The application of antibiotics in this group of patients was analyzed. The incidence of burn sepsis during shock stage in this group was calculated according to the results of the bacterial culture of the blood samples and burn wound samples,as well as the diagnostic criteria of sepsis. The relationship between sepsis during shock stage and the possibility of enteral bacterial translocation was discussed. Other postburn complications in patients with burn sepsis during shock stage were also observed and their prognosis was explored. This group of patients were all treated with 3rd and 4th generation of Cephalosporins and Imipenem/Cilastatin sodium after hospitalization. Burn sepsis during shock stage occurred in 4 cases (9.09%), in which one was caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other three possibly by Escherichia coli, Streptococcus faecalis and Bacillus gasoformans. Among the 4 cases, severe disorder in water and electrolytes happened in 1 case, stress ulcer in 2 and acute renal failure in 2. As a result, only one out of the 4 patients survived. Bacterial translocation was probable cause of sepsis during shock stage. Shock might predispose sepsis. Early postburn applications of antibiotics sensitive to enteric bacteria could be beneficial to the management of burn sepsis during shock stage.

  5. Biomarkers of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Faix, James D

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is an unusual systemic reaction to what is sometimes an otherwise ordinary infection, and it probably represents a pattern of response by the immune system to injury. A hyper-inflammatory response is followed by an immunosuppressive phase during which multiple organ dysfunction is present and the patient is susceptible to nosocomial infection. Biomarkers to diagnose sepsis may allow early intervention which, although primarily supportive, can reduce the risk of death. Although lactate is currently the most commonly used biomarker to identify sepsis, other biomarkers may help to enhance lactate's effectiveness; these include markers of the hyper-inflammatory phase of sepsis, such as pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines; proteins such as C-reactive protein and procalcitonin which are synthesized in response to infection and inflammation; and markers of neutrophil and monocyte activation. Recently, markers of the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis, such as anti-inflammatory cytokines, and alterations of the cell surface markers of monocytes and lymphocytes have been examined. Combinations of pro- and anti-inflammatory biomarkers in a multi-marker panel may help identify patients who are developing severe sepsis before organ dysfunction has advanced too far. Combined with innovative approaches to treatment that target the immunosuppressive phase, these biomarkers may help to reduce the mortality rate associated with severe sepsis which, despite advances in supportive measures, remains high.

  6. Sepsis and septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Opal, Steven M.; Reinhart, Konrad; Turnbull, Isaiah R.; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2017-01-01

    For more than two decades, sepsis was defined as a microbial infection that produces fever (or hypothermia), tachycardia, tachypnoea and blood leukocyte changes. Sepsis is now increasingly being considered a dysregulated systemic inflammatory and immune response to microbial invasion that produces organ injury for which mortality rates are declining to 15–25%. Septic shock remains defined as sepsis with hyperlactataemia and concurrent hypotension requiring vasopressor therapy, with in-hospital mortality rates approaching 30–50%. With earlier recognition and more compliance to best practices, sepsis has become less of an immediate life-threatening disorder and more of a long-term chronic critical illness, often associated with prolonged inflammation, immune suppression, organ injury and lean tissue wasting. Furthermore, patients who survive sepsis have continuing risk of mortality after discharge, as well as long-term cognitive and functional deficits. Earlier recognition and improved implementation of best practices have reduced in-hospital mortality, but results from the use of immunomodulatory agents to date have been disappointing. Similarly, no biomarker can definitely diagnose sepsis or predict its clinical outcome. Because of its complexity, improvements in sepsis outcomes are likely to continue to be slow and incremental. PMID:28117397

  7. Biomarkers of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is an unusual systemic reaction to what is sometimes an otherwise ordinary infection, and it probably represents a pattern of response by the immune system to injury. A hyper-inflammatory response is followed by an immunosuppressive phase during which multiple organ dysfunction is present and the patient is susceptible to nosocomial infection. Biomarkers to diagnose sepsis may allow early intervention which, although primarily supportive, can reduce the risk of death. Although lactate is currently the most commonly used biomarker to identify sepsis, other biomarkers may help to enhance lactate’s effectiveness; these include markers of the hyper-inflammatory phase of sepsis, such as pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines; proteins such as C-reactive protein and procalcitonin which are synthesized in response to infection and inflammation; and markers of neutrophil and monocyte activation. Recently, markers of the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis, such as anti-inflammatory cytokines, and alterations of the cell surface markers of monocytes and lymphocytes have been examined. Combinations of pro- and anti-inflammatory biomarkers in a multi-marker panel may help identify patients who are developing severe sepsis before organ dysfunction has advanced too far. Combined with innovative approaches to treatment that target the immunosuppressive phase, these biomarkers may help to reduce the mortality rate associated with severe sepsis which, despite advances in supportive measures, remains high. PMID:23480440

  8. Pharmacological management of sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    Systemic sepsis continues to be the most-difficult management problem in caring for the combat casualty. The complications of sepsis pervade all areas of injury to soldiers in the field, whether it is mechanical (missiles), thermal (burns), chemical, biological, or radiation injury. With the advent of tactical nuclear weapons, the problem of sepsis will be much higher in future wars than has previously been experienced through the world. The purpose of this chapter is a) to review the data suggesting pharmacological agents that may benefit the septic patient, and b) to emphasize the adjunctive therapies that should be explored in clinical trials. The pharmacological management of sepsis remains controversial. Most of the drugs utilized clinically treat the symptoms of the disease and are not necessarily directed at fundamental mechanisms that are known to be present in sepsis. A broad data base is emerging, indicating that NSAID should be used in human clinical trials. Prostaglandins are sensitive indicators of cellular injury and may be mediators for a number of vasoactive chemicals. Opiate antagonists and calcium channel blockers require more in-depth data; however, recent studies generate excitement for their potential use in the critically ill patient. Pharmacological effects of antibiotics, in concert with other drugs, suggest an entirely new approach to pharmacological treatment in sepsis. There is no doubt that new treatment modalities or adjunctive therapies must be utilized to alter the poor prognosis of severe sepsis that we have observed in the past 4 decades.

  9. [Predictive value of procalcitonin in children with suspected sepsis].

    PubMed

    Bustos B, Raúl; Padilla P, Oslando

    2015-01-01

    The use of biomarkers could be a tool for diagnosis, prognosis and stratifying children with sepsis. Our main goal was to analyze the value of procalcitonin (PCT), C reactive protein (CRP) and lactate in predicting mortality, septic shock and the stratification in children with suspected sepsis Prospective study in 81 patients. Plasma levels of PCT, CRP and lactate were measured at admission in the pediatric intensive care unit. Patients were categorized into systemic inflammatory response syndrome, sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock. Concentrations of PCT (ng/mL) increased significantly according to the severity of sepsis: 0.36 (0-1.2) for systemic inflammatory response syndrome; 1.96 (0.4-3.5) for sepsis; 7.5 (3.9-11.1) for severe sepsis; and 58.9 (35.1-82.7) for septic shock (P<.001). Compared to CRP and lactate, the area under the ROC curve revealed a good discriminative power of PCT to predict septic shock and mortality, 0.91 (95% CI: 0.83-0.97) and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.69-0.88), respectively. In contrast to CRP and lactate, the determination of PCT in pediatric intensive care unit admission is a good predictor of mortality and septic shock and can stratify patients according to severity of sepsis. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. The Microcirculation in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Asha; Sethi, Ashok Kumar; Girotra, Gautam; Mohta, Medha

    2009-01-01

    Summary Sepsis is a leading cause of mortality in critically ill patients. The pathophysiology of sepsis involves a highly complex and integrated response, including the activation of various cell types, inflammatory mediators, and the haemostatic system. Recent evidence suggests an emerging role of the microcirculation in sepsis, necessitating a shift in our locus away Irom the macrohaemodynamics to ill icrohaemodynanmics in a septic patient. This review article provides a brief overview of the microcirculation, its assessment techniques, and specific therapies to resuscitate the microhaemodynamics. PMID:20640135

  11. Neutrophil paralysis in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Alves-Filho, José C; Spiller, Fernando; Cunha, Fernando Q

    2010-09-01

    Sepsis develops when the initial host response is unable to contain the primary infection, resulting in widespread inflammation and multiple organ dysfunction. The impairment of neutrophil migration into the infection site, also termed neutrophil paralysis, is a critical hallmark of sepsis, which is directly related to the severity of the disease. Although the precise mechanism of this phenomenon is not fully understood, there has been much advancement in the understanding of this field. In this review, we highlight the recent insights into the molecular mechanisms of neutrophil paralysis during sepsis.

  12. Prehospital Sepsis Care.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jerrilyn; Lawner, Benjamin J

    2017-02-01

    Prehospital care providers are tasked with the delivery of time-sensitive care, and emergency medical services (EMS) systems must match patients to appropriate clinical resources. Modern systems are uniquely positioned to recognize and treat patients with sepsis. Interventions such as administration of intravenous fluid and transporting patients to the appropriate level of definitive care are linked to improved patient outcomes. As EMS systems refine their protocols for the recognition and stabilization of patients with suspected or presumed sepsis, EMS providers need to be educated about the spectrum of sepsis-related presentations and treatment strategies need to be standardized.

  13. The Pathogenesis of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Stearns-Kurosawa, Deborah J.; Osuchowski, Marcin F.; Valentine, Catherine; Kurosawa, Shinichiro; Remick, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is a serious clinical condition that represents a patient’s response to a severe infection and has a very high mortality rate. Normal immune and physiologic responses eradicate pathogens, and the pathophysiology of sepsis is due to the inappropriate regulation of these normal reactions. In an ideal scenario, the first pathogen contact with the inflammatory system should eliminate the microbe and quickly return the host to homeostasis. The septic response may accelerate due to continued activation of neutrophils and macrophages/monocytes. Upregulation of lymphocyte costimulatory molecules and rapid lymphocyte apoptosis, delayed apoptosis of neutrophils, and enhanced necrosis of cells/tissues also contribute to the pathogenesis of sepsis. The coagulation system is closely tied to the inflammatory response, with cross talk between the two systems driving the dysregulated response. Biomarkers may be used to help diagnose patients with sepsis, and they may also help to identify patients who would benefit from immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:20887193

  14. Vitamin D and sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Kempker, Jordan A.; Han, Jenny E.; Tangpricha, Vin; Ziegler, Thomas R.; Martin, Greg S.

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency and sepsis are both highly prevalent worldwide problems and this article reviews the emerging science that is defining the intersections of these conditions. The importance of vitamin D’s role in skeletal health has long been understood but recent evidence is beginning to highlight its role in the functioning of other physiologic systems of the body. Basic science data reveal its integral role in local immune responses to pathogens and the systemic inflammatory pathways of sepsis. Furthermore, clinical scientists have found associations with respiratory infections, critical illness and sepsis but the causal relationship and its clinical impact have yet to be clearly defined. The article ends with speculations on the connections between racial disparities and seasonal differences in sepsis and vitamin D insufficiency. PMID:22928065

  15. Neurologic complications of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Schmutzhard, E; Pfausler, B

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decades, the incidence of sepsis and resultant neurologic sequelae has increased, both in industrialized and low- or middle-income countries, by approximately 5% per year. Up to 300 patients per 100 000 population per year are reported to suffer from sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock. Mortality is up to 30%, depending on the precision of diagnostic criteria. The increasing incidence of sepsis is partially explained by demographic changes in society, with aging, increasing numbers of immunocompromised patients, dissemination of multiresistant pathogens, and greater availability of supportive medical care in both industrialized and middle-income countries. This results in more septic patients being admitted to intensive care units. Septic encephalopathy is a manifestation especially of severe sepsis and septic shock where the neurologist plays a crucial role in diagnosis and management. It is well known that timely treatment of sepsis improves outcome and that septic encephalopathy may precede other signs and symptoms. Particularly in the elderly and immunocompromised patient, the brain may be the first organ to show signs of failure. The neurologist diagnosing early septic encephalopathy may therefore contribute to the optimal management of septic patients. The brain is not only an organ failing in sepsis (a "sepsis victim" - as with other organs), but it also overwhelmingly influences all inflammatory processes on a variety of pathophysiologic levels, thus contributing to the initiation and propagation of septic processes. Therefore, the best possible pathophysiologic understanding of septic encephalopathy is essential for its management, and the earliest possible therapy is crucial to prevent the evolution of septic encephalopathy, brain failure, and poor prognosis.

  16. Sepsis and maternal mortality.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Colleen D; Knight, Marian

    2013-04-01

    Despite global progress towards reducing maternal mortality, sepsis remains a leading cause of preventable maternal death. This review focuses on current measurement challenges, trends, causes and efforts to curb maternal death from sepsis in high and low-income countries. Under-reporting using routine registration data, compounded by misclassification and unreported deaths, results in significant underestimation of the burden of maternal death from sepsis. In the UK and the Netherlands the recent increase in maternal death from sepsis is mainly attributed to an increase in invasive group A streptococcal infections. Susceptibility to infection may be complicated by modulation of maternal immune response and increasing rates of risk factors such as caesarean section and obesity. Failure to recognize severity of infection is a major universal risk factor. Standardized Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) recommendations for management of severe maternal sepsis are continuing to be implemented worldwide; however, outcomes differ according to models of intensive care resourcing and use. The need for robust data with subsequent analyses is apparent. This will significantly increase our understanding of risk factors and their causal pathways, which are critical to informing effective treatment strategies in consideration of resource availability.

  17. Blood purification therapy for sepsis.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Hiromi; Yonekawa, Motoki; Kawamura, Akio

    2006-12-01

    Accumulating evidences of underlining pathogenesis of sepsis have contributed to the therapeutic strategy for sepsis. Not only endotoxin and cytokine, but also signal transduction through Toll-like receptors could be a strategic target for the management of sepsis. Blood purification therapy including polymyxin B-immobilized hemoperfusion cartridge and continuous hemodiafiltration has shown the beneficial effect on patients with sepsis in Japan. Although they were initially designed to remove endotoxin and cytokines respectively, they might eliminate unexpected mediators responsible for sepsis. Further elucidation of mechanism and randomized controlled studies are needed to establish the role of blood purification therapy in sepsis.

  18. [Severe sepsis and septic shock].

    PubMed

    Tønnesen, Else; Larsen, Kim

    2014-07-07

    Sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock are syndromes. The incidence of sepsis is as high as 35% and with mortality rates in the intensive care unit from 27% to 54% in sepsis and septic shock, respectively. Many new treatments have been tested but only few have been implemented in clinical practise. The treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock is based on the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines developed by an international expert panel. Early diagnosis, optimization of haemodynamics, rapid identification of focus and adequate antibiotic treatment are the most important strategies.

  19. Sepsis after elective ureteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Jonathan; Fox, Cristina; Fullerton, Sean; Matthews, Gerald; Phillips, John

    2017-10-01

    We sought to determine our rate of postoperative sepsis after ureteroscopy as well as identifying associative factors, common antibiotic practices along with culture data. Records of all patients who underwent elective ureteroscopy from 2010 to 2015 at an urban tertiary care facility were retrospectively reviewed. Factors thought to be associated with infection were collected, along with comorbidities depicted as Charlson Age-Adjusted Comorbidity Index (CAACI) and American Society of Anesthesia (ASA) score. Each patient's course was reviewed to determine if they were treated for postoperative sepsis as defined by standardized criteria. A total of 345 patients underwent elective ureteroscopy with 15 (4.3%) being treated for sepsis postoperatively. This resulted in an additional 5.33 ± 3.84 days of hospitalization per patient. The sepsis group grew three gram positive organisms and five multi-drug resistant (MDR) gram negatives while 7/15 (46.7%) had negative cultures. The most common preoperative antibiotics used in the sepsis group were cefazolin (60.0%), gentamicin (48.5%) and ciprofloxacin (20.0%). Univariate analysis showed prior endoscopic procedures, recent treatment for urinary tract infections (UTI), multiple comorbidities and longer operative times associated with sepsis. However, significant variables after multivariate analysis were treatment for UTI within the last month, (OR) 7.19 (2.25-22.99), p = 0.001. Patients with multiple comorbidities, prior endoscopic procedures, longer operative times and especially those recently treated for a urinary infection should be carefully monitored after ureteroscopy for signs of sepsis. Perioperative antibiotics in these patients should be selected to cover both MDR organisms and gram positives.

  20. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Cotena, Simona; Piazza, Ornella

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is defined as a diffuse or multifocal cerebral dysfunction induced by the systemic response to the infection without clinical or laboratory evidence of direct brain infection. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial. SAE generally occurs early during severe sepsis and precedes multiple-organ failure. The most common clinical feature of SAE is the consciousness alteration which ranges from mildly reduced awareness to unresponsiveness and coma. Diagnosis of SAE is primarily clinical and depends on the exclusion of other possible causes of brain deterioration. Electroencephalography (EEG) is almost sensitive, but it is not specific for SAE. Computed Tomography (CT) head scan generally is negative in case of SAE, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can show brain abnormalities in case of SAE, but they are not specific for this condition. Somatosensitive Evoked Potentials (SEPs) are sensitive markers of developing cerebral dysfunction in sepsis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CBF) analysis is generally normal, a part an inconstant elevation of proteins concentration. S100B and NSE have been proposed like biomarkers for diagnosis of SAE, but the existing data are controversial. SAE is reversible even if survivors of severe sepsis have often long lasting or irreversible cognitive and behavioral sequel; however the presence of SAE can have a negative influence on survival. A specific therapy of SAE does not exist and the outcome depends on a prompt and appropriate treatment of sepsis as whole.

  1. Sepsis: An update in management.

    PubMed

    Galen, Benjamin T; Sankey, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Hospitalists are a critical link in providing evidence-based care for patients with sepsis across the disease spectrum, from early recognition to recovery. The past decade of sepsis research has led to significant findings that will change clinical practice for hospital medicine practitioners. Although the incidence of severe sepsis in the United States has continued to rise, in-hospital mortality has declined. Management of the spectrum of sepsis disorders is no longer restricted to the intensive care unit (ICU). This review article will provide an update in the management of sepsis for hospitalists based on recently published pivotal studies. The expanding evidence base in sepsis includes early goal-directed therapy/clinical endpoints/sepsis bundles, antibiotics and source control, volume resuscitation, ICU considerations (including the use of insulin and corticosteroids), mortality/complications, and the newly recognized condition of "sepsis survivorship".

  2. Mitochondrial Function in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Arulkumaran, Nishkantha; Deutschman, Clifford S.; Pinsky, Michael R.; Zuckerbraun, Brian; Schumacker, Paul T.; Gomez, Hernando; Gomez, Alonso; Murray, Patrick; Kellum, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are an essential part of the cellular infrastructure, being the primary site for high energy adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production through oxidative phosphorylation. Clearly, in severe systemic inflammatory states, like sepsis, cellular metabolism is usually altered and end organ dysfunction not only common but predictive of long term morbidity and mortality. Clearly, interest is mitochondrial function both as a target for intracellular injury and response to extrinsic stress have been a major focus of basic science and clinical research into the pathophysiology of acute illness. However, mitochondria have multiple metabolic and signaling functions that may be central in both the expression of sepsis and its ultimate outcome. In this review, the authors address five primary questions centered on the role of mitochondria in sepsis. This review should be used as both a summary source in placing mitochondrial physiology within the context of acute illness and as a focal point for addressing new research into diagnostic and treatment opportunities these insights provide. PMID:26871665

  3. Biomarkers for Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Henriquez-Camacho, Cesar; Losa, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Bloodstream infections are a major concern because of high levels of antibiotic consumption and of the increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistance. Bacteraemia is identified in a small percentage of patients with signs and symptoms of sepsis. Biomarkers are widely used in clinical practice and they are useful for monitoring the infectious process. Procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) have been most widely used, but even these have limited abilities to distinguish sepsis from other inflammatory conditions or to predict outcome. PCT has been used to guide empirical antibacterial therapy in patients with respiratory infections and help to determine if antibacterial therapy can be stopped. New biomarkers such as those in this review will discuss the major types of biomarkers of bloodstream infections/sepsis, including soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1), soluble urokinase-type plasminogen receptor (suPAR), proadrenomedullin (ProADM), and presepsin. PMID:24800240

  4. Biomarkers for sepsis.

    PubMed

    Henriquez-Camacho, Cesar; Losa, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Bloodstream infections are a major concern because of high levels of antibiotic consumption and of the increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistance. Bacteraemia is identified in a small percentage of patients with signs and symptoms of sepsis. Biomarkers are widely used in clinical practice and they are useful for monitoring the infectious process. Procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) have been most widely used, but even these have limited abilities to distinguish sepsis from other inflammatory conditions or to predict outcome. PCT has been used to guide empirical antibacterial therapy in patients with respiratory infections and help to determine if antibacterial therapy can be stopped. New biomarkers such as those in this review will discuss the major types of biomarkers of bloodstream infections/sepsis, including soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1), soluble urokinase-type plasminogen receptor (suPAR), proadrenomedullin (ProADM), and presepsin.

  5. Does group B streptococcal infection contribute significantly to neonatal sepsis in Antigua and Barbuda?

    PubMed

    Martin, T C; Adamson, J; Dickson, T; DiGiantomasso, E; Nesbitt, C

    2007-12-01

    Group B streptococcus is the most common cause of neonatal sepsis in the United States of America (USA). This study was undertaken to determine the contribution of group B streptococcus to neonatal septicaemia in Antigua and Barbuda. From 1994 to 2002, there were about 12,000 births, with 2500 Special Care Nursery admissions, 1100 (44%) with potential neonatal septicaemia. Blood cultures were done in 433/1100 (39%) and cerebrospinal fluid cultures in 52/1100 (5%). Positive cultures were seen in 41/433 (9.5%) with group B streptococcus in 1/41 (2.4%), streptococcus "species" in 3/41 (7.4%) and positive cerebrospinal fluid cultures were seen in 2/52 (one group B streptococcus) giving 5 per 12,000 or 0.4 cases per 1000 babies. Vaginal cultures from 1994 to 2002 revealed group B streptococcus in 14/163 (8.6%) of positive bacterial cultures. A sample of pregnant women from a private office had positive culture for group B streptococcus in 2/120 (1.7%). The prevalence rate of carriage (15 to 40%) and infection (1.7 to 4 per 1000 babies) was much higher in the USA in the same period Universal screening of mothers for group B streptococcus may not be as necessary or cost-effective in Antigua and Barbuda.

  6. Quality improvement in pediatric sepsis.

    PubMed

    Melendez, Elliot; Bachur, Richard

    2015-06-01

    Although there is abundant literature detailing the impact of quality improvement in adult sepsis, the pediatric literature is lacking. Despite consensus definitions for sepsis, which patients along the sepsis spectrum should receive aggressive management and the exact onset of sepsis ('time zero') are not clearly established. In the adult emergency department (ED), sepsis onset is defined as the time of entry into the ED; however, this definition cannot be applied to hospitalized patients or patients who evolve during their ED course. Since the time of sepsis onset will dictate the timeliness of subsequent process measures, the variable definitions in the literature make it difficult to generalize findings among prior studies. Despite the variation in defining time zero, aggressive fluid administration, timely antibiotics, and compliance with sepsis bundles have been shown to improve mortality and to reduce hospital and intensive care length of stay. In addition, early identification tools show promise in beginning to define sepsis onset and retrospective search tools may allow improved case finding of those children of concern for sepsis. Quality improvement in pediatric sepsis is evolving. As we continue to define quality measures, we must standardize the definition of sepsis onset. This definition should be applicable to any treatment venue to ensure measures can be evaluated across all settings. In addition, we must delineate which patients along the sepsis spectrum should be candidates for timely interventions and standardize other outcome measures beyond mortality.

  7. Inducing host protection in pneumococcal sepsis by preactivation of the Ashwell-Morell receptor.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Prabhjit K; Aziz, Peter V; Uchiyama, Satoshi; Rubio, Gabriel R; Lardone, Ricardo D; Le, Dzung; Varki, Nissi M; Nizet, Victor; Marth, Jamey D

    2013-12-10

    The endocytic Ashwell-Morell receptor (AMR) of hepatocytes detects pathogen remodeling of host glycoproteins by neuraminidase in the bloodstream and mitigates the lethal coagulopathy of sepsis. We have investigated the mechanism of host protection by the AMR during the onset of sepsis and in response to the desialylation of blood glycoproteins by the NanA neuraminidase of Streptococcus pneumoniae. We find that the AMR selects among potential glycoprotein ligands unmasked by microbial neuraminidase activity in pneumococcal sepsis to eliminate from blood circulation host factors that contribute to coagulation and thrombosis. This protection is attributable in large part to the rapid induction of a moderate thrombocytopenia by the AMR. We further show that neuraminidase activity in the blood can be manipulated to induce the clearance of AMR ligands including platelets, thereby preactivating a protective response in pneumococcal sepsis that moderates the severity of disseminated intravascular coagulation and enables host survival.

  8. Essentials of sepsis management.

    PubMed

    Green, John M

    2015-04-01

    Despite remarkable advances in the knowledge of infection and human response to it, sepsis continues to be one of the most common challenges surgeons and critical care providers face. Surgeons confront the problem of infection every day, in treating established infections or reacting to a consequence of surgical intervention. Infections after surgery continue to be a problem despite massive efforts to prevent them. Patients rely on the surgeon's ability to recognize infection and treat it. Also, preventing nosocomial infection and antibiotic resistance is a primary responsibility. This article describes diagnostic and therapeutic measures for sepsis in the perioperative surgical patient.

  9. [Clustered cases of intrafamily invasive Streptococcus pyogenes infection (or group A streptococcus)].

    PubMed

    Caillet-Gossot, S; Rousset-Rouviere, C; Arlaud, K; Dubus, J-C; Bosdure, E

    2011-12-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes or group A streptococcus (GAS) is responsible for serious invasive infections with a risk of secondary infection in patients with more contact than in the general population. Regardless of clustering, few intrafamilial invasive infections have been reported despite a recent increase in the incidence of invasive GAS disease. We report the cases of two brothers, one a boy of 8.5 years with toxic shock syndrome with no bacteria identified and the second, 1 week later, his 14.5-year-old brother in hospital for sepsis due to GAS. The occurrence of a confirmed case of invasive GAS and a probable case within such a short period met the definition of clustered cases. Both brothers showed no risk factors for invasive disease and no gateway including skin was found. Antibiotic therapy was initiated in the family as recommended by the French Higher Council of Public Hygiene. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Revisiting caspases in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, M; Jacob, A; Wang, P

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening illness that occurs due to an abnormal host immune network which extends through the initial widespread and overwhelming inflammation, and culminates at the late stage of immunosupression. Recently, interest has been shifted toward therapies aimed at reversing the accompanying periods of immune suppression. Studies in experimental animals and critically ill patients have demonstrated that increased apoptosis of lymphoid organs and some parenchymal tissues contributes to this immune suppression, anergy and organ dysfunction. Immediate to the discoveries of the intracellular proteases, caspases for the induction of apoptosis and inflammation, and their striking roles in sepsis have been focused elaborately in a number of original and review articles. Here we revisited the different aspects of caspases in terms of apoptosis, pyroptosis, necroptosis and inflammation and focused their links in sepsis by reviewing several recent findings. In addition, we have documented striking perspectives which not only rewrite the pathophysiology, but also modernize our understanding for developing novel therapeutics against sepsis. PMID:25412304

  11. Sepsis Associated Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Neera; Duggal, Ashish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a common but poorly understood neurological complication of sepsis. It is characterized by diffuse brain dysfunction secondary to infection elsewhere in the body without overt CNS infection. The pathophysiology of SAE is complex and multifactorial including a number of intertwined mechanisms such as vascular damage, endothelial activation, breakdown of the blood brain barrier, altered brain signaling, brain inflammation, and apoptosis. Clinical presentation of SAE may range from mild symptoms such as malaise and concentration deficits to deep coma. The evaluation of cognitive dysfunction is made difficult by the absence of any specific investigations or biomarkers and the common use of sedation in critically ill patients. SAE thus remains diagnosis of exclusion which can only be made after ruling out other causes of altered mentation in a febrile, critically ill patient by appropriate investigations. In spite of high mortality rate, management of SAE is limited to treatment of the underlying infection and symptomatic treatment for delirium and seizures. It is important to be aware of this condition because SAE may present in early stages of sepsis, even before the diagnostic criteria for sepsis can be met. This review discusses the diagnostic approach to patients with SAE along with its epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis.

  12. Emerging drugs in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Leone, Marc; Textoris, Julien; Michel, Fabrice; Wiramus, Sandrine; Martin, Claude

    2010-03-01

    Sepsis remains a major cause of death in intensive care units. Despite an intense research, a new drug that is effective in reducing mortality in sepsis is still awaited. The literature was analyzed with Pubmed() during the 2008 - 2009 period. If required, seminal articles published before 2008 were cited. Clinical trials focusing on 'sepsis' were first assessed. Next, relevant experimental data in this field were reported. The goal of the review is to determine the role for new licensed antibiotics, to give an insight into the conflict on adjuvant therapies and to disclose new experimental concepts. New licensed antibiotics will offer the opportunity to refine the treatment choices. Direct hemoperfusion using polymyxin B-immobilized fiber column may be an option in sepsis due to Gram-negative bacilli. Among non-antibiotic drugs, new ongoing studies will clarify the role of drotrecogin alfa (activated) and low dose hydrocortisone. The modulation of monocytic human leukocyte antigen-DR seems the most prominent treatment. The use of cardiovascular drugs requires well-conducted clinical trials. The regulation of high mobility group box 1, adenosine blockade or correction of the impaired energy production is still at the experimental level.

  13. Defining Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the review Although infection rates have modestly decreased in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) as a result of ongoing quality improvement measures, neonatal sepsis remains a frequent and devastating problem among hospitalized preterm neonates. Despite multiple attempts to address this unmet need, there have been minimal advances in clinical management, outcomes, and accuracy of diagnostic testing options over the last three decades. One strong contributor to a lack of medical progress is a variable case definition of disease. The inability to agree on a precise definition greatly reduces the likelihood of aligning findings from epidemiologists, clinicians, and researchers, which, in turn, severely hinders progress towards improving outcomes. Recent findings Pediatric consensus definitions for sepsis are not accurate in term infants and are not appropriate for preterm infants. In contrast to the defined multi-stage criteria for other devastating diseases encountered in the NICU (e.g., bronchopulmonary dysplasia), there is significant variability in the criteria used by investigators to substantiate the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. Summary The lack of an accepted consensus definition for neonatal sepsis impedes our efforts towards improved diagnostic and prognostic options as well as accurate outcomes information for this vulnerable population. PMID:26766602

  14. Sepsis Associated Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Neera; Duggal, Ashish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a common but poorly understood neurological complication of sepsis. It is characterized by diffuse brain dysfunction secondary to infection elsewhere in the body without overt CNS infection. The pathophysiology of SAE is complex and multifactorial including a number of intertwined mechanisms such as vascular damage, endothelial activation, breakdown of the blood brain barrier, altered brain signaling, brain inflammation, and apoptosis. Clinical presentation of SAE may range from mild symptoms such as malaise and concentration deficits to deep coma. The evaluation of cognitive dysfunction is made difficult by the absence of any specific investigations or biomarkers and the common use of sedation in critically ill patients. SAE thus remains diagnosis of exclusion which can only be made after ruling out other causes of altered mentation in a febrile, critically ill patient by appropriate investigations. In spite of high mortality rate, management of SAE is limited to treatment of the underlying infection and symptomatic treatment for delirium and seizures. It is important to be aware of this condition because SAE may present in early stages of sepsis, even before the diagnostic criteria for sepsis can be met. This review discusses the diagnostic approach to patients with SAE along with its epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis. PMID:26556425

  15. Sepsis and cytokines: current status.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, T S; Christman, J W

    1996-07-01

    Sepsis is a constellation of clinical signs and symptoms resulting from excessive systemic host inflammatory response to infection. This inflammatory response is largely mediated by cytokines, which are released into the systemic circulation. Plasma concentrations of specific cytokines, TNF alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-8 are frequently elevated in human sepsis and cytokine concentrations correlate with severity and outcome of sepsis. In addition to pro-inflammatory cytokines, soluble cytokine receptors, cytokine receptor antagonists and counter-inflammatory cytokines are also produced in large quantities in patients with sepsis; however, the specific role of these molecules in sepsis remains undefined. A complex interaction of cytokines and cytokine-neutralizing molecules probably determines the clinical presentation and course of sepsis. Intervening in this sequence of events to modify the host inflammatory responses may prove to be a beneficial treatment strategy for sepsis, but currently tested anticytokine therapies have been largely unsuccessful.

  16. Sepsis-induced Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Bermejo, Francisco J; Ruiz-Bailen, Manuel; Gil-Cebrian, Julián; Huertos-Ranchal, María J

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial dysfunction is one of the main predictors of poor outcome in septic patients, with mortality rates next to 70%. During the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, both ventricles can dilate and diminish its ejection fraction, having less response to fluid resuscitation and catecholamines, but typically is assumed to be reversible within 7-10 days. In the last 30 years, It´s being subject of substantial research; however no explanation of its etiopathogenesis or effective treatment have been proved yet. The aim of this manuscript is to review on the most relevant aspects of the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, discuss its clinical presentation, pathophysiology, etiopathogenesis, diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies proposed in recent years. PMID:22758615

  17. [Adsorption therapy in sepsis].

    PubMed

    Hasper, D; Schefold, J C; Jörres, A

    2015-05-01

    The activation of multiple pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators is a key feature in the pathophysiology of sepsis. Many of these mediators may directly contribute to organ dysfunction and determine disease severity. So far our ability to modulate these upregulated mediator pathways is very limited. Therefore the adsorption of such mediators via an extracorporeal circuit may be a beneficial intervention during sepsis. Recent technical innovations have made this intervention feasible. Both systems for exclusive mediator adsorption and for adsorption beside a conventional renal replacement therapy are now available. Some of the membranes can adsorb a broad range of mediators by rather unspecific binding, whereas others specifically adsorb endotoxin or mediators. Whilst biochemical efficacy could be demonstrated by some of the systems, controlled and randomized studies demonstrating improved clinical endpoints are still lacking. Therefore the use of such therapies outside clinical studies cannot yet be recommended.

  18. Defining and Diagnosing Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Scott, Michael C

    2017-02-01

    Sepsis is a heterogeneous clinical syndrome that encompasses infections of many different types and severity. Not surprisingly, it has confounded most attempts to apply a single definition, which has also limited the ability to develop a set of reliable diagnostic criteria. It is perhaps best defined as the different clinical syndromes produced by an immune response to infection that causes harm to the body beyond that of the local effects of the infection.

  19. Sepsis in vulnerable populations.

    PubMed

    Bhagwanjee, Satish; Ugarte, Sebastian

    2014-09-01

    Despite the acquisition of a large body of evidence, there are many unanswered questions about sepsis. The definition of this disease is plagued by the lack of a simple pathophysiological description linking cause to effect and the activation of host immune responses that hinders disease progression at the same time producing multiorgan dysfunction. A plethora of inconsistent clinical features has served to obfuscate rather than illuminate. The Surviving Sepsis Guidelines (SSG) are a major advance because it comprehensively interrogates all aspects of care for the critically ill. For vulnerable populations living in low- and middle-income countries, this guideline is ineffectual because of the lack of region-specific data, differences in etiology of sepsis and burden of disease, limited human capacity and infrastructure, as well as socioeconomic realities. Appropriate care must be guided by common sense guidelines that are sensitive to local realities and adapted as relevant data are acquired. Copyright © 2014 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical trials in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Oeser, Clarissa; Lutsar, Irja; Metsvaht, Tuuli; Turner, Mark A; Heath, Paul T; Sharland, Mike

    2013-12-01

    Antibiotic licensing studies remain a problem in neonates. The classical adult clinical syndrome-based licensing studies do not apply to neonates, where sepsis is the most common infection. The main obstacle to conducting neonatal antibiotic trials is a lack of consensus on the definition of neonatal sepsis itself and the selection of appropriate endpoints. This article describes the difficulties of the clinical and laboratory definitions of neonatal sepsis and reviews the varying designs of previous neonatal sepsis trials. The optimal design of future trials of new antibiotics will need to be based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic parameters, combined with adequately powered clinical studies to determine safety and efficacy.

  1. Early-onset neonatal sepsis in Dhaka, Bangladesh: risk associated with maternal bacterial colonisation and chorioamnionitis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Grace J; Baqui, Abdullah H; Modak, Joyanta K; Murillo-Chaves, Adriana; Mahmud, Abdullah A; Boyd, Theonia K; Black, Robert E; Saha, Samir K

    2013-09-01

    To estimate the risk of early-onset neonatal sepsis among newborns of mothers with chorioamnionitis and/or bacterial colonisation in Dhaka. We conducted a cohort study at a maternity centre following 600 mother-newborn pairs. Women with a positive bacterial vaginal culture or positive Group B streptococcus (GBS) rectal culture during labour were classified as colonised. Women with placental histopathology demonstrating signs of maternal or foetal inflammation were classified as having chorioamnionitis. Newborns were followed over the first 7 days of life. The primary outcome measure was physician or community health worker diagnosis of neonatal sepsis following modified World Health Organization Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses criteria. Survival analysis was conducted with non-parametric, parametric and semiparametric models. Of the 600 mother-newborn pairs, 12.8% of newborns were diagnosed with early-onset sepsis. Five hundred and forty-three women had both colonisation and chorioamnionitis data, 55.4% of mothers were non-exposed, 31.7% were only colonised and 12.9% had chorioamnionitis regardless of colonisation status. After adjusting for birthweight, sex, maternal characteristics and wealth, newborns of only colonised mothers developed sepsis 63% faster and had a 71% higher risk of developing sepsis than their non-exposed counterparts (RT = 0.37, 95% CI 0.14-1.03; RH = 1.71, 95% CI 1.00-2.94). Newborns of mothers with chorioamnionitis developed sepsis 74% faster and had a 111% higher risk of developing sepsis (RT = 0.26, 95% CI 0.07-0.94; RH = 2.11, 95% CI 1.06-4.21). Newborns born to mothers with colonisation or chorioamnionitis developed sepsis faster and were at higher risk of developing sepsis in Dhaka. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Streptococcus anginosus ("Streptococcus milleri"): the unrecognized pathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Ruoff, K L

    1988-01-01

    "Streptococcus milleri" is an unofficial name that has been applied to a group of streptococci which, although basically similar, show various hemolytic, serological, and physiological characteristics. The species name Streptococcus anginosus has recently been recognized as the approved name for these organisms. Streptococci known as "S. milleri" have been implicated as etiologic agents in a variety of serious purulent infections, but because of their heterogeneous characteristics, these organisms may be unrecognized or misidentified by clinical laboratorians. This review describes the bacteriological aspects of organisms known as "S. milleri," their clinical significance, and the problems encountered with their identification in the clinical laboratory. PMID:3060239

  3. Clinical case presentation: life threatening Group A sepsis secondary to HyCoSy

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Joanne; Gee, Alison; Ramsay, Philippa; Benness, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hysterosalpingo contrast sonography (HyCoSy) is a commonly performed procedure in the investigation of infertility. Infection is an uncommon complication of this procedure. Should it occur, it is generally mild and amenable to outpatient treatment with oral antibiotics. We present a case of an immunosuppressed woman who underwent HyCoSy for investigation of secondary infertility and developed life‐threatening sepsis with Group A streptococcus. PMID:28191223

  4. Coagulation and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Levi, Marcel; van der Poll, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Severe sepsis is almost invariably associated with systemic activation of coagulation. There is ample evidence that demonstrates a wide-ranging cross-talk between hemostasis and inflammation, which is probably implicated in the pathogenesis of organ dysfunction in patients with sepsis. Inflammation not only leads to initiation and propagation of coagulation activity, but coagulation also markedly influences inflammation. Molecular mechanisms that play a role in inflammation-induced effects on coagulation have been recognized in much detail. Pro-inflammatory cells and cyto- and chemokines can activate the coagulation system and downregulate crucial physiological anticoagulant mechanisms. Initiation of coagulation activation and consequent thrombin generation is caused by expression of tissue factor on activated monocytes and endothelial cells and is ineffectually offset by tissue factor pathway inhibitor. At the same time, endothelial-associated anticoagulant pathways, in particular the protein C system, is impaired by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Also, fibrin removal is severely obstructed by inactivation of the endogenous fibrinolytic system, mainly as a result of upregulation of its principal inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1). Increased fibrin generation and impaired break down lead to deposition of (micro)vascular clots, which may contribute to tissue ischemia and ensuing organ dysfunction. The foundation of the management of coagulation in sepsis is the explicit and thorough treatment of the underlying disorder by antibiotic treatment and source control measures. Adjunctive strategies focused at the impairment of coagulation, including anticoagulants and restoration of physiological anticoagulant mechanisms, may supposedly be indicated and have been found advantageous in experimental and initial clinical trials.

  5. The role of the liver in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Li, Song; Li, Shulin

    2014-01-01

    Despite the progress made in the clinical management of sepsis, sepsis morbidity and mortality rates remain high. The inflammatory pathogenesis and organ injury leading to death from sepsis are not fully understood for vital organs, especially the liver. Only recently has the role of the liver in sepsis begun to be revealed. Pre-existing liver dysfunction is a risk factor for the progression of infection to sepsis. Liver dysfunction after sepsis is an independent risk factor for multiple organ dysfunction and sepsis-induced death. The liver works as a lymphoid organ in response to sepsis. Acting as a double-edged sword in sepsis, the liver-mediated immune response is responsible for clearing bacteria and toxins but also causes inflammation, immunosuppression, and organ damage. Attenuating liver injury and restoring liver function lowers morbidity and mortality rates in patients with sepsis. This review summarizes the central role of liver in the host immune response to sepsis and in clinical outcomes.

  6. Sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Patrick J

    2013-08-01

    Early recognition of sepsis and septic shock in children relies on obtaining an attentive clinical history, accurate vital signs, and a physical examination focused on mental status, work of breathing, and circulatory status. Laboratory tests may support the diagnosis but are not reliable in isolation. The goal of septic shock management is reversal of tissue hypoperfusion. The therapeutic end point is shock reversal. Mortality is significantly better among children when managed appropriately. Every physician who cares for children must strive to have a high level of suspicion and keen clinical acumen for recognizing the rare but potentially seriously ill child.

  7. Sepsis in Special Populations.

    PubMed

    Borloz, Matthew P; Hamden, Khalief E

    2017-02-01

    Sepsis is recognized by the presence of physiologic and laboratory changes that reflect the inflammatory response to infection on cellular and systemic levels. Comorbid conditions, such as cirrhosis, end-stage renal disease, and obesity, alter patients' susceptibility to infection and their response to it once present. Baseline changes in vital signs and chronic medications often mask clues to the severity of illness. The physiologic, hematologic, and biochemical adjustments that accompany pregnancy and the puerperium introduce similar challenges. Emergency providers must remain vigilant for subtle alterations in the expected baseline for these conditions to arrive at appropriate management decisions.

  8. The evolutionary logic of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Rózsa, Lajos; Apari, Péter; Sulyok, Mihály; Tappe, Dennis; Bodó, Imre; Hardi, Richárd; Müller, Viktor

    2017-09-09

    The recently proposed Microbiome Mutiny Hypothesis posits that members of the human microbiome obtain information about the host individuals' health status and, when host survival is compromised, switch to an intensive exploitation strategy to maximize residual transmission. In animals and humans, sepsis is an acute systemic reaction to microbes invading the normally sterile body compartments. When induced by formerly mutualistic or neutral microbes, possibly in response to declining host health, sepsis appears to fit the 'microbiome mutiny' scenario except for its apparent failure to enhance transmission of the causative organisms. We propose that the ability of certain species of the microbiome to induce sepsis is not a fortuitous side effect of within-host replication, but rather it might, in some cases, be the result of their adaptive evolution. Whenever host health declines, inducing sepsis can be adaptive for those members of the healthy human microbiome that are capable of colonizing the future cadaver and spread by cadaver-borne transmission. We hypothesize that such microbes might exhibit switches along the 'mutualist - lethal pathogen - decomposer - mutualist again' scenario, implicating a previously unsuspected, surprising level of phenotypic plasticity. This hypothesis predicts that those species of the healthy microbiome that are recurring causative agents of sepsis can participate in the decomposition of cadavers, and can be transmitted as soil-borne or water-borne infections. Furthermore, in individual sepsis cases, the same microbial clones that dominate the systemic infection that precipitates sepsis, should also be present in high concentration during decomposition following death: this prediction is testable by molecular fingerprinting in experimentally induced animal models. Sepsis is a leading cause of human death worldwide. If further research confirms that some cases of sepsis indeed involve the 'mutiny' (facultative phenotypic switching) of

  9. Gender differences in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Angele, Martin K; Pratschke, Sebastian; Hubbard, William J; Chaudry, Irshad H

    2014-01-01

    During sepsis, a complex network of cytokine, immune, and endothelial cell interactions occur and disturbances in the microcirculation cause organ dysfunction or even failure leading to high mortality in those patients. In this respect, numerous experimental and clinical studies indicate sex-specific differences in infectious diseases and sepsis. Female gender has been demonstrated to be protective under such conditions, whereas male gender may be deleterious due to a diminished cell-mediated immune response and cardiovascular functions. Male sex hormones, i.e., androgens, have been shown to be suppressive on cell-mediated immune responses. In contrast, female sex hormones exhibit protective effects which may contribute to the natural advantages of females under septic conditions. Thus, the hormonal status has to be considered when treating septic patients. Therefore, potential therapies could be derived from this knowledge. In this respect, administration of female sex hormones (estrogens and their precursors) may exert beneficial effects. Alternatively, blockade of male sex hormone receptors could result in maintained immune responses under adverse circulatory conditions. Finally, administration of agents that influence enzymes synthesizing female sex hormones which attenuate the levels of pro-inflammatory agents might exert salutary effects in septic patients. Prospective patient studies are required for transferring those important experimental findings into the clinical arena. PMID:24193307

  10. Cytopathic hypoxia in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Fink, M

    1997-01-01

    Diminished availability of oxygen at the cellular level might account for organ dysfunction in sepsis. Although the classical forms of tissue hypoxia due to hypoxemia, anemia, or inadequate perfusion all might be important under some conditions, it seems increasingly likely that a fourth mechanism, namely cytopathic hypoxia, might play a role as well. The term cytopathic hypoxia is used to denote diminished production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) despite normal (or even supranormal) PO2 values in the vicinity of mitochondria within cells. At least in theory, cytopathic hypoxia could be a consequence of several different (but mutually compatible) pathogenic mechanisms, including diminished delivery of a key substrate (e.g., pyruvate) into the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, inhibition of key mitochondrial enzymes involved in either the TCA cycle or the electron transport chain, activation of the enzyme, poly-(ADP)-ribosylpolymerase (PARP), or collapse of the protonic gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane leading to uncoupling of oxidation (of NADH and FADH) from phosphorylation of ADP to form ATP. Tantalizing, but limited, data support the view that cytopathic hypoxia occurs in both animals and patients with sepsis or endotoxemia.

  11. The Changing Epidemiology and Definitions of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Kempker, Jordan A.; Martin, Greg S.

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis This review begins with a description of the trends in the incidence of and mortality from sepsis in the United States and globally. Then we discuss the known factors associated with increased risk for the development of sepsis. Finally, we discuss the limitations of the current clinical definition of sepsis and the clinical correlations of the current epidemiology of sepsis. PMID:27229635

  12. Acute Neonatal Parotitis with Late-Onset Septic Shock due to Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Boulyana, M.

    2014-01-01

    Acute neonatal parotitis (ANP) is a very rare disease. Most cases are managed conservatively; early antibiotics and adequate hydration may reduce the need for surgery. The most common cause of ANP is Staphylococcus aureus. We report a rare case of acute neonatal parotitis with late-onset septic shock due to Streptococcus agalactiae. The diagnosis was confirmed with ultrasound and isolation of Streptococcus agalactiae from blood culture. The patient was treated successfully with 10 days of intravenous antibiotics and supportive measures. Despite being rare, streptococcal ANP should be considered in the etiological diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. Early diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic might prevent serious complications. PMID:24653847

  13. Renal blood flow in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Langenberg, Christoph; Bellomo, Rinaldo; May, Clive; Wan, Li; Egi, Moritoki; Morgera, Stanislao

    2005-01-01

    Introduction To assess changes in renal blood flow (RBF) in human and experimental sepsis, and to identify determinants of RBF. Method Using specific search terms we systematically interrogated two electronic reference libraries to identify experimental and human studies of sepsis and septic acute renal failure in which RBF was measured. In the retrieved studies, we assessed the influence of various factors on RBF during sepsis using statistical methods. Results We found no human studies in which RBF was measured with suitably accurate direct methods. Where it was measured in humans with sepsis, however, RBF was increased compared with normal. Of the 159 animal studies identified, 99 reported decreased RBF and 60 reported unchanged or increased RBF. The size of animal, technique of measurement, duration of measurement, method of induction of sepsis, and fluid administration had no effect on RBF. In contrast, on univariate analysis, state of consciousness of animals (P = 0.005), recovery after surgery (P < 0.001), haemodynamic pattern (hypodynamic or hyperdynamic state; P < 0.001) and cardiac output (P < 0.001) influenced RBF. However, multivariate analysis showed that only cardiac output remained an independent determinant of RBF (P < 0.001). Conclusion The impact of sepsis on RBF in humans is unknown. In experimental sepsis, RBF was reported to be decreased in two-thirds of studies (62 %) and unchanged or increased in one-third (38%). On univariate analysis, several factors not directly related to sepsis appear to influence RBF. However, multivariate analysis suggests that cardiac output has a dominant effect on RBF during sepsis, such that, in the presence of a decreased cardiac output, RBF is typically decreased, whereas in the presence of a preserved or increased cardiac output RBF is typically maintained or increased. PMID:16137349

  14. Sepsis From the Gut: The Enteric Habitat of Bacteria That Cause Late-Onset Neonatal Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Carl, Mike A.; Ndao, I. Malick; Springman, A. Cody; Manning, Shannon D.; Johnson, James R.; Johnston, Brian D.; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.; Weinstock, Erica Sodergren; Weinstock, George M.; Wylie, Todd N.; Mitreva, Makedonka; Abubucker, Sahar; Zhou, Yanjiao; Stevens, Harold J.; Hall-Moore, Carla; Julian, Samuel; Shaikh, Nurmohammad; Warner, Barbara B.; Tarr, Phillip I.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Late-onset sepsis is a major problem in neonatology, but the habitat of the pathogens before bloodstream invasion occurs is not well established. Methods. We examined prospectively collected stools from premature infants with sepsis to find pathogens that subsequently invaded their bloodstreams, and sought the same organisms in stools of infants without sepsis. Culture-based techniques were used to isolate stool bacteria that provisionally matched the bloodstream organisms, which were then genome sequenced to confirm or refute commonality. Results. Of 11 children with late-onset neonatal bloodstream infections, 7 produced at least 1 stool that contained group B Streptococcus (GBS), Serratia marcescens, or Escherichia coli before their sepsis episode with provisionally matching organisms. Of 96 overlap comparison subjects without sepsis temporally associated with these cases, 4 were colonized with provisionally matching GBS or S. marcescens. Of 175 comparisons of stools from randomly selected infants without sepsis, 1 contained a GBS (this infant had also served as an overlap comparison subject and both specimens contained provisionally matching GBS). Genome sequencing confirmed common origin of provisionally matching fecal and blood isolates. The invasive E. coli were present in all presepticemic stools since birth, but gut colonization with GBS and S. marcescens occurred closer to time of bloodstream infection. Conclusions. The neonatal gut harbors sepsis-causing pathogens, but such organisms are not inevitable members of the normal microbiota. Surveillance microbiology, decolonization, and augmented hygiene might prevent dissemination of invasive bacteria between and within premature infants. PMID:24647013

  15. Neonatal Sepsis and Neutrophil Insufficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Melvan, John Nicholas; Bagby, Gregory J.; Welsh, David A.; Nelson, Steve; Zhang, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis has continuously been a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality despite current advances in chemotherapy and patient intensive care facilities. Neonates are at high risk for developing bacterial infections due to quantitative and qualitative insufficiencies of innate immunity, particularly granulocyte lineage development and response to infection. Although antibiotics remain the mainstay of treatment, adjuvant therapies enhancing immune function have shown promise in treating sepsis in neonates. This chapter reviews current strategies for the clinical management of neonatal sepsis and analyzes mechanisms underlying insufficiencies of neutrophil defense in neonates with emphasis on new directions for adjuvant therapy development. PMID:20521927

  16. Fluid Resuscitation in Severe Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Loflin, Rob; Winters, Michael E

    2017-02-01

    Since its original description in 1832, fluid resuscitation has become the cornerstone of early and aggressive treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock. However, questions remain about optimal fluid composition, dose, and rate of administration for critically ill patients. This article reviews pertinent physiology of the circulatory system, pathogenesis of septic shock, and phases of sepsis resuscitation, and then focuses on the type, rate, and amount of fluid administration for severe sepsis and septic shock, so providers can choose the right fluid, for the right patient, at the right time.

  17. Improving multidisciplinary severe sepsis management using the Sepsis Six .

    PubMed

    Bhat, Amar; Asghar, Maryam; Raulia, Gagandeep; Mandal, Amit Keiran John

    2016-12-01

    Each year in the UK, it is estimated that more than 100,000 people are admitted to hospital with sepsis and around 37,000 people will die as a result of the condition. We present an audit, re-audit and the implications these have had on the management of severe sepsis using the Sepsis Six, ultimately through actively promoting teamwork to initiate the protocol. This led to a significant improvement in management, decreasing admissions to the intensive care unit (ITU), length of stay in hospital and the number of patient deaths.The initial audit and re-audit were done over 2-month periods. All clerking notes of patients with a medical consultant diagnosis of 'sepsis' on post-take ward round were analysed and further screened for presence of severe sepsis according to national guidelines.There was significant improvement from only 1% of patients being appropriately managed (according to the existing guidelines) to 67% of eligible subjects adhering to the protocol (p<0.0001). Initially, 19% were admitted to the ITU (6% died), improving to 7% on re-audit (with no deaths). Length of hospital stay reduced from 10 to 7 days (p<0.0001).There was a complete change in the management of severe sepsis with trust-wide updated protocols, resulting in a decrease in hospital morbidity and mortality. © Royal College of Physicians 2016. All rights reserved.

  18. Thyroid hormone disorders and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bin; Yu, Zhui; Li, Yinping

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome with high mortality, which results from severe infection and can lead to secondary organ dysfunction. It is one of the most common cause of death in intensive care unit. Clinical reports have shown that sepsis was often accompanied by thyroid dysfunction, which is called "low triiodothyronine (T3)" syndrome and characterized by decreased blood total T3 and free T3, and by normal or decreased thyroxine (T4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). This syndrome may greatly affect the prognosis of patients with sepsis. The main purpose of this review is to illustrate the role of thyroid hormone disorder in the development and prognosis of sepsis.

  19. Group B Streptococcus and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ105 PREGNANCY Group B Strep and Pregnancy • What is group B streptococcus (GBS)? • What does it mean to be ... a planned cesarean birth? •Glossary What is group B streptococcus (GBS)? Group B streptococcus is one of ...

  20. Severe sepsis in older adults.

    PubMed

    Umberger, Reba; Callen, Bonnie; Brown, Mary Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Severe sepsis may be underrecognized in older adults. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to review special considerations related to early detection of severe sepsis in older adults. Normal organ changes attributed to aging may delay early detection of sepsis at the time when interventions have the greatest potential to improve patient outcomes. Systems are reviewed for changes. For example, the cardiovascular system may have a limited or absent compensatory response to inflammation after an infectious insult, and the febrile response and recruitment of white blood cells may be blunted because of immunosenescence in aging. Three of the 4 hallmark responses (temperature, heart rate, and white blood cell count) to systemic inflammation may be diminished in older adults as compared with younger adults. It is important to consider that older adults may not always manifest the typical systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Atypical signs such as confusion, decreased appetite, and unsteady gait may occur before sepsis related organ failure. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria and a comparison of organ failure criteria were reviewed. Mortality rates in sepsis and severe sepsis remain high and are often complicated by multiple organ failures. As the numbers of older adults increase, early identification and prompt treatment is crucial in improving patient outcomes.

  1. Neonatal Sepsis and Inflammatory Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Reis Machado, Juliana; Soave, Danilo Figueiredo; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius; de Menezes, Liliana Borges; Etchebehere, Renata Margarida; Monteiro, Maria Luiza Gonçalves dos Reis; Antônia dos Reis, Marlene; Corrêa, Rosana Rosa Miranda; Celes, Mara Rúbia Nunes

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and its signs and symptoms are nonspecific, which makes the diagnosis difficult. The routinely used laboratory tests are not effective methods of analysis, as they are extremely nonspecific and often cause inappropriate use of antibiotics. Sepsis is the result of an infection associated with a systemic inflammatory response with production and release of a wide range of inflammatory mediators. Cytokines are potent inflammatory mediators and their serum levels are increased during infections, so changes from other inflammatory effector molecules may occur. Although proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines have been identified as probable markers of neonatal infection, in order to characterize the inflammatory response during sepsis, it is necessary to analyze a panel of cytokines and not only the measurement of individual cytokines. Measurements of inflammatory mediators bring new options for diagnosing and following up neonatal sepsis, thus enabling early treatment and, as a result, increased neonatal survival. By taking into account the magnitude of neonatal sepsis, the aim of this review is to address the role of cytokines in the pathogenesis of neonatal sepsis and its value as a diagnostic criterion. PMID:25614712

  2. Understanding brain dysfunction in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis often is characterized by an acute brain dysfunction, which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Its pathophysiology is highly complex, resulting from both inflammatory and noninflammatory processes, which may induce significant alterations in vulnerable areas of the brain. Important mechanisms include excessive microglial activation, impaired cerebral perfusion, blood–brain-barrier dysfunction, and altered neurotransmission. Systemic insults, such as prolonged inflammation, severe hypoxemia, and persistent hyperglycemia also may contribute to aggravate sepsis-induced brain dysfunction or injury. The diagnosis of brain dysfunction in sepsis relies essentially on neurological examination and neurological tests, such as EEG and neuroimaging. A brain MRI should be considered in case of persistent brain dysfunction after control of sepsis and exclusion of major confounding factors. Recent MRI studies suggest that septic shock can be associated with acute cerebrovascular lesions and white matter abnormalities. Currently, the management of brain dysfunction mainly consists of control of sepsis and prevention of all aggravating factors, including metabolic disturbances, drug overdoses, anticholinergic medications, withdrawal syndromes, and Wernicke’s encephalopathy. Modulation of microglial activation, prevention of blood–brain-barrier alterations, and use of antioxidants represent relevant therapeutic targets that may impact significantly on neurologic outcomes. In the future, investigations in patients with sepsis should be undertaken to reduce the duration of brain dysfunction and to study the impact of this reduction on important health outcomes, including functional and cognitive status in survivors. PMID:23718252

  3. Sepsis in Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Derek S.; Wong, Hector R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In this review we will discuss risk factors for developing sepsis; the role of biomarkers in establishing an early diagnosis, monitoring therapeutic efficacy, stratification, and for the identification of sepsis endotypes; and the pathophysiology and management of severe sepsis and septic shock, with an emphasis on the impact of sepsis on cardiovascular function. Data Source MEDLINE, PubMed Conclusion There is a lot of excitement in the field of sepsis research today. Scientific advances in the diagnosis and clinical staging of sepsis, as well as a personalized approach to the treatment of sepsis, offer tremendous promise for the future. However, at the same time, it is also evident that sepsis mortality has not improved enough, even with progress in our understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of sepsis. PMID:27490609

  4. Antibiotic use in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Yurdakök, M

    1998-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a life-threatening emergency and any delay in treatment may cause death. Initial signs of neonatal sepsis are slight and nonspecific. Therefore, in suspected sepsis, two or three days empirical antibiotic therapy should begin immediately after cultures have been obtained without awaiting the results. Antibiotics should be reevaluated when the results of the cultures and susceptibility tests are available. If the cultures are negative and the clinical findings are well, antibiotics should be stopped. Because of the nonspecific nature of neonatal sepsis, especially in small preterm infants, physicians continue antibiotics once started. If a baby has pneumonia or what appears to be sepsis, antibiotics should not be stopped, although cultures are negative. The duration of therapy depends on the initial response to the appropriate antibiotics but should be 10 to 14 days in most infants with sepsis and minimal or absent focal infection. In infants who developed sepsis during the first week of life, empirical therapy must cover group B streptococci, Enterobacteriaceae (especially E. coli) and Listeria monocytogenes. Penicillin or ampicillin plus an aminoglycoside is usually effective against all these organisms. Initial empirical antibiotic therapy for infants who developed sepsis beyond the first days of life must cover the organisms associated with early-onset sepsis as well as hospital-acquired pathogens such as staphylococci, enterococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Penicillin or ampicillin and an aminoglycoside combination may also be used in the initial therapy of late-onset sepsis as in cases with early-onset sepsis. In nosocomial infections, netilmicin or amikacin should be preferred. In cases showing increased risk of staphylococcal infection (e.g. presence of vascular catheter) or Pseudomonas infection (e.g. presence of typical skin lesions), antistaphylococcal or anti-Pseudomonas agents may be preferred in the initial empirical therapy. In

  5. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Gofton, Teneille E; Young, G Bryan

    2012-10-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a diffuse brain dysfunction that occurs secondary to infection in the body without overt CNS infection. SAE is frequently encountered in critically ill patients in intensive care units, and in up to 70% of patients with severe systemic infection. The severity of SAE can range from mild delirium to deep coma. Seizures and myoclonus are infrequent and cranial nerves are almost always spared, but most severe cases have an associated critical illness neuromyopathy. Development of SAE probably involves a number of mechanisms that are not mutually exclusive and vary from patient to patient. Substantial neurological and psychological morbidities often occur in survivors. Mortality is almost always due to multiorgan failure rather than neurological complications, and is almost 70% in patients with severe SAE. Further research into the pathophysiology, management and prevention of SAE is needed. This Review discusses the epidemiology and clinical presentation of SAE. Recent evidence for SAE pathophysiology is outlined and a diagnostic approach to patients with this syndrome is presented. Lastly, prognosis and management of SAE is discussed.

  6. Trends in the epidemiology of neonatal sepsis of vertical transmission in the era of group B streptococcal prevention.

    PubMed

    López Sastre, José B; Fernández Colomer, Belen; Coto Cotallo, Gilan D; Ramos Aparicio, Antonio

    2005-04-01

    To assess trends in the epidemiology of culture-proven and clinical neonatal sepsis of vertical transmission in the era of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis. Since 1995, the neonatal services of 28 acute-care teaching hospitals in Spain ("Grupo de Hospitales Castrillo") have been involved in the prospective surveillance of neonatal infection of vertical transmission. We here report the comparison of the incidence for the periods 1996-1997 and 2000-2001, and look separately at two groups of hospitals according to the time at which the official hospital policy to provide intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis for group B Streptococcus (GBS) prevention was adopted. In 16 hospitals the policy was adopted in 1999 and in 10 before 1998 (nine hospitals in 1996, one in 1997). The incidence of proven sepsis decreased significantly by 22% and 54% in the hospitals that started prophylaxis in 1999 and before 1998, respectively. The incidence of GBS sepsis also declined significantly by 36.4% and 65.4% in both groups of hospitals, respectively. Significant variations in the incidence of clinical vertical sepsis as well as in the incidence of sepsis caused by Haemophilus influenzae and Klebsiella were not found. Sepsis caused by Escherichia coli increased in the hospitals with prophylaxis from 1999 and decreased in those that began prophylaxis before 1998, in which the mortality rate of proven and clinical sepsis also decreased significantly by 58.6%. There was a substantial decline in the incidence of proven vertical sepsis, with a significant reduction of GBS sepsis, although decreases were more marked when antibiotic prophylaxis was started before 1998. In this group of hospitals, there was also a decrease in the mortality rate. Fluctuations in the incidence of E. coli infection suggest the need for continuing epidemiological surveillance.

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides in Human Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lukas; van Meegern, Anne; Doemming, Sabine; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) were identified as an important part of innate immunity. They exist in species from bacteria to mammals and can be isolated in body fluids and on surfaces constitutively or induced by inflammation. Defensins have anti-bacterial effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as anti-viral and anti-yeast effects. Human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1–3 and human beta-defensins (HBDs) 1–3 are some of the most important defensins in humans. Recent studies have demonstrated higher levels of HNP 1–3 and HBD-2 in sepsis. The bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) attenuates local inflammatory response and decreases systemic toxicity of endotoxins. Moreover, BPI might reflect the severity of organ dysfunction in sepsis. Elevated plasma lactoferrin is detected in patients with organ failure. HNP 1–3, lactoferrin, BPI, and heparin-binding protein are increased in sepsis. Human lactoferrin peptide 1–11 (hLF 1–11) possesses antimicrobial activity and modulates inflammation. The recombinant form of lactoferrin [talactoferrin alpha (TLF)] has been shown to decrease mortality in critically ill patients. A phase II/III study with TLF in sepsis did not confirm this result. The growing number of multiresistant bacteria is an ongoing problem in sepsis therapy. Furthermore, antibiotics are known to promote the liberation of pro-inflammatory cell components and thus augment the severity of sepsis. Compared to antibiotics, AMPs kill bacteria but also neutralize pathogenic factors such as lipopolysaccharide. The obstacle to applying naturally occurring AMPs is their high nephro- and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the challenge is to develop peptides to treat septic patients effectively without causing harm. This overview focuses on natural and synthetic AMPs in human and experimental sepsis and their potential to provide significant improvements in the treatment of critically ill with severe infections

  8. The Ashwell receptor mitigates the lethal coagulopathy of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Prabhjit K; Uchiyama, Satoshi; Ditto, David; Varki, Nissi; Le, Dzung T; Nizet, Victor; Marth, Jamey D

    2008-06-01

    The Ashwell receptor, the major lectin of hepatocytes, rapidly clears from blood circulation glycoproteins bearing glycan ligands that include galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine. This asialoglycoprotein receptor activity remains a key factor in the development and administration of glycoprotein pharmaceuticals, yet a biological purpose of the Ashwell receptor has remained elusive. We have identified endogenous ligands of the Ashwell receptor as glycoproteins and regulatory components in blood coagulation and thrombosis that include von Willebrand factor (vWF) and platelets. The Ashwell receptor normally modulates vWF homeostasis and is responsible for thrombocytopenia during systemic Streptococcus pneumoniae infection by eliminating platelets desialylated by the bacterium's neuraminidase. Hemostatic adaptation by the Ashwell receptor moderates the onset and severity of disseminated intravascular coagulation during sepsis and improves the probability of host survival.

  9. Intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis for Group B Streptococcus: has the time come to wait more than 4 hours?

    PubMed

    Turrentine, Mark

    2014-07-01

    Despite progress in preventing infant group B streptococcal disease, group B streptococcus remains the leading cause of early-onset neonatal sepsis in the United States. Fortunately, most women who are colonized with group B streptococcus receive therapy and antibiotic prophylaxis is effective. However, the only factor associated with missed chemoprophylaxis is the short duration of time between hospital admission and delivery. Although antibiotic prophylaxis given for at least 2 hours shows some pharmacological benefit, the most effective method of preventing early-onset group B streptococcus disease is 4 hours of therapy. Intrapartum management strategies might be modified to improve the efficacy of antibiotic exposure. Obstetricians should consider strengthening the beneficial effect of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis for infants exposed to group B streptococcus by providing at least 4 hours of treatment coverage. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Established and novel biomarkers of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Faix, James D

    2011-04-01

    The increased incidence of sepsis, a systemic response to infection that occurs in some patients, has stimulated interest in identifying infected patients who are at risk and intervening early. When this condition progresses to severe sepsis (characterized by organ dysfunction), mortality is high. Hospitals that have implemented recommendations of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign have seen a reduction in mortality rate for hospital-acquired severe sepsis. They may reduce this further by focusing on new approaches to diagnosing sepsis, especially at an early stage. Sepsis is a complicated syndrome with many physiological derangements and many emerging laboratory markers of sepsis have been proposed as adjuncts to clinical evaluation. The list includes cytokines, acute phase proteins, neutrophil activation markers, markers of abnormal coagulation and, recently, markers of suppression of both the innate and adaptive immune response. The perfect biomarker would accurately identify patients at risk of developing severe sepsis and then guide targeted therapy.

  11. Sepsis care: getting it right every time.

    PubMed

    2016-10-06

    In the UK, there are an estimated 150,000 cases of sepsis per year, resulting in 44,000 deaths. This equates to more deaths than from bowel, breast and prostate cancer combined according to the Sepsis Trust.

  12. Current epidemiology of sepsis in mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xuelian; Du, Bin; Lu, Meizhu; Wu, Minming

    2016-01-01

    The disease burden of sepsis is a global issue. Most of the large-scale epidemiological investigations on sepsis have been carried out in developed countries. The population of 1.3 billion in mainland China accounts for approximately 1/5th of the whole world population. Thus, the knowledge of the incidence and mortality of sepsis in mainland China is vital before employing measures for its improvement. However, most of the epidemiological data of sepsis in mainland China was obtained from ICU settings, and thus lacks the population-based incidence and mortality of sepsis. In the present review, we summarized the limited literature encompassing the incidence, mortality, long-term outcome, and pathogens of sepsis in mainland China. Therefore, it might provide some valuable information regarding the sepsis disease burden and current issues in the management of sepsis in mainland China. PMID:27713882

  13. Update on pediatric sepsis: a review.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the leading causes of mortality among children worldwide. Unfortunately, however, reliable evidence was insufficient in pediatric sepsis and many aspects in clinical practice actually depend on expert consensus and some evidence in adult sepsis. More recent findings have given us deep insights into pediatric sepsis since the publication of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines 2012. New knowledge was added regarding the hemodynamic management and the timely use of antimicrobials. Quality improvement initiatives of pediatric "sepsis bundles" were reported to be successful in clinical outcomes by several centers. Moreover, a recently published global epidemiologic study (the SPROUT study) did not only reveal the demographics, therapeutic interventions, and prognostic outcomes but also elucidated the inappropriateness of the current definition of pediatric sepsis. With these updated knowledge, the management of pediatric sepsis would be expected to make further progress. In addition, it is meaningful that the fundamental data on which future research should be based were established through the SPROUT study.

  14. [Understanding the pathogenetic mechanisms of SIRS and sepsis and development of innovative therapies of sepsis].

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Naoki; Fujishima, Seitaro

    2004-12-01

    The concept of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) was introduced in 1992 to define and objectively diagnose sepsis. Over the last decade, the definition of sepsis has been used for inclusion criteria of multicenter trials to develop innovative therapies of sepsis. With the recent understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms of sepsis, many drugs have been tested, but only two drugs (activated protein C and neutrophil-elastase inhibitor) have been approved for clinical use in sepsis or SIRS. Further understanding of basic pathophysiology of SIRS and sepsis holds promise to develop a new therapeutic strategy to improve survival of patients with SIRS and sepsis.

  15. Association of fungal sepsis and galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sanjay; Bharti, Bhavneet; Inusha, P

    2010-06-01

    Galactosemia is one of the rare inborn errors of metabolism, which if detected early can be treated effectively. Galactosemic infants have a significant increased risk of developing sepsis. E. coli sepsis is a known entity, and also an important cause of early mortality in these children. But fungal sepsis in these patients is rarely reported. Here is a case of 45 day-old child who presented with fungal sepsis, which on investigation turned out to be galactosemia.

  16. The inflammatory response in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Bosmann, Markus; Ward, Peter A

    2013-03-01

    The pathophysiology of sepsis and its accompanying systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and the events that lead to multiorgan failure and death are poorly understood. It is known that, in septic humans and rodents, the development of SIRS is associated with a loss of the redox balance, but SIRS can also develop in noninfectious states. In addition, a hyperinflammatory state develops, together with impaired innate immune functions of phagocytes, immunosuppression, and complement activation, collectively leading to septic shock and lethality. Here, we discuss recent insights into the signaling pathways in immune and phagocytic cells that underlie sepsis and SIRS and consider how these might be targeted for therapeutic interventions to reverse or attenuate pathways that lead to lethality during sepsis.

  17. The Inflammatory Response in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Bosmann, Markus; Ward, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    The pathophysiology of sepsis and its accompanying systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and the events that lead to multiorgan failure and death are poorly understood. It is known that, in septic humans and rodents, the development of SIRS is associated with a loss of the redox balance, but SIRS can also develop in non-infectious states. In addition, a hyperinflammatory state develops, together with impaired innate immune functions of phagocytes, immunosuppression, and complement activation, collectively leading to septic shock and lethality. Here we discuss recent insights into the signaling pathways in immune and phagocytic cells that underlie sepsis and SIRS and consider how these might be targeted for therapeutic interventions to reverse or attenuate pathways that lead to lethality during sepsis. PMID:23036432

  18. Transfusion-associated bacterial sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, S J; Friedman, L I; Dodd, R Y

    1994-01-01

    The incidence of sepsis caused by transfusion of bacterially contaminated blood components is similar to or less than that of transfusion-transmitted hepatitis C virus infection, yet significantly exceeds those currently estimated for transfusion-associated human immunodeficiency and hepatitis B viruses. Outcomes are serious and may be fatal. In addition, transfusion of sterile allogenic blood can have generalized immunosuppressive effects on recipients, resulting in increased susceptibility to postoperative infection. This review examines the frequency of occurrence of transfusion-associated sepsis, the organisms implicated, and potential sources of bacteria. Approaches to minimize the frequency of sepsis are discussed, including the benefits and disadvantages of altering the storage conditions for blood. In addition, the impact of high levels of bacteria on the gross characteristics of erythrocyte and platelet concentrates is described. The potentials and limitations of current tests for detecting bacteria in blood are also discussed. PMID:7923050

  19. Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE): a review.

    PubMed

    Green, Rebecca; Scott, L Keith; Minagar, Alireza; Conrad, Steven

    2004-05-01

    Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a poorly understood condition that is associated with severe sepsis and appears to have a negative influence on survival. The incidence of encephalopathy secondary to sepsis is unknown. Amino acid derangements, blood-brain barrier disruption, abnormal neurotransmitters, and direct CNS effect are possible causes of septic encephalopathy. Research has not defined the pathogenesis of SAE.

  20. Incidence of fever in labor and risk of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Towers, Craig V; Yates, Angela; Zite, Nikki; Smith, Casey; Chernicky, Lindsey; Howard, Bobby

    2017-06-01

    The current recommendation regarding the management of a term newborn delivered of a mother with an intrapartum fever or a diagnosis of clinical chorioamnionitis is that the neonate should have baseline laboratory work drawn along with blood cultures and be universally treated with antibiotics until culture results return. These guidelines report that the rate of intrapartum fever is about 3%; however, a few large studies suggest that the rate is higher at about 7%. We sought to prospectively evaluate the rate of fever during labor in a large number of deliveries and determine the rate of early-onset neonatal sepsis in newborns delivered from mothers with an intrapartum fever compared with newborns delivered from mothers without intrapartum fever. This was a prospective cohort study of all temperatures obtained in women in labor from Jan. 1, 2011, through June 30, 2014. Every patient with a fever of ≥38°C at ≥36 weeks' gestation was evaluated for gestational age, parity, spontaneous or induced labor, group B streptococcus status, regional anesthesia, mode of delivery, treatment with intrapartum antibiotics, and whether a clinical diagnosis of chorioamnionitis was made by the managing physician. Neonates were assessed for blood culture results, neonatal intensive care unit admission, length of stay, and any major newborn complications. Statistical analysis involved χ(2), Fisher exact, and Student t test. A total of 412 patients (6.8%; 95% confidence interval, 6.2-7.5%) developed a fever in 6057 deliveries at ≥36 weeks' gestation. No cases of maternal sepsis occurred. Of the 417 newborns (5 sets of twins), only 1 (0.24%; 95% confidence interval, 0.01-1.3%) developed early-onset neonatal sepsis with a positive blood culture for Escherichia coli. There were 4 cases (0.07%; 95% confidence interval, 0.02-0.18%) of early-onset neonatal sepsis in the 5697 newborns (52 sets of twins) delivered from mothers who were not febrile and this difference was not significant

  1. Galactosemia presenting as recurrent sepsis.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Narendra; Rathi, Akanksha

    2011-12-01

    Galactosemia is a treatable metabolic disorder caused by the deficiency of enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) and inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. A case of neonate manifesting with recurrent Escherichia coli sepsis is presented here which turned out to be a classic galactosemia. No other common presenting features were observed in this infant except cataract on slit lamp examination. To the best of our knowledge, there is no case of galactosemia reported in literature which presented with recurrent neonatal sepsis without hepatomegaly, hyperbilirubinemia, bleeding disorder, vomiting, diarrhea, failure to thrive, hypoglycemia, coagulopathy, hemolysis or renal tubular acidosis.

  2. Vasopressors and Inotropes in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Leeanne; Berlin, David A; Arbo, John E

    2017-02-01

    Vasopressor and inotropes are beneficial in shock states. Norepinephrine is considered the first-line vasopressor for patients with sepsis-associated hypotension. Dobutamine is considered the first-line inotrope in sepsis, and should be considered for patients with evidence of myocardial dysfunction or ongoing signs of hypoperfusion. Vasopressor and inotrope therapy has complex effects that are often difficult to predict; emergency providers should consider the physiology and clinical trial data. It is essential to continually reevaluate the patient to determine if the selected treatment is having the intended result.

  3. c-Jun kinase is a critical signaling molecule in a neonatal model of group B streptococcal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Kenzel, Sybille; Mancuso, Guiseppe; Malley, Richard; Teti, Guiseppe; Golenbock, Douglas T; Henneke, Philipp

    2006-03-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) is the major cause of sepsis in newborn infants. In vitro, inactivated GBS stimulates macrophages to produce inflammatory proteins via the TLR adapter protein MyD88. Furthermore, inflammatory cytokine release in response to GBS greatly exceeds that following stimulation with pneumococci. In this study, we attempted to unravel signaling events that are involved in GBS-, but not Streptococcus pneumoniae-stimulated phagocytes to identify molecular targets for adjunctive sepsis therapy. We found that inactivated GBS and S. pneumoniae differed in the activation of the MAPK JNK, but not IkappaB kinase. Furthermore, JNK was essential for the transcriptional activation of inflammatory cytokine genes in response to GBS. Inhibition of JNK by the anthrapyrazolone SP600125 abrogated GBS-induced cytokine formation via an AP-1- and NF-kappaB-dependent mechanism without impairing antibacterial properties such as phagocytosis of GBS and the formation of intracellular oxidative species. In contrast, inhibition of the MAPK p38 impaired both antibacterial processes. In a neonatal mouse model of GBS sepsis SP600125 inhibited the inflammatory response and improved survival. In conclusion, JNK plays a major role in the inflammatory, but not in the direct antibacterial response to inactivated GBS, and may thus serve as a rational target for an adjunctive GBS sepsis therapy.

  4. Sepsis and Septic Shock: Lingering Questions.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Tiffany; Francis-Frank, Lyndave; Chong, Josebelo; Balaan, Marvin R

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are major health conditions in the United States, with a high incidence and mortality. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign, which was formed in 2002, formulates guidelines for the management of severe sepsis and septic shock and has actually demonstrated a reduction in mortality with institution of "sepsis bundles." Despite this, some elements of the guidelines have been questioned, and recent data suggest that strict compliance with bundles and protocols may not be necessary. Still, prompt recognition and treatment of sepsis and septic shock remain of utmost importance.

  5. [Molecular biology and immunopathogenetic mechanisms of sepsis].

    PubMed

    Průcha, M

    2009-01-01

    Sepsis, the systemic inflammatory response to infection, causes high mortality in patients in non-coronary units of intensive care. The most important characteristic of sepsis is the interaction between two subjects, the macro and the microorganism, associated with the dysfunction of innate and adaptive immunity. Sepsis is understood more as a dynamic syndrome characterized by many phenomenona which are often antagonistic. The inflammation, characterizing sepsis, does not act as a primary physiological compensatory mechanism and rather oscillates between the phase of hyperinflammatory response and anergy or immunoparalysis. The elucidation of the pathogenesis of sepsis is linked to the understanding of immunopathogenetic mechanisms, which characterize the interaction between the macro and microorganisms.

  6. The Coagulopathy of Acute Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Jeff; Pittet, Jean-Francois

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Sepsis, defined by the presence of infection and host inflammation, is a lethal clinical syndrome with an increasing mortality rate worldwide. In severe disease, the coagulation system becomes diffusely activated, with consumption of multiple clotting factors resulting in Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC). When present, DIC portends a higher mortality rate. Understanding the mechanisms that tie inflammation and diffuse thrombosis will allow therapeutic interventions to be developed. The Coagulopathy of Acute Sepsis is a dynamic process that is time and disease burden specific. Whole blood testing of coagulation may provide more clinically useful information than classical tests. Natural anticoagulants that regulate thrombosis are down regulated in sepsis. Patients may benefit from modulation of the coagulation system when systemic inflammation and hypercoagulopathy exist. Proper timing of anticoagulant therapy may ultimately lead to decreased incidence of multisystem organ dysfunction (MODS). Recent Findings The pathogenesis of coagulopathy in sepsis is driven by an up-regulation of procoagulant mechanisms and simultaneous down-regulation of natural anticoagulants. Inflammation caused by the invading organism is a natural host defense than cannot be eliminated during treatment. Successful strategies to prevent MODS center on stratifying patients at high risk for DIC and restoring the balance of inflammation and coagulation. Summary The prevention of DIC in septic patients is a key therapeutic target in preventing death from multisystem organ failure. Stratifying patients for therapy using thromboelastometry, specific markers for DIC, and composite scoring systems is an area of growing research. PMID:25590467

  7. Which Biomarkers Reveal Neonatal Sepsis?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Bhandari, Vineet; Chepustanova, Sofya; Huber, Greg; O′Hara, Stephen; O′Hern, Corey S.; Shattuck, Mark D.; Kirby, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We address the identification of optimal biomarkers for the rapid diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. We employ both canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and sparse support vector machine (SSVM) classifiers to select the best subset of biomarkers from a large hematological data set collected from infants with suspected sepsis from Yale-New Haven Hospital's Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). CCA is used to select sets of biomarkers of increasing size that are most highly correlated with infection. The effectiveness of these biomarkers is then validated by constructing a sparse support vector machine diagnostic classifier. We find that the following set of five biomarkers capture the essential diagnostic information (in order of importance): Bands, Platelets, neutrophil CD64, White Blood Cells, and Segs. Further, the diagnostic performance of the optimal set of biomarkers is significantly higher than that of isolated individual biomarkers. These results suggest an enhanced sepsis scoring system for neonatal sepsis that includes these five biomarkers. We demonstrate the robustness of our analysis by comparing CCA with the Forward Selection method and SSVM with LASSO Logistic Regression. PMID:24367543

  8. The role of the liver in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jun; Li, Song; Li, Shulin

    2014-01-01

    Despite the progress made in the clinical management of sepsis, sepsis morbidity and mortality rates remain high. The inflammatory pathogenesis and organ injury leading to death from sepsis are not fully understood for vital organs, especially the liver. Only recently has the role of the liver in sepsis begun to be revealed. Pre-existing liver dysfunction is a risk factor for the progression of infection to sepsis. Liver dysfunction after sepsis is an independent risk factor for multiple organ dysfunction and sepsis-induced death. The liver works as a lymphoid organ in response to sepsis. Acting as a double-edged sword in sepsis, the liver-mediated immune response is responsible for clearing bacteria and toxins but also causes inflammation, immunosuppression, and organ damage. Attenuating liver injury and restoring liver function lowers morbidity and mortality rates in patients with sepsis. This review summarizes the central role of liver in the host immune response to sepsis and in clinical outcomes. PMID:24611785

  9. Prophage-Cured Derivatives of Streptococcus lactis and Streptococcus cremoris

    PubMed Central

    Gasson, Michael J.; Davies, F. Lyndon

    1980-01-01

    Prophage curing was achieved in Streptococcus lactis and Streptococcus cremoris, and the cured derivatives were shown to be indicators for their temperate bacteriophages. Relysogenization of these cured derivatives completed the first formal demonstration of the lysogenic state in lactic streptococci. Images PMID:16345661

  10. Vaccination in Southeast Asia--reducing meningitis, sepsis and pneumonia with new and existing vaccines.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Alice; Morris, Denise E; Clarke, Stuart C

    2014-07-16

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae type b and Neisseria meningitidis are leading causes of vaccine-preventable diseases such as meningitis, sepsis and pneumonia. Although there has been much progress in the introduction of vaccines against these pathogens, access to vaccines remains elusive in some countries. This review highlights the current S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae type b, and N. meningitidis immunization schedules in the 10 countries belonging to the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). Epidemiologic studies may be useful for informing vaccine policy in these countries, particularly when determining the cost-effectiveness of introducing new vaccines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Chlorhexidine maternal-vaginal and neonate body wipes in sepsis and vertical transmission of pathogenic bacteria in South Africa: a randomised, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cutland, Clare L; Madhi, Shabir A; Zell, Elizabeth R; Kuwanda, Locadiah; Laque, Martin; Groome, Michelle; Gorwitz, Rachel; Thigpen, Michael C; Patel, Roopal; Velaphi, Sithembiso C; Adrian, Peter; Klugman, Keith; Schuchat, Anne; Schrag, Stephanie J

    2009-12-05

    About 500,000 sepsis-related deaths per year arise in the first 3 days of life. On the basis of results from non-randomised studies, use of vaginal chlorhexidine wipes during labour has been proposed as an intervention for the prevention of early-onset neonatal sepsis in developing countries. We therefore assessed the efficacy of chlorhexidine in early-onset neonatal sepsis and vertical transmission of group B streptococcus. In a trial in Soweto, South Africa, 8011 women (aged 12-51 years) were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to chlorhexidine vaginal wipes or external genitalia water wipes during active labour, and their 8129 newborn babies were assigned to full-body (intervention group) or foot (control group) washes with chlorhexidine at birth, respectively. In a subset of mothers (n=5144), we gathered maternal lower vaginal swabs and neonatal skin swabs after delivery to assess colonisation with potentially pathogenic bacteria. Primary outcomes were neonatal sepsis in the first 3 days of life and vertical transmission of group B streptococcus. Analysis was by intention to treat. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00136370. Rates of neonatal sepsis did not differ between the groups (chlorhexidine 141 [3%] of 4072 vs control 148 [4%] of 4057; p=0.6518). Rates of colonisation with group B streptococcus in newborn babies born to mothers in the chlorhexidine (217 [54%] of 401) and control groups (234 [55%] of 429] did not differ (efficacy -0.05%, 95% CI -9.5 to 7.9). Because chlorhexidine intravaginal and neonatal wipes did not prevent neonatal sepsis or the vertical acquisition of potentially pathogenic bacteria among neonates, we need other interventions to reduce childhood mortality. US Agency for International Development, National Vaccine Program Office and Centers for Disease Control's Antimicrobial Resistance Working Group, and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

  12. Severe Maternal Sepsis in the UK, 2011–2012: A National Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Colleen D.; Kurinczuk, Jennifer J.; Lucas, D. Nuala; Tuffnell, Derek J.; Sellers, Susan; Knight, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Background In light of increasing rates and severity of sepsis worldwide, this study aimed to estimate the incidence of, and describe the causative organisms, sources of infection, and risk factors for, severe maternal sepsis in the UK. Methods and Findings A prospective case-control study included 365 confirmed cases of severe maternal sepsis and 757 controls from all UK obstetrician-led maternity units from June 1, 2011, to May 31, 2012. Incidence of severe sepsis was 4.7 (95% CI 4.2–5.2) per 10,000 maternities; 71 (19.5%) women developed septic shock; and five (1.4%) women died. Genital tract infection (31.0%) and the organism Escherichia coli (21.1%) were most common. Women had significantly increased adjusted odds ratios (aORs) of severe sepsis if they were black or other ethnic minority (aOR = 1.82; 95% CI 1.82–2.51), were primiparous (aOR = 1.60; 95% CI 1.17–2.20), had a pre-existing medical problem (aOR = 1.40; 95% CI 1.01–1.94), had febrile illness or were taking antibiotics in the 2 wk prior to presentation (aOR = 12.07; 95% CI 8.11–17.97), or had an operative vaginal delivery (aOR = 2.49; 95% CI 1.32–4.70), pre-labour cesarean (aOR = 3.83; 95% CI 2.24–6.56), or cesarean after labour onset (aOR = 8.06; 95% CI 4.65–13.97). Median time between delivery and sepsis was 3 d (interquartile range = 1–7 d). Multiple pregnancy (aOR = 5.75; 95% CI 1.54–21.45) and infection with group A streptococcus (aOR = 4.84; 2.17–10.78) were associated with progression to septic shock; for 16 (50%) women with a group A streptococcal infection there was <2 h—and for 24 (75%) women, <9 h—between the first sign of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and a diagnosis of severe sepsis. A limitation of this study was the proportion of women with sepsis without an identified organism or infection source (16.4%). Conclusions For each maternal sepsis death, approximately 50 women have life-threatening morbidity from

  13. Expression and immunological evaluation of elongation factor Tu of Streptococcus suis serotype 2.

    PubMed

    Xia, X J; Wang, L; Cheng, L K; Shen, Z Q; Li, S G; Wang, J L

    2017-03-01

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2) is considered as a major pathogen that causes sepsis and meningitis in piglets and humans, but knowledge of its antigenic proteins remains limited so far. The surface-related proteins of pathogens often play significant roles in bacterium-host interactions and infection. Here, we obtained the elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) gene of Streptococcus suis and constructed the recombinant expression plasmid successfully. The target recombinant plasmid was then expressed in Escherichia coli and the immuno-protection of the recombinant protein was subsequently evaluated as well. The EF-Tu gene of Streptococcus suis is 1197 bp in length, encodes 398 amino acids. The target recombinant EF-Tu (rEF-Tu) protein can recognize the antiserum of Streptococcus suis and can provoke obvious humoral immune responses in rabbits and conferred protection to rabbits against Streptococcus suis ear-vein challenge, implying that the EF-Tu may be used as an attractive candidate antigen for a component of subunit vaccine.

  14. Diagnosing sepsis - The role of laboratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shu-Ling; Miller, Nancy S; Lee, John; Remick, Daniel G

    2016-09-01

    Sepsis is the host response to microbial pathogens resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. An accurate and timely diagnosis of sepsis allows prompt and appropriate treatment. This review discusses laboratory testing for sepsis because differentiating systemic inflammation from infection is challenging. Procalcitonin (PCT) is currently an FDA approved test to aid in the diagnosis of sepsis but with questionable efficacy. However, studies support the use of PCT for antibiotic de-escalation. Serial lactate measurements have been recommended for monitoring treatment efficacy as part of sepsis bundles. The 2016 sepsis consensus definitions include lactate concentrations >2mmol/L (>18mg/dL) as part of the definition of septic shock. Also included in the 2016 definitions are measuring bilirubin and creatinine to determine progression of organ failure indicating worse prognosis. Hematologic parameters, including a simple white blood cell count and differential, are frequently part of the initial sepsis diagnostic protocols. Several new biomarkers have been proposed to diagnose sepsis or to predict mortality, but they currently lack sufficient sensitivity and specificity to be considered as stand-alone testing. If sepsis is suspected, new technologies and microbiologic assays allow rapid and specific identification of pathogens. In 2016 there is no single laboratory test that accurately diagnoses sepsis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. What is next in sepsis: current trials in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Artigas, Antonio; Niederman, Michael S; Torres, Antoni; Carlet, Jean

    2012-08-01

    International experts reviewed and updated the most recent and relevant scientific advances on severe sepsis during the 17th International Symposium on Infections in the Critically Ill Patients in Barcelona (Spain) in February 2012. All new pharmacological therapeutic strategies have failed to demonstrate a survival benefit. Despite the large variability among countries and hospitals, the improvement of standard care according to the Surviving Sepsis campaign recommendations reduced the 28-day mortality to 24%. These results may have implications for future clinical trials in which much larger samples sizes of patients at high risk of death will be necessary. The identification of novel proinflammatory endogeneous signals and pathways may lead to the discovery of new drugs to reduce inflammatory reactions and end-organ dysfunction in critically ill patients with sepsis. Extracorporeal blood purification stem or progenitor cells have received increasing interest for the treatment of inflammation and organ injury. A better understanding of how these therapies work is essential and its benefit should be confirmed in future prospective randomized studies.

  16. Streptococcus pneumoniae, le transformiste.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Calum; Campo, Nathalie; Bergé, Matthieu J; Polard, Patrice; Claverys, Jean-Pierre

    2014-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is an important human pathogen. Natural genetic transformation, which was discovered in this species, involves internalization of exogenous single-stranded DNA and its incorporation into the chromosome. It allows acquisition of pathogenicity islands and antibiotic resistance and promotes vaccine escape via capsule switching. This opinion article discusses how recent advances regarding several facets of pneumococcal transformation support the view that the process has evolved to maximize plasticity potential in this species, making the pneumococcus le transformiste of the bacterial kingdom and providing an advantage in the constant struggle between this pathogen and its host.

  17. End Points of Sepsis Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, John C; Orloski, Clinton J

    2017-02-01

    Resuscitation goals for the patient with sepsis and septic shock are to return the patient to a physiologic state that promotes adequate end-organ perfusion along with matching metabolic supply and demand. Ideal resuscitation end points should assess the adequacy of tissue oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption, and be quantifiable and reproducible. Despite years of research, a single resuscitation end point to assess adequacy of resuscitation has yet to be found. Thus, the clinician must rely on multiple end points to assess the patient's overall response to therapy. This review will discuss the role and limitations of central venous pressure (CVP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and cardiac output/index as macrocirculatory resuscitation targets along with lactate, central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2), central venous-arterial CO2 gradient, urine output, and capillary refill time as microcirculatory resuscitation endpoints in patients with sepsis.

  18. Multiplex PCR-based identification of Streptococcus canis, Streptococcus zooepidemicus and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies from dogs.

    PubMed

    Moriconi, M; Acke, E; Petrelli, D; Preziuso, S

    2017-02-01

    Streptococcus canis (S. canis), Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus) and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies (S. dysgalactiae subspecies) are β-haemolytic Gram positive bacteria infecting animals and humans. S. canis and S. zooepidemicus are considered as two of the major zoonotic species of Streptococcus, while more research is needed on S. dysgalactiae subspecies bacteria. In this work, a multiplex-PCR protocol was tested on strains and clinical samples to detect S. canis, S. dysgalactiae subspecies and S. equi subspecies bacteria in dogs. All strains were correctly identified as S. canis, S. equi subspecies or S. dysgalactiae subspecies by the multiplex-PCR. The main Streptococcus species isolated from symptomatic dogs were confirmed S. canis. The multiplex-PCR protocol described is a rapid, accurate and efficient method for identifying S. canis, S. equi subspecies and S. dysgalactiae subspecies in dogs and could be used for diagnostic purposes and for epidemiological studies.

  19. Biosensor of endotoxin and sepsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yang; Wang, Xiang; Wu, Xi; Gao, Wei; He, Qing-hua; Cai, Shaoxi

    2001-09-01

    To investigate the relation between biosensor of endotoxin and endotoxin of plasma in sepsis. Method: biosensor of endotoxin was designed with technology of quartz crystal microbalance bioaffinity sensor ligand of endotoxin were immobilized by protein A conjugate. When a sample soliton of plasma containing endotoxin 0.01, 0.03, 0.06, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0Eu, treated with perchloric acid and injected into slot of quartz crystal surface respectively, the ligand was released from the surface of quartz crystal to form a more stable complex with endotoxin in solution. The endotoxin concentration corresponded to the weight change on the crystal surface, and caused change of frequency that occurred when desorbed. The result was biosensor of endotoxin might detect endotoxin of plasma in sepsis, measurements range between 0.05Eu and 0.5Eu in the stop flow mode, measurement range between 0.1Eu and 1Eu in the flow mode. The sensor of endotoxin could detect the endotoxin of plasm rapidly, and use for detection sepsis in clinically.

  20. Sepsis and Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Bilgili, Beliz; Haliloğlu, Murat; Cinel, İsmail

    2014-12-01

    Acute kindney injury (AKI) is a clinical syndrome which is generally defined as an abrupt decline in glomerular filtration rate, causing accumulation of nitrogenous products and rapid development of fluid, electrolyte and acid base disorders. In intensive care unit sepsis and septic shock are leading causes of AKI. Sepsis-induced AKI literally acts as a biologic indicator of clinical deterioration. AKI triggers variety of immune, inflammatory, metabolic and humoral patways; ultimately leading distant organ dysfunction and increases morbidity and mortality. Serial mesurements of creatinine and urine volume do not make it possible to diagnose AKI at early stages. Serum creatinine influenced by age, weight, hydration status and become apparent only when the kidneys have lost 50% of their function. For that reason we need new markers, and many biomarkers in the diagnosis of early AKI activity is assessed. Historically "Risk-Injury-Failure-Loss-Endstage" (RIFLE), "Acute Kidney Injury Netwok" (AKIN) and "The Kidney Disease/ Improving Global Outcomes" (KDIGO) classification systems are used for diagnosing easily in clinical practice and research and grading disease. Classifications including diagnostic criteria are formed for the identification of AKI. Neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL), cystatin-C (Cys-C), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) and also "cell cycle arrest" molecules has been concerned for clinical use. In this review the pathophysiology of AKI, with the relationship of sepsis and the importance of early diagnosis of AKI is evaluated.

  1. Sepsis and Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bilgili, Beliz; Haliloğlu, Murat; Cinel, İsmail

    2014-01-01

    Acute kindney injury (AKI) is a clinical syndrome which is generally defined as an abrupt decline in glomerular filtration rate, causing accumulation of nitrogenous products and rapid development of fluid, electrolyte and acid base disorders. In intensive care unit sepsis and septic shock are leading causes of AKI. Sepsis-induced AKI literally acts as a biologic indicator of clinical deterioration. AKI triggers variety of immune, inflammatory, metabolic and humoral patways; ultimately leading distant organ dysfunction and increases morbidity and mortality. Serial mesurements of creatinine and urine volume do not make it possible to diagnose AKI at early stages. Serum creatinine influenced by age, weight, hydration status and become apparent only when the kidneys have lost 50% of their function. For that reason we need new markers, and many biomarkers in the diagnosis of early AKI activity is assessed. Historically “Risk-Injury-Failure-Loss-Endstage” (RIFLE), “Acute Kidney Injury Netwok” (AKIN) and “The Kidney Disease/ Improving Global Outcomes” (KDIGO) classification systems are used for diagnosing easily in clinical practice and research and grading disease. Classifications including diagnostic criteria are formed for the identification of AKI. Neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL), cystatin-C (Cys-C), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) and also “cell cycle arrest” molecules has been concerned for clinical use. In this review the pathophysiology of AKI, with the relationship of sepsis and the importance of early diagnosis of AKI is evaluated. PMID:27366441

  2. [Sepsis: a new look at the problem].

    PubMed

    Beloborodova, N V

    2013-01-01

    The recent proceedings of congresses and forums on sepsis were used to write this review. The available definitions of sepsis and ideas on its etiology and pathogenesis are critically analyzed. There is information on new concepts of sepsis and data on a search for new targets, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, and biomarkers. It is hypothesized that there is a mechanism of action of bacteria on mitochondrial dysfunction and human hormonal regulation with low-molecular weight exometabolites, namely aromatic microbial metabolites.

  3. Antimicrobial Stewardship in the Management of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Pulia, Michael S; Redwood, Robert; Sharp, Brian

    2017-02-01

    Sepsis represents a unique clinical dilemma with regard to antimicrobial stewardship. The standard approach to suspected sepsis in the emergency department centers on fluid resuscitation and timely broad-spectrum antimicrobials. The lack of gold standard diagnostics and evolving definitions for sepsis introduce a significant degree of diagnostic uncertainty that may raise the potential for inappropriate antimicrobial prescribing. Intervention bundles that combine traditional quality improvement strategies with emerging electronic health record-based clinical decision support tools and rapid molecular diagnostics represent the most promising approach to enhancing antimicrobial stewardship in the management of suspected sepsis in the emergency department.

  4. Mechanical Ventilation in Sepsis: A Reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Fernando G; Mazza, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is the main cause of close to 70% of all cases of acute respiratory distress syndromes (ARDS). In addition, sepsis increases susceptibility to ventilator-induced lung injury. Therefore, the development of a ventilatory strategy that can achieve adequate oxygenation without injuring the lungs is highly sought after for patients with acute infection and represents an important therapeutic window to improve patient care. Suboptimal ventilatory settings cannot only harm the lung, but may also contribute to the cascade of organ failure in sepsis due to organ crosstalk.Despite the prominent role of sepsis as a cause for lung injury, most of the studies that addressed mechanical ventilation strategies in ARDS did not specifically assess sepsis-related ARDS patients. Consequently, most of the recommendations regarding mechanical ventilation in sepsis patients are derived from ARDS trials that included multiple clinical diagnoses. While there have been important improvements in general ventilatory management that should apply to all critically ill patients, sepsis-related lung injury might still have particularities that could influence bedside management.After revisiting the interplay between sepsis and ventilation-induced lung injury, this review will reappraise the evidence for the major components of the lung protective ventilation strategy, emphasizing the particularities of sepsis-related acute lung injury.

  5. The Effect of Sepsis on the Erythrocyte.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Ryon M; Sharpe, Michael D; Singer, Mervyn; Ellis, Christopher G

    2017-09-08

    Sepsis induces a wide range of effects on the red blood cell (RBC). Some of the effects including altered metabolism and decreased 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate are preventable with appropriate treatment, whereas others, including decreased erythrocyte deformability and redistribution of membrane phospholipids, appear to be permanent, and factors in RBC clearance. Here, we review the effects of sepsis on the erythrocyte, including changes in RBC volume, metabolism and hemoglobin's affinity for oxygen, morphology, RBC deformability (an early indicator of sepsis), antioxidant status, intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis, membrane proteins, membrane phospholipid redistribution, clearance and RBC O₂-dependent adenosine triphosphate efflux (an RBC hypoxia signaling mechanism involved in microvascular autoregulation). We also consider the causes of these effects by host mediated oxidant stress and bacterial virulence factors. Additionally, we consider the altered erythrocyte microenvironment due to sepsis induced microvascular dysregulation and speculate on the possible effects of RBC autoxidation. In future, a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in sepsis induced erythrocyte pathophysiology and clearance may guide improved sepsis treatments. Evidence that small molecule antioxidants protect the erythrocyte from loss of deformability, and more importantly improve septic patient outcome suggest further research in this area is warranted. While not generally considered a critical factor in sepsis, erythrocytes (and especially a smaller subpopulation) appear to be highly susceptible to sepsis induced injury, provide an early warning signal of sepsis and are a factor in the microvascular dysfunction that has been associated with organ dysfunction.

  6. Ready for Prime Time? Biomarkers in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Long, Brit; Koyfman, Alex

    2017-02-01

    Sepsis is a common condition managed in the emergency department. Current diagnosis relies on physiologic criteria and suspicion of a source of infection using history, physical examination, laboratory studies, and imaging studies. The infection triggers a host response with the aim to destroy the pathogen, and this response can be measured. A reliable biomarker for sepsis should assist with earlier diagnosis, improve risk stratification, or improve clinical decision making. Current biomarkers for sepsis include lactate, troponin, and procalcitonin. This article discusses the use of lactate, procalcitonin, troponin, and novel biomarkers for use in sepsis.

  7. [Severe infections : causes and management of sepsis].

    PubMed

    Salzberger, B; Hanses, F; Birkenfeld, G; Langgartner, J

    2013-08-01

    The sepsis syndrome has only recently been defined as a clinical syndrome but despite its unspecific definition it has evolved rapidly into an important concept. Although specific therapeutic interventions targeting the inflammatory pathway have not yet been effective in treating sepsis, a better understanding of mechanisms leading to organ dysfunction has led to better management of patients with sepsis. Clinical signs of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) or sepsis are hallmarks for the definition of severe infections. Current guidelines are presented for the management of a number of severe infectious syndromes.

  8. Characteristics of Streptococcus suis isolated from patients in Japan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bin; Wada, Akihito; Ikebe, Tadayoshi; Ohnishi, Makoto; Mita, Kazuhito; Endo, Miyoko; Matsuo, Hirosuke; Asatuma, Yoshinori; Kuramoto, Sanae; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Motoyosi; Yoshikawa, Hiroko; Watabe, Nobuei; Yamada, Hideko; Kurita, Shohachi; Imai, Yumiko; Watanabe, Haruo

    2006-12-01

    Seven cases of Streptococcus suis infection in Japan during 1994 and 2006 were summarized. All cases had porcine exposure and five of them had hand skin injury during the exposure. Five cases presented symptoms of meningitis, three presented symptoms of sepsis, and one resulted in sudden death. All of the isolated S. suis belonged to Lancefield's group D and to serotype 2. They were susceptible to penicillin G, ampicillin, cefotaxime, and ciprofloxacin. However, six of them were resistant to both erythromycin and clindamycin, and four were also resistant to minocycline. Multilocus sequence typing of six isolates showed that they belonged to sequence type (ST) 1, and their pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns were similar. The remaining isolate was ST28 and its PFGE pattern was distinct from those of the others.

  9. Recognition of Streptococcus pneumoniae by the innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Koppe, Uwe; Suttorp, Norbert; Opitz, Bastian

    2012-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is both a frequent colonizer of the upper respiratory tract and a leading cause of life-threatening infections such as pneumonia, meningitis and sepsis. The innate immune system is critical for the control of colonization and for defence during invasive disease. Initially, pneumococci are recognized by different sensors of the innate immune system called pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which control most subsequent host defence pathways. These PRRs include the transmembrane Toll-like receptors (TLRs) as well as the cytosolic NOD-like receptors (NLRs) and DNA sensors. Recognition of S. pneumoniae by members of these PRR families regulates the production of inflammatory mediators that orchestrate the following immune response of infected as well as neighbouring non-infected cells, stimulates the recruitment of immune cells such as neutrophils and macrophages, and shapes the adaptive immunity. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the function of different PRRs in S. pneumoniae infection.

  10. The Burden of Invasive Early-Onset Neonatal Sepsis in the United States, 2005–2008

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Emily J.; Pondo, Tracy; Lewis, Melissa M.; Martell-Cleary, Pat; Morin, Craig; Jewell, Brenda; Daily, Pam; Apostol, Mirasol; Petit, Sue; Farley, Monica; Lynfield, Ruth; Reingold, Art; Hansen, Nellie I.; Stoll, Barbara J.; Shane, Andi L.; Zell, Elizabeth; Schrag, Stephanie J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Sepsis in the first 3 days of life is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among infants. Group B Streptococcus (GBS), historically the primary cause of early-onset sepsis, has declined through widespread use of intrapartum chemoprophylaxis. We estimated the national burden of invasive early-onset sepsis (EOS) cases and deaths in the era of GBS prevention. Methods Population-based surveillance for invasive EOS was conducted in 4 of CDC’s Active Bacterial Core surveillance (ABCs) sites from 2005–2008. We calculated incidence using state and national live birth files. Estimates of the national number of cases and deaths were calculated, standardizing by race and gestational age. Results ABCs identified 658 cases of EOS; 72 (10.9%) were fatal. Overall incidence remained stable during the three years (2005:0.77 cases/1,000 live births; 2008:0.76 cases/1,000 live births). GBS (~38%) was the most commonly reported pathogen followed by Escherichia coli (~24%). Black preterm infants had the highest incidence (5.14 cases/1,000 live births) and case fatality (24.4%). Non-black term infants had the lowest incidence (0.40 cases/1,000 live births) and case fatality (1.6%). The estimated national annual burden of EOS was approximately 3,320 cases (95% CI: 3,060–3,580) including 390 deaths (95% CI: 300–490). Among preterm infants, 1,570 cases (95% CI: 1,400–1,770; 47.3% of the overall) and 360 deaths (95% CI: 280–460; 92.3% of the overall) occurred annually. Conclusions The burden of invasive early-onset sepsis remains substantial in the era of GBS prevention and disproportionately affects preterm and black infants. Identification of strategies to prevent preterm births is needed to reduce the neonatal sepsis burden. PMID:21654548

  11. Cord Blood Acute Phase Reactants Predict Early Onset Neonatal Sepsis in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Mithal, Leena B; Palac, Hannah L; Yogev, Ram; Ernst, Linda M; Mestan, Karen K

    2017-01-01

    Early onset sepsis (EOS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in preterm infants, yet diagnosis remains inadequate resulting in missed cases or prolonged empiric antibiotics with adverse consequences. Evaluation of acute phase reactant (APR) biomarkers in umbilical cord blood at birth may improve EOS detection in preterm infants with intrauterine infection. In this nested case-control study, infants (29.7 weeks gestation, IQR: 27.7-32.2) were identified from a longitudinal cohort with archived cord blood and placental histopathology. Patients were categorized using culture, laboratory, clinical, and antibiotic treatment data into sepsis groups: confirmed sepsis (cEOS, n = 12); presumed sepsis (PS, n = 30); and no sepsis (controls, n = 30). Nine APRs were measured in duplicate from cord blood using commercially available multiplex immunoassays (Bio-Plex Pro™). In addition, placental histopathologic data were linked to biomarker results. cEOS organisms were Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae, Proteus mirabilis, Haemophilus influenzae and Listeria monocytogenes. C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid P and ferritin were significantly elevated in cEOS compared to controls (p<0.01). SAA, CRP, and Hp were elevated in cEOS but not in PS (p<0.01) and had AUCs of 99%, 96%, and 95% respectively in predicting cEOS. Regression analysis revealed robust associations of SAA, CRP, and Hp with EOS after adjustment for covariates. Procalcitonin, fibrinogen, α-2-macroglobulin and tissue plasminogen activator were not significantly different across groups. Placental acute inflammation was associated with APR elevation and was present in all cEOS, 9 PS, and 17 control infants. This study shows that certain APRs are elevated in cord blood of premature infants with EOS of intrauterine origin. SAA, CRP, and Hp at birth have potential diagnostic utility for risk stratification and identification of infants with EOS.

  12. Cord Blood Acute Phase Reactants Predict Early Onset Neonatal Sepsis in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Palac, Hannah L.; Yogev, Ram; Ernst, Linda M.; Mestan, Karen K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Early onset sepsis (EOS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in preterm infants, yet diagnosis remains inadequate resulting in missed cases or prolonged empiric antibiotics with adverse consequences. Evaluation of acute phase reactant (APR) biomarkers in umbilical cord blood at birth may improve EOS detection in preterm infants with intrauterine infection. Methods In this nested case-control study, infants (29.7 weeks gestation, IQR: 27.7–32.2) were identified from a longitudinal cohort with archived cord blood and placental histopathology. Patients were categorized using culture, laboratory, clinical, and antibiotic treatment data into sepsis groups: confirmed sepsis (cEOS, n = 12); presumed sepsis (PS, n = 30); and no sepsis (controls, n = 30). Nine APRs were measured in duplicate from cord blood using commercially available multiplex immunoassays (Bio-Plex Pro™). In addition, placental histopathologic data were linked to biomarker results. Results cEOS organisms were Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae, Proteus mirabilis, Haemophilus influenzae and Listeria monocytogenes. C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid P and ferritin were significantly elevated in cEOS compared to controls (p<0.01). SAA, CRP, and Hp were elevated in cEOS but not in PS (p<0.01) and had AUCs of 99%, 96%, and 95% respectively in predicting cEOS. Regression analysis revealed robust associations of SAA, CRP, and Hp with EOS after adjustment for covariates. Procalcitonin, fibrinogen, α-2-macroglobulin and tissue plasminogen activator were not significantly different across groups. Placental acute inflammation was associated with APR elevation and was present in all cEOS, 9 PS, and 17 control infants. Conclusion This study shows that certain APRs are elevated in cord blood of premature infants with EOS of intrauterine origin. SAA, CRP, and Hp at birth have potential diagnostic utility for risk stratification and

  13. A prehospital screening tool utilizing end-tidal carbon dioxide predicts sepsis and severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Christopher L; Silvestri, Salvatore; Ralls, George; Stone, Amanda; Walker, Ayanna; Papa, Linda

    2016-05-01

    To determine the utility of a prehospital sepsis screening protocol utilizing systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria and end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2). We conducted a prospective cohort study among sepsis alerts activated by emergency medical services during a 12 month period after the initiation of a new sepsis screening protocol utilizing ≥2 SIRS criteria and ETCO2 levels of ≤25 mmHg in patients with suspected infection. The outcomes of those that met all criteria of the protocol were compared to those that did not. The main outcome was the diagnosis of sepsis and severe sepsis. Secondary outcomes included mortality and in-hospital lactate levels. Of 330 sepsis alerts activated, 183 met all protocol criteria and 147 did not. Sepsis alerts that followed the protocol were more frequently diagnosed with sepsis (78% vs 43%, P < .001) and severe sepsis (47% vs 7%, P < .001), and had a higher mortality (11% vs 5%, P = .036). Low ETCO2 levels were the strongest predictor of sepsis (area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.99, 95% CI 0.99-1.00; P < .001), severe sepsis (AUC 0.80, 95% CI 0.73-0.86; P < .001), and mortality (AUC 0.70, 95% CI 0.57-0.83; P = .005) among all prehospital variables. Sepsis alerts that followed the protocol had a sensitivity of 90% (95% CI 81-95%), a specificity of 58% (95% CI 52-65%), and a negative predictive value of 93% (95% CI 87-97%) for severe sepsis. There were significant associations between prehospital ETCO2 and serum bicarbonate levels (r = 0.415, P < .001), anion gap (r = -0.322, P < .001), and lactate (r = -0.394, P < .001). A prehospital screening protocol utilizing SIRS criteria and ETCO2 predicts sepsis and severe sepsis, which could potentially decrease time to therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Structural and Functional Analysis of Cell Wall-anchored Polypeptide Adhesin BspA in Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Rego, Sara; Heal, Timothy J; Pidwill, Grace R; Till, Marisa; Robson, Alice; Lamont, Richard J; Sessions, Richard B; Jenkinson, Howard F; Race, Paul R; Nobbs, Angela H

    2016-07-29

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus, GBS) is the predominant cause of early-onset infectious disease in neonates and is responsible for life-threatening infections in elderly and immunocompromised individuals. Clinical manifestations of GBS infection include sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis. Here, we describe BspA, a deviant antigen I/II family polypeptide that confers adhesive properties linked to pathogenesis in GBS. Heterologous expression of BspA on the surface of the non-adherent bacterium Lactococcus lactis confers adherence to scavenger receptor gp340, human vaginal epithelium, and to the fungus Candida albicans Complementary crystallographic and biophysical characterization of BspA reveal a novel β-sandwich adhesion domain and unique asparagine-dependent super-helical stalk. Collectively, these findings establish a new bacterial adhesin structure that has in effect been hijacked by a pathogenic Streptococcus species to provide competitive advantage in human mucosal infections. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Structural and Functional Analysis of Cell Wall-anchored Polypeptide Adhesin BspA in Streptococcus agalactiae*

    PubMed Central

    Rego, Sara; Heal, Timothy J.; Pidwill, Grace R.; Till, Marisa; Robson, Alice; Lamont, Richard J.; Sessions, Richard B.; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Race, Paul R.; Nobbs, Angela H.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus, GBS) is the predominant cause of early-onset infectious disease in neonates and is responsible for life-threatening infections in elderly and immunocompromised individuals. Clinical manifestations of GBS infection include sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis. Here, we describe BspA, a deviant antigen I/II family polypeptide that confers adhesive properties linked to pathogenesis in GBS. Heterologous expression of BspA on the surface of the non-adherent bacterium Lactococcus lactis confers adherence to scavenger receptor gp340, human vaginal epithelium, and to the fungus Candida albicans. Complementary crystallographic and biophysical characterization of BspA reveal a novel β-sandwich adhesion domain and unique asparagine-dependent super-helical stalk. Collectively, these findings establish a new bacterial adhesin structure that has in effect been hijacked by a pathogenic Streptococcus species to provide competitive advantage in human mucosal infections. PMID:27311712

  16. Monocyte Profiles in Critically Ill Patients With Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Sepsis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-02

    Pseudomonas Infections; Pseudomonas Septicemia; Pseudomonas; Pneumonia; Pseudomonal Bacteraemia; Pseudomonas Urinary Tract Infection; Pseudomonas Gastrointestinal Tract Infection; Sepsis; Sepsis, Severe; Critically Ill

  17. Genetic Manipulation of Streptococcus pyogenes (The Group A Streptococcus, GAS)

    PubMed Central

    Le Breton, Yoann; McIver, Kevin S.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (the group A streptococcus, GAS) is a Gram-positive bacterium responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from mild superficial infections (pharyngitis, impetigo) to severe often life-threatening invasive diseases (necrotizing fasciitis, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome) in humans. This unit describes molecular techniques for the genetic manipulation of S. pyogenes with detailed protocols for transformation, gene disruption, allelic exchange, transposon mutagenesis, and genetic complementation. PMID:24510894

  18. Genetic manipulation of Streptococcus pyogenes (the Group A Streptococcus, GAS).

    PubMed

    Le Breton, Yoann; McIver, Kevin S

    2013-10-02

    Streptococcus pyogenes (the Group A Streptococcus, GAS) is a Gram-positive bacterium responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from mild superficial infections (pharyngitis, impetigo) to severe, often life-threatening invasive diseases (necrotizing fasciitis, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome) in humans. This unit describes molecular techniques for the genetic manipulation of S. pyogenes with detailed protocols for transformation, gene disruption, allelic exchange, transposon mutagenesis, and genetic complementation.

  19. Identification of Streptococcus bovis and Streptococcus salivarius in clinical laboratories.

    PubMed

    Ruoff, K L; Ferraro, M J; Holden, J; Kunz, L J

    1984-08-01

    Streptococci identified as Streptococcus bovis, S. bovis variant, and Streptococcus salivarius were examined with respect to physiological and serological characteristics and cellular fatty acid content. Similarities in physiological reactions and problems encountered in serological analysis were noted, suggesting that an expanded battery of physiological tests is needed to definitively identify these streptococci. Cellular fatty acid analysis provided an accurate method for distinguishing S. salivarius from S. bovis and S. bovis variant.

  20. Neonatal sepsis-- a global problem: an overview.

    PubMed

    Afroza, S

    2006-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is one of the major health problems throughout the world. Every year an estimated 30 million newborns acquire infection and 1-2 million of these die. The present review provides updates regarding neonatal sepsis to help paediatricians to protect the newborn from this deadly problem. The onset of sepsis within first 48 hours of life (early onset sepsis) is frequently associated with pre and perinatal predisposing factors while onset after 48-72 hours of life (late onset sepsis) frequently reflects infection acquired nosocomially. Some literatures say that early onset disease presents in the first 5-7 days of life. Klebsiella pneumoniae is the leading pathogen causing neonatal sepsis in Bangladesh and neighbouring countries. Among many risk factors the single most important neonatal risk factor is low birth weight. Other main risk factors are invassive procedures in the postnatal period and inadequate hand washing before and after handling babies. Sepsis score is a useful method for early and rapid diagnosis of neonatal sepsis which was developed by Tollner U in 1982. Antibiotics should be given to most of the neonates suspected of infection. Ampicillin and gentamicin are the first drug of choice. In Bangladesh context sepsis score may be used as a good parameter for the early and rapid diagnosis of sepsis and that will guide the treatment plan. Clean and safe delivery, early and exclusive breastfeeding, strict postnatal cleanliness following adequate handwashing and aseptic technique during invasive procedure might reduce the incidence of neonatal sepsis. Prompt use of antibiotic according to standard policy is warranted to save the newborn lives from septicaemia.

  1. Mutacins of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Regianne Umeko; Taiete, Tiago; Gonçalves, Reginaldo Bruno

    2011-01-01

    The colonization and accumulation of Streptococcus mutans are influenced by various factors in the oral cavity, such as nutrition and hygiene conditions of the host, salivary components, cleaning power and salivary flow and characteristics related with microbial virulence factors. Among these virulence factors, the ability to synthesize glucan of adhesion, glucan-binding proteins, lactic acid and bacteriocins could modify the infection process and pathogenesis of this species in the dental biofilm. This review will describe the role of mutacins in transmission, colonization, and/or establishment of S. mutans, the major etiological agent of human dental caries. In addition, we will describe the method for detecting the production of these inhibitory substances in vitro (mutacin typing), classification and diversity of mutacins and the regulatory mechanisms related to its synthesis. PMID:24031748

  2. [Streptococcus pyogenes pathogenic factors].

    PubMed

    Bidet, Ph; Bonacorsi, S

    2014-11-01

    The pathogenicity of ß-hemolytic group A streptococcus (GAS) is particularly diverse, ranging from mild infections, such as pharyngitis or impetigo, to potentially debilitating poststreptococcal diseases, and up to severe invasive infections such as necrotizing fasciitis or the dreaded streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. This variety of clinical expressions, often radically different in individuals infected with the same strain, results from a complex interaction between the bacterial virulence factors, the mode of infection and the immune system of the host. Advances in comparative genomics have led to a better understanding of how, following this confrontation, GAS adapts to the immune system's pressure, either peacefully by reducing the expression of certain virulence factors to achieve an asymptomatic carriage, or on the contrary, by overexpressing them disproportionately, resulting in the most severe forms of invasive infection.

  3. Streptococcus suis infection

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Youjun; Zhang, Huimin; Wu, Zuowei; Wang, Shihua; Cao, Min; Hu, Dan; Wang, Changjun

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) is a family of pathogenic gram-positive bacterial strains that represents a primary health problem in the swine industry worldwide. S. suis is also an emerging zoonotic pathogen that causes severe human infections clinically featuring with varied diseases/syndromes (such as meningitis, septicemia, and arthritis). Over the past few decades, continued efforts have made significant progress toward better understanding this zoonotic infectious entity, contributing in part to the elucidation of the molecular mechanism underlying its high pathogenicity. This review is aimed at presenting an updated overview of this pathogen from the perspective of molecular epidemiology, clinical diagnosis and typing, virulence mechanism, and protective antigens contributing to its zoonosis. PMID:24667807

  4. Novel strategies for the treatment of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Riedemann, Niels C; Guo, Ren-Feng; Ward, Peter A

    2003-05-01

    The history of therapeutic interventions in clinical trials for sepsis has been referred to as the "graveyard for pharmaceutical companies." That is now set to change, as research provides hope for new approaches that will be therapeutically effective in humans with sepsis.

  5. The Changing Epidemiology and Definitions of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Kempker, Jordan A; Martin, Greg S

    2016-06-01

    This article describes the trends in the incidence of and mortality from sepsis in the United States and globally. The article then discusses the known factors associated with increased risk for developing sepsis and the limitations of the current clinical definition and the clinical correlations of the current epidemiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pelvic sepsis after stapled hemorrhoidopexy

    PubMed Central

    van Wensen, Remco JA; van Leuken, Maarten H; Bosscha, Koop

    2008-01-01

    Stapled hemorrhoidopexy is a surgical procedure used worldwide for the treatment of grade III and IV hemorrhoids in all age groups. However, life-threatening complications occur occasionally. The following case report describes the development of pelvic sepsis after stapled hemorrhoidopexy. A literature review of techniques used to manage major septic complications after stapled hemorrhoidopexy was performed. There is no standardized treatment currently available. Stapled hemorrhoidopexy is a safe, effective and time-efficient procedure in the hands of experienced colorectal surgeons. PMID:18855996

  7. Burn sepsis and burn toxin

    PubMed Central

    Allgöwer, Martin; Städtler, Karl; Schoenenberger, Guido A

    1974-01-01

    The salient steps of a 20-year programme of research into the nature of burn disease are described. By burn disease we mean the late mortality and morbidity following burns. We have isolated a burn toxin which is derived from a thermal polymerization of cell membrane lipoproteins within the dermis and have studied its influence on the effects of sepsis. We have also used it in the development of active and passive immunization therapy of severe burns. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9 PMID:4429330

  8. Group B Streptococcus pili mediate adherence to salivary glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Brittan, Jane L; Nobbs, Angela H

    2015-05-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of neonatal sepsis, pneumonia and meningitis, and is responsible for a rising number of severe invasive infections in adults. For all disease manifestations, colonisation is a critical first step. GBS has frequently been isolated from the oropharynx of neonates and adults. However, little is understood about the mechanisms of GBS colonisation at this site. In this study it is shown that three GBS strains (COH1, NEM316, 515) have capacity to adhere to human salivary pellicle. Heterologous expression of GBS pilus island (PI) genes in Lactococcus lactis to form surface-expressed pili demonstrated that GBS PI-2a and PI-1 pili bound glycoprotein-340 (gp340), a component of salivary pellicle. By contrast, PI-2b pili did not interact with gp340. The variation was attributable to differences in capacities for backbone and ancillary protein subunits of each pilus to bind gp340. Furthermore, while GBS strains were aggregated by fluid-phase gp340, this mechanism was not mediated by pili, which displayed specificity for immobilised gp340. Thus pili may enable GBS to colonise the soft and hard tissues of the oropharynx, while evading an innate mucosal defence, with implications for risk of progression to severe diseases such as meningitis and sepsis. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Development and implementation of sepsis alert systems

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Andrew M.; Gajic, Ognjen; Pickering, Brian W.; Herasevich, Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis/Summary Development and implementation of sepsis alert systems is challenging, particularly outside the monitored intensive care unit (ICU) setting. Important barriers to wider use of sepsis alerts include evolving clinical definitions of sepsis, information overload & alert fatigue, due to suboptimal alert performance. Outside the ICU, additional barriers include differences in health care delivery models, charting behaviors, and availability of electronic data. Currently available evidence does not support routine use of sepsis alert systems in clinical practice. However, continuous improvement in both the afferent (data availability and accuracy of detection algorithms) and efferent (evidence-based decision support and smoother integration into clinical workflow) limbs of sepsis alert systems will help translate theoretical advantages into measurable patient benefit. PMID:27229639

  10. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy: not just delirium

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Fernando Godinho; Park, Marcelo; Machado, Fabio Santana; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in intensive care units. Organ dysfunction is triggered by inflammatory insults and tissue hypoperfusion. The brain plays a pivotal role in sepsis, acting as both a mediator of the immune response and a target for the pathologic process. The measurement of brain dysfunction is difficult because there are no specific biomarkers of neuronal injury, and bedside evaluation of cognitive performance is difficult in an intensive care unit. Although sepsis-associated encephalopathy was described decades ago, it has only recently been subjected to scientific scrutiny and is not yet completely understood. The pathophysiology of sepsis-associated encephalopathy involves direct cellular damage to the brain, mitochondrial and endothelial dysfunction and disturbances in neurotransmission. This review describes the most recent findings in the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of sepsis-associated encephalopathy and focuses on its many presentations. PMID:22012058

  11. Limited role of the receptor for advanced glycation end products during Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Achouiti, Ahmed; de Vos, Alex F; de Beer, Regina; Florquin, Sandrine; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of sepsis. Sepsis is associated with the release of 'damage-associated molecular patterns' (DAMPs). The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor, abundantly expressed in the lungs, that recognizes several of these DAMPs. Triggering of RAGE leads to activation of the NF-κB pathway and perpetuation of inflammation. Earlier investigations have shown that the absence of RAGE reduces inflammation and bacterial dissemination and increases survival in sepsis caused by S. pneumoniae pneumonia. We hypothesized that the detrimental role of RAGE depends on the level of RAGE expression in the primary organ of infection. By directly injecting S. pneumoniae intravenously, thereby circumventing the extensive RAGE-expressing lung, we here determined whether RAGE contributes to an adverse outcome of bacteremia or whether its role is restricted to primary lung infection. During late-stage infection (48 h), rage(-/-) mice had an attenuated systemic inflammatory response, as reflected by lower plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines, reduced endothelial cell activation (as measured by E-selectin levels) and less neutrophil accumulation in lung tissue. However, RAGE deficiency did not influence bacterial loads or survival in this model. In accordance, plasma markers for cell injury were similar in both mouse strains. These results demonstrate that while RAGE plays a harmful part in S. pneumoniae sepsis originating from the respiratory tract, this receptor has a limited role in the outcome of primary bloodstream infection by this pathogen.

  12. Naturally occurring disseminated group B streptococcus infections in postnatal rats.

    PubMed

    Shuster, Katherine A; Hish, Gerald A; Selles, Lindsi A; Chowdhury, Mahboob A; Wiggins, Roger C; Dysko, Robert C; Bergin, Ingrid L

    2013-02-01

    Group B Streptococcus (Streptococcus agalactiae, GBS) is a gram-positive commensal and occasional opportunistic pathogen of the human vaginal, respiratory, and intestinal tracts that can cause sepsis, pneumonia, or meningitis in human neonates, infants, and immunosuppressed persons. We report here on a spontaneous outbreak of postnatal GBS-associated disease in rats. Ten of 26 (38.5%) 21- to 24-d-old rat pups died or were euthanized due to a moribund state in a colony of rats transgenic for the human diphtheria toxin receptor on a Munich-Wistar-Frömter genetic background. Four pups had intralesional coccoid bacteria in various organs without accompanying inflammation. GBS was isolated from the liver of 2 of these pups and from skin abscesses in 3 littermates. A connection with the transgene could not be established. A treatment protocol was evaluated in the remaining breeding female rats. GBS is a potentially clinically significant spontaneous infection in various populations of research rats, with some features that resemble late-onset postnatal GBS infection in human infants.

  13. Proteomic Biomarkers Associated with Streptococcus agalactiae Invasive Genogroups

    PubMed Central

    Lanotte, Philippe; Perivier, Marylise; Haguenoer, Eve; Mereghetti, Laurent; Burucoa, Christophe; Claverol, Stéphane; Atanassov, Christo

    2013-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS, Streptococcus agalactiae) is a leading cause of meningitis and sepsis in newborns and an etiological agent of meningitis, endocarditis, osteoarticular and soft tissue infections in adults. GBS isolates are routinely clustered in serotypes and in genotypes. At present one GBS sequence type (i.e. ST17) is considered to be closely associated with bacterial invasiveness and novel proteomic biomarkers could make a valuable contribution to currently available GBS typing data. For that purpose we analyzed the protein profiles of 170 genotyped GBS isolates by Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (SELDI). Univariate statistical analysis of the SELDI profiles identified four protein biomarkers significantly discriminating ST17 isolates from those of the other sequence types. Two of these biomarkers (MW of 7878 Da and 12200 Da) were overexpressed and the other two (MW of 6258 Da and 10463 Da) were underexpressed in ST17. The four proteins were isolated by mass spectrometry-assisted purification and their tryptic peptides analyzed by LC-MS/MS. They were thereby identified as the small subunit of exodeoxyribonuclease VII, the 50S ribosomal protein L7/L12, a CsbD-like protein and thioredoxin, respectively. In conclusion, we identified four candidate biomarkers of ST17 by SELDI for high-throughput screening. These markers may serve as a basis for further studies on the pathophysiology of GBS infection, and for the development of novel vaccines. PMID:23372719

  14. Aetiology of community-acquired neonatal sepsis in low and middle income countries.

    PubMed

    Waters, Donald; Jawad, Issrah; Ahmad, Aziez; Lukšić, Ivana; Nair, Harish; Zgaga, Lina; Theodoratou, Evropi; Rudan, Igor; Zaidi, Anita K M; Campbell, Harry

    2011-12-01

    99% of the approximate 1 million annual neonatal deaths from life-threatening invasive bacterial infections occur in developing countries, at least 50% of which are from home births or community settings. Data concerning aetiology of sepsis in these settings are necessary to inform targeted therapy and devise management guidelines. This review describes and analyses the bacterial aetiology of community-acquired neonatal sepsis in developing countries. A search of Medline, Embase, Global Health and Web of Knowledge, limited to post-1980, found 27 relevant studies. Data on aetiology were extracted, tabulated and analysed along with data on incidence, risk factors, case fatality rates and antimicrobial sensitivity. The most prevalent pathogens overall were Staphylococcus aureus (14.9%), Escherichia coli (12.2%), and Klebsiella species (11.6%). However, variations were observed both between global regions and age-of-onset categories. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae were most prevalent in Africa, while Klebsiella was highly prevalent in South-East Asia. A notably higher prevalence of Group B Streptococcus was present in neonates aged 7 days or less. The highest case fatality rates were recorded in South-East Asia. Klebsiella species showed highest antimicrobial resistance. Data on community-acquired neonatal sepsis in developing countries are limited. Future research should focus on areas of high disease burden with relative paucity of data. Research into maternal and neonatal vaccination strategies and improved diagnostics is also needed. All of this could contribute to the formulation of community-based care packages, the implementation of which has significant potential to lower overall neonatal mortality and hence advance progress towards the attainment of Millennium Development Goal 4.

  15. Aetiology of community-acquired neonatal sepsis in low and middle income countries

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Donald; Jawad, Issrah; Ahmad, Aziez; Lukšić, Ivana; Nair, Harish; Zgaga, Lina; Theodoratou, Evropi; Rudan, Igor; Zaidi, Anita K. M.; Campbell, Harry

    2011-01-01

    Background 99% of the approximate 1 million annual neonatal deaths from life-threatening invasive bacterial infections occur in developing countries, at least 50% of which are from home births or community settings. Data concerning aetiology of sepsis in these settings are necessary to inform targeted therapy and devise management guidelines. This review describes and analyses the bacterial aetiology of community-acquired neonatal sepsis in developing countries. Methods A search of Medline, Embase, Global Health and Web of Knowledge, limited to post-1980, found 27 relevant studies. Data on aetiology were extracted, tabulated and analysed along with data on incidence, risk factors, case fatality rates and antimicrobial sensitivity. Results The most prevalent pathogens overall were Staphylococcus aureus (14.9%), Escherichia coli (12.2%), and Klebsiella species (11.6%). However, variations were observed both between global regions and age-of-onset categories. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae were most prevalent in Africa, while Klebsiella was highly prevalent in South-East Asia. A notably higher prevalence of Group B Streptococcus was present in neonates aged 7 days or less. The highest case fatality rates were recorded in South-East Asia. Klebsiella species showed highest antimicrobial resistance. Conclusion Data on community-acquired neonatal sepsis in developing countries are limited. Future research should focus on areas of high disease burden with relative paucity of data. Research into maternal and neonatal vaccination strategies and improved diagnostics is also needed. All of this could contribute to the formulation of community-based care packages, the implementation of which has significant potential to lower overall neonatal mortality and hence advance progress towards the attainment of Millennium Development Goal 4. PMID:23198116

  16. Therapeutic intervention of clinical sepsis with intravenous immunoglobulin, white blood cells and antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Fischer, G W; Weisman, L E

    1990-01-01

    Antibiotics are the mainstay of therapy for acute bacterial infections. However, recent studies have suggested that adjunctive therapy designed to augment host immunity, might reduce morbidity and mortality. Many bacterial pathogens such as Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Group B streptococcus are encapsulated and require opsonic antibody to promote efficient phagocytosis and killing by neutrophils. Children with bacterial sepsis may be deficient in both of these components of immunity. This is a particularly serious problem in premature babies who may not receive protective amounts of antibodies from their mothers, since most antibody crosses the placenta in the last 4-6 weeks of pregnancy. Septic infants may also deplete their neutrophil reserves and develop neutropenia during infection. Since efficient clearance of encapsulated bacteria require both neutrophils and antibody, these babies are at high risk for treatment failure even with appropriate antibiotic therapy. Several studies have analyzed the role of neutrophil transfusions and immunoglobulin therapy in septic infants. However, relatively few patients have been prospectively evaluated in controlled studies. In addition, the logistical problems related to rapidly collecting neutrophils for therapy of bacterial sepsis are considerable and have decreased the usefulness of this approach. The availability of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has made the use of immunoglobulin feasible even in rapidly progressing bacterial sepsis. Animal studies have demonstrated the potential usefulness of IVIG and studies in septic babies strongly suggest that IVIG as an adjunct to antibiotics might improve mortality in septic neonates. Further research is needed to improve the logistics of obtaining neutrophils and to improve the availability of pathogen-specific immunoglobulin preparations.

  17. Emerging drugs for the treatment of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Heming, Nicholas; Lamothe, Laure; Ambrosi, Xavier; Annane, Djillali

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of sepsis, the systemic inflammatory response of the host to an infectious insult, has steadily increased over past decades. This trend is expected to continue. Sepsis is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Treatment relies on antibiotics associated to source control and supportive care. Major progress has been made in the understanding and overall management of sepsis. However, there is no specific treatment for sepsis. We searched PubMed and the ClinicalTrials.gov site for English language reports of phase II and III clinical trials pertaining to the field of sepsis. The current review provides a summary of promising candidate treatments for sepsis. We broadly separated candidate drugs into three distinct categories: Blood purification techniques, immunomodulatory drugs and treatments targeting other systems including the heart, the endothelium or coagulation. Efforts to identify an efficient treatment for sepsis are hampered by the broad definition of the syndrome associated with major heterogeneity between patients affected by sepsis. The characterization of homogeneous groups of patients, through biological or clinical markers is unfortunately lacking. Current research remains active. Candidate drugs for sepsis include hemoperfusion with polymyxin B coated fibre devices, modulation of the immune system with treatments such as hydrocortisone, intravenous immunoglobulins, mesenchymal stem cells, GM-CSF or interferon gamma. Candidate drugs acting on the cardiovascular system include short acting beta 1 blockers, levosimendan or selepressin. Finally, promising strategies, involving monoclonal antibodies or protein antagonists, which selectively inhibit bacterial virulence factors are being assessed at the bedside. A much awaited and needed specific treatment for sepsis will hopefully soon emerge.

  18. Pentoxifylline Treatment of Very Low Birth Weight Neonates with Nosocomial Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Hamilçıkan, Şahin; Can, Emrah; Büke, Övgü; Erol, Meltem; Gayret, Özlem Bostan

    2017-07-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess the result of intravenous pentoxifylline as an adjunct to antibiotic therapy on mortality and morbidity in very low birth weight (VLBW) preterm neonates with nosocomial sepsis. Methods For the 18 VLBW preterm neonates, as an adjunct therapy to antibiotics regimens, pentoxifylline (5 mg/kg/h for 6 hours) was administered to premature infants with sepsis on 3 successive days. Clinical and laboratory parameters were recorded before and after treatment. Results Following pentoxifylline therapy, the immature-to-total neutrophil ratio and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were significantly decreased, while the blood pH and base excess were significantly increased (p < 0.05). The axillary temperature, noninvasive blood pressure, hemoglobin, leukocyte, and thrombocyte values did not significantly differ after treatment (p > 0.05). Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) (32%), Streptococcus hominis (7.3%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5.3%), and Candida parapsilosis (3.1%) were identified in the blood cultures. There were no short-term morbidities (intraventricular hemorrhages, necrotizing enterocolitis, periventricular leukomalacia, and patent ductus arteriosus), no adverse effects, and no mortalities during or after the pentoxifylline therapy in the preterm neonate participants. Conclusion The CRP levels and heart rate both decreased, while the pH and base excess parameters of the blood gas analysis changed positively after pentoxifylline treatment in VLBW preterm neonates with nosocomial sepsis. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. Sepsis-induced brain dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Adam, Nicolas; Kandelman, Stanislas; Mantz, Jean; Chrétien, Fabrice; Sharshar, Tarek

    2013-02-01

    Systemic infection is often revealed by or associated with brain dysfunction, which is characterized by alteration of consciousness, ranging from delirium to coma, seizure or focal neurological signs. Its pathophysiology involves an ischemic process, secondary to impairment of cerebral perfusion and its determinants and a neuroinflammatory process that includes endothelial activation, alteration of the blood-brain barrier and passage of neurotoxic mediators. Microcirculatory dysfunction is common to these two processes. This brain dysfunction is associated with increased mortality, morbidity and long-term cognitive disability. Its diagnosis relies essentially on neurological examination that can lead to specific investigations, including electrophysiological testing or neuroimaging. In practice, cerebrospinal fluid analysis is indisputably required when meningitis is suspected. Hepatic, uremic or respiratory encephalopathy, metabolic disturbances, drug overdose, sedative or opioid withdrawal, alcohol withdrawal delirium or Wernicke's encephalopathy are the main differential diagnoses. Currently, treatment consists mainly of controlling sepsis. The effects of insulin therapy and steroids need to be assessed. Various drugs acting on sepsis-induced blood-brain barrier dysfunction, brain oxidative stress and inflammation have been tested in septic animals but not yet in patients.

  20. Abnormal heart rate characteristics preceding neonatal sepsis and sepsis-like illness.

    PubMed

    Griffin, M Pamela; O'Shea, T Michael; Bissonette, Eric A; Harrell, Frank E; Lake, Douglas E; Moorman, J Randall

    2003-06-01

    Late-onset neonatal sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, and early detection could prove beneficial. Previously, we found that abnormal heart rate characteristics (HRC) of reduced variability and transient decelerations occurred early in the course of neonatal sepsis and sepsis-like illness in infants in a single neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). We hypothesized that this finding can be generalized to other NICUs. We prospectively collected clinical data and continuously measured RR intervals in all infants in two NICUs who stayed for >7 d. We defined episodes of sepsis and sepsis-like illness as acute clinical deteriorations that prompted physicians to obtain blood cultures and start antibiotics. A predictive statistical model yielding an HRC index was developed on a derivation cohort of 316 neonates in the University of Virginia NICU and then applied to the validation cohort of 317 neonates in the Wake Forest University NICU. In the derivation cohort, there were 155 episodes of sepsis and sepsis-like illness in 101 infants, and in the validation cohort, there were 118 episodes in 93 infants. In the validation cohort, the HRC index 1) showed highly significant association with impending sepsis and sepsis-like illness (receiver operator characteristic area 0.75, p < 0.001) and 2) added significantly to the demographic information of birth weight, gestational age, and days of postnatal age in predicting sepsis and sepsis-like illness (p < 0.001). Continuous HRC monitoring is a generally valid and potentially useful noninvasive tool in the early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis and sepsis-like illness.

  1. Streptococcus zooepidemicus and Streptococcus equi evolution: the role of CRISPRs.

    PubMed

    Waller, Andrew S; Robinson, Carl

    2013-12-01

    The host-restricted bacterium Streptococcus equi is the causative agent of equine strangles, the most frequently diagnosed infectious disease of horses worldwide. The disease is characterized by abscessation of the lymph nodes of the head and neck, leading to significant welfare and economic cost. S. equi is believed to have evolved from an ancestral strain of Streptococcus zooepidemicus, an opportunistic pathogen of horses and other animals. Comparison of the genome of S. equi strain 4047 with those of S. zooepidemicus identified examples of gene loss due to mutation and deletion, and gene gain through the acquisition of mobile genetic elements that have probably shaped the pathogenic specialization of S. equi. In particular, deletion of the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) locus in the ancestor of S. equi may have predisposed the bacterium to acquire and incorporate new genetic material into its genome. These include four prophages and a novel integrative conjugative element. The virulence cargo carried by these mobile genetic elements is believed to have shaped the ability of S. equi to cause strangles. Further sequencing of S. zooepidemicus has highlighted the diversity of this opportunistic pathogen. Again, CRISPRs are postulated to influence evolution, balancing the need for gene gain over genome stability. Analysis of spacer sequences suggest that these pathogens may be susceptible to a limited range of phages and provide further evidence of cross-species exchange of genetic material among Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus dysgalactiae.

  2. Community-acquired neonatal and infant sepsis in developing countries: efficacy of WHO's currently recommended antibiotics--systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Downie, Lilian; Armiento, Raffaela; Subhi, Rami; Kelly, Julian; Clifford, Vanessa; Duke, Trevor

    2013-02-01

    To review the aetiology and antibiotic resistance patterns of community-acquired sepsis in developing countries in infants where no clear focus of infection is clinically identified. To estimate the likely efficacy of WHO's recommended treatment for infant sepsis. A systematic review of the literature describing the aetiology of community-acquired neonatal and infant sepsis in developing countries. Using meta-analytical methods, susceptibility was determined to the antibiotic combinations recommended by WHO: (1) benzylpenicillin/ampicillin and gentamicin, (2) chloramphenicol and benzylpenicillin, and (3) third-generation cephalosporins. 19 studies were identified from 13 countries, with over 4000 blood culture isolates. Among neonates, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella spp. and Escherichia coli accounted for 55% (39-70%) of culture positive sepsis on weighted prevalence. In infants outside the neonatal period, the most prevalent pathogens were S aureus, E coli, Klebsiella spp., Streptococcus pneumoniae and Salmonella spp., which accounted for 59% (26-92%) of culture positive sepsis. For neonates, penicillin/gentamicin had comparable in vitro coverage to third-generation cephalosporins (57% vs. 56%). In older infants (1-12 months), in vitro susceptibility to penicillin/gentamicin, chloramphenicol/penicillin and third-generation cephalosporins was 63%, 47% and 64%, respectively. The high rate of community-acquired resistant sepsis-especially that caused by Klebsiella spp. and S aureus-is a serious global public health concern. In vitro susceptibility data suggest that third-generation cephalosporins are not more effective in treating sepsis than the currently recommended antibiotics, benzylpenicillin and gentamicin; however, with either regimen a significant proportion of bacteraemia is not covered. Revised recommendations for effective second-line antibiotics in neonatal and infant sepsis in developing countries are urgently needed.

  3. Aetiology, antimicrobial therapy and outcome of patients with community acquired severe sepsis: a prospective study in a Norwegian university hospital.

    PubMed

    Nygård, Siri Tandberg; Langeland, Nina; Flaatten, Hans K; Fanebust, Rune; Haugen, Oddbjørn; Skrede, Steinar

    2014-03-04

    Severe sepsis is recognized as an inflammatory response causing organ dysfunction in patients with infection. Antimicrobial therapy is the mainstay of treatment. There is an ongoing demand for local surveillance of sepsis aetiology and monitoring of empirical treatment recommendations. The present study was established to describe the characteristics, quality of handling and outcome of patients with severe sepsis admitted to a Norwegian university hospital. A one year prospective, observational study of adult community acquired case-defined severe sepsis was undertaken. Demographics, focus of infection, microbiological findings, timing and adequacy of empirical antimicrobial agents were recorded. Clinical diagnostic practice was evaluated. Differences between categorical groups were analysed with Pearson's chi-squared test. Predictors of in-hospital mortality were identified in a multivariate stepwise backward logistic regression model. In total 220 patients were identified, yielding an estimated annual incidence of 0.5/1000 inhabitants. The focus of infection was established at admission in 69%. Respiratory tract infection was present in 52%, while genitourinary, soft tissue and abdominal infections each were found in 12-14%. Microbiological aetiology was identified in 61%; most prevalent were Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Independent predictors of in-hospital mortality were malignancy, cardiovascular disease, endocarditis, abdominal infections, undefined microbiological aetiology, delay in administration of empirical antimicrobial agents ≥ 6 hours and use of inadequate antimicrobial agents. In patients ≥ 75 years, antimicrobial therapy was less in compliance with current recommendations and more delayed. Community acquired severe sepsis is common. Initial clinical aetiology is often revised. Compliance with recommendations for empirical antimicrobial treatment is lowest in elderly patients. Our results emphasizes that

  4. Comparison of three different commercial PCR assays for the detection of pathogens in critically ill sepsis patients.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, J; Nierhaus, A; Braune, S A; de Heer, G; Kluge, S

    2013-05-01

    The high mortality rate associated with sepsis necessitates a timely identification of the causative organism in order to optimize antimicrobial therapy. PCR assays are increasingly being used for this purpose. The aim of this study was to compare three commercially available PCR systems for the diagnosis of systemic infections. In a prospective observational study, a broad-range (SepsiTest®; Molzym, Bremen, Germany) and two multiplex PCR assays (VYOO®; SIRS-Lab, Jena, Germany and LightCycler® SeptiFast; Roche, Mannheim, Germany) were compared to blood cultures with respect to the clinical course of 50 critically ill patients with sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock. Pathogens were detected by PCR in 12 % (SepsiTest®), 10 % (VYOO®) and 14 % (LightCycler® SeptiFast) of samples and in 26 % by blood culture. Negative results were obtained using all four methods in 32 samples (64 %) and 3 (6 %) samples were positive in all tests. Upon consideration of additional diagnostic findings and the clinical course, eight (16 %) of the positive blood culture results were deemed clinically relevant. All three PCR assays could also identify the causative organism (or a specific gene thereof) in three of these eight positive blood cultures, whereas for five of the eight, all three PCR assays were negative. In one patient with a negative blood culture, the SepsiTest®, VYOO® and LightCycler® SeptiFast assays were positive for Streptococcus species. The PCR assays appeared to be less susceptible than blood cultures to false-positive results arising from contamination with coagulase-negative staphylococcal organisms. There was some variability between the three PCR assays tested and the corresponding blood cultures with regards to the type of pathogen detected. The three PCR assays appeared to be less susceptible to false-positive results than blood cultures.

  5. Five additions to the list of Sepsidae Diptera for Vietnam: Perochaeta cuirassa sp. n., Perochaeta lobo sp. n., Sepsis spura sp. n., Sepsis sepsi Ozerov, 2003 and Sepsis monostigma Thompson, 1869

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Yuchen; Meier, Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A recent collecting trip to Vietnam yielded three new species and two new records of Sepsidae (Diptera) for the country. Here we describe two new species in the species-poor genus Perochaeta (Perochaeta cuirassa sp. n. andPerochaeta lobo sp. n.) and one to the largest sepsid genus Sepsis (Sepsis spura sp. n.) which is also found in Sumatra and Sulawesi. Two additional Sepsis species are new records for Vietnam (Sepsis sepsi Ozerov, 2003; Sepsis monostigma Thompson, 1869). We conclude with a discussion of the distribution of Perochaeta and the three Sepsis species. PMID:21594042

  6. The changing immune system in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Boomer, Jonathan S; Green, Jonathan M; Hotchkiss, Richard S

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis remains the leading cause of death in most intensive care units. Advances in understanding the immune response to sepsis provide the opportunity to develop more effective therapies. The immune response in sepsis can be characterized by a cytokine-mediated hyper-inflammatory phase, which most patients survive, and a subsequent immune-suppressive phase. Patients fail to eradicate invading pathogens and are susceptible to opportunistic organisms in the hypo-inflammatory phase. Many mechanisms are responsible for sepsis-induced immuno-suppression, including apoptotic depletion of immune cells, increased T regulatory and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and cellular exhaustion. Currently in clinical trial for sepsis are granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor and interferon gamma, immune-therapeutic agents that boost patient immunity. Immuno-adjuvants with promise in clinically relevant animal models of sepsis include anti-programmed cell death-1 and interleukin-7. The future of immune therapy in sepsis will necessitate identification of the immunologic phase using clinical and laboratory parameters as well as biomarkers of innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:24067565

  7. [Early goal directed therapy in severe sepsis].

    PubMed

    Janssens, U

    2014-11-01

    The treatment of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock continues to evolve. Recent studies have enunciated the benefit of early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) during the first 6 h after recognition of the condition. With EGDT a reduction in mortality of over 16% was shown over standard care. Thereafter the components of the EGDT were consequently implemented in the international Surviving Sepsis Campaign as well as the German sepsis guidelines. Nevertheless the medical community's enthusiasm for EGDT has remained indecisive. There remains a profound skepticism about treatment targets such as central venous pressure or mean arterial pressure as well as central venous oxygen saturation. Moreover multiple barriers such as critical shortage of nursing staff, problems in obtaining central venous pressure monitoring or lack of agreement with the EGDT resuscitation protocol may lead to non-adherence to EGDT early in the course of sepsis. In a recent multicenter trial, protocol-based resuscitation of patients in whom septic shock was diagnosed in the emergency department did not improve outcomes. The Severe Sepsis 3-Hour Resuscitation Bundle and the 6-Hour Septic Shock Bundle represent a distillation of the concepts and recommendations found in the practice guidelines published by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign. The bundles are designed to allow teams to follow the timing, sequence, and goals of the individual elements of care. Early recognition, early mobilization of resources, and multidisciplinary collaboration are imperative to enhance the prognosis of patients with sepsis.

  8. Sepsis as a model of SIRS.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Madhav; He, Min; Zhang, Huili; Moochhala, Shabbir

    2009-01-01

    Sepsis describes a complex clinical syndrome that results from the host inability to regulate the inflammatory response against infection. Despite more than 20 years of extensive study, sepsis and excessive systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) are still the leading cause of death in intensive care units. The clinical study of sepsis and new therapeutics remains challenging due to the complexity of this disease. Therefore, many animal models have been employed to investigate the pathogenesis of sepsis and to preliminarily test potential therapeutics. However, so far, most therapeutics that have shown promising results in animal models failed in human clinical trials. In this chapter we will present an overview of different experimental animal models of sepsis and compare their advantages and disadvantage. The studies in animal models have greatly improved our understanding about the inflammatory mediators in sepsis. In this chapter we will also highlight the roles of several critical mediators including TNF-a , IL-1b , IL-6, chemokines, substance P, hydrogen sulfide and activated protein C in animal models of sepsis as well as in clinical studies.

  9. Monitoring of the physical exam in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Postelnicu, Radu; Evans, Laura

    2017-06-01

    Monitoring of mental status and peripheral circulatory changes can be accomplished noninvasively in patients in the ICU. Emphasis on physical examination in conditions such as sepsis have gained increased attention as these evaluations can often serve as a surrogate marker for short-term treatment efficacy of therapeutic interventions. Sepsis associated encephalopathy and mental status changes correlate with worse prognosis in patients. Evaluation of peripheral circulation has been shown to be a convenient, easily accessible, and accurate marker for prognosis in patients with septic shock. The purpose of this article is to emphasize the main findings according to recent literature into the monitoring of physical examination changes in patients with sepsis. Several recent studies have expanded our knowledge about the pathophysiology of mental status changes and the clinical assessment of peripheral circulation in patients with sepsis. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy is associated with an increased rate of morbidity and mortality in an intensive care setting. Increased capillary refill time (CRT) and persistent skin mottling are strongly predictive of mortality, whereas temperature gradients can reveal vasoconstriction and more severe organ dysfunction. Monitoring of physical examination changes is a significant and critical intervention in patients with sepsis. Utilizing repeated neurologic evaluations, and assessing CRT, mottling score, and skin temperature gradients should be emphasized as important noninvasive diagnostic tools. The significance of these methods can be incorporated during the utilization of therapeutic strategies in resuscitation protocols in patients with sepsis.

  10. Where Sepsis and Antimicrobial Resistance Countermeasures Converge

    PubMed Central

    Inglis, Timothy J. J.; Urosevic, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    The United Nations General Assembly debate on antimicrobial resistance (AMR) recognizes the global significance of AMR. Much work needs to be done on technology capability and capacity to convert the strategic intent of the debate into operational plans and tangible outcomes. Enhancement of the biomedical science–clinician interface requires better exploitation of systems biology tools for in-laboratory and point of care methods that detect sepsis and characterize AMR. These need to link sepsis and AMR data with responsive, real-time surveillance. We propose an AMR sepsis register, similar in concept to a cancer registry, to aid coordination of AMR countermeasures. PMID:28220145

  11. Sepsis Resuscitation: Fluid Choice and Dose

    PubMed Central

    Semler, Matthew W.; Rice, Todd W.

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis Sepsis is a common and life-threatening inflammatory response to severe infection treated with antibiotics and fluid resuscitation. Despite the central role of intravenous fluid in sepsis management, fundamental questions regarding “which fluid” and “in what amount” remain unanswered. Recent advances in understanding the physiologic response to fluid administration, as well as large clinical studies examining resuscitation strategies, fluid balance after resuscitation, colloid versus crystalloid solutions, and high- versus low-chloride crystalloids, inform the current approach to sepsis fluid management and suggest areas for future research. PMID:27229641

  12. Sepsis Resuscitation: Fluid Choice and Dose.

    PubMed

    Semler, Matthew W; Rice, Todd W

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis is a common and life-threatening inflammatory response to severe infection treated with antibiotics and fluid resuscitation. Despite the central role of intravenous fluid in sepsis management, fundamental questions regarding which fluid and in what amount remain unanswered. Recent advances in understanding the physiologic response to fluid administration, and large clinical studies examining resuscitation strategies, fluid balance after resuscitation, colloid versus crystalloid solutions, and high- versus low-chloride crystalloids, inform the current approach to sepsis fluid management and suggest areas for future research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Model of meningococcal sepsis in mice].

    PubMed

    Krasnoproshina, L I; Ermakova, L G; Belova, T N; Filippov, Iu V; Efimov, D D

    1978-11-01

    The authors studied a possibility of obtaining experimental meningococcus sepsis model on mice. The use of cyclophosphane, iron compounds, yolk medium produced no significant organism. When 4--5% mucine was injected intraperitoneally together with meningococcus culture mice died with sepsis phenomena. Differences were revealed in the sensitivity of linear and mongrel mice to meningococcus infection--AKR mice proved to be more sensitive. At the same time it was found that mongrel mice weighing from 10 to 12 g could be used to induce meningococcus sepsis.

  14. Pitfalls in the Treatment of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lars-Kristofer N; Chase, Karin

    2017-02-01

    Sepsis is a challenging, dynamic, pathophysiology requiring expertise in diagnosis and management. Controversy exists as to the most sensitive early indicators of sepsis and sepsis severity. Patients presenting to the emergency department often lack complete history or clinical data that would point to optimal management. Awareness of these potential knowledge gaps is important for the emergency provider managing the septic patient. Specific areas of management including the initiation and management of mechanical ventilation, the appropriate disposition of the patient, and consideration of transfer to higher levels of care are reviewed.

  15. A Highly Arginolytic Streptococcus Species That Potently Antagonizes Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xuelian; Palmer, Sara R.; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Richards, Vincent P.; Williams, Matthew L.; Nascimento, Marcelle M.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of certain oral biofilm bacteria to moderate pH through arginine metabolism by the arginine deiminase system (ADS) is a deterrent to the development of dental caries. Here, we characterize a novel Streptococcus strain, designated strain A12, isolated from supragingival dental plaque of a caries-free individual. A12 not only expressed the ADS pathway at high levels under a variety of conditions but also effectively inhibited growth and two intercellular signaling pathways of the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. A12 produced copious amounts of H2O2 via the pyruvate oxidase enzyme that were sufficient to arrest the growth of S. mutans. A12 also produced a protease similar to challisin (Sgc) of Streptococcus gordonii that was able to block the competence-stimulating peptide (CSP)–ComDE signaling system, which is essential for bacteriocin production by S. mutans. Wild-type A12, but not an sgc mutant derivative, could protect the sensitive indicator strain Streptococcus sanguinis SK150 from killing by the bacteriocins of S. mutans. A12, but not S. gordonii, could also block the XIP (comX-inducing peptide) signaling pathway, which is the proximal regulator of genetic competence in S. mutans, but Sgc was not required for this activity. The complete genome sequence of A12 was determined, and phylogenomic analyses compared A12 to streptococcal reference genomes. A12 was most similar to Streptococcus australis and Streptococcus parasanguinis but sufficiently different that it may represent a new species. A12-like organisms may play crucial roles in the promotion of stable, health-associated oral biofilm communities by moderating plaque pH and interfering with the growth and virulence of caries pathogens. PMID:26826230

  16. A Highly Arginolytic Streptococcus Species That Potently Antagonizes Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuelian; Palmer, Sara R; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Richards, Vincent P; Williams, Matthew L; Nascimento, Marcelle M; Burne, Robert A

    2016-01-29

    The ability of certain oral biofilm bacteria to moderate pH through arginine metabolism by the arginine deiminase system (ADS) is a deterrent to the development of dental caries. Here, we characterize a novel Streptococcus strain, designated strain A12, isolated from supragingival dental plaque of a caries-free individual. A12 not only expressed the ADS pathway at high levels under a variety of conditions but also effectively inhibited growth and two intercellular signaling pathways of the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. A12 produced copious amounts of H2O2 via the pyruvate oxidase enzyme that were sufficient to arrest the growth of S. mutans. A12 also produced a protease similar to challisin (Sgc) of Streptococcus gordonii that was able to block the competence-stimulating peptide (CSP)-ComDE signaling system, which is essential for bacteriocin production by S. mutans. Wild-type A12, but not an sgc mutant derivative, could protect the sensitive indicator strain Streptococcus sanguinis SK150 from killing by the bacteriocins of S. mutans. A12, but not S. gordonii, could also block the XIP (comX-inducing peptide) signaling pathway, which is the proximal regulator of genetic competence in S. mutans, but Sgc was not required for this activity. The complete genome sequence of A12 was determined, and phylogenomic analyses compared A12 to streptococcal reference genomes. A12 was most similar to Streptococcus australis and Streptococcus parasanguinis but sufficiently different that it may represent a new species. A12-like organisms may play crucial roles in the promotion of stable, health-associated oral biofilm communities by moderating plaque pH and interfering with the growth and virulence of caries pathogens.

  17. Clinical and microbiological features of maternal sepsis: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Abir, G; Akdagli, S; Butwick, A; Carvalho, B

    2017-02-01

    Identifying pregnant women with sepsis is challenging because diagnostic clinical and laboratory criteria overlap with normal pregnant physiologic indices. Our primary study aim was to describe clinical and laboratory characteristics of women diagnosed with sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock. Our secondary aim was to determine positive predictive values for International Classification of Disease (ICD)-9 billing codes for sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock. After gaining Institutional Review Board approval, we identified women with ICD-9 codes for sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock who were admitted to a single tertiary obstetric center from 2007-2013. Diagnoses were confirmed using criteria from the International Sepsis Definitions Conference report. Demographic, obstetric, vital signs and laboratory data were abstracted by medical chart review. We identified 190 women with sepsis-related ICD-9 codes: of these, 35 (18%) women met the criteria for a clinical diagnosis of sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock. Twenty (57%) women had a sepsis-related diagnosis after cesarean delivery. Twenty-one (60%) women had one or more pre-existing medical conditions and 19 (54%) women had one or more obstetric-related conditions. The genital tract was the most common site of infection. We observed considerable heterogeneity in maternal vital signs and laboratory indices for women with ICD-9 codes for sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock. The positive predictive value for each sepsis-related ICD-9 code was low: 16% (95% CI 10 to 24%) for sepsis, 10% (95% CI 3 to 25%) for severe sepsis and 24% (95% CI 10 to 46%) for septic shock. We identified marked heterogeneity in patient characteristics, clinical features, laboratory indices and microbiological findings among cohorts of women diagnosed with maternal sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock. Based on our findings, the incidence of maternal sepsis using ICD-9 codes may be significantly overestimated. Copyright

  18. Driving sepsis mortality down: emergency department and critical care partnerships.

    PubMed

    Powell, Kristine K; Fowler, Rita J

    2014-12-01

    This article describes the Baylor Health Care System (BHCS) approach to decreasing sepsis-related mortality within a large complex adaptive health care system. BHCS implemented sepsis care improvement initiatives based on the Surviving Sepsis Campaign early goal directed therapy guidelines. By adhering to rigorous process improvement and evidence-based practice principles, BHCS has demonstrated improvements in sepsis care processes and a significant reduction in sepsis mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular pathogenicity of Streptococcus anginosus.

    PubMed

    Asam, D; Spellerberg, B

    2014-08-01

    Streptococcus anginosus and the closely related species Streptococcus constellatus and Streptococcus intermedius, are primarily commensals of the mucosa. The true pathogenic potential of this group has been under-recognized for a long time because of difficulties in correct species identification as well as the commensal nature of these species. In recent years, streptococci of the S. anginosus group have been increasingly found as relevant microbial pathogens in abscesses and blood cultures and they play a pathogenic role in cystic fibrosis. Several international studies have shown a surprisingly high frequency of infections caused by the S. anginosus group. Recent studies and a genome-wide comparative analysis suggested the presence of multiple putative virulence factors that are well-known from other streptococcal species. However, very little is known about the molecular basis of pathogenicity in these bacteria. This review summarizes our current knowledge of pathogenicity factors and their regulation in S. anginosus.

  20. Understanding sepsis: from SIRS to septic shock.

    PubMed

    Hynes-Gay, Patricia; Lalla, Patti; Leo, Maria; Merrill-Bell, Audrey; Nicholson, Marjorie; Villaruel, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Sepsis remains the leading cause of death in non-coronary ICU patients, despite improvements in supportive treatment modalities such as antimicrobial drugs and ventilation therapy. Further, the incidence of sepsis is projected to increase in years to come, related to factors including a rise in immunosuppressed patient populations and more widespread use of invasive lines and procedures. In this article, the authors seek to advance nurses' understanding of sepsis by reviewing the SIRS to septic shock paradigm and using a case study to illustrate how a patient progressed along the continuum. The role of the critical care nurse is an important aspect of the care of these patients. Early identification of patients at risk for, or who are developing, sepsis is crucial in order to improve patient outcomes.

  1. Staghorn calculus endotoxin expression in sepsis.

    PubMed

    McAleer, Irene M; Kaplan, George W; Bradley, John S; Carroll, Stephen F

    2002-04-01

    Staghorn calculi are infrequent and generally are infected stones. Struvite or apatite calculi are embedded with gram-negative bacteria, which can produce endotoxin. Sepsis syndrome may occur after surgical therapy or endoscopic manipulation of infected or staghorn calculi. Sepsis, which can occur despite perioperative antibiotic use, may be due to bacteremia or endotoxemia. We present a child with an infected staghorn calculus who developed overwhelming sepsis and died after percutaneous stone manipulation. Endotoxin assay of stone fragments demonstrated an extremely high level of endotoxin despite low colony bacterial culture growth. This is the first reported case in which endotoxin was demonstrated in stone fragments from a child who died of severe sepsis syndrome after percutaneous staghorn stone manipulation.

  2. [Identification of the patient with sepsis].

    PubMed

    Rossi, B; Piazza, C; Moraschini, F; Marchesi, G M; Fumagalli, R

    2004-05-01

    Sepsis may be defined as a clinical syndrome caused by an organism's response to infection. The complex alterations triggered by the infection include inflammation and systemic coagulopathy in the absence of effective fibrinolysis. Possible manifestations vary in entity and severity, ranging from systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) to septic shock and multiorgan dysfunction syndrome (MODS). The nurse can play a fundamental role in the timely recognition of SIRS and in the early identification of the onset of signs of organ damage. In this way, an additional aid to establishing diagnosis can be provided and targeted treatment instituted. Following a brief presentation of the pathophysiology and epidemiology of sepsis, the manifestations and attendant risks are described, the most appropriate monitoring methods and the main nursing tasks in treating sepsis are discussed. We present the results of our experience in identifying patients with sepsis through the application of selection criteria adopted from clinical studies on the use of activated protein C.

  3. Neuro-oxidative-nitrosative stress in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Berg, Ronan M G; Møller, Kirsten; Bailey, Damian M

    2011-07-01

    Neuro-oxidative-nitrosative stress may prove the molecular basis underlying brain dysfunction in sepsis. In the current review, we describe how sepsis-induced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) trigger lipid peroxidation chain reactions throughout the cerebrovasculature and surrounding brain parenchyma, due to failure of the local antioxidant systems. ROS/RNS cause structural membrane damage, induce inflammation, and scavenge nitric oxide (NO) to yield peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). This activates the inducible NO synthase, which further compounds ONOO(-) formation. ROS/RNS cause mitochondrial dysfunction by inhibiting the mitochondrial electron transport chain and uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation, which ultimately leads to neuronal bioenergetic failure. Furthermore, in certain 'at risk' areas of the brain, free radicals may induce neuronal apoptosis. In the present review, we define a role for ROS/RNS-mediated neuronal bioenergetic failure and apoptosis as a primary mechanism underlying sepsis-associated encephalopathy and, in sepsis survivors, permanent cognitive deficits.

  4. Chronic kidney disease-induced HMGB1 elevation worsens sepsis and sepsis-induced acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Leelahavanichkul, Asada; Huang, Yuning; Hu, Xuzhen; Zhou, Hua; Tsuji, Takayuki; Chen, Richard; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Schnermann, Jürgen; Yuen, Peter S.T.; Star, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    We previously showed that kidney dysfunction/interstitial fibrosis by folate predisposes mice to sepsis mortality (normal/sepsis: 15%; folate/sepsis: 90%); agents that increased survival in normal septic mice were ineffective in the two-stage model. We used a recently characterized 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx) mouse model of progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD) to study how CKD impacts sepsis and acute kidney injury (AKI) induced by cecal ligation-puncture (CLP). CKD intensified sepsis severity (by kidney and liver injury, cytokines, and spleen apoptosis). Accumulation of HMGB1, VEGF, TNF-α, IL-6, or IL-10 was increased in CKD or sepsis alone and to a greater extent in CKD-sepsis, and only part of this effect could be explained by decreased renal clearance. Surprisingly, we found splenic apoptosis in CKD, even in the absence of sepsis. Although sFLT-1 effectively treated sepsis, it was ineffective against CKD-sepsis. Conversely, a single dose of HMGB1-neutralizing antiserum, administered 6h after sepsis alone was ineffective; however, CKD/sepsis was attenuated by anti-HMGB1. Splenectomy transiently decreased circulating HMGB1 levels, which reversed the effectiveness of anti-HMGB1 treatment on CKD/sepsis. We conclude that progressive CKD increases sepsis severity, in part, by reducing renal clearance of cytokines; CKD-induced splenic apoptosis and HMGB1 could be important common mediators for both CKD and sepsis. PMID:21832986

  5. Streptococcus Adherence and Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Nobbs, Angela H.; Lamont, Richard J.; Jenkinson, Howard F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Streptococci readily colonize mucosal tissues in the nasopharynx; the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary tracts; and the skin. Each ecological niche presents a series of challenges to successful colonization with which streptococci have to contend. Some species exist in equilibrium with their host, neither stimulating nor submitting to immune defenses mounted against them. Most are either opportunistic or true pathogens responsible for diseases such as pharyngitis, tooth decay, necrotizing fasciitis, infective endocarditis, and meningitis. Part of the success of streptococci as colonizers is attributable to the spectrum of proteins expressed on their surfaces. Adhesins enable interactions with salivary, serum, and extracellular matrix components; host cells; and other microbes. This is the essential first step to colonization, the development of complex communities, and possible invasion of host tissues. The majority of streptococcal adhesins are anchored to the cell wall via a C-terminal LPxTz motif. Other proteins may be surface anchored through N-terminal lipid modifications, while the mechanism of cell wall associations for others remains unclear. Collectively, these surface-bound proteins provide Streptococcus species with a “coat of many colors,” enabling multiple intimate contacts and interplays between the bacterial cell and the host. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated direct roles for many streptococcal adhesins as colonization or virulence factors, making them attractive targets for therapeutic and preventive strategies against streptococcal infections. There is, therefore, much focus on applying increasingly advanced molecular techniques to determine the precise structures and functions of these proteins, and their regulatory pathways, so that more targeted approaches can be developed. PMID:19721085

  6. Neonatal Infectious Diseases: Evaluation of Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Spearman, Paul W.; Stoll, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Neonatal sepsis remains a feared cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Maternal, neonatal and environmental factors are associated with risk of infection, and a combination of prevention strategies, judicious neonatal evaluation and early initiation of therapy are required to prevent adverse outcomes. The following chapter reviews recent trends in epidemiology, and provides an update on risk factors, diagnostic methods and management of neonatal sepsis. PMID:23481106

  7. Neonatal infectious diseases: evaluation of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres; Spearman, Paul W; Stoll, Barbara J

    2013-04-01

    Neonatal sepsis remains a feared cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Maternal, neonatal, and environmental factors are associated with risk of infection, and a combination of prevention strategies, judicious neonatal evaluation, and early initiation of therapy are required to prevent adverse outcomes. This article reviews recent trends in epidemiology and provides an update on risk factors, diagnostic methods, and management of neonatal sepsis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Sepsis: new findings and developments. Update 2016].

    PubMed

    Kochanek, Matthias; Shimabukuro-Vornhagen, Alexander; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael; Böll, Boris

    2016-09-01

    The incidence of sepsis increases in Germany from latest DRG evaluations and also the mortality is still at a high level. The aim of the new Sepsis - 3 definition is to optimize the identification and initiation of therapy. The treatment algorithms by Rivers (EGDT) are getting old. Rapid identification of septic patients, rapid administration of antibiotics and rapid therapy management are crucial. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Development of primer sets for loop-mediated isothermal amplification that enables rapid and specific detection of Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae are the three main pathogens causing bovine mastitis, with great losses to the dairy industry. Rapid and specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification methods (LAMP) for identification and differentiation of these three ...

  10. The Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3).

    PubMed

    Singer, Mervyn; Deutschman, Clifford S; Seymour, Christopher Warren; Shankar-Hari, Manu; Annane, Djillali; Bauer, Michael; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Bernard, Gordon R; Chiche, Jean-Daniel; Coopersmith, Craig M; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Levy, Mitchell M; Marshall, John C; Martin, Greg S; Opal, Steven M; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; van der Poll, Tom; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Angus, Derek C

    2016-02-23

    Definitions of sepsis and septic shock were last revised in 2001. Considerable advances have since been made into the pathobiology (changes in organ function, morphology, cell biology, biochemistry, immunology, and circulation), management, and epidemiology of sepsis, suggesting the need for reexamination. To evaluate and, as needed, update definitions for sepsis and septic shock. A task force (n = 19) with expertise in sepsis pathobiology, clinical trials, and epidemiology was convened by the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine. Definitions and clinical criteria were generated through meetings, Delphi processes, analysis of electronic health record databases, and voting, followed by circulation to international professional societies, requesting peer review and endorsement (by 31 societies listed in the Acknowledgment). Limitations of previous definitions included an excessive focus on inflammation, the misleading model that sepsis follows a continuum through severe sepsis to shock, and inadequate specificity and sensitivity of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria. Multiple definitions and terminologies are currently in use for sepsis, septic shock, and organ dysfunction, leading to discrepancies in reported incidence and observed mortality. The task force concluded the term severe sepsis was redundant. Sepsis should be defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. For clinical operationalization, organ dysfunction can be represented by an increase in the Sequential [Sepsis-related] Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score of 2 points or more, which is associated with an in-hospital mortality greater than 10%. Septic shock should be defined as a subset of sepsis in which particularly profound circulatory, cellular, and metabolic abnormalities are associated with a greater risk of mortality than with sepsis alone. Patients with septic shock

  11. Sepsis: From Pathophysiology to Individualized Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    László, Ildikó; Trásy, Domonkos; Molnár, Zsolt; Fazakas, János

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis has become a major health economic issue, with more patients dying in hospitals due to sepsis related complications compared to breast and colorectal cancer together. Despite extensive research in order to improve outcome in sepsis over the last few decades, results of large multicenter studies were by-and-large very disappointing. This fiasco can be explained by several factors, but one of the most important reasons is the uncertain definition of sepsis resulting in very heterogeneous patient populations, and the lack of understanding of pathophysiology, which is mainly based on the imbalance in the host-immune response. However, this heroic research work has not been in vain. Putting the results of positive and negative studies into context, we can now approach sepsis in a different concept, which may lead us to new perspectives in diagnostics and treatment. While decision making based on conventional sepsis definitions can inevitably lead to false judgment due to the heterogeneity of patients, new concepts based on currently gained knowledge in immunology may help to tailor assessment and treatment of these patients to their actual needs. Summarizing where we stand at present and what the future may hold are the purpose of this review. PMID:26258150

  12. [Are statins a therapeutic alternative in sepsis?].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Rivera-Buendía, Santos; Carrillo-Córdova, Jorge Raúl; Carrillo-Córdova, Luis Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Sepsis continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Evidence is emerging from observational studies and basic science research that statins might be associated with reduced mortality in sepsis. Statins have diverse immunomodulatory and antiinflammatory properties independent of their lipid-lowering ability. The protective association between statins and sepsis persisted in high-risk subgroups including patients with diabetes mellitus, those with malignancy, and those receiving steroids. This review discusses the basis of these observations and the current place of statin therapy in patients with sepsis. This is a rapidly growing field of fascinating experimental biology. It suggests an urgent need to investigate the pharmacology of these drugs and reappraise their therapeutic indications in critically ill patients. If this finding is supported by prospective controlled trials, statins may play an important role in sepsis related mortality. By the other hand statins are significantly cheaper than other therapies that have been shown to improve outcome in sepsis, and the demonstration of mortality benefit would have enormous cost-benefit implication.

  13. Sepsis: From Pathophysiology to Individualized Patient Care.

    PubMed

    László, Ildikó; Trásy, Domonkos; Molnár, Zsolt; Fazakas, János

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis has become a major health economic issue, with more patients dying in hospitals due to sepsis related complications compared to breast and colorectal cancer together. Despite extensive research in order to improve outcome in sepsis over the last few decades, results of large multicenter studies were by-and-large very disappointing. This fiasco can be explained by several factors, but one of the most important reasons is the uncertain definition of sepsis resulting in very heterogeneous patient populations, and the lack of understanding of pathophysiology, which is mainly based on the imbalance in the host-immune response. However, this heroic research work has not been in vain. Putting the results of positive and negative studies into context, we can now approach sepsis in a different concept, which may lead us to new perspectives in diagnostics and treatment. While decision making based on conventional sepsis definitions can inevitably lead to false judgment due to the heterogeneity of patients, new concepts based on currently gained knowledge in immunology may help to tailor assessment and treatment of these patients to their actual needs. Summarizing where we stand at present and what the future may hold are the purpose of this review.

  14. Pleiotropic regulations of neutrophil receptors response to sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huafeng; Sun, Bingwei

    2017-03-01

    Sepsis is a complex clinical condition that causes a high mortality rate worldwide. Numerous studies on the pathophysiology of sepsis have revealed an imbalance in the inflammatory network, thus leading to tissue damage, organ failure, and ultimately death. The impairment of neu-trophil migration is associated with the outcome of sepsis. Literature review was performed on the roles of neutrophil recruitment and neutrophil receptors as pleiotropic regulators during sepsis. Additionally, we systematically classify neutrophil receptors with regard to the neutrophil response during sepsis and discuss the clinical implications of these receptors for the treatment of sepsis. Increasing evidence suggests that there is significant dysfunction in neutrophil recruitment during sepsis, characterized by the failure to migrate to the site of infection. Neutrophil receptors, as pleiotropic regulators, play important roles in the neutrophil response during sepsis. Neutrophil receptors play key roles in chemotactic neutrophil migration and may prove to be suitable targets in future pharmacological therapies for sepsis.

  15. Post-Acute Care Use and Hospital Readmission after Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tiffanie K; Fuchs, Barry D; Small, Dylan S; Halpern, Scott D; Hanish, Asaf; Umscheid, Craig A; Baillie, Charles A; Kerlin, Meeta Prasad; Gaieski, David F; Mikkelsen, Mark E

    2015-06-01

    The epidemiology of post-acute care use and hospital readmission after sepsis remains largely unknown. To examine the rate of post-acute care use and hospital readmission after sepsis and to examine risk factors and outcomes for hospital readmissions after sepsis. In an observational cohort study conducted in an academic health care system (2010-2012), we compared post-acute care use at discharge and hospital readmission after 3,620 sepsis hospitalizations with 108,958 nonsepsis hospitalizations. We used three validated, claims-based approaches to identify sepsis and severe sepsis. Post-acute care use at discharge was more likely after sepsis, driven by skilled care facility placement (35.4% after sepsis vs. 15.8%; P < 0.001), with the highest rate observed after severe sepsis. Readmission rates at 7, 30, and 90 days were higher postsepsis (P < 0.001). Compared with nonsepsis hospitalizations (15.6% readmitted within 30 d), the increased readmission risk was present regardless of sepsis severity (27.3% after sepsis and 26.0-26.2% after severe sepsis). After controlling for presepsis characteristics, the readmission risk was found to be 1.51 times greater (95% CI, 1.38-1.66) than nonsepsis hospitalizations. Readmissions after sepsis were more likely to result in death or transition to hospice care (6.1% vs. 13.3% after sepsis; P < 0.001). Independent risk factors associated with 30-day readmissions after sepsis hospitalizations included age, malignancy diagnosis, hospitalizations in the year prior to the index hospitalization, nonelective index admission type, one or more procedures during the index hospitalization, and low hemoglobin and high red cell distribution width at discharge. Post-acute care use and hospital readmissions were common after sepsis. The increased readmission risk after sepsis was observed regardless of sepsis severity and was associated with adverse readmission outcomes.

  16. Population structure of Streptococcus oralis

    PubMed Central

    Do, Thuy; Jolley, Keith A.; Maiden, Martin C. J.; Gilbert, Steven C.; Clark, Douglas; Wade, William G.; Beighton, David

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus oralis is a member of the normal human oral microbiota, capable of opportunistic pathogenicity; like related oral streptococci, it exhibits appreciable phenotypic and genetic variation. A multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme for S. oralis was developed and the resultant data analysed to examine the population structure of the species. Analysis of 113 isolates, confirmed as belonging to the S. oralis/mitis group by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, characterized the population as highly diverse and undergoing inter- and intra-species recombination with a probable clonal complex structure. ClonalFrame analysis of these S. oralis isolates along with examples of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae grouped the named species into distinct, coherent populations and did not support the clustering of S. pseudopneumoniae with S. mitis as reported previously using distance-based methods. Analysis of the individual loci suggested that this discrepancy was due to the possible hybrid nature of S. pseudopneumoniae. The data are available on the public MLST website (http://pubmlst.org/soralis/). PMID:19423627

  17. Recombination-deficient Streptococcus sanguis

    SciTech Connect

    Daneo-Moore, L.; Volpe, A.

    1985-05-01

    A UV-sensitive derivative was obtained from Streptococcus sanguis Challis. The organism could be transformed with a number of small streptococcal plasmids at frequencies equal to, or 1 logarithm below, the transformation frequencies for the parent organism. However, transformation with chromosomal DNA was greatly impaired in the UV-sensitive derivative.

  18. Laboratory detection of sepsis: biomarkers and molecular approaches.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Stefan; Carroll, Karen C

    2013-09-01

    Sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Rapid diagnosis and therapeutic interventions are desirable to improve the overall mortality in patients with sepsis. However, gold standard laboratory diagnostic methods for sepsis, pose a significant challenge to rapid diagnosis of sepsis by physicians and laboratories. This article discusses the usefulness and potential of biomarkers and molecular test methods for a more rapid clinical and laboratory diagnosis of sepsis. Because new technologies are quickly emerging, physicians and laboratories must appreciate the key factors and characteristics that affect the clinical usefulness and diagnostic accuracy of these test methodologies.

  19. Sepsis-related hypertensive response: friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    In daily practice acute arterial hypertension may occur during acute sepsis. No management guidelines concerning this issue figured in the latest sepsis campaign guidelines. Arterial hypertension occurring during sepsis could be an overlooked condition despite its potential haemodynamic harmful consequences. In this paper, a clinical study of acute hypertensive response related to sepsis is detailed. It shows that arterial hypertension, renal salt wasting and glomerular hyperfiltration can occur simultaneously during sepsis. Mechanisms and management options of sepsis-related arterial hypertensive response are also discussed. PMID:24855080

  20. Pathophysiology of sepsis and recent patents on the diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis for sepsis.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Yasumasa; Matsukawa, Akihiro

    2009-01-01

    Despite advances in the development of powerful antibiotics and intensive care unit, sepsis is still life threatening and the mortality rate remains unchanged for the past three decades. Recent prospective trials with biological response modifiers have shown a modest clinical benefit. The pathological basis of sepsis is initially an excessive inflammatory response against invading pathogens, leading to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Evidence reveals that a variety of inflammatory mediators orchestrate the intense inflammation through complicated cellular interactions. More recent data indicate that most septic patients survive this stage and then subjected to an immunoparalysis phase, termed compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS), which is more fatal than the initial phase. Sepsis is a complicated clinical syndrome with multiple physiologic and immunologic abnormalities. In this review, we summarize the recent understandings of the pathophysiology of sepsis, and introduce recent patents on diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis for sepsis.

  1. Maternal sepsis mortality and morbidity during hospitalization for delivery: temporal trends and independent associations for severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Melissa E; Bateman, Brian T; Bauer, Samuel T; Shanks, Amy M; Mhyre, Jill M

    2013-10-01

    Sepsis is currently the leading cause of direct maternal death in the United Kingdom. In this study, we aimed to determine frequency, temporal trends, and independent associations for severe sepsis during hospitalization for delivery in the United States. Data were obtained from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for the years 1998 through 2008. The presence of severe sepsis was identified by the appropriate International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess temporal trends for sepsis, severe sepsis, and sepsis-related death and also to identify independent associations of severe sepsis. Of an estimated 44,999,260 hospitalizations for delivery, sepsis complicated 1:3333 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1:3151-1:3540) deliveries, severe sepsis complicated 1:10,823 (95% CI, 1:10,000-1:11,792) deliveries, and sepsis-related death complicated 1:105,263 (95% CI, 1:83,333-1:131,579) deliveries. While the overall frequency of sepsis was stable(P = 0.95), the risk of severe sepsis and sepsis-related death increased during the study period, (P < 0.001) and (P = 0.02), respectively. Independent associations for severe sepsis, with an adjusted odds ratio and lower bound 95% CI higher than 3, include congestive heart failure, chronic liver disease, chronic renal disease, systemic lupus erythematous, and rescue cerclage placement. Maternal severe sepsis and sepsis-related deaths are increasing in the United States. Severe sepsis often occurs in the absence of a recognized risk factor and underscores the need for developing systems of care that increase sensitivity for disease detection across the entire population. Physicians should enhance surveillance in patients with congestive heart failure, chronic liver disease, chronic renal disease, and systemic lupus erythematous and institute early treatment when signs of sepsis are emerging.

  2. Burkholderia cepacia sepsis among neonates.

    PubMed

    Patra, Saikat; Bhat Y, Ramesh; Lewis, Leslie Edward; Purakayastha, Jayashree; Sivaramaraju, V Vamsi; Kalwaje E, Vandana; Mishra, Swathi

    2014-11-01

    Burkholderia cepacia is a rare cause of sepsis in newborns and its transmission involves human contact with heavily contaminated medical devices and disinfectants. The authors aimed to determine epidemiology, clinical features, antibiotic sensitivity pattern, complications and outcome of blood culture proven B. cepacia infections in 12 neonates. All neonates were outborn, 5 preterm and 7 term. B. cepacia was isolated from blood in all and concurrently from CSF in three neonates. Lethargy and respiratory distress (41.7 %) were major presenting features. Five newborns (41.7 %) required mechanical ventilation for 3-7 d. Highest bacterial susceptibility was observed for meropenem (100 %), followed by cefoperazone-sulbactam, piperacillin-tazobactam, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (all 83 %), ceftazidime (75 %) and ciprofloxacin (42 %). Piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin and cotrimoxazole either singly or in combination led to complete recovery of 11 (91.7 %) newborns; one developed hydrocephalus. Eight of nine infants who completed 6 mo follow up were normal. Prompt recognition and appropriate antibiotic therapy for B. cepacia infection results in complete recovery in majority.

  3. Immunological monitoring to prevent and treat sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The clinical, human and economic burden associated with sepsis is huge. Initiatives such as the Surviving Sepsis Campaign aim to effectively reduce risk of death from severe sepsis and septic shock. Nonetheless, although substantial benefits raised from the implementation of this campaign have been obtained, much work remains if we are to realise the full potential promised by this strategy. A deeper understanding of the processes leading to sepsis is necessary before we can design an effective suite of interventions. Dysregulation of the immune response to infection is acknowledged to contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. Production of both proinflammatory and immunosuppressive cytokines is observed from the very first hours following diagnosis. In addition, hypogammaglobulinemia is often present in patients with septic shock. Moreover, levels of IgG, IgM and IgA at diagnosis correlate directly with survival. In turn, nonsurvivors have lower levels of C4 (a protein of the complement system) than the survivors. Natural killer cell counts and function also seem to have an important role in this disease. HLA-DR in the surface of monocytes and counts of CD4+CD25+ T-regulatory cells in blood could also be useful biomarkers for sepsis. At the genomic level, repression of networks corresponding to major histocompatibility complex antigen presentation is observed in septic shock. In consequence, cumulative evidence supports the potential role of immunological monitoring to guide measures to prevent or treat sepsis in a personalised and timely manner (early antibiotic administration, immunoglobulin replacement, immunomodulation). In conclusion, although diffuse and limited, current available information supports the development of large comprehensive studies aimed to urgently evaluate immunological monitoring as a tool to prevent sepsis, guide its treatment and, as a consequence, diminish the morbidity and mortality associated with this severe condition. PMID

  4. Immune cell phenotype and function in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Rimmelé, Thomas; Payen, Didier; Cantaluppi, Vincenzo; Marshall, John; Gomez, Hernando; Gomez, Alonso; Murray, Patrick; Kellum, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems play a critical role in the host response to sepsis. Moreover, their accessibility for sampling and their capacity to respond dynamically to an acute threat increases the possibility that leukocytes might serve as a measure of a systemic state of altered responsiveness in sepsis. The working group of the 14th Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) conference sought to obtain consensus on the characteristic functional and phenotypic changes in cells of the innate and adaptive immune system in the setting of sepsis. Techniques for the study of circulating leukocytes were also reviewed and the impact on cellular phenotypes and leukocyte function of non extracorporeal treatments and extracorporeal blood purification therapies proposed for sepsis was analyzed. A large number of alterations in the expression of distinct neutrophil and monocyte surface markers have been reported in septic patients. The most consistent alteration seen in septic neutrophils is their activation of a survival program that resists apoptotic death. Reduced expression of HLA-DR is a characteristic finding on septic monocytes but monocyte antimicrobial function does not appear to be significantly altered in sepsis. Regarding adaptive immunity, sepsis-induced apoptosis leads to lymphopenia in patients with septic shock and it involves all types of T cells (CD4, CD8 and Natural Killer) except T regulatory cells, thus favoring immunosuppression. Finally, numerous promising therapies targeting the host immune response to sepsis are under investigation. These potential treatments can have an effect on the number of immune cells, the proportion of cell subtypes and the cell function. PMID:26529661

  5. Immunological monitoring to prevent and treat sepsis.

    PubMed

    Almansa, Raquel; Wain, John; Tamayo, Eduardo; Andaluz-Ojeda, David; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Ramirez, Paula; Bermejo-Martin, Jesús F

    2013-01-25

    The clinical, human and economic burden associated with sepsis is huge. Initiatives such as the Surviving Sepsis Campaign aim to effectively reduce risk of death from severe sepsis and septic shock. Nonetheless, although substantial benefits raised from the implementation of this campaign have been obtained, much work remains if we are to realise the full potential promised by this strategy. A deeper understanding of the processes leading to sepsis is necessary before we can design an effective suite of interventions. Dysregulation of the immune response to infection is acknowledged to contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. Production of both proinflammatory and immunosuppressive cytokines is observed from the very first hours following diagnosis. In addition, hypogammaglobulinemia is often present in patients with septic shock. Moreover, levels of IgG, IgM and IgA at diagnosis correlate directly with survival. In turn, nonsurvivors have lower levels of C4 (a protein of the complement system) than the survivors. Natural killer cell counts and function also seem to have an important role in this disease. HLA-DR in the surface of monocytes and counts of CD4+CD25+ T-regulatory cells in blood could also be useful biomarkers for sepsis. At the genomic level, repression of networks corresponding to major histocompatibility complex antigen presentation is observed in septic shock. In consequence, cumulative evidence supports the potential role of immunological monitoring to guide measures to prevent or treat sepsis in a personalised and timely manner (early antibiotic administration, immunoglobulin replacement, immunomodulation). In conclusion, although diffuse and limited, current available information supports the development of large comprehensive studies aimed to urgently evaluate immunological monitoring as a tool to prevent sepsis, guide its treatment and, as a consequence, diminish the morbidity and mortality associated with this severe condition.

  6. Susceptibility and emm type of Streptococcus pyogenes isolated from children with severe infection.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of various antimicrobial agents were measured against 12 strains of Streptococcus pyogenes isolated from children with invasive infections between 2003 and 2012. The patients ranged in age from 1 day to 15 years, with patients younger than 5 years, including three neonates, accounting for a half of the patients. The disease was sepsis in four patients, skin and soft tissue infection in three patients, retropharyngeal abscess in two patients, pneumonia plus sepsis in one patient, empyema in one patient, and pyogenic arthritis in one patient. One patient with sepsis died, while cure without sequelae was achieved in all the remaining patients. When classified by type, emm1 (six strains) was the most prevalent type, followed by emm12 (two strains). The MIC90/MBC90 values were 0.015/0.015 μg/mL for penicillin G, 0.03/0.03 μg/mL for ampicillin, 0.015/0.03 μg/mL for cefotaxime, 0.03/0.03 μg/mL for ceftriaxone, 0.008/0.008 μg/mL for panipenem, 0.008/0.008 μg/mL for meropenem, and ≤0.004/≤0.004 μg/mL for doripenem, indicating the superior antimicrobial activities of carbapenem.

  7. Gene Repertoire Evolution of Streptococcus pyogenes Inferred from Phylogenomic Analysis with Streptococcus canis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Lefébure, Tristan; Richards, Vince P.; Lang, Ping; Pavinski-Bitar, Paulina; Stanhope, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, is an important human pathogen classified within the pyogenic group of streptococci, exclusively adapted to the human host. Our goal was to employ a comparative evolutionary approach to better understand the genomic events concomitant with S. pyogenes human adaptation. As part of ascertaining these events, we sequenced the genome of one of the potential sister species, the agricultural pathogen S. canis, and combined it in a comparative genomics reconciliation analysis with two other closely related species, Streptococcus dysgalactiae and Streptococcus equi, to determine the genes that were gained and lost during S. pyogenes evolution. Genome wide phylogenetic analyses involving 15 Streptococcus species provided convincing support for a clade of S. equi, S. pyogenes, S. dysgalactiae, and S. canis and suggested that the most likely S. pyogenes sister species was S. dysgalactiae. The reconciliation analysis identified 113 genes that were gained on the lineage leading to S. pyogenes. Almost half (46%) of these gained genes were phage associated and 14 showed significant matches to experimentally verified bacteria virulence factors. Subsequent to the origin of S. pyogenes, over half of the phage associated genes were involved in 90 different LGT events, mostly involving different strains of S. pyogenes, but with a high proportion involving the horse specific pathogen S. equi subsp. equi, with the directionality almost exclusively (86%) in the S. pyogenes to S. equi direction. Streptococcus agalactiae appears to have played an important role in the evolution of S. pyogenes with a high proportion of LGTs originating from this species. Overall the analysis suggests that S. pyogenes adaptation to the human host was achieved in part by (i) the integration of new virulence factors (e.g. speB, and the sal locus) and (ii) the construction of new regulation networks (e.g. rgg, and to some extent speB). PMID:22666370

  8. Linkage Analyses of Extracellular Glucans from Streptococcus sanguis and Streptococcus mitior

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, M.; Birkhed, D.; Coykendall, A.; Rizzo, D.

    1979-01-01

    Similar α-(1→6) linkage-rich, soluble, extracellular glucans have been isolated from six strains of two genetically distinct groups of Streptococcus sanguis and three strains of Streptococcus mitior. PMID:457265

  9. Emerging therapies for the treatment of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2015-08-01

    Sepsis affects patients of all ages with multiple comorbidities and underlying diagnoses, and is the result of infection by many potential pathogens infecting various organs or sites. Many molecules have been clinically tested in recent years for their potential immunomodulatory effects, but have been shown to have no beneficial effects on outcomes in heterogeneous populations of patients with sepsis. There are, therefore, no specific antisepsis therapies and mortality and morbidity rates remain high despite improved overall management of these patients. This review covers promising agents currently used in clinical trials. There are several candidates currently undergoing early and later phase of clinical testing, including thrombomodulin, alkaline phosphatase, interferon-beta, and selepressin. Other approaches including immunoglobulins, extracorporeal therapies, and pharmaconutrients will also be discussed. Despite multiple trials of potential therapies for sepsis, no strategies have yet been persistently shown to have beneficial effects on outcomes. The main reason for the disappointing results is that patient populations in these studies have been too heterogeneous. Selecting patients on the basis of general symptoms is not enough. Rather patients should be selected according to the likely action of the drug in question. To achieve this, improved biomarkers of sepsis and of the immune response are needed and the activities of the individual agents need to be carefully characterized. New candidates are being developed and the results of ongoing and recent clinical trials of immunomodulatory therapies are eagerly awaited as new therapies for sepsis are urgently needed.

  10. Global DNA methylation in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Dhas, Benet Bosco; Antony, Hiasindh Ashmi; Bhat, Vishnu; Newton, Banupriya; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2015-04-01

    To find out whether gDNA methylation can be used as a diagnostic/prognostic method for neonatal sepsis. The study was conducted in the neonatal division of a tertiary care referral hospital. Fifty one newborns as cases and thirty seven newborns as controls were enrolled in the study. Using 5-mC DNA ELISA method, the percentage of genomic DNA methylated in these newborns was established. Highly significant difference in percentage of gDNA methylated was found between the cases and controls (Cases: 2.4 ± 0.39; 2.07 ± 0.35; P < 0.0001). Culture proven and possible cases were also significantly distinguishable (P < 0.05). No significant differences in methylation were observed in terms of gestational age, birth weight and outcomes such shock, thrombocytopenia, except for renal failure. The index results showed that genomic DNA methylation varies significantly among newborns with sepsis (clinical, probable and culture positive) and without sepsis. Although the global DNA methylation was not a highly sensitive diagnostic method, this study reveals that DNA methylation might play a vital role in neonatal sepsis susceptibility. Identification of the specific differentially methylated genes might serve as a promising future diagnostic/prognostic marker for neonatal sepsis.

  11. Sepsis: a roadmap for future research.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jonathan; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Adhikari, Neill K J; Machado, Flavia R; Angus, Derek C; Calandra, Thierry; Jaton, Katia; Giulieri, Stefano; Delaloye, Julie; Opal, Steven; Tracey, Kevin; van der Poll, Tom; Pelfrene, Eric

    2015-05-01

    Sepsis is a common and lethal syndrome: although outcomes have improved, mortality remains high. No specific anti-sepsis treatments exist; as such, management of patients relies mainly on early recognition allowing correct therapeutic measures to be started rapidly, including administration of appropriate antibiotics, source control measures when necessary, and resuscitation with intravenous fluids and vasoactive drugs when needed. Although substantial developments have been made in the understanding of the basic pathogenesis of sepsis and the complex interplay of host, pathogen, and environment that affect the incidence and course of the disease, sepsis has stubbornly resisted all efforts to successfully develop and then deploy new and improved treatments. Existing models of clinical research seem increasingly unlikely to produce new therapies that will result in a step change in clinical outcomes. In this Commission, we set out our understanding of the clinical epidemiology and management of sepsis and then ask how the present approaches might be challenged to develop a new roadmap for future research.

  12. Neuromuscular Dysfunction in Experimental Sepsis and Glutamine

    PubMed Central

    Çankayalı, İlkin; Boyacılar, Özden; Demirağ, Kubilay; Uyar, Mehmet; Moral, Ali Reşat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electrophysiological studies show that critical illness polyneuromyopathy appears in the early stage of sepsis before the manifestation of clinical findings. The metabolic response observed during sepsis causes glutamine to become a relative essential amino acid. Aims: We aimed to assess the changes in neuromuscular transmission in the early stage of sepsis after glutamine supplementation. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into two groups. Rats in both groups were given normal feeding for one week. In the study group, 1 g/kg/day glutamine was added to normal feeding by feeding tube for one week. Cecal ligation and perforation (CLP) surgery was performed at the end of one week. Before and 24 hours after CLP, compound muscle action potentials were recorded from the gastrocnemius muscle. Results: Latency measurements before and 24 hours after CLP were 0.68±0.05 ms and 0.80±0.09 ms in the control group and 0.69±0.07 ms and 0.73±0.07 ms in the study group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Since enteral glutamine prevented compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) latency prolongation in the early phase of sepsis, it was concluded that enteral glutamine replacement might be promising in the prevention of neuromuscular dysfunction in sepsis; however, further studies are required. PMID:27308070

  13. Improving Outcomes in Patients With Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Armen, Scott B; Freer, Carol V; Showalter, John W; Crook, Tonya; Whitener, Cynthia J; West, Cheri; Terndrup, Thomas E; Grifasi, Marissa; DeFlitch, Christopher J; Hollenbeak, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis mortality may be improved by early recognition and appropriate treatment based on evidence-based guidelines. An intervention was developed that focused on earlier identification of sepsis, early antimicrobial administration, and an educational program that was disseminated throughout all hospital units and services. There were 1331 patients with sepsis during the intervention period and 1401 patients with sepsis during the control period. After controlling for expected mortality, patients in the intervention period had 30% lower odds of dying (odds ratio = 0.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.57 to 0.84). They also had 1.07 fewer days on average in the intensive care unit (95% CI = -1.98 to -0.16), 2.15 fewer hospital days (95% CI = -3.45 to -0.86), and incurred on average $1949 less in hospital costs, although the effect on costs was not statistically significant. Continued incremental improvement and sustainment is anticipated through organizational oversight, continued education, and initiation of an automated electronic sepsis alert function. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Auranofin efficacy against MDR Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus infections.

    PubMed

    Aguinagalde, Leire; Díez-Martínez, Roberto; Yuste, Jose; Royo, Inmaculada; Gil, Carmen; Lasa, Íñigo; Martín-Fontecha, Mar; Marín-Ramos, Nagore Isabel; Ardanuy, Carmen; Liñares, Josefina; García, Pedro; García, Ernesto; Sánchez-Puelles, José M

    2015-09-01

    Auranofin is an FDA-approved, gold-containing compound in clinical use for the oral treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and has been recently granted by the regulatory authorities due to its antiprotozoal properties. A reprofiling strategy was performed with a Streptococcus pneumoniae phenotypic screen and a proprietary library of compounds, consisting of both FDA-approved and unapproved bioactive compounds. Two different multiresistant S. pneumoniae strains were employed in a sepsis mouse model of infection. In addition, an MRSA strain was tested using both the thigh model and a mesh-associated biofilm infection in mice. The repurposing approach showed the high potency of auranofin against multiresistant clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus in vitro and in vivo. Efficacy in the S. pneumoniae sepsis model was obtained using auranofin by the oral route in the dose ranges used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Thioglucose replacement by alkyl chains showed that this moiety was not essential for the antibacterial activity and led to the discovery of a new gold derivative (MH05) with remarkable activity in vitro and in vivo. Auranofin and the new gold derivative MH05 showed encouraging in vivo activity against multiresistant clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae and S. aureus. The clinical management of auranofin, alone or in combination with other antibiotics, deserves further exploration before use in patients presenting therapeutic failure caused by infections with multiresistant Gram-positive pathogens. Decades of clinical use mean that this compound is safe to use and may accelerate its evaluation in humans. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Sepsis leads to thyroid impairment and dysfunction in rat model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xingsheng; Shi, Songjing; Shi, Songchang

    2016-10-01

    Sepsis was a systemic response to a local infection. Apoptosis was observed in the experimental sepsis. In this study, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis was established in rats. We found that sepsis decreased thyroid hormone levels, including triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), free T3 (fT3), and free T4 (fT4). Besides, we detected the increasing expression level of Caspase-3 and increasing ratio of TUNEL positive cells in the thyroid after sepsis. Furthermore, a series of pathological ultrastructural changes were observed in thyroid follicular epithelial cells by CLP-induced sepsis. This study established a sepsis animal model and provided the cellular and molecular basis for decoding the pathological mechanism in thyroid with the occurrence of sepsis.

  16. Potential Impact of the 2016 Consensus Definitions of Sepsis and Septic Shock on Future Sepsis Research.

    PubMed

    Peake, Sandra L; Delaney, Anthony; Bailey, Michael; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2017-10-01

    The influence of the Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3) on the conduct of future sepsis research is unknown. We seek to examine the potential effect of the new definitions on the identification and outcomes of patients enrolled in a sepsis trial. This was a post hoc analysis of the Australasian Resuscitation in Sepsis Evaluation (ARISE) trial of early goal-directed therapy that recruited 1,591 adult patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with early septic shock diagnosed by greater than or equal to 2 systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria and either refractory hypotension or hyperlactatemia. The proportion of participants who would have met the Sepsis-3 criteria for quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) score, sepsis (an increased Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score ≥2 because of infection) and septic shock before randomization, their baseline characteristics, interventions delivered, and mortality were determined. There were 1,139 participants who had a qSOFA score of greater than or equal to 2 at baseline (71.6% [95% confidence interval {CI} 69.4% to 73.8%]). In contrast, 1,347 participants (84.7% [95% CI 82.9% to 86.4%]) met the Sepsis-3 criteria for sepsis. Only 1,010 participants were both qSOFA positive and met the Sepsis-3 criteria for sepsis (63.5% [95% CI 61.1% to 65.8%]). The Sepsis-3 definition for septic shock was met at baseline by 203 participants (12.8% [95% CI 11.2% to 14.5%]), of whom 175 (86.2% [95% CI 81.5% to 91.0%]) were also qSOFA positive. Ninety-day mortality for participants fulfilling the Sepsis-3 criteria for sepsis and septic shock was 20.4% (95% CI 18.2% to 22.5%) (274/1,344) and 29.6% (95% CI 23.3% to 35.8% [60/203]) versus 9.4% (95% CI 5.8% to 13.1%) (23/244) and 17.1% (95% CI 15.1% to 19.1% [237/1,388]), respectively, for participants not meeting the criteria (risk differences 11.0% [95% CI 6.2% to 14.8%] and 12.5% [95% CI 6.3% to 19

  17. Emerging resistant serotypes of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Elshafie, Sittana; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J

    2016-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of meningitis and sepsis. The aim of the study was to analyze the distribution, vaccine serotype coverage, and antibiotic resistance of S. pneumoniae serotypes isolated from patients with invasive diseases, after the introduction of pneumococcal 7-valent conjugated vaccine (PCV-7). Methods A total of 134 isolates were collected from blood and cerebrospinal fluid specimens at Hamad Hospital during the period from 2005 to 2009. Isolate serotyping was done using the Quellung reaction. The prevaccination period was considered before 2005. Results The most common serotypes for all age groups were 3 (12.70%), 14 (11.90%), 1 (11.90%), 19A (9.00%), 9V (5.20%), 23F (5.20%), and 19F (4.50%). Coverage rates for infant <2 years for PCV-7, the 10-valent conjugated vaccine (PCV-10), and the 13-valent conjugated vaccine (PCV-13) were 34.78%, 52.17%, and 78.26%, respectively. Coverage rates of these vaccines were 50%, 67.86%, and 75% for the 2–5 years age group; 27.12%, 40.68%, and 64.41% for the age group 6–64 years; and 25%, 33.33%, and 66.67% for the ≥65 years age group, respectively. The percentage of nonsusceptible isolates to penicillin, cefotaxime, and erythromycin were 43.86%, 16.66%, and 22.81%, respectively. Thirty-seven isolates (32.46%) were multidrug resistant (MDR) and belonged to serotypes 14, 19A, 19F, 23F, 1, 9V, 12F, 4, 6B, 3, and 15A. Compared to previous results before the introduction of PCV-7, there was a significant reduction in penicillin-nonsusceptable S. pneumoniae from 66.67% to 43.86%, and a slight insignificant reduction in erythromycin nonsusceptible strains from 27.60% to 22.8%, while there was a significant increase in cefotaxime nonsusceptible strains from 3.55% to 16.66%. Conclusion Invasive pneumococcal strains and the emergence of MDR serotypes is a global burden that must be addressed through multiple strategies, including vaccination, antibiotic stewardship, and continuous

  18. Epidemiology of Streptococcus agalactiae colonization in Germany.

    PubMed

    Brimil, Nadia; Barthell, Elisabeth; Heindrichs, Uwe; Kuhn, Melanie; Lütticken, Rudolf; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2006-02-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae can cause severe pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis in neonates and remains one of the most prevalent causes of invasive neonatal infections. Maternal transmission of S. agalactiae during delivery can be prevented by prenatal screening and peripartal antibiotic prophylaxis. Implementation of CDC guidelines for group B streptococci (GBS) disease prevention resulted in a significant decline of invasive neonatal S. agalactiae infections in the USA. Similar national guidelines were issued in 2000 for Germany. However, the epidemiology of S. agalactiae colonization in Germany has not been investigated for more than 15 years and the impact these guidelines will have is therefore unknown. To assess colonization rates in Germany, we cultured vaginal and rectal swabs for S. agalactiae from pregnant and non-pregnant adult patients in the region of Aachen and Munich. Swabs were cultivated in selective broth medium for 24h and subsequently plated on blood agar plates according to the CDC recommendations. Colonies negative for catalase and pyrrolidonyl aminopeptidase were further differentiated by the CAMP test and a DNA probe specific for S. agalactiae. Rectal or vaginal colonization of S. agalactiae was found in 34 (16%) of 210 pregnant patients and in 41 (16%) of 250 non-pregnant women. S. agalactiae was found only in rectal swabs in 4% of pregnant and non-pregnant patients. For further characterization of the strains capsular serotypes and major surface protein antigens were determined by Ouchterlony immunodiffusion and PCR. Among the 75 different patient isolates serotype III was the most prevalent with 21 (28%) isolates, followed by 16 (21%) isolates of serotype II, 13 (17%) isolates of serotype Ia, 12 (16%) of serotype V, 11 (15%) of serotype Ib and only 2 (3%) isolates of serotype IV. The vast majority of all strains harbored genes for the major surface protein antigens, the alpha-C-protein or alpha-C-protein like antigens like Alp2-4, epsilon and

  19. [Streptococcus pyogenes--much more than the aetiological agent of scarlet fever].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2009-11-01

    The grampositive bacterium S. pyogenes (beta-haemolytic group A Streptococcus) is a natural colonizer of the human oropharynx mucous membrane and one of the most common agents of infectious diseases in humans. S. pyogenes causes the widest range of disease in humans among all bacterial pathogens. It is responsible for various skin infections such as impetigo contagiosa and erysipelas, and localized mucous membrane infections of the oropharynx (e. g. tonsillitis and pharyngitis). Betahaemolytic group A Streptococcus causes also invasive diseases such as sepses including puerperal sepsis. Additionally, S. pyogenes induces toxin-mediated syndromes, i. e. scarlet fever, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) and necrotizing fasciitis (NF). STSS and NF are severe, frequently fatal diseases that have emerged in Europe and Northern America during the last two decades. Finally, some immunpathological diseases such as acute rheumatic fever and glomerulonephritis also result from S. pyogenes infections. Most scientists recommend penicillins (benzylpenicillin, phenoxymethylpenicllin) as drugs of first choice for treatment of Streptococcus tonsillopharyngitis and scarlet fever. Erysipelas and some other skin infections should be treated with benzylpenicillin. Intensive care measurements are needed for treatment of severe toxin-mediated S. pyogenes diseases. These measurements include the elimination of internal bacterial foci, concomitant application of clindamycin and benzylpenicillin and suitable treatment of shock symptoms. Management of immunpathological diseases requires antiphlogistical therapy. Because of the wide distribution of S. pyogenes in the general population and the lack of an effective vaccine, possibilities for prevention allowing a suitable protection for diseases due to S. pyogenes are very limited.

  20. The new sepsis definition: limitations and contribution to research and diagnosis of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Verdonk, Franck; Blet, Alice; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2017-04-01

    Based on recent clinical, epidemiological, and pathophysiological data, a third international consensus conference was carried out to define new criteria of sepsis in February 2016. This review presents the different items of this new definition, their limitations and their contribution to research and diagnosis of sepsis, in comparison with the previous definitions. Incidence, management, and pathophysiological knowledge of sepsis have improved over the past 20 years. However, sepsis still evolves to a mortal outcome, in one case out of five, with no new recent or specific therapy showing its efficacy on the patient's prognosis. These findings have led to the development of new definition. The new definition of sepsis incorporates relevant clinical and biological criteria such as SOFA score or serum lactate levels. It no longer takes into account the items of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome, which present a lack of specificity. It also simplifies the different stages of severity by deleting the term of 'severe sepsis' and by defining septic shock as a subset of sepsis. This definition, endorsed by only two international societies of intensive care, has some limitations and so merits prospective validation at different levels.

  1. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia induce distinct host responses.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Kevin W; McDunn, Jonathan E; Clark, Andrew T; Dunne, W Michael; Dixon, David J; Turnbull, Isaiah R; Dipasco, Peter J; Osberghaus, William F; Sherman, Benjamin; Martin, James R; Walter, Michael J; Cobb, J Perren; Buchman, Timothy G; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2010-01-01

    Pathogens that cause pneumonia may be treated in a targeted fashion by antibiotics, but if this therapy fails, then treatment involves only nonspecific supportive measures, independent of the inciting infection. The purpose of this study was to determine whether host response is similar after disparate infections with similar mortalities. Prospective, randomized controlled study. Animal laboratory in a university medical center. Pneumonia was induced in FVB/N mice by either Streptococcus pneumoniae or two different concentrations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from septic animals was assayed by a microarray immunoassay measuring 18 inflammatory mediators at multiple time points. The host response was dependent on the causative organism as well as kinetics of mortality, but the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses were independent of inoculum concentration or degree of bacteremia. Pneumonia caused by different concentrations of the same bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, also yielded distinct inflammatory responses; however, inflammatory mediator expression did not directly track the severity of infection. For all infections, the host response was compartmentalized, with markedly different concentrations of inflammatory mediators in the systemic circulation and the lungs. Hierarchical clustering analysis resulted in the identification of five distinct clusters of the host response to bacterial infection. Principal components analysis correlated pulmonary macrophage inflammatory peptide-2 and interleukin-10 with progression of infection, whereas elevated plasma tumor necrosis factor sr2 and macrophage chemotactic peptide-1 were indicative of fulminant disease with >90% mortality within 48 hrs. Septic mice have distinct local and systemic responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Targeting specific host inflammatory responses induced by distinct bacterial infections could represent a

  2. Current concept of abdominal sepsis: WSES position paper

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although sepsis is a systemic process, the pathophysiological cascade of events may vary from region to region. Abdominal sepsis represents the host’s systemic inflammatory response to bacterial peritonitis. It is associated with significant morbidity and mortality rates, and is the second most common cause of sepsis-related mortality in the intensive care unit. The review focuses on sepsis in the specific setting of severe peritonitis. PMID:24674057

  3. Neonatal sepsis caused by Shewanella algae: A case report.

    PubMed

    Charles, Marie Victor Pravin; Srirangaraj, Sreenivasan; Kali, Arunava

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis remains a leading cause of mortality among neonates, especially in developing countries. Most cases of neonatal sepsis are attributed to Escherichia coli and other members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. Shewanella algae (S. algae) is a gram-negative saprophytic bacillus, commonly associated with the marine environment, which has been isolated from humans. Early onset neonatal sepsis caused by S. algae is uncommon. We report a case of S. algae blood stream infection in a newborn with early onset neonatal sepsis.

  4. Sepsis Induces Telomere Shortening: a Potential Mechanism Responsible for Delayed Pathophysiological Events in Sepsis Survivors?

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Naara Mendes; Rios, Ester CS; de Lima, Thais Martins; Victorino, Vanessa Jacob; Barbeiro, Hermes; da Silva, Fabiano Pinheiro; Szabo, Csaba; Soriano, Francisco Garcia

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis survivors suffer from additional morbidities, including higher risk of readmissions, nervous system disturbances and cognitive dysfunction, and increased mortality, even several years after the initial episode of sepsis. In many ways, the phenotype of sepsis survivors resembles the phenotype associated with accelerated aging. Since telomere shortening is a hallmark of aging, we investigated whether sepsis also leads to telomere shortening. Male balb/c mice were divided into two groups: the control group received 100 μl of normal saline intraperitoneally (i.p.) and the sepsis group received 15 mg/kg of bacterial lipopolysaccharide i.p. After 48 h, animals were euthanized to collect blood, spleen and kidney. The human component of our study utilized blood samples obtained from patients in the trauma department and samples collected 7 d later in those patients who developed sepsis. Telomere length was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Since oxidative stress is a known inducer of telomere shortening, thiobarbituric acid–reactive substances and superoxide dismutase activity were analyzed to evaluate oxidative stress burden. Induction of endotoxemia in mice resulted in significant telomere shortening in spleen and kidney. Blood cells from patients who progressed to sepsis also exhibited a statistically significant reduction of telomere length. Endotoxemia in mice also induced an early-onset increase in oxidative stress markers but was not associated with a downregulation of telomerase protein expression. We conclude that endotoxemia and sepsis induce telomere shortening in various tissues and hypothesize that this may contribute to the pathogenesis of the delayed pathophysiological events in sepsis survivors. PMID:27925632

  5. Neutropenic sepsis: prevention, identification and treatment.

    PubMed

    Warnock, Clare

    2016-04-27

    Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia may result in significant physical, social and emotional consequences for patients receiving anticancer therapy. Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia also leads to delays in treatment and reductions in dose intensity. In some cases neutropenia may be prevented by the use of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, but it remains one of the most common side effects of chemotherapy. Patients who are neutropenic have a reduced ability to fight infection and are at increased risk of developing neutropenic sepsis. Nurses need to be able to recognise the signs and symptoms of neutropenic sepsis to ensure early diagnosis and treatment. There are evidence-based pathways for the treatment of patients with neutropenic sepsis and nurses have the potential to develop services and initiatives to support best practice for this group of patients.

  6. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Galley, H F

    2011-07-01

    Sepsis-related organ dysfunction remains the most common cause of death in the intensive care unit (ICU), despite advances in healthcare and science. Marked oxidative stress as a result of the inflammatory responses inherent with sepsis initiates changes in mitochondrial function which may result in organ damage. Normally, a complex system of interacting antioxidant defences is able to combat oxidative stress and prevents damage to mitochondria. Despite the accepted role that oxidative stress-mediated injury plays in the development of organ failure, there is still little conclusive evidence of any beneficial effect of systemic antioxidant supplementation in patients with sepsis and organ dysfunction. It has been suggested, however, that antioxidant therapy delivered specifically to mitochondria may be useful.

  7. Is There NO Treatment For Severe Sepsis?

    PubMed

    As, Bredan; A, Cauwels

    2008-03-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome in the presence of suspected or proven infection, and it may progress to or encompass organ failure (severe sepsis) and hypotension (septic shock). Clinicians possess an arsenal of supportive measures to combat severe sepsis and septic shock, and some success, albeit controversial, has been achieved by using low doses of corticosteroids or recombinant human activated protein C. However, a truly effective mediator-directed specific treatment has not been developed yet. Treatment with low doses of corticosteroids or with recombinant human activated protein C remains controversial and its success very limited. Attempts to treat shock by blocking LPS, TNF or IL-1 were unsuccessful, as were attempts to use interferon-gamma or granulocyte colony stimulating factor. Inhibiting nitric oxide synthases held promise but met with considerable difficulties. Scavenging excess nitric oxide or targeting molecules downstream of inducible nitric oxide synthase, such as soluble guanylate cyclase or potassium channels, might offer other alternatives.

  8. Nociceptin system as a target in sepsis?

    PubMed

    Thomas, Róisín; Stover, Cordula; Lambert, David G; Thompson, Jonathan P

    2014-10-01

    The nociceptin system comprises the nociceptin receptor (NOP) and the ligand nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) that binds to the receptor. The archetypal role of the system is in pain processing but the NOP receptor is also expressed on immune cells. Activation of the NOP receptor is known to modulate inflammatory responses, such as mast-cell degranulation, neutrophil rolling, vasodilation, increased vascular permeability, adhesion molecule regulation and leucocyte recruitment. As there is a loss of regulation of inflammatory responses during sepsis, the nociceptin system could be a target for therapies aimed at modulating sepsis. This review details the known effects of NOP activation on leucocytes and the vascular endothelium and discusses the most recent human and animal data on the role of the nociceptin system in sepsis.

  9. Insulin in sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Das, Undurti N

    2003-07-01

    NF-kappaB activation, and elevated concentrations of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1(IL-1), IL-6, free radicals, inducible nitric oxide (iNO), and stress hyperglycemia occurs in sepsis and this leads to systemic inflammatory response and myocardial depression seen in sepsis and septic shock. Conversely, insulin suppresses production of MIF, TNF-alpha, IL-1, IL-6, and free radicals, enhances endothelial NO generation, and enhances the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4, and IL-10, corrects stress hyperglycemia and improves myocardial function. This supports my earlier proposal that insulin (with or without glucose and potassium) therapy to maintain euglycemia suppresses the inflammatory response, improves myocardial function, and thus, is of benefit in acute myocardial infarction, sepsis andseptic shock.

  10. First Isolation of Streptococcus halichoeri and Streptococcus phocae from a Steller Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus) in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kichan; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Jung, Suk Chan; Lee, Hee-Soo; Her, Moon; Chae, Chanhee

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus species are emerging potential pathogens in marine mammals. We report the isolation and identification of Streptococcus halichoeri and Streptococcus phocae in a Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) in South Korea.

  11. Panax ginseng aqueous extract prevents pneumococcal sepsis in vivo by potentiating cell survival and diminishing inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong Thach; Luong, Truc Thanh; Lee, Seung Yeop; Kim, Gyu Lee; Kwon, Hyogyoung; Lee, Hong-Gyun; Park, Chae-Kyu; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2015-10-15

    More than 50% of sepsis cases are caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, and hospital mortality related to sepsis comprises 52% of all hospital deaths. Therefore, sepsis is a medical emergency, and any treatment against the agent that produces it, is welcome. The role of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (Araliaceae) aqueous extract in bacterial infection in vivo is not well understood. Here, the protective effect of Korean red ginseng (KRG) extract against pneumococcal infection and sepsis was elucidated. In this study, mice were administrated KRG (25, 50, 100 mg/kg) for 15 days, and then infected with a lethal S. pneumoniae strain. Survival rate, body weight, and colonization were determined. The RAW 264.7 macrophage cells were infected with S. pneumoniae and cell viability was assessed using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Inflammation was examined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining while gene expression was determined using western blotting. KRG-pre-treated mice (100 mg/kg of KRG) had significantly higher survival rates and body weights than those of the non-treated controls; KRG-pre-treated mice had lower bacterial number and morbidity than those of the non-treated controls. 100 mg/kg of KRG administration decreased cytokine levels including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (897 and 623 pg/ml, control and KRG groups, respectively, P < 0.05) and interleukin (IL)-1β (175 and 127 pg/ml, control and KRG groups, respectively, P = 0.051), nitric oxide level (149 and 81 nM, control and KRG groups, respectively, P < 0.05), and neutrophil infiltration 48 h post-infection, in vivo. In pneumococcal infection, KRG pre-treatment downregulated toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and TNF-ɑ expressions in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells and increased cell survival by activating phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling. Taken together, 100 mg/kg of KRG appeared to protect host cells from lethal

  12. GLYOXYLATE FERMENTATION BY STREPTOCOCCUS ALLANTOICUS

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, R. C.; Drucker, H.; Wolfe, R. S.

    1964-01-01

    Valentine, R. C. (University of Illinois, Urbana), H. Drucker, and R. S. Wolfe. Glyoxylate fermentation by Streptococcus allantoicus. J. Bacteriol. 87:241–246. 1964.—Extracts of Streptococcus allantoicus were found to degrade glyoxylate, yielding tartronic semialdehyde and CO2. Tartronic semialdehyde was prepared chemically, and its properties were compared with the enzymatic product: reduction by sodium borohydride yielded glycerate; heating at 100 C yielded glycolaldehyde and CO2; autoxidation yielded mesoxalic semialdehyde; periodate oxidation yielded glyoxylate and a compound presumed to be formate. Tartronic semialdehyde reductase was present in extracts of S. allantoicus and in a species of Pseudomonas grown on allantoin. A scheme for the synthesis of acetate from glyoxylate by S. allantoicus is discussed. PMID:14151040

  13. An Evidence Based Approach to Sepsis: Educational Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for recognizing and treating sepsis have been available for decades, yet healthcare providers do not adhere to the recommendations. Sepsis can progress rapidly if not recognized early. Literature reports reveal that sepsis is the leading cause of death in non-cardiac intensive care units (ICUs), and it is one of the most…

  14. Course of sepsis in rats with thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Taşcı, Halil İbrahim; Erikoğlu, Mehmet; Toy, Hatice; Karaibrahimoğlu, Adnan

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies show the relationship between sepsis and thyroid hormones. Virtually all these studies investigate changes in post-sepsis thyroid hormones and the relationship between these changes and the progression of the disease. Our aim in this study was to investigate the progression of sepsis in rats with thyroid dysfunction. The study involved four groups, each containing seven female Wistar albino rats: Group 1: Sham, Group 2: Control (Sepsis), Group 3: Hyperthyroidism-Sepsis, and Group 4: Hypothyroidism-Sepsis. Group 1 only received laparotomy. Group 2 only had sepsis. Sepsis was induced in Group 3 and Group 4 following formation of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism, respectively. After 24 hours, relaparotomy and thoracotomy were performed, and tissue and blood samples were drawn. Dysfunctions seen in the liver, lungs, and kidneys during sepsis and other findings of sepsis were milder in the hyperthyroidism group in comparison to both the control and hypothyroidism groups. The results of Simon's grade, histopathological organ damage, and laboratory parameters revealed that the progression of sepsis was milder in the hyperthyroid group than in the hypothyroid and euthyroid groups. The progression in the hypothyroid group was the most severe. Therefore, the results of the study raise the question of whether immediate treatment in cases of hypothyroidism and slow return of thyroid function to normal levels in cases of hyperthyroidism are adequate treatment approaches in patients who may develop sepsis or septic shock." To determine the answer to this question, more detailed studies are required with a higher number of subjects.

  15. An Evidence Based Approach to Sepsis: Educational Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for recognizing and treating sepsis have been available for decades, yet healthcare providers do not adhere to the recommendations. Sepsis can progress rapidly if not recognized early. Literature reports reveal that sepsis is the leading cause of death in non-cardiac intensive care units (ICUs), and it is one of the most…

  16. New sepsis definition changes incidence of sepsis in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, James N; Thompson, Kelly; Shetty, Amith; Iredell, Jonathan R; Lander, Harvey; Myburgh, John A; Finfer, Simon

    2017-03-01

    To estimate the impact of adopting the proposed new diagnostic criteria for sepsis, based on Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) criteria, on the diagnosis and apparent mortality of sepsis in Australian and New Zealand intensive care units. A two-stage, post hoc analysis of prospectively collected ICU research data from 3780 adult patients in 77 Australian and New Zealand ICUs on 7 study days, between 2009 and 2014. The proportion of patients who were diagnosed with sepsis using the criteria for systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and who met the SOFA criteria for sepsis, and the proportion of patients who were admitted to the ICU with a diagnosis consistent with infection, who met either, both or neither sets of criteria for sepsis; comparison of the demographic differences and in-hospital mortality between these groups. Of 926 patients diagnosed with sepsis on a study day using SIRS criteria, 796/923 (86.2% [95% CI, 84.0%-88.5%]) satisfied the SOFA criteria. Inhospital mortality was similar in these groups, with death recorded for 216/872 patients (24.8% [95% CI, 21.9%-27.8%]) who met the SIRS criteria for sepsis, and for 200/747 patients (26.8% [95% CI, 23.6%-30.1%]) who met both the SIRS and SOFA criteria for sepsis. Of 122 patients meeting the SIRS criteria but not the SOFA criteria, 16 (13.1% [95% CI, 7.7%-19.1%]) died. Of 241 patients admitted with an infective condition and complete data, 142 (58.9% [95% CI, 52.4%-65.2%]) satisfied the SIRS criteria for sepsis and 210 (87.1% [95% CI, 82.2%-91.1%]) satisfied the SOFA criteria. Of the 241 patients, 99 (41.1%) were not classified as having sepsis on the study day by SIRS criteria and, of these, 80 (80.8%) met the SOFA criteria. Adopting the SOFA criteria will increase the apparent incidence of sepsis in patients admitted to the ICU with infective conditions without affecting the mortality rate. Prospective evaluation of the effect of adopting the new definition of sepsis is required.

  17. Severe sepsis and septic shock in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Barton, John R; Sibai, Baha M

    2012-09-01

    Pregnancies complicated by severe sepsis and septic shock are associated with increased rates of preterm labor, fetal infection, and preterm delivery. Sepsis onset in pregnancy can be insidious, and patients may appear deceptively well before rapidly deteriorating with the development of septic shock, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, or death. The outcome and survivability in severe sepsis and septic shock in pregnancy are improved with early detection, prompt recognition of the source of infection, and targeted therapy. This improvement can be achieved by formulating a stepwise approach that consists of early provision of time-sensitive interventions such as: aggressive hydration (20 mL/kg of normal saline over the first hour), initiation of appropriate empiric intravenous antibiotics (gentamicin, clindamycin, and penicillin) within 1 hour of diagnosis, central hemodynamic monitoring, and the involvement of infectious disease specialists and critical care specialists familiar with the physiologic changes in pregnancy. Thorough physical examination and imaging techniques or empiric exploratory laparotomy are suggested to identify the septic source. Even with appropriate antibiotic therapy, patients may continue to deteriorate unless septic foci (ie, abscess, necrotic tissue) are surgically excised. The decision for delivery in the setting of antepartum severe sepsis or septic shock can be challenging but must be based on gestational age, maternal status, and fetal status. The natural inclination is to proceed with emergent delivery for a concerning fetal status, but it is imperative to stabilize the mother first, because in doing so the fetal status will likewise improve. Aggressive [corrected] treatment of sepsis can be expected to reduce the progression to severe sepsis and septic shock and prevention strategies can include preoperative skin preparations and prophylactic antibiotic therapy as well as appropriate immunizations.

  18. Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus constellatus, and Streptococcus anginosus ("Streptococcus milleri group") are of different clinical importance and are not equally associated with abscess.

    PubMed

    Claridge, J E; Attorri, S; Musher, D M; Hebert, J; Dunbar, S

    2001-05-15

    Difficulties in distinguishing organisms of the "Streptococcus milleri group" (SMG; Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus constellatus, and Streptococcus anginosus), have caused ambiguity in determining their pathogenic potential. We reviewed 118 cases in which SMG isolates had been identified using 16S rDNA sequence. S. constellatus and S. anginosus were isolated far more frequently than was S. intermedius. Nearly all isolates of S. intermedius and most isolates of S. constellatus, but only 19% of those of S. anginosus, were associated with abscess. Our findings suggest that speciation of the SMG may guide diagnostic evaluation, give insight into the possible role of coinfecting organisms, and help assess the need to search for occult abscess.

  19. Empyema following intra-abdominal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, K C; Sethia, B; Reece, I J; Davidson, K G

    1984-09-01

    Over the past 9 years, ten patients have presented to the Thoracic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, with 12 empyemas secondary to intra-abdominal sepsis. In eight patients, the presenting signs and symptoms were wrongly attributed to primary intra-thoracic pathology. All were subsequently found to have intra-abdominal sepsis. The presence of empyema after recent abdominal surgery or abdominal pain strongly suggests a diagnosis of ipsilateral subphrenic abscess. Adequate surgical drainage is essential. In our experience, limited thoracotomy with subdiaphragmatic extension offers the best access to both pleural and subphrenic spaces and provides the greatest chance of eradicating infection on both sides of the diaphragm.

  20. Fluid Resuscitation in Sepsis: Reexamining the Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Tirupakuzhi Vijayaraghavan, Bharath Kumar; Cove, Matthew Edward

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis results in widespread inflammatory responses altering homeostasis. Associated circulatory abnormalities (peripheral vasodilation, intravascular volume depletion, increased cellular metabolism, and myocardial depression) lead to an imbalance between oxygen delivery and demand, triggering end organ injury and failure. Fluid resuscitation is a key part of treatment, but there is little agreement on choice, amount, and end points for fluid resuscitation. Over the past few years, the safety of some fluid preparations has been questioned. Our paper highlights current concerns, reviews the science behind current practices, and aims to clarify some of the controversies surrounding fluid resuscitation in sepsis. PMID:25180196

  1. Pediatric sepsis: challenges and adjunctive therapies.

    PubMed

    Hanna, William; Wong, Hector R

    2013-04-01

    Sepsis remains an important challenge in pediatric critical care medicine. This review provides an appraisal of adjunctive therapies for sepsis and highlights opportunities for meeting selected challenges in the field. Future clinical studies should address long-term and functional outcomes as well as acute outcomes. Potential adjunctive therapies such as corticosteroids, hemofiltration, hemoadsorption, and plasmapheresis may have important roles, but still require formal and more rigorous testing by way of clinical trials. Finally, the design of future clinical trials should consider novel approaches for stratifying outcome risks as a means of improving the risk-to-benefit ratio of experimental therapies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Pediatric sepsis: challenges and adjunctive therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, William; Wong, Hector R.

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Sepsis remains an important challenge in pediatric critical care medicine. The current review intends to provide an appraisal of adjunctive therapies for sepsis and to highlight opportunities for meeting selected challenges in the field. Future clinical studies should address long-term and functional outcomes, as well as acute outcomes. Potential adjunctive therapies such as corticosteroids, hemofiltration, hemoadsorption, and plasmapheresis may have important roles, but still require formal and more rigorous testing by way of clinical trials. Finally, the design of future clinical trials should consider novel approaches for stratifying outcome risks as a means of improving the risk to benefit ratio of experimental therapies. PMID:23537672

  3. The Use of Fluids in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Audrey A; Sherwin, Nomi K; Taylor, Robinson D

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to severe infection causing significant morbidity and mortality that costs the health care system $20.3 billion annually within the United States. It is well established that fluid resuscitation is a central component of sepsis management; however, to date there is no consensus as to the ideal composition of fluid used for resuscitation. In this review, we discuss the progression of clinical research comparing various fluids, as well as the historical background behind fluid selection for volume resuscitation. We conclude that the use of balanced fluids, such as Ringer’s Lactate, seems very promising but further research is needed to confirm their role. PMID:27081589

  4. Sepsis and septic shock: a review.

    PubMed

    Chong, Josebelo; Dumont, Tiffany; Francis-Frank, Lyndave; Balaan, Marvin

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are a continuum of disease resulting from a complex host response to infection. They are major health issues in the United States, causing significant financial burden to the health care system in addition to multisystem morbidity and high rates of mortality. In recent decades, landmark trials in sepsis management have demonstrated improved mortality. Although the value of protocol-driven care is currently under question, it is clear that early recognition, prompt resuscitation, and timely use of antibiotics are of utmost importance.

  5. Sepsis Resuscitation in Resource-Limited Settings.

    PubMed

    Meier, Brian; Staton, Catherine

    2017-02-01

    Our evolving understanding of the physiologic processes that lead to sepsis has led to updated consensus guidelines outlining priorities in the recognition and treatment of septic patients. However, an enormous question remains when considering how to best implement these guidelines in settings with limited resources, which include rural US emergency departments and low- and middle-income countries. The core principles of sepsis management should be a priority in community emergency departments. Similarly, cost-effective interventions are key priorities in low- and middle-income countries; however, consideration must be given to the unique challenges associated with such settings.

  6. Sepsis: Current Definition, Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management.

    PubMed

    Taeb, Abdalsamih M; Hooper, Michael H; Marik, Paul E

    2017-06-01

    Sepsis is a clinical syndrome that results from the dysregulated inflammatory response to infection that leads to organ dysfunction. The resulting losses to society in terms of financial burden, morbidity, and mortality are enormous. We provide a review of sepsis, its underlying pathophysiology, and guidance for diagnosis and management of this common disease. Current established treatments include appropriate antimicrobial agents to target the underlying infection, optimization of intravascular volume to improve stroke volume, vasopressors to counteract vasoplegic shock, and high-quality supportive care. Appropriate implementation of established treatments combined with novel therapeutic approaches promises to continue to decrease the impact of this disease.

  7. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome-based severe sepsis screening algorithms in emergency department patients with suspected sepsis.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Amith L; Brown, Tristam; Booth, Tarra; Van, Kim Linh; Dor-Shiffer, Daphna E; Vaghasiya, Milan R; Eccleston, Cassanne E; Iredell, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS)-based severe sepsis screening algorithms have been utilised in stratification and initiation of early broad spectrum antibiotics for patients presenting to EDs with suspected sepsis. We aimed to investigate the performance of some of these algorithms on a cohort of suspected sepsis patients. We conducted a retrospective analysis on an ED-based prospective sepsis registry at a tertiary Sydney hospital, Australia. Definitions for sepsis were based on the 2012 Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines. Numerical values for SIRS criteria and ED investigation results were recorded at the trigger of sepsis pathway on the registry. Performance of specific SIRS-based screening algorithms at sites from USA, Canada, UK, Australia and Ireland health institutions were investigated. Severe sepsis screening algorithms' performance was measured on 747 patients presenting with suspected sepsis (401 with severe sepsis, prevalence 53.7%). Sensitivity and specificity of algorithms to flag severe sepsis ranged from 20.2% (95% CI 16.4-24.5%) to 82.3% (95% CI 78.2-85.9%) and 57.8% (95% CI 52.4-63.1%) to 94.8% (95% CI 91.9-96.9%), respectively. Variations in SIRS values between uncomplicated and severe sepsis cohorts were only minor, except a higher mean lactate (>1.6 mmol/L, P < 0.01). We found the Ireland and JFK Medical Center sepsis algorithms performed modestly in stratifying suspected sepsis patients into high-risk groups. Algorithms with lactate levels thresholds of >2 mmol/L rather than >4 mmol/L performed better. ED sepsis registry-based characterisation of patients may help further refine sepsis definitions of the future. © 2016 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  8. Incidence and mortality of sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock in intensive care unit patients with candidemia.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kevin; Schorr, Christa; Reboli, Annette C; Zanotti, Sergio; Tsigrelis, Constantine

    2015-08-01

    In this incidence study, of 16 074 patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) from 1/1/2003 to 7/31/2011, 161 cases of candidemia were identified. The incidence of sepsis (27%), severe sepsis (31%), and septic shock (40%) was remarkably high in these cases of candidemia, as was the all-cause in-hospital mortality for sepsis (30%), severe sepsis (44%), and septic shock (65%).

  9. Epidemiology of Invasive Early-Onset Neonatal Sepsis, 2005 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Schrag, Stephanie J; Farley, Monica M; Petit, Susan; Reingold, Arthur; Weston, Emily J; Pondo, Tracy; Hudson Jain, Jennifer; Lynfield, Ruth

    2016-12-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) and Escherichia coli have historically dominated as causes of early-onset neonatal sepsis. Widespread use of intrapartum prophylaxis for GBS disease led to concerns about the potential adverse impact on E coli incidence. Active, laboratory, and population-based surveillance for culture-positive (blood or cerebrospinal fluid) bacterial infections among infants 0 to 2 days of age was conducted statewide in Minnesota and Connecticut and in selected counties of California and Georgia during 2005 to 2014. Demographic and clinical information were collected and hospital live birth denominators were used to calculate incidence rates (per 1000 live births). We used the Cochran-Amitage test to assess trends. Surveillance identified 1484 cases. GBS was most common (532) followed by E coli (368) and viridans streptococci (280). Eleven percent of cases died and 6.3% of survivors had sequelae at discharge. All-cause (2005: 0.79; 2014: 0.77; P = .05) and E coli (2005: 0.21; 2014: 0.18; P = .25) sepsis incidence were stable. GBS incidence decreased (2005: 0.27; 2014: 0.22; P = .02). Among infants <1500 g, incidence was an order of magnitude higher for both pathogens and stable. The odds of death among infants <1500 g were similar for both pathogens but among infants ≥1500 g, the odds of death were greater for E coli cases (odds ratio: 7.0; 95% confidence interval: 2.7-18.2). GBS prevention efforts have not led to an increasing burden of early-onset E coli infections. However, the stable burden of E coli sepsis and associated mortality underscore the need for interventions. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. The burden of invasive early-onset neonatal sepsis in the United States, 2005-2008.

    PubMed

    Weston, Emily J; Pondo, Tracy; Lewis, Melissa M; Martell-Cleary, Pat; Morin, Craig; Jewell, Brenda; Daily, Pam; Apostol, Mirasol; Petit, Sue; Farley, Monica; Lynfield, Ruth; Reingold, Art; Hansen, Nellie I; Stoll, Barbara J; Shane, Andi L; Zell, Elizabeth; Schrag, Stephanie J

    2011-11-01

    Sepsis in the first 3 days of life is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among infants. Group B Streptococcus (GBS), historically the primary cause of early-onset sepsis (EOS), has declined through widespread use of intrapartum chemoprophylaxis. We estimated the national burden of invasive EOS cases and deaths in the era of GBS prevention. Population-based surveillance for invasive EOS was conducted in 4 of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Active Bacterial Core surveillance sites from 2005 to 2008. We calculated incidence using state and national live birth files. Estimates of the national number of cases and deaths were calculated, standardizing by race and gestational age. Active Bacterial Core surveillance identified 658 cases of EOS; 72 (10.9%) were fatal. Overall incidence remained stable during the 3 years (2005: 0.77 cases/1000 live births; 2008: 0.76 cases/1000 live births). GBS (∼ 38%) was the most commonly reported pathogen followed by Escherichia coli (∼ 24%). Black preterm infants had the highest incidence (5.14 cases/1000 live births) and case fatality (24.4%). Nonblack term infants had the lowest incidence (0.40 cases/1000 live births) and case fatality (1.6%). The estimated national annual burden of EOS was approximately 3320 cases (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3060-3580), including 390 deaths (95% CI: 300-490). Among preterm infants, 1570 cases (95% CI: 1400-1770; 47.3% of the overall) and 360 deaths (95% CI: 280-460; 92.3% of the overall) occurred annually. The burden of invasive EOS remains substantial in the era of GBS prevention and disproportionately affects preterm and black infants. Identification of strategies to prevent preterm births is needed to reduce the neonatal sepsis burden.

  11. Streptococcus tangierensis sp. nov. and Streptococcus cameli sp. nov., two novel Streptococcus species isolated from raw camel milk in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Kadri, Zaina; Vandamme, Peter; Ouadghiri, Mouna; Cnockaert, Margo; Aerts, Maarten; Elfahime, El Mostafa; Farricha, Omar El; Swings, Jean; Amar, Mohamed

    2015-02-01

    Biochemical and molecular genetic studies were performed on two unidentified Gram-stain positive, catalase and oxidase negative, non-hemolytic Streptococcus-like organisms recovered from raw camel milk in Morocco. Phenotypic characterization and comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing demonstrated that the two strains were highly different from each other and that they did not correspond to any recognized species of the genus Streptococcus. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed the unidentified organisms each formed a hitherto unknown sub-line within the genus Streptococcus, displaying a close affinity with Streptococcus moroccensis, Streptococcus minor and Streptococcus ovis. DNA G+C content determination, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and biochemical tests demonstrated the bacterial isolates represent two novel species. Based on the phenotypic distinctiveness of the new bacteria and molecular genetic evidence, it is proposed to classify the two strains as Streptococcus tangierensis sp. nov., with CCMM B832(T) (=LMG 27683(T)) as the type strain, and Streptococcus cameli sp. nov., with CCMM B834(T) (=LMG 27685(T)) as the type strain.

  12. Sepsis in Children: Global Implications of the World Health Assembly Resolution on Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Kissoon, Niranjan; Reinhart, Konrad; Daniels, Ron; Machado, Machado Flavia R; Schachter, Raymond D; Finfer, Simon

    2017-09-13

    Sepsis, worldwide the leading cause of death in children, has now been recognized as the global health emergency it is. On May 26, 2017, the World Health Assembly, the decision-making body of the World Health Organization, adopted a resolution proposed by the Global Sepsis Alliance to improve the prevention, diagnosis, and management of sepsis. To discuss the implications of this resolution for children worldwide. The resolution highlights sepsis as a global threat and urges the 194 United Nations member states to take specific actions and implement appropriate measures to reduce its human and health economic burden. The resolution is a major step toward achieving the targets outlined by the Sustainable Developmental Goals for decreasing mortality in infants and children, but implementing it will require a concerted global effort.

  13. Polarization of microglia and its role in bacterial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Michels, Monique; Sonai, Beatriz; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2017-02-15

    Microglial polarization in response to brain inflammatory conditions is a crescent field in neuroscience. However, the effect of systemic inflammation, and specifically sepsis, is a relatively unexplored field that has great interest and relevance. Sepsis has been associated with both early and late harmful events of the central nervous system, suggesting that there is a close link between sepsis and neuroinflammation. During sepsis evolution it is supposed that microglial could exert both neurotoxic and repairing effects depending on the specific microglial phenotype assumed. In this context, here it was reviewed the role of microglial polarization during sepsis-associated brain dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [An inquiry into the relevant issues about burn sepsis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Liao, Zhenjiang

    2014-02-01

    Since the definition of sepsis was proposed in Chest by American College of Chest Physicians and Society of Critical Care Medicine in 1992, researches on burn sepsis have focused on the regulation of immune-inflammation response resulting in minimizing tissue injury resulted from excessive inflammatory response. Treatment of sepsis should focus on effect of early circulation oxygenation support in preventing and treating multiple organ dysfunction. The hypothesis of producing a hibernation-like state which might prevent multiple organ dysfunction in patients with sepsis provides us a new therapeutic strategy in protecting organs in the early stage of sepsis in future.

  15. Temporal trends in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome, sepsis, and medical coding of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Benjamin S; Jafarzadeh, S Reza; Warren, David K; McCormick, Sandra; Fraser, Victoria J; Marschall, Jonas

    2015-11-24

    Recent reports using administrative claims data suggest the incidence of community- and hospital-onset sepsis is increasing. Whether this reflects changing epidemiology, more effective diagnostic methods, or changes in physician documentation and medical coding practices is unclear. We performed a temporal-trend study from 2008 to 2012 using administrative claims data and patient-level clinical data of adult patients admitted to Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri. Temporal-trend and annual percent change were estimated using regression models with autoregressive integrated moving average errors. We analyzed 62,261 inpatient admissions during the 5-year study period. 'Any SIRS' (i.e., SIRS on a single calendar day during the hospitalization) and 'multi-day SIRS' (i.e., SIRS on 3 or more calendar days), which both use patient-level data, and medical coding for sepsis (i.e., ICD-9-CM discharge diagnosis codes 995.91, 995.92, or 785.52) were present in 35.3 %, 17.3 %, and 3.3 % of admissions, respectively. The incidence of admissions coded for sepsis increased 9.7 % (95 % CI: 6.1, 13.4) per year, while the patient data-defined events of 'any SIRS' decreased by 1.8 % (95 % CI: -3.2, -0.5) and 'multi-day SIRS' did not change significantly over the study period. Clinically-defined sepsis (defined as SIRS plus bacteremia) and severe sepsis (defined as SIRS plus hypotension and bacteremia) decreased at statistically significant rates of 5.7 % (95 % CI: -9.0, -2.4) and 8.6 % (95 % CI: -4.4, -12.6) annually. All-cause mortality, SIRS mortality, and SIRS and clinically-defined sepsis case fatality did not change significantly during the study period. Sepsis mortality, based on ICD-9-CM codes, however, increased by 8.8 % (95 % CI: 1.9, 16.2) annually. The incidence of sepsis, defined by ICD-9-CM codes, and sepsis mortality increased steadily without a concomitant increase in SIRS or clinically-defined sepsis. Our results highlight the need to develop

  16. De-escalation of antimicrobial treatment for adults with sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock.

    PubMed

    Silva, Brenda N G; Andriolo, Régis B; Atallah, Alvaro N; Salomão, Reinaldo

    2013-03-28

    Mortality rates among patients with sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock are highly variable throughout different regions or services and can be upwards of 50%. Empirical broad-spectrum antimicrobial treatment is aimed at achieving adequate antimicrobial therapy, thus reducing mortality; however, there is a risk that empirical broad-spectrum antimicrobial treatment can expose patients to overuse of antimicrobials. De-escalation has been proposed as a strategy to replace empirical broad-spectrum antimicrobial treatment by using a narrower antimicrobial therapy. This is done by reviewing the patient's microbial culture results and then making changes to the pharmacological agent or discontinuing a pharmacological combination. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of de-escalation antimicrobial treatment for adult patients diagnosed with sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock caused by any micro-organism. In this updated version, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 10); MEDLINE via PubMed (from inception to October 2012); EMBASE (from inception to October 2012); LILACS (from inception to October 2012); Current Controlled Trials; bibliographic references of relevant studies; and specialists in the area. We applied no language restriction. We had previously searched the databases to August 2010. We planned to include randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing de-escalation (based on culture results) versus standard therapy for adults with sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock. The primary outcome was mortality (at 28 days, hospital discharge or at the end of the follow-up period). Studies including patients initially treated with an empirical but not adequate antimicrobial therapy were not considered for inclusion. Two authors planned to independently select and extract data and to evaluate methodological quality of all studies. We planned to use relative risk (risk ratio) for dichotomous data

  17. Global Epidemiology of Pediatric Severe Sepsis: The Sepsis Prevalence, Outcomes, and Therapies Study

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Scott L.; Pappachan, John; Wheeler, Derek; Jaramillo-Bustamante, Juan C.; Salloo, Asma; Singhi, Sunit C.; Erickson, Simon; Roy, Jason A.; Bush, Jenny L.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Thomas, Neal J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Limited data exist about the international burden of severe sepsis in critically ill children. Objectives: To characterize the global prevalence, therapies, and outcomes of severe sepsis in pediatric intensive care units to better inform interventional trials. Methods: A point prevalence study was conducted on 5 days throughout 2013–2014 at 128 sites in 26 countries. Patients younger than 18 years of age with severe sepsis as defined by consensus criteria were included. Outcomes were severe sepsis point prevalence, therapies used, new or progressive multiorgan dysfunction, ventilator- and vasoactive-free days at Day 28, functional status, and mortality. Measurements and Main Results: Of 6,925 patients screened, 569 had severe sepsis (prevalence, 8.2%; 95% confidence interval, 7.6–8.9%). The patients’ median age was 3.0 (interquartile range [IQR], 0.7–11.0) years. The most frequent sites of infection were respiratory (40%) and bloodstream (19%). Common therapies included mechanical ventilation (74% of patients), vasoactive infusions (55%), and corticosteroids (45%). Hospital mortality was 25% and did not differ by age or between developed and resource-limited countries. Median ventilator-free days were 16 (IQR, 0–25), and vasoactive-free days were 23 (IQR, 12–28). Sixty-seven percent of patients had multiorgan dysfunction at sepsis recognition, with 30% subsequently developing new or progressive multiorgan dysfunction. Among survivors, 17% developed at least moderate disability. Sample sizes needed to detect a 5–10% absolute risk reduction in outcomes within interventional trials are estimated between 165 and 1,437 patients per group. Conclusions: Pediatric severe sepsis remains a burdensome public health problem, with prevalence, morbidity, and mortality rates similar to those reported in critically ill adult populations. International clinical trials targeting children with severe sepsis are warranted. PMID:25734408

  18. [Pharmaconutrition with parenteral selenium in sepsis].

    PubMed

    Langlois, P L; de Oliveira Figliolino, L F; Hardy, G; Manzanares, W

    2014-04-01

    Critical illness is characterized by oxidative stress which leads to multiple organ failure, and sepsis-related organ dysfunction remains the most common cause of death in the intensive care unit. Over the last 2 decades, different antioxidant therapies have been developed to improve outcomes in septic patients. According to recent evidence, selenium therapy should be considered the cornerstone of the antioxidant strategies. Selenium given as selenious acid or sodium selenite should be considered as a drug or pharmaconutrient with prooxidant and cytotoxic effects when a loading dose in intravenous bolus form is administered, particularly in the early stage of severe sepsis/septic shock. To date, several phase ii trials have demonstrated that selenium therapy may be able to decrease mortality, improve organ dysfunction and reduce infections in critically ill septic patients. The effect of selenium therapy in sepsis syndrome must be confirmed by large, well designed phase iii clinical trials. The purpose of this review is to discuss current evidence on selenium pharmaconutrition in sepsis syndrome.

  19. Sepsis progression and outcome: a dynamical model

    PubMed Central

    Zuev, Sergey M; Kingsmore, Stephen F; Gessler, Damian DG

    2006-01-01

    Background Sepsis (bloodstream infection) is the leading cause of death in non-surgical intensive care units. It is diagnosed in 750,000 US patients per annum, and has high mortality. Current understanding of sepsis is predominately observational and correlational, with only a partial and incomplete understanding of the physiological dynamics underlying the syndrome. There exists a need for dynamical models of sepsis progression, based upon basic physiologic principles, which could eventually guide hourly treatment decisions. Results We present an initial mathematical model of sepsis, based on metabolic rate theory that links basic vascular and immunological dynamics. The model includes the rate of vascular circulation, a surrogate for the metabolic rate that is mechanistically associated with disease progression. We use the mass-specific rate of blood circulation (SRBC), a correlate of the body mass index, to build a differential equation model of circulation, infection, organ damage, and recovery. This introduces a vascular component into an infectious disease model that describes the interaction between a pathogen and the adaptive immune system. Conclusion The model predicts that deviations from normal SRBC correlate with disease progression and adverse outcome. We compare the predictions with population mortality data from cardiovascular disease and cancer and show that deviations from normal SRBC correlate with higher mortality rates. PMID:16480490

  20. Ralstonia picketti neonatal sepsis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepak; Sharma, Pradeep; Soni, Priyanka; Gupta, Basudev

    2017-01-07

    Ralstonia genus are gram negative bacillus and includes four bacteria namely Ralstonia picketti, Ralstonia Solanacearum, Ralstonia insidiosa and Ralstonia mannitolilytica. These are opportunistic pathogens and cause infections in immunocompromised host. The sources of infection are usually contaminated solutions and water. The majority of the reported cases are caused by R. picketti. It is very rare cause of neonatal sepsis with less than twenty cases reported in literature till date. A late preterm male infant, Indian race was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit for respiratory distress developing soon after birth. The infant was managed with respiratory support and gradually infant improved and diagnosis of transient tachypnea of newborn was made. At age of 84 h of postnatal life, the infant developed features of neonatal sepsis and investigations were suggestive of sepsis. The infant was started on intravenous antibiotic, multiple vasopressors and steroids. The blood culture showed growth of multi-drug resistant R. picketti. The antibiotics were changed as per sensitivity pattern and infant was discharged in good condition and was accepting breast feeding at the time of discharge. There was also no other case of R. picketti in the nursery during the same time period. Ralstonia picketti is an uncommon cause of neonatal sepsis and usually source of infection are contaminated solutions and medical products. The management involves early detection, treatment with appropriate antibiotics and doing surveillance culture to identify the possible source of infection.

  1. [Innate immunity, Toll receptor and sepsis].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl

    2003-01-01

    The innate immune response is the first line of defense against infection. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize bacterial lipopolysaccharide and other pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Intracellular signals initiated by interaction between Toll receptors and specific PAMPs results in inflammatory response. Sepsis and septic shock are the result of an exaggerated inflammatory systemic response induced by innate immune dysregulation.

  2. [Clinical and immunological criteria of burn sepsis].

    PubMed

    Shlyk, I V; Pivovarova, L P; Krylov, K M; Filippova, O V; Il'ina, V A; Krylov, P K

    2005-01-01

    A hundred and twenty-nine victims aged 16 to 60 years who had skin burns in the area of 15 to 60% of the body surface without severe concomitant somatic disease (SAPS less than 9 scores). The clinical symptoms of a systemic inflammatory response (SIR) and the signs of wound infection were recorded in all the examinees. The victims underwent a comprehensive clinical and laboratory examination, 55 of them were immunologically studied over time (on admission, on days 3 and 10). To reveal the predictive clinical and immunological criteria for sepsis, the examinees were divided into 3 groups. Group 1 comprised 33 burnt persons who were observed to have the symptoms of SIR and the signs of burn wound infections without impaired function of organs and systems. Group 2 included 46 victims with severe sepsis and a good outcome of burn disease. Group 3 consisted of 50 patients who had died from severe sepsis. Analysis of the results of the study has indicated that the count of formed blood elements by calculating the leukocytic intoxication index, the estimation of the level of lysosomal cation proteins in the neutrophilic granulocytes, the detection of populations of T helper cells, cytotoxic lymphocytes, as well as histomorphological and bacteriological findings are early and valid criteria for the development of infectious complications. Their use for the diagnosis and prediction of sepsis permits initiation of its treatment at early stages, without awaiting the appearance of the signs of a septic process.

  3. Pathogenesis of Multiple Organ Failure in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Rossaint, Jan; Zarbock, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a severe critical illness syndrome that arises from infectious insults. While the host immune system is generally beneficial, an overshooting and unregulated immune response can cause serious organ tissue injury. During sepsis, systemic hypotension, disturbed perfusion of the microcirculation, and direct tissue-toxicity caused by inflammatory immune reaction can occur and contribute to organ failure. The failure of two or more vital organ systems is termed multi-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and resembles a very critical condition associated with high morbidity and mortality. Importantly, no specific treatment strategy exists to efficiently prevent the development of MODS during sepsis. In this review, we aim to identify the relevant molecular immunological pathways involved in the pathogenesis of MODS during sepsis. We believe that a detailed understanding of this mechanism is necessary for the development of new treatment approaches for septic patients. In particular, knowledge of the endogenous regulators keeping the balance between necessary immune system activation to combat infections and prevention of host tissue damage would greatly improve the chances for the development of effective interventions.

  4. Role of cellular events in the pathophysiology of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Bhan, Chandra; Dipankar, Pankaj; Chakraborty, Papiya; Sarangi, Pranita P

    2016-11-01

    Sepsis is a dysregulated host immune response due to an uncontrolled infection. It is a leading cause of mortality in adult intensive care units globally. When the host immune response induced against a local infection fails to contain it locally, it progresses to sepsis, severe sepsis, septic shock and death. Literature survey was performed on the roles of different innate and adaptive immune cells in the development and progression of sepsis. Additionally, the effects of septic changes on reprogramming of different immune cells were also summarized to prepare the manuscript. Scientific evidences to date suggest that the loss of balance between inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses results in reprogramming of immune cell activities that lead to irreversible tissue damaging events and multi-organ failure during sepsis. Many surface receptors expressed on immune cells at various stages of sepsis have been suggested as biomarkers for sepsis diagnosis. Various immunomodulatory therapeutics, which could improve the functions of immune cells during sepsis, were shown to restore immunological homeostasis and improve survival in animal models of sepsis. In-depth and comprehensive knowledge on the immune cell activities and their correlation with severity of sepsis will help clinicians and scientists to design effective immunomodulatory therapeutics for treating sepsis.

  5. Regulation of Cellular Immune Responses in Sepsis by Histone Modifications.

    PubMed

    Carson, W F; Kunkel, S L

    2017-01-01

    Severe sepsis, septic shock, and related inflammatory syndromes are driven by the aberrant expression of proinflammatory mediators by immune cells. During the acute phase of sepsis, overexpression of chemokines and cytokines drives physiological stress leading to organ failure and mortality. Following recovery from sepsis, the immune system exhibits profound immunosuppression, evidenced by an inability to produce the same proinflammatory mediators that are required for normal responses to infectious microorganisms. Gene expression in inflammatory responses is influenced by the transcriptional accessibility of the chromatin, with histone posttranslational modifications determining whether inflammatory gene loci are set to transcriptionally active, repressed, or poised states. Experimental evidence indicates that histone modifications play a central role in governing the cytokine storm of severe sepsis, and that aberrant chromatin modifications induced during the acute phase of sepsis may mediate chronic immunosuppression in sepsis survivors. This review will focus on the role of histone modifications in governing immune responses in severe sepsis, with an emphasis on specific leukocyte subsets and the histone modifications observed in these cells during chronic stages of sepsis. Additionally, the expression and function of chromatin-modifying enzymes (CMEs) will be discussed in the context of severe sepsis, as potential mediators of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in sepsis responses. In summary, this review will argue for the use of chromatin modifications and CME expression in leukocytes as potential biomarkers of immunosuppression in patients with severe sepsis.

  6. Streptococcus salivarius K12 Limits Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Patras, Kathryn A.; Wescombe, Philip A.; Rösler, Berenice; Hale, John D.; Tagg, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) colonizes the rectovaginal tract in 20% to 30% of women and during pregnancy can be transmitted to the newborn, causing severe invasive disease. Current routine screening and antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen short of complete prevention of GBS transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal infection. We have investigated the ability of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant member of the native human oral microbiota, to control GBS colonization. Comparison of the antibacterial activities of multiple S. salivarius strains by use of a deferred-antagonism test showed that S. salivarius strain K12 exhibited the broadest spectrum of activity against GBS. K12 effectively inhibited all GBS strains tested, including disease-implicated isolates from newborns and colonizing isolates from the vaginal tract of pregnant women. Inhibition was dependent on the presence of megaplasmid pSsal-K12, which encodes the bacteriocins salivaricin A and salivaricin B; however, in coculture experiments, GBS growth was impeded by K12 independently of the megaplasmid. We also demonstrated that K12 adheres to and invades human vaginal epithelial cells at levels comparable to GBS. Inhibitory activity of K12 was examined in vivo using a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization. Mice colonized with GBS were treated vaginally with K12. K12 administration significantly reduced GBS vaginal colonization in comparison to nontreated controls, and this effect was partially dependent on the K12 megaplasmid. Our results suggest that K12 may have potential as a preventative therapy to control GBS vaginal colonization and thereby prevent its transmission to the neonate during pregnancy. PMID:26077762

  7. Streptococcus salivarius K12 Limits Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization.

    PubMed

    Patras, Kathryn A; Wescombe, Philip A; Rösler, Berenice; Hale, John D; Tagg, John R; Doran, Kelly S

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) colonizes the rectovaginal tract in 20% to 30% of women and during pregnancy can be transmitted to the newborn, causing severe invasive disease. Current routine screening and antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen short of complete prevention of GBS transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal infection. We have investigated the ability of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant member of the native human oral microbiota, to control GBS colonization. Comparison of the antibacterial activities of multiple S. salivarius strains by use of a deferred-antagonism test showed that S. salivarius strain K12 exhibited the broadest spectrum of activity against GBS. K12 effectively inhibited all GBS strains tested, including disease-implicated isolates from newborns and colonizing isolates from the vaginal tract of pregnant women. Inhibition was dependent on the presence of megaplasmid pSsal-K12, which encodes the bacteriocins salivaricin A and salivaricin B; however, in coculture experiments, GBS growth was impeded by K12 independently of the megaplasmid. We also demonstrated that K12 adheres to and invades human vaginal epithelial cells at levels comparable to GBS. Inhibitory activity of K12 was examined in vivo using a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization. Mice colonized with GBS were treated vaginally with K12. K12 administration significantly reduced GBS vaginal colonization in comparison to nontreated controls, and this effect was partially dependent on the K12 megaplasmid. Our results suggest that K12 may have potential as a preventative therapy to control GBS vaginal colonization and thereby prevent its transmission to the neonate during pregnancy. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Identifying Patients With Sepsis on the Hospital Wards.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Poushali; Edelson, Dana P; Churpek, Matthew M

    2017-04-01

    Sepsis contributes to up to half of all deaths in hospitalized patients, and early interventions, such as appropriate antibiotics, have been shown to improve outcomes. Most research has focused on early identification and treatment of patients with sepsis in the ED and the ICU; however, many patients acquire sepsis on the general wards. The goal of this review is to discuss recent advances in the detection of sepsis in patients on the hospital wards. We discuss data highlighting the benefits and limitations of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria for screening patients with sepsis, such as its low specificity, as well as newly described scoring systems, including the proposed role of the quick sepsis-related organ failure assessment (qSOFA) score. Challenges specific to detecting sepsis on the wards are discussed, and future directions that use big data approaches and automated alert systems are highlighted. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanisms, detection, and potential management of microcirculatory disturbances in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Imran; Nonas, Stephanie A

    2010-04-01

    Despite improvements in resuscitation and treatment of sepsis, the morbidity and mortality remain unacceptably high. Microvascular dysfunction has been shown to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of sepsis and is a potential new target in the management of sepsis. Clinical studies, aided by new techniques that allow for real-time assessment of the microcirculation, have shown that disturbances in microcirculatory flow are common in sepsis and correlate with worse outcomes. Bedside measurement of microcirculatory perfusion has become simpler and more accessible, and may provide key insights into prognosis in sepsis and guide future therapeutics, much like mean arterial pressure (MAP), lactate, and mixed central oxygen saturation (SvO(2)) do now. The authors review here the role of microcirculatory dysfunction in sepsis and its potential role as a therapeutic target in sepsis.

  10. Redox therapy in neonatal sepsis: reasons, targets, strategy, and agents.

    PubMed

    Bajčetić, Milica; Spasić, Snežana; Spasojević, Ivan

    2014-09-01

    Neonatal sepsis is one of the most fulminating conditions in neonatal intensive care units. Antipathogen and supportive care are administered routinely, but do not deliver satisfactory results. In addition, the efforts to treat neonatal sepsis with anti-inflammatory agents have generally shown to be futile. The accumulating data imply that intracellular redox changes intertwined into neonatal sepsis redox cycle represent the main cause of dysfunction of mitochondria and cells in neonatal sepsis. Our aim here is to support the new philosophy in neonatal sepsis treatment, which involves the integration of mechanisms that are responsible for cellular dysfunction and organ failure, the recognition of the most important targets, and the selection of safe agents that can stop the neonatal sepsis redox cycle by hitting the hot spots. Redox-active agents that could be beneficial for neonatal sepsis treatment according to these criteria include lactoferrin, interleukin 10, zinc and selenium supplements, ibuprofen, edaravone, and pentoxifylline.

  11. Recognizing and managing severe sepsis: a common and deadly threat.

    PubMed

    Schlichting, Douglas; McCollam, Jill Shwed

    2007-06-01

    Through a literature review, the epidemiology and pathophysiology, including alterations in inflammation, coagulation, and impaired fibrinolysis that occur in the course of severe sepsis, is presented. Treatment guidelines that are evidence-based and endorsed by 11 professional societies representing multispecialty groups are described. Severe sepsis is common; 750,000 cases are estimated to occur annually in the United States. The mortality rate for severe sepsis still ranges from 30 to 50%, and is as high as 80 to 90% for septic shock and multiple organ dysfunction. Severe sepsis exists along a continuum initiated by a localized infection that triggers a systemic response. A cascade of inflammation and activation of the coagulation system associated with impaired fibrinolysis leads to alterations in microvascular circulation associated with organ dysfunction, severe sepsis, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and death. In an attempt to improve care and reduce mortality, the Surviving Sepsis Campaign and The Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) have created two sepsis treatment bundles.

  12. How can the microbiologist help in diagnosing neonatal sepsis?

    PubMed

    Paolucci, Michela; Landini, Maria Paola; Sambri, Vittorio

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis can be classified into two subtypes depending upon whether the onset of symptoms is before 72 hours of life (early-onset neonatal sepsis-EONS) or later (late-onset neonatal sepsis-LONS). These definitions have contributed greatly to diagnosis and treatment by identifying which microorganisms are likely to be responsible for sepsis during these periods and the expected outcomes of infection. This paper focuses on the tools that microbiologist can offer to diagnose and eventually prevent neonatal sepsis. Here, we discuss the advantages and limitation of the blood culture, the actual gold standard for sepsis diagnosis. In addition, we examine the utility of molecular techniques in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis.

  13. Evolutionary inactivation of a sialidase in group B Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Masaya; Hirose, Yujiro; Nakata, Masanobu; Uchiyama, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuka; Goto, Kana; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Lewis, Amanda L.; Kawabata, Shigetada; Nizet, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of bacterial sepsis and meningitis in newborns. GBS possesses a protein with homology to the pneumococcal virulence factor, NanA, which has neuraminidase (sialidase) activity and promotes blood-brain barrier penetration. However, phylogenetic sequence and enzymatic analyses indicate the GBS NanA ortholog has lost sialidase function – and for this distinction we designate the gene and encoded protein nonA/NonA. Here we analyze NonA function in GBS pathogenesis, and through heterologous expression of active pneumococcal NanA in GBS, potential costs of maintaining sialidase function. GBS wild-type and ΔnonA strains lack sialidase activity, but forced expression of pneumococcal NanA in GBS induced degradation of the terminal sialic acid on its exopolysaccharide capsule. Deletion of nonA did not change GBS-whole blood survival or brain microvascular cell invasion. However, forced expression of pneumococcal NanA in GBS removed terminal sialic acid residues from the bacterial capsule, restricting bacterial proliferation in human blood and in vivo upon mouse infection. GBS expressing pneumococcal NanA had increased invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells. Thus, we hypothesize that nonA lost enzyme activity allowing the preservation of an effective survival factor, the sialylated exopolysaccharide capsule. PMID:27352769

  14. Characterization of Afb, a novel bifunctional protein in Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Dehbashi, Sanaz; Pourmand, Mohammad Reza; Mashhadi, Rahil

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Streptococcus agalactiae is the leading cause of bacterial sepsis and meningitis in newborns and results in pneumonia and bacteremia in adults. A number of S. agalactiae components are involved in colonization of target cells. Destruction of peptidoglycan and division of covalently linked daughter cells is mediated by autolysins. In this study, autolytic activity and plasma binding ability of AFb novel recombinant protein of S. agalactiae was investigated. Materials and Methods: The gbs1805 gene was cloned and expressed. E. coli strains DH5α and BL21 were used as cloning and expression hosts, respectively. After purification, antigenicity and binding ability to plasma proteins of the recombinant protein was evaluated. Results: AFb, the 18KDa protein was purified successfully. The insoluble mature protein revealed the ability to bind to fibrinogen and fibronectin. This insoluble mature protein revealed that it has the ability to bind to fibrinogen and fibronectin plasma proteins. Furthermore, in silico analysis demonstrated the AFb has an autolytic activity. Conclusions: AFb is a novel protein capable of binding to fibrinogen and fibronectin. This findings lay a ground work for further investigation of the role of the bacteria in adhesion and colonization to the host. PMID:27092228

  15. Challenges in reducing group B Streptococcus disease in African settings

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, Yo; Dangor, Ziyaad; French, Neil; Madhi, Shabir; Heyderman, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis in high-income settings and is associated with high rates of neonatal mortality and morbidity. There is now increasing evidence to suggest that there is a high GBS disease burden in resource-limited countries, and it is therefore critically important to identify suitable and practical preventive strategies. In Europe and North America, intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP) has led to a dramatic reduction of early-onset GBS disease. However, the methods for identifying pregnant women who should receive IAP and how to reduce late-onset GBS disease are not without controversy and are challenging for most sub-Saharan African countries. GBS vaccines are approaching phase III trials but are still under development. This review aims to explore the current evidence related to strategies for reducing invasive GBS disease in an African setting, the development of a GBS vaccine and whether preventative measures against GBS disease can be practically implemented. PMID:27831912

  16. Translational research and biomarkers in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Delanghe, Joris R; Speeckaert, Marijn M

    2015-12-07

    As neonatal sepsis is a severe condition, there is a call for reliable biomarkers to differentiate between infected and noninfected newborns. Although blood culture has been considered as the gold standard, this analysis is still too slow and limited by false negative results. Use of CRP is hampered by a physiological 3-day increase, resulting in a low sensitivity to detect sepsis at an early stage. A moderate diagnostic accuracy of other acute phase proteins has been demonstrated (serum amyloid A, procalcitonin, lipopolysaccharide binding protein, mannose binding lectin and hepcidin). In neonatal sepsis, changed chemokine/cytokine levels are observed before those of acute phase reactants. High IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α concentrations are detected in infected infants. Soluble interleukin-2 receptor has been used to identify bacteremia, whereas low plasma RANTES concentrations are characteristic for septicemia. Several cell adhesion molecules contribute to the pathogenesis of sepsis. As an upregulated CD64 expression on granulocytes is found within 1-6h after bacterial invasion, serial CD64 measurements could guide antibiotic therapy. An increased CD11b/CD18 density can improve the diagnosis, and a positive correlation between CD11b and the severity of systemic inflammation has been reported. An early increase in sCD14-ST presepsin is also observed during sepsis, whereas high sTREM-1 values in early-onset neonatal sepsis (EOS) have been associated with mortality. Biomarkers resulting from proteomics are also promising. A 4-biomarker 'mass restricted' score has been validated as diagnostic for intra-amniotic infection and/or inflammation. S100A8 in amniotic fluid is a strong predictor of an increased incidence of EOS. Proteomic analysis of cord blood has revealed altered protein expression patterns. The ApoSAA score is useful for identifying sepsis and could guide prescription of antibiotics. (1)H-NMR and GC-MS metabolomics allow to diagnose septic shock, which is

  17. Concepts and controversies in the management of group B streptococcus during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Glantz, J C; Kedley, K E

    1998-03-01

    Group B beta-hemolytic streptococcus colonizes 20 percent of pregnant women. Intrapartum fetal colonization leads to invasive disease in 1 to 2 infants of every 1000 births in the United States, and has a mortality of approximately 6 percent. Several protocols using intrapartum chemoprophylaxis have been devised to improve management of the disease, but confusion continues about details and implementation. This review examined the clinical issues, current management protocols, and advantages and disadvantages of these protocols for group B streptococcus. We reviewed the literature and described the epidemiology, detection methods, risk factors, neonatal disease potential of group B streptococcus, and the historical development of management protocols. Two current alternatives, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' risk-based protocol and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's screening-based protocol, are described and compared. The risk-based protocol does not entail antepartum screening, but treats women with certain risk factors during labor. The screening-based protocol includes cultures at 35 to 37 weeks' gestation, and offers intrapartum prophylaxis to all women with positive cultures. Uncultured women with risk factors are treated. Both protocols involve high rates of intrapartum antibiotic use and both may significantly lower rates of neonatal group B streptococcus sepsis (screening-based more than risk-based for both). The risk-based approach is simpler than the screening-based approach. Practitioners should select one of the two protocols and use it consistently. The differences in efficacy are small; a practitioner may not see a difference in outcomes over the course of his or her career, although more antibiotics will be administered using the screening-based approach.

  18. Group A Streptococcus vulvovaginitis in breastfeeding women.

    PubMed

    Rahangdale, Lisa; Lacy, Judith; Hillard, Paula A

    2008-08-01

    Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus-associated vulvovaginitis is uncommon in adult women. Clinicians should include group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus as a possible cause of vulvovaginal symptoms in breastfeeding women. Along with appropriate antibiotic therapy, vaginal estrogen therapy may be considered to diminish susceptibility to recurrent infection in women with vaginal atrophy.

  19. [New Sepsis-3 definition : Do we have to treat sepsis before we can diagnose it from now on?

    PubMed

    Schmoch, T; Bernhard, M; Uhle, F; Gründling, M; Brenner, T; Weigand, M A

    2017-05-11

    The Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3) have been available since the beginning of 2016. SEPSIS-3 completely replaces the old SIRS criteria in the definition of sepsis and defines sepsis from now on as "life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection". However, it seems questionable whether in clinical practice the new definition is really superior to the old one. The most important question is the following: Is it helpful to have a definition that first recognizes a patient once organ dysfunction has occurred and the patient already needs intensive care?

  20. The Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3)

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Mervyn; Deutschman, Clifford S.; Seymour, Christopher Warren; Shankar-Hari, Manu; Annane, Djillali; Bauer, Michael; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Bernard, Gordon R.; Chiche, Jean-Daniel; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Levy, Mitchell M.; Marshall, John C.; Martin, Greg S.; Opal, Steven M.; Rubenfeld, Gordon D.; van der Poll, Tom; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Angus, Derek C.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Definitions of sepsis and septic shock were last revised in 2001. Considerable advances have since been made into the pathobiology (changes in organ function, morphology, cell biology, biochemistry, immunology, and circulation), management, and epidemiology of sepsis, suggesting the need for reexamination. OBJECTIVE To evaluate and, as needed, update definitions for sepsis and septic shock. PROCESS A task force (n = 19) with expertise in sepsis pathobiology, clinical trials, and epidemiology was convened by the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine. Definitions and clinical criteria were generated through meetings, Delphi processes, analysis of electronic health record databases, and voting, followed by circulation to international professional societies, requesting peer review and endorsement (by 31 societies listed in the Acknowledgment). KEY FINDINGS FROMEVIDENCE SYNTHESIS Limitations of previous definitions included an excessive focus on inflammation, the misleading model that sepsis follows a continuum through severe sepsis to shock, and inadequate specificity and sensitivity of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria. Multiple definitions and terminologies are currently in use for sepsis, septic shock, and organ dysfunction, leading to discrepancies in reported incidence and observed mortality. The task force concluded the term severe sepsis was redundant. RECOMMENDATIONS Sepsis should be defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. For clinical operationalization, organ dysfunction can be represented by an increase in the Sequential [Sepsis-related] Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score of 2 points or more, which is associated with an in-hospital mortality greater than 10%. Septic shock should be defined as a subset of sepsis in which particularly profound circulatory, cellular, and metabolic abnormalities are associated with a

  1. Objective Sepsis Surveillance Using Electronic Clinical Data.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Chanu; Kadri, Sameer; Huang, Susan S; Murphy, Michael V; Li, Lingling; Platt, Richard; Klompas, Michael

    2016-02-01

    To compare the accuracy of surveillance of severe sepsis using electronic health record clinical data vs claims and to compare incidence and mortality trends using both methods. We created an electronic health record-based surveillance definition for severe sepsis using clinical indicators of infection (blood culture and antibiotic orders) and concurrent organ dysfunction (vasopressors, mechanical ventilation, and/or abnormal laboratory values). We reviewed 1,000 randomly selected medical charts to characterize the definition's accuracy and stability over time compared with a claims-based definition requiring infection and organ dysfunction codes. We compared incidence and mortality trends from 2003-2012 using both methods. Two US academic hospitals. Adult inpatients. The electronic health record-based clinical surveillance definition had stable and high sensitivity over time (77% in 2003-2009 vs 80% in 2012, P=.58) whereas the sensitivity of claims increased (52% in 2003-2009 vs 67% in 2012, P=.02). Positive predictive values for claims and clinical surveillance definitions were comparable (55% vs 53%, P=.65) and stable over time. From 2003 to 2012, severe sepsis incidence imputed from claims rose by 72% (95% CI, 57%-88%) and absolute mortality declined by 5.4% (95% CI, 4.6%-6.7%). In contrast, incidence using the clinical surveillance definition increased by 7.7% (95% CI, -1.1% to 17%) and mortality declined by 1.7% (95% CI, 1.1%-2.3%). Sepsis surveillance using clinical data is more sensitive and more stable over time compared with claims and can be done electronically. This may enable more reliable estimates of sepsis burden and trends.

  2. Readmissions for Recurrent Sepsis: New or Relapsed Infection?

    PubMed

    DeMerle, Kimberley Marie; Royer, Stephanie C; Mikkelsen, Mark E; Prescott, Hallie C

    2017-10-01

    Sepsis hospitalizations are frequently followed by hospital readmissions, often for recurrent sepsis. However, it is unclear how often sepsis readmissions are for relapsed/recrudescent versus new infections. The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which 90-day readmissions for recurrent sepsis are due to infection of the same site and same pathogen as the initial episode. Retrospective cohort study. University of Michigan Health System. All hospitalizations (May 15, 2013 to May 14, 2015) with a principal International Classification of Diseases, Ninth revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis of septicemia (038.x), severe sepsis (995.92), or septic shock (785.52), as well as all subsequent hospitalizations and sepsis readmissions within 90 days. We determined organism and site of sepsis through manual chart abstraction. None. We identified 472 readmissions within 90 days of sepsis, of which 137 (29.1%) were for sepsis. In sepsis readmissions, the site and organisms were most commonly urinary (29.2%), gastrointestinal (20.4%), Gram negative (29.9%), Gram positive (16.8%), and culture negative (30.7%). Ninety-four readmissions (68.6%) were for infection at the same site as initial sepsis hospitalization. Nineteen percent of readmissions were confirmed to be same site and same organism. However, accounting for the uncertainty from culture-negative sepsis, as many as 53.2% of readmissions could plausibly due to infections with both the same organism and same site. Of the patients readmitted with sepsis within 90 days, two thirds had infection at the same site as their initial admission. Just 19% had infection confirmed to be from the same site and organism as the initial sepsis hospitalization. Half of readmissions were definitively for new infections, whereas an additional 34% were unclear since cultures were negative in one of the hospitalizations.

  3. Group G Streptococcus bacteremia in recurrent cellulitis.

    PubMed

    di Meo, Nicola; Stinco, Giuseppe; Gubertini, Nicoletta; Patriarca, Maria Martina; Trevisan, Giusto

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, group G Streptococcus has been reported with increasing frequency as the cause of a variety of human infections. Underlying host factors such as immunosuppression, malignancy, diabetes mellitus, and rheumatoid arthritis may be predisposing conditions leading to infection. Toxic involvement and post-streptococcal sequalae, once believed to be exclusive to infections caused by group A Streptococcus, are now known to occur following acute group G Streptococcus and group C Streptococcus infections. We report on a case of group G Streptococcus bacteremia and recurrent cellulitis with toxic involvement. Patient blood cultures were always negative for β-hemolytic Streptococci in all the recurrences, except during the last one. Antibiotic therapy based on antibiogram quickly resolved the infection. A regimen of intramuscular injection of 1.2 million units of benzathine penicillin every 15 days for one year prevented recurrences of cellulitis.

  4. Alterations of T helper lymphocyte subpopulations in sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Li, Ming; Su, Longxiang; Wang, Huijuan; Xiao, Kun; Deng, Jie; Jia, Yanhong; Han, Gencheng; Xie, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Circulating lymphocyte number was significantly decreased in patients with sepsis. However, it remains unknown which severity phase (sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock) does it develop and what happen on each subpopulation. Eight patients with differing severities of sepsis (31 sepses, 33 severe sepses, and 16 septic shocks) were enrolled. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of Th1, Th2, and Th17; regulatory T (Treg) cell-specific transcription factor T-bet; GATA-3; RORgammat (RORγt); forkhead box P3 (FOXP3); and IL-17 mRNA were performed, and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect serum interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-4, and IL-10. In this study, the Th1, Th2, Treg transcription factors, and related cytokines IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-10 levels of sepsis and severe sepsis patients in peripheral blood were significantly higher than those of the normal controls. Except for IL-17, the T-bet, GATA-3, and IFN-γ levels of septic shock patients were lower than those of sepsis patients. We also observed that the proportions of Th17/Treg in the sepsis and septic shock groups were inversed. From the above, the inflammatory response especially the adaptive immune response is still activated in sepsis and severe sepsis, but significant immunosuppression was developed in septic shock. In addition, the proportion of Th17/Treg inversed may be associated with the illness aggravation of patients with sepsis.

  5. Plasma soluble Tim-3 emerges as an inhibitor in sepsis: sepsis contrary to membrane Tim-3 on monocytes.

    PubMed

    Ren, F; Li, J; Jiang, X; Xiao, K; Zhang, D; Zhao, Z; Ai, J; Hou, C; Jia, Y; Han, G; Xie, L

    2015-11-01

    Immune dysfunction is the main characteristic of sepsis. T cell Ig and mucin domain protein 3 (Tim-3) on the monocytes has been reported to promote immune homeostasis during sepsis, but the influences of plasm soluble Tim-3 (sTim-3) on the immune system during sepsis remain unknown. Here, 100 patients with different severities of sepsis (40 sepsis, 42 severe sepsis, and 18 septic shock) were enrolled in this study. The Tim-3 and human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR) on the circulating monocytes were detected using flow cytometry. Plasma sTim-3 was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Inflammatory factors and two kinds of A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) - ADAM10 and ADAM17 were assessed. The Tim-3 and HLA-DR on the monocytes decreased with increasing sepsis severity. The sTim-3 was reduced in the sepsis and severe sepsis patients but was elevated in the septic shock patients who exhibited significant immunosuppression as predicted by HLA-DR. sTim-3 levels were negatively correlated with IL-12 and TNF-α. ADAM10 and ADAM17, sheddases of Tim-3, exhibited trends toward elevations in the septic shock group. In conclusion, sTim-3 was involved in the development of sepsis. The homeostasis-promoting role of the Tim-3 on the monocytes was disrupted, while the inhibitory role of sTim-3 emerged during sepsis-induced immunosuppression.

  6. Interaction of Streptococcus agalactiae and Cellular Innate Immunity in Colonization and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Landwehr-Kenzel, Sybille; Henneke, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus, GBS) is highly adapted to humans, where it is a normal constituent of the intestinal and vaginal flora. Yet, GBS has highly invasive potential and causes excessive inflammation, sepsis, and death at the beginning of life, in the elderly and in diabetic patients. Thus, GBS is a model pathobiont that thrives in the healthy host, but has not lost its potential virulence during coevolution with mankind. It remains incompletely understood how the innate immune system contains GBS in the natural niches, the intestinal and genital tracts, and which molecular events underlie breakdown of mucocutaneous resistance. Newborn infants between days 7 and 90 of life are at risk of a particularly striking sepsis manifestation (late-onset disease), where the transition from colonization to invasion and dissemination, and thus from health to severe sepsis is typically fulminant and not predictable. The great majority of late-onset sepsis cases are caused by one clone, GBS ST17, which expresses HvgA as a signature virulence factor and adhesin. In mice, HvgA promotes the crossing of both the mucosal and the blood–brain barrier. Expression levels of HvgA and other GBS virulence factors, such as pili and toxins, are regulated by the upstream two-component control system CovR/S. This in turn is modulated by acidic epithelial pH, high glucose levels, and during the passage through the mouse intestine. After invasion, GBS has the ability to subvert innate immunity by mechanisms like glycerinaldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase-dependent induction of IL-10 and β-protein binding to the inhibitory phagocyte receptors sialic acid binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 5 and 14. On the host side, sensing of GBS nucleic acids and lipopeptides by both Toll-like receptors and the inflammasome appears to be critical for host resistance against GBS. Yet, comprehensive models on the interplay between GBS and human immune cells at the colonizing site are

  7. Streptococcus milleri in the appendix.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, P M; Wilson, G

    1977-01-01

    The appendix was investigated as a possible habitat of Streptococcus milleri. Both normal and inflamed appendices were examined and the isolation rates compared. S. milleri was present in a quarter of the normal appendices and more than half of those associated with apendicitis--a difference that was statistically highly significant. The isolation rates throughout were indepencent of age. There was a pronounced connection between the presence of S. milleri in the appendix and the purulent manifestations of appendicitis. S. milleri was isolated from other abdominal sites associated with appendicitis. The frequency of isolation was increased by culture in an enrichment broth containing nalidixic acid and sulphadimidine. PMID:591633

  8. Streptococcus milleri in the appendix.

    PubMed

    Poole, P M; Wilson, G

    1977-10-01

    The appendix was investigated as a possible habitat of Streptococcus milleri. Both normal and inflamed appendices were examined and the isolation rates compared. S. milleri was present in a quarter of the normal appendices and more than half of those associated with apendicitis--a difference that was statistically highly significant. The isolation rates throughout were indepencent of age. There was a pronounced connection between the presence of S. milleri in the appendix and the purulent manifestations of appendicitis. S. milleri was isolated from other abdominal sites associated with appendicitis. The frequency of isolation was increased by culture in an enrichment broth containing nalidixic acid and sulphadimidine.

  9. Polyarteritis nodosa associated with streptococcus.

    PubMed Central

    David, J; Ansell, B M; Woo, P

    1993-01-01

    Twelve children are described with an essentially benign vasculitic illness in association with streptococcal infection. They demonstrated characteristic clinical features of nodular cutaneous polyarteritis with fever. Laboratory findings showed an acute phase response associated with raised antistreptolysin and antihyaluronidase titres in all patients and a positive throat culture for beta haemolytic streptococcus in three patients. Ten required corticosteroids. Two patients had systemic involvement with abnormal arteriography; both had appreciably raised white cell counts (> 40 x 10(9)/l). They may represent a subset of poststreptococcal vasculitis, requiring cytotoxic treatment for effective disease control. Images PMID:7904442

  10. Assessment of Clinical Criteria for Sepsis: For the Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3).

    PubMed

    Seymour, Christopher W; Liu, Vincent X; Iwashyna, Theodore J; Brunkhorst, Frank M; Rea, Thomas D; Scherag, André; Rubenfeld, Gordon; Kahn, Jeremy M; Shankar-Hari, Manu; Singer, Mervyn; Deutschman, Clifford S; Escobar, Gabriel J; Angus, Derek C

    2016-02-23

    The Third International Consensus Definitions Task Force defined sepsis as "life-threatening organ dysfunction due to a dysregulated host response to infection." The performance of clinical criteria for this sepsis definition is unknown. To evaluate the validity of clinical criteria to identify patients with suspected infection who are at risk of sepsis. Among 1.3 million electronic health record encounters from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2012, at 12 hospitals in southwestern Pennsylvania, we identified those with suspected infection in whom to compare criteria. Confirmatory analyses were performed in 4 data sets of 706,399 out-of-hospital and hospital encounters at 165 US and non-US hospitals ranging from January 1, 2008, until December 31, 2013. Sequential [Sepsis-related] Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria, Logistic Organ Dysfunction System (LODS) score, and a new model derived using multivariable logistic regression in a split sample, the quick Sequential [Sepsis-related] Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) score (range, 0-3 points, with 1 point each for systolic hypotension [≤100 mm Hg], tachypnea [≥22/min], or altered mentation). For construct validity, pairwise agreement was assessed. For predictive validity, the discrimination for outcomes (primary: in-hospital mortality; secondary: in-hospital mortality or intensive care unit [ICU] length of stay ≥3 days) more common in sepsis than uncomplicated infection was determined. Results were expressed as the fold change in outcome over deciles of baseline risk of death and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). In the primary cohort, 148,907 encounters had suspected infection (n = 74,453 derivation; n = 74,454 validation), of whom 6347 (4%) died. Among ICU encounters in the validation cohort (n = 7932 with suspected infection, of whom 1289 [16%] died), the predictive validity for in-hospital mortality was

  11. Diagnosing Sepsis – The Role of Laboratory Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shu-Ling; Miller, Nancy S.; Lee, John; Remick, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is the host response to microbial pathogens resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. An accurate and timely diagnosis of sepsis allows prompt and appropriate treatment. This review discusses laboratory testing for sepsis because differentiating systemic inflammation from infection is challenging. Procalcitonin (PCT) is currently an FDA approved test to aid in the diagnosis of sepsis but with questionable efficacy. However, studies support the use of PCT for antibiotic de-escalation. Serial lactate measurements have been recommended for monitoring treatment efficacy as part of sepsis bundles. The 2016 sepsis consensus definitions include lactate concentrations greater than 2 mmol/L (>18 mg/dL) as part of the definition of septic shock. Also included in the 2016 definitions are measuring bilirubin and creatinine to determine progression of organ failure indicating worse prognosis. Hematologic parameters, including a simple white blood cell count and differential, are frequently part of the initial sepsis diagnostic protocols. Several new biomarkers have been proposed to diagnose sepsis or to predict mortality, but they currently lack sufficient sensitivity and specificity to be considered as stand-alone testing. If sepsis is suspected, new technologies and microbiologic assays allow rapid and specific identification of pathogens. In 2016 there is no single laboratory test that accurately diagnoses sepsis. PMID:27387712

  12. Can melatonin be used as a marker for neonatal sepsis?

    PubMed

    El-Mashad, Abdel-Rahman; Elmahdy, Heba; El-Dib, Mohamed; Elbatch, Manal; Aly, Hany

    2016-09-01

    Melatonin, an indolamine endogenously produced by pineal body, has important role as an anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic. Whether melatonin concentration changes in neonatal sepsis and whether it can be used as a marker of sepsis is unknown. The objective of this study is to evaluate melatonin concentration in the serum as a marker for neonatal sepsis and compare it to standard markers. We prospectively studied 40 neonates: 20 diagnosed with late neonatal sepsis and 20 healthy neonates as a control group. Markers of sepsis and melatonin concentration were compared between both groups. The sepsis groups had significantly increased immature to total neutrophils ratio (I/T ratio), and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (HsCRP), and decreased platelet count. Melatonin concentration was increased in sepsis group when compared to control group (27.2 ± 3.3 versus 11.4 ± 3.2 pg/ml, p = 0.001), and positively correlated with HsCRP (r = 0.952, p = 0.001) and I/T ratio (r = 0.326, p = 0.015). Combining melatonin to HsCRP increased sensitivity and specificity to detect neonatal sepsis to 97.3 and 93.3%, respectively. Endogenous melatonin concentration is increased in late neonatal sepsis and can potentially be used as a marker for sepsis especially when combined with CRP.

  13. Biology of sepsis: its relevance to pediatric nephrology.

    PubMed

    Blatt, Neal B; Srinivasan, Sushant; Mottes, Theresa; Shanley, Maureen M; Shanley, Thomas P

    2014-12-01

    Because of its multi-organ involvement, the syndrome of sepsis provides clinical challenges to a wide variety of health care providers. While multi-organ dysfunction triggered by sepsis requires general supportive critical care provided by intensivists, the impact of sepsis on renal function and the ability of renal replacement therapies to modulate its biologic consequences provide a significant opportunity for pediatric nephrologists and related care providers to impact outcomes. In this review, we aim to highlight newer areas of understanding of the pathobiology of sepsis with special emphasis on those aspects of particular interest to pediatric nephrology. As such, we aim to: (1) review the definition of sepsis and discuss advances in our mechanistic understanding of sepsis; (2) review current hypotheses regarding sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) and describe its epidemiology based on evolving definitions of AKI; (3) review the impact of renal failure on the immune system, highlighting the sepsis risk in this cohort and strategies that might minimize this risk; (4) review how renal replacement therapeutic strategies may impact sepsis-induced AKI outcomes. By focusing the review on these specific areas, we have omitted other important areas of the biology of sepsis and additional interactions with renal function from this discussion; however, we have aimed to provide a comprehensive list of references that provide contemporary reviews of these additional areas.

  14. [Bacterial sepsis : Diagnostics and calculated antibiotic therapy].

    PubMed

    Richter, D C; Heininger, A; Brenner, T; Hochreiter, M; Bernhard, M; Briegel, J; Dubler, S; Grabein, B; Hecker, A; Krüger, W A; Mayer, K; Pletz, M W; Störzinger, D; Pinder, N; Hoppe-Tichy, T; Weiterer, S; Zimmermann, S; Brinkmann, A; Weigand, M A; Lichtenstern, Christoph

    2017-10-04

    The mortality of patients with sepsis and septic shock is still unacceptably high. An effective antibiotic treatment within 1 h of recognition of sepsis is an important target of sepsis treatment. Delays lead to an increase in mortality; therefore, structured treatment concepts form a rational foundation, taking relevant diagnostic and treatment steps into consideration. In addition to the assumed focus and individual risks of each patient, local resistance patterns and specific problem pathogens must be taken into account for selection of anti-infection treatment. Many pathophysiological alterations influence the pharmacokinetics of antibiotics during sepsis. The principle of standard dosing should be abandoned and replaced by an individual treatment approach with stronger weighting of the pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) index of the substance groups. Although this is not yet the clinical standard, prolonged (or continuous) infusion of beta-lactam antibiotics and therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) can help to achieve defined PK targets. Prolonged infusion is sufficient without TDM but for continuous infusion TDM is basically necessary. A further argument for individual PK/PD-oriented antibiotic approaches is the increasing number of infections due to multidrug resistant pathogens (MDR) in the intensive care unit. For effective treatment antibiotic stewardship teams (ABS team) are becoming more established. Interdisciplinary cooperation of the ABS team with infectiologists, microbiologists and clinical pharmacists leads not only to a rational administration of antibiotics but also has a positive influence on the outcome. The gold standards for pathogen detection are still culture-based detection and microbiological resistance testing for the various antibiotic groups. Despite the rapid investigation time, novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based procedures for pathogen identification and resistance determination, are currently only an adjunct to

  15. [Recognizing prevention and treatment of burn sepsis with the concept of holistic integrative medicine].

    PubMed

    Huan, J N

    2017-04-20

    Sepsis remains a major cause of death in severe burns. The effect of sepsis management is influenced by its complicated pathophysiologic changes. In order to improve the outcome of burn sepsis, the predisposing factor of sepsis after burn analyzed by advanced technology, the early prevention, antibiotics therapy, and combined treatment in severe burns with sepsis are discussed using the concept of holistic integrative medicine.

  16. STARCH HYDROLYSIS BY STREPTOCOCCUS EQUINUS

    PubMed Central

    Dunican, Lawrence K.; Seeley, Harry W.

    1962-01-01

    Dunican, Lawrence K. (Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y.) and Harry W. Seeley. Starch hydrolysis by Streptococcus equinus. J. Bacteriol. 82:264–269. 1962.—In a study of starch hydrolysis by strains of Streptococcus equinus, 52 isolates were obtained and their amylolytic abilities determined. It was found that all the strains could hydrolyze starch to some extent when grown in the presence of an easily fermentable carbohydrate, viz., glucose. Without this carbohydrate the organisms did not hydrolyze starch. The hydrolysis of starch was inhibited when the organisms were grown in an atmosphere of 5% CO2 and 95% N2, even if grown in the presence of a fermentable monosaccharide. S. bovis, which was used as a reference organism, readily hydrolyzed starch in the absence of monosaccharides and in atmospheres containing CO2. In no instance did S. equinus hydrolyze the starch to the level of reducing sugars. Negligible amounts of reducing sugars were recovered when the cell-free filtrates of S. equinus were incubated with starch. With S. bovis, the yield of reducing sugars under such conditions was almost quantitative. These facts extend further the differences between these related organisms. The ability to synthesize an internal starchlike polysaccharide was noted in most of the strains of S. equinus. Synthesis was found when the organisms were grown on maltose or on a starch medium containing a small amount of fermentable monosaccharide. PMID:13888473

  17. Streptococcus pyogenes adhesion and colonization.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Stephan; Barnett, Timothy C; Rivera-Hernandez, Tania; Rohde, Manfred; Walker, Mark J

    2016-11-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus, GAS) is a human-adapted pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of disease. GAS can cause relatively mild illnesses, such as strep throat or impetigo, and less frequent but severe life-threatening diseases such as necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. GAS is an important public health problem causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. The main route of GAS transmission between humans is through close or direct physical contact, and particularly via respiratory droplets. The upper respiratory tract and skin are major reservoirs for GAS infections. The ability of GAS to establish an infection in the new host at these anatomical sites primarily results from two distinct physiological processes, namely bacterial adhesion and colonization. These fundamental aspects of pathogenesis rely upon a variety of GAS virulence factors, which are usually under strict transcriptional regulation. Considerable progress has been made in better understanding these initial infection steps. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of GAS adhesion and colonization. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  18. Streptococcus agalactiae mastitis: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, G P

    1997-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae continues to be a major cause of subclinical mastitis in dairy cattle and a source of economic loss for the industry. Veterinarians are often asked to provide information on herd level control and eradication of S. agalactiae mastitis. This review collects and collates relevant publications on the subject. The literature search was conducted in 1993 on the Agricola database. Articles related to S. agalactiae epidemiology, pathogen identification techniques, milk quality consequences, and control, prevention, and therapy were included. Streptococcus agalactiae is an oblique parasite of the bovine mammary gland and is susceptible to treatment with a variety of antibiotics. Despite this fact, where state or provincial census data are available, herd prevalence levels range from 11% (Alberta, 1991) to 47% (Vermont, 1985). Infection with S. agalactiae is associated with elevated somatic cell count and total bacteria count and a decrease in the quantity and quality of milk products produced. Bulk tank milk culture has, using traditional milk culture techniques, had a low sensitivity for identifying S. agalactiae at the herd level. New culture methods, using selective media and large inocula, have substantially improved the sensitivity of bulk tank culture. Efficacy of therapy on individual cows remains high. Protocols for therapy of all infected animals in a herd are generally successful in eradicating the pathogen from the herd, especially if they are followed up with good udder hygiene techniques. PMID:9220132

  19. Toward the early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis and sepsis-like illness using novel heart rate analysis.

    PubMed

    Griffin, M P; Moorman, J R

    2001-01-01

    Abrupt clinical deterioration because of sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates, and earlier diagnosis should improve therapy of this potentially catastrophic illness. In practice, clinical signs and laboratory data have not been perceived as sensitive or specific for early stages of sepsis. Because heart rate characteristics (HRC) are abnormal during fetal distress and neonatal illness, we hypothesized that abnormal HRC might precede the clinical diagnosis of neonatal sepsis, adding independent information to standard clinical parameters. In the neonatal intensive care unit at the University of Virginia, we prospectively studied infants admitted from August 1995 to April 1999 who were at risk for developing sepsis. Infants in the sepsis (culture-positive) and sepsis-like illness (culture-negative) groups had an abrupt clinical deterioration that raised clinical suspicion of infection and prompted physicians to obtain blood cultures and start antibiotic therapy. Infants without sepsis raised no clinical suspicion of illness and had no cultures obtained. We measured novel characteristics-moments and percentiles-of normalized heart rate (HR) time series for 5 days before and 3 days after sepsis, sepsis-like illness, or a random time in controls. We also calculated the Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology (SNAP) and the Neonatal Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System (NTISS) as clinical scores of the severity of illness. There were 46 episodes of culture-positive sepsis in 40 patients and 27 episodes of culture-negative sepsis-like illness in 23 patients. We analyzed 29 control periods in 26 patients. Infants with sepsis and sepsis-like illness had lower birth weights and gestational ages and higher SNAP and NTISS scores than did infants without sepsis. The most important new finding was that the infants in the sepsis and sepsis-like illness groups had increasingly abnormal HRC for up to 24 hours preceding their abrupt clinical deterioration

  20. The Glyoxalase System and Methylglyoxal-Derived Carbonyl Stress in Sepsis: Glycotoxic Aspects of Sepsis Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Schmoch, Thomas; Uhle, Florian; Siegler, Benedikt H.; Fleming, Thomas; Morgenstern, Jakob; Nawroth, Peter P.; Weigand, Markus A.; Brenner, Thorsten

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis remains one of the leading causes of death in intensive care units. Although sepsis is caused by a viral, fungal or bacterial infection, it is the dysregulated generalized host response that ultimately leads to severe dysfunction of multiple organs and death. The concomitant profound metabolic changes are characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and profound transformations of the intracellular energy supply in both peripheral and immune cells. A further hallmark of the early phases of sepsis is a massive formation of reactive oxygen (ROS; e.g., superoxide) as well as nitrogen (RNS; e.g., nitric oxide) species. Reactive carbonyl species (RCS) form a third crucial group of highly reactive metabolites, which until today have been not the focus of interest in sepsis. However, we previously showed in a prospective observational clinical trial that patients suffering from septic shock are characterized by significant methylglyoxal (MG)-derived carbonyl stress, with the glyoxalase system being downregulated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In this review, we give a detailed insight into the current state of research regarding the metabolic changes that entail an increased MG-production in septicemia. Thus, we point out the special role of the glyoxalase system in the context of sepsis. PMID:28304355

  1. The Glyoxalase System and Methylglyoxal-Derived Carbonyl Stress in Sepsis: Glycotoxic Aspects of Sepsis Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Schmoch, Thomas; Uhle, Florian; Siegler, Benedikt H; Fleming, Thomas; Morgenstern, Jakob; Nawroth, Peter P; Weigand, Markus A; Brenner, Thorsten

    2017-03-17

    Sepsis remains one of the leading causes of death in intensive care units. Although sepsis is caused by a viral, fungal or bacterial infection, it is the dysregulated generalized host response that ultimately leads to severe dysfunction of multiple organs and death. The concomitant profound metabolic changes are characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and profound transformations of the intracellular energy supply in both peripheral and immune cells. A further hallmark of the early phases of sepsis is a massive formation of reactive oxygen (ROS; e.g., superoxide) as well as nitrogen (RNS; e.g., nitric oxide) species. Reactive carbonyl species (RCS) form a third crucial group of highly reactive metabolites, which until today have been not the focus of interest in sepsis. However, we previously showed in a prospective observational clinical trial that patients suffering from septic shock are characterized by significant methylglyoxal (MG)-derived carbonyl stress, with the glyoxalase system being downregulated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In this review, we give a detailed insight into the current state of research regarding the metabolic changes that entail an increased MG-production in septicemia. Thus, we point out the special role of the glyoxalase system in the context of sepsis.

  2. The Parenteral Vitamin C Improves Sepsis and Sepsis-Induced Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome via Preventing Cellular Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Yan-Fen

    2017-01-01

    Cellular immunosuppression appears to be involved in sepsis and sepsis-induced multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Recent evidence showed that parenteral vitamin C (Vit C) had the ability to attenuate sepsis and sepsis-induced MODS. Herein, we investigated the impact of parenteral Vit C on cellular immunosuppression and the therapeutic value in sepsis. Using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), sepsis was induced in WT and Gulo−/− mice followed with 200 mg/Kg parenteral Vit C administration. The immunologic functions of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and CD4+CD25− T cells, as well as the organ functions, were determined. Administration of parenteral Vit C per se markedly improved the outcome of sepsis and sepsis-induced MODS of WT and Gulo−/− mice. The negative immunoregulation of Tregs was inhibited, mainly including inhibiting the expression of forkhead helix transcription factor- (Foxp-) 3, cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen- (CTLA-) 4, membrane associated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-βm+), and the secretion of inhibitory cytokines [including TGF-β and interleukin- (IL-) 10], as well as CD4+ T cells-mediated cellular immunosuppression which was improved by parenteral Vit C in WT and Gulo−/− septic mice. These results suggested that parenteral Vit C has the ability to improve the outcome of sepsis and sepsis-induced MODS and is associated with improvement in cellular immunosuppression. PMID:28210072

  3. The Parenteral Vitamin C Improves Sepsis and Sepsis-Induced Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome via Preventing Cellular Immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu-Lei; Lu, Bin; Zhai, Jian-Hua; Liu, Yan-Cun; Qi, Hai-Xia; Yao, Ying; Chai, Yan-Fen; Shou, Song-Tao

    2017-01-01

    Cellular immunosuppression appears to be involved in sepsis and sepsis-induced multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Recent evidence showed that parenteral vitamin C (Vit C) had the ability to attenuate sepsis and sepsis-induced MODS. Herein, we investigated the impact of parenteral Vit C on cellular immunosuppression and the therapeutic value in sepsis. Using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), sepsis was induced in WT and Gulo(-/-) mice followed with 200 mg/Kg parenteral Vit C administration. The immunologic functions of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells, as well as the organ functions, were determined. Administration of parenteral Vit C per se markedly improved the outcome of sepsis and sepsis-induced MODS of WT and Gulo(-/-) mice. The negative immunoregulation of Tregs was inhibited, mainly including inhibiting the expression of forkhead helix transcription factor- (Foxp-) 3, cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen- (CTLA-) 4, membrane associated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β(m+)), and the secretion of inhibitory cytokines [including TGF-β and interleukin- (IL-) 10], as well as CD4(+) T cells-mediated cellular immunosuppression which was improved by parenteral Vit C in WT and Gulo(-/-) septic mice. These results suggested that parenteral Vit C has the ability to improve the outcome of sepsis and sepsis-induced MODS and is associated with improvement in cellular immunosuppression.

  4. Neonatal group B streptococcus disease in developing countries: are we ready to deploy a vaccine?

    PubMed

    Iroh Tam, Pui-Ying; Delair, Shirley F; Obaro, Stephen K

    2015-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) disease is the leading cause of neonatal sepsis in developed countries and has high case fatality rates. In developing countries, however, the burden of GBS is less clear; this is due to a lack of studies using optimal diagnostic, clinical and laboratory techniques and is complicated by the wide availability of non-prescription antibiotics to the general population and in peripartum patients. There is an urgent need for prospective, population-based surveillance to provide an accurate assessment of neonatal GBS disease burden in developing countries, which remains largely unrecognized, and consequently obscures the potential relevance of GBS vaccination in these populations. Preliminary data on GBS vaccines are promising as a preventive tool for neonatal GBS infection, more so than any other currently available public health initiative. However, how do we assess the true impact of a GBS vaccine without accurate surveillance data on the real burden of disease?

  5. Genome Analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes Associated with Pharyngitis and Skin Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Joe; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Jospin, Guillaume; Coil, David A.; Khazen, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a very important human pathogen, commonly associated with skin or throat infections but can also cause life-threatening situations including sepsis, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, and necrotizing fasciitis. Various studies involving typing and molecular characterization of S. pyogenes have been published to date; however next-generation sequencing (NGS) studies provide a comprehensive collection of an organism’s genetic variation. In this study, the genomes of nine S. pyogenes isolates associated with pharyngitis and skin infection were sequenced and studied for the presence of virulence genes, resistance elements, prophages, genomic recombination, and other genomic features. Additionally, a comparative phylogenetic analysis of the isolates with global clones highlighted their possible evolutionary lineage and their site of infection. The genomes were found to also house a multitude of features including gene regulation systems, virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance mechanisms. PMID:27977735

  6. Scrum kidney: epidemic pyoderma caused by a nephritogenic Streptococcus pyogenes in a rugby team.

    PubMed

    Ludlam, H; Cookson, B

    1986-08-09

    In December, 1984, an outbreak of pyoderma affected five scrum players in the St Thomas' Hospital rugby team. The causative organism, Streptococcus pyogenes, was acquired during a match against a team experiencing an outbreak of impetigo, and was transmitted to two front row players of another team a week later, and to two girlfriends of affected St Thomas' players a month later. The strain was M-type 49, tetracycline-resistant, and virulent. It caused salpingitis in a girlfriend and acute glomerulonephritis in one rugby player. No case of subclinical glomerulonephritis was detected in eight patients with pyoderma. Screening of the St Thomas' Hospital team revealed four further cases of non-streptococcal skin infection, with evidence for contemporaneous spread of Staphylococcus aureus. Teams should not field players with sepsis, and it may be advisable to apply a skin antiseptic to traumatised skin after the match.

  7. Genome Analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes Associated with Pharyngitis and Skin Infections.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Joe; Eisen, Jonathan A; Jospin, Guillaume; Coil, David A; Khazen, Georges; Tokajian, Sima

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a very important human pathogen, commonly associated with skin or throat infections but can also cause life-threatening situations including sepsis, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, and necrotizing fasciitis. Various studies involving typing and molecular characterization of S. pyogenes have been published to date; however next-generation sequencing (NGS) studies provide a comprehensive collection of an organism's genetic variation. In this study, the genomes of nine S. pyogenes isolates associated with pharyngitis and skin infection were sequenced and studied for the presence of virulence genes, resistance elements, prophages, genomic recombination, and other genomic features. Additionally, a comparative phylogenetic analysis of the isolates with global clones highlighted their possible evolutionary lineage and their site of infection. The genomes were found to also house a multitude of features including gene regulation systems, virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance mechanisms.

  8. Assessment of Clinical Criteria for Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Christopher W.; Liu, Vincent X.; Iwashyna, Theodore J.; Brunkhorst, Frank M.; Rea, Thomas D.; Scherag, André; Rubenfeld, Gordon; Kahn, Jeremy M.; Shankar-Hari, Manu; Singer, Mervyn; Deutschman, Clifford S.; Escobar, Gabriel J.; Angus, Derek C.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The Third International Consensus Definitions Task Force defined sepsis as “life-threatening organ dysfunction due to a dysregulated host response to infection.” The performance of clinical criteria for this sepsis definition is unknown. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the validity of clinical criteria to identify patients with suspected infection who are at risk of sepsis. DESIGN, SETTINGS, AND POPULATION Among 1.3 million electronic health record encounters from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2012, at 12 hospitals in southwestern Pennsylvania, we identified those with suspected infection in whom to compare criteria. Confirmatory analyses were performed in 4 data sets of 706 399 out-of-hospital and hospital encounters at 165 US and non-US hospitals ranging from January 1, 2008, until December 31, 2013. EXPOSURES Sequential [Sepsis-related] Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria, Logistic Organ Dysfunction System (LODS) score, and a new model derived using multivariable logistic regression in a split sample, the quick Sequential [Sepsis-related] Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) score (range, 0–3 points, with 1 point each for systolic hypotension [≤100 mm Hg], tachypnea [≥22/min], or altered mentation). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES For construct validity, pairwise agreement was assessed. For predictive validity, the discrimination for outcomes (primary: in-hospital mortality; secondary: in-hospital mortality or intensive care unit [ICU] length of stay ≥3 days) more common in sepsis than uncomplicated infection was determined. Results were expressed as the fold change in outcome over deciles of baseline risk of death and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). RESULTS In the primary cohort, 148 907 encounters had suspected infection (n = 74 453 derivation; n = 74 454 validation), of whom 6347 (4%) died. Among ICU encounters in the validation cohort (n = 7932 with suspected

  9. Risk assessment in neonatal early onset sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Sagori; Puopolo, Karen M

    2012-12-01

    The incidence of neonatal early onset sepsis has declined with the widespread use of intrapartum antibiotic therapies, yet early onset sepsis remains a potentially fatal condition, particularly among very low birth-weight infants. Clinical signs of neonatal infection are nonspecific and may be absent in the immediate postnatal period. Maternal and infant clinical characteristics, as well as infant laboratory values, have been used to identify newborns at risk and to administer empiric antibiotic therapy to prevent progression to more severe illness. Such approaches result in the evaluation of approximately 15% of asymptomatic term and late preterm infants and of nearly all preterm infants. The development of multivariate predictive models may provide more accurate methods of identifying newborns at highest risk and allow for more limited newborn antibiotic exposures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Aeromonas hydrophila Sepsis Mimicking Vibrio vulnificus Infection.

    PubMed

    Park, Se Young; Nam, Hyun Min; Park, Kun; Park, Seok Don

    2011-09-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is a facultatively anaerobic, asporogenous gram-negative rod that has often been regarded as an opportunistic pathogen in hosts with impairment of a local or general defense mechanism. A 68-year-old alcoholic woman presented with shock and gangrene on the right arm. At first, her clinical presentations were severe painful erythematous swelling that worsened within a few hours with development of gangrene, edema, and blisters. Bullous fluid and blood cultures yielded A. hydrophila. Histopathological findings of sections obtained from the vesicle revealed subepidermal vesicles; necrosis of the epidermis, papillary dermis, and subcutaneous fat; and massive hemorrhage in the subcutis. Despite all efforts to save the patient, she died 8 hours after admission. Clinical features of A. hydrophila sepsis resemble those of Vibrio vulnificus sepsis. Therefore, in addition to the case report, we compared the cultural, biochemical, and morphological differences between A. hydrophila and V. vulnificus for facilitation of early and accurate identification of the causative agent.

  11. Sepsis management: An evidence-based approach.

    PubMed

    Baig, Muhammad Akbar; Shahzad, Hira; Jamil, Bushra; Hussain, Erfan

    2016-03-01

    The Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guidelines have outlined an early goal directed therapy (EGDT) which demonstrates a standardized approach to ensure prompt and effective management of sepsis. Having said that, there are barriers associated with the application of evidence-based practice, which often lead to an overall poorer adherence to guidelines. Considering the global burden of disease, data from low- to middle-income countries is scarce. Asia is the largest continent but most Asian countries do not have a well-developed healthcare system and compliance rates to resuscitation and management bundles are as low as 7.6% and 3.5%, respectively. Intensive care units are not adequately equipped and financial concerns limit implementation of expensive treatment strategies. Healthcare policy-makers should be notified in order to alleviate financial restrictions and ensure delivery of standard care to septic patients.

  12. Carbon monoxide in the treatment of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Nakahira, Kiichi; Choi, Augustine M K

    2015-12-15

    Carbon monoxide (CO), a low-molecular-weight gas, is endogenously produced in the body as a product of heme degradation catalyzed by heme oxygenase (HO) enzymes. As the beneficial roles of HO system have been elucidated in vitro and in vivo, CO itself has also been reported as a potent cytoprotective molecule. Whereas CO represents a toxic inhalation hazard at high concentration, low-dose exogenous CO treatment (~250-500 parts per million) demonstrates protective functions including but not limited to the anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic effects in preclinical models of human diseases. Of note, CO exposure confers protection in animal models of sepsis by inhibiting inflammatory responses and also enhancing bacterial phagocytosis in leukocytes. These unique functions of CO including both dampening inflammation and promoting host defense mechanism are mediated by multiple pathways such as autophagy induction or biosynthesis of specialized proresolving lipid mediators. We suggest that CO gas may represent a novel therapy for patients with sepsis.

  13. Streptococcus agalactiae Toxic Shock-Like Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Al Akhrass, Fadi; Abdallah, Lina; Berger, Steven; Hanna, Rami; Reynolds, Nina; Thompson, Shellie; Hallit, Rabih; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We present 2 patients with Streptococcus agalactiae toxic shock-like syndrome and review another 11 well-reported cases from the literature. Streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome is a devastating illness with a high mortality rate, therefore we stress the importance of early supportive management, antimicrobial therapy, and surgical intervention. Toxic shock-like syndrome is likely to be underestimated in patients with invasive Streptococcus agalactiae infection who present with shock. Early diagnosis requires high suspicion of the illness, along with a thorough mucocutaneous examination. Streptococcus agalactiae produces uncharacterized pyrogenic toxins, which explains the ability of the organism to cause toxic shock-like syndrome. PMID:23263717

  14. Neonatal sepsis: progress towards improved outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shane, Andi L; Stoll, Barbara J

    2014-01-01

    Neonates are predisposed to infections during the perinatal period due to multiple exposures and a relatively compromised immune system. The burden of disease attributed to neonatal infections varies by geographic region and maternal and neonatal risk factors. Worldwide, it is estimated that more than 1.4 million neonatal deaths annually are the consequence of invasive infections. Risk factors for early-onset neonatal sepsis (EOS) include prematurity, immunologic immaturity, maternal Group B streptococcal colonization, prolonged rupture of membranes, and maternal intra-amniotic infection. Intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis administered to GBS-colonized women has reduced the burden of disease associated with early onset GBS invasive infections. Active surveillance has identified Gram-negative pathogens as an emerging etiology of early-onset invasive infections. Late-onset neonatal sepsis (LOS) attributable to Gram-positive organisms, including coagulase negative Staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality among premature infants. Invasive candidiasis is an emerging cause of late-onset sepsis, especially among infants who receive broad spectrum antimicrobial agents. Prophylactic fluconazole administration to very low birthweight (VLBW) neonates during the first 6 weeks of life reduces invasive candidiasis in neonatal intensive care units with high rates of fungal infection. Prevention of healthcare associated infections through antimicrobial stewardship, limited steroid use, early enteral feeding, limited use of invasive devices and standardization of catheter care practices, and meticulous hand hygiene are important and cost-effective strategies for reducing the burden of late-onset neonatal sepsis. Copyright © 2013 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The protein C pathway and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Della Valle, Patrizia; Pavani, Giulia; D'Angelo, Armando

    2012-03-01

    After the discovery of the key components of the protein C (PC) pathway a beneficial effect on survival of the infusion of activated protein C (APC) in animal models of sepsis was demonstrated, leading to the development of recombinant human activated protein C (rh-APC) as a therapeutic agent. It soon became clear that rather than the anticoagulant and profibrinolytic activities of APC, its anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective properties played a major role in the treatment of patients with severe sepsis. Such properties affect the response to inflammation of endothelial cells and leukocytes and are exerted through binding of APC to at least five receptors with intracellular signaling. The main APC protective mechanism involves binding of the Gla-domain to the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) and cleavage of protease activated receptor 1 (PAR-1), eliciting suppression of proinflammatory cytokines synthesis and of intracellular proapoptotic pathways and activation of endothelial barrier properties. However, thrombin cleaves PAR-1 with much higher catalytic efficiency, followed by pro-inflammatory, pro-apoptotic and barrier disruptive intracellular signaling, and it is unclear how APC can exert a protective activity through the cleavage of PAR-1 when thrombin is also present in the same environment. Interestingly, in endothelial cell cultures, PAR-1 cleavage by thrombin results in anti-inflammatory and barrier protective signaling provided occupation of EPCR by the PC gla-domain, raising the possibility that the beneficial effects of rh-APC might be recapitulated in vivo by administration of h-PC zymogen to patients with severe sepsis. Recent reports of h-PC infusion in animal models of sepsis support this hypothesis.

  16. Incidence and Prognosis of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients With Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Gretchen L.; Morris, Peter E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although the mortality rate among patients with sepsis is declining, the incidence of both sepsis and sepsis-related deaths is increasing, likely due to its presence in a growing elderly population. As atrial fibrillation is more common in the elderly, we hypothesize that its presence will be associated with greater mortality among patients with sepsis. Methods The Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU) database of a large tertiary care medical center was queried for sepsis-related codes and atrial fibrillation. Results Atrial fibrillation was associated with older age and a higher mortality in this series of patients with sepsis. Conclusions Whether atrial fibrillation is a marker of disease severity or contributes to mortality is uncertain. Further studies are necessary to determine optimal management.

  17. Sepsis-induced immune dysfunction: can immune therapies reduce mortality?

    PubMed Central

    Delano, Matthew J.; Ward, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response induced by an infection, leading to organ dysfunction and mortality. Historically, sepsis-induced organ dysfunction and lethality were attributed to the interplay between inflammatory and antiinflammatory responses. With advances in intensive care management and goal-directed interventions, early sepsis mortality has diminished, only to surge later after “recovery” from acute events, prompting a search for sepsis-induced alterations in immune function. Sepsis is well known to alter innate and adaptive immune responses for sustained periods after clinical “recovery,” with immunosuppression being a prominent example of such alterations. Recent studies have centered on immune-modulatory therapy. These efforts are focused on defining and reversing the persistent immune cell dysfunction that is associated with mortality long after the acute events of sepsis have resolved. PMID:26727230

  18. Particularities regarding the etiology of sepsis in forensic services.

    PubMed

    Dermengiu, Dan; Curca, George Cristian; Ceausu, Mihai; Hostiuc, Sorin

    2013-09-01

    If in clinical practice definitive diagnostic criteria had been established, after death sepsis is often difficult to diagnose, especially if a site of origin is not found or if no clinical data are available. This article will analyze the etiology of sepsis in a medical-legal service with emphasis on the differences in diagnosing it in clinical and forensic environments. A total of 78 cases of sepsis cases diagnosed or confirmed at the autopsy were selected. The etiological agent was determined either during the hospitalization or by postmortem bacteriology. A high prevalence of Gram-negative sepsis was found, especially multidrug-resistant micro-organisms. Most frequent etiological agents were Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter, Enterococcus, Pseudomonas, and Klebsiella. Polymicrobial sepsis is much more frequent than in nonforensic cases. In legal medicine, the prevalence of Gram-negative sepsis is much higher than in nonforensic autopsies, and the point of origin is shifted toward the skin and the gastrointestinal system.

  19. Apoptosis and caspases regulate death and inflammation in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Hotchkiss, Richard S; Nicholson, Donald W

    2006-11-01

    Although the prevailing concept has been that mortality in sepsis results from an unbridled hyper-inflammatory cytokine-mediated response, the failure of more than 30 clinical trials to treat sepsis by controlling this cytokine response requires a 'rethink' of the molecular mechanism underpinning the development of sepsis. As we discuss here, remarkable new studies indicate that most deaths from sepsis are actually the result of a substantially impaired immune response that is due to extensive death of immune effector cells. Rectification of this apoptotic-inflammatory imbalance using modulators of caspases and other components of the cell-death pathway have shown striking efficacy in stringent animal models of sepsis, indicating an entirely novel path forward for the clinical treatment of human sepsis.

  20. [Updated definition of sepsis : Implications for diagnostics and therapy principles].

    PubMed

    Schlegel, N

    2017-01-01

    Until a short time ago the criteria for sepsis were based on the assumption that sepsis is primarily caused by the inflammatory reaction of the body to an infection, which does not correspond to the current knowledge on the pathophysiology of sepsis. Accordingly, sepsis is now defined as a life-threatening organ dysfunction due to a falsely regulated response of the body to an infection. Septic shock occurs when a condition of persisting hypotension with the continuous need for vasopressor agents and serum lactate levels of >2 mmol/l despite administration of sufficient volume and fluid is present. These new definitions are discussed in this article with respect to the consequences for the diagnosis of sepsis. This review article also presents the current controversies on the most important aspects of the therapy of sepsis.

  1. A Study of Sepsis in Surgical Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Hnatko, S. I.; Macdonald, G. R.; Rodin, A. E.

    1963-01-01

    Published records of the frequency of wound sepsis are often unreliable sources of information on the general frequency of this complication because of unstandardized methods of reporting and because of the various views of different investigators as to what constitutes sepsis. A method of infection reporting, its study and analysis are outlined. A survey of postoperative infections by this method for the years 1959, 1960 and 1961 revealed infection rates of 2.02%, 1.20% and 1.14%, respectively. For the same period the percentages of wound infections caused by Staph. aureus were 83.06%, 69.8% and 51.8%, respectively. The most prevalent phage types were 55/53/54 and 52/80/81/82, although types 80/81/82 and 80 were also involved. Infections with Gram-negative organisms were encountered more often in 1961 than in 1959. The majority of these were of mixed type, and followed abdominal surgery. There is need for more comprehensive study and analysis of postoperative wound sepsis and its complications. It was apparent from this study that, statistically, a relatively low rate of postoperative infections may mask a high rate following a specific surgical procedure. PMID:13954844

  2. Coagulation in patients with severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Levi, Marcel; Poll, Tom van der

    2015-02-01

    In the majority of patients with severe sepsis, systemic activation of coagulation is present. Increasing evidence points to an extensive cross-talk between coagulation and inflammation that may play an important role in the pathogenesis of sepsis. Inflammation not only leads to activation of coagulation, but coagulation also considerably affects inflammatory activity. Molecular pathways that contribute to inflammation-induced activation of coagulation have been precisely identified. Proinflammatory cytokines and other mediators are capable of activating the coagulation system and downregulating important physiological anticoagulant pathways. Activation of the coagulation system and ensuing thrombin generation is dependent on expression of tissue factor on activated mononuclear cells and endothelial cells, and is insufficiently counteracted by TFPI. Simultaneously, endothelial-bound anticoagulant mechanism, in particular the protein C system, is shutoff by proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, fibrin removal is severely inhibited, because of inactivation of the fibrinolytic system, caused by an upregulation of its main inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1). Increased fibrin formation and impaired removal lead to (micro)vascular thrombosis, which may result in tissue ischemia and subsequent organ damage. The cornerstone of the management of coagulation in sepsis is the specific and vigorous treatment of the underlying disorder. Strategies aimed at the inhibition of coagulation activation may theoretically be justified and have been found beneficial in experimental and initial clinical studies. Heparin may be an effective anticoagulant approach and alternative strategies comprise restoration of physiological anticoagulant pathways.

  3. Ethyl pyruvate: a novel treatment for sepsis.

    PubMed

    Fink, Mitchell P

    2007-01-01

    Ethyl pyruvate (EP), a simple aliphatic ester derived from pyruvic acid, improves survival and ameliorates organ system dysfunction in mice with peritonitis induced by caecal ligation and perforation, even when treatment is started as late as 12-24 hours after the onset of sepsis. In studies using lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophage like cells, EP inhibits activation of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor, NF-kappaB, and down regulates secretion of a number of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF). In this reductionist in vitro system, EP also blocks secretion of the late-appearing pro inflammatory cytokine-like molecule, high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). In murine models of endotoxaemia or sepsis, treatment with EP decreases circulating levels of TNF and HMGB1. While the molecular events responsible for the salutary effects of EP remain to be elucidated, one mechanism may involve covalent modification of a critical thiol residue in the p65 component of NF-kappaB. EP warrants evaluation as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of sepsis in humans.

  4. Pro-inflammatory mechanisms in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Chong, Deborah L W; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is characterised by a hyper-inflammatory response due to microbial infection. We here review our current understanding of host mechanisms employed to mediate this hyper-inflammatory response, drawing together current knowledge pertaining to pathogen recognition and host pro-inflammatory response. Recognition of microbial derived ligands by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) is a key step in initiating pro-inflammatory signalling pathways. Examples of PRRs linked to the aetiology of sepsis include Toll-like, C-type lectin, RIG-1-like and also Nod-like receptors, which are involved in the formation of the inflammasome, crucial for the maturation of some pro-inflammatory cytokines. Bacterial superantigens have evolved to exploit host MHC class II and T cell receptors (normally considered part of the adaptive immune response) as innate PRRs to propagate a so-called 'cytokine storm', while synergy between different microbial ligands and host-derived alarmins can augment the inflammatory response still further through as yet poorly understood interactions. The host pro-inflammatory response results in the characteristic features of inflammation: rubor, calor, dolor, and tumor. We will review herein the key mediators of inflammation in sepsis, identifying their overlapping and intersecting roles in vascular changes in tone, endothelial permeability, coagulation and contact activation, leukocyte mobilisation and activation. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Inhibition of Intestinal Thiamin Transport in Rat Model of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Sassoon, Catherine S.; Zhu, Ercheng; Fang, Liwei; Subramanian, Veedamali S.; Said, Hamid M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Thiamin deficiency is highly prevalent in patients with sepsis, but the mechanism by which sepsis induces thiamin deficiency is unknown. This study aimed to determine the influence of various severity of sepsis on carrier-mediated intestinal thiamin uptake, level of expressions of thiamin transporters (thiamin transporter-1 (THTR-1) and thiamin transporter-2 (THTR-2)), and mitochondrial thiamin pyrophosphate transporter (MTPPT). Design Randomized, controlled study Setting Research laboratory at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center Subjects Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into controls, mild, moderate and severe sepsis with equal number of animals in each group. Measurements and Main Results Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture with the cecum ligated below the cecal valve at 25 %, 50 % and 75 % of cecal length, defined as severe, moderate and mild sepsis, respectively. Control animals underwent laparotomy only. After 2 days of induced sepsis, carrier-mediated intestinal thiamin uptake was measured using [3H]thiamin. Expressions of THTR-1, THTR-2, and MTPPT proteins and mRNA were measured. Proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IL-6), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were also measured. Sepsis inhibited [3H]thiamin uptake and the inhibition was a function of sepsis severity. Both cell membranes thiamin transporters and MTPPT expression levels were suppressed; also levels of ATP in the intestine of animals with moderate and severe sepsis were significantly lower than that of sham operated controls. Conclusions For the first time we demonstrated that sepsis inhibited carrier-mediated intestinal thiamin uptake as a function of sepsis severity, suppressed thiamin transporters and MTPPT, leading to ATP depletion. PMID:27065466

  6. Defining Sepsis Mortality Clusters in the United States.

    PubMed

    Moore, Justin Xavier; Donnelly, John P; Griffin, Russell; Howard, George; Safford, Monika M; Wang, Henry E

    2016-07-01

    In the United States, sepsis is a major public health problem accounting for over 200,000 annual deaths. The aims of this study were to identify U.S. counties with high sepsis mortality and to assess the community characteristics associated with increased sepsis mortality. We performed a descriptive analysis of 2003 through 2012 Compressed Mortality File data. We defined sepsis deaths as deaths associated with an infection, classified according to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Version. Three thousand one hundred and eight counties in the contiguous U.S. counties, excluding Hawaii and Alaska. Using geospatial autocorrelation methods, we defined county-level sepsis mortality as strongly clustered, moderately clustered, and nonclustered. We approximated the mean crude, age-adjusted, and community-adjusted sepsis mortality rates nationally and for clustering groups. We contrasted demographic and community characteristics between clustering groups. We performed logistic regression for the association between strongly clustered counties and community characteristics. Among 3,108 U.S. counties, the age-adjusted sepsis mortality rate was 59.6 deaths per 100,000 persons (95% CI, 58.9-60.4). Sepsis mortality was higher in the Southern U.S. and clustered in three major regions: Mississippi Valley, Middle Georgia, and Central Appalachia. Among 161 (5.2%) strongly clustered counties, age-adjusted sepsis mortality was 93.1 deaths per 100,000 persons (95% CI, 90.5-95.7). Strongly clustered sepsis counties were more likely to be located in the south (92.6%; p < 0.001), exhibit lower education, higher impoverished population, without medical insurance, higher medically uninsured rates, and had higher unemployment rates (p < 0.001). Sepsis mortality is higher in the Southern United States, with three regional clusters: "Mississippi Valley," "Middle Georgia," and "Central Appalachia": Regions of high sepsis mortality are characterized by lower education, income

  7. The pediatric sepsis biomarker risk model: potential implications for sepsis therapy and biology

    PubMed Central

    Alder, Matthew N; Lindsell, Christopher J; Wong, Hector R

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in adult and pediatric intensive care units. Heterogeneity of demographics, comorbidities, biological mechanisms, and severity of illness leads to difficulty in determining which patients are at highest risk of mortality. Determining mortality risk is important for weighing the potential benefits of more aggressive interventions and for deciding whom to enroll in clinical trials. Biomarkers can be used to parse patients into different risk categories and can outperform current methods of patient risk stratification based on physiologic parameters. Here we review the Pediatric Sepsis Biomarker Risk Model that has also been modified and applied to estimate mortality risk in adult patients. We compare the two models and speculate on the biological implications of the biomarkers in patients with sepsis. PMID:24754535

  8. Comparison of Automated Methods Versus the American Burn Association Sepsis Definition to Identify Sepsis and Sepsis With Organ Dysfunction/Septic Shock in Burn-Injured Adults.

    PubMed

    Rech, Megan A; Mosier, Michael J; Zelisko, Susan; Netzer, Giora; Kovacs, Elizabeth J; Afshar, Majid

    To develop an algorithm to identify sepsis and sepsis with organ dysfunction/septic shock in burn-injured patients incorporating criteria from the American Burn Association sepsis definition that possesses good test characteristics compared with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision-Clinical Modification (ICD-9) codes and an algorithm previously validated in nonburn-injured septic patients (Martin et al method). This was a retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients admitted to the burn intensive care unit between January 2008 and March 2015. Of the 4761 admitted, 8.6% (n = 407) met inclusion criteria, of which the case rate for sepsis was 34.2% (n = 139; n = 48 sepsis; n = 91 sepsis with organ dysfunction/septic shock). For sepsis identification, the novel algorithm had an accuracy of 86.0% (95% CI: 82.2-89.2%), sensitivity of 66.9% (95% CI: 59.1-74.7%), and specificity of 95.9% (95% CI: 93.5-98.3%). The novel algorithm had better discrimination (0.81, 95% CI: 0.77-0.86) than the ICD-9 method (0.77, 95% CI: 0.73-0.81), although this was not significant (P = .08). For sepsis with organ dysfunction/septic shock, the novel algorithm plus vasopressors (0.67, 95% CI: 0.63-0.72) and the ICD-9 method (0.63, 95% CI: 0.58-0.68) performed equivocal (P = 0.15) but the Martin method (0.76, 95% CI: 0.71-0.81) had superior discrimination than other methods (P < .01). The novel algorithm is an accurate and simple tool to identify sepsis in the burn cohort with good sensitivity and specificity and equivocal discriminative ability to ICD-9 coding. The Martin method had superior discriminative ability for identifying sepsis with organ dysfunction/septic shock in burn-injured patients than either the novel algorithm plus vasopressors or ICD-9 coding.

  9. Impaired cerebrovascular autoregulation in patients with severe sepsis and sepsis-associated delirium

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis-associated delirium (SAD) increases morbidity in septic patients and, therefore, factors contributing to SAD should be further characterized. One possible mechanism might be the impairment of cerebrovascular autoregulation (AR) by sepsis, leading to cerebral hypo- or hyperperfusion in these haemodynamically unstable patients. Therefore, the present study investigates the relationship between the incidence of SAD and the status of AR during sepsis. Methods Cerebral blood flow velocity was measured using transcranial Doppler sonography and was correlated with the invasive arterial blood pressure curve to calculate the index of AR Mx (Mx>0.3 indicates impaired AR). Mx was measured daily during the first 4 days of sepsis. Diagnosis of a SAD was performed using the confusion assessment method for ICU (CAM-ICU) and, furthermore the predominant brain electrical activity in electroencephalogram (EEG) both at day 4 after reduction of sedation to RASS >-2. Results 30 critically ill adult patients with severe sepsis or septic shock (APACHE II 32 ± 6) were included. AR was impaired at day 1 in 60%, day 2 in 59%, day 3 in 41% and day 4 in 46% of patients; SAD detected by CAM-ICU was present in 76 % of patients. Impaired AR at day 1 was associated with the incidence of SAD at day 4 (p = 0.035). Conclusions AR is impaired in the great majority of patients with severe sepsis during the first two days. Impaired AR is associated with SAD, suggesting that dysfunction of AR is one of the trigger mechanisms contributing to the development of SAD. Trial registration clinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01029080 PMID:23036135

  10. Surviving Sepsis Campaign: International Guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2016.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Andrew; Evans, Laura E; Alhazzani, Waleed; Levy, Mitchell M; Antonelli, Massimo; Ferrer, Ricard; Kumar, Anand; Sevransky, Jonathan E; Sprung, Charles L; Nunnally, Mark E; Rochwerg, Bram; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Angus, Derek C; Annane, Djillali; Beale, Richard J; Bellinghan, Geoffrey J; Bernard, Gordon R; Chiche, Jean-Daniel; Coopersmith, Craig; De Backer, Daniel P; French, Craig J; Fujishima, Seitaro; Gerlach, Herwig; Hidalgo, Jorge Luis; Hollenberg, Steven M; Jones, Alan E; Karnad, Dilip R; Kleinpell, Ruth M; Koh, Younsuk; Lisboa, Thiago Costa; Machado, Flavia R; Marini, John J; Marshall, John C; Mazuski, John E; McIntyre, Lauralyn A; McLean, Anthony S; Mehta, Sangeeta; Moreno, Rui P; Myburgh, John; Navalesi, Paolo; Nishida, Osamu; Osborn, Tiffany M; Perner, Anders; Plunkett, Colleen M; Ranieri, Marco; Schorr, Christa A; Seckel, Maureen A; Seymour, Christopher W; Shieh, Lisa; Shukri, Khalid A; Simpson, Steven Q; Singer, Mervyn; Thompson, B Taylor; Townsend, Sean R; Van der Poll, Thomas; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Wiersinga, W Joost; Zimmerman, Janice L; Dellinger, R Phillip

    2017-03-01

    To provide an update to "Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2012". A consensus committee of 55 international experts representing 25 international organizations was convened. Nominal groups were assembled at key international meetings (for those committee members attending the conference). A formal conflict-of-interest (COI) policy was developed at the onset of the process and enforced throughout. A stand-alone meeting was held for all panel members in December 2015. Teleconferences and electronic-based discussion among subgroups and among the entire committee served as an integral part of the development. The panel consisted of five sections: hemodynamics, infection, adjunctive therapies, metabolic, and ventilation. Population, intervention, comparison, and outcomes (PICO) questions were reviewed and updated as needed, and evidence profiles were generated. Each subgroup generated a list of questions, searched for best available evidence, and then followed the principles of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system to assess the quality of evidence from high to very low, and to formulate recommendations as strong or weak, or best practice statement when applicable. The Surviving Sepsis Guideline panel provided 93 statements on early management and resuscitation of patients with sepsis or septic shock. Overall, 32 were strong recommendations, 39 were weak recommendations, and 18 were best-practice statements. No recommendation was provided for four questions. Substantial agreement exists among a large cohort of international experts regarding many strong recommendations for the best care of patients with sepsis. Although a significant number of aspects of care have relatively weak support, evidence-based recommendations regarding the acute management of sepsis and septic shock are the foundation of improved outcomes for these critically ill patients with high mortality.

  11. Experimental treatments for mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis: A narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guilang; Lyu, Juanjuan; Huang, Jingda; Xiang, Dan; Xie, Meiyan; Zeng, Qiyi

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to infection. Sepsis, which can lead to severe sepsis, septic shock, and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, is an important cause of mortality. Pathogenesis is extremely complex. In recent years, cell hypoxia caused by mitochondrial dysfunction has become a hot research field. Sepsis damages the structure and function of mitochondria, conversely, mitochondrial dysfunction aggravated sepsis. The treatment of sepsis lacks effective specific drugs. The aim of this paper is to undertake a narrative review of the current experimental treatment for mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis. The search was conducted in PubMed databases and Web of Science databases from 1950 to January 2014. A total of 1,090 references were retrieved by the search, of which 121 researches met all the inclusion criteria were included. Articles on the relationship between sepsis and mitochondria, and drugs used for mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis were reviewed retrospectively. The drugs were divided into four categories: (1) Drug related to mitochondrial matrix and respiratory chain, (2) drugs of mitochondrial antioxidant and free radical scavengers, (3) drugs related to mitochondrial membrane stability, (4) hormone therapy for septic mitochondria. In animal experiments, many drugs show good results. However, clinical research lacks. In future studies, the urgent need is to develop promising drugs in clinical trials. PMID:25983774

  12. Sepsis-induced myocardial depression and takotsubo syndrome.

    PubMed

    Y-Hassan, Shams; Settergren, Magnus; Henareh, Loghman

    2014-09-01

    Abstract Background and objectives: Myocardial depression in the setting of sepsis and septic shock is common and has been recognized for a long time. The aim of this study is to find out an association and causal link between sepsis and takotsubo syndrome (TS). Fifteen cases of TS were studied. Critical review of the literature dealing with sepsis and myocardial depression was done Results: Fifteen cases of sepsis-induced TS are described. Fifty-three per cent of the patients were men. The ages ranged from 39 to 76 years (mean age 60 years). Two-thirds of the patients had ST-elevation myocardial infarction ECG changes. Complications occurred in 80% of the patients. No specific types of sepsis or micro-organisms were associated with the development of TS. Critical review of the sepsis-induced myocardial depression shows that the left ventricular dysfunction, which is reversible within one-to-two weeks, is characterized by segmental ventricular dysfunction, and involvement of the right ventricle in one fourth of cases. These features are also consistent with TS. Sepsis triggers TS, which may be the cause of the majority of cases of sepsis-induced myocardial depression. Acute cardiac sympathetic disruption with noradrenaline spill-over may be the cause of sepsis-induced TS.

  13. Developments in the management of patients with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Steen, Colin

    Sepsis is associated with a high incidence of mortality and morbidity, however with appropriate strategies for monitoring and early targeted intervention mortality rates decline. This article examines the basic pathophysiology of the inflammatory response to tissue injury and the effects this has on circulation. A partnership of the Society of Critical Care Medicine, the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the International Sepsis Forum has developed the surviving sepsis strategy, which includes the sepsis six treatment pathway and early goal-directed therapy incorporating the six-hour care bundle.

  14. Haemophilus influenzae: a forgotten cause of neonatal sepsis?

    PubMed

    Dobbelaere, A; Jeannin, P; Bovyn, T; Ide, L

    2015-06-01

    Due to the introduction of the conjugate vaccine against serotype b, neonatal sepsis caused by Haemophilus influenzae became very rare. There is little data in Belgium concerning the prevalence of H. influenzae early onset neonatal sepsis and articles about neonatal sepsis and H. influenzae published in the last decade are scarce. We report two invasive infections with a non-typeable H. influenzae. These cases show that neonatal sepsis caused by non-typeable H. influenzae may be underestimated and we believe that there is need for a better registration of this kind of infection.

  15. Mass spectrometry for the discovery of biomarkers of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Katelyn R; Hummon, Amanda B

    2017-03-28

    Sepsis is a serious medical condition that occurs in 30% of patients in intensive care units (ICUs). Early detection of sepsis is key to prevent its progression to severe sepsis and septic shock, which can cause organ failure and death. Diagnostic criteria for sepsis are nonspecific and hinder a timely diagnosis in patients. Therefore, there is currently a large effort to detect biomarkers that can aid physicians in the diagnosis and prognosis of sepsis. Mass spectrometry is often the method of choice to detect metabolomic and proteomic changes that occur during sepsis progression. These "omics" strategies allow for untargeted profiling of thousands of metabolites and proteins from human biological samples obtained from septic patients. Differential expression of or modifications to these metabolites and proteins can provide a more reliable source of diagnostic biomarkers for sepsis. Here, we focus on the current knowledge of biomarkers of sepsis and discuss the various mass spectrometric technologies used in their detection. We consider studies of the metabolome and proteome and summarize information regarding potential biomarkers in both general and neonatal sepsis.

  16. Microbial pathogens causative of neonatal sepsis in Arabic countries.

    PubMed

    Tosson, Angie M S; Speer, Christian P

    2011-08-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. We analyzed the spectrum of pathogens causing neonatal sepsis in various Arabic countries. We analyzed hospital-based published studies on neonatal sepsis in eight Arabic countries documenting etiological pathogens and onset of sepsis published between 1990 and 2009. Twelve studies from eight Arabic countries including 2308 newborns with culture proven sepsis and clinical signs of sepsis reported that early onset sepsis ranged from 24 to 74%. Gram-negative organisms were the predominant pathogens in Libya, Egypt, Jordan, and Iraq (65-90% of all sepsis cases) with Klebsiella species (spp.), Serratia spp., Enterobacter spp., Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas spp. being the most frequent bacteria. In Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and Kuwait, the Gram-positive microorganisms, coagulase negative Staphylocooci and Staphylococcus aureus were taking the lead (64-75%). Group B Streptococci were the predominant pathogen (24%) in the United Arab of Emirates (UAE). Candida species were emerging in Egypt, UAE, Bahrain, and Kuwait. The spectrum of microorganisms responsible for neonatal sepsis varies considerably in different Arabic countries. The predominance of Gram-negative bacteria as well as the emergence of Candida species in some areas asks for neonatal networks, benchmarking instruments, and surveillance programs of microorganisms.

  17. Bacteriological profile and clinical predictors of ESBL neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepak; Kumar, Chetan; Pandita, Aakash; Pratap, Oleti Tejo; Dasi, Teena; Murki, Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriologic profile and risk factors for ESBL sepsis in newborns admitted to a Level III NICU. This was a retrospective observational study that enrolled newborns admitted to NICU with perinatal risk factors or clinical signs of sepsis and positive blood culture from January 2013 to August 2014. Blood cultures were done by BACTEC and ESBL production was evaluated from double-disc synergy method. Maternal, perinatal and neonatal risk factors were recorded from the case records and computerized information base. Mothers received cephalosporins for PPROM but its use was restricted in newborns for both probable and culture-positive sepsis. Among the infants with sepsis 24% had early-onset sepsis. The incidence of ESBL of early-onset Gram-negative sepsis (EOGNS) was 44.7% (n = 17 of 38) and it was 65% in late-onset Gram-negative sepsis (n = 84 of 129). The predominant ESBL-producing microbe responsible for neonatal sepsis was Klebsiella sp. Among newborns with EOGNS, the risk factors for the production of ESBL were preterm PROM (p = 0.004) and maternal exposure to antibiotics (p = 0.05). ESBL Gram-negative sepsis is a substantial problem in neonatal infections. Maternal exposure to cephalosporins and maternal PPROM are important risk factors for ESBL Gram-negative EOS.

  18. TRPV1 and SP: key elements for sepsis outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Bodkin, Jennifer Victoria; Fernandes, Elizabeth Soares

    2013-01-01

    Sensory neurons play important roles in many disorders, including inflammatory diseases, such as sepsis. Sepsis is a potentially lethal systemic inflammatory reaction to a local bacterial infection, affecting thousands of patients annually. Although associated with a high mortality rate, sepsis outcome depends on the severity of systemic inflammation, which can be directly influenced by several factors, including the immune response of the patient. Currently, there is a lack of effective drugs to treat sepsis, and thus there is a need to develop new drugs to improve sepsis outcome. Several mediators involved in the formation of sepsis have now been identified, but the mechanisms underlying the pathology remain poorly understood. The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor and the neuropeptide substance P (SP) have recently been demonstrated as important targets for sepsis and are located on sensory neurones and non-neuronal cells. Herein, we highlight and review the importance of sensory neurones for the modulation of sepsis, with specific focus on recent findings relating to TRPV1 and SP, with their distinct abilities to alter the transition from local to systemic inflammation and also modify the overall sepsis outcome. We also emphasize the protective role of TRPV1 in this context. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Neuropeptides. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-7 PMID:23145480

  19. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Immune Cell Metabolism in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a life threatening condition mediated by systemic infection, but also triggered by hemorrhage and trauma. These are significant causes of organ injury implicated in morbidity and mortality, as well as post-sepsis complications associated with dysfunction of innate and adaptive immunity. The role of cellular bioenergetics and loss of metabolic plasticity of immune cells is increasingly emerging in the pathogenesis of sepsis. This review describes mitochondrial biology and metabolic alterations of immune cells due to sepsis, as well as indicates plausible therapeutic opportunities. PMID:28378540

  20. Incidence of Post-Operative Sepsis and Role of Charlson Co-Morbidity Score for Predicting Postoperative Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Emami-Razavi, Seyed Hassan; Mohammadi, Atefeh; Alibakhshi, Abbas; Jalali, Mehdi; Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa

    2016-05-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are among mortality causes following major surgeries. The Charlson co-morbidity index consists of 19 weighted categories related to chronic health which measures the burden of co-morbidity. The goal of this study was to determine the incidence of postoperative sepsis in patients underwent gynecological and gastrointestinal cancer surgeries and predictive role of Charlson index for this situation. Two hundred and twenty-two patients who underwent gynecological and gastrointestinal cancer surgeries were evaluated. Sixty-four (28.6%) patients developed SIRS postoperatively. Forty-four (19.7%) patients developed sepsis postoperatively. Mean age, duration of hospitalization and surgery, the Charlson score were significantly higher in patients who developed sepsis than other cases. Blood transfusion and Charlson score were independent predictors of sepsis occurrence. Charlson co-morbidity index is a predictive factor for developing postoperative sepsis.

  1. Pediatric sepsis in the developing world: challenges in defining sepsis and issues in post-discharge mortality.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Matthew O; Kumbakumba, Elias; Kissoon, Niranjan; Ansermino, J Mark; Ndamira, Andrew; Larson, Charles P

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis represents the progressive underlying inflammatory pathway secondary to any infectious illness, and ultimately is responsible for most infectious disease-related deaths. Addressing issues related to sepsis has been recognized as an important step towards reducing morbidity and mortality in developing countries, where the majority of the 7.5 million annual deaths in children under 5 years of age are considered to be secondary to sepsis. However, despite its prevalence, sepsis is largely neglected. Application of sepsis definitions created for use in resource-rich countries are neither practical nor feasible in most developing country settings, and alternative definitions designed for use in these settings need to be established. It has also been recognized that the inflammatory state created by sepsis increases the risk of post-discharge morbidity and mortality in developed countries, but exploration of this issue in developing countries is lacking. Research is urgently required to characterize better this potentially important issue.

  2. Autophagy and Skeletal Muscles in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Mofarrahi, Mahroo; Sigala, Ioanna; Guo, Yeting; Godin, Richard; Davis, Elaine C.; Petrof, Basil; Sandri, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial injury develops in skeletal muscles during the course of severe sepsis. Autophagy is a protein and organelle recycling pathway which functions to degrade or recycle unnecessary, redundant, or inefficient cellular components. No information is available regarding the degree of sepsis-induced mitochondrial injury and autophagy in the ventilatory and locomotor muscles. This study tests the hypotheses that the locomotor muscles are more prone to sepsis-induced mitochondrial injury, depressed biogenesis and autophagy induction compared with the ventilatory muscles. Methodology/Principal Findings Adult male C57/Bl6 mice were injected with i.p. phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 20 mg/kg) and sacrificed 24 h later. The tibialis anterior (TA), soleus (SOLD) and diaphragm (DIA) muscles were quickly excised and examined for mitochondrial morphological injury, Ca++ retention capacity and biogenesis. Autophagy was detected with electron microscopy, lipidation of Lc3b proteins and by measuring gene expression of several autophagy-related genes. Electron microscopy revealed ultrastructural injuries in the mitochondria of each muscle, however, injuries were more severe in the TA and SOL muscles than they were in the DIA. Gene expressions of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA transcription factors and co-activators (indicators of biogenesis) were significantly depressed in all treated muscles, although to a greater extent in the TA and SOL muscles. Significant autophagosome formation, Lc3b protein lipidation and upregulation of autophagy-related proteins were detected to a greater extent in the TA and SOL muscles and less so in the DIA. Lipidation of Lc3b and the degree of induction of autophagy-related proteins were significantly blunted in mice expressing a muscle-specific IκBα superrepresor. Conclusion/Significance We conclude that locomotor muscles are more prone to sepsis-induced mitochondrial injury, decreased biogenesis

  3. High-volume haemofiltration for sepsis.

    PubMed

    Borthwick, Emma M J; Hill, Christopher J; Rabindranath, Kannaiyan S; Maxwell, Alexander P; McAuley, Danny F; Blackwood, Bronagh

    2013-01-31

    Severe sepsis and septic shock are leading causes of death in the intensive care unit (ICU). This is despite advances in the management of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock including early recognition, source control, timely and appropriate administration of antimicrobial agents, and goal directed haemodynamic, ventilatory and metabolic therapies. High-volume haemofiltration (HVHF) is a blood purification technique which may improve outcomes in critically ill patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. The technique of HVHF has evolved from renal replacement therapies used to treat acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill patients in the ICU. This review assessed whether HVHF improves clinical outcome in adult critically ill patients with sepsis in an ICU setting. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, 2011, Issue 7); MEDLINE (1990 to August 2011), EMBASE (1990 to August 2011); LILACS (1982 to August 2011), Web of Science (1990 to August 2011), CINAHL (1982 to August 2011) and specific websites. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomized trials comparing HVHF or high-volume haemodiafiltration to standard or usual dialysis therapy; and RCTs and quasi-randomized trials comparing HVHF or high-volume haemodiafiltration to no similar dialysis therapy. The studies involved adults in critical care units. Three review authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality. We sought additional information as required from trialists. We included three randomized trials involving 64 participants. Due to the small number of studies and participants, it was not possible to combine data or perform sub-group analyses. One trial reported ICU and 28-day mortality, one trial reported hospital mortality and in the third, the number of deaths stated did not match the quoted mortality rates. No trials reported length of stay in ICU or hospital and one reported organ dysfunction

  4. Streptococcus pyogenes in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Malmström, Johan; Karlsson, Christofer; Nordenfelt, Pontus; Ossola, Reto; Weisser, Hendrik; Quandt, Andreas; Hansson, Karin; Aebersold, Ruedi; Malmström, Lars; Björck, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a major bacterial pathogen and a potent inducer of inflammation causing plasma leakage at the site of infection. A combination of label-free quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategies were used to measure how the intracellular proteome homeostasis of S. pyogenes is influenced by the presence of human plasma, identifying and quantifying 842 proteins. In plasma the bacterium modifies its production of 213 proteins, and the most pronounced change was the complete down-regulation of proteins required for fatty acid biosynthesis. Fatty acids are transported by albumin (HSA) in plasma. S. pyogenes expresses HSA-binding surface proteins, and HSA carrying fatty acids reduced the amount of fatty acid biosynthesis proteins to the same extent as plasma. The results clarify the function of HSA-binding proteins in S. pyogenes and underline the power of the quantitative mass spectrometry strategy used here to investigate bacterial adaptation to a given environment. PMID:22117078

  5. Towards Control of Streptococcus iniae

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Andrew C.

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus iniae is an emerging zoonotic pathogen; such infections generally occur through injuries associated with preparing whole fresh fish for cooking. Those infected to date have been of Asian descent, are usually elderly (average age 68 years), and have had >1 underlying conditions that may predispose them to infection. Studies of the foundations of growth characteristics of S. iniae and its interactions with piscine host cells have recently been complemented by molecular studies. Advances in molecular biology have allowed research groups to identify numerous virulence factors and to explore their roles in the progression of S. iniae infection. Many of these virulence factors are homologous to those found in the major human pathogen S. pyogenes. An increased understanding of the properties of these factors and their effect on the success of infection is leading to novel approaches to control S. iniae infection; in particular, vaccination programs at fish farms have reduced the reservoir of infection for additional clinical cases. PMID:19961667

  6. Pneumonia and Streptococcus pneumoniae vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gyu-Lee; Seon, Seung-Han; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2017-07-22

    Pneumonia is an inflammatory disease of the lung, responsible for high morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, or other microorganisms. Streptococcus pneumoniae, a gram-positive bacterium with over 90 serotypes, is the most common causative agent. Moreover, comorbid factors including heart failure, renal disease, and pulmonary disease could increase the risk of pneumococcal pneumonia. Since the advent of the pneumococcal vaccine in the 1980s, the incidence of pneumonia has decreased significantly. However, current vaccines confer only limited protection against serotypes included in the vaccine. Thus, to overcome this limitation, new types of pneumococcal vaccines have been sought and under clinical trials. In this review, we discuss pneumonia and summarize the various types of pneumococcal vaccines in progress.

  7. Costs of postoperative sepsis: the business case for quality improvement to reduce postoperative sepsis in veterans affairs hospitals.

    PubMed

    Vaughan-Sarrazin, Mary S; Bayman, Levent; Cullen, Joseph J

    2011-08-01

    To estimate the incremental costs associated with sepsis as a complication of general surgery, controlling for patient risk factors that may affect costs (eg, surgical complexity and comorbidity) and hospital-level variation in costs. Database analysis. One hundred eighteen Veterans Health Affairs hospitals. A total of 13 878 patients undergoing general surgery during fiscal year 2006 (October 1, 2005, through September 30, 2006). Incremental costs associated with sepsis as a complication of general surgery (controlling for patient risk factors and hospital-level variation of costs), as well as the increase in costs associated with complications that co-occur with sepsis. Costs were estimated using the Veterans Health Affairs Decision Support System, and patient risk factors and postoperative complications were identified in the Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Overall, 564 of 13 878 patients undergoing general surgery developed postoperative sepsis, for a rate of 4.1%. The average unadjusted cost for patients with no sepsis was $24 923, whereas the average cost for patients with sepsis was 3.6 times higher at $88 747. In risk-adjusted analyses, the relative costs were 2.28 times greater for patients with sepsis relative to patients without sepsis (95% confidence interval, 2.19-2.38), with the difference in risk-adjusted costs estimated at $26 972 (ie, $21 045 vs $48 017). Sepsis often co-occurred with other types of complications, most frequently with failure to wean the patient from mechanical ventilation after 48 hours (36%), postoperative pneumonia (31%), and reintubation for respiratory or cardiac failure (29%). Costs were highest when sepsis occurred with pneumonia or failure to wean the patient from mechanical ventilation after 48 hours. Given the high cost of treating sepsis, a business case can be made for quality improvement initiatives that reduce the likelihood of postoperative sepsis.

  8. Infections Associated with Streptococcus intermedius in Children.

    PubMed

    Faden, Howard S

    2016-09-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a viridans Streptococcus belonging to the Anginosus group. In the past 7 years, it has been associated with abscesses in 48 children, 40% of whom had complicated and/or life-threatening illness. It was the sole pathogen in 35 cases. Seventy-five percent of the infections occurred in winter and spring. None occurred in infants younger than 1 year.

  9. Genotypic Profile of Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 and Clinical Features of Infection in Humans, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Kerdsin, Anusak; Dejsirilert, Surang; Puangpatra, Parichart; Sripakdee, Saowalak; Chumla, Koranan; Boonkerd, Nitsara; Polwichai, Pitimol; Tanimura, Susumu; Takeuchi, Dan; Nakayama, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Shota; Akeda, Yukihiro; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Sawanpanyalert, Pathom

    2011-01-01

    To examine associations between clinical features of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 infections in humans in Thailand and genotypic profiles of isolates, we conducted a retrospective study during 2006–2008. Of 165 patients for whom bacterial cultures of blood, cerebrospinal fluid, or both were positive for S. suis serotype 2, the major multilocus sequence types (STs) found were ST1 (62.4%) and ST104 (25.5%); the latter is unique to Thailand. Clinical features were examined for 158 patients. Infections were sporadic; case-fatality rate for adults was 9.5%, primarily in northern Thailand. Disease incidence peaked during the rainy season. Disease was classified as meningitis (58.9%) or nonmeningitis (41.1%, and included sepsis [35.4%] and others [5.7%]). Although ST1 strains were significantly associated with the meningitis category (p<0.0001), ST104 strains were significantly associated with the nonmeningitis category (p<0.0001). The ST1 and ST104 strains are capable of causing sepsis, but only the ST1 strains commonly cause meningitis. PMID:21529392

  10. Streptococcus pneumoniae Invades Erythrocytes and Utilizes Them to Evade Human Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Masaya; Terao, Yutaka; Mori-Yamaguchi, Yuka; Domon, Hisanori; Sakaue, Yuuki; Yagi, Tetsuya; Nishino, Kunihiko; Yamaguchi, Akihito; Nizet, Victor; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, a Gram-positive bacterium, is a major cause of invasive infection-related diseases such as pneumonia and sepsis. In blood, erythrocytes are considered to be an important factor for bacterial growth, as they contain abundant nutrients. However, the relationship between S. pneumoniae and erythrocytes remains unclear. We analyzed interactions between S. pneumoniae and erythrocytes, and found that iron ion present in human erythrocytes supported the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, another major Gram-positive sepsis pathogen, while it partially inhibited pneumococcal growth by generating free radicals. S. pneumoniae cells incubated with human erythrocytes or blood were subjected to scanning electron and confocal fluorescence microscopic analyses, which showed that the bacterial cells adhered to and invaded human erythrocytes. In addition, S. pneumoniae cells were found associated with human erythrocytes in cultures of blood from patients with an invasive pneumococcal infection. Erythrocyte invasion assays indicated that LPXTG motif-containing pneumococcal proteins, erythrocyte lipid rafts, and erythrocyte actin remodeling are all involved in the invasion mechanism. In a neutrophil killing assay, the viability of S. pneumoniae co-incubated with erythrocytes was higher than that without erythrocytes. Also, H2O2 killing of S. pneumoniae was nearly completely ineffective in the presence of erythrocytes. These results indicate that even when S. pneumoniae organisms are partially killed by iron ion-induced free radicals, they can still invade erythrocytes. Furthermore, in the presence of erythrocytes, S. pneumoniae can more effectively evade antibiotics, neutrophil phagocytosis, and H2O2 killing. PMID:24194877

  11. The effect of mango and neem extract on four organisms causing dental caries: Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus salivavius, Streptococcus mitis, and Streptococcus sanguis: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Prashant, G M; Chandu, G N; Murulikrishna, K S; Shafiulla, M D

    2007-01-01

    Chewing twigs of the mango or neem tree is a common way of cleaning the teeth in the rural and semi-urban population. These twigs are also believed to possess medicinal properties. The present study was conducted to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of these chewing sticks on the microorganisms Streptococcus mutans , Streptococcus salivarius , Streptococcus mitis , and Streptococcus sanguis which are involved in the development of dental caries. An additional objective was to identify an inexpensive, simple, and effective method of preventing and controlling dental caries. The sticks were sun dried, ground into a coarse powder, and weighed into 5 gm, 10 gm, and 50 gm amounts. These were added to 100 ml of deionized distilled water. After soaking for 48 h at 4 degrees C, the water was filtered. The filtrate was inoculated onto blood agar plates containing individual species of microorganisms and incubated at 37 degrees C for 48 h. Mango extract, at 50% concentration, showed maximum zone of inhibition on Streptococcus mitis . Neem extract produced the maximum zone of inhibition on Streptococcus mutans at 50% concentration. Even at 5% concentration neem extract showed some inhibition of growth for all the four species of organisms. A combination of neem and mango chewing sticks may provide the maximum benefit. We recommend the use of both the chewing sticks.

  12. Invasive disease by Streptococcus pyogenes: patients hospitalized for 6 years.

    PubMed

    Arias-Constantí, Vanessa; Trenchs-Sainz de la Maza, Victoria; Sanz-Marcos, Nuria Elvira; Guitart-Pardellans, Carmina; Gené-Giralt, Amadeu; Luaces-Cubells, Carles

    2017-07-10

    The last years an increase of severe cases of invasive disease (ID) due to Streptococcus pyogenes or streptococcus b-hemolytic group A (SGA) had been detected. The aim of this study was to analyze the epidemiology and the clinical features of ID due to SGA in a tertiary Pediatric Hospital. Retrospective study in a Pediatric hospital, of all in-patients with final diagnosis of ID due to SGA during 6 years (2009-2014). To consider ID, SGA had to be isolated in sterile samples; in patients with fascitis necroticans in skin samples or in any sample in patients with the diagnostic of Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome (STSS). The SSTS was defined as hypotension and at least 2 of these criteria: renal failure, hepatic failure, acute respiratory distress, tissue necrosis or desquamative erythematous rash. Demographic data, type of infection, risk factors, clinical presentation, analytical data at admission, treatment, need for admission to a pediatric intensive care unit, microbiological data, hospital stay and evolution were collected. Fifty-two (52) cases were included (12/10,000 of all inpatients); 3 years-old was the medium age (p25-75: 1.4-6.9 years); 28 (53.8%) were boys. Fourteen patients (26.9%) had risk factors. Fever was the major symptom (51 patients, 98.1%). The skin lesions were the most frequent clinical manifestations found (21; 40.4%). In 50 (96%) cases, SGA was isolated in at least one sterile sample. Skin and soft tissue infections were diagnosed in 14 patients (26.9%), 14 (26.9%) pneumonias, 12 (23.1%) bones and joints infections, 10 (19.2%) SSTS, 6 (11.5%) occult bacteremia, 4 (7.7%) meningitis and 2 (3.8%) sepsis. Surgery was required in 18 cases (34.6%) and 17 patients (32.7%) needed intensive care. The medium hospital stay was 9.5 days (p25-75: 8-15 days). Three patients presented sequels and one patient died. The ID due to SGA was a rare but serious reason for hospital admission. Skin and soft tissue infections, and pleuroneumonia were the most

  13. Transport of multidrug resistance substrates by the Streptococcus agalactiae hemolysin transporter.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Birgit; Bröker, Gerd; Kuhn, Melanie; Aymanns, Simone; Gleich-Theurer, Ute; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2006-08-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) causes neonatal sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis, as well as infections of the bovine udder. The S. agalactiae hemolysin is regarded as an important virulence factor, and hemolysin expression is dependent on the cyl gene cluster. cylA and cylB encode the ATP binding and transmembrane domains of a typical ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter. The deduced proteins contain the signature sequence of a multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter, and mutation of the genes results in a nonhemolytic and nonpigmented phenotype. To further elucidate the function of the putative transporter, nonpolar deletion mutants of cylA were constructed. These mutants are nonhemolytic and can be complemented by the transporter genes. Wild-type strain and nonhemolytic cylA and cylK deletion mutants were exposed to known substrates of MDR transporters. Mutation of cylA significantly impaired growth in the presence of daunorubicin, doxorubicin, and rhodamine 6G and resulted in a decreased export of doxorubicin from the cells. The mutation of cylK, a gene of unknown function located downstream from cylA, caused a loss of hemolysis but had no effect on the transport of MDR substrates. Furthermore, the hemolytic activity of the wild-type strain was inhibited by reserpine in a dose-dependent manner. We conclude that CylAB closely resembles an ABC-type MDR transporter and propose that the GBS hemolysin molecule represents a natural substrate of the transporter.

  14. Acute septicemia caused by Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus in turkey poults.

    PubMed

    Saumya, Dona; Wijetunge, S; Dunn, Patricia; Wallner-Pendleton, Eva; Lintner, Valerie; Matthews, Tammy; Pierre, Traci; Kariyawasam, Subhashinie

    2014-06-01

    Streptococcus gallolyticus, previously known as Streptococcus bovis biotypes I and II/2, is a well-known cause of sepsis and meningitis in humans and birds. The present case report describes an outbreak of fatal septicemia associated with S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus (S. bovis biotype II/2) in 11 turkey flocks in Pennsylvania between 2010 and 2013. Affected poults were 2-3 wk of age. Major clinical observation was sudden increase in mortality among turkey poults without any premonitory clinical signs. Postmortem examination findings revealed acute septicemia with lesions such as fibrinous pericarditis, meningitis, splenic multifocal fibrinoid necrosis, hepatitis, osteochondritis, myositis, and airsacculitis. Gram-positive cocci were isolated from several organs by routine bacterial culture. Biotyping identified bacteria as streptococci, whereas 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing identified them as S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus. Antibiotic susceptibility profiles revealed that all the strains isolated were sensitive to penicillin and erythromycin with different sensitivity profiles for other antibacterial agents tested. The present study reports the first confirmed case of acute septicemia in turkey poults caused by S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus.

  15. Vitamin D Deficiency in Human and Murine Sepsis*

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Dhruv; Patel, Jaimin M.; Scott, Aaron; Lax, Sian; Dancer, Rachel C. A.; D’Souza, Vijay; Greenwood, Hannah; Fraser, William D.; Gao, Fang; Sapey, Elizabeth; Perkins, Gavin D.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Vitamin D deficiency has been implicated as a pathogenic factor in sepsis and ICU mortality but causality of these associations has not been demonstrated. To determine whether sepsis and severe sepsis are associated with vitamin D deficiency and to determine whether vitamin D deficiency influences the severity of sepsis. Design, Setting, and Patients: Sixty-one patients with sepsis and severe sepsis from two large U.K. hospitals and 20 healthy controls were recruited. Murine models of cecal ligation and puncture and intratracheal lipopolysaccharide were undertaken in normal and vitamin D deficient mice to address the issue of causality. Measurements and Main Results: Patients with severe sepsis had significantly lower concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 than patients with either mild sepsis or age-matched healthy controls (15.7 vs 49.5 vs 66.5 nmol/L; p = 0.0001). 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 concentrations were significantly lower in patients who had positive microbiologic culture than those who were culture negative (p = 0.0023) as well as those who died within 30 days of hospital admission (p = 0.025). Vitamin D deficiency in murine sepsis was associated with increased peritoneal (p = 0.037), systemic (p = 0.019), and bronchoalveolar lavage (p = 0.011) quantitative bacterial culture. This was associated with reduced local expression of the cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide as well as evidence of defective macrophage phagocytosis (p = 0.029). In the intratracheal lipopolysaccharide model, 1,500 IU of intraperitoneal cholecalciferol treatment 6 hours postinjury reduced alveolar inflammation, cellular damage, and hypoxia. Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency is common in severe sepsis. This appears to contribute to the development of the condition in clinically relevant murine models and approaches to correct vitamin D deficiency in patients with sepsis should be developed. PMID:27632669

  16. Using the integrated nurse leadership program to reduce sepsis mortality.

    PubMed

    Kliger, Julie; Singer, Sara J; Hoffman, Frank H

    2015-06-01

    The Integrated Nurse Leadership Program (INLP) is a collaborative improvement model focused on developing practical leadership skills of nurses and other frontline clinicians to lead quality improvement efforts. Sepsis is a major challenge to treat because it arises unpredictably and can progress rapidly. Nine San Francisco Bay Area hospitals participated in a 22-month INLP Sepsis Mortality Reduction Project to improve sepsis detection and management. The INLP focused on developing leadership and process improvement skills of nurses and other frontline clinicians. Teams of trained clinicians then implemented three strategies to improve early identification and timely treatment of sepsis: (1) sepsis screening of all patients, with diagnostic testing according to protocol; (2) timely treatment on the basis of key elements of Early Goal-Directed Therapy (EGDT); and (3) ongoing data review. Each hospital agreed to pursue the goal of reducing sepsis mortality by 15% by the end of the project. In the data collection period (baseline, July-December 2008 and project completion, January-June 2011), team members showed strong improvement in perceived leadership skills, team effectiveness, and ability to improve care quality. During this period, sepsis mortality for eight of the participating hospitals (Hospital 9 joined the project six months after it began) decreased by 43.7%-from 28% in the baseline period to 16% at project completion. Sepsis mortality rates trended downward for all hospitals, significantly decreasing (p<.05 at one hospital, p<.01 for four hospitals). In addition to improvement in safety culture and management of septic patients, hospitals participating in the INLP Sepsis Mortality Reduction Project achieved reductions in sepsis mortality during the study period and sustained reductions for more than one year later. The INLP model can be readily applied beyond sepsis management and mortality to other quality problems.

  17. Understanding of sepsis among emergency medical services: a survey study.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Christopher W; Carlbom, David; Engelberg, Ruth A; Larsen, Jonathan; Bulger, Eileen M; Copass, Michael K; Rea, Thomas D

    2012-06-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) personnel commonly encounter sepsis, yet little is known about their understanding of sepsis. To determine the awareness, knowledge, current practice, and attitudes about sepsis among EMS personnel. We performed an anonymous, multi-agency, online survey of emergency medical technicians (EMTs), firefighter-emergency medical technicians (FF-EMTs), and paramedics in a metropolitan, 2-tier EMS system. We compared responses according to the level of EMS training and used multivariable logistic regression to determine the odds of correctly identifying the definition of sepsis, independent of demographic and professional factors. Overall response rate of study participants was 57% (786/1390), and was greatest among EMTs (79%; 276/350). A total of 761 respondents (97%) had heard of the term "sepsis." EMTs and FF-EMTs were at significantly reduced odds of correctly defining sepsis compared to paramedics, independent of age, sex, and years of experience (EMTs: odds ratio 0.44, 95% confidence interval 0.3-0.8; FF-EMTs: odds ratio 0.32, 95% confidence interval 0.2-0.6. Overall, knowledge of the clinical signs and symptoms and recommended treatments for sepsis was typically>75%, though better among paramedics than EMTs or FF-EMTs (p<0.01). The majority of respondents believed sepsis is not recognized by EMS "some" or "a lot" of the time (76%, 596/786). EMS personnel demonstrated an overall sound awareness of sepsis. Knowledge of sepsis was less among FF-EMTs and EMTs compared to paramedics. These results suggest that paramedics could be integrated into strategies of early identification and treatment of sepsis, and EMTs may benefit from focused education and training. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Isolation of Streptococcus tigurinus - a novel member of Streptococcus mitis group from a case of periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Dhotre, Shree V; Mehetre, Gajanan T; Dharne, Mahesh S; Suryawanshi, Namdev M; Nagoba, Basavraj S

    2014-08-01

    Streptococcus tigurinus is a new member of the Streptococcus viridians group and is closely related to Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus infantis. The type strain AZ_3a(T) of S. tigurinus was originally isolated from a patient with infective endocarditis. Accurate identification of S. tigurinus is facilitated only by newer molecular methods like 16S rRNA gene analysis. During the course of study on bacteraemia and infective endocarditis with reference to periodontitis and viridians group of streptococci, a strain of S. tigurinus isolated from subgingival plaque of a patient with periodontitis identified by 16S rRNA gene analysis, which was originally identified as Streptococcus pluranimalium by Vitek 2. Confirmation by 16S rRNA gene analysis showed 99.39% similarity (1476/1485 bp) with S. tigurinus AZ_3a(T) (AORU01000002). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of isolation of S. tigurinus from the oral cavity of a periodontitis patient.

  19. Penetration of Streptococcus sobrinus and Streptococcus sanguinis into dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Kneist, Susanne; Nietzsche, Sandor; Küpper, Harald; Raser, Gerhard; Willershausen, Brita; Callaway, Angelika

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess the difference in virulence of acidogenic and aciduric oral streptococci in an in vitro caries model using their penetration depths into dental enamel. 30 caries-free extracted molars from 11- to 16-year-olds were cleaned ultrasonically for 1 min with de-ionized water and, after air-drying, embedded in epoxy resin. After 8-h of setting at room temperature, the specimens were ground on the buccal side with SiC-paper 1200 (particle size 13-16 μm). Enamel was removed in circular areas sized 3 mm in diameter; the mean depth of removed enamel was 230 ± 60 μm. 15 specimens each were incubated anaerobically under standardized conditions with 24 h-cultures of Streptococcus sanguinis 9S or Streptococcus sobrinus OMZ 176 in Balmelli broth at 37 ± 2 °C; the pH-values of the broths were measured at the beginning and end of each incubation cycle. After 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks 3 teeth each were fixed in 2.5% glutaraldehyde in cacodylate buffer for 24 h, washed 3× and dehydrated 30-60min by sequential washes through a series of 30-100% graded ethanol. The teeth were cut in half longitudinally; afterward, two slits were made to obtain fracture surfaces in the infected area. After critical-point-drying the fragments were gold-sputtered and viewed in a scanning electron microscope at magnifications of ×20-20,000. After 10 weeks of incubation, penetration of S. sanguinis of 11.13 ± 24.04 μm below the break edges into the enamel was observed. The invasion of S. sobrinus reached depths of 87.53 ± 76.34 μm. The difference was statistically significant (paired t test: p = 0.033). The experimental penetration depths emphasize the importance of S. sanguinis versus S. sobrinus in the context of the extended ecological plaque hypothesis.

  20. Management of sepsis: a 47-year-old woman with an indwelling intravenous catheter and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Angus, Derek C

    2011-04-13

    Severe sepsis is the term used to describe the host response to infection when complicated by acute organ dysfunction. Severe sepsis occurs in more than 750,000 individuals in the United States each year, with a hospital mortality of about 30%. Although the classic presentation is of florid shock with frank hypotension, fever, and elevated white blood cell count, many patients can present with cryptogenic shock (shock without hypotension) with more subtle signs of vital organ compromise. Using the case of Ms C, a 47-year-old woman with short gut syndrome and an indwelling intravenous catheter who developed an episode of severe sepsis secondary to a central line infection, treatment of sepsis is discussed. Management consists of prompt intervention with broad-spectrum antibiotics and fluid resuscitation, even in the absence of hypotension, and institution of a variety of strategies in the emergency setting to prevent development or worsening of vital organ dysfunction. Although advances in understanding the host immune response have fueled considerable interest in immunomodulatory therapy, the role of such agents in clinical practice remains limited and controversial.

  1. [Clinical criteria for pathogen bacteria in term newborn suspected of neonatal sepsis].

    PubMed

    Glusko-Charlet, A; Fontaine, C; Raucy, M; Barcat, L; Lahana, A; Erbani, R; Poirie, G; Kongolo, G; Diouf, M; Leke, A; Gondry, J; Tourneux, P

    2017-09-08

    Neonatal early onset sepsis (EOS) remains an important etiology of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis is difficult due to a lack of sensitivity and specificity markers. In France, the management of newborn infants suspected of infection includes the analysis of gastric suction. The objective of the study was to identify early clinical signs in newborn infants with suspected neonatal sepsis to differentiate a likely infection with pathogen bacteria in the gastric suction culture (Streptococcus agalactiae or Escherichia coli) from a possible infection without such pathogen bacteria. We conducted a retrospective study in the Amiens University Hospital. All term newborn infants born between 1 January and 31 December 2013 and hospitalized for suspected EOS were included. Suspicion of EOS was considered when there were arguments to treat by antibiotics for a period of at least 5 days. Fifty-eight newborn infants were included, 25 had a likely EOS and 33 a possible EOS. Newborn infants with a likely EOS were less mature (P<0.01) with more clinical signs at birth (P<0.01). The most common clinical signs were: hyperthermia (P=0.01), somnolence (P<0.01), and hypotonia (P=0.01). After adjusting for the term, the presence of hyperthermia was no longer significantly different between the two groups (P=0.059), the other clinical signs remained significantly different. The presence of neonatal symptoms at birth appears to be a useful clinical marker of probable neonatal EOS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Neutrophil apoptosis: a marker of disease severity in sepsis and sepsis-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fialkow, Léa; Fochesatto Filho, Luciano; Bozzetti, Mary C; Milani, Adriana R; Rodrigues Filho, Edison M; Ladniuk, Roberta M; Pierozan, Paula; de Moura, Rafaela M; Prolla, João C; Vachon, Eric; Downey, Gregory P

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Apoptosis of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear neutrophils [PMNs]) may limit inflammatory injury in sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the relationship between the severity of sepsis and extent of PMN apoptosis and the effect of superimposed ARDS is unknown. The objective of this study was to correlate neutrophil apoptosis with the severity of sepsis and sepsis-induced ARDS. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted in intensive care units of three tertiary hospitals in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil. Fifty-seven patients with sepsis (uncomplicated sepsis, septic shock, and sepsis-induced ARDS) and 64 controls were enrolled. Venous peripheral blood was collected from patients with sepsis within 24 hours of diagnosis. All surgical groups, including controls, had their blood drawn 24 hours after surgery. Control patients on mechanical ventilation had blood collected within 24 hours of initiation of mechanical ventilation. Healthy controls were blood donors. Neutrophils were isolated, and incubated ex vivo, and apoptosis was determined by light microscopy on cytospun preparations. The differences among groups were assessed by analysis of variance with Tukeys. Results In medical patients, the mean percentage of neutrophil apoptosis (± standard error of the mean [SEM]) was lower in sepsis-induced ARDS (28% ± 3.3%; n = 9) when compared with uncomplicated sepsis (57% ± 3.2%; n = 8; p < 0.001), mechanical ventilation without infection, sepsis, or ARDS (53% ± 3.0%; n = 11; p < 0.001) and healthy controls (69% ± 1.1%; n = 33; p < 0.001) but did not differ from septic shock (38% ± 3.7%; n = 12; p = 0.13). In surgical patients with sepsis, the percentage of neutrophil apoptosis was lower for all groups when compared with surgical controls (52% ± 3.6%; n = 11; p < 0.001). Conclusion In medical patients with sepsis, neutrophil apoptosis is inversely proportional to the severity of sepsis and thus may be a marker of the severity of

  3. B cells enhance early innate immune responses during bacterial sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra M.; Scumpia, Philip O.; Weinstein, Jason S.; Delano, Matthew J.; Cuenca, Alex G.; Nacionales, Dina C.; Wynn, James L.; Lee, Pui Y.; Kumagai, Yutaro; Efron, Philip A.; Akira, Shizuo; Wasserfall, Clive; Atkinson, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Microbes activate pattern recognition receptors to initiate adaptive immunity. T cells affect early innate inflammatory responses to viral infection, but both activation and suppression have been demonstrated. We identify a novel role for B cells in the early innate immune response during bacterial sepsis. We demonstrate that Rag1−/− mice display deficient early inflammatory responses and reduced survival during sepsis. Interestingly, B cell–deficient or anti-CD20 B cell–depleted mice, but not α/β T cell–deficient mice, display decreased inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production and reduced survival after sepsis. Both treatment of B cell–deficient mice with serum from wild-type (WT) mice and repletion of Rag1−/− mice with B cells improves sepsis survival, suggesting antibody-independent and antibody-dependent roles for B cells in the outcome to sepsis. During sepsis, marginal zone and follicular B cells are activated through type I interferon (IFN-I) receptor (IFN-α/β receptor [IFNAR]), and repleting Rag1−/− mice with WT, but not IFNAR−/−, B cells improves IFN-I–dependent and –independent early cytokine responses. Repleting B cell–deficient mice with the IFN-I–dependent chemokine, CXCL10 was also sufficient to improve sepsis survival. This study identifies a novel role for IFN-I–activated B cells in protective early innate immune responses during bacterial sepsis. PMID:21746813

  4. Coagulopathy in sepsis - a new look at an old problem.

    PubMed

    Lipinska-Gediga, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening condition characterized by a systemic response to microbial infection. Despite considerable progress in intensive care medicine, the incidence of sepsis and the number of sepsis-related deaths are increasing world-wide. There is a complex relationship between the coagulation, immune and inflammatory systems in sepsis. Activation of the coagulation cascade in sepsis is a result of a pathogen invasion and is a part of a immuno-inflammatory host response. In sepsis, the close cooperation of the immune and coagulation systems through cross signalling results in immunothrombosis. According to a recently described new theory, immunothrombosis is a immune response in which the local activation of coagulation facilitates the recognition and destruction of pathogens. Small amounts of clot formation are beneficial for the host because of bacteria trapping and prevention of the systemic spread of infection. Sepsis is a dynamic syndrome and in all patients with sepsis coagulation changes may progress from a normal profile to hypercoagulability and hypofibrinolysis, hyperfibrinolysis, and ultimately hypocoagulability.

  5. Clinical factors influencing mortality risk in hospital acquired sepsis.

    PubMed

    López-Mestanza, Cristina; Andaluz-Ojeda, David; Gómez-López, Juan Ramón; Bermejo Martín, Jesús F

    2017-09-04

    Identification of factors that confer an increased risk of mortality in hospital acquired sepsis (HAS) is necessary to help prevent, and improve the outcome of, this condition. To evaluate the clinical characteristics and factors associated with mortality in patients with HAS. Retrospective study of patients with HAS in a major Spanish Hospital from 2011 to 2015. Data from adults receiving any of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes associated with sepsis were collected. Those fulfilling the SEPSIS-2 definition with no evidence of infection during the first 48 hours following hospitalization were included (n=196). A multivariate analysis was employed to identify the risk factors of mortality. HAS patients were found to have many of the risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease (male sex, ageing, antecedent of cardiac disease, arterial hypertension, dyslipemia, smoking habit) and cancer. Vascular disease or chronic kidney disease were associated with 28 day mortality. Time from hospital admission to sepsis diagnosis, and the presence of organ failure were risk factors for 28-day and hospital mortality. Experiencing more than one episode of sepsis increased the risk of hospital mortality. "Sepsis Code" for the early identification of sepsis was protective against hospital mortality. We have identified a number of major factors associated to mortality in patients suffering from HAS. Implementation of surveillance programmes for the early identification and treatment of sepsis translate into a clear benefit. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [The latest research advance in media involved in sepsis].

    PubMed

    Hao, Yufang; Geng, Lixia

    2016-02-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are the major causes of death in intensive care units (ICUs) worldwide. A large amount of studies on their pathophysiology have revealed an imbalance in the inflammatory network leading to tissue damage, organ failure, and ultimately, death. Cytokines, proteases, lipid mediators, vasoactive peptides, and cell stress markers play key roles in pathophysiology of sepsis. Although anti-inflammatory mediators can neutralize the promoting role of pro-inflammatory mediators, but persistent immune regulation may cause host susceptibility to concurrent infections. Therefore, it is a great challenge to seek effective clinical therapy against sepsis. To understand the complicated interplay between pro- and anti-inflammatory agents in sepsis, and their interaction in signal transduction and immune regulation in sepsis constitute vital significance to the prevention and control of sepsis. Summarize the latest findings about mediators associated with sepsis and innate and adaptive immune system at home and abroad in recent years, and illustrate the impact of its effects on sepsis, which may lead to resolution of many unexplored queries in the future.

  7. An unusual case of sepsis and petechial rash.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Christina

    2017-05-01

    This article describes a man who presented to the ED in acute distress with signs and symptoms of sepsis, pneumonia, and a new petechial rash on his chest. He was eventually diagnosed with Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Aggressive treatment of sepsis and timely administration of empiric antibiotics were lifesaving in this situation.

  8. The Endothelial Glycocalyx: New Diagnostic and Therapeutic Approaches in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Koczera, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is defined as a life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. The endothelial glycocalyx is one of the earliest sites involved during sepsis. This fragile layer is a complex network of cell-bound proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycan side chains, and sialoproteins lining the luminal side of endothelial cells with a thickness of about 1 to 3 μm. Sepsis-associated alterations of its structure affect endothelial permeability and result in the liberation of endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Once liberated in the circulatory system, DAMPs trigger the devastating consequences of the proinflammatory cascades in sepsis and septic shock. In this way, the injury to the glycocalyx with the consecutive release of DAMPs contributes to a number of specific clinical effects of sepsis, including acute kidney injury, respiratory failure, and septic cardiomyopathy. Moreover, the extent of glycocalyx degradation serves as a marker of endothelial dysfunction and sepsis severity. In this review, we highlight the crucial role of the glycocalyx in sepsis as a diagnostic tool and discuss the potential of members of the endothelial glycocalyx serving as hopeful therapeutic targets in sepsis-associated multiple organ failures. PMID:27699168

  9. Scoring systems for the characterization of sepsis and associated outcomes

    PubMed Central

    McLymont, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is responsible for the utilisation of a significant proportion of healthcare resources and has high mortality rates. Early diagnosis and prompt interventions are associated with better outcomes but is impeded by a lack of diagnostic tools and the heterogeneous and enigmatic nature of sepsis. The recently updated definitions of sepsis have moved away from the centrality of inflammation and the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria which have been shown to be non-specific. Sepsis is now defined as a “life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection”. The Quick (q) Sequential (Sepsis-related) Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score is proposed as a surrogate for organ dysfunction and may act as a risk predictor for patients with known or suspected infection, as well as being a prompt for clinicians to consider the diagnosis of sepsis. Early warning scores (EWS) are track and trigger physiological monitoring systems that have become integrated within many healthcare systems for the detection of acutely deteriorating patients. The recent study by Churpek and colleagues sought to compare qSOFA to more established alerting criteria in a population of patients with presumed infection, and compared the ability to predict death or unplanned intensive care unit (ICU) admission. This perspective paper discusses recent advances in the diagnostic criteria for sepsis and how qSOFA may fit into the pre-existing models of acute care and sepsis quality improvement. PMID:28149888

  10. Use of melatonin as an adjuvant therapy in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    El Frargy, M; El-Sharkawy, H M; Attia, G F

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of melatonin as an adjuvant therapy in treating neonatal sepsis. A prospective clinical trial study was conducted on 50 infants with neonatal sepsis diagnosed on the basis of both clinical and laboratory criteria. Enrolled infants were divided into two groups. Intervention group (n = 25) received melatonin and antibiotics, while the control group (n = 25) was treated with antibiotics only. Melatonin was administered as a single oral dose of 20 mg and antibiotics were administered according to a standard protocol. Both groups were compared using a predefined sepsis score utilizing both clinical and laboratory parameters. There was no significant difference in sepsis score between both groups before starting melatonin (p-value = 0.99), while there was significant difference in sepsis score between groups after 24 hours, 48 hours and 72 hours of starting melatonin with (p-value = 0.008, 0.006 and 0.002, respectively). There was significant improvement sepsis score in both groups with more improvement of sepsis score in the intervention group. Administration of melatonin as an adjuvant therapy in the treatment of neonatal sepsis is associated with improvement of clinical and laboratory outcomes.

  11. Quality in practice: preventing and managing neonatal sepsis in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    López, Sergio; Wong, Yudy; Urbina, Luis; Gómez, Ivonne; Escobar, Flavia; Tinoco, Bernarda; Parrales, Alba

    2013-10-01

    Incorrect and excessive diagnosis of newborn infections in Nicaragua caused overcrowding in the neonatal intensive care units and unnecessary hospitalization. A baseline study in nine hospitals found that none correctly utilized disinfectants, sterilization or hand hygiene and that diagnosis of neonatal sepsis was based primarily on clinical manifestations. In 2007, the Ministry of Health (MINSA), with Unites States Agency for the International Development technical assistance, began developing guidelines and implementing quality improvement in infection prevention and control to reduce neonatal infections. In a second intervention phase, the MINSA introduced an algorithm for correct identification of maternal risk factors and standardized laboratory tests for neonatal sepsis. Interventions included developing national guidelines on correct use of disinfectants and hand hygiene; training medical staff on the guidelines; revising the basic medical supply list to support appropriate antisepsis; defining a package of diagnostic tests for neonatal sepsis and systematically measuring compliance with the new procedures. The 18 hospitals achieved appropriate use of disinfectants in a 12-month period. In seven hospitals that introduced improvements in diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis, application of the standardized laboratory package in suspected sepsis cases increased from 0% in April 2009 to 93% in July 2011, and the median incidence of neonatal sepsis was reduced by 67%. The organizational changes implemented for the diagnosis and verification of neonatal sepsis led to a reduction in the newborn sepsis admissions and expenditures for antibiotics, allowing resources to be redirected to treating other critically ill newborns.

  12. New perspectives on immunomodulatory therapy for bacteraemia and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Opal, Steven M

    2010-12-01

    Systemic immune dysregulation is generally acknowledged to be the fundamental molecular mechanism that underlies the pathophysiology of severe sepsis and septic shock. In the presence of a systemic infection, microbial pathogens and their soluble mediators induce generalised immune activation and coagulation activation, leading to severe sepsis and septic shock. For decades, immune-based therapies have been devised with the specific intent of inhibiting the pro-inflammatory events that are thought to precipitate the septic process. Despite a clear therapeutic rationale based upon the available experimental evidence, anti-inflammatory therapies targeting the innate or acquired immune response have largely been unsuccessful in clinical trials of sepsis. Compelling evidence now exists that a prolonged state of sepsis-induced immune suppression follows the initial period of stabilisation and resuscitation in many critically ill patients. Sepsis-related immune suppression is evidenced by histological findings of markedly enhanced lymphocytic and monocytic apoptosis, poor response to neoantigens and recall antigens, and increased incidence of infections by opportunistic pathogens. Candidiasis, cytomegalovirus activation and secondary infections by relatively avirulent bacterial pathogens such as Stenotrophomonas and Acinetobacter spp. are commonplace in septic patients during prolonged Intensive Care Unit stays. Immunological tools to detect sepsis-induced immunosuppression are now available, and novel immunoadjuvants are in development to re-establish immune competence in sepsis patients. The intelligent use of immunomodulatory agents in sepsis will necessitate a personalised medicine approach to treat each patient at the appropriate time and with the optimal therapy.

  13. Fluid resuscitation in human sepsis: Time to rewrite history?

    PubMed

    Byrne, Liam; Van Haren, Frank

    2017-12-01

    Fluid resuscitation continues to be recommended as the first-line resuscitative therapy for all patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. The current acceptance of the therapy is based in part on long history and familiarity with its use in the resuscitation of other forms of shock, as well as on an incomplete and incorrect understanding of the pathophysiology of sepsis. Recently, the safety of intravenous fluids in patients with sepsis has been called into question with both prospective and observational data suggesting improved outcomes with less fluid or no fluid. The current evidence for the continued use of fluid resuscitation for sepsis remains contentious with no prospective evidence demonstrating benefit to fluid resuscitation as a therapy in isolation. This article reviews the historical and physiological rationale for the introduction of fluid resuscitation as treatment for sepsis and highlights a number of significant concerns based on current experimental and clinical evidence. The research agenda should focus on the development of hyperdynamic animal sepsis models which more closely mimic human sepsis and on experimental and clinical studies designed to evaluate minimal or no fluid strategies in the resuscitation phase of sepsis.

  14. Scoring systems for the characterization of sepsis and associated outcomes.

    PubMed

    McLymont, Natalie; Glover, Guy W

    2016-12-01

    Sepsis is responsible for the utilisation of a significant proportion of healthcare resources and has high mortality rates. Early diagnosis and prompt interventions are associated with better outcomes but is impeded by a lack of diagnostic tools and the heterogeneous and enigmatic nature of sepsis. The recently updated definitions of sepsis have moved away from the centrality of inflammation and the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria which have been shown to be non-specific. Sepsis is now defined as a "life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection". The Quick (q) Sequential (Sepsis-related) Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score is proposed as a surrogate for organ dysfunction and may act as a risk predictor for patients with known or suspected infection, as well as being a prompt for clinicians to consider the diagnosis of sepsis. Early warning scores (EWS) are track and trigger physiological monitoring systems that have become integrated within many healthcare systems for the detection of acutely deteriorating patients. The recent study by Churpek and colleagues sought to compare qSOFA to more established alerting criteria in a population of patients with presumed infection, and compared the ability to predict death or unplanned intensive care unit (ICU) admission. This perspective paper discusses recent advances in the diagnostic criteria for sepsis and how qSOFA may fit into the pre-existing models of acute care and sepsis quality improvement.

  15. Administration of bone marrow stromal cells in sepsis attenuates sepsis-related coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lifei; Huang, Yueyue; Pan, Xiaojun; Quan, Shichao; Xu, Shunyao; Li, Dequan; Song, Lijun; Zhang, Xiaomin; Chen, Wanzhou; Pan, Jingye

    2016-01-01

    Coagulopathy plays an important role in sepsis. The aim of this study was to determine whether bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) administration could attenuate coagulopathy in sepsis. In vitro: endothelial cells were cultured with/without BMSCs for 6 h following LPS stimulation and were collected for thrombomodulin (TM) and endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) measurements. In vivo: Thirty-six mice were randomized into sham, sepsis, and sepsis + BMSC groups (n = 12 each group). Sepsis was induced through cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). BMSC infusion was started at 6 h after CLP. Lung tissues and plasma samples were collected at 24 h after CLP for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), quantitative real-time RT-PCR, western blot, and immunohistochemistry analysis. In vitro: BMSCs attenuated the decrease in TM and EPCR mRNA and protein expression levels in LPS-stimulated endothelial cells. In vivo: BMSC treatment decreased lung injury and mesenteric perfusion impairment, and ameliorated coagulopathy, as suggested by the reduction in elevated TF, vWF, and TAT circulation levels. BMSC infusion decreased TF mRNA transcription and protein expression levels in lung tissues, and increased TM and EPCR mRNA transcription and expression levels. BMSC administration attenuated coagulopathy, and decreased lung injury and mesenteric perfusion impairment in sepsis. Key messages BMSCs increased the expression of TM and EPCR from endothelium cells exposed to LPS in vitro. BMSC treatment attenuated lung injury and coagulopathy in the mice cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model. BMSC administration-attenuated coagulopathy is related to the reduced expression of TF and increased expression of TM and EPCR.

  16. Serial physical examinations, a simple and reliable tool for managing neonates at risk for early-onset sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Berardi, Alberto; Buffagni, Anna Maria; Rossi, Cecilia; Vaccina, Eleonora; Cattelani, Chiara; Gambini, Lucia; Baccilieri, Federica; Varioli, Francesca; Ferrari, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate whether serial physical examinations (SPEs) are a safe tool for managing neonates at risk for early-onset sepsis (EOS). METHODS This is a retrospective cohort study of neonates (≥ 34 wks’ gestation) delivered in three high-volume level IIIbirthing centres in Emilia-Romagna (Italy) during a 4-mo period (from September 1 to December 31, 2015). Neonates at risk for EOS were managed according to the SPEs strategy, these were carried out in turn by bedside nursing staff and physicians. A standardized form detailing general wellbeing, skin colour and vital signs was filled in and signed at standard intervals (at age 3, 6, 12, 18, 36 and 48 h) in neonates at risk for EOS. Three independent reviewers reviewed all charts of neonates and abstracted data (gestational age, mode of delivery, group B streptococcus status, risk factors for EOS, duration of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis, postpartum evaluations, therapies and outcome). Rates of sepsis workups, empirical antibiotics and outcome of neonates at-risk (or not) for EOS were evaluated. RESULTS There were 2092 live births and 1 culture-proven EOS (Haemophilus i) (incidence rates of 0.48/1000 live births). Most newborns with signs of illness (51 out of 101, that is 50.5%), and most of those who received postpartum antibiotics (17 out of 29, that is 58.6%) were not at risk for EOS. Compared to neonates at risk, neonates not at risk for EOS were less likely to have signs of illness (51 out of 1442 vs 40 out of 650, P = 0.009) or have a sepsis workup (25 out of 1442 vs 28 out of 650, P < 0.001). However, they were not less likely to receive empirical antibiotics (17 out of 1442 vs 12 out of 650, P = 0.3). Thirty-two neonates were exposed to intrapartum fever or chorioamnionitis: 62.5% (n = 20) had a sepsis workup and 21.9% (n = 7) were given empirical antibiotics. Among 216 neonates managed through the SPEs strategy, only 5.6% (n = 12) had subsequently a sepsis workup and only 1.9% (n = 4) were

  17. Inadequate exercise as a risk factor for sepsis mortality.

    PubMed

    Williams, Paul T

    2013-01-01

    Test whether inadequate exercise is related to sepsis mortality. Mortality surveillance of an epidemiological cohort of 155,484 National Walkers' and Runners' Health Study participants residing in the United States. Deaths were monitored for an average of 11.6-years using the National Death index through December 31, 2008. Cox proportional hazard analyses were used to compare sepsis mortality (ICD-10 A40-41) to inadequate exercise (<1.07 METh/d run or walked) as measured on their baseline questionnaires. Deaths occurring within one year of the baseline survey were excluded. Sepsis was the underlying cause in 54 deaths (sepsis(underlying)) and a contributing cause in 184 deaths (sepsis(contributing)), or 238 total sepsis-related deaths (sepsis(total)). Inadequate exercise was associated with 2.24-fold increased risk for sepsis(underlying) (95%CI: 1.21 to 4.07-fold, P = 0.01), 2.11-fold increased risk for sepsis(contributing) (95%CI: 1.51- to 2.92-fold, P<10(-4)), and 2.13-fold increased risk for sepsis(total) (95%CI: 1.59- to 2.84-fold, P<10(-6)) when adjusted for age, sex, race, and cohort. The risk increase did not differ significantly between runners and walkers, by sex, or by age. Sepsis(total) risk was greater in diabetics (P = 10(-5)), cancer survivors (P = 0.0001), and heart attack survivors (P = 0.003) and increased with waist circumference (P = 0.0004). The sepsis(total) risk associated with inadequate exercise persisted when further adjusted for diabetes, prior cancer, prior heart attack and waist circumference, and when excluding deaths with cancer, or cardiovascular, respiratory, or genitourinary disease as the underlying cause. Inadequate exercise also increased sepsis(total) risk in 2163 baseline diabetics (4.78-fold, 95%CI: 2.1- to 13.8-fold, P = 0.0001) when adjusted, which was significantly greater (P = 0.03) than the adjusted risk increase in non-diabetics (1.80-fold, 95%CI: 1.30- to 2.46-fold, P = 0

  18. Therapeutic potential of HMGB1-targeting agents in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haichao; Zhu, Shu; Zhou, Rongrong; Li, Wei; Sama, Andrew E.

    2008-01-01

    Sepsis refers to a systemic inflammatory response syndrome resulting from a microbial infection. The inflammatory response is partly mediated by innate immune cells (such as macrophages, monocytes and neutrophils), which not only ingest and eliminate invading pathogens but also initiate an inflammatory response upon recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). The prevailing theories of sepsis as a dysregulated inflammatory response, as manifested by excessive release of inflammatory mediators such as tumour necrosis factor and high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), are supported by extensive studies employing animal models of sepsis. Here we review emerging evidence that support extracellular HMGB1 as a late mediator of experimental sepsis, and discuss the therapeutic potential of several HMGB1-targeting agents (including neutralising antibodies and steroid-like tanshinones) in experimental sepsis. PMID:18980707

  19. Oxidative Stress in Critically Ill Children with Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Derek S

    2011-10-07

    Sepsis is one of the leading causes of death in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit. Sepsis accounts for significant morbidity and mortality in critically ill children as well. The pathophysiology of sepsis is characterized by a complex systemic inflammatory response, endothelial dysfunction, and alterations in the coagulation system, which lead to perturbations in the delivery of oxygen and metabolic substrates to the tissues, end-organ dysfunction, and ultimately death. Oxidative stress plays a crucial role as both a promoter and mediator of the systemic inflammatory response, suggesting potential targets for the treatment of critically ill children with the sepsis syndrome. Herein, we will provide a brief review of the role of oxidative and nitrosative stress in the pathophysiology of sepsis.

  20. Elucidating the role of genomics in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Lakshmi; Kirpalani, Haresh; Cotten, Charles Michael

    2015-12-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality, especially in vulnerable preterm populations. Immature immune defenses, and environmental and maternal factors contribute to this risk, with as many as a third of very preterm infants experiencing sepsis during their stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Epidemiologic and twin studies have suggested that there is a genetic contribution to sepsis predilection. Several investigators have conducted candidate gene association studies on variants of specific interest and potential functional significance in neonatal sepsis. In this review, we describe details of studies that have evaluated genetic susceptibility in neonatal sepsis, and summarize findings from a review of candidate gene association studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Reduced Expression of SARM in Mouse Spleen during Polymicrobial Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; Zou, Lin; Cen, Dongzhi; Chao, Wei; Chen, Dunjin

    2016-12-01

    Objective Immune dysfunction, including prominent apoptosis of immune cells and decreased functioning of the remaining immune cells, plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sepsis. Sterile α and HEAT/armadillo motif-containing protein (SARM) is implicated in the regulation of immune cell apoptosis. This study aimed to elucidate SARM contributes to sepsis-induced immune cell death and immunosuppression. Methods A mouse model of polymicrobial sepsis was generated by cecum ligation and puncture (CLP). SARM gene and protein expression, caspase 3 cleavage and intracellular ATP production were measured in the mouse spleens. Results CLP-induced polymicrobial sepsis specifically attenuated both the gene and protein expression of SARM in the spleens. Moreover, the attenuation of SARM expression synchronized with splenocyte apoptosis, as evidenced by increased caspase 3 cleavage and ATP depletion. Conclusions These findings suggest that SARM is a potential regulator of sepsis-induced splenocyte apoptosis.

  2. Science review: The brain in sepsis – culprit and victim

    PubMed Central

    Sharshar, Tarek; Hopkinson, Nicholas S; Orlikowski, David; Annane, Djillali

    2005-01-01

    On one side, brain dysfunction is a poorly explored complication of sepsis. On the other side, brain dysfunction may actively contribute to the pathogenesis of sepsis. The current review aimed at summarizing the current knowledge about the reciprocal interaction between the immune and central nervous systems during sepsis. The immune-brain cross talk takes part in circumventricular organs that, being free from blood-brain-barrier, interface between brain and bloodstream, in autonomic nuclei including the vagus nerve, and finally through the damaged endothelium. Recent observations have confirmed that sepsis is associated with excessive brain inflammation and neuronal apoptosis which clinical relevance remains to be explored. In parallel, damage within autonomic nervous and neuroendocrine systems may contribute to sepsis induced organ dysfunction. PMID:15693982

  3. How Can the Microbiologist Help in Diagnosing Neonatal Sepsis?

    PubMed Central

    Paolucci, Michela; Landini, Maria Paola; Sambri, Vittorio

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis can be classified into two subtypes depending upon whether the onset of symptoms is before 72 hours of life (early-onset neonatal sepsis—EONS) or later (late-onset neonatal sepsis—LONS). These definitions have contributed greatly to diagnosis and treatment by identifying which microorganisms are likely to be responsible for sepsis during these periods and the expected outcomes of infection. This paper focuses on the tools that microbiologist can offer to diagnose and eventually prevent neonatal sepsis. Here, we discuss the advantages and limitation of the blood culture, the actual gold standard for sepsis diagnosis. In addition, we examine the utility of molecular techniques in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis. PMID:22319539

  4. Role of pore-forming toxins in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Sonnen, Andreas F-P; Henneke, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Protein toxins are important virulence factors contributing to neonatal sepsis. The major pathogens of neonatal sepsis, group B Streptococci, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, secrete toxins of different molecular nature, which are key for defining the disease. Amongst these toxins are pore-forming exotoxins that are expressed as soluble monomers prior to engagement of the target cell membrane with subsequent formation of an aqueous membrane pore. Membrane pore formation is not only a means for immediate lysis of the targeted cell but also a general mechanism that contributes to penetration of epithelial barriers and evasion of the immune system, thus creating survival niches for the pathogens. Pore-forming toxins, however, can also contribute to the induction of inflammation and hence to the manifestation of sepsis. Clearly, pore-forming toxins are not the sole factors that drive sepsis progression, but they often act in concert with other bacterial effectors, especially in the initial stages of neonatal sepsis manifestation.

  5. Sepsis-induced immunosuppression: from cellular dysfunctions to immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Monneret, Guillaume; Payen, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis — severe life-threatening infection with organ dysfunction — initiates a complex interplay of host pro- and anti-inflammatory processes. In a real sense, sepsis can be considered a race to the death between the pathogens and the host immune system. It is the proper balance between the often competing pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways that determines the fate of the individual. Although the field of sepsis research has witnessed the failure of many highly-touted clinical trials, a better understanding of the pathophysiological basis of the disorder and the mechanisms responsible for the associated pro- and anti-inflammatory responses is leading to a novel approach to treat this highly lethal condition. Biomarker-guided immunotherapy administered to patients at the proper immune phase of sepsis represents a potential major advance in the treatment of sepsis and more broadly in the field of infectious disease. PMID:24232462

  6. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740 Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. (a) Identification. Streptococcus spp. serological reagents are devices... streptococci are associated with infections, such as sore throat, impetigo (an infection characterized by...

  7. Immunotherapy: A promising approach to reverse sepsis-induced immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Patil, Naeem K; Bohannon, Julia K; Sherwood, Edward R

    2016-09-01

    Sepsis is defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by dysregulated host responses to infection (Third International Consensus definition for Sepsis and septic shock). Despite decades of research, sepsis remains the leading cause of death in intensive care units. More than 40 clinical trials, most of which have targeted the sepsis-associated pro-inflammatory response, have failed. Thus, antibiotics and fluid resuscitation remain the mainstays of supportive care and there is intense need to discover and develop novel, targeted therapies to treat sepsis. Both pre-clinical and clinical studies over the past decade demonstrate unequivocally that sepsis not only causes hyper-inflammation, but also leads to simultaneous adaptive immune system dysfunction and impaired antimicrobial immunity. Evidences for immunosuppression include immune cell depletion (T cells most affected), compromised T cell effector functions, T cell exhaustion, impaired antigen presentation, increased susceptibility to opportunistic nosocomial infections, dysregulated cytokine secretion, and reactivation of latent viruses. Therefore, targeting immunosuppression provides a logical approach to treat protracted sepsis. Numerous pre-clinical studies using immunomodulatory agents such as interleukin-7, anti-programmed cell death 1 antibody (anti-PD-1), anti-programmed cell death 1 ligand antibody (anti-PD-L1), and others have demonstrated reversal of T cell dysfunction and improved survival. Therefore, identifying immunosuppressed patients with the help of specific biomarkers and administering specific immunomodulators holds significant potential for sepsis therapy in the future. This review focusses on T cell dysfunction during sepsis and discusses the potential immunotherapeutic agents to boost T cell function during sepsis and improve host resistance to infection.

  8. Genome Wide Association Study of Sepsis in Extremely Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Lakshmi; Page, Grier; Kirpalani, Haresh; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Bell, Edward F.; Goldberg, Ronald N.; Schibler, Kurt; Sood, Beena G.; Stevenson, David K.; Stoll, Barbara J.; Van Meurs, Krisa P.; Johnson, Karen J.; Levy, Joshua; McDonald, Scott A.; Zaterka-Baxter, Kristin M.; Kennedy, Kathleen A.; Sánchez, Pablo J.; Duara, Shahnaz; Walsh, Michele C.; Shankaran, Seetha; Wynn, James L.; Cotten, C. Michael

    2017-01-01

    Objective To identify genetic variants associated with sepsis (early and late-onset) using a genome wide association (GWA) analysis in a cohort of extremely premature infants. Study Design Previously generated GWA data from the Neonatal Research Network’s anonymized genomic database biorepository of extremely premature infants were used for this study. Sepsis was defined as culture-positive early-onset or late-onset sepsis or culture-proven meningitis. Genomic and whole genome amplified DNA was genotyped for 1.2 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs); 91% of SNPs were successfully genotyped. We imputed 7.2 million additional SNPs. P values and false discovery rates were calculated from multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusting for gender, gestational age and ancestry. Target statistical value was p<10−5. Secondary analyses assessed associations of SNPs with pathogen type. Pathway analyses were also run on primary and secondary end points. Results Data from 757 extremely premature infants were included: 351 infants with sepsis and 406 infants without sepsis. No SNPs reached genome-wide significance levels (5×10−8); two SNPs in proximity to FOXC2 and FOXL1 genes achieved target levels of significance. In secondary analyses, SNPs for ELMO1, IRAK2 (Gram positive sepsis), RALA, IMMP2L (Gram negative sepsis) and PIEZO2 (fungal sepsis) met target significance levels. Pathways associated with sepsis and Gram negative sepsis included gap junctions, fibroblast growth factor receptors, regulators of cell division and Interleukin-1 associated receptor kinase 2 (p values<0.001 and FDR<20%). Conclusions No SNPs met genome-wide significance in this cohort of ELBW infants; however, areas of potential association and pathways meriting further study were identified. PMID:28283553

  9. Differential expression of plasma miR-146a in sepsis patients compared with non-sepsis-SIRS patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lina; Wang, Hua-Cheng; Chen, Cha; Zeng, Jianming; Wang, Qian; Zheng, Lei; Yu, Huan-DU

    2013-04-01

    Sepsis is a subtype of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), which is characterized by infection. Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs), including miR-150, miR-146a and miR-223, are potential biomarkers of sepsis. In this study, we demonstrated that measuring the relative expression of miR-146a/U6 in plasma, using the 2(-ΔΔCt) method, provides a method for differentiating between sepsis and non-sepsis-SIRS. We observed a significant increase in miR-146a expression in the initial cohort of 6 non-sepsis-SIRS patients compared to the 4 sepsis patients (P=0.01) and in the second cohort of 8 non-sepsis-SIRS patients compared to the 10 sepsis patients (P=0.027). Additionally, we identified that sodium citrate and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) K2 may be used as anticoagulant reagents. Generation of a standard curve is not necessary in these diagnostic tests, unless the standard of normalization is carefully selected. Thus we provide more detailed guidance for the clinical use of circulating miRNA biomarkers.

  10. Routine culture-based screening versus risk-based management for the prevention of early-onset group B streptococcus disease in the neonate: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Ella; Davis, Deborah

    2015-04-17

    Early-onset group B streptococcus disease, recognized as the most common cause of early onset neonatal sepsis in developed countries, is transmitted vertically from the group B streptococcus carrier mother to the neonate in the peripartum. Accordingly, early-onset group B streptococcus disease is prevented by halting the transmission of the microorganism from the mother to the infant. Two main methods, routine culture-based screening and risk-based management, may be used in the identification of mothers requiring intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis in labor. While there are advantages and disadvantages to each, there is limited high level evidence available as to which method is superior. To identify the effectiveness of risk-based management versus routine culture-based screening in the prevention of early-onset group B streptococcus disease in the neonate. This review considered studies which treated pregnant women with intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis following risk- and culture-based protocols for the prevention of early-onset group B streptococcus disease in the neonate. Types of intervention: This review considered studies that evaluated risk-based management against routine culture-based screening for the prevention of early-onset group B streptococcus disease in the neonate. Types of studies: This review looked for highest evidence available which in this case consisted of one quasi experimental study and eight comparative cohort studies with historical or concurrent control groups. Types of outcomes: Incidence of early-onset group B streptococcus disease in neonates as measured by positive group B streptococcus culture from an otherwise sterile site. Secondary outcomes include neonatal death due to group B streptococcus sepsis and percentage of women who received intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis. A multi-step search strategy was used to find studies which were limited to the English language and published between January 2000 and June 2013. The quality

  11. Intestinal radiation syndrome: sepsis and endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Geraci, J.P.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.

    1985-03-01

    Rats were whole-body irradiated with 8-MeV cyclotron-produced neutrons and /sup 137/Cs ..gamma.. rays to study the role of enteric bacteria and endotoxin in the intestinal radiation syndrome. Decrease in intestinal weight was used as an index of radiation-induced breakdown of the mucosa. Neutron and ..gamma..-ray doses that were sublethal for intestinal death resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in intestinal weight, reaching minimal values 2 to 3 days after exposure, followed by recovery within 5 days after irradiation. Neutron and photon doses that caused intestinal death resulted in greater mucosal breakdown with little or no evidence of mucosal recovery. The presence of fluid in the intestine and diarrhea, but not bacteremia or endotoxemia, were related to mucosal breakdown and recovery. Neither sepsis nor endotoxin could be detected in liver samples taken at autopsy from animals which died a short time earlier from intestinal injury. These results suggest that overt sepsis and endotoxemia do not play a significant role in the intestinal radiation syndrome.

  12. Lactoferrin for prevention of neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Turin, Christie G.; Zea-Vera, Alonso; Pezo, Alonso; Cruz, Karen; Zegarra, Jaime; Bellomo, Sicilia; Cam, Luis; Llanos, Raul; Castañeda, Anne; Tucto, Lourdes; Ochoa, Theresa J.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm neonates are at risk to acquire infections. In addition to the high mortality associated with sepsis, these patients are at risk for long-term disabilities, particularly neurodevelopment impairment. Several interventions have been evaluated to reduce rates of infections in neonates but have not proven efficacy. Lactoferrin (LF), a milk glycoprotein with anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and anti-microbial properties, has the potential to prevent infections in young children. We performed a review of current and ongoing clinical trials of LF for prevention of neonatal sepsis, and found eleven registered clinical trials that include more than 6000 subjects. Few of these trials have finished; despite their small sample size, the preliminary results show a trend towards a positive protective effect of LF on neonatal infections. Larger trials are underway to confirm the findings of these initial studies. This information will help to define LF´s role in clinical settings and, if proven effective, would profoundly affect the treatment of low birth weight neonates as a cost-effective intervention worldwide. PMID:24935001

  13. Hypomagnesemia in Critically Ill Sepsis Patients.

    PubMed

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vassilios; Pierrakos, Charalampos; Aretha, Diamanto; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2015-12-01

    Magnesium (Mg), also known as "the forgotten electrolyte", is the fourth most abundant cation overall and the second most abundant intracellular cation in the body. Mg deficiency has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many diseases. This article is a review of the literature regarding Mg abnormalities with emphasis on the implications of hypomagnesemia in critical illness and on treatment options for hypomagnesemia in critically ill patients with sepsis. Hypomagnesemia is common in critically ill patients, and there is strong, consistent clinical evidence, largely from observational studies, showing that hypomagnesemia is significantly associated with increased need for mechanical ventilation, prolonged ICU stay and increased mortality. Although the mechanism linking hypomagnesemia with poor clinical outcomes is not known, experimental data suggest mechanisms contributing to such outcomes. However, at the present time, there is no clear evidence that magnesium supplementation improves outcomes in critically ill patients with hypomagnesemia. Large, well-designed clinical trials are needed to evaluate the role of magnesium therapy for improving outcomes in critically ill patients with sepsis.

  14. Hypomagnesemia in Critically Ill Sepsis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vassilios; Pierrakos, Charalampos; Aretha, Diamanto; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg), also known as “the forgotten electrolyte”, is the fourth most abundant cation overall and the second most abundant intracellular cation in the body. Mg deficiency has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many diseases. This article is a review of the literature regarding Mg abnormalities with emphasis on the implications of hypomagnesemia in critical illness and on treatment options for hypomagnesemia in critically ill patients with sepsis. Hypomagnesemia is common in critically ill patients, and there is strong, consistent clinical evidence, largely from observational studies, showing that hypomagnesemia is significantly associated with increased need for mechanical ventilation, prolonged ICU stay and increased mortality. Although the mechanism linking hypomagnesemia with poor clinical outcomes is not known, experimental data suggest mechanisms contributing to such outcomes. However, at the present time, there is no clear evidence that magnesium supplementation improves outcomes in critically ill patients with hypomagnesemia. Large, well-designed clinical trials are needed to evaluate the role of magnesium therapy for improving outcomes in critically ill patients with sepsis. PMID:26566403

  15. Aerobic Metabolism of Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Mickelson, M. N.

    1967-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae cultures possess an aerobic pathway for glucose oxidation that is strongly inhibited by cyanide. The products of glucose oxidation by aerobically grown cells of S. agalactiae 50 are lactic and acetic acids, acetylmethylcarbinol, and carbon dioxide. Glucose degradation products by aerobically grown cells, as percentage of glucose carbon, were 52 to 61% lactic acid, 20 to 23% acetic acid, 5.5 to 6.5% acetylmethylcarbinol, and 14 to 16% carbon dioxide. There was no evidence for a pentose cycle or a tricarboxylic acid cycle. Crude cell-free extracts of S. agalactiae 50 possessed a strong reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH2) oxidase that is also cyanide-sensitive. Dialysis or ultrafiltration of the crude, cell-free extract resulted in loss of NADH2 oxidase activity. Oxidase activity was restored to the inactive extract by addition of the ultrafiltrate or by addition of menadione or K3Fe(CN)6. Noncytochrome iron-containing pigments were present in cell-free extracts of S. agalactiae. The possible participation of these pigments in the respiration of S. agalactiae is presently being studied. PMID:4291090

  16. Bacteriocin (Hemolysin) of Streptococcus zymogenes

    PubMed Central

    Basinger, Scott F.; Jackson, Robert W.

    1968-01-01

    The sensitivity of Streptococcus faecalis (ATTC 8043) to S. zymogenes X-14 bacteriocin depends greatly on its physiological age. Sensitivity decreases from the mid-log phase on and is completely lost in the stationary phase. The sensitivity of erythrocytes to the hemolytic capacity of the bacteriocin showed considerable species variation. The order of increasing sensitivity was goose < sheep < dog < horse < human < rabbit. However, when red cell stromata were used as inhibitors of hemolysis in a standard system employing rabbit erythrocytes the order of increasing effectiveness was sheep < rabbit < human < horse < goose. When rabbit cells were used in varying concentrations with a constant hemolysin concentration, there was a lag of about 30 min, which for a given hemolysin preparation was constant for all red cell concentrations. Furthermore, the rate of hemolysis increased with increasing red cell concentration. If red cells are held constant and lysin varied, the time to reach half-maximal lysis varies directly with lysin but is not strictly proportional. Bacterial membranes were one to three orders of magnitude more effective than red cell stromata as inhibitors. The order of increasing effectiveness seems to be Escherichia coli < Bacillus megaterium < S. faecalis < Micrococcus lysodeikticus. In addition to membranes, a d-alanine containing glycerol teichoic acid, trypsin in high concentration, and deoxyribonuclease also inhibited hemolysis. Ribonuclease, d-alanine, l-alanine, dl-alanyl-dl-alanine, N-acetyl-d-alanine, N-acetyl-l-alanine did not inhibit hemolysis. PMID:4972910

  17. Macrolide Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Max R.; Stephens, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common commensal and an opportunistic pathogen. Suspected pneumococcal upper respiratory infections and pneumonia are often treated with macrolide antibiotics. Macrolides are bacteriostatic antibiotics and inhibit protein synthesis by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit. The widespread use of macrolides is associated with increased macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae, and the treatment of pneumococcal infections with macrolides may be associated with clinical failures. In S. pneumoniae, macrolide resistance is due to ribosomal dimethylation by an enzyme encoded by erm(B), efflux by a two-component efflux pump encoded by mef (E)/mel(msr(D)) and, less commonly, mutations of the ribosomal target site of macrolides. A wide array of genetic elements have emerged that facilitate macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae; for example erm(B) is found on Tn917, while the mef (E)/mel operon is carried on the 5.4- or 5.5-kb Mega element. The macrolide resistance determinants, erm(B) and mef (E)/mel, are also found on large composite Tn916-like elements most notably Tn6002, Tn2009, and Tn2010. Introductions of 7-valent and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV-7 and PCV-13) have decreased the incidence of macrolide-resistant invasive pneumococcal disease, but serotype replacement and emergence of macrolide resistance remain an important concern. PMID:27709102

  18. Biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Domenech, Mirian; García, Ernesto; Moscoso, Miriam

    2012-07-01

    Biofilm-grown bacteria are refractory to antimicrobial agents and show an increased capacity to evade the host immune system. In recent years, studies have begun on biofilm formation by Streptococcus pneumoniae, an important human pathogen, using a variety of in vitro model systems. The bacterial cells in these biofilms are held together by an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, proteins and, possibly, polysaccharide(s). Although neither the precise nature of these proteins nor the composition of the putative polysaccharide(s) is clear, it is known that choline-binding proteins are required for successful biofilm formation. Further, many genes appear to be involved, although the role of each appears to vary when biofilms are produced in batch or continuous culture. Prophylactic and therapeutic measures need to be developed to fight S. pneumoniae biofilm formation. However, much care needs to be taken when choosing strains for such studies because different S. pneumoniae isolates can show remarkable genomic differences. Multispecies and in vivo biofilm models must also be developed to provide a more complete understanding of biofilm formation and maintenance. © 2011 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Domenech, Mirian; García, Ernesto; Moscoso, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    Summary Biofilm‐grown bacteria are refractory to antimicrobial agents and show an increased capacity to evade the host immune system. In recent years, studies have begun on biofilm formation by Streptococcus pneumoniae, an important human pathogen, using a variety of in vitro model systems. The bacterial cells in these biofilms are held together by an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, proteins and, possibly, polysaccharide(s). Although neither the precise nature of these proteins nor the composition of the putative polysaccharide(s) is clear, it is known that choline‐binding proteins are required for successful biofilm formation. Further, many genes appear to be involved, although the role of each appears to vary when biofilms are produced in batch or continuous culture. Prophylactic and therapeutic measures need to be developed to fight S. pneumoniae biofilm formation. However, much care needs to be taken when choosing strains for such studies because different S. pneumoniae isolates can show remarkable genomic differences. Multispecies and in vivo biofilm models must also be developed to provide a more complete understanding of biofilm formation and maintenance. PMID:21906265

  20. Galactokinase activity in Streptococcus thermophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Hutkins, R.; Morris, H.A.; McKay, L.L.

    1985-10-01

    ATP-dependent phosphorylation of (/sup 14/C)galactose by 11 strains of streptococcus thermophilus indicated that these organisms possessed the Leloir enzyme, galactokinase (galK). Activities were 10 times higher in fully induced, galactose-fermenting (Gal/sup +/) strains than in galactose-nonfermenting (Gal/sup -/) strains. Lactose-grown, Gal/sup -/ cells released free galactose into the medium and were unable to utilize residual galactose or to induce galK above basal levels. Gal/sup +/ S. thermophilus 19258 also released galactose into the medium, but when lactose was depleted, growth on galactose commenced, and galK increased from 0.025 to 0.22 ..mu..mol of galactose phosphorylated per min per mg of protein. When lactose was added to galactose-grown cells of S. thermophilus 19258, galK activity rapidly decreased. These results suggest that galK in Gal/sup +/ S. thermophilus is subject to an induction-repression mechanism, but that galK cannot be induced in Gal/sup -/ strains.

  1. The efficacy of neem extract on four microorganisms responsible for causing dental caries viz Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus sanguis: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Chava, Venkateswara Rao; Manjunath, S M; Rajanikanth, A V; Sridevi, N

    2012-11-01

    HISTORY AND OBJECTIVES: From the ancient time, neem used to be the traditional medicine for many diseases and was mainly used for cleaning the oral cavity. The incidence of dental caries was less a few decades ago but now the incidence of caries is very aggressive. This might be due to change in dietary habits, life style and more tendency toward processed food. The objective of this study is to find out the truth that if the neem is really efficacious against caries-inducing microorganisms, mainly Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus sanguis. The dried neem sticks ground into a coarse powder and weighed into 5, 10 and 50 gm were added to 100 ml of deionized double distilled water. After soaking for 2 days, the water was filtered at 4 °C and the fine filtrate was inoculated onto blood agar plates contains individual species of microorganisms and incubated at 37 °C for 2 days. At maximum concentrations, neem extract has shown the maximum zone of inhibition on Streptococcus mutans. At less concentration, the efficacy of neem has shown some inhibition of growth for all the four species of microorganisms. Neem chewing provides the maximum benefits. Hence, the use of chewing sticks of neem can be recommended.

  2. Aspiration pneumonia-induced sepsis increases cardiac dysfunction after burn trauma.

    PubMed

    Sheeran, P W; Maass, D L; White, D J; Turbeville, T D; Giroir, B P; Horton, J W

    1998-05-01

    Pneumonia occurs in approximately 50% of incubated patients in burn intensive care units and carries a mortality as high as 40%. A model was developed to study altered cardiopulmonary function in burn complicated by pneumococcal pneumonia. Sprague-Dawley rats were given a 43% total body surface area scald burn or sham burn; 24 h later they were transtracheally inoculated with either 10(7) Streptococcus pneumoniae in 0.5 ml phosphate buffer solution (PBS) or 0.5 ml PBS alone. The four groups were: Sham (N = 7), Burn alone (N = 10), Pneumonia alone (N = 11), and Burn and Pneumonia ( N = 12). A fifth group of burned rats (N = 10), given an identical fluid resuscitation regimen, was sacrificed 24 h postburn to examine the early cardiac responses to burn injury alone. Shams and burned animals had normal lung histology, negative bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cultures, and negative blood cultures. Pneumonia and burn plus pneumonia animals had abnormal lung histology, positive BAL cultures, and positive blood cultures. Cardiac function was assessed 24 h after S.pneumoniae challenge (48 h after burn) (Langendorff preparation). Compared to the Sham group, Pneumonia group, and Burn group, the Burn plus Pneumonia group had the lowest left ventricular pressure (LVP: 94 +/- 4, 71 +/- 3, and 87 +/- 3 mm Hg vs 63 +/- 4 mm Hg, P < 0.05), the lowest maximal rate of LVP rise (+dP/dt[max]:1932 +/- 115, 1419 +/- 71, and 1772 +/- 96 mm Hg vs 1309 +/- 59 mm Hg/s, P < 0.05), and the lowest maximal rate of LVP fall (-dP/dt[max]:1704 +/- 120, 1263 +/- 73, and 1591 +/- 83 mm Hg vs 1025 +/- 98 mm Hg/s, P < 0.05). Cardiac contraction and relaxation deficits were confirmed in animals 24 h postburn (group 5), as indicated by a significantly lower LVP and +/-dP/dt(max) (62 +/- 3 mm Hg 1210 +/- 60, and 909 +/- 50 mm Hg/s, respectively, P < 0.05 compared to Sham group). Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) concentrations in serum, but not bronchoalveolar lavage, were greater in burned animals

  3. Distribution of Streptococcus troglodytae and Streptococcus dentirousetti in chimpanzee oral cavities.

    PubMed

    Miyanohara, Mayu; Imai, Susumu; Okamoto, Masaaki; Saito, Wataru; Nomura, Yoshiaki; Momoi, Yasuko; Tomonaga, Masaki; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution and phenotypic properties of the indigenous streptococci in chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) oral cavities. Eleven chimpanzees (aged from 9 to 44 years, mean ± SD, 26.9 ± 12.6 years) in the Primate Research Institute of Kyoto University were enrolled in this research and brushing bacterial samples collected from them. Streptococci were isolated from the oral cavities of all chimpanzees. The isolates (n = 46) were identified as thirteen species by 16S rRNA genes analysis. The predominant species was Streptococcus sanguinis of mitis streptococci from five chimpanzees (45%). Mutans streptococci were isolated from six chimpanzees (55%). The predominant species in the mutans streptococci were Streptococcus troglodytae from four chimpanzees (36%), this species having been proposed as a novel species by us, and Streptococcus dentirousetti from three chimpanzees (27%). Streptococcus mutans was isolated from one chimpanzee (9%). However, Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus macacae and Streptococcus downei, which are indigenous to human and monkey (Macaca fasciclaris) oral habitats, were not isolated. Of the mutans streptococci, S. troglodytae, S. dentirousetti, and S. mutans possessed strong adherence activity to glass surface.

  4. Streptococcus orisasini sp. nov. and Streptococcus dentasini sp. nov., isolated from the oral cavity of donkeys.

    PubMed

    Takada, Kazuko; Saito, Masanori; Tsudukibashi, Osamu; Hiroi, Takachika; Hirasawa, Masatomo

    2013-08-01

    Four Gram-positive, catalase-negative, coccoid isolates that were obtained from donkey oral cavities formed two distinct clonal groups when characterized by phenotypic and phylogenetic studies. From the results of biochemical tests, the organisms were tentatively identified as a streptococcal species. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies confirmed the organisms to be members of the genus Streptococcus. Two of the isolates were related most closely to Streptococcus ursoris with 95.6 % similarity based on the 16S rRNA gene and to Streptococcus ratti with 92.0 % similarity based on the 60 kDa heat-shock protein gene (groEL). The other two isolates, however, were related to Streptococcus criceti with 95.0 and 89.0 % similarities based on the 16S rRNA and groEL genes, respectively. From both phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence, the four isolates formed two distinct clonal groups and are suggested to represent novel species of the genus Streptococcus. The names proposed for these organisms are Streptococcus orisasini sp. nov. (type strain NUM 1801(T) = JCM 17942(T) = DSM 25193(T)) and Streptococcus dentasini sp. nov. (type strain NUM 1808(T) = JCM 17943(T) = DSM 25137(T)).

  5. Postoperative sepsis prediction in patients undergoing major cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Sood, Akshay; Abdollah, Firas; Sammon, Jesse D; Arora, Nivedita; Weeks, Matthew; Peabody, James O; Menon, Mani; Trinh, Quoc-Dien

    2017-03-01

    Cancer patients are at increased risk for postoperative sepsis. However, studies addressing the issue are lacking. We sought to identify preoperative and intraoperative predictors of 30-d sepsis after major cancer surgery (MCS) and derive a postoperative sepsis risk stratification tool. Patients undergoing one of nine MCSs (gastrointestinal, urological, gynecologic, or pulmonary) were identified within the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (2005-2011, n = 69,169). Multivariable adjusted analyses (MVA) were performed to identify the predictors of postoperative sepsis. A composite sepsis risk score (CSRS) was constructed using the regression coefficients of predictors significant on MVA. The score was stratified into low, intermediate, and high risk, and its predictive accuracy for sepsis, septic shock, and mortality was assessed using the area under the curve analysis. Overall, 4.3% (n = 2954) of patients developed postoperative sepsis. In MVA, Black race (odds ratio [OR] = 1.30, P = 0.002), preoperative hematocrit <30 (OR = 1.40, P = 0.022), cardiopulmonary and cerebrovascular comorbidities (P < 0.010), American Society of Anesthesiologists score >3 (P < 0.05), operative time (OR = 1.002, P < 0.001), surgical approach (OR = 1.81, P < 0.001), and procedure type (P < 0.001) were significant predictors of postoperative sepsis. CSRS demonstrated favorable accuracy in predicting postoperative sepsis, septic shock, and mortality (area under the curve 0.72, 0.75, and 0.74, respectively). Furthermore, CSRS risk stratification demonstrated high concordance with sepsis rates, 1.3% in low-risk patients versus 9.7% in high-risk patients. Similarly, 30-d mortality rate varied from 0.5% to 5.5% (10-fold difference) in low-risk patients versus high-risk patients. Our study identifies the major risk factors for 30-d sepsis after MCS. These risk factors have been converted into a simple, accurate bedside sepsis risk

  6. ATP-driven calcium transport in membrane vesicles of Streptococcus sanguis. [Streptococcus sanguis; Streptococcus faecalis; Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Houng, H.; Lynn, A.R.; Rosen, B.P.

    1986-11-01

    Calcium transport was investigated in membrane vesicles prepared from the oral bacterium Streptococcus sanguis. Procedures were devised for the preparation of membrane vesicles capable of accumulation /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. Uptake was ATP dependent and did not require a proton motive force. Calcium transport in these vesicles was compared with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ accumulation in membrane vesicles from Streptococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli. The data support the existence of an ATP-driven calcium pump in S. sanguis similar to that in S. faecalis. This pump, which catalyzes uptake into membrane vesicles, would be responsible for extrusion of calcium from intact cells.

  7. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for differentiation between Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    van Prehn, Joffrey; van Veen, Suzanne Q; Schelfaut, Jacqueline J G; Wessels, Els

    2016-05-01

    We compared the Vitek MS and Microflex MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry platform for species differentiation within the Streptococcus mitis group with PCR assays targeted at lytA, Spn9802, and recA as reference standard. The Vitek MS correctly identified 10/11 Streptococcus pneumoniae, 13/13 Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, and 12/13 S. mitis/oralis. The Microflex correctly identified 9/11 S. pneumoniae, 0/13 S. pseudopneumoniae, and 13/13 S. mitis/oralis. MALDI-TOF is a powerful tool for species determination within the mitis group. Diagnostic accuracy varies depending on platform and database used.

  8. Construction and management of ARDS/sepsis registry with REDCap

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiaoqing; Kozlowski, Natascha; Wu, Sulong; Jiang, Mei; Huang, Yongbo; Mao, Pu; Liu, Xiaoqing; He, Weiqun; Huang, Chaoyi; Zhang, Haibo

    2014-01-01

    Objective The study aimed to construct and manage an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)/sepsis registry that can be used for data warehousing and clinical research. Methods The workflow methodology and software solution of research electronic data capture (REDCap) was used to construct the ARDS/sepsis registry. Clinical data from ARDS and sepsis patients registered to the intensive care unit (ICU) of our hospital formed the registry. These data were converted to the electronic case report form (eCRF) format used in REDCap by trained medical staff. Data validation, quality control, and database management were conducted to ensure data integrity. Results The clinical data of 67 patients registered to the ICU between June 2013 and December 2013 were analyzed. Of the 67 patients, 45 (67.2%) were classified as sepsis, 14 (20.9%) as ARDS, and eight (11.9%) as sepsis-associated ARDS. The patients’ information, comprising demographic characteristics, medical history, clinical interventions, daily assessment, clinical outcome, and follow-up data, was properly managed and safely stored in the ARDS/sepsis registry. Data efficiency was guaranteed by performing data collection and data entry twice weekly and every two weeks, respectively. Conclusions The ARDS/sepsis database that we constructed and manage with REDCap in the ICU can provide a solid foundation for translational research on the clinical data of interest, and a model for development of other medical registries in the future. PMID:25276372

  9. Activated Complement Factors as Disease Markers for Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Charchaflieh, Jean; Rushbrook, Julie; Worah, Samrat; Zhang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of death in the United States and worldwide. Early recognition and effective management are essential for improved outcome. However, early recognition is impeded by lack of clinically utilized biomarkers. Complement factors play important roles in the mechanisms leading to sepsis and can potentially serve as early markers of sepsis and of sepsis severity and outcome. This review provides a synopsis of recent animal and clinical studies of the role of complement factors in sepsis development, together with their potential as disease markers. In addition, new results from our laboratory are presented regarding the involvement of the complement factor, mannose-binding lectin, in septic shock patients. Future clinical studies are needed to obtain the complete profiles of complement factors/their activated products during the course of sepsis development. We anticipate that the results of these studies will lead to a multipanel set of sepsis biomarkers which, along with currently used laboratory tests, will facilitate earlier diagnosis, timely treatment, and improved outcome. PMID:26420913

  10. Obesity Exacerbates Sepsis-Induced Oxidative Damage in Organs.

    PubMed

    Petronilho, Fabricia; Giustina, Amanda Della; Nascimento, Diego Zapelini; Zarbato, Graciela Freitas; Vieira, Andriele Aparecida; Florentino, Drielly; Danielski, Lucinéia Gainski; Goldim, Mariana Pereira; Rezin, Gislaine Tezza; Barichello, Tatiana

    2016-12-01

    Sepsis progression is linked to the imbalance between reactive oxygen species and antioxidant enzymes. Sepsis affects multiple organs, but when associated with a chronic inflammatory disease, such as obesity, it may be exacerbated. We hypothesized that obesity could aggravate the oxidative damage to peripheral organs of rats submitted to an animal model of sepsis. Male Wistar rats aged 8 weeks received hypercaloric nutrition for 2 months to induce obesity. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) procedure, and sham-operated rats were considered as control group. The experimental groups were divided into sham + eutrophic, sham + obese, CLP + eutrophic, and CLP + obese. Twelve and 24 h after surgery, oxidative damage to lipids and proteins and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities were evaluated in the liver, lung, kidney, and heart. The data indicate that obese rats subjected to sepsis present oxidative stress mainly in the lung and liver. This alteration reflected an oxidative damage to lipids and proteins and an imbalance of SOD and CAT levels, especially 24 h after sepsis. It follows that obesity due to its pro-inflammatory phenotype can aggravate sepsis-induced damage in peripheral organs.

  11. Sepsis-induced immunoparalysis: mechanisms, markers, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Hamers, L; Kox, M; Pickkers, P

    2015-04-01

    Sepsis remains the leading cause of death in the ICU. Considering the key role of the immune system in sepsis, immunomodulation represents an attractive target for adjunctive therapy. Until recently, clinical trials focused on suppression of the immune system, but this approach failed to improve sepsis outcome. Recent advances in the understanding of sepsis have led to the view that not the initial hyperinflammatory state, but rather a profoundly suppressed state of the immune system, called sepsis-induced immunoparalysis, accounts for the majority of sepsis-related deaths. Immunoparalysis results in ineffective clearance of septic foci, and renders the septic patient more vulnerable to secondary infections, as well as reactivation of latent infections. Several mechanisms behind immunoparalysis have been recognised. Furthermore, due to recognition of the importance of immunoparalysis, immunostimulatory treatment is emerging as a possible adjunctive treatment for sepsis. As such, identification of patients suffering from immunoparalysis using biomarkers is of utmost importance to guide immunostimulatory treatment. In this review, an short overview of the concept of immunoparalysis is presented, while the main focus is on potential biological markers of immunoparalysis and promising immunostimulatory therapeutic agents. The challenging heterogeneity of septic patients in respect to immunomodulatory advances will be discussed, and recommendations for future research are provided.

  12. Characterising Cytokine Gene Expression Signatures in Patients with Severe Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Grealy, Robert; White, Mary; Stordeur, Patrick; Kelleher, Dermot; Doherty, Derek G.; McManus, Ross; Ryan, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Severe sepsis in humans may be related to an underlying profound immune suppressive state. We investigated the link between gene expression of immune regulatory cytokines and the range of illness severity in patients with infection and severe sepsis. Methods. A prospective observational study included 54 ICU patients with severe sepsis, 53 patients with infection without organ failure, and 20 healthy controls. Gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results. Infection differed from health by decreased expression of the IL2, and IL23 and greater expression of IL10 and IL27. Severe sepsis differed from infection by having decreased IL7, IL23, IFNγ, and TNFα gene expression. An algorithm utilising mRNA copy number for TNFα, IFNγ, IL7, IL10, and IL23 accurately distinguished sepsis from severe sepsis with a receiver operator characteristic value of 0.88. Gene expression was similar with gram-positive and gram-negative infection and was similar following medical and surgical severe sepsis. Severity of organ failure was associated with serum IL6 protein levels but not with any index of cytokine gene expression in PBMCs. Conclusions. Immune regulatory cytokine gene expression in PBMC provides a robust method of modelling patients' response to infection. PMID:23935244

  13. Diagnosis trajectories of prior multi-morbidity predict sepsis mortality

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Mette K.; Jensen, Anders Boeck; Nielsen, Annelaura Bach; Perner, Anders; Moseley, Pope L.; Brunak, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis affects millions of people every year, many of whom will die. In contrast to current survival prediction models for sepsis patients that primarily are based on data from within-admission clinical measurements (e.g. vital parameters and blood values), we aim for using the full disease history to predict sepsis mortality. We benefit from data in electronic medical records covering all hospital encounters in Denmark from 1996 to 2014. This data set included 6.6 million patients of whom almost 120,000 were diagnosed with the ICD-10 code: A41 ‘Other sepsis’. Interestingly, patients following recurrent trajectories of time-ordered co-morbidities had significantly increased sepsis mortality compared to those who did not follow a trajectory. We identified trajectories which significantly altered sepsis mortality, and found three major starting points in a combined temporal sepsis network: Alcohol abuse, Diabetes and Cardio-vascular diagnoses. Many cancers also increased sepsis mortality. Using the trajectory based stratification model we explain contradictory reports in relation to diabetes that recently have appeared in the literature. Finally, we compared the predictive power using 18.5 years of disease history to scoring based on within-admission clinical measurements emphasizing the value of long term data in novel patient scores that combine the two types of data. PMID:27812043

  14. Risk Factors and Outcomes in Patients With Hypernatremia and Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ni, Hai-Bin; Hu, Xing-Xing; Huang, Xiao-Fei; Liu, Ke-Qin; Yu, Chen-Bin; Wang, Xiao-Meng; Ke, Lu

    2016-06-01

    Hypernatremia is an uncommon but important electrolyte abnormality in intensive care unit patients. Sepsis is one of the most common causes of intensive care unit admission, but few studies about the role of hypernatremia in sepsis has been published yet. In this study, we aimed to explore the risk factors for developing hypernatremia in patients with sepsis, and the prognosis of patients with sepsis with or without hypernatremia was also assessed. In this retrospective cohort study of 51 septic intensive care unit patients at a single center, we examined the risk factors for the development of hypernatremia and the association of hypernatremia with clinical outcomes using univariate and multivariable analyses. Clinical outcomes such as mortality and hospital duration of patients with or without hypernatremia were also compared. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score (odds ratio = 1.15; 95% CI: 1.022-1.294) was found to be the only independent risk factor for hypernatremia in patients with sepsis. Moreover, patients developing hypernatremia during hospitalization showed significantly higher morbidity and mortality. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score may be an independent risk factor for hypernatremia in patients with sepsis. Moreover, hypernatremia is strongly associated with worse outcome in sepsis. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Circulating Endothelial Cells and Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Pediatric Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zahran, Asmaa Mohamad; Elsayh, Khalid Ibrahim; Mohamad, Ismail Lotfy; Hassan, Gamal Mohamad; Abdou, Madleen Adel A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to measure the number of circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEPs) in pediatric patients with sepsis and correlating it with the severity of the disease and its outcome. The study included 19 children with sepsis, 26 with complicated sepsis, and 30 healthy controls. The patients were investigated within 48 hours of pediatric intensive care unit admission together with flow cytometric detection of CECs and CEPs. The levels of both CECs and CEPs were significantly higher in patient with sepsis and complicated sepsis than the controls. The levels of CECs were higher in patients with complicated sepsis, whereas the levels of CEPs were lower in patients with complicated sepsis. Comparing the survival and nonsurvival septic patients, the levels of CEPs were significantly higher in the survival than in nonsurvival patients, whereas the levels of CECs were significantly lower in the survival than in nonsurvival patients. Serum albumin was higher in survival than in nonsurvival patients. Estimation of CECs and CEPs and their correlation with other parameters such as serum albumen could add important information regarding prognosis in septic pediatric patients.

  16. Challenges in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Zea-Vera, Alonso

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is the third leading cause of neonatal mortality and a major public health problem, especially in developing countries. Although recent medical advances have improved neonatal care, many challenges remain in the diagnosis and management of neonatal infections. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is complicated by the frequent presence of noninfectious conditions that resemble sepsis, especially in preterm infants, and by the absence of optimal diagnostic tests. Since neonatal sepsis is a high-risk disease, especially in preterm infants, clinicians are compelled to empirically administer antibiotics to infants with risk factors and/or signs of suspected sepsis. Unfortunately, both broad-spectrum antibiotics and prolonged treatment with empirical antibiotics are associated with adverse outcomes and increase antimicrobial resistance rates. Given the high incidence and mortality of sepsis in preterm infants and its long-term consequences on growth and development, efforts to reduce the rates of infection in this vulnerable population are one of the most important interventions in neonatal care. In this review, we discuss the most common questions and challenges in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis, with a focus on developing countries. PMID:25604489

  17. Challenges in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zea-Vera, Alonso; Ochoa, Theresa J

    2015-02-01

    Neonatal sepsis is the third leading cause of neonatal mortality and a major public health problem, especially in developing countries. Although recent medical advances have improved neonatal care, many challenges remain in the diagnosis and management of neonatal infections. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is complicated by the frequent presence of noninfectious conditions that resemble sepsis, especially in preterm infants, and by the absence of optimal diagnostic tests. Since neonatal sepsis is a high-risk disease, especially in preterm infants, clinicians are compelled to empirically administer antibiotics to infants with risk factors and/or signs of suspected sepsis. Unfortunately, both broad-spectrum antibiotics and prolonged treatment with empirical antibiotics are associated with adverse outcomes and increase antimicrobial resistance rates. Given the high incidence and mortality of sepsis in preterm infants and its long-term consequences on growth and development, efforts to reduce the rates of infection in this vulnerable population are one of the most important interventions in neonatal care. In this review, we discuss the most common questions and challenges in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis, with a focus on developing countries. © The Author [2015]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Neonatal sepsis: an old problem with new insights.

    PubMed

    Shah, Birju A; Padbury, James F

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis continues to be a common and significant health care burden, especially in very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBW<1500 g). Though intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis has decreased the incidence of early-onset group B streptococcal infection dramatically, it still remains a major cause of neonatal sepsis. Moreover, some studies among VLBW preterm infants have shown an increase in early-onset sepsis caused by Escherichia coli. As the signs and symptoms of neonatal sepsis are nonspecific, early diagnosis and prompt treatment remains a challenge. There have been a myriad of studies on various diagnostic markers like hematological indices, acute phase reactants, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, cytokines, and cell surface markers among others. Nonetheless, further research is needed to identify a biomarker with high diagnostic accuracy and validity. Some of the newer markers like inter α inhibitor proteins have shown promising results thereby potentially aiding in early detection of neonates with sepsis. In order to decrease the widespread, prolonged use of unnecessary antibiotics and improve the outcome of the infants with sepsis, reliable identification of sepsis at an earlier stage is paramount.

  19. Mortality in Sepsis and its relationship with Gender

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Nosheen; Jamil, Bushra; Siddiqui, Shahla; Talat, Najeeha; Khan, Fauzia A.; Hussain, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Sepsis remains a leading cause of death across the world, carrying a mortality rate of 20–50%. Women have been reported to be less likely to suffer from sepsis and to have a lower risk of mortality from sepsis compared to men. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between gender and mortality in sepsis, and compare cytokine profiles of male and female patients. Methods: This was a prospective case series on 97 patients admitted with sepsis. Clinical and microbiological data was gathered, blood samples were collected for cytokine (IL-10, IL-6 and TNFα) levels and patients were followed up for clinical outcome. Results: There were 54% males and 46% females, with no significant difference of age or comorbids between genders. Respiratory tract infection was the commonest source of sepsis, and was more common in females (60%) compared to males (39%) (p=0.034). Males had a higher mortality (p=0.048, RR 1.73) and plasma IL-6 level(p=0.040) compared to females. Mean IL-6 plasma level was significantly (p<0.01) higher in patients who died vs. who recovered. Conclusion: Our study shows that males with sepsis have a 70% greater mortality rate, and mortality is associated with a higher IL-6 plasma level. PMID:26649014

  20. Telehealth Intensive Care Unit Nurse Surveillance of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Rincon, Teresa A; Manos, E LaVerne; Pierce, Janet D

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the usability and human factors engineering standards used in development of a sepsis alert known as the sepsis prompt. Sensory processing, cognitive processing, signal detection, criterion response, and user satisfaction were evaluated with controlled user testing and critical incident response techniques. Nurses reported that the sepsis prompt was visible and distinct, making it easily detectable. The prompt provided a clear response mechanism and adequately balanced the number of false alerts with the likelihood of misses. Designers were able to use a mental model approach as they designed the prompt because the nurses were already using a manual sepsis detection process. This may have predisposed the nurses to response bias, and as such, they were willing to accommodate more false alarms than nurses who are not familiar with sepsis screening (surveillance). Nurses not currently screening for sepsis may not place the same value on this alert and find it an annoyance. The sepsis prompt met usability standards, and the nurses reported that it improved efficiency over the manual screening method.

  1. Construction and management of ARDS/sepsis registry with REDCap.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaoqing; Kozlowski, Natascha; Wu, Sulong; Jiang, Mei; Huang, Yongbo; Mao, Pu; Liu, Xiaoqing; He, Weiqun; Huang, Chaoyi; Li, Yimin; Zhang, Haibo

    2014-09-01

    The study aimed to construct and manage an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)/sepsis registry that can be used for data warehousing and clinical research. The workflow methodology and software solution of research electronic data capture (REDCap) was used to construct the ARDS/sepsis registry. Clinical data from ARDS and sepsis patients registered to the intensive care unit (ICU) of our hospital formed the registry. These data were converted to the electronic case report form (eCRF) format used in REDCap by trained medical staff. Data validation, quality control, and database management were conducted to ensure data integrity. The clinical data of 67 patients registered to the ICU between June 2013 and December 2013 were analyzed. Of the 67 patients, 45 (67.2%) were classified as sepsis, 14 (20.9%) as ARDS, and eight (11.9%) as sepsis-associated ARDS. The patients' information, comprising demographic characteristics, medical history, clinical interventions, daily assessment, clinical outcome, and follow-up data, was properly managed and safely stored in the ARDS/sepsis registry. Data efficiency was guaranteed by performing data collection and data entry twice weekly and every two weeks, respectively. The ARDS/sepsis database that we constructed and manage with REDCap in the ICU can provide a solid foundation for translational research on the clinical data of interest, and a model for development of other medical registries in the future.

  2. 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis distinguishes biotypes of Streptococcus bovis: Streptococcus bovis Biotype II/2 is a separate genospecies and the predominant clinical isolate in adult males.

    PubMed

    Clarridge, J E; Attorri, S M; Zhang, Q; Bartell, J

    2001-04-01

    We characterized 22 human clinical strains of Streptococcus bovis by genotypic (16S rRNA gene sequence analysis [MicroSeq]; Applied Biosystems, Foster City, Calif.) and phenotypic (API 20 Strep and Rapid ID32 Strep systems (bioMerieux Vitek, Hazelton, Mo.) methods. The strains, isolated from blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and urine, formed two distinct 16S ribosomal DNA sequence clusters. Three strains which were associated with endocarditis urinary tract infection (UTI), and sepsis clustered with the S. bovis type strain ATCC 33317 (cluster 1); other closely related type strains were S. equinus and S. infantarius. Nineteen strains clustered at a distance of about 2.5% dissimilarity to the S. bovis type strain (cluster 2) and were associated with central nervous system (CNS) disease in addition to endocarditis, UTI, and sepsis. All strains were distinct from S. gallolyticus. Within cluster 2, a single strain grouped with ATCC strain 43143 (cluster 2a) and may be phenotypically distinct. All the other strains formed a second subgroup (cluster 2b) that was biochemically similar to S. bovis biotype II/2 (mannitol negative and beta galactosidase, alpha galactosidase, beta glucuronidase, and trehalose positive). The API 20 Strep system identified isolates of cluster 2b as S. bovis biotype II/2, those of cluster 1 as S. bovis biotype II/1, and that of cluster 2a as S. bovis biotype I. There was an excellent correlation of biotype and genotype: S. bovis biotype II/2 isolates form a separate genospecies distinct from the S. bovis, S. gallolyticus, and S. infantarius type strains and are the most common isolates in adult males.

  3. Colloids in sepsis: evenly distributed molecules surrounded by uneven questions.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Fernando Godinho; Park, Marcelo; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes

    2013-05-01

    Colloids are frequently used for fluid expansion in the intensive care unit, although its use on several clinical scenarios remains unproven of any relevant clinical benefit. The purpose of this article was to carry out a narrative review regarding the safety and efficacy of colloids in patients with sepsis and septic shock, with emphasis on the most commonly used colloids, albumin and starches. Colloids are effective fluid expanders and are able to restore the hemodynamic profile with less total volume than crystalloids. These properties appear to be preserved even in patients with sepsis with increased capillary permeability. However, some colloids are associated with renal impairment and coagulation abnormalities. Starch use was associated with increased mortality in two large clinical trials. Also, starches probably have significant renal adverse effects and may be related to more need for renal replacement therapy in severe sepsis. Albumin is the only colloid that has been shown safe in patients with sepsis and that may be associated with improved outcomes on specific subpopulations. No trial so far found any robust clinical end point favoring colloid use in patients with sepsis. Because there is no proven benefit of the use of most colloids in patients with sepsis, its use should not be encouraged outside clinical trials. Albumin is the only colloid solution that has proven to be safe, and its use may be considered on hypoalbuminemic patients with sepsis. Nevertheless, there are no robust data to recommend routine albumin administration in sepsis. Starch use should be avoided in patients with sepsis because of the recent findings of a multicenter randomized study until further evidence is available.

  4. Positive maternal C-reactive protein predicts neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ji Hyun; Namgung, Ran; Park, Min Soo; Park, Koo In; Lee, Chul

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of maternal inflammatory marker: C-reactive protein (CRP) in predicting early onset neonatal sepsis (that occurring within 72 hours after birth). 126 low birth weight newborns (gestation 32±3.2 wk, birth weight 1887±623 g) and their mothers were included. Neonates were divided into sepsis group (n=51) including both proven (positive blood culture) and suspected (negative blood culture but with more than 3 abnormal clinical signs), and controls (n=75). Mothers were subgrouped into CRP positive ≥1.22 mg/dL (n=48) and CRP negative <1.22 mg/dL (n=78) group, determined by Receiver Operating Characteristic curves, and odds ratio was calculated for neonatal sepsis according to maternal condition. Maternal CRP was significantly higher in neonatal sepsis group than in control (3.55±2.69 vs. 0.48±0.31 mg/dL, p=0.0001). Maternal CRP (cutoff value >1.22 mg/dL) had sensitivity 71% and specificity 84% for predicting neonatal sepsis. Maternal CRP positive group had more neonatal sepsis than CRP negative group (71% vs. 29%, p<0.001). Odds ratio of neonatal sepsis in maternal CRP positive group versus CRP negative group was 10.68 (95% confidence interval: 4.313-26.428, p<0.001). The risk of early onset neonatal sepsis significantly increased in the case of positive maternal CRP (≥1.22 mg/dL). In newborn of CRP positive mother, the clinician may be alerted to earlier evaluation for possible neonatal infection prior to development of sepsis.

  5. Metabolomics as a Driver in Advancing Precision Medicine in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Eckerle, Michelle; Ambroggio, Lilliam; Puskarich, Michael A; Winston, Brent; Jones, Alan E; Standiford, Theodore J; Stringer, Kathleen A

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this review is to explain the science of metabolomics-a science of systems biology that measures and studies endogenous small molecules (metabolites) that are present in a single biological sample-and its application to the diagnosis and treatment of sepsis. In addition, we discuss how discovery through metabolomics can contribute to the development of precision medicine targets for this complex disease state and the potential avenues for those new discoveries to be applied in the clinical environment. A nonsystematic literature review was performed focusing on metabolomics, pharmacometabolomics, and sepsis. Human (adult and pediatric) and animal studies were included. Metabolomics has been investigated in the diagnosis, prognosis, and risk stratification of sepsis, as well as for the identification of drug target opportunities. Metabolomics elucidates a new level of detail when compared with other systems biology sciences, with regard to the metabolites that are most relevant in the pathophysiology of sepsis, as well as highlighting specific biochemical pathways at work in sepsis. Metabolomics also highlights biochemical differences between sepsis survivors and nonsurvivors at a level of detail greater than that demonstrated by genomics, transcriptomics, or proteomics, potentially leading to actionable targets for new therapies. The application of pharmacometabolomics and its integration with other systems pharmacology to sepsis therapeutics could be particularly helpful in differentiating drug responders and nonresponders and furthering knowledge of mechanisms of drug action and response. The accumulated literature on metabolomics suggests it is a viable tool for continued discovery around the pathophysiology, diagnosis and prognosis, and treatment of sepsis in both adults and children, and it provides a greater level of biochemical detail and insight than other systems biology approaches. However, the clinical application of metabolomics in

  6. Understanding the Inflammatory Cytokine Response in Pneumonia and Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Kellum, John A.; Kong, Lan; Fink, Mitchell P.; Weissfeld, Lisa A.; Yealy, Donald M.; Pinsky, Michael R.; Fine, Jonathan; Krichevsky, Alexander; Delude, Russell L.; Angus, Derek C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe sepsis is common and frequently fatal, and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the leading cause. Although severe sepsis is often attributed to uncontrolled and unbalanced inflammation, evidence from humans with infection syndromes across the breadth of disease is lacking. In this study we describe the systemic cytokine response to pneumonia and determine if specific patterns, including the balance of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers, are associated with severe sepsis and death. Methods This is a cohort study of 1886 subjects hospitalized with CAP through the emergency departments in 28 US academic and community hospitals. We defined severe sepsis as CAP complicated by new-onset organ dysfunction, following international consensus conference criteria. We measured plasma tumor necrosis factor, IL-6 (interleukin 6), and IL-10 levels daily for the first week and weekly thereafter. Our main outcome measures were severe sepsis and 90-day mortality. Results A total of 583 patients developed severe sepsis (31%), of whom 149 died (26%). Systemic cytokine level elevation occurred in 82% of all subjects with CAP. Mean cytokine concentrations were highest at presentation, declined rapidly over the first few days, but remained elevated throughout the first week, beyond resolution of clinical signs of infection. Cytokine levels were highest in fatal severe sepsis and lowest in CAP with no severe sepsis. Unbalanced (high/low) cytokine patterns were unusual (4.6%) and not associated with decreased survival. Highest risk of death was with combined high levels of the proinflammatory IL-6 and anti-inflammatory IL-10 cytokine activity (hazard ratio, 20.5; 95% confidence interval, 10.8–39.0) (P<.001). Conclusions The circulating cytokine response to pneumonia is heterogeneous and continues for more than a week after presentation, with considerable overlap between those who do and do not develop severe sepsis. Unbalanced activation is uncommon, and

  7. Improving Diagnosis of Sepsis After Burn Injury Using a Portable Sepsis Alert System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    guidelines using ‘new vital signs’ of heart rate variability, regional tissue oxygenation , and noninvasive cardiac output can diagnose burn sepsis earlier...reducing morbidity and mortality. Rationale: Heart Rate Variability (HRV), regional Tissue Oxygenation , and non-invasive Cardiac Output (CO), have...7 6. Products 9 7. Participants & Other Collaborating Organizations 12 8. Special Reporting Requirements 15 9. Appendices 15 10. Attachment 1

  8. Epidemiology and Changes in Mortality of Sepsis After the Implementation of Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Herrán-Monge, Rubén; Muriel-Bombín, Arturo; García-García, Marta M; Merino-García, Pedro A; Martínez-Barrios, Miguel; Andaluz, David; Ballesteros, Juan Carlos; Domínguez-Berrot, Ana María; Moradillo-Gonzalez, Susana; Macías, Santiago; Álvarez-Martínez, Braulio; Fernández-Calavia, M José; Tarancón, Concepción; Villar, Jesús; Blanco, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    To determine the epidemiology and outcome of severe sepsis and septic shock after 9 years of the implementation of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) and to build a mortality prediction model. This is a prospective, multicenter, observational study performed during a 5-month period in 2011 in a network of 11 intensive care units (ICUs). We compared our findings with those obtained in the same ICUs in a study conducted in 2002. The current cohort included 262 episodes of severe sepsis and/or septic shock, and the 2002 cohort included 324. The prevalence was 14% (95% confidence interval: 12.5-15.7) with no differences to 2002. The population-based incidence was 31 cases/100 000 inhabitants/year. Patients in 2011 had a significantly lower Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II; 21.9 ± 6.6 vs 25.5 ± 7.07), Logistic Organ Dysfunction Score (5.6 ± 3.2 vs 6.3 ± 3.6), and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores on day 1 (8 ± 3.5 vs 9.6 ± 3.7; P < .01). The main source of infection was intraabdominal (32.5%) although microbiologic isolation was possible in 56.7% of cases. The 2011 cohort had a marked reduction in 48-hour (7% vs 14.8%), ICU (27.2% vs 48.2%), and in-hospital (36.7% vs 54.3%) mortalities. Most relevant factors associated with death were APACHE II score, age, previous immunosuppression and liver insufficiency, alcoholism, nosocomial infection, and Delta SOFA score. Although the incidence of sepsis/septic shock remained unchanged during a 10-year period, the implementation of the SSC guidelines resulted in a marked decrease in the overall mortality. The lower severity of patients on ICU admission and the reduced early mortality suggest an improvement in early diagnosis, better initial management, and earlier antibiotic treatment.

  9. Monoclonal Idiotope Vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Mary K.; Ward, Ronald E.; Kohler, Heinz

    1984-12-01

    A monoclonal anti-idiotope antibody coupled to a carrier protein was used to immunize BALB/c mice against a lethal Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. Vaccinated mice developed a high titer of antibody to phosphorylcholine, which is known to protect against infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Measurement of the median lethal dose of the bacteria indicated that anti-idiotope immunization significantly increased the resistance of BALB/c mice to the bacterial challenge. Antibody to an idiotope can thus be used as an antigen substitute for the induction of protective immunity.

  10. Differentiation of Listeria and Streptococcus strains.

    PubMed

    Herendi, A; Ralovich, B

    1989-01-01

    Colonial morphology of non-beta haemolytic Listeria strains is frequently similar to that of non-haemolytic streptococci. Biochemical characteristics, motility, haemolysis on ox blood agar, growth on Clauberg, selective streptococcus (Si) and Mitis-Salivarius agar medium, CAMP test, serological behaviour of 16 Listeria strains were studied and the results were compared with the properties of Streptococcus strains. Microscopic morphology, motility and catalase activity are useful for distinguishing these strains. To avoid a false diagnosis, latex-agglutination should be supplemented with the above tests.

  11. Streptococcus anginosus Group Bacterial Infections.

    PubMed

    Fazili, Tasaduq; Riddell, Scott; Kiska, Deanna; Endy, Tim; Giurgea, Luca; Sharngoe, Calden; Javaid, Waleed

    2017-09-01

    The Streptococcus anginosus group (SAG) causes a variety of infections in adults. To better understand the burden of SAG infections and their associated morbidity and mortality, we conducted a retrospective analysis of these infections in adults at a tertiary care center. A retrospective review of all cultures positive for SAG in adults and a corresponding review of the patients' medical records were conducted at a tertiary care facility in central New York. Patients with these cultures during the period of January 2007-December 2011 were included. Demographic data, area of residence, clinical features and underlying illnesses, site of infection, length of hospital stay, antibiotic susceptibility and antibiotic therapy were recorded and analyzed. There were 332 SAG cases; most patients were males (59%), mean age of 47 years and 84% lived in urban areas. Overall mortality was 3% with underlying conditions common such as diabetes (25%), hypertension (31%) and immunodeficiency (22%). Most of the infections were related to skin and soft tissue (72%) and polymicrobial (70%) with gram-negative anaerobes and Enterobacteriaceae commonly isolated with SAG. We present the largest study, thus far, reviewing the clinical presentation, management and outcome of infections due to the SAG of organisms. Notable findings from our study are the low mortality associated with SAG infection, and the propensity to present as a skin and tissue and polymicrobial infection. Our findings will assist clinicians in managing patients with SAG infections and recognizing that S anginosus may be one of several organisms responsible for infection. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Iron acquisition and regulation systems in Streptococcus species.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ruiguang; Sun, Xuesong

    2014-05-01

    Gram-positive Streptococcus species are responsible for millions of cases of meningitis, bacterial pneumonia, endocarditis, erysipelas and necrotizing fasciitis. Iron is essential for the growth and survival of Streptococcus in the host environment. Streptococcus species have developed various mechanisms to uptake iron from an environment with limited available iron. Streptococcus can directly extract iron from host iron-containing proteins such as ferritin, transferrin, lactoferrin and hemoproteins, or indirectly by relying on the employment of specialized secreted hemophores (heme chelators) and small siderophore molecules (high affinity ferric chelators). This review presents the most recent discoveries in the iron acquisition system of Streptococcus species - the transporters as well as the regulators.

  13. Implications of the new sepsis definition on research and practice.

    PubMed

    Peach, Brian C

    2017-04-01

    The Society of Critical-Care Medicine and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine recently announced a marked change in the sepsis definition. A task force of 19 sepsis clinicians and researchers made the change based on advances in the pathobiological understanding of the septic process. The task force determined that there were numerous justifications for a revision of the sepsis definition, which are outlined in this article. The systemic inflammatory response criteria have been replaced by the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score in the newly operationalized definition (Singer et al., 2016). In addition to the definition change, the task force recommended using the new quick SOFA (qSOFA) score in non-ICU settings, as a risk stratification tool to identify patients who may be septic or be at risk of developing sepsis. The change in definition will likely have a negative impact on sepsis research in the short-term as hospitals adjust their coding for the new definition, but may result in less misclassification bias and improved research data in the long-term. While the intent of the SCCM/ESICM task force was to better define sepsis for coding and epidemiological research purposes, there is the potential for improved patient outcomes if clinicians are better able to differentiate between sepsis and inflammatory events. The qSOFA tool may also aid clinicians in recognizing sepsis in a quicker manner, leading to more timely treatment, and potentially better outcomes. While the new operationalized Sepsis-3 definition appears on the surface to be an improvement over the previous iterations, it remains to be seen if research data will be more robust using the new criteria. There is the potential for better patient outcomes if clinicians are better able to differentiate sepsis from inflammatory events with the new definition, and if sepsis cases are recognized sooner with qSOFA. Future research on the impact of this definition change on research and

  14. Pulmonary vs Nonpulmonary Sepsis and Mortality in Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sevransky, Jonathan E.; Martin, Greg S.; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro; Shanholtz, Carl; Brower, Roy; Pronovost, Peter J.; Needham, Dale M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute lung injury (ALI) is a frequent complication of sepsis. It is unclear if a pulmonary vs nonpulmonary source of sepsis affects mortality in patients with sepsis-induced ALI. Methods Two hundred eighty-eight consecutive patients with sepsis-induced ALI from 14 ICUs at four hospitals in Baltimore,MDwere prospectively classified as having a pulmonary vs nonpulmonary source of sepsis. Multiple logistic regression was conducted to evaluate the independent association of a pulmonary vs nonpulmonary source of sepsis with inpatient mortality. Results In an unadjusted analysis, in-hospital mortality was lower for pulmonary vs nonpulmonary source of sepsis (42% vs 66%, p < 0.0001). Patients with pulmonary sepsis had lower acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores, shorter ICU stays prior to the development of ALI, and higher lung injury scores. In the adjusted analysis, several factors were predictive of mortality: age (odds ratio [OR], 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01 to 1.06), Charlson comorbidity index (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.30), ICU length of stay prior to ALI diagnosis (OR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.39), APACHE II score (OR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.12), lung injury score (OR, 1.64; 95% CI, 1.11 to 2.43), SOFA score (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.26), and cumulative fluid balance in the first 7 days after ALI diagnosis (OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.10). A pulmonary vs nonpulmonary source of sepsis was not independently associated with mortality (OR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.38 to 1.35). Conclusions Although lower mortality was observed for ALI patients with a pulmonary vs nonpulmonary source of sepsis, this finding is likely due to a lower severity of illness in those with pulmonary sepsis. Pulmonary vs nonpulmonary source of sepsis was not independently predictive of mortality for patients with ALI. PMID:18641112

  15. [Sepsis: case numbers increasing worldwide but new strategies too].

    PubMed

    Rüddel, H; Weinmann, C; Reinhart, K

    2016-08-01

    With the numbers of cases rising worldwide and consistently high mortality, sepsis is one of the world's most significant health issues. The Jena Symposium was dedicated to the challenges in research and development, new approaches to treatment, internationally successful strategies, and a potentially successful new initiative for improving the quality of prophylaxis, early diagnosis, and therapy. The importance of intensifying efforts in the fight against sepsis is becoming increasingly recognized by health care policy. Knowledge of lay people/the public about sepsis is lacking and the standards of quality are in need of improvement.

  16. Sepsis-associated takotsubo cardiomyopathy can be reversed with levosimendan.

    PubMed

    Karvouniaris, Marios; Papanikolaou, John; Makris, Demosthenes; Zakynthinos, Epameinondas

    2012-06-01

    Sepsis is a stressful physical condition, and at the acute phase, overstimulation of the sympathetic nervous system may occur; these events have the potential to induce cardiomyopathy. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is a form of catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy, which occurs very rarely in sepsis. However, TTC management in critically ill patients with sepsis may be challenging because the use of exogenous catecholamines for circulatory support might augment further TTC. Herein, we report a rare case of TTC after urosepsis; and we point out that cardiac function may improve after catecholamine withdrawal and the application of calcium channel sensitizer levosimendan.

  17. Pantoea dispersa: an unusual cause of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mehar, Veerendra; Yadav, Dinesh; Sanghvi, Jyoti; Gupta, Nidhi; Singh, Kuldeep

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal septicemia is the most important cause of neonatal mortality. A wide variety of bacteria both aerobic and anaerobic can cause neonatal sepsis. Genus Pantoea is a member of Enterobacteriaceae family that inhabits plants, soil and water and rarely causes human infections, however, Pantoea dispersa has not been reported as a causative organism for neonatal sepsis. We hereby report two neonates with early onset sepsis caused by Pantoea dispersa. Early detection and appropriate antibiotic therapy can improve overall outcome of this rare infection in neonates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. The Physiology of Early Goal-Directed Therapy for Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lief, Lindsay; Arbo, John; Berlin, David A

    2016-10-05

    In 2001, Rivers and colleagues published a randomized controlled trial of early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) for the treatment of sepsis. More than a decade later, it remains a landmark achievement. The study proved the benefits of early aggressive treatment of sepsis. However, many questions remain about specific aspects of the complex EGDT algorithm. Recently, 3 large trials attempted to replicate these results. None of the studies demonstrated a benefit of an EGDT protocol for sepsis. This review explores the physiologic basis of goal-directed therapy, including the hemodynamic targets and the therapeutic interventions. An understanding of the physiologic basis of EGDT helps reconcile the results of the clinical trials.

  19. Challenges with Diagnosing and Managing Sepsis in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Kalin M.; Dy-Boarman, Eliza A.; Haase, Krystal K.; Maxvill, Kristen (Hesch); Pass, Steven; Alvarez, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis in older adults has many challenges that affect rate of septic diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring parameters. Numerous age-related changes and comorbidities contribute to increased risk of infections in older adults, but also atypical symptomatology that delays diagnosis. Due to various pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic changes in the older adult, medications are absorbed, metabolized, and eliminated at different rates as compared to younger adults, which increases risk of adverse drug reactions due to use of drug therapy needed for sepsis management. This review provides information to aid in diagnosis as well as offers recommendations for monitoring and treating sepsis in the older adult population. PMID:26687340

  20. Effects of propofol on vasopressor use in patients with sepsis and severe sepsis: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Marler, Jacob; Mohrien, Kerry; Kimmons, Lauren A; Vandigo, Joseph E; Oliphant, Carrie S; Boucher, Adam N; Jones, G Morgan

    2016-10-01

    Propofol is one of the most commonly used sedatives in the intensive care unit (ICU) despite its undesirable hypotensive effects. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of continuous intravenous (CIV) propofol on vasopressor requirements in mechanically ventilated patients with sepsis. A multicenter, retrospective, propensity-matched pilot study was conducted comparing patients with sepsis or severe sepsis who received CIV propofol for sedation to those who did not. The primary outcome was incidence of vasopressor support. Secondary outcomes included change in mean arterial pressure, mortality, and length of stay. A total of 279 patients (149 CIV propofol, 130 non-CIV propofol) were evaluated, with 174 patients matched 1:1 based on propensity score. There was no difference in vasopressor support requirements (49.4% vs 54%; P= .65) or in those experiencing a greater than 20% decrease in mean arterial pressure from baseline (58.6% vs 63.2%; P= .53) in the CIV propofol and non-CIV propofol groups. Furthermore, there were no differences in any secondary outcomes including hospital mortality (32.2% vs 33.3%; P= .87). Continuous intravenous propofol for sedation did not increase vasopressor requirements in this septic population. Furthermore, CIV propofol was not associated with significant differences in the use of multiple vasopressors, change in mean arterial pressure, length of stay, or mortality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Diagnostic value of Pentraxin-3 in patients with sepsis and septic shock in accordance with latest sepsis-3 definitions.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Sonja; Behnes, Michael; Pauly, Dominic; Lepiorz, Dominic; Barre, Max; Becher, Tobias; Lang, Siegfried; Akin, Ibrahim; Borggrefe, Martin; Bertsch, Thomas; Hoffmann, Ursula

    2017-08-09

    Pentraxin-3 (PTX-3) is an acute-phase protein involved in inflammatory and infectious processes. This study assesses its diagnostic and prognostic value in patients with sepsis or septic shock in a medical intensive care unit (ICU). The study includes 213 ICU patients with clinical criteria of sepsis and septic shock. 77 donors served as controls. Plasma levels of PTX-3, procalcitonin (PCT) and interleukin-6 were measured on day 1, 3 and 8. PTX-3 correlated with higher lactate levels as well as with APACHE II and SOFA scores (p = 0.0001). PTX-3 levels of patients with sepsis or septic shock were consistently significantly higher than in the control group (p ≤ 0.001). Plasma levels were able to discriminate sepsis and septic shock significantly on day 1, 3 and 8 (range of AUC 0.73-0.92, p = 0.0001). Uniform cut-off levels were defined at ≥5 ng/ml for at least sepsis, ≥9 ng/ml for septic shock (p = 0.0001). PTX-3 reveals diagnostic value for sepsis and septic shock during the first week of intensive care treatment, comparable to interleukin-6 according to latest Sepsis-3 definitions. NCT01535534 . Registered 14.02.2012.

  2. Quantifying the improvement in sepsis diagnosis, documentation, and coding: the marginal causal effect of year of hospitalization on sepsis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Jafarzadeh, S Reza; Thomas, Benjamin S; Marschall, Jonas; Fraser, Victoria J; Gill, Jeff; Warren, David K

    2016-01-01

    To quantify the coinciding improvement in the clinical diagnosis of sepsis, its documentation in the electronic health records, and subsequent medical coding of sepsis for billing purposes in recent years. We examined 98,267 hospitalizations in 66,208 patients who met systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria at a tertiary care center from 2008 to 2012. We used g-computation to estimate the causal effect of the year of hospitalization on receiving an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification discharge diagnosis code for sepsis by estimating changes in the probability of getting diagnosed and coded for sepsis during the study period. When adjusted for demographics, Charlson-Deyo comorbidity index, blood culture frequency per hospitalization, and intensive care unit admission, the causal risk difference for receiving a discharge code for sepsis per 100 hospitalizations with systemic inflammatory response syndrome, had the hospitalization occurred in 2012, was estimated to be 3.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.8%-4.0%), 3.4% (95% CI, 3.3%-3.5%), 2.2% (95% CI, 2.1%-2.3%), and 0.9% (95% CI, 0.8%-1.1%) from 2008 to 2011, respectively. Patients with similar characteristics and risk factors had a higher of probability of getting diagnosed, documented, and coded for sepsis in 2012 than in previous years, which contributed to an apparent increase in sepsis incidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Pathophysiology of sepsis--will the basic research contribute to the improvement of outcome in clinical sepsis?].

    PubMed

    Karima, Risuke

    2008-03-01

    In this decade, the molecular mechanism of sepsis has been strikingly clarified. Especially, the identification of toll-like receptors as the pivotal molecules for the recognition of the stimulation of the inflammatory products of microorganisms has contributed to the elucidation of intracellular signaling pathways which result in severe systemic inflammatory response in sepsis. The production and release of a variety of pro-inflammatory mediators have been found to be associated with severe systemic inflammation and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). In the pathophysiology of the development of MODS in sepsis, the disturbance of peripheral microcirculation, the insult of tissues and cells by leukocytes and activated complements and the augmentation of the disorder of fibrinolytic and coagulation systems, which often results in the outbreak of disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC), will be critically involved. Despite of the advance in the basic research regarding molecular pathophysiology of sepsis, sepsis is still accompanied by high mortality in clinical settings. Almost all clinical trials targeting sepsis-associated mediators have failed, except the substitution therapy of activated protein C. However, further trials based on the basic findings, including the therapies targeting the multiple mediators, will contribute to the improvement of outcome of clinical sepsis. ple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), pro-inflammatory mediator, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC).

  4. Nutritional support in sepsis: still skeptical?

    PubMed

    Nitenberg, Gérard

    2000-08-01

    The immediate metabolic response to a septic challenge is probably adaptive, meaning that nutritional interference, mainly via the parenteral route, during this early phase of instability can do more harm than good. During the later phases, a gradual increase in enteral nutrition, at the expense of parenteral nutrition, combined with the administration of nutraceuticals such as glutamine and omega-3 fatty acids, can counteract wasting and modulate the complex inflammatory response and immunosuppression associated with sepsis. In these times of scarce resources, there is an urgent need to clearly document the efficacy of immuno/pharmaconutrients, individually and in combination, enterally or parenterally, before proposing them for routine management of septic patients in the intensive care unit.

  5. Sepsis, parenteral vaccination and skin disinfection.

    PubMed

    Cook, Ian F

    2016-10-02

    ASBSTRACT Disinfection should be required for all skin penetrative procedures including parenteral administration of vaccines. This review analyses medically attended infectious events following parenteral vaccination in terms of their microbiological aetiology and pathogenesis. Like 'clean' surgical site infections, the major pathogens responsible for these events were Staphylococcal species, implicating endogenous con-tamination as a significant source of infection. As 70% isopropyl alcohol swabbing has been shown to effectively disinfect the skin, it would be medico-legally difficult to defend a case of sepsis with the omission of skin disinfection unless the very low risk of this event was adequately explained to the patient and documented prior to vaccination. There was a significant cost-benefit for skin disinfection and cellulitis. Skin disinfection in the context of parenteral vaccination represents a new paradigm of medical practice; the use of a low cost intervention to prevent an event of very low prevalence but of significant cost.

  6. An Immunological Perspective on Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Bernard; Razzaghian, Hamid; Lavoie, Pascal M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite concerted international efforts, mortality from neonatal infections remains unacceptably high in some areas of the world, particularly for premature infants. Recent developments in flow cytometry and next-generation sequencing technologies have led to major discoveries over the past few years, providing a more integrated understanding of the developing human immune system in the context of its microbial environment. We review these recent findings, focusing on how in human newborns incomplete maturation of the immune system before a full term of gestation impacts on their vulnerability to infection. We also discuss some of the clinical implications of this research in guiding the design of more-accurate age-adapted diagnostic and preventive strategies for neonatal sepsis. PMID:26993220

  7. Sepsis: from pattern to mechanism and back.

    PubMed

    An, Gary; Namas, Rami A; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis is a clinical entity in which complex inflammatory and physiological processes are mobilized, not only across a range of cellular and molecular interactions, but also in clinically relevant physiological signals accessible at the bedside. There is a need for a mechanistic understanding that links the clinical phenomenon of physiologic variability with the underlying patterns of the biology of inflammation, and we assert that this can be facilitated through the use of dynamic mathematical and computational modeling. An iterative approach of laboratory experimentation and mathematical/computational modeling has the potential to integrate cellular biology, physiology, control theory, and systems engineering across biological scales, yielding insights into the control structures that govern mechanisms by which phenomena, detected as biological patterns, are produced. This approach can represent hypotheses in the formal language of mathematics and computation, and link behaviors that cross scales and domains, thereby offering the opportunity to better explain, diagnose, and intervene in the care of the septic patient.

  8. Sepsis, parenteral vaccination and skin disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Ian F.

    2016-01-01

    ASBSTRACT Disinfection should be required for all skin penetrative procedures including parenteral administration of vaccines. This review analyses medically attended infectious events following parenteral vaccination in terms of their microbiological aetiology and pathogenesis. Like ‘clean’ surgical site infections, the major pathogens responsible for these events were Staphylococcal species, implicating endogenous con-tamination as a significant source of infection. As 70% isopropyl alcohol swabbing has been shown to effectively disinfect the skin, it would be medico-legally difficult to defend a case of sepsis with the omission of skin disinfection unless the very low risk of this event was adequately explained to the patient and documented prior to vaccination. There was a significant cost-benefit for skin disinfection and cellulitis. Skin disinfection in the context of parenteral vaccination represents a new paradigm of medical practice; the use of a low cost intervention to prevent an event of very low prevalence but of significant cost. PMID:27295449

  9. A latent class approach for sepsis diagnosis supports use of procalcitonin in the emergency room for diagnosis of severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Given the acknowledged problems in sepsis diagnosis, we use a novel way with the application of the latent class analysis (LCA) to determine the operative characteristics of C-reactive protein (CRP), D-dimer (DD) and Procalcitonin (PCT) as diagnostic tests for sepsis in patients admitted to hospital care with a presumptive infection. Methods Cross-sectional study to determine the diagnostic accuracy of three biological markers against the gold standard of clinical definition of sepsis provided by an expert committee, and also against the likelihood of sepsis according to LCA. Patients were recruited in the emergency room within 24 hours of hospitalization and were follow-up daily until discharge. Results Among 765 patients, the expert committee classified 505 patients (66%) with sepsis, 112 (15%) with infection but without sepsis and 148 (19%) without infection. The best cut-offs points for CRP, DD, and PCT were 7.8 mg/dl, 1616 ng/ml and 0.3 ng/ml, respectively; but, neither sensitivity nor specificity reach 70% for any biomarker. The LCA analysis with the same three tests identified a “cluster” of 187 patients with several characteristics suggesting a more severe condition as well as better microbiological confirmation. Assuming this subset of patients as the new prevalence of sepsis, the ROC curve analysis identified new cut-off points for the tests and suggesting a better discriminatory ability for PCT with a value of 2 ng/ml. Conclusions Under a “classical” definition of sepsis three typical biomarkers (CRP, PCT and DD) are not capable enough to differentiate septic from non-septic patients in the ER. However, a higher level of PCT discriminates a selected group of patients with severe sepsis. PMID:24050481

  10. Internal Validation of the Sepsis in Obstetrics Score to Identify Risk of Morbidity From Sepsis in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Albright, Catherine M; Has, Phinnara; Rouse, Dwight J; Hughes, Brenna L

    2017-10-01

    To prospectively validate the Sepsis in Obstetrics Score, a pregnancy-specific sepsis scoring system, to identify risk for intensive care unit (ICU) admission for sepsis in pregnancy. This is a prospective validation study of the Sepsis in Obstetrics Score. The primary outcome was admission to the ICU for sepsis. Secondary outcomes included admission to a telemetry unit and time to administration of antibiotic therapy. We evaluated test characteristics of a predetermined score of 6 or greater. Between March 2012 and May 2015, 1,250 pregnant or postpartum women presented to the emergency department and met systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria. Of those, 425 (34%) had a clinical suspicion or diagnosis of an infection, 14 of whom (3.3%) were admitted to the ICU. The Sepsis in Obstetrics Score had an area under the curve of 0.85 (95% CI 0.76-0.95) for prediction of ICU admission for sepsis. This is within the prespecified 15% margin of the area under the curve of 0.97 found in the derivation cohort. A score of 6 or greater had a sensitivity of 64%, specificity of 88%, positive predictive value of 15%, and negative predictive value of 98.6%. Women with a score 6 or greater were more likely to be admitted to the ICU (15% compared with 1.4%, P<.01), admitted to a telemetry unit (37.3% compared with 7.2%, P<.01), and have antibiotic therapy initiated (90% compared with 72.9%, P<.01), initiated more quickly (3.2 compared with 3.7 hours, P=.03), although not within 1 hour (5.6 compared with 3.4%, P=.44). The Sepsis in Obstetrics Score is a validated pregnancy-specific score to identify risk of ICU admission for sepsis with the threshold score of 6 having a negative predictive value of 98.6%. Adherence to antibiotic administration guidelines is poor.

  11. In-111 WBC imaging in musculoskeletal sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.; Ouzounian, T.J.; Webber, M.M.; Amstutz, H.C.

    1984-01-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy and utility of the In-111 labeled WBC imaging in a series of patients who were suspected of having musculoskeletal sepsis. The labeling of the WBCs was patterned after a method previously described, in which the WBCs are labeled with In-111 oxine in plasma. The WBCs from 100 ml of blood are separated and incubated with In-111 oxine complex, and then 500 ..mu..Ci. of the labeled cells were reinjected into the patient. Images of the areas in question were obtained at 24 hrs. In some instances, 48 hour images were also obtained. Images were interpreted using consistent criteria. Forty imaging procedures were done on 39 patients. These included 39 total joint protheses, and 17 other images to evaluate possible osteomyelitis, septic arthritis or deep abscesses. Of these studies, 15 were positive, and 42 negative. The findings were then correlated with operative culture and pathology in 21, aspiration cultures and gram stains in 14, and with clinical findings in the remaining 21. This correlation showed 41 true negatives, 12 true positives, 1 false negative, and 2 false positives. The sensitivity was 92.9% and the specificity was 95.2%l. The false negative occurred in a patient on chronic suppressive antibiotic therapy for an infected total hip replacement. The false positive images occurred in a patient with active rheumatoid arthritis and in a patient imaged one month post operative placement of the prosthesis. These images were very useful in several septic patients who had many possible sites of infection. The authors conclude that In-III imaging is an accurate and useful non-invasive method of evaluating musculoskeletal sepsis.

  12. Predictors of neonatal sepsis in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Weber, Martin W; Carlin, John B; Gatchalian, Salvacion; Lehmann, Deborah; Muhe, Lulu; Mulholland, E Kim

    2003-08-01

    Neonatal infections are a major cause of death worldwide. Simple procedures for identifying infants with infection that need referral for treatment are therefore of major public health importance. We investigated 3303 infants <2 months of age presenting with illness to health facilities in Ethiopia, The Gambia, Papua New Guinea and The Philippines, using a standardized approach. Historical factors and clinical signs predicting sepsis, meningitis, hypoxemia, deaths and an ordinal scale indicating severe disease were investigated by logistic regression, and the performance of simple combination rules was explored. In multivariable analysis, reduced feeding ability, no spontaneous movement, temperature >38 degrees C, being drowsy/unconscious, a history of a feeding problem, history of change in activity, being agitated, the presence of lower chest wall indrawing, respiratory rate >60 breaths/min, grunting, cyanosis, a history of convulsions, a bulging fontanel and slow digital capillary refill were independent predictors of severe disease. The presence of any 1 of these 14 signs had a sensitivity for severe disease (defined as sepsis, meningitis, hypoxemia, or radiologically proven pneumonia) of 87% and a specificity of 54%. More stringent combinations, such as demanding 2 signs from the list, resulted in a considerable loss of sensitivity. By contrast only slight loss of sensitivity and considerable gain of specificity resulted from reducing the list to 9 signs. Requiring the presence of fever and any other sign produced a diagnostic rule with extremely low sensitivity (25%). Physical signs can be used to identify young infants at risk of severe disease, however with limited specificity, resulting in large numbers of unnecessary referrals. Further studies are required to validate and refine the prediction of severe disease, especially in the first week of life, but there appear to be limits on the accuracy of prediction that is achievable.

  13. Inhibited muscle amino acid uptake in sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Hasselgren, P O; James, J H; Fischer, J E

    1986-01-01

    Amino acid uptake in vivo was determined in soleus (SOL) muscle, diaphragm, heart, and liver following intravenous injection of [3H]-alpha-amino-isobutyric acid ([3H]-AIB) in rats made septic by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and in sham-operated controls. Muscle amino acid transport was also measured in vitro by determining uptake of [3H]-AIB in incubated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and SOL muscles. Results were expressed as distribution ratio between [3H]-AIB in intracellular and extracellular fluid. AIB uptake in vivo was reduced by 90% in SOL and cardiac muscle and by 45% in diaphragm 16 hours after CLP. In contrast, AIB uptake by liver was almost four times higher in septic than in control animals. AIB uptake in vitro was reduced by 18% in EDL 8 hours after CLP but was not significantly altered in SOL at the same time point. Sixteen hours after CLP, AIB uptake was significantly reduced in both muscles, i.e., by 17% in EDL and by 65% in SOL. When muscles from untreated rats were incubated in the presence of plasma from septic animals (16 hours CLP) or from animals injected with endotoxin (2 mg/kg body weight), AIB uptake was reduced. Addition of endotoxin in vitro (2-200 micrograms/ml) to incubated muscles did not affect AIB uptake. The results suggest that sepsis leads to marked impairment of amino acid transport system A in muscle and that this impairment is mediated by a circulating factor that is not endotoxin. Reduced uptake of amino acids by skeletal muscle during sepsis may divert amino acids to the liver for increased gluconeogenesis and protein synthesis. PMID:3963895

  14. Melatonin, clock genes and mitochondria in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; Rahim, Ibtissem; Acuña-Fernández, Carlos; Fernández-Ortiz, Marisol; Solera-Marín, Jorge; Sayed, Ramy K A; Díaz-Casado, María E; Rusanova, Iryna; López, Luis C; Escames, Germaine

    2017-08-07

    After the characterization of the central pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the expression of clock genes was identified in several peripheral tissues including the immune system. The hierarchical control from the central clock to peripheral clocks extends to other functions including endocrine, metabolic, immune, and mitochondrial responses. Increasing evidence links the disruption of the clock genes expression with multiple diseases and aging. Chronodisruption is associated with alterations of the immune system, immunosenescence, impairment of energy metabolism, and reduction of pineal and extrapineal melatonin production. Regarding sepsis, a condition coursing with an exaggerated response of innate immunity, experimental and clinical data showed an alteration of circadian rhythms that reflects the loss of the normal oscillation of the clock. Moreover, recent data point to that some mediators of the immune system affects the normal function of the clock. Under specific conditions, this control disappears reactivating the immune response. So, it seems that clock gene disruption favors the innate immune response, which in turn induces the expression of proinflammatory mediators, causing a further alteration of the clock. Here, the clock control of the mitochondrial function turns off, leading to a bioenergetic decay and formation of reactive oxygen species that, in turn, activate the inflammasome. This arm of the innate immunity is responsible for the huge increase of interleukin-1β and entrance into a vicious cycle that could lead to the death of the patient. The broken clock is recovered by melatonin administration, that is accompanied by the normalization of the innate immunity and mitochondrial homeostasis. Thus, this review emphasizes the connection between clock genes, innate immunity and mitochondria in health and sepsis, and the role of melatonin to maintain clock homeostasis.

  15. Performance of interleukin-27 as a sepsis diagnostic biomarker in critically ill adults.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hector R; Liu, Kathleen D; Kangelaris, Kirsten N; Lahni, Patrick; Calfee, Carolyn S

    2014-10-01

    We recently identified interleukin-27 (IL-27) as a sepsis diagnostic biomarker in children. Here we assess IL-27 as a sepsis diagnostic biomarker in critically ill adults with systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis. IL-27 and procalcitonin (PCT) were measured from plasma samples in three groups: no sepsis (n = 78), pulmonary source of sepsis (n = 66), and non-pulmonary source of sepsis (n = 43). Receiver operating characteristic curves and classification and regression tree methodology were used to evaluate biomarker performance. IL-27 did not discriminate effectively between sepsis and sterile systemic inflammatory response syndrome in unselected patients. The highest area under the curve (AUC) was 0.70 (95% C.I. 0.60 - 0.80) for IL-27 in subjects with a non-pulmonary source of sepsis. A decision tree incorporating IL-27, PCT, and age had an AUC of 0.79 (0.71-0.87) in subjects with a non-pulmonary source of sepsis. Compared to children with sepsis, adults with sepsis express less IL-27. IL-27 performed overall poorly in this cohort as a sepsis diagnostic biomarker. Combining IL-27, PCT, and age reasonably estimated the risk of sepsis in subjects with a non-pulmonary source of sepsis. IL-27 may be a more reliable sepsis diagnostic biomarker in children than in adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Performance of Interleukin-27 as a Sepsis Diagnostic Biomarker in Critically Ill Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hector R.; Liu, Kathleen D.; Kangelaris, Kirsten N.; Lahni, Patrick; Calfee, Carolyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We recently identified interleukin-27 (IL-27) as a sepsis diagnostic biomarker in children. Here we assess IL-27 as a sepsis diagnostic biomarker in critically ill adults with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis. Methods IL-27 and procalcitonin (PCT) were measured from plasma samples in three groups: no sepsis (n = 78), pulmonary source of sepsis (n = 66), and non-pulmonary source of sepsis (n = 43). Receiver operating characteristic curves and classification and regression tree methodology were used to evaluate biomarker performance. Results IL-27 did not discriminate effectively between sepsis and sterile SIRS in unselected patients. The highest area under the curve (AUC) was 0.70 (95% C.I. 0.60 – 0.80) for IL-27 in subjects with a non-pulmonary source of sepsis. A decision tree incorporating IL-27, PCT, and age had an AUC of 0.79 (0.71 – 0.87) in subjects with a non-pulmonary source of sepsis. Compared to children with sepsis, adults with sepsis express less IL-27. Conclusions IL-27 performed overall poorly in this cohort as a sepsis diagnostic biomarker. Combining IL-27, PCT, and age reasonably estimated the risk of sepsis in subjects with a non-pulmonary source of sepsis. IL-27 may be a more reliable sepsis diagnostic biomarker in children than in adults. PMID:24848949

  17. Genetic Basis of Antibiotic Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Streptococcus gallolyticus (Streptococcus bovis)

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, Roland; Huet, Corinne; Picherot, Mélanie; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Poyart, Claire

    2005-01-01

    Among 128 Streptococcus gallolyticus (Streptococcus bovis) isolates, 77.7% were resistant to tetracyclines and contained tet(M) and/or tet(L) and/or tet(O). A total of 59.4% had macrolide resistance and contained erm(B) and, rarely, mef(A). Among the one-third of isolates highly resistant to kanamycin and streptomycin, most harbored aphA3 and aad-6 genes. PMID:15793162

  18. Streptococcus tigurinus, a Novel Member of the Streptococcus mitis Group, Causes Invasive Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Nicolas J.; Tarr, Philip E.; Eich, Gerhard; Schulthess, Bettina; Bahlmann, Anna S.; Keller, Peter M.; Bloemberg, Guido V.

    2012-01-01

    We recently described the novel species Streptococcus tigurinus sp. nov. belonging to the Streptococcus mitis group. The type strain AZ_3aT of S. tigurinus was originally isolated from a patient with infective endocarditis. According to its phenotypic and molecular characteristics, S. tigurinus is most closely related to Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus infantis. Accurate identification of S. tigurinus is facilitated by 16S rRNA gene analysis. We retrospectively analyzed our 16S rRNA gene molecular database, which contains sequences of all clinical samples obtained in our institute since 2003. We detected 17 16S rRNA gene sequences which were assigned to S. tigurinus, including sequences from the 3 S. tigurinus strains described previously. S. tigurinus originated from normally sterile body sites, such as blood, cerebrospinal fluid, or heart valves, of 14 patients and was initially detected by culture or broad-range 16S rRNA gene PCR, followed by sequencing. The 14 patients had serious invasive infections, i.e., infective endocarditis (n = 6), spondylodiscitis (n = 3), bacteremia (n = 2), meningitis (n = 1), prosthetic joint infection (n = 1), and thoracic empyema (n = 1). To evaluate the presence of Streptococcus tigurinus in the endogenous oral microbial flora, we screened saliva specimens of 31 volunteers. After selective growth, alpha-hemolytic growing colonies were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and subsequent molecular methods. S. tigurinus was not identified among 608 strains analyzed. These data indicate that S. tigurinus is not widely distributed in the oral cavity. In conclusion, S. tigurinus is a novel agent of invasive infections, particularly infective endocarditis. PMID:22760039

  19. The Prehospital Sepsis Project: out-of-hospital physiologic predictors of sepsis outcomes.

    PubMed

    Baez, Amado Alejandro; Hanudel, Priscilla; Wilcox, Susan Renee

    2013-12-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock are common, expensive and often fatal medical problems. The care of the critically sick and injured often begins in the prehospital setting; there is limited data available related to predictors and interventions specific to sepsis in the prehospital arena. The objective of this study was to assess the predictive effect of physiologic elements commonly reported in the out-of-hospital setting in the outcomes of patients transported with sepsis. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study. Data from the years 2004-2006 were collected. Adult cases (≥18 years of age) transported by Emergency Medical Services to a major academic center with the diagnosis of sepsis as defined by ICD-9-CM diagnostic codes were included. Descriptive statistics and standard deviations were used to present group characteristics. Chi-square was used for statistical significance and odds ratio (OR) to assess strength of association. Statistical significance was set at the .05 level. Physiologic variables studied included mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR) and shock index (SI). Sixty-three (63) patients were included. Outcome variables included a mean hospital length of stay (HLOS) of 13.75 days (SD = 9.97), mean ventilator days of 4.93 (SD = 7.87), in-hospital mortality of 22 out of 63 (34.9%), and mean intensive care unit length-of-stay (ICU-LOS) of 7.02 days (SD = 7.98). Although SI and RR were found to predict intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, [OR 5.96 (CI, 1.49-25.78; P = .003) and OR 4.81 (CI, 1.16-21.01; P = .0116), respectively] none of the studied variables were found to predict mortality (MAP <65 mmHg: P = .39; HR >90: P = .60; RR >20 P = .11; SI >0.7 P = .35). This study demonstrated that the out-of-hospital shock index and respiratory rate have high predictability for ICU admission. Further studies should include the development of an out-of-hospital sepsis score.

  20. Streptococcus moroccensis sp. nov. and Streptococcus rifensis sp. nov., isolated from raw camel milk.

    PubMed

    Kadri, Zaina; Amar, Mohamed; Ouadghiri, Mouna; Cnockaert, Margo; Aerts, Maarten; El Farricha, Omar; Vandamme, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Two catalase- and oxidase-negative Streptococcus-like strains, LMG 27682(T) and LMG 27684(T), were isolated from raw camel milk in Morocco. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing assigned these bacteria to the genus Streptococcus with Streptococcus rupicaprae 2777-2-07(T) as their closest phylogenetic neighbour (95.9% and 95.7% similarity, respectively). 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between the two strains was 96.7%. Although strains LMG 27682(T) and LMG 27684(T) shared a DNA-DNA hybridization value that corresponded to the threshold level for species delineation (68%), the two strains could be distinguished by multiple biochemical tests, sequence analysis of the phenylalanyl-tRNA synthase (pheS), RNA polymerase (rpoA) and ATP synthase (atpA) genes and by their MALDI-TOF MS profiles. On the basis of these considerable phenotypic and genotypic differences, we propose to classify both strains as novel species of the genus Streptococcus, for which the names Streptococcus moroccensis sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 27682(T)  = CCMM B831(T)) and Streptococcus rifensis sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 27684(T)  = CCMM B833(T)) are proposed.

  1. Streptococcus loxodontisalivarius sp. nov. and Streptococcus saliviloxodontae sp. nov., isolated from oral cavities of elephants.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masanori; Shinozaki-Kuwahara, Noriko; Hirasawa, Masatomo; Takada, Kazuko

    2014-09-01

    Four Gram-stain-positive, catalase-negative, coccoid-shaped organisms were isolated from elephant oral cavities. The isolates were tentatively identified as streptococcal species based on the results of biochemical tests. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies confirmed the organisms to be members of the genus Streptococcus. Two isolates (NUM 6304(T) and NUM 6312) were related most closely to Streptococcus salivarius with 96.8 % and 93.1 % similarity based on the 16S rRNA gene and the RNA polymerase β subunit encoding gene (rpoB), respectively, and to Streptococcus vestibularis with 83.7 % similarity based on the 60 kDa heat-shock protein gene (groEL). The other two isolates (NUM 6306(T) and NUM 6318) were related most closely to S. vestibularis with 97.0 % and 82.9 % similarity based on the 16S rRNA and groEL genes, respectively, and to S. salivarius with 93.5 % similarity based on the rpoB gene. Based on phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence, these isolates are suggested to represent novel species of the genus Streptococcus, for which the names Streptococcus loxodontisalivarius sp. nov. (type strain NUM 6304(T) = JCM 19287(T) = DSM 27382(T)) and Streptococcus saliviloxodontae sp. nov. (type strain NUM 6306(T) = JCM 19288(T) = DSM 27513(T)) are proposed.

  2. Uso de la punción lumbar en la evaluación de sepsis neonatal tardía en recién nacidos de bajo peso al nacer

    PubMed Central

    Zea-Vera, A; Turín, CG; Rueda, MS; Guillén-Pinto, D; Medina-Alva, P; Tori, A; Rivas, M; Zegarra, J; Castañeda, A; Cam, L; Ochoa, TJ

    2017-01-01

    RESUMEN El objetivo de este estudio fue analizar el uso de la punción lumbar (PL) en las sospechas de sepsis neonatal tardía. Se recomienda realizar una PL en la evaluación de toda sospecha de sepsis neonatal tardía. Se utilizó una cohorte de 414 neonatos con peso al nacer <2000g en tres hospitales de Lima. Se realizó la PL en 45/214 (21,0%) sospechas de sepsis y en 13/48 (27,1%) sepsis confirmadas por hemocultivo. Se diagnosticó meningitis en 8/214 (3,7%) sospechas y en 8/45 (17,5%) episodios en los que se realizó la PL. El tiempo de tratamiento de los episodios sin PL fue similar a los episodios de sepsis con meningitis descartada y menor a los episodios de meningitis. El uso de la PL es bajo, lo que puede resultar en meningitis no diagnosticadas y tratadas inadecuadamente. Es necesario reforzar la importancia de la PL en la evaluación de sepsis neonatal. PMID:27656928

  3. Picroside II protects against sepsis via suppressing inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Zhou, Miao; Li, Chengbao; Chen, Yuanli; Fang, Wei; Xu, Guo; Shi, Xueyin

    2016-01-01

    Picroside II, an iridoid compound extracted from Picrorhiza, exhibits anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activities. We explored the protective effects and mechanisms of picroside II in a mouse model of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), using three groups of mice: Group A (sham), Group B (CLP+NS) and Group C (CLP+20 mg/kg picroside II). The mortality in mice with sepsis was decreased by the administration of picroside II, and lung injury was alleviated simultaneously. Picroside II treatment enhanced bacterial clearance in septic mice. Further, picroside II treatment alleviated the inflammatory response in sepsis and enhanced immune function by inhibiting the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome and NF-κB pathways. Picroside II may represent an anti-inflammatory drug candidate, providing novel insight into the treatment of sepsis. PMID:28078023

  4. Development of an e-learning package for sepsis care.

    PubMed

    Davis, Anna; Henderson, James; Langmack, Gill

    Severe sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK. This article describes the collaborative development and implementation of an interactive online learning package to understand the key role nurses have in recognising and then starting to apply the Sepsis Six care bundle in clinical practice. The e-learning package, developed in a UK teaching hospital, uses a case study approach to address the knowledge that is required to be able to recognise sepsis, to understand the processes that occur and the ongoing care and treatment required. The package is relevant to final-year student nurses, newly registered nurses in preceptorship and other health professionals involved in assessing and treating patients who may be developing sepsis.

  5. Sepsis in cirrhosis: emerging concepts in pathogenesis, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Philips, Cyriac Abby; Sarin, Shiv Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Infections and sepsis are more common in cirrhotic than in the general population and constitute the commonest cause of sudden worsening and death. The diagnosis of systemic inflammatory syndrome and sepsis are challenging in cirrhotics due to an underlying a state of hyperdynamic circulation. Further, poor nutritional and bone marrow reserves lead to modest host immune response, the so called immunoparalysis state and the outcome of antibiotic therapy is suboptimal. In this review, a comprehensive description of current and emerging concepts in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of sepsis with importance to current and novel biomarkers for diagnosis of sepsis in cirrhosis is presented. Furthermore, novel treatment options and preventive strategies are discussed to improve the overall survival.

  6. Molecular Hydrogen Therapy Ameliorates Organ Damage Induced by Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yijun; Zhu, Duming

    2016-01-01

    Since it was proposed in 2007, molecular hydrogen therapy has been widely concerned and researched. Many animal experiments were carried out in a variety of disease fields, such as cerebral infarction, ischemia reperfusion injury, Parkinson syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, chronic kidney disease, radiation injury, chronic hepatitis, rheumatoid arthritis, stress ulcer, acute sports injuries, mitochondrial and inflammatory disease, and acute erythema skin disease and other pathological processes or diseases. Molecular hydrogen therapy is pointed out as there is protective effect for sepsis patients, too. The impact of molecular hydrogen therapy against sepsis is shown from the aspects of basic vital signs, organ functions (brain, lung, liver, kidney, small intestine, etc.), survival rate, and so forth. Molecular hydrogen therapy is able to significantly reduce the release of inflammatory factors and oxidative stress injury. Thereby it can reduce damage of various organ functions from sepsis and improve survival rate. Molecular hydrogen therapy is a prospective method against sepsis.

  7. SOMANZ guidelines for the investigation and management sepsis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, Lucy; Robinson, Helen L; Barrett, Helen; Crozier, Timothy M; Giles, Michelle; Idel, Irena; Lowe, Sandra; Lust, Karin; Marnoch, Catherine A; Morton, Mark R; Said, Joanne; Wong, Maggie; Makris, Angela

    2017-07-03

    SOMANZ (Society of Obstetric Medicine Australia and New Zealand) has written a guideline to provide evidence-based guidance for the investigation and care of women with sepsis in pregnancy or the postpartum period. The guideline is evidence-based and incorporates recent changes in the definition of sepsis. The etiology, investigation and treatment of bacterial, viral and non-infective causes of sepsis are discussed. Obstetric considerations relevant to anaesthetic and intensive care treatment in sepsis are also addressed. A multi-disciplinary group of clinicians with experience in all aspects of the care of pregnant women have contributed to the development of the guidelines. This is an executive summary of the guidelines. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  8. Government introduces action plan to reduce deaths from sepsis.

    PubMed

    Kleebauer, Alistair

    2015-01-20

    Tackling sepsis - the potentially fatal over-reaction of the immune system to infection - must be given the same priority as reducing Clostridium difficile and MRSA infections, the government has said.

  9. Clinical Decision Support for Early Recognition of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Amland, Robert C; Hahn-Cover, Kristin E

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is an inflammatory response triggered by infection, with a high in-hospital mortality rate. Early recognition and treatment can reverse the inflammatory response, with evidence of improved patient outcomes. One challenge clinicians face is identifying the inflammatory syndrome against the background of the patient's infectious illness and comorbidities. An approach to this problem is implementation of computerized early warning tools for sepsis. This multicenter retrospective study sought to determine clinimetric performance of a cloud-based computerized sepsis clinical decision support system (CDS), understand the epidemiology of sepsis, and identify opportunities for quality improvement. Data encompassed 6200 adult hospitalizations from 2012 through 2013. Of 13% patients screened-in, 51% were already suspected to have an infection when the system activated. This study focused on a patient cohort screened-in before infection was suspected; median time from arrival to CDS activation was 3.5 hours, and system activation to diagnostic collect was another 8.6 hours.

  10. HDL in sepsis - risk factor and therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Morin, Emily E; Guo, Ling; Schwendeman, Anna; Li, Xiang-An

    2015-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a key component of circulating blood and plays essential roles in regulation of vascular endothelial function and immunity. Clinical data demonstrate that HDL levels drop by 40-70% in septic patients, which is associated with a poor prognosis. Experimental studies using Apolipoprotein A-I (ApoAI) null mice showed that HDL deficient mice are susceptible to septic death, and overexpressing ApoAI in mice to increase HDL levels protects against septic death. These clinical and animal studies support our hypothesis that a decrease in HDL level is a risk factor for sepsis, and raising circulating HDL levels may provide an efficient therapy for sepsis. In this review, we discuss the roles of HDL in sepsis and summarize the efforts of using synthetic HDL as a potential therapy for sepsis.

  11. Use of biomarkers in pediatric sepsis: literature review

    PubMed Central

    Lanziotti, Vanessa Soares; Póvoa, Pedro; Soares, Márcio; Silva, José Roberto Lapa e; Barbosa, Arnaldo Prata; Salluh, Jorge Ibrain Figueira

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in recent years, sepsis is still a leading cause of hospitalization and mortality in infants and children. The presence of biomarkers during the response to an infectious insult makes it possible to use such biomarkers in screening, diagnosis, prognosis (risk stratification), monitoring of therapeutic response, and rational use of antibiotics (for example, the determination of adequate treatment length). Studies of biomarkers in sepsis in children are still relatively scarce. This review addresses the use of biomarkers in sepsis in pediatric patients with emphasis on C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, interleukins 6, 8, and 18, human neutrophil gelatinase, and proadrenomedullin. Assessment of these biomarkers may be useful in the management of pediatric sepsis. PMID:28099644

  12. Histamine H3 activation depresses cardiac function in experimental sepsis.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Eschun, G; Bose, D; Jacobs, H; Yang, J J; Light, R B; Mink, S N

    1998-11-01

    In the heart, histamine (H3) receptors may function as inhibitory presynaptic receptors that decrease adrenergic norepinephrine release in conditions of enhanced sympathetic neural activity. We hypothesized that H3-receptor blockade might improve cardiovascular function in sepsis. In a canine model of Escherichia coli sepsis, we found that H3-receptor blockade increased cardiac output (3.6 to 5.3 l/min, P < 0.05), systemic blood pressure (mean 76 to 96 mmHg, P < 0.05), and left ventricular contractility compared with pretreatment values. Plasma histamine concentrations increased modestly in the H3-blocker-sepsis group compared with values obtained in a nonsepsis-time-control group. In an in vitro preparation, histamine H3 activation could be identified under conditions of septic plasma. We conclude that activation of H3 receptors may contribute to cardiovascular collapse in sepsis.

  13. HDL in sepsis – risk factor and therapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Emily E.; Guo, Ling; Schwendeman, Anna; Li, Xiang-An

    2015-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a key component of circulating blood and plays essential roles in regulation of vascular endothelial function and immunity. Clinical data demonstrate that HDL levels drop by 40–70% in septic patients, which is associated with a poor prognosis. Experimental studies using Apolipoprotein A-I (ApoAI) null mice showed that HDL deficient mice are susceptible to septic death, and overexpressing ApoAI in mice to increase HDL levels protects against septic death. These clinical and animal studies support our hypothesis that a decrease in HDL level is a risk factor for sepsis, and raising circulating HDL levels may provide an efficient therapy for sepsis. In this review, we discuss the roles of HDL in sepsis and summarize the efforts of using synthetic HDL as a potential therapy for sepsis. PMID:26557091

  14. Biomarkers for Sepsis: What Is and What Might Be?

    PubMed Central

    Biron, Bethany M.; Ayala, Alfred; Lomas-Neira, Joanne L.

    2015-01-01

    Every year numerous individuals develop the morbid condition of sepsis. Therefore, novel biomarkers that might better inform clinicians treating such patients are sorely needed. Difficulty in identifying such markers is in part due to the complex heterogeneity of sepsis, resulting from the broad and vague definition of this state/condition based on numerous possible clinical signs and symptoms as well as an incomplete understanding of the underlying pathobiology of this complex condition. This review considers some of the attempts that have been made so far, looking at both the pro- and anti-inflammatory response to sepsis, as well as genomic analysis, as sources of potential biomarkers. Irrespective, for functional biomarker(s) of sepsis to successfully translate from the laboratory to a clinical setting, the biomarker must be target specific and sensitive as well as easy to implement/interpret, and be cost effective, such that they can be utilized routinely in patient diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26417200

  15. Why we need a new definition of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Beesley, Sarah J; Lanspa, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    On April 23, 2015, Kaukonen and colleagues published an article in the New England Journal of Medicine entitled "Systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria in defining severe sepsis", which investigated the sensitivity and validity of using SIRS criteria to define intensive care unit (ICU) patients with severe sepsis. This study used admission data of over 100,000 patients in order to investigate patients with severe sepsis who either met or didn't meet SIRS criteria. The investigators found that in-hospital mortality increased linearly with the number of SIRS criteria met; raising concern that SIRS criterion is not sensitive enough. This study of SIRS criteria raises important questions about the recognition and diagnosis of severe sepsis.

  16. 9230 FECAL ENTEROCOCCUS/STREPTOCOCCUS GROUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1903 the genus name Enterococcus was proposed for gram-positive, catalase-negative, coccoid-shaped bacterial of intestinal origin. Several years later, it was suggested that the genus name be changed to Streptococcus because of the organisms' ability to form chains of coccoid...

  17. A lingual abscess caused by Streptococcus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Amanda T; Hsia, Jennifer C; Mendez, Eduardo; Clarridge, Jill E

    2012-04-01

    Lingual abscesses are rare. We describe a case in a healthy female with no recent history of trauma. The organism recovered by culture of drainage material collected prior to antibiotic treatment was Streptococcus intermedius, an organism recognized as flora of the oropharynx and associated with abscess formation. The isolate was resistant to clindamycin, which was the antibiotic therapy that the patient received.

  18. 9230 FECAL ENTEROCOCCUS/STREPTOCOCCUS GROUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1903 the genus name Enterococcus was proposed for gram-positive, catalase-negative, coccoid-shaped bacterial of intestinal origin. Several years later, it was suggested that the genus name be changed to Streptococcus because of the organisms' ability to form chains of coccoid...

  19. Nontypeable Streptococcus pneumoniae as an Otopathogen

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingfu; Kaur, Ravinder; Casey, Janet R.; Sabharwal, Vishakha; Pelton, Stephen; Pichichero, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Among 34 Spn sequential isolates from middle ear fluid we found a case of a nontypeable Streptococcus pneumoniae (NT-Spn) in a child with AOM. The strain was pneumolysin PCR positive and capsule gene PCR negative. Virulence of the NT-Spn was confirmed in a chinchilla model of AOM. PMID:21251566

  20. Streptococcus-Zebrafish Model of Bacterial Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Melody N.; Pfeifer, John D.; Caparon, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Due to its small size, rapid generation time, powerful genetic systems, and genomic resources, the zebrafish has emerged as an important model of vertebrate development and human disease. Its well-developed adaptive and innate cellular immune systems make the zebrafish an ideal model for the study of infectious diseases. With a natural and important pathogen of fish, Streptococcus iniae, we have established a streptococcus- zebrafish model of bacterial pathogenesis. Following injection into the dorsal muscle, zebrafish developed a lethal infection, with a 50% lethal dose of 103 CFU, and died within 2 to 3 days. The pathogenesis of infection resembled that of S. iniae in farmed fish populations and that of several important human streptococcal diseases and was characterized by an initial focal necrotic lesion that rapidly progressed to invasion of the pathogen into all major organ systems, including the brain. Zebrafish were also susceptible to infection by the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. However, disease was characterized by a marked absence of inflammation, large numbers of extracellular streptococci in the dorsal muscle, and extensive myonecrosis that occurred far in advance of any systemic invasion. The genetic systems available for streptococci, including a novel method of mutagenesis which targets genes whose products are exported, were used to identify several mutants attenuated for virulence in zebrafish. This combi