Science.gov

Sample records for sequence including maps

  1. Sequence finishing and mapping of Drosophila melanogasterheterochromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Kennedy, Cameron; Acevedo,David; Evans-Holm, Martha; Frise, Erwin; Wan, Kenneth H.; Park, Soo; Mendez-Lago, Maria; Rossi, Fabrizio; Villasante, Alfredo; Dimitri,Patrizio; Karpen, Gary H.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2007-06-15

    Genome sequences for most metazoans are incomplete due tothe presence of repeated DNA in the pericentromeric heterochromatin. Theheterochromatic regions of D. melanogaster contain 20 Mb of sequenceamenable to mapping, sequence assembly and finishing. Here we describethe generation of 15 Mb of finished or improved heterochromatic sequenceusing available clone resources and assembly and mapping methods. We alsoconstructed a BAC-based physical map that spans approximately 13 Mb ofthe pericentromeric heterochromatin, and a cytogenetic map that positionsapproximately 11 Mb of BAC contigs and sequence scaffolds in specificchromosomal locations. The integrated sequence assembly and maps greatlyimprove our understanding of the structure and composition of this poorlyunderstood fraction of a metazoan genome and provide a framework forfunctional analyses.

  2. A Statistical Approach for Ambiguous Sequence Mappings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When attempting to map RNA sequences to a reference genome, high percentages of short sequence reads are often assigned to multiple genomic locations. One approach to handling these “ambiguous mappings” has been to discard them. This results in a loss of data, which can sometimes be as much as 45% o...

  3. Mapping Replication Origin Sequences in Eukaryotic Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Haiqing; Besnard, Emilie; Desprat, Romain; Ryan, Michael; Kahli, Malik; Lemaitre, Jean-Marc; Aladjem, Mirit I.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in genome sequencing technology have led towards the complete mapping of DNA replication initiation sites in the human genome. This thorough origin mapping facilitates the understanding of the relationship between replication initiation events, transcription and chromatin modifications and allows the characterization of consensus sequences of potential replication origins. This unit provides a detailed protocol for isolation and sequence analyses of nascent DNA strands. Two variations of the protocol based on non-overlapping assumptions are described below, addressing potential bias issues for whole genome analyses. PMID:25447077

  4. From mapping to sequencing, post-sequencing and beyond.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Takuji; Matsumoto, Takashi; Antonio, Baltazar A; Nagamura, Yoshiaki

    2005-01-01

    The Rice Genome Research Program (RGP) in Japan has been collaborating with the international community in elucidating a complete high-quality sequence of the rice genome. As the pioneer in large-scale analysis of the rice genome, the RGP has successfully established the fundamental tools for genome research such as a genetic map, a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC)-based physical map, a transcript map and a phage P1 artificial chromosome (PAC)/bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) sequence-ready physical map, which serve as common resources for genome sequencing. Among the 12 rice chromosomes, the RGP is in charge of sequencing six chromosomes covering 52% of the 390 Mb total length of the genome. The contribution of the RGP to the realization of decoding the rice genome sequence with high accuracy and deciphering the genetic information in the genome will have a great impact in understanding the biology of the rice plant that provides a major food source for almost half of the world's population. A high-quality draft sequence (phase 2) was completed in December 2002. Since then, much of the finished quality sequence (phase 3) has become available in public databases. With the completion of sequencing in December 2004, it is expected that the genome sequence would facilitate innovative research in functional and applied genomics. A map-based genome sequence is indispensable for further improvement of current rice varieties and for development of novel varieties carrying agronomically important traits such as high yield potential and tolerance to both biotic and abiotic stresses. In addition to genome sequencing, various related projects have been initiated to generate valuable resources, which could serve as indispensable tools in clarifying the structure and function of the rice genome. These resources have been made available to the scientific community through the Rice Genome Resource Center (RGRC) of the National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences (NIAS) to

  5. Reading sequence-directed computational nucleosome maps.

    PubMed

    Nibhani, Reshma; Trifonov, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Recently developed latest version of the sequence-directed single-base resolution nucleosome mapping reveals existence of strong nucleosomes and chromatin columnar structures (columns). Broad application of this simple technique for further studies of chromatin and chromosome structure requires some basic understanding as to how it works and what information it affords. The paper provides such an introduction to the method. The oscillating maps of singular nucleosomes, of short and long oligonucleosome columns, are explained, as well as maps of chromatin on satellite DNA and occurrences of counter-phase (antiparallel) nucleosome neighbors.

  6. Interior view looking SW includes map hanging from ceiling and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view looking SW includes map hanging from ceiling and edge of fire finder stand on right. - Badger Mountain Lookout, .125 mile northwest of Badger Mountain summit, East Wenatchee, Douglas County, WA

  7. Sequence analysis by iterated maps, a review.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Jonas S

    2014-05-01

    Among alignment-free methods, Iterated Maps (IMs) are on a particular extreme: they are also scale free (order free). The use of IMs for sequence analysis is also distinct from other alignment-free methodologies in being rooted in statistical mechanics instead of computational linguistics. Both of these roots go back over two decades to the use of fractal geometry in the characterization of phase-space representations. The time series analysis origin of the field is betrayed by the title of the manuscript that started this alignment-free subdomain in 1990, 'Chaos Game Representation'. The clash between the analysis of sequences as continuous series and the better established use of Markovian approaches to discrete series was almost immediate, with a defining critique published in same journal 2 years later. The rest of that decade would go by before the scale-free nature of the IM space was uncovered. The ensuing decade saw this scalability generalized for non-genomic alphabets as well as an interest in its use for graphic representation of biological sequences. Finally, in the past couple of years, in step with the emergence of BigData and MapReduce as a new computational paradigm, there is a surprising third act in the IM story. Multiple reports have described gains in computational efficiency of multiple orders of magnitude over more conventional sequence analysis methodologies. The stage appears to be now set for a recasting of IMs with a central role in processing nextgen sequencing results.

  8. Mapping and sequencing the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    1988-01-01

    Numerous meetings have been held and a debate has developed in the biological community over the merits of mapping and sequencing the human genome. In response a committee to examine the desirability and feasibility of mapping and sequencing the human genome was formed to suggest options for implementing the project. The committee asked many questions. Should the analysis of the human genome be left entirely to the traditionally uncoordinated, but highly successful, support systems that fund the vast majority of biomedical research. Or should a more focused and coordinated additional support system be developed that is limited to encouraging and facilitating the mapping and eventual sequencing of the human genome. If so, how can this be done without distorting the broader goals of biological research that are crucial for any understanding of the data generated in such a human genome project. As the committee became better informed on the many relevant issues, the opinions of its members coalesced, producing a shared consensus of what should be done. This report reflects that consensus.

  9. Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1988-01-01

    Numerous meetings have been held and a debate has developed in the biological community over the merits of mapping and sequencing the human genome. In response a committee to examine the desirability and feasibility of mapping and sequencing the human genome was formed to suggest options for implementing the project. The committee asked many questions. Should the analysis of the human genome be left entirely to the traditionally uncoordinated, but highly successful, support systems that fund the vast majority of biomedical research. Or should a more focused and coordinated additional support system be developed that is limited to encouraging and facilitating the mapping and eventual sequencing of the human genome. If so, how can this be done without distorting the broader goals of biological research that are crucial for any understanding of the data generated in such a human genome project. As the committee became better informed on the many relevant issues, the opinions of its members coalesced, producing a shared consensus of what should be done. This report reflects that consensus.

  10. Using the NCBI Map Viewer to browse genomic sequence data.

    PubMed

    Wolfsberg, Tyra G

    2011-04-01

    This unit includes a basic protocol with an introduction to the Map Viewer, describing how to perform a simple text-based search of genome annotations to view the genomic context of a gene, navigate along a chromosome, zoom in and out, and change the displayed maps to hide and show information. It also describes some of NCBI's sequence-analysis tools, which are provided as links from the Map Viewer. The alternate protocols describe different ways to query the genome sequence, and also illustrate additional features of the Map Viewer. Alternate Protocol 1 shows how to perform and interpret the results of a BLAST search against the human genome. Alternate Protocol 2 demonstrates how to retrieve a list of all genes between two STS markers. Finally, Alternate Protocol 3 shows how to find all annotated members of a gene family.

  11. Using the NCBI Map Viewer to browse genomic sequence data.

    PubMed

    Wolfsberg, Tyra G

    2007-01-01

    This unit includes an introduction to the Map Viewer, which describes how to perform a simple text-based search of genome annotations to view the genomic context of a gene, navigate along a chromosome, zoom in and out, and change the displayed maps to hide and show information. It also describes some of NCBI's sequence-analysis tools, which are provided as links from the Map Viewer. The Alternate Protocols describe different ways to query the genome sequence, and also illustrate additional features of the Map Viewer. Alternate Protocol 1 shows how to perform and interpret the results of a BLAST search against the human genome. Alternate Protocol 2 demonstrates how to retrieve a list of all genes between two STS markers. Finally, Alternate Protocol 3 shows how to find all annotated members of a gene family.

  12. Using the NCBI map viewer to browse genomic sequence data.

    PubMed

    Wolfsberg, Tyra G

    2010-03-01

    This unit includes a Basic Protocol with an introduction to the Map Viewer, describing how to perform a simple text-based search of genome annotations to view the genomic context of a gene, navigate along a chromosome, zoom in and out, and change the displayed maps to hide and show information. It also describes some of NCBI's sequence-analysis tools, which are provided as links from the Map Viewer. The Alternate Protocols describe different ways to query the genome sequence, and also illustrate additional features of the Map Viewer. Alternate Protocol 1 shows how to perform and interpret the results of a BLAST search against the human genome. Alternate Protocol 2 demonstrates how to retrieve a list of all genes between two STS markers. Finally, Alternate Protocol 3 shows how to find all annotated members of a gene family.

  13. Sequence analysis by iterated maps, a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Among alignment-free methods, Iterated Maps (IMs) are on a particular extreme: they are also scale free (order free). The use of IMs for sequence analysis is also distinct from other alignment-free methodologies in being rooted in statistical mechanics instead of computational linguistics. Both of these roots go back over two decades to the use of fractal geometry in the characterization of phase-space representations. The time series analysis origin of the field is betrayed by the title of the manuscript that started this alignment-free subdomain in 1990, ‘Chaos Game Representation’. The clash between the analysis of sequences as continuous series and the better established use of Markovian approaches to discrete series was almost immediate, with a defining critique published in same journal 2 years later. The rest of that decade would go by before the scale-free nature of the IM space was uncovered. The ensuing decade saw this scalability generalized for non-genomic alphabets as well as an interest in its use for graphic representation of biological sequences. Finally, in the past couple of years, in step with the emergence of BigData and MapReduce as a new computational paradigm, there is a surprising third act in the IM story. Multiple reports have described gains in computational efficiency of multiple orders of magnitude over more conventional sequence analysis methodologies. The stage appears to be now set for a recasting of IMs with a central role in processing nextgen sequencing results. PMID:24162172

  14. Whole Genome Mapping with Feature Sets from High-Throughput Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yonglong; Wang, Xiaoming; Liu, Lin; Wang, Hao; Luo, Meizhong

    2016-01-01

    A good physical map is essential to guide sequence assembly in de novo whole genome sequencing, especially when sequences are produced by high-throughput sequencing such as next-generation-sequencing (NGS) technology. We here present a novel method, Feature sets-based Genome Mapping (FGM). With FGM, physical map and draft whole genome sequences can be generated, anchored and integrated using the same data set of NGS sequences, independent of restriction digestion. Method model was created and parameters were inspected by simulations using the Arabidopsis genome sequence. In the simulations, when ~4.8X genome BAC library including 4,096 clones was used to sequence the whole genome, ~90% of clones were successfully connected to physical contigs, and 91.58% of genome sequences were mapped and connected to chromosomes. This method was experimentally verified using the existing physical map and genome sequence of rice. Of 4,064 clones covering 115 Mb sequence selected from ~3 tiles of 3 chromosomes of a rice draft physical map, 3,364 clones were reconstructed into physical contigs and 98 Mb sequences were integrated into the 3 chromosomes. The physical map-integrated draft genome sequences can provide permanent frameworks for eventually obtaining high-quality reference sequences by targeted sequencing, gap filling and combining other sequences. PMID:27611682

  15. Next-Generation Technologies for Multiomics Approaches Including Interactome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Hiroyuki; Miyamoto-Sato, Etsuko

    2015-01-01

    The development of high-speed analytical techniques such as next-generation sequencing and microarrays allows high-throughput analysis of biological information at a low cost. These techniques contribute to medical and bioscience advancements and provide new avenues for scientific research. Here, we outline a variety of new innovative techniques and discuss their use in omics research (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, proteomics, and interactomics). We also discuss the possible applications of these methods, including an interactome sequencing technology that we developed, in future medical and life science research. PMID:25649523

  16. Analecta of structures formed during the 28 June 1992 Landers-Big Bear, California earthquake sequence (including maps of shear zones, belts of shear zones, tectonic ridge, duplex en echelon fault, fault elements, and thrusts in restraining steps)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.M.; Johnson, N.A.; Johnson, K.M.; Wei, W.; Fleming, R.W.; Cruikshank, K.M.; Martosudarmo, S.Y.

    1997-12-31

    The June 28, 1992, M{sub s} 7.5 earthquake at Landers, California, which occurred about 10 km north of the community of Yucca Valley, California, produced spectacular ground rupturing more than 80 km in length (Hough and others, 1993). The ground rupturing, which was dominated by right-lateral shearing, extended along at least four distinct faults arranged broadly en echelon. The faults were connected through wide transfer zones by stepovers, consisting of right-lateral fault zones and tension cracks. The Landers earthquakes occurred in the desert of southeastern California, where details of ruptures were well preserved, and patterns of rupturing were generally unaffected by urbanization. The structures were varied and well-displayed and, because the differential displacements were so large, spectacular. The scarcity of vegetation, the aridity of the area, the compactness of the alluvium and bedrock, and the relative isotropy and brittleness of surficial materials collaborated to provide a marvelous visual record of the character of the deformation zones. The authors present a series of analecta -- that is, verbal clips or snippets -- dealing with a variety of structures, including belts of shear zones, segmentation of ruptures, rotating fault block, en echelon fault zones, releasing duplex structures, spines, and ramps. All of these structures are documented with detailed maps in text figures or in plates (in pocket). The purpose is to describe the structures and to present an understanding of the mechanics of their formation. Hence, most descriptions focus on structures where the authors have information on differential displacements as well as spatial data on the position and orientation of fractures.

  17. Target Enrichment Improves Mapping of Complex Traits by Deep Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianjun; Fan, Jue; Hauser, Bernard A; Rhee, Seung Y

    2015-11-03

    Complex traits such as crop performance and human diseases are controlled by multiple genetic loci, many of which have small effects and often go undetected by traditional quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. Recently, bulked segregant analysis with large F2 pools and genome-level markers (named extreme-QTL or X-QTL mapping) has been used to identify many QTL. To estimate parameters impacting QTL detection for X-QTL mapping, we simulated the effects of population size, marker density, and sequencing depth of markers on QTL detectability for traits with differing heritabilities. These simulations indicate that a high (>90%) chance of detecting QTL with at least 5% effect requires 5000× sequencing depth for a trait with heritability of 0.4-0.7. For most eukaryotic organisms, whole-genome sequencing at this depth is not economically feasible. Therefore, we tested and confirmed the feasibility of applying deep sequencing of target-enriched markers for X-QTL mapping. We used two traits in Arabidopsis thaliana with different heritabilities: seed size (H(2) = 0.61) and seedling greening in response to salt (H(2) = 0.94). We used a modified G test to identify QTL regions and developed a model-based statistical framework to resolve individual peaks by incorporating recombination rates. Multiple QTL were identified for both traits, including previously undiscovered QTL. We call our method target-enriched X-QTL (TEX-QTL) mapping; this mapping approach is not limited by the genome size or the availability of recombinant inbred populations and should be applicable to many organisms and traits.

  18. Simulation of Accident Sequences Including Emergency Operating Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Queral, Cesar; Exposito, Antonio; Hortal, Javier

    2004-07-01

    Operator actions play an important role in accident sequences. However, design analysis (Safety Analysis Report, SAR) seldom includes consideration of operator actions, although they are required by compulsory Emergency Operating Procedures (EOP) to perform some checks and actions from the very beginning of the accident. The basic aim of the project is to develop a procedure validation system which consists of the combination of three elements: a plant transient simulation code TRETA (a C based modular program) developed by the CSN, a computerized procedure system COPMA-III (Java technology based program) developed by the OECD-Halden Reactor Project and adapted for simulation with the contribution of our group and a software interface that provides the communication between COPMA-III and TRETA. The new combined system is going to be applied in a pilot study in order to analyze sequences initiated by secondary side breaks in a Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) plant. (authors)

  19. Mapping copy number variation by population-scale genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mills, Ryan E; Walter, Klaudia; Stewart, Chip; Handsaker, Robert E; Chen, Ken; Alkan, Can; Abyzov, Alexej; Yoon, Seungtai Chris; Ye, Kai; Cheetham, R Keira; Chinwalla, Asif; Conrad, Donald F; Fu, Yutao; Grubert, Fabian; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Iakoucheva, Lilia M; Iqbal, Zamin; Kang, Shuli; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Konkel, Miriam K; Korn, Joshua; Khurana, Ekta; Kural, Deniz; Lam, Hugo Y K; Leng, Jing; Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Yingrui; Lin, Chang-Yun; Luo, Ruibang; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Nemesh, James; Peckham, Heather E; Rausch, Tobias; Scally, Aylwyn; Shi, Xinghua; Stromberg, Michael P; Stütz, Adrian M; Urban, Alexander Eckehart; Walker, Jerilyn A; Wu, Jiantao; Zhang, Yujun; Zhang, Zhengdong D; Batzer, Mark A; Ding, Li; Marth, Gabor T; McVean, Gil; Sebat, Jonathan; Snyder, Michael; Wang, Jun; Ye, Kenny; Eichler, Evan E; Gerstein, Mark B; Hurles, Matthew E; Lee, Charles; McCarroll, Steven A; Korbel, Jan O

    2011-02-03

    Genomic structural variants (SVs) are abundant in humans, differing from other forms of variation in extent, origin and functional impact. Despite progress in SV characterization, the nucleotide resolution architecture of most SVs remains unknown. We constructed a map of unbalanced SVs (that is, copy number variants) based on whole genome DNA sequencing data from 185 human genomes, integrating evidence from complementary SV discovery approaches with extensive experimental validations. Our map encompassed 22,025 deletions and 6,000 additional SVs, including insertions and tandem duplications. Most SVs (53%) were mapped to nucleotide resolution, which facilitated analysing their origin and functional impact. We examined numerous whole and partial gene deletions with a genotyping approach and observed a depletion of gene disruptions amongst high frequency deletions. Furthermore, we observed differences in the size spectra of SVs originating from distinct formation mechanisms, and constructed a map of SV hotspots formed by common mechanisms. Our analytical framework and SV map serves as a resource for sequencing-based association studies.

  20. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    1993-02-16

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a pu GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  1. Halvade: scalable sequence analysis with MapReduce

    PubMed Central

    Decap, Dries; Reumers, Joke; Herzeel, Charlotte; Costanza, Pascal; Fostier, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Post-sequencing DNA analysis typically consists of read mapping followed by variant calling. Especially for whole genome sequencing, this computational step is very time-consuming, even when using multithreading on a multi-core machine. Results: We present Halvade, a framework that enables sequencing pipelines to be executed in parallel on a multi-node and/or multi-core compute infrastructure in a highly efficient manner. As an example, a DNA sequencing analysis pipeline for variant calling has been implemented according to the GATK Best Practices recommendations, supporting both whole genome and whole exome sequencing. Using a 15-node computer cluster with 360 CPU cores in total, Halvade processes the NA12878 dataset (human, 100 bp paired-end reads, 50× coverage) in <3 h with very high parallel efficiency. Even on a single, multi-core machine, Halvade attains a significant speedup compared with running the individual tools with multithreading. Availability and implementation: Halvade is written in Java and uses the Hadoop MapReduce 2.0 API. It supports a wide range of distributions of Hadoop, including Cloudera and Amazon EMR. Its source is available at http://bioinformatics.intec.ugent.be/halvade under GPL license. Contact: jan.fostier@intec.ugent.be Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25819078

  2. A maize map standard with sequenced core markers, grass genome reference points and 932 expressed sequence tagged sites (ESTs) in a 1736-locus map.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, G L; McMullen, M D; Baysdorfer, C; Musket, T; Grant, D; Staebell, M; Xu, G; Polacco, M; Koster, L; Melia-Hancock, S; Houchins, K; Chao, S; Coe, E H

    1999-01-01

    We have constructed a 1736-locus maize genome map containing1156 loci probed by cDNAs, 545 probed by random genomic clones, 16 by simple sequence repeats (SSRs), 14 by isozymes, and 5 by anonymous clones. Sequence information is available for 56% of the loci with 66% of the sequenced loci assigned functions. A total of 596 new ESTs were mapped from a B73 library of 5-wk-old shoots. The map contains 237 loci probed by barley, oat, wheat, rice, or tripsacum clones, which serve as grass genome reference points in comparisons between maize and other grass maps. Ninety core markers selected for low copy number, high polymorphism, and even spacing along the chromosome delineate the 100 bins on the map. The average bin size is 17 cM. Use of bin assignments enables comparison among different maize mapping populations and experiments including those involving cytogenetic stocks, mutants, or quantitative trait loci. Integration of nonmaize markers in the map extends the resources available for gene discovery beyond the boundaries of maize mapping information into the expanse of map, sequence, and phenotype information from other grass species. This map provides a foundation for numerous basic and applied investigations including studies of gene organization, gene and genome evolution, targeted cloning, and dissection of complex traits. PMID:10388831

  3. A maize map standard with sequenced core markers, grass genome reference points and 932 expressed sequence tagged sites (ESTs) in a 1736-locus map.

    PubMed

    Davis, G L; McMullen, M D; Baysdorfer, C; Musket, T; Grant, D; Staebell, M; Xu, G; Polacco, M; Koster, L; Melia-Hancock, S; Houchins, K; Chao, S; Coe, E H

    1999-07-01

    We have constructed a 1736-locus maize genome map containing1156 loci probed by cDNAs, 545 probed by random genomic clones, 16 by simple sequence repeats (SSRs), 14 by isozymes, and 5 by anonymous clones. Sequence information is available for 56% of the loci with 66% of the sequenced loci assigned functions. A total of 596 new ESTs were mapped from a B73 library of 5-wk-old shoots. The map contains 237 loci probed by barley, oat, wheat, rice, or tripsacum clones, which serve as grass genome reference points in comparisons between maize and other grass maps. Ninety core markers selected for low copy number, high polymorphism, and even spacing along the chromosome delineate the 100 bins on the map. The average bin size is 17 cM. Use of bin assignments enables comparison among different maize mapping populations and experiments including those involving cytogenetic stocks, mutants, or quantitative trait loci. Integration of nonmaize markers in the map extends the resources available for gene discovery beyond the boundaries of maize mapping information into the expanse of map, sequence, and phenotype information from other grass species. This map provides a foundation for numerous basic and applied investigations including studies of gene organization, gene and genome evolution, targeted cloning, and dissection of complex traits.

  4. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1995-03-21

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 11 figures.

  5. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1999-05-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 12 figs.

  6. CDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    1995-03-21

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  7. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    1999-05-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  8. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    2000-07-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  9. A Probabilistic Approach for Improved Sequence Mapping in Metatranscriptomic Studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mapping millions of short DNA sequences a reference genome is a necessary step in many experiments designed to investigate the expression of genes involved in disease resistance. This is a difficult task in which several challenges often arise resulting in a suboptimal mapping. This mapping process ...

  10. [Recent progress in gene mapping through high-throughput sequencing technology and forward genetic approaches].

    PubMed

    Lu, Cairui; Zou, Changsong; Song, Guoli

    2015-08-01

    Traditional gene mapping using forward genetic approaches is conducted primarily through construction of a genetic linkage map, the process of which is tedious and time-consuming, and often results in low accuracy of mapping and large mapping intervals. With the rapid development of high-throughput sequencing technology and decreasing cost of sequencing, a variety of simple and quick methods of gene mapping through sequencing have been developed, including direct sequencing of the mutant genome, sequencing of selective mutant DNA pooling, genetic map construction through sequencing of individuals in population, as well as sequencing of transcriptome and partial genome. These methods can be used to identify mutations at the nucleotide level and has been applied in complex genetic background. Recent reports have shown that sequencing mapping could be even done without the reference of genome sequence, hybridization, and genetic linkage information, which made it possible to perform forward genetic study in many non-model species. In this review, we summarized these new technologies and their application in gene mapping.

  11. Microbial genome sequencing using optical mapping and Illumina sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction Optical mapping is a technique in which strands of genomic DNA are digested with one or more restriction enzymes, and a physical map of the genome constructed from the resulting image. In outline, genomic DNA is extracted from a pure culture, linearly arrayed on a specialized glass sli...

  12. Trace and antitrace maps for aperiodic sequences: Extensions and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Grimm, Uwe; Schreiber, Michael

    2000-12-01

    We study aperiodic systems based on substitution rules by means of a transfer-matrix approach. In addition to the well-known trace map, we investigate the so-called ``antitrace'' map, which is the corresponding map for the difference of the off-diagonal elements of the 2×2 transfer matrix. The antitrace maps are obtained for various binary, ternary, and quaternary aperiodic sequences, such as the Fibonacci, Thue-Morse, period-doubling, Rudin-Shapiro sequences, and certain generalizations. For arbitrary substitution rules, we show that not only trace maps, but also antitrace maps exist. The dimension of our antitrace map is r(r+1)/2, where r denotes the number of basic letters in the aperiodic sequence. Analogous maps for specific matrix elements of the transfer matrix can also be constructed, but the maps for the off-diagonal elements and for the difference of the diagonal elements coincide with the antitrace map. Thus, from the trace and antitrace map, we can determine any physical quantity related to the global transfer matrix of the system. As examples, we employ these dynamical maps to compute the transmission coefficients for optical multilayers, harmonic chains, and electronic systems.

  13. QTL mapping using high-throughput sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping in plants dates to the 1980’s, but earlier studies were often hindered by the expense and time required to identify large numbers of polymorphic genetic markers that differentiated the parental genotypes and then to genotype them on large segregating mapping po...

  14. Restoration of distorted depth maps calculated from stereo sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damour, Kevin; Kaufman, Howard

    1991-01-01

    A model-based Kalman estimator is developed for spatial-temporal filtering of noise and other degradations in velocity and depth maps derived from image sequences or cinema. As an illustration of the proposed procedures, edge information from image sequences of rigid objects is used in the processing of the velocity maps by selecting from a series of models for directional adaptive filtering. Adaptive filtering then allows for noise reduction while preserving sharpness in the velocity maps. Results from several synthetic and real image sequences are given.

  15. Congenic mapping and sequence analysis of the Renin locus

    PubMed Central

    Flister, Michael J.; Hoffman, Matthew J.; Reddy, Prajwal; Jacob, Howard J.; Moreno, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Renin was the first blood pressure (BP) quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapped by linkage analysis in the rat. Subsequent BP linkage and congenic studies capturing different portions of the renin region have returned conflicting results, suggesting that multiple interdependent BP loci may be residing in the chromosome 13 BP QTL that includes Renin. We used SS-13BN congenic strains to map 2 BP loci in the Renin region (chr13:45.2–49.0 Mb). We identified a 1.1 Mb protective Brown Norway (BN) region around Renin (chr13:46.1–47.2 Mb) that significantly decreased BP by 32 mmHg. The Renin protective BP locus was offset by an adjacent hypertensive locus (chr13:47.2–49.0 Mb) that significantly increased BP by 29 mmHg. Sequence analysis of the protective and hypertensive BP loci revealed 1,433 and 2,063 variants between Dahl salt-sensitive/Mcwi (SS) and BN rats, respectively. To further reduce the list of candidate variants, we re-genotyped an overlapping SS-13SR congenic strain (S/renrr) with a previously reported BP phenotype. Sequence comparison between SS, Dahl R (SR), and BN reduced the number of candidate variants in the 2 BP loci by 42% for further study. Combined with previous studies, these data suggest that at least 4 BP loci reside within the 30 cM chromosome 13 BP QTL that includes Renin. PMID:23460292

  16. Universal full-length nucleosome mapping sequence probe.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Vijay; Salih, Bilal; Trifonov, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    For the computational sequence-directed mapping of the nucleosomes, the knowledge of the nucleosome positioning motifs - 10-11 base long sequences - and respective matrices of bendability, is not sufficient, since there is no justified way to fuse these motifs in one continuous nucleosome DNA sequence. Discovery of the strong nucleosome (SN) DNA sequences, with visible sequence periodicity allows derivation of the full-length nucleosome DNA bendability pattern as matrix or consensus sequence. The SN sequences of three species (A. thaliana, C. elegans, and H. sapiens) are aligned (512 sequences for each species), and long (115 dinucleotides) matrices of bendability derived for the species. The matrices have strong common property - alternation of runs of purine-purine (RR) and pyrimidine-pyrimidine (YY) dinucleotides, with average period 10.4 bases. On this basis the universal [R,Y] consensus of the nucleosome DNA sequence is derived, with exactly defined positions of respective penta- and hexamers RRRRR, RRRRRR, YYYYY, and YYYYYY.

  17. Probe mapping to facilitate transposon-based DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Strausbaugh, L.D.; Bourke, M.T.; Sommer, M.T.; Coon, M.E.; Berg, C.M. )

    1990-08-01

    A promising strategy for DNA sequencing exploits transposons to provide mobile sites for the binding of sequencing primers. For such a strategy to be maximally efficient, the location and orientation of the transposon must be readily determined and the insertion sites should be randomly distributed. The authors demonstrate an efficient probe-based method for the localization and orientation of transposon-borne primer sites, which is adaptable to large-scale sequencing strategies. This approach requires no prior restriction enzyme mapping or knowledge of the cloned sequence and eliminates the inefficiency inherent in totally random sequencing methods. To test the efficiency of probe mapping, 49 insertions of the transposon {gamma}{delta} (Tn1000) in a cloned fragment of Drosophila melanogaster DNA were mapped and oriented. In addition, oligonucleotide primers specific for unique subterminal {gamma}{delta} segments were used to prime dideoxynucleotide double-stranded sequencing. These data provided an opportunity to rigorously examine {gamma}{delta} insertion sites. The insertions were quire randomly distributed, even though the target DNA fragment had both A+T-rich and G+C-rich regions; in G+C-rich DNA, the insertions were found in A+T-rich valleys. These data demonstrate that {gamma}{delta} is an excellent choice for supplying mobile primer binding sites to cloned DNA and that transposon-based probe mapping permits the sequences of large cloned segments to be determined without any subcloning.

  18. Simple sequence repeat map of the sunflower genome.

    PubMed

    Tang, S.; Yu, J.-K.; Slabaugh, B.; Shintani, K.; Knapp, J.

    2002-12-01

    Several independent molecular genetic linkage maps of varying density and completeness have been constructed for cultivated sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.). Because of the dearth of sequence and probe-specific DNA markers in the public domain, the various genetic maps of sunflower have not been integrated and a single reference map has not emerged. Moreover, comparisons between maps have been confounded by multiple linkage group nomenclatures and the lack of common DNA markers. The goal of the present research was to construct a dense molecular genetic linkage map for sunflower using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. First, 879 SSR markers were developed by identifying 1,093 unique SSR sequences in the DNA sequences of 2,033 clones isolated from genomic DNA libraries enriched for (AC)(n) or (AG)(n) and screening 1,000 SSR primer pairs; 579 of the newly developed SSR markers (65.9% of the total) were polymorphic among four elite inbred lines (RHA280, RHA801, PHA and PHB). The genetic map was constructed using 94 RHA280 x RHA801 F(7) recombinant inbred lines (RILs) and 408 polymorphic SSR markers (462 SSR marker loci segregated in the mapping population). Of the latter, 459 coalesced into 17 linkage groups presumably corresponding to the 17 chromosomes in the haploid sunflower genome ( x = 17). The map was 1,368.3-cM long and had a mean density of 3.1 cM per locus. The SSR markers described herein supply a critical mass of DNA markers for constructing genetic maps of sunflower and create the basis for unifying and cross-referencing the multitude of genetic maps developed for wild and cultivated sunflowers.

  19. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Namhai Chua; Kush, A.

    1993-02-16

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids.

  20. Data repository mapping for influenza protein sequence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrino, Donald; Chen, Chaomei

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a new method for creating an interactive sequence similarity map of all known influenza virus protein sequences and integrating the map with existing general purpose analytical tools. The NCBI data model was designed to provide a high degree of interconnectedness amongst data objects. Substantial and continuous increase in data volume has led to a large and highly connected information space. Researchers seeking to explore this space are challenged to identify a starting point. They often choose data that is popular in the literature. Reference in the literature follow a power law distribution and popular data points may bias explorers toward paths that lead only to a dead-end of what is already known. To help discover the unexpected we developed an interactive visual analytics system to map the information space of influenza protein sequence data. The design is motivated by the needs of eScience researchers.

  1. Genetic interaction mapping with microfluidic-based single cell sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Haliburton, John R.; Shao, Wenjun; Deutschbauer, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Abate, Adam R.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic interaction mapping is useful for understanding the molecular basis of cellular decision making, but elucidating interactions genome-wide is challenging due to the massive number of gene combinations that must be tested. Here, we demonstrate a simple approach to thoroughly map genetic interactions in bacteria using microfluidic-based single cell sequencing. Using single cell PCR in droplets, we link distinct genetic information into single DNA sequences that can be decoded by next generation sequencing. Our approach is scalable and theoretically enables the pooling of entire interaction libraries to interrogate multiple pairwise genetic interactions in a single culture. The speed, ease, and low-cost of our approach makes genetic interaction mapping viable for routine characterization, allowing the interaction network to be used as a universal read out for a variety of biology experiments, and for the elucidation of interaction networks in non-model organisms. PMID:28170417

  2. Genetic interaction mapping with microfluidic-based single cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Haliburton, John R; Shao, Wenjun; Deutschbauer, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Abate, Adam R

    2017-01-01

    Genetic interaction mapping is useful for understanding the molecular basis of cellular decision making, but elucidating interactions genome-wide is challenging due to the massive number of gene combinations that must be tested. Here, we demonstrate a simple approach to thoroughly map genetic interactions in bacteria using microfluidic-based single cell sequencing. Using single cell PCR in droplets, we link distinct genetic information into single DNA sequences that can be decoded by next generation sequencing. Our approach is scalable and theoretically enables the pooling of entire interaction libraries to interrogate multiple pairwise genetic interactions in a single culture. The speed, ease, and low-cost of our approach makes genetic interaction mapping viable for routine characterization, allowing the interaction network to be used as a universal read out for a variety of biology experiments, and for the elucidation of interaction networks in non-model organisms.

  3. Indexing a sequence for mapping reads with a single mismatch

    PubMed Central

    Crochemore, Maxime; Langiu, Alessio; Rahman, M. Sohel

    2014-01-01

    Mapping reads against a genome sequence is an interesting and useful problem in computational molecular biology and bioinformatics. In this paper, we focus on the problem of indexing a sequence for mapping reads with a single mismatch. We first focus on a simpler problem where the length of the pattern is given beforehand during the data structure construction. This version of the problem is interesting in its own right in the context of the next generation sequencing. In the sequel, we show how to solve the more general problem. In both cases, our algorithm can construct an efficient data structure in time and space and can answer subsequent queries in time. Here, n is the length of the sequence, m is the length of the read, 0<ε<1 and is the optimal output size. PMID:24751874

  4. Automatic identification of highly conserved family regions and relationships in genome wide datasets including remote protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Tunca; Karaçalı, Bilge

    2013-01-01

    Identifying shared sequence segments along amino acid sequences generally requires a collection of closely related proteins, most often curated manually from the sequence datasets to suit the purpose at hand. Currently developed statistical methods are strained, however, when the collection contains remote sequences with poor alignment to the rest, or sequences containing multiple domains. In this paper, we propose a completely unsupervised and automated method to identify the shared sequence segments observed in a diverse collection of protein sequences including those present in a smaller fraction of the sequences in the collection, using a combination of sequence alignment, residue conservation scoring and graph-theoretical approaches. Since shared sequence fragments often imply conserved functional or structural attributes, the method produces a table of associations between the sequences and the identified conserved regions that can reveal previously unknown protein families as well as new members to existing ones. We evaluated the biological relevance of the method by clustering the proteins in gold standard datasets and assessing the clustering performance in comparison with previous methods from the literature. We have then applied the proposed method to a genome wide dataset of 17793 human proteins and generated a global association map to each of the 4753 identified conserved regions. Investigations on the major conserved regions revealed that they corresponded strongly to annotated structural domains. This suggests that the method can be useful in predicting novel domains on protein sequences.

  5. Sniper: improved SNP discovery by multiply mapping deep sequenced reads.

    PubMed

    Simola, Daniel F; Kim, Junhyong

    2011-06-20

    SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) discovery using next-generation sequencing data remains difficult primarily because of redundant genomic regions, such as interspersed repetitive elements and paralogous genes, present in all eukaryotic genomes. To address this problem, we developed Sniper, a novel multi-locus Bayesian probabilistic model and a computationally efficient algorithm that explicitly incorporates sequence reads that map to multiple genomic loci. Our model fully accounts for sequencing error, template bias, and multi-locus SNP combinations, maintaining high sensitivity and specificity under a broad range of conditions. An implementation of Sniper is freely available at http://kim.bio.upenn.edu/software/sniper.shtml.

  6. EST2Prot: Mapping EST sequences to proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Paul; Lin, David M; Yona, Golan

    2006-01-01

    Background EST libraries are used in various biological studies, from microarray experiments to proteomic and genetic screens. These libraries usually contain many uncharacterized ESTs that are typically ignored since they cannot be mapped to known genes. Consequently, new discoveries are possibly overlooked. Results We describe a system (EST2Prot) that uses multiple elements to map EST sequences to their corresponding protein products. EST2Prot uses UniGene clusters, substring analysis, information about protein coding regions in existing DNA sequences and protein database searches to detect protein products related to a query EST sequence. Gene Ontology terms, Swiss-Prot keywords, and protein similarity data are used to map the ESTs to functional descriptors. Conclusion EST2Prot extends and significantly enriches the popular UniGene mapping by utilizing multiple relations between known biological entities. It produces a mapping between ESTs and proteins in real-time through a simple web-interface. The system is part of the Biozon database and is accessible at . PMID:16515706

  7. Sequence of the WT1 upstream region including the Wit-1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Gessler, M. ); Bruns, G.A.P. )

    1993-08-01

    The Wilms tumor gene WT1 encodes a Cys[sub 2]His[sub 2]-type zinc finger protein that can bind DNA and function as a transcriptional regulator. The pathological spectrum of tumorigenesis and various developmental defects produced by different WT1 alteration suggests that WT1 controls a number of subsequent effector genes. To define the role of WT1 in these developmental processes it will be important to elucidate mechanisms that govern expression of WT1 itself. To facilitate mapping of the WT1 promoter region and 5[prime] control elements the authors have determined the sequence upstream of the WT1 transcription unit. This includes the Wit-1 gene that is transcribed in the opposite direction. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Evolutionary optimization of biopolymers and sequence structure maps

    SciTech Connect

    Reidys, C.M.; Kopp, S.; Schuster, P.

    1996-06-01

    Searching for biopolymers having a predefined function is a core problem of biotechnology, biochemistry and pharmacy. On the level of RNA sequences and their corresponding secondary structures we show that this problem can be analyzed mathematically. The strategy will be to study the properties of the RNA sequence to secondary structure mapping that is essential for the understanding of the search process. We show that to each secondary structure s there exists a neutral network consisting of all sequences folding into s. This network can be modeled as a random graph and has the following generic properties: it is dense and has a giant component within the graph of compatible sequences. The neutral network percolates sequence space and any two neutral nets come close in terms of Hamming distance. We investigate the distribution of the orders of neutral nets and show that above a certain threshold the topology of neutral nets allows to find practically all frequent secondary structures.

  9. Fast and sensitive mapping of nanopore sequencing reads with GraphMap

    PubMed Central

    Sović, Ivan; Šikić, Mile; Wilm, Andreas; Fenlon, Shannon Nicole; Chen, Swaine; Nagarajan, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    Realizing the democratic promise of nanopore sequencing requires the development of new bioinformatics approaches to deal with its specific error characteristics. Here we present GraphMap, a mapping algorithm designed to analyse nanopore sequencing reads, which progressively refines candidate alignments to robustly handle potentially high-error rates and a fast graph traversal to align long reads with speed and high precision (>95%). Evaluation on MinION sequencing data sets against short- and long-read mappers indicates that GraphMap increases mapping sensitivity by 10–80% and maps >95% of bases. GraphMap alignments enabled single-nucleotide variant calling on the human genome with increased sensitivity (15%) over the next best mapper, precise detection of structural variants from length 100 bp to 4 kbp, and species and strain-specific identification of pathogens using MinION reads. GraphMap is available open source under the MIT license at https://github.com/isovic/graphmap. PMID:27079541

  10. DNA methylation mapping by tag-modified bisulfite genomic sequencing.

    PubMed

    Han, Weiguo; Cauchi, Stephane; Herman, James G; Spivack, Simon D

    2006-08-01

    A tag-modified bisulfite genomic sequencing (tBGS) method employing direct cycle sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products at kilobase scale, without conventional DNA fragment cloning, was developed for simplified evaluation of DNA methylation sites. The method entails subjecting bisulfite-modified genomic DNA to a second-round PCR amplification employing GC-tagged primers. Qualitative results from tBGS closely correlated with those from conventional BGS (R=0.935, p=0.002). In application, the intertissue and interindividual CpG methylation differences in promoter sequence for two genes, CYP1B1 and GSTP1, were then explored across four human tissue types (peripheral blood cells, exfoliated buccal cells, paired nontumor-tumor lung tissues), and two lung cell types in culture (normal NHBE and malignant A549). Predominantly conserved methylation maps for the two gene promoters were apparent across donors and tissues. At any given CpG site, variation in the degree of methylation could be determined by the relative height of C and T peaks in the sequencing trace. Methylation maps for the GSTP1 promoter diverged between NHBE (unmethylated) and A549 (completely methylated) cells in a previously unexplored upstream region, correlating with a 2.7-fold difference in GSTP1 mRNA expression (p<0.01). The tBGS method simplifies detailed methylation scanning of kilobase-scale genomic DNA, facilitating more ambitious genomic methylation mapping studies.

  11. A probe-based mapping strategy for DNA sequencing with mobile primers

    SciTech Connect

    Strausbaugh, L.D.; Berg, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Research on DNA sequencing continued. The specific areas of research targeted for the period of this Progress Report included three general phases: (1) optimization of probe-mapping by both the development of new transposons and the design of stream-lined methods for mapping; (2) application of transposon-based methods to larger plasmids and cosmids; and (3) initiation of PCR-based applications of transposons.

  12. A probe-based mapping strategy for DNA sequencing with mobile primers. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Strausbaugh, L.D.; Berg, C.M.

    1991-12-31

    Research on DNA sequencing continued. The specific areas of research targeted for the period of this Progress Report included three general phases: (1) optimization of probe-mapping by both the development of new transposons and the design of stream-lined methods for mapping; (2) application of transposon-based methods to larger plasmids and cosmids; and (3) initiation of PCR-based applications of transposons.

  13. Simple sequence repeat marker development and genetic mapping in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.).

    PubMed

    Jarvis, D E; Kopp, O R; Jellen, E N; Mallory, M A; Pattee, J; Bonifacio, A; Coleman, C E; Stevens, M R; Fairbanks, D J; Maughan, P J

    2008-04-01

    Quinoa is a regionally important grain crop in the Andean region of South America. Recently quinoa has gained international attention for its high nutritional value and tolerances of extreme abiotic stresses. DNA markers and linkage maps are important tools for germplasm conservation and crop improvement programmes. Here we report the development of 216 new polymorphic SSR (simple sequence repeats) markers from libraries enriched for GA, CAA and AAT repeats, as well as 6 SSR markers developed from bacterial artificial chromosome-end sequences (BES-SSRs). Heterozygosity (H) values of the SSR markers ranges from 0.12 to 0.90, with an average value of 0.57. A linkage map was constructed for a newly developed recombinant inbred lines (RIL) population using these SSR markers. Additional markers, including amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), two 11S seed storage protein loci, and the nucleolar organizing region (NOR), were also placed on the linkage map. The linkage map presented here is the first SSR-based map in quinoa and contains 275 markers, including 200 SSR. The map consists of 38 linkage groups (LGs) covering 913 cM. Segregation distortion was observed in the mapping population for several marker loci, indicating possible chromosomal regions associated with selection or gametophytic lethality. As this map is based primarily on simple and easily-transferable SSR markers, it will be particularly valuable for research in laboratories in Andean regions of South America.

  14. A fine-scale chimpanzee genetic map from population sequencing.

    PubMed

    Auton, Adam; Fledel-Alon, Adi; Pfeifer, Susanne; Venn, Oliver; Ségurel, Laure; Street, Teresa; Leffler, Ellen M; Bowden, Rory; Aneas, Ivy; Broxholme, John; Humburg, Peter; Iqbal, Zamin; Lunter, Gerton; Maller, Julian; Hernandez, Ryan D; Melton, Cord; Venkat, Aarti; Nobrega, Marcelo A; Bontrop, Ronald; Myers, Simon; Donnelly, Peter; Przeworski, Molly; McVean, Gil

    2012-04-13

    To study the evolution of recombination rates in apes, we developed methodology to construct a fine-scale genetic map from high-throughput sequence data from 10 Western chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes verus. Compared to the human genetic map, broad-scale recombination rates tend to be conserved, but with exceptions, particularly in regions of chromosomal rearrangements and around the site of ancestral fusion in human chromosome 2. At fine scales, chimpanzee recombination is dominated by hotspots, which show no overlap with those of humans even though rates are similarly elevated around CpG islands and decreased within genes. The hotspot-specifying protein PRDM9 shows extensive variation among Western chimpanzees, and there is little evidence that any sequence motifs are enriched in hotspots. The contrasting locations of hotspots provide a natural experiment, which demonstrates the impact of recombination on base composition.

  15. MOSAIK: a hash-based algorithm for accurate next-generation sequencing short-read mapping.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wan-Ping; Stromberg, Michael P; Ward, Alistair; Stewart, Chip; Garrison, Erik P; Marth, Gabor T

    2014-01-01

    MOSAIK is a stable, sensitive and open-source program for mapping second and third-generation sequencing reads to a reference genome. Uniquely among current mapping tools, MOSAIK can align reads generated by all the major sequencing technologies, including Illumina, Applied Biosystems SOLiD, Roche 454, Ion Torrent and Pacific BioSciences SMRT. Indeed, MOSAIK was the only aligner to provide consistent mappings for all the generated data (sequencing technologies, low-coverage and exome) in the 1000 Genomes Project. To provide highly accurate alignments, MOSAIK employs a hash clustering strategy coupled with the Smith-Waterman algorithm. This method is well-suited to capture mismatches as well as short insertions and deletions. To support the growing interest in larger structural variant (SV) discovery, MOSAIK provides explicit support for handling known-sequence SVs, e.g. mobile element insertions (MEIs) as well as generating outputs tailored to aid in SV discovery. All variant discovery benefits from an accurate description of the read placement confidence. To this end, MOSAIK uses a neural-network based training scheme to provide well-calibrated mapping quality scores, demonstrated by a correlation coefficient between MOSAIK assigned and actual mapping qualities greater than 0.98. In order to ensure that studies of any genome are supported, a training pipeline is provided to ensure optimal mapping quality scores for the genome under investigation. MOSAIK is multi-threaded, open source, and incorporated into our command and pipeline launcher system GKNO (http://gkno.me).

  16. DOE project on genome mapping and sequencing. Progress report, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, G.A.

    1992-12-31

    These efforts on the human genome project were initiated in September, 1990, to contribute towards completion of the human genome project physical mapping effort. In the original application, the authors proposed a novel strategy for constructing a physical map of human chromosome 11, based upon techniques derived in this group and by others. The original goals were to (1) produce a set of cosmid reference clones mapped to specific sites by high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization, (2) produce a set of associated STS sequences and PCR primers for each site, (3) isolate YAC clones corresponding to each STS and, (4) construct YAC contigs such that > 90% of the chromosome would be covered by contigs of 2 mb or greater. Since that time, and with the advent of new technology and reagents, the strategy has been modified slightly but still retains the same goals as originally proposed. The authors have added a project to produce chromosome 11-specific cDNAs and determine the map location and DNA sequence of a selected portion of them.

  17. Mapping DNA polymerase errors by single-molecule sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, David F.; Lu, Jenny; Chang, Seungwoo; Loparo, Joseph J.; Xie, Xiaoliang S.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic integrity is compromised by DNA polymerase replication errors, which occur in a sequence-dependent manner across the genome. Accurate and complete quantification of a DNA polymerase's error spectrum is challenging because errors are rare and difficult to detect. We report a high-throughput sequencing assay to map in vitro DNA replication errors at the single-molecule level. Unlike previous methods, our assay is able to rapidly detect a large number of polymerase errors at base resolution over any template substrate without quantification bias. To overcome the high error rate of high-throughput sequencing, our assay uses a barcoding strategy in which each replication product is tagged with a unique nucleotide sequence before amplification. This allows multiple sequencing reads of the same product to be compared so that sequencing errors can be found and removed. We demonstrate the ability of our assay to characterize the average error rate, error hotspots and lesion bypass fidelity of several DNA polymerases. PMID:27185891

  18. Sequence, molecular properties, and chromosomal mapping of mouse lumican

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funderburgh, J. L.; Funderburgh, M. L.; Hevelone, N. D.; Stech, M. E.; Justice, M. J.; Liu, C. Y.; Kao, W. W.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE. Lumican is a major proteoglycan of vertebrate cornea. This study characterizes mouse lumican, its molecular form, cDNA sequence, and chromosomal localization. METHODS. Lumican sequence was determined from cDNA clones selected from a mouse corneal cDNA expression library using a bovine lumican cDNA probe. Tissue expression and size of lumican mRNA were determined using Northern hybridization. Glycosidase digestion followed by Western blot analysis provided characterization of molecular properties of purified mouse corneal lumican. Chromosomal mapping of the lumican gene (Lcn) used Southern hybridization of a panel of genomic DNAs from an interspecific murine backcross. RESULTS. Mouse lumican is a 338-amino acid protein with high-sequence identity to bovine and chicken lumican proteins. The N-terminus of the lumican protein contains consensus sequences for tyrosine sulfation. A 1.9-kb lumican mRNA is present in cornea and several other tissues. Antibody against bovine lumican reacted with recombinant mouse lumican expressed in Escherichia coli and also detected high molecular weight proteoglycans in extracts of mouse cornea. Keratanase digestion of corneal proteoglycans released lumican protein, demonstrating the presence of sulfated keratan sulfate chains on mouse corneal lumican in vivo. The lumican gene (Lcn) was mapped to the distal region of mouse chromosome 10. The Lcn map site is in the region of a previously identified developmental mutant, eye blebs, affecting corneal morphology. CONCLUSIONS. This study demonstrates sulfated keratan sulfate proteoglycan in mouse cornea and describes the tools (antibodies and cDNA) necessary to investigate the functional role of this important corneal molecule using naturally occurring and induced mutants of the murine lumican gene.

  19. Mapping by sequencing the Pneumocystis genome using the ordering DNA sequences V3 tool.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zheng; Lance, Britton; Vargas, Claudia; Arpinar, Budak; Bhandarkar, Suchendra; Kraemer, Eileen; Kochut, Krys J; Miller, John A; Wagner, Jeff R; Weise, Michael J; Wunderlich, John K; Stringer, James; Smulian, George; Cushion, Melanie T; Arnold, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    A bioinformatics tool called ODS3 has been created for mapping by sequencing. The tool allows the creation of integrated genomic maps from genetic, physical mapping, and sequencing data and permits an integrated genome map to be stored, retrieved, viewed, and queried in a stand-alone capacity, in a client/server relationship with the Fungal Genome Database (FGDB), and as a web-browsing tool for the FGDB. In that ODS3 is programmed in Java, the tool promotes platform independence and supports export of integrated genome-mapping data in the extensible markup language (XML) for data interchange with other genome information systems. The tool ODS3 is used to create an initial integrated genome map of the AIDS-related fungal pathogen, Pneumocystis carinii. Contig dynamics would indicate that this physical map is approximately 50% complete with approximately 200 contigs. A total of 10 putative multigene families were found. Two of these putative families were previously characterized in P. carinii, namely the major surface glycoproteins (MSGs) and HSP70 proteins; three of these putative families (not previously characterized in P. carinii) were found to be similar to families encoding the HSP60 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the heat-shock psi protein in S. pombe, and the RNA synthetase family (i.e., MES1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Physical mapping data are consistent with the 16S, 5.8S, and 26S rDNA genes being single copy in P. carinii. No other fungus outside this genus is known to have the rDNA genes in single copy. PMID:12702676

  20. Random-breakage mapping method applied to human DNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobrich, M.; Rydberg, B.; Cooper, P. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The random-breakage mapping method [Game et al. (1990) Nucleic Acids Res., 18, 4453-4461] was applied to DNA sequences in human fibroblasts. The methodology involves NotI restriction endonuclease digestion of DNA from irradiated calls, followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, Southern blotting and hybridization with DNA probes recognizing the single copy sequences of interest. The Southern blots show a band for the unbroken restriction fragments and a smear below this band due to radiation induced random breaks. This smear pattern contains two discontinuities in intensity at positions that correspond to the distance of the hybridization site to each end of the restriction fragment. By analyzing the positions of those discontinuities we confirmed the previously mapped position of the probe DXS1327 within a NotI fragment on the X chromosome, thus demonstrating the validity of the technique. We were also able to position the probes D21S1 and D21S15 with respect to the ends of their corresponding NotI fragments on chromosome 21. A third chromosome 21 probe, D21S11, has previously been reported to be close to D21S1, although an uncertainty about a second possible location existed. Since both probes D21S1 and D21S11 hybridized to a single NotI fragment and yielded a similar smear pattern, this uncertainty is removed by the random-breakage mapping method.

  1. Rational experiment design for sequencing-based RNA structure mapping.

    PubMed

    Aviran, Sharon; Pachter, Lior

    2014-12-01

    Structure mapping is a classic experimental approach for determining nucleic acid structure that has gained renewed interest in recent years following advances in chemistry, genomics, and informatics. The approach encompasses numerous techniques that use different means to introduce nucleotide-level modifications in a structure-dependent manner. Modifications are assayed via cDNA fragment analysis, using electrophoresis or next-generation sequencing (NGS). The recent advent of NGS has dramatically increased the throughput, multiplexing capacity, and scope of RNA structure mapping assays, thereby opening new possibilities for genome-scale, de novo, and in vivo studies. From an informatics standpoint, NGS is more informative than prior technologies by virtue of delivering direct molecular measurements in the form of digital sequence counts. Motivated by these new capabilities, we introduce a novel model-based in silico approach for quantitative design of large-scale multiplexed NGS structure mapping assays, which takes advantage of the direct and digital nature of NGS readouts. We use it to characterize the relationship between controllable experimental parameters and the precision of mapping measurements. Our results highlight the complexity of these dependencies and shed light on relevant tradeoffs and pitfalls, which can be difficult to discern by intuition alone. We demonstrate our approach by quantitatively assessing the robustness of SHAPE-Seq measurements, obtained by multiplexing SHAPE (selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) chemistry in conjunction with NGS. We then utilize it to elucidate design considerations in advanced genome-wide approaches for probing the transcriptome, which recently obtained in vivo information using dimethyl sulfate (DMS) chemistry.

  2. BS-RNA: An efficient mapping and annotation tool for RNA bisulfite sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fang; Hao, Lili; Wang, Jinyue; Shi, Shuo; Xiao, Jingfa; Li, Rujiao

    2016-12-01

    Cytosine methylation is one of the most important RNA epigenetic modifications. With the development of experimental technology, scientists attach more importance to RNA cytosine methylation and find bisulfite sequencing is an effective experimental method for RNA cytosine methylation study. However, there are only a few tools can directly deal with RNA bisulfite sequencing data efficiently. Herein, we developed a specialized tool BS-RNA, which can analyze cytosine methylation of RNA based on bisulfite sequencing data and support both paired-end and single-end sequencing reads from directional bisulfite libraries. For paired-end reads, simply removing the biased positions from the 5' end may result in "dovetailing" reads, where one or both reads seem to extend past the start of the mate read. BS-RNA could map "dovetailing" reads successfully. The annotation result of BS-RNA is exported in BED (.bed) format, including locations, sequence context types (CG/CHG/CHH, H=A,T, or C), reference sequencing depths, cytosine sequencing depths, and methylation levels of covered cytosine sites on both Watson and Crick strands. BS-RNA is an efficient, specialized and highly automated mapping and annotation tool for RNA bisulfite sequencing data. It performs better than the existing program in terms of accuracy and efficiency. BS-RNA is developed by Perl language and the source code of this tool is freely available from the website: http://bs-rna.big.ac.cn.

  3. Murine Brca2: Sequence, map position, and expression pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Sharan, S.K.; Bradley, A.

    1997-03-01

    Mutations in the human BRCA2 gene are responsible for about 45% of hereditary early onset breast cancer. Recently, the human BRCA2 gene was cloned, and several germline mutations were identified. Here we describe the cloning of the mouse homologue of BRCA2. The mouse cDNA sequence predicts a 3328-amino-acid Brca2 protein, 90 amino acids shorter than the human protein. The overall identity between the mouse and the human proteins is 59%, while the similarity is 72%. At the nucleotide level the homology is 74%. By comparing the amino acid sequences of the two homologues we have identified five highly conserved novel domains that may be functionally significant. Brca2 has been mapped to the distal end of mouse chromosome 5, a region of the mouse genome that contains other genes that also map to human chromosome 13q12-q13, confirming the conservation of this linkage group between the two species. Expression of Brca2 was detected in midgestation embryos and adult testis, thymus, and ovary. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  4. An autotetraploid linkage map of rose (Rosa hybrida) validated using the strawberry (Fragaria vesca) genome sequence.

    PubMed

    Gar, Oron; Sargent, Daniel J; Tsai, Ching-Jung; Pleban, Tzili; Shalev, Gil; Byrne, David H; Zamir, Dani

    2011-01-01

    Polyploidy is a pivotal process in plant evolution as it increase gene redundancy and morphological intricacy but due to the complexity of polysomic inheritance we have only few genetic maps of autopolyploid organisms. A robust mapping framework is particularly important in polyploid crop species, rose included (2n = 4x = 28), where the objective is to study multiallelic interactions that control traits of value for plant breeding. From a cross between the garden, peach red and fragrant cultivar Fragrant Cloud (FC) and a cut-rose yellow cultivar Golden Gate (GG), we generated an autotetraploid GGFC mapping population consisting of 132 individuals. For the map we used 128 sequence-based markers, 141 AFLP, 86 SSR and three morphological markers. Seven linkage groups were resolved for FC (Total 632 cM) and GG (616 cM) which were validated by markers that segregated in both parents as well as the diploid integrated consensus map.The release of the Fragaria vesca genome, which also belongs to the Rosoideae, allowed us to place 70 rose sequenced markers on the seven strawberry pseudo-chromosomes. Synteny between Rosa and Fragaria was high with an estimated four major translocations and six inversions required to place the 17 non-collinear markers in the same order. Based on a verified linear order of the rose markers, we could further partition each of the parents into its four homologous groups, thus providing an essential framework to aid the sequencing of an autotetraploid genome.

  5. Rapid multipoint linkage analysis of recessive traits in nuclear families, including homozygosity mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglyak, L.; Daly, M.J.; Lander, E.S. |

    1995-02-01

    Homozygosity mapping is a powerful strategy for mapping rare recessive traits in children of consanguineous marriages. Practical applications of this strategy are currently limited by the inability of conventional linkage analysis software to compute, in reasonable time, multipoint LOD scores for pedigrees with inbreeding loops. We have developed a new algorithm for rapid multipoint likelihood calculations in small pedigrees, including those with inbreeding loops. The running time of the algorithm grows, at most, linearly with the number of loci considered simultaneously. The running time is not sensitive to the presence of inbreeding loops, missing genotype information, and highly polymorphic loci. We have incorporated this algorithm into a software package, MAPMAKER/HOMOZ, that allows very rapid multipoint mapping of disease genes in nuclear families, including homozygosity mapping. Multipoint analysis with dozens of markers can be carried out in minutes on a personal workstation. 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. A physical map of the highly heterozygous Populus genome: integration with the genome sequence and genetic map

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, Colin; CHIU, Dr. R.; Shin, Dr. H.; Krywinski, Martin; Fjell, Chris; Wilkin, Jennifer; Yin, Tongming; Difazio, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01

    As part of a larger project to sequence the Populus genome and generate genomic resources for this emerging model tree, we constructed a physical map of the Populus genome, representing one of the few such maps of an undomesticated, highly heterozygous plant species. The physical map, consisting of 2802 contigs, was constructed from fingerprinted bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. The map represents approximately 9.4-fold coverage of the Populus genome, which has been estimated from the genome sequence assembly to be 485 {+-} 10 Mb in size. BAC ends were sequenced to assist long-range assembly of whole-genome shotgun sequence scaffolds and to anchor the physical map to the genome sequence. Simple sequence repeat-based markers were derived from the end sequences and used to initiate integration of the BAC and genetic maps. A total of 2411 physical map contigs, representing 97% of all clones assigned to contigs, were aligned to the sequence assembly (JGI Populus trichocarpa, version 1.0). These alignments represent a total coverage of 384 Mb (79%) of the entire poplar sequence assembly and 295 Mb (96%) of linkage group sequence assemblies. A striking result of the physical map contig alignments to the sequence assembly was the co-localization of multiple contigs across numerous regions of the 19 linkage groups. Targeted sequencing of BAC clones and genetic analysis in a small number of representative regions showed that these co-aligning contigs represent distinct haplotypes in the heterozygous individual sequenced, and revealed the nature of these haplotype sequence differences.

  7. Microsatellite Discovery from BAC End Sequences and Genetic Mapping to Anchor the Soybean Physical and Genetic Maps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical maps can be an invaluable resource for improving and assessing the quality of a whole-genome sequence assembly. Here we report the identification and screening of 3,290 microsatellites (SSRs) identified from BAC end sequences of clones comprising the physical map of the cultivar Williams 8...

  8. Nondestructive, in situ, cellular-scale mapping of elemental abundances including organic carbon in permineralized fossils.

    PubMed

    Boyce, C K; Hazen, R M; Knoll, A H

    2001-05-22

    The electron microprobe allows elemental abundances to be mapped at the microm scale, but until now high resolution mapping of light elements has been challenging. Modifications of electron microprobe procedure permit fine-scale mapping of carbon. When applied to permineralized fossils, this technique allows simultaneous mapping of organic material, major matrix-forming elements, and trace elements with microm-scale resolution. The resulting data make it possible to test taphonomic hypotheses for the formation of anatomically preserved silicified fossils, including the role of trace elements in the initiation of silica precipitation and in the prevention of organic degradation. The technique allows one to understand the localization of preserved organic matter before undertaking destructive chemical analyses and, because it is nondestructive, offers a potentially important tool for astrobiological investigations of samples returned from Mars or other solar system bodies.

  9. Linkage maps of the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) genome derived from RAD sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic linkage maps are useful tools for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing variation in traits of interest in a population. Genotyping-by-sequencing approaches such as Restriction-site Associated DNA sequencing (RAD-Seq) now enable the rapid discovery and genotyping of genome-wide SNP markers suitable for the development of dense SNP linkage maps, including in non-model organisms such as Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). This paper describes the development and characterisation of a high density SNP linkage map based on SbfI RAD-Seq SNP markers from two Atlantic salmon reference families. Results Approximately 6,000 SNPs were assigned to 29 linkage groups, utilising markers from known genomic locations as anchors. Linkage maps were then constructed for the four mapping parents separately. Overall map lengths were comparable between male and female parents, but the distribution of the SNPs showed sex-specific patterns with a greater degree of clustering of sire-segregating SNPs to single chromosome regions. The maps were integrated with the Atlantic salmon draft reference genome contigs, allowing the unique assignment of ~4,000 contigs to a linkage group. 112 genome contigs mapped to two or more linkage groups, highlighting regions of putative homeology within the salmon genome. A comparative genomics analysis with the stickleback reference genome identified putative genes closely linked to approximately half of the ordered SNPs and demonstrated blocks of orthology between the Atlantic salmon and stickleback genomes. A subset of 47 RAD-Seq SNPs were successfully validated using a high-throughput genotyping assay, with a correspondence of 97% between the two assays. Conclusions This Atlantic salmon RAD-Seq linkage map is a resource for salmonid genomics research as genotyping-by-sequencing becomes increasingly common. This is aided by the integration of the SbfI RAD-Seq SNPs with existing reference maps and the draft reference genome, as well

  10. Automatic phylogenetic classification of bacterial beta-lactamase sequences including structural and antibiotic substrate preference information.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianmin; Eisenhaber, Frank; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian

    2013-12-01

    Beta lactams comprise the largest and still most effective group of antibiotics, but bacteria can gain resistance through different beta lactamases that can degrade these antibiotics. We developed a user friendly tree building web server that allows users to assign beta lactamase sequences to their respective molecular classes and subclasses. Further clinically relevant information includes if the gene is typically chromosomal or transferable through plasmids as well as listing the antibiotics which the most closely related reference sequences are known to target and cause resistance against. This web server can automatically build three phylogenetic trees: the first tree with closely related sequences from a Tachyon search against the NCBI nr database, the second tree with curated reference beta lactamase sequences, and the third tree built specifically from substrate binding pocket residues of the curated reference beta lactamase sequences. We show that the latter is better suited to recover antibiotic substrate assignments through nearest neighbor annotation transfer. The users can also choose to build a structural model for the query sequence and view the binding pocket residues of their query relative to other beta lactamases in the sequence alignment as well as in the 3D structure relative to bound antibiotics. This web server is freely available at http://blac.bii.a-star.edu.sg/.

  11. Including non-public data and studies in systematic reviews and systematic maps.

    PubMed

    Haddaway, Neal R; Collins, Alexandra M; Coughlin, Deborah; Kohl, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Systematic reviews and maps should be based on the best available evidence, and reviewers should make all reasonable efforts to source and include potentially relevant studies. However, reviewers may not be able to consider all existing evidence, since some data and studies may not be publicly available. Including non-public studies in reviews provides a valuable opportunity to increase systematic review/map comprehensiveness, potentially mitigating negative impacts of publication bias. Studies may be non-public for many reasons: some may still be in the process of being published (publication can take a long time); some may not be published due to author/publisher restrictions; publication bias may make it difficult to publish non-significant or negative results. Here, we consider what forms these non-public studies may take and the implications of including them in systematic reviews and maps. Reviewers should carefully consider the advantages and disadvantages of including non-public studies, weighing risks of bias against benefits of increased comprehensiveness. As with all systematic reviews and maps, reviewers must be transparent about methods used to obtain data and avoid risks of bias in their synthesis. We make tentative suggestions for reviewers in situations where non-public data may be present in an evidence base.

  12. A sequence-based genetic map of Medicago truncatula and comparison of marker colinearity with M. sativa.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Dongjin; Uhm, Taesik; Limpens, Eric; Lim, Hyunju; Mun, Jeong-Hwan; Kalo, Peter; Penmetsa, R Varma; Seres, Andrea; Kulikova, Olga; Roe, Bruce A; Bisseling, Ton; Kiss, Gyorgy B; Cook, Douglas R

    2004-01-01

    A core genetic map of the legume Medicago truncatula has been established by analyzing the segregation of 288 sequence-characterized genetic markers in an F(2) population composed of 93 individuals. These molecular markers correspond to 141 ESTs, 80 BAC end sequence tags, and 67 resistance gene analogs, covering 513 cM. In the case of EST-based markers we used an intron-targeted marker strategy with primers designed to anneal in conserved exon regions and to amplify across intron regions. Polymorphisms were significantly more frequent in intron vs. exon regions, thus providing an efficient mechanism to map transcribed genes. Genetic and cytogenetic analysis produced eight well-resolved linkage groups, which have been previously correlated with eight chromosomes by means of FISH with mapped BAC clones. We anticipated that mapping of conserved coding regions would have utility for comparative mapping among legumes; thus 60 of the EST-based primer pairs were designed to amplify orthologous sequences across a range of legume species. As an initial test of this strategy, we used primers designed against M. truncatula exon sequences to rapidly map genes in M. sativa. The resulting comparative map, which includes 68 bridging markers, indicates that the two Medicago genomes are highly similar and establishes the basis for a Medicago composite map. PMID:15082563

  13. Integrated genome sequence and linkage map of physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.), a biodiesel plant.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pingzhi; Zhou, Changpin; Cheng, Shifeng; Wu, Zhenying; Lu, Wenjia; Han, Jinli; Chen, Yanbo; Chen, Yan; Ni, Peixiang; Wang, Ying; Xu, Xun; Huang, Ying; Song, Chi; Wang, Zhiwen; Shi, Nan; Zhang, Xudong; Fang, Xiaohua; Yang, Qing; Jiang, Huawu; Chen, Yaping; Li, Meiru; Wang, Ying; Chen, Fan; Wang, Jun; Wu, Guojiang

    2015-03-01

    The family Euphorbiaceae includes some of the most efficient biomass accumulators. Whole genome sequencing and the development of genetic maps of these species are important components in molecular breeding and genetic improvement. Here we report the draft genome of physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.), a biodiesel plant. The assembled genome has a total length of 320.5 Mbp and contains 27,172 putative protein-coding genes. We established a linkage map containing 1208 markers and anchored the genome assembly (81.7%) to this map to produce 11 pseudochromosomes. After gene family clustering, 15,268 families were identified, of which 13,887 existed in the castor bean genome. Analysis of the genome highlighted specific expansion and contraction of a number of gene families during the evolution of this species, including the ribosome-inactivating proteins and oil biosynthesis pathway enzymes. The genomic sequence and linkage map provide a valuable resource not only for fundamental and applied research on physic nut but also for evolutionary and comparative genomics analysis, particularly in the Euphorbiaceae.

  14. Integration of the Rat Recombination and EST Maps in the Rat Genomic Sequence and Comparative Mapping Analysis With the Mouse Genome

    PubMed Central

    Wilder, Steven P.; Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Argoud, Karène; Watanabe, Takeshi K.; Lathrop, Mark; Gauguier, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    Inbred strains of the laboratory rat are widely used for identifying genetic regions involved in the control of complex quantitative phenotypes of biomedical importance. The draft genomic sequence of the rat now provides essential information for annotating rat quantitative trait locus (QTL) maps. Following the survey of unique rat microsatellite (11,585 including 1648 new markers) and EST (10,067) markers currently available, we have incorporated a selection of 7952 rat EST sequences in an improved version of the integrated linkage-radiation hybrid map of the rat containing 2058 microsatellite markers which provided over 10,000 potential anchor points between rat QTL and the genomic sequence of the rat. A total of 996 genetic positions were resolved (avg. spacing 1.77 cM) in a single large intercross and anchored in the rat genomic sequence (avg. spacing 1.62 Mb). Comparative genome maps between rat and mouse were constructed by successful computational alignment of 6108 mapped rat ESTs in the mouse genome. The integration of rat linkage maps in the draft genomic sequence of the rat and that of other species represents an essential step for translating rat QTL intervals into human chromosomal targets. PMID:15060020

  15. Periodic sequences of simple maps can support chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cánovas, Jose S.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the Parrondo's paradox when several dynamically simple maps are combined in a periodic way, producing chaotic dynamics. We show that the paradox is not commutative, that is, it depends on the way that the maps are iterated. We also see that the paradox happens more frequently when the number of maps that we iterate increases.

  16. Integrated and sequence-ordered BAC- and YAC-based physical maps for the rat genome.

    PubMed

    Krzywinski, Martin; Wallis, John; Gösele, Claudia; Bosdet, Ian; Chiu, Readman; Graves, Tina; Hummel, Oliver; Layman, Dan; Mathewson, Carrie; Wye, Natasja; Zhu, Baoli; Albracht, Derek; Asano, Jennifer; Barber, Sarah; Brown-John, Mabel; Chan, Susanna; Chand, Steve; Cloutier, Alison; Davito, Jonathon; Fjell, Chris; Gaige, Tony; Ganten, Detlev; Girn, Noreen; Guggenheimer, Kurtis; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Kreitler, Thomas; Leach, Stephen; Lee, Darlene; Lehrach, Hans; Mayo, Michael; Mead, Kelly; Olson, Teika; Pandoh, Pawan; Prabhu, Anna-Liisa; Shin, Heesun; Tänzer, Simone; Thompson, Jason; Tsai, Miranda; Walker, Jason; Yang, George; Sekhon, Mandeep; Hillier, LaDeana; Zimdahl, Heike; Marziali, Andre; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Zhao, Shaying; Siddiqui, Asim; de Jong, Pieter J; Warren, Wes; Mardis, Elaine; McPherson, John D; Wilson, Richard; Hübner, Norbert; Jones, Steven; Marra, Marco; Schein, Jacqueline

    2004-04-01

    As part of the effort to sequence the genome of Rattus norvegicus, we constructed a physical map comprised of fingerprinted bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from the CHORI-230 BAC library. These BAC clones provide approximately 13-fold redundant coverage of the genome and have been assembled into 376 fingerprint contigs. A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) map was also constructed and aligned with the BAC map via fingerprinted BAC and P1 artificial chromosome clones (PACs) sharing interspersed repetitive sequence markers with the YAC-based physical map. We have annotated 95% of the fingerprint map clones in contigs with coordinates on the version 3.1 rat genome sequence assembly, using BAC-end sequences and in silico mapping methods. These coordinates have allowed anchoring 358 of the 376 fingerprint map contigs onto the sequence assembly. Of these, 324 contigs are anchored to rat genome sequences localized to chromosomes, and 34 contigs are anchored to unlocalized portions of the rat sequence assembly. The remaining 18 contigs, containing 54 clones, still require placement. The fingerprint map is a high-resolution integrative data resource that provides genome-ordered associations among BAC, YAC, and PAC clones and the assembled sequence of the rat genome.

  17. HetMappsS: Heterozygous mapping strategy for high resolution Genotyping-by-Sequencing Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reduced representation genotyping approaches, such as genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), provide opportunities to generate high-resolution genetic maps at a low per-sample cost. However, missing data and non-uniform sequence coverage can complicate map creation in highly heterozygous species. To facili...

  18. The widely used Nicotiana benthamiana 16c line has an unusual T-DNA integration pattern including a transposon sequence

    PubMed Central

    Lorenc, Michał T.; Dudley, Kevin J.; Hellens, Roger P.

    2017-01-01

    Nicotiana benthamiana is employed around the world for many types of research and one transgenic line has been used more extensively than any other. This line, 16c, expresses the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP), highly and constitutively, and has been a major resource for visualising the mobility and actions of small RNAs. Insights into the mechanisms studied at a molecular level in N. benthamiana 16c are likely to be deeper and more accurate with a greater knowledge of the GFP gene integration site. Therefore, using next generation sequencing, genome mapping and local alignment, we identified the location and characteristics of the integrated T-DNA. As suggested from previous molecular hybridisation and inheritance data, the transgenic line contains a single GFP-expressing locus. However, the GFP coding sequence differs from that originally reported. Furthermore, a 3.2 kb portion of a transposon, appears to have co-integrated with the T-DNA. The location of the integration mapped to a region of the genome represented by Nbv0.5scaffold4905 in the www.benthgenome.com assembly, and with less integrity to Niben101Scf03641 in the www.solgenomics.net assembly. The transposon is not endogenous to laboratory strains of N. benthamiana or Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain GV3101 (MP90), which was reportedly used in the generation of line 16c. However, it is present in the popular LBA4404 strain. The integrated transposon sequence includes its 5’ terminal repeat and a transposase gene, and is immediately adjacent to the GFP gene. This unexpected genetic arrangement may contribute to the characteristics that have made the 16c line such a popular research tool and alerts researchers, taking transgenic plants to commercial release, to be aware of this genomic hitchhiker. PMID:28231340

  19. The widely used Nicotiana benthamiana 16c line has an unusual T-DNA integration pattern including a transposon sequence.

    PubMed

    Philips, Joshua G; Naim, Fatima; Lorenc, Michał T; Dudley, Kevin J; Hellens, Roger P; Waterhouse, Peter M

    2017-01-01

    Nicotiana benthamiana is employed around the world for many types of research and one transgenic line has been used more extensively than any other. This line, 16c, expresses the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP), highly and constitutively, and has been a major resource for visualising the mobility and actions of small RNAs. Insights into the mechanisms studied at a molecular level in N. benthamiana 16c are likely to be deeper and more accurate with a greater knowledge of the GFP gene integration site. Therefore, using next generation sequencing, genome mapping and local alignment, we identified the location and characteristics of the integrated T-DNA. As suggested from previous molecular hybridisation and inheritance data, the transgenic line contains a single GFP-expressing locus. However, the GFP coding sequence differs from that originally reported. Furthermore, a 3.2 kb portion of a transposon, appears to have co-integrated with the T-DNA. The location of the integration mapped to a region of the genome represented by Nbv0.5scaffold4905 in the www.benthgenome.com assembly, and with less integrity to Niben101Scf03641 in the www.solgenomics.net assembly. The transposon is not endogenous to laboratory strains of N. benthamiana or Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain GV3101 (MP90), which was reportedly used in the generation of line 16c. However, it is present in the popular LBA4404 strain. The integrated transposon sequence includes its 5' terminal repeat and a transposase gene, and is immediately adjacent to the GFP gene. This unexpected genetic arrangement may contribute to the characteristics that have made the 16c line such a popular research tool and alerts researchers, taking transgenic plants to commercial release, to be aware of this genomic hitchhiker.

  20. Sequencing the Pig Genome Using a Mapped BAC by BAC Approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have generated a highly contiguous physical map covering >98% of the pig genome in just 176 contigs. The map is localised to the genome through integration with the UIUC RH map as well BAC end sequence alignments to the human genome. Over 265k HindIII restriction digest fingerprints totalling 1...

  1. Mapping membrane activity in undiscovered peptide sequence space using machine learning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ernest Y; Fulan, Benjamin M; Wong, Gerard C L; Ferguson, Andrew L

    2016-11-29

    There are some ∼1,100 known antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which permeabilize microbial membranes but have diverse sequences. Here, we develop a support vector machine (SVM)-based classifier to investigate ⍺-helical AMPs and the interrelated nature of their functional commonality and sequence homology. SVM is used to search the undiscovered peptide sequence space and identify Pareto-optimal candidates that simultaneously maximize the distance σ from the SVM hyperplane (thus maximize its "antimicrobialness") and its ⍺-helicity, but minimize mutational distance to known AMPs. By calibrating SVM machine learning results with killing assays and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we find that the SVM metric σ correlates not with a peptide's minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), but rather its ability to generate negative Gaussian membrane curvature. This surprising result provides a topological basis for membrane activity common to AMPs. Moreover, we highlight an important distinction between the maximal recognizability of a sequence to a trained AMP classifier (its ability to generate membrane curvature) and its maximal antimicrobial efficacy. As mutational distances are increased from known AMPs, we find AMP-like sequences that are increasingly difficult for nature to discover via simple mutation. Using the sequence map as a discovery tool, we find a unexpectedly diverse taxonomy of sequences that are just as membrane-active as known AMPs, but with a broad range of primary functions distinct from AMP functions, including endogenous neuropeptides, viral fusion proteins, topogenic peptides, and amyloids. The SVM classifier is useful as a general detector of membrane activity in peptide sequences.

  2. A mapping of an ensemble of mitochondrial sequences for various organisms into 3D space based on the word composition.

    PubMed

    Aita, Takuyo; Nishigaki, Koichi

    2012-11-01

    To visualize a bird's-eye view of an ensemble of mitochondrial genome sequences for various species, we recently developed a novel method of mapping a biological sequence ensemble into Three-Dimensional (3D) vector space. First, we represented a biological sequence of a species s by a word-composition vector x(s), where its length [absolute value]x(s)[absolute value] represents the sequence length, and its unit vector x(s)/[absolute value]x(s)[absolute value] represents the relative composition of the K-tuple words through the sequence and the size of the dimension, N=4(K), is the number of all possible words with the length of K. Second, we mapped the vector x(s) to the 3D position vector y(s), based on the two following simple principles: (1) [absolute value]y(s)[absolute value]=[absolute value]x(s)[absolute value] and (2) the angle between y(s) and y(t) maximally correlates with the angle between x(s) and x(t). The mitochondrial genome sequences for 311 species, including 177 Animalia, 85 Fungi and 49 Green plants, were mapped into 3D space by using K=7. The mapping was successful because the angles between vectors before and after the mapping highly correlated with each other (correlation coefficients were 0.92-0.97). Interestingly, the Animalia kingdom is distributed along a single arc belt (just like the Milky Way on a Celestial Globe), and the Fungi and Green plant kingdoms are distributed in a similar arc belt. These two arc belts intersect at their respective middle regions and form a cross structure just like a jet aircraft fuselage and its wings. This new mapping method will allow researchers to intuitively interpret the visual information presented in the maps in a highly effective manner.

  3. A sequencing-based linkage map of cucumber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic maps are important tools for molecular breeding, gene cloning, and study of meiotic recombination. In cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), the marker density, resolution and genome coverage of previously developed genetic maps using PCR-based molecular markers are relatively low. In this study we ...

  4. The organization of biological sequences into constrained and unconstrained parts determines fundamental properties of genotype–phenotype maps

    PubMed Central

    Greenbury, S. F.; Ahnert, S. E.

    2015-01-01

    Biological information is stored in DNA, RNA and protein sequences, which can be understood as genotypes that are translated into phenotypes. The properties of genotype–phenotype (GP) maps have been studied in great detail for RNA secondary structure. These include a highly biased distribution of genotypes per phenotype, negative correlation of genotypic robustness and evolvability, positive correlation of phenotypic robustness and evolvability, shape-space covering, and a roughly logarithmic scaling of phenotypic robustness with phenotypic frequency. More recently similar properties have been discovered in other GP maps, suggesting that they may be fundamental to biological GP maps, in general, rather than specific to the RNA secondary structure map. Here we propose that the above properties arise from the fundamental organization of biological information into ‘constrained' and ‘unconstrained' sequences, in the broadest possible sense. As ‘constrained' we describe sequences that affect the phenotype more immediately, and are therefore more sensitive to mutations, such as, e.g. protein-coding DNA or the stems in RNA secondary structure. ‘Unconstrained' sequences, on the other hand, can mutate more freely without affecting the phenotype, such as, e.g. intronic or intergenic DNA or the loops in RNA secondary structure. To test our hypothesis we consider a highly simplified GP map that has genotypes with ‘coding' and ‘non-coding' parts. We term this the Fibonacci GP map, as it is equivalent to the Fibonacci code in information theory. Despite its simplicity the Fibonacci GP map exhibits all the above properties of much more complex and biologically realistic GP maps. These properties are therefore likely to be fundamental to many biological GP maps. PMID:26609063

  5. The organization of biological sequences into constrained and unconstrained parts determines fundamental properties of genotype-phenotype maps.

    PubMed

    Greenbury, S F; Ahnert, S E

    2015-12-06

    Biological information is stored in DNA, RNA and protein sequences, which can be understood as genotypes that are translated into phenotypes. The properties of genotype-phenotype (GP) maps have been studied in great detail for RNA secondary structure. These include a highly biased distribution of genotypes per phenotype, negative correlation of genotypic robustness and evolvability, positive correlation of phenotypic robustness and evolvability, shape-space covering, and a roughly logarithmic scaling of phenotypic robustness with phenotypic frequency. More recently similar properties have been discovered in other GP maps, suggesting that they may be fundamental to biological GP maps, in general, rather than specific to the RNA secondary structure map. Here we propose that the above properties arise from the fundamental organization of biological information into 'constrained' and 'unconstrained' sequences, in the broadest possible sense. As 'constrained' we describe sequences that affect the phenotype more immediately, and are therefore more sensitive to mutations, such as, e.g. protein-coding DNA or the stems in RNA secondary structure. 'Unconstrained' sequences, on the other hand, can mutate more freely without affecting the phenotype, such as, e.g. intronic or intergenic DNA or the loops in RNA secondary structure. To test our hypothesis we consider a highly simplified GP map that has genotypes with 'coding' and 'non-coding' parts. We term this the Fibonacci GP map, as it is equivalent to the Fibonacci code in information theory. Despite its simplicity the Fibonacci GP map exhibits all the above properties of much more complex and biologically realistic GP maps. These properties are therefore likely to be fundamental to many biological GP maps.

  6. Genomics and introgression: discovery and mapping of thousands of species-diagnostic SNPs using RAD sequencing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hand, Brian K; Hether, Tyler D; Kovach, Ryan P.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Amish, Stephen J.; Boyer, Matthew C.; O’Rourke, Sean M.; Miller, Michael R.; Lowe, Winsor H.; Hohenlohe, Paul A.; Luikart, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Invasive hybridization and introgression pose a serious threat to the persistence of many native species. Understanding the effects of hybridization on native populations (e.g., fitness consequences) requires numerous species-diagnostic loci distributed genome-wide. Here we used RAD sequencing to discover thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are diagnostic between rainbow trout (RBT, Oncorhynchus mykiss), the world’s most widely introduced fish, and native westslope cutthroat trout (WCT, O. clarkii lewisi) in the northern Rocky Mountains, USA. We advanced previous work that identified 4,914 species-diagnostic loci by using longer sequence reads (100 bp vs. 60 bp) and a larger set of individuals (n = 84). We sequenced RAD libraries for individuals from diverse sampling sources, including native populations of WCT and hatchery broodstocks of WCT and RBT. We also took advantage of a newly released reference genome assembly for RBT to align our RAD loci. In total, we discovered 16,788 putatively diagnostic SNPs, 10,267 of which we mapped to anchored chromosome locations on the RBT genome. A small portion of previously discovered putative diagnostic loci (325 of 4,914) were no longer diagnostic (i.e., fixed between species) based on our wider survey of non-hybridized RBT and WCT individuals. Our study suggests that RAD loci mapped to a draft genome assembly could provide the marker density required to identify genes and chromosomal regions influencing selection in admixed populations of conservation concern and evolutionary interest.

  7. Combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis of complex traits in outbred rats.

    PubMed

    Baud, Amelie; Hermsen, Roel; Guryev, Victor; Stridh, Pernilla; Graham, Delyth; McBride, Martin W; Foroud, Tatiana; Calderari, Sophie; Diez, Margarita; Ockinger, Johan; Beyeen, Amennai D; Gillett, Alan; Abdelmagid, Nada; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Jagodic, Maja; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Beattie, Elisabeth; Huynh, Ngan; Miller, William H; Koller, Daniel L; Alam, Imranul; Falak, Samreen; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Martinez-Membrives, Esther; Canete, Toni; Blazquez, Gloria; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Diaz-Moran, Sira; Tobena, Adolf; Hummel, Oliver; Zelenika, Diana; Saar, Kathrin; Patone, Giannino; Bauerfeind, Anja; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Heinig, Matthias; Lee, Young-Ae; Rintisch, Carola; Schulz, Herbert; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Lathrop, Mark; Lansu, Nico; Toonen, Pim; Ruzius, Frans Paul; de Bruijn, Ewart; Hauser, Heidi; Adams, David J; Keane, Thomas; Atanur, Santosh S; Aitman, Tim J; Flicek, Paul; Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E Yvonne; Ekman, Diana; Lopez-Aumatell, Regina; Dominiczak, Anna F; Johannesson, Martina; Holmdahl, Rikard; Olsson, Tomas; Gauguier, Dominique; Hubner, Norbert; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Cuppen, Edwin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2013-07-01

    Genetic mapping on fully sequenced individuals is transforming understanding of the relationship between molecular variation and variation in complex traits. Here we report a combined sequence and genetic mapping analysis in outbred rats that maps 355 quantitative trait loci for 122 phenotypes. We identify 35 causal genes involved in 31 phenotypes, implicating new genes in models of anxiety, heart disease and multiple sclerosis. The relationship between sequence and genetic variation is unexpectedly complex: at approximately 40% of quantitative trait loci, a single sequence variant cannot account for the phenotypic effect. Using comparable sequence and mapping data from mice, we show that the extent and spatial pattern of variation in inbred rats differ substantially from those of inbred mice and that the genetic variants in orthologous genes rarely contribute to the same phenotype in both species.

  8. Combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis of complex traits in outbred rats

    PubMed Central

    Baud, Amelie; Hermsen, Roel; Guryev, Victor; Stridh, Pernilla; Graham, Delyth; McBride, Martin W.; Foroud, Tatiana; Calderari, Sophie; Diez, Margarita; Ockinger, Johan; Beyeen, Amennai D.; Gillett, Alan; Abdelmagid, Nada; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Jagodic, Maja; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Beattie, Elisabeth; Huynh, Ngan; Miller, William H.; Koller, Daniel L.; Alam, Imranul; Falak, Samreen; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Martinez-Membrives, Esther; Canete, Toni; Blazquez, Gloria; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Diaz-Moran, Sira; Tobena, Adolf; Hummel, Oliver; Zelenika, Diana; Saar, Kathrin; Patone, Giannino; Bauerfeind, Anja; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Heinig, Matthias; Lee, Young-Ae; Rintisch, Carola; Schulz, Herbert; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lathrop, Mark; Lansu, Nico; Toonen, Pim; Ruzius, Frans Paul; de Bruijn, Ewart; Hauser, Heidi; Adams, David J.; Keane, Thomas; Atanur, Santosh S.; Aitman, Tim J.; Flicek, Paul; Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E. Yvonne; Ekman, Diana; Lopez-Aumatell, Regina; Dominiczak, Anna F; Johannesson, Martina; Holmdahl, Rikard; Olsson, Tomas; Gauguier, Dominique; Hubner, Norbert; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Cuppen, Edwin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Genetic mapping on fully sequenced individuals is transforming our understanding of the relationship between molecular variation and variation in complex traits. Here we report a combined sequence and genetic mapping analysis in outbred rats that maps 355 quantitative trait loci for 122 phenotypes. We identify 35 causal genes involved in 31 phenotypes, implicating novel genes in models of anxiety, heart disease and multiple sclerosis. The relation between sequence and genetic variation is unexpectedly complex: at approximately 40% of quantitative trait loci a single sequence variant cannot account for the phenotypic effect. Using comparable sequence and mapping data from mice, we show the extent and spatial pattern of variation in inbred rats differ significantly from those of inbred mice, and that the genetic variants in orthologous genes rarely contribute to the same phenotype in both species. PMID:23708188

  9. DNA sequence analyses of blended herbal products including synthetic cannabinoids as designer drugs.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Jun; Uchiyama, Nahoko; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Goda, Yukihiro

    2013-04-10

    In recent years, various herbal products adulterated with synthetic cannabinoids have been distributed worldwide via the Internet. These herbal products are mostly sold as incense, and advertised as not for human consumption. Although their labels indicate that they contain mixtures of several potentially psychoactive plants, and numerous studies have reported that they contain a variety of synthetic cannabinoids, their exact botanical contents are not always clear. In this study, we investigated the origins of botanical materials in 62 Spice-like herbal products distributed on the illegal drug market in Japan, by DNA sequence analyses and BLAST searches. The nucleotide sequences of four regions were analyzed to identify the origins of each plant species in the herbal mixtures. The sequences of "Damiana" (Turnera diffusa) and Lamiaceae herbs (Mellissa, Mentha and Thymus) were frequently detected in a number of products. However, the sequences of other plant species indicated on the packaging labels were not detected. In a few products, DNA fragments of potent psychotropic plants were found, including marijuana (Cannabis sativa), "Diviner's Sage" (Salvia divinorum) and "Kratom" (Mitragyna speciosa). Their active constituents were also confirmed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), although these plant names were never indicated on the labels. Most plant species identified in the products were different from the plants indicated on the labels. The plant materials would be used mainly as diluents for the psychoactive synthetic compounds, because no reliable psychoactive effects have been reported for most of the identified plants, with the exception of the psychotropic plants named above.

  10. Secondary Structure Predictions for Long RNA Sequences Based on Inversion Excursions and MapReduce.

    PubMed

    Yehdego, Daniel T; Zhang, Boyu; Kodimala, Vikram K R; Johnson, Kyle L; Taufer, Michela; Leung, Ming-Ying

    2013-05-01

    Secondary structures of ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules play important roles in many biological processes including gene expression and regulation. Experimental observations and computing limitations suggest that we can approach the secondary structure prediction problem for long RNA sequences by segmenting them into shorter chunks, predicting the secondary structures of each chunk individually using existing prediction programs, and then assembling the results to give the structure of the original sequence. The selection of cutting points is a crucial component of the segmenting step. Noting that stem-loops and pseudoknots always contain an inversion, i.e., a stretch of nucleotides followed closely by its inverse complementary sequence, we developed two cutting methods for segmenting long RNA sequences based on inversion excursions: the centered and optimized method. Each step of searching for inversions, chunking, and predictions can be performed in parallel. In this paper we use a MapReduce framework, i.e., Hadoop, to extensively explore meaningful inversion stem lengths and gap sizes for the segmentation and identify correlations between chunking methods and prediction accuracy. We show that for a set of long RNA sequences in the RFAM database, whose secondary structures are known to contain pseudoknots, our approach predicts secondary structures more accurately than methods that do not segment the sequence, when the latter predictions are possible computationally. We also show that, as sequences exceed certain lengths, some programs cannot computationally predict pseudoknots while our chunking methods can. Overall, our predicted structures still retain the accuracy level of the original prediction programs when compared with known experimental secondary structure.

  11. Physical mapping of complex genomes by sampled sequencing: A theoretical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kupfer, K.; Smith, M.; Quackenbush, J.

    1995-05-01

    A method for high-throughput, high-resolution physical mapping of complex genomes and human chromosomes called Genomic Sequence Sampling (GSS) has recently been proposed. This mapping strategy employs high-density cosmid contig assembly over 200-kb to 1-Mb regions of the target genome coupled with DNA sequencing of the cosmid ends. The relative order and spacing of the sequence fragments is determined from the template contig, resulting in a physical map of 1-to 5-kb resolution that contains a substantial portion of the entire sequence at one-pass accuracy. The purpose of this paper is to determine the theoretical parameters for GSS mapping, to evaluate the effectiveness of the contig-building strategy, and to calculate the expected fraction of the target genome that can be recovered as mapped sequence. A novel aspect of the cosmid fingerprinting and contig-building strategy involves determining the orientation of the genomic inserts relative to the cloning vectors, so that the sampled sequence fragments can be mapped with high resolution. The algorithm is based upon complete restriction enzyme digestion, contig assembly by matching fragments, and end-orientation of individual cosmids by determining the best consistent fit of the labeled cosmid end fragments in the consensus restriction map. 32 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Analysis of the primary sequence and microtubule-binding region of the Drosophila 205K MAP

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    We have sequenced cDNA clones encoding the Drosophila 205K microtubule- associated protein (MAP), a protein that may be the species specific homologue of mammalian MAP4. The peptide sequence deduced from the longest open-reading frame reveals a hydrophilic protein, which has basic and acidic regions that are similar in organization to mammalian MAP2. Using truncated forms of the 205K MAP, a 232-amino acid region could be defined that is necessary for microtubule binding. The amino acid sequence of this region shares no similarity with the binding motif of MAP2 or tau. We also analyzed several embryonic cDNA clones, which show the existence of differentially spliced mRNAs. Finally, we identified several potential protein kinase target sequences. One of these is distal to the microtubule-binding site and fits the phosphorylation consensus sequence of proteins phosphorylated by the mitosis specific protein kinase cdc2. Our data suggest that the 205K MAP uses a microtubule-binding motif unlike that found in other MAPs, and also raise the possibility that the activities of the 205K MAP may be regulated by alternative splicing and phosphorylation. PMID:1703540

  13. Construction of an integrated high density simple sequence repeat linkage map in cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) and its applicability.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Sachiko N; Hirakawa, Hideki; Sato, Shusei; Maeda, Fumi; Ishikawa, Masami; Mori, Toshiki; Yamamoto, Yuko; Shirasawa, Kenta; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Fukami, Masanobu; Hashizume, Fujio; Tsuji, Tomoko; Sasamoto, Shigemi; Kato, Midori; Nanri, Keiko; Tsuruoka, Hisano; Minami, Chiharu; Takahashi, Chika; Wada, Tsuyuko; Ono, Akiko; Kawashima, Kumiko; Nakazaki, Naomi; Kishida, Yoshie; Kohara, Mitsuyo; Nakayama, Shinobu; Yamada, Manabu; Fujishiro, Tsunakazu; Watanabe, Akiko; Tabata, Satoshi

    2013-02-01

    The cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) is an octoploid (2n = 8x = 56) of the Rosaceae family whose genomic architecture is still controversial. Several recent studies support the AAA'A'BBB'B' model, but its complexity has hindered genetic and genomic analysis of this important crop. To overcome this difficulty and to assist genome-wide analysis of F. × ananassa, we constructed an integrated linkage map by organizing a total of 4474 of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers collected from published Fragaria sequences, including 3746 SSR markers [Fragaria vesca expressed sequence tag (EST)-derived SSR markers] derived from F. vesca ESTs, 603 markers (F. × ananassa EST-derived SSR markers) from F. × ananassa ESTs, and 125 markers (F. × ananassa transcriptome-derived SSR markers) from F. × ananassa transcripts. Along with the previously published SSR markers, these markers were mapped onto five parent-specific linkage maps derived from three mapping populations, which were then assembled into an integrated linkage map. The constructed map consists of 1856 loci in 28 linkage groups (LGs) that total 2364.1 cM in length. Macrosynteny at the chromosome level was observed between the LGs of F. × ananassa and the genome of F. vesca. Variety distinction on 129 F. × ananassa lines was demonstrated using 45 selected SSR markers.

  14. Development of a high density integrated reference genetic linkage map for the multinational Brassica rapa Genome Sequencing Project.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaonan; Ramchiary, Nirala; Choi, Su Ryun; Van Nguyen, Dan; Hossain, Md Jamil; Yang, Hyeon Kook; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2010-11-01

    We constructed a high-density Brassica rapa integrated linkage map by combining a reference genetic map of 78 doubled haploid lines derived from Chiifu-401-42 × Kenshin (CKDH) and a new map of 190 F2 lines derived from Chiifu-401-42 × rapid cycling B. rapa (CRF2). The integrated map contains 1017 markers and covers 1262.0 cM of the B. rapa genome, with an average interlocus distance of 1.24 cM. High similarity of marker order and position was observed among the linkage groups of the maps with few short-distance inversions. In total, 155 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, anchored to 102 new bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) and 146 intron polymorphic (IP) markers were mapped in the integrated map, which would be helpful to align the sequenced BACs in the ongoing multinational Brassica rapa Genome Sequencing Project (BrGSP). Further, comparison of the B. rapa consensus map with the 10 B. juncea A-genome linkage groups by using 98 common IP markers showed high-degree colinearity between the A-genome linkage groups, except for few markers showing inversion or translocation. Suggesting that chromosomes are highly conserved between these Brassica species, although they evolved independently after divergence. The sequence information coming out of BrGSP would be useful for B. juncea breeding. and the identified Arabidopsis chromosomal blocks and known quantitative trait loci (QTL) information of B. juncea could be applied to improve other Brassica crops including B. rapa.

  15. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hev ein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    2000-07-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  16. Use of Composite Protein Database including Search Result Sequences for Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Cell Secretome

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jihye; Kim, Gamin; Kabir, Mohammad Humayun; Park, Seong Jun; Lee, Seoung Taek; Lee, Cheolju

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometric (MS) data of human cell secretomes are usually run through the conventional human database for identification. However, the search may result in false identifications due to contamination of the secretome with fetal bovine serum (FBS) proteins. To overcome this challenge, here we provide a composite protein database including human as well as 199 FBS protein sequences for MS data search of human cell secretomes. Searching against the human-FBS database returned more reliable results with fewer false-positive and false-negative identifications compared to using either a human only database or a human-bovine database. Furthermore, the improved results validated our strategy without complex experiments like SILAC. We expect our strategy to improve the accuracy of human secreted protein identification and to also add value for general use. PMID:25822838

  17. Draft genome sequence, and a sequence-defined genetic linkage map of the legume crop species Lupinus angustifolius L.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huaan; Tao, Ye; Zheng, Zequn; Zhang, Qisen; Zhou, Gaofeng; Sweetingham, Mark W; Howieson, John G; Li, Chengdao

    2013-01-01

    Lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.) is the most recently domesticated crop in major agricultural cultivation. Its seeds are high in protein and dietary fibre, but low in oil and starch. Medical and dietetic studies have shown that consuming lupin-enriched food has significant health benefits. We report the draft assembly from a whole genome shotgun sequencing dataset for this legume species with 26.9x coverage of the genome, which is predicted to contain 57,807 genes. Analysis of the annotated genes with metabolic pathways provided a partial understanding of some key features of lupin, such as the amino acid profile of storage proteins in seeds. Furthermore, we applied the NGS-based RAD-sequencing technology to obtain 8,244 sequence-defined markers for anchoring the genomic sequences. A total of 4,214 scaffolds from the genome sequence assembly were aligned into the genetic map. The combination of the draft assembly and a sequence-defined genetic map made it possible to locate and study functional genes of agronomic interest. The identification of co-segregating SNP markers, scaffold sequences and gene annotation facilitated the identification of a candidate R gene associated with resistance to the major lupin disease anthracnose. We demonstrated that the combination of medium-depth genome sequencing and a high-density genetic linkage map by application of NGS technology is a cost-effective approach to generating genome sequence data and a large number of molecular markers to study the genomics, genetics and functional genes of lupin, and to apply them to molecular plant breeding. This strategy does not require prior genome knowledge, which potentiates its application to a wide range of non-model species.

  18. A physical map, including a BAC/PAC clone contig, of the Williams-Beuren syndrome--deletion region at 7q11.23.

    PubMed

    Peoples, R; Franke, Y; Wang, Y K; Pérez-Jurado, L; Paperna, T; Cisco, M; Francke, U

    2000-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a developmental disorder caused by haploinsufficiency for genes in a 2-cM region of chromosome band 7q11.23. With the exception of vascular stenoses due to deletion of the elastin gene, the various features of WBS have not yet been attributed to specific genes. Although >/=16 genes have been identified within the WBS deletion, completion of a physical map of the region has been difficult because of the large duplicated regions flanking the deletion. We present a physical map of the WBS deletion and flanking regions, based on assembly of a bacterial artificial chromosome/P1-derived artificial chromosome contig, analysis of high-throughput genome-sequence data, and long-range restriction mapping of genomic and cloned DNA by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Our map encompasses 3 Mb, including 1.6 Mb within the deletion. Two large duplicons, flanking the deletion, of >/=320 kb contain unique sequence elements from the internal border regions of the deletion, such as sequences from GTF2I (telomeric) and FKBP6 (centromeric). A third copy of this duplicon exists in inverted orientation distal to the telomeric flanking one. These duplicons show stronger sequence conservation with regard to each other than to the presumptive ancestral loci within the common deletion region. Sequence elements originating from beyond 7q11.23 are also present in these duplicons. Although the duplicons are not present in mice, the order of the single-copy genes in the conserved syntenic region of mouse chromosome 5 is inverted relative to the human map. A model is presented for a mechanism of WBS-deletion formation, based on the orientation of duplicons' components relative to each other and to the ancestral elements within the deletion region.

  19. A Time Sequence-Oriented Concept Map Approach to Developing Educational Computer Games for History Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Hui-Chun; Yang, Kai-Hsiang; Chen, Jing-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Concept maps have been recognized as an effective tool for students to organize their knowledge; however, in history courses, it is important for students to learn and organize historical events according to the time of their occurrence. Therefore, in this study, a time sequence-oriented concept map approach is proposed for developing a game-based…

  20. Construction of a SNP and SSR linkage map in autotetraploid blueberry using genotyping by sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A mapping population developed from a cross between two key highbush blueberry cultivars, Draper × Jewel (Vaccinium corymbosum), segregating for a number of important phenotypic traits, has been utilized to produce a genetic linkage map. Data on 233 single sequence repeat (SSR) markers and 1794 sing...

  1. Comparison and quantitative verification of mapping algorithms for whole genome bisulfite sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coupling bisulfite conversion with next-generation sequencing (Bisulfite-seq) enables genome-wide measurement of DNA methylation, but poses unique challenges for mapping. However, despite a proliferation of Bisulfite-seq mapping tools, no systematic comparison of their genomic coverage and quantitat...

  2. Sex Differences in Infants' Mapping of Complex Occlusion Sequences: Further Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Teresa

    2007-01-01

    Recently, infant researchers have reported sex differences in infants' capacity to map their representation of an occlusion sequence onto a subsequent no-occlusion display. The research reported here sought to identify the extent to which these sex differences are observed in event-mapping tasks and to identify the underlying basis for these…

  3. Genetic Linkage Map will aid the Whole genome Sequence Assembly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The allotetraploid peanut genome assembly will be a valuable resource to researchers studying polyploidy species, in addition to peanut genome evolution and domestication other than facilitating QTL analysis and the tools for marker-assisted breeding. Therefore, a peanut linkage map will aid genome ...

  4. How to include the variability of TMS responses in simulations: a speech mapping case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Geeter, N.; Lioumis, P.; Laakso, A.; Crevecoeur, G.; Dupré, L.

    2016-11-01

    When delivered over a specific cortical site, TMS can temporarily disrupt the ongoing process in that area. This allows mapping of speech-related areas for preoperative evaluation purposes. We numerically explore the observed variability of TMS responses during a speech mapping experiment performed with a neuronavigation system. We selected four cases with very small perturbations in coil position and orientation. In one case (E) a naming error occurred, while in the other cases (NEA, B, C) the subject appointed the images as smoothly as without TMS. A realistic anisotropic head model was constructed of the subject from T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI. The induced electric field distributions were computed, associated to the coil parameters retrieved from the neuronavigation system. Finally, the membrane potentials along relevant white matter fibre tracts, extracted from DTI-based tractography, were computed using a compartmental cable equation. While only minor differences could be noticed between the induced electric field distributions of the four cases, computing the corresponding membrane potentials revealed different subsets of tracts were activated. A single tract was activated for all coil positions. Another tract was only triggered for case E. NEA induced action potentials in 13 tracts, while NEB stimulated 11 tracts and NEC one. The calculated results are certainly sensitive to the coil specifications, demonstrating the observed variability in this study. However, even though a tract connecting Broca’s with Wernicke’s area is only triggered for the error case, further research is needed on other study cases and on refining the neural model with synapses and network connections. Case- and subject-specific modelling that includes both electromagnetic fields and neuronal activity enables demonstration of the variability in TMS experiments and can capture the interaction with complex neural networks.

  5. Comparative organization of cattle chromosome 5 revealed by comparative mapping by annotation and sequence similarity and radiation hybrid mapping.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, A; Band, M R; Larson, J H; Donovan, J; Green, C A; Womack, J E; Lewin, H A

    2000-04-11

    A whole genome cattle-hamster radiation hybrid cell panel was used to construct a map of 54 markers located on bovine chromosome 5 (BTA5). Of the 54 markers, 34 are microsatellites selected from the cattle linkage map and 20 are genes. Among the 20 mapped genes, 10 are new assignments that were made by using the comparative mapping by annotation and sequence similarity strategy. A LOD-3 radiation hybrid framework map consisting of 21 markers was constructed. The relatively low retention frequency of markers on this chromosome (19%) prevented unambiguous ordering of the other 33 markers. The length of the map is 398.7 cR, corresponding to a ratio of approximately 2.8 cR(5,000)/cM. Type I genes were binned for comparison of gene order among cattle, humans, and mice. Multiple internal rearrangements within conserved syntenic groups were apparent upon comparison of gene order on BTA5 and HSA12 and HSA22. A similarly high number of rearrangements were observed between BTA5 and MMU6, MMU10, and MMU15. The detailed comparative map of BTA5 should facilitate identification of genes affecting economically important traits that have been mapped to this chromosome and should contribute to our understanding of mammalian chromosome evolution.

  6. A map of the protein space--an automatic hierarchical classification of all protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Yona, G; Linial, N; Tishby, N; Linial, M

    1998-01-01

    well as many interesting relations between protein families. The hierarchical organization proposed may be considered as the first map of the space of all protein sequences. An interactive web site including the results of our analysis has been constructed, and is now accessible through http:/(/)www.protomap.cs.huji.ac.il

  7. Identification of mesoderm development (mesd) candidate genes by comparative mapping and genome sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Wines, M E; Lee, L; Katari, M S; Zhang, L; DeRossi, C; Shi, Y; Perkins, S; Feldman, M; McCombie, W R; Holdener, B C

    2001-02-15

    The proximal albino deletions identify several functional regions on mouse Chromosome 7 critical for differentiation of mesoderm (mesd), development of the hypothalamus neuroendocrine lineage (nelg), and function of the liver (hsdr1). Using comparative mapping and genomic sequence analysis, we have identified four novel genes and Il16 in the mesd deletion interval. Two of the novel genes, mesdc1 and mesdc2, are located within the mesd critical region defined by BAC transgenic rescue. We have investigated the fetal role of genes located outside the mesd critical region using BAC transgenic complementation of the mesd early embryonic lethality. Using human radiation hybrid mapping and BAC contig construction, we have identified a conserved region of human chromosome 15 homologous to the mesd, nelg, and hsdr1 functional regions. Three human diseases cosegregate with microsatellite markers used in construction of the human BAC/YAC physical map, including autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ENFL2; also known as ADNFLE), a syndrome of mental retardation, spasticity, and tapetoretinal degeneration (MRST); and a pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne syndrome (PAPA).

  8. Toward a physical map of Drosophila buzzatii. Use of randomly amplified polymorphic dna polymorphisms and sequence-tagged site landmarks.

    PubMed Central

    Laayouni, H; Santos, M; Fontdevila, A

    2000-01-01

    We present a physical map based on RAPD polymorphic fragments and sequence-tagged sites (STSs) for the repleta group species Drosophila buzzatii. One hundred forty-four RAPD markers have been used as probes for in situ hybridization to the polytene chromosomes, and positive results allowing the precise localization of 108 RAPDs were obtained. Of these, 73 behave as effectively unique markers for physical map construction, and in 9 additional cases the probes gave two hybridization signals, each on a different chromosome. Most markers (68%) are located on chromosomes 2 and 4, which partially agree with previous estimates on the distribution of genetic variation over chromosomes. One RAPD maps close to the proximal breakpoint of inversion 2z(3) but is not included within the inverted fragment. However, it was possible to conclude from this RAPD that the distal breakpoint of 2z(3) had previously been wrongly assigned. A total of 39 cytologically mapped RAPDs were converted to STSs and yielded an aggregate sequence of 28,431 bp. Thirty-six RAPDs (25%) did not produce any detectable hybridization signal, and we obtained the DNA sequence from three of them. Further prospects toward obtaining a more developed genetic map than the one currently available for D. buzzatii are discussed. PMID:11102375

  9. High-density linkage map construction and mapping of seed trait QTLs in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) using Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS)

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Subodh; Gupta, Shefali; Bandhiwal, Nitesh; Kumar, Tapan; Bharadwaj, Chellapilla; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the use of Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS) for large-scale SNP discovery and simultaneous genotyping of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of an intra-specific mapping population of chickpea contrasting for seed traits. A total of 119,672 raw SNPs were discovered, which after stringent filtering revealed 3,977 high quality SNPs of which 39.5% were present in genic regions. Comparative analysis using physically mapped marker loci revealed a higher degree of synteny with Medicago in comparison to soybean. The SNP genotyping data was utilized to construct one of the most saturated intra-specific genetic linkage maps of chickpea having 3,363 mapped positions including 3,228 SNPs on 8 linkage groups spanning 1006.98 cM at an average inter marker distance of 0.33 cM. The map was utilized to identify 20 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with seed traits accounting for phenotypic variations ranging from 9.97% to 29.71%. Analysis of the genomic sequence corresponding to five robust QTLs led to the identification of 684 putative candidate genes whose expression profiling revealed that 101 genes exhibited seed specific expression. The integrated approach utilizing the identified QTLs along with the available genome and transcriptome could serve as a platform for candidate gene identification for molecular breeding of chickpea. PMID:26631981

  10. High-density linkage map construction and mapping of seed trait QTLs in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) using Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS).

    PubMed

    Verma, Subodh; Gupta, Shefali; Bandhiwal, Nitesh; Kumar, Tapan; Bharadwaj, Chellapilla; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2015-12-03

    This study reports the use of Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS) for large-scale SNP discovery and simultaneous genotyping of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of an intra-specific mapping population of chickpea contrasting for seed traits. A total of 119,672 raw SNPs were discovered, which after stringent filtering revealed 3,977 high quality SNPs of which 39.5% were present in genic regions. Comparative analysis using physically mapped marker loci revealed a higher degree of synteny with Medicago in comparison to soybean. The SNP genotyping data was utilized to construct one of the most saturated intra-specific genetic linkage maps of chickpea having 3,363 mapped positions including 3,228 SNPs on 8 linkage groups spanning 1006.98 cM at an average inter marker distance of 0.33 cM. The map was utilized to identify 20 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with seed traits accounting for phenotypic variations ranging from 9.97% to 29.71%. Analysis of the genomic sequence corresponding to five robust QTLs led to the identification of 684 putative candidate genes whose expression profiling revealed that 101 genes exhibited seed specific expression. The integrated approach utilizing the identified QTLs along with the available genome and transcriptome could serve as a platform for candidate gene identification for molecular breeding of chickpea.

  11. Human insulin genome sequence map, biochemical structure of insulin for recombinant DNA insulin.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Mungantiwar, Ashish A

    2003-08-01

    Insulin is a essential molecule for type I diabetes that is marketed by very few companies. It is the first molecule, which was made by recombinant technology; but the commercialization process is very difficult. Knowledge about biochemical structure of insulin and human insulin genome sequence map is pivotal to large scale manufacturing of recombinant DNA Insulin. This paper reviews human insulin genome sequence map, the amino acid sequence of porcine insulin, crystal structure of porcine insulin, insulin monomer, aggregation surfaces of insulin, conformational variation in the insulin monomer, insulin X-ray structures for recombinant DNA technology in the synthesis of human insulin in Escherichia coli.

  12. A Topographic Image Map of the Sabrina Valles Region Including Information on Large Martian Impact Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrke, S.; Köhring, R.; Barlow, N. G.; Gwinner, K.; Scholten, F.; Lehmann, H.; Albertz, J.

    2007-03-01

    The Catalog of Large Martian Impact Craters provides detailed information on 42,283 craters >5 km; it is planned to be integrated in the Topographic Image Map Mars 1:200,000 series. Such an update is shown in a special target map, based on HRSC data.

  13. ZOOM Lite: next-generation sequencing data mapping and visualization software.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zefeng; Lin, Hao; Ma, Bin

    2010-07-01

    High-throughput next-generation sequencing technologies pose increasing demands on the efficiency, accuracy and usability of data analysis software. In this article, we present ZOOM Lite, a software for efficient reads mapping and result visualization. With a kernel capable of mapping tens of millions of Illumina or AB SOLiD sequencing reads efficiently and accurately, and an intuitive graphical user interface, ZOOM Lite integrates reads mapping and result visualization into a easy to use pipeline on desktop PC. The software handles both single-end and paired-end reads, and can output both the unique mapping result or the top N mapping results for each read. Additionally, the software takes a variety of input file formats and outputs to several commonly used result formats. The software is freely available at http://bioinfor.com/zoom/lite/.

  14. The hidden perils of read mapping as a quality assessment tool in genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lehri, B.; Seddon, A. M.; Karlyshev, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a comparative analysis of the various methods of genome sequencing focusing on verification of the assembly quality. The results of a comparative assessment of various de novo assembly tools, as well as sequencing technologies, are presented using a recently completed sequence of the genome of Lactobacillus fermentum 3872. In particular, quality of assemblies is assessed by using CLC Genomics Workbench read mapping and Optical mapping developed by OpGen. Over-extension of contigs without prior knowledge of contig location can lead to misassembled contigs, even when commonly used quality indicators such as read mapping suggest that a contig is well assembled. Precautions must also be undertaken when using long read sequencing technology, which may also lead to misassembled contigs. PMID:28225089

  15. Saturated linkage map construction in Rubus idaeus using genotyping by sequencing and genome-independent imputation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rapid development of highly saturated genetic maps aids molecular breeding, which can accelerate gain per breeding cycle in woody perennial plants such as Rubus idaeus (red raspberry). Recently, robust genotyping methods based on high-throughput sequencing were developed, which provide high marker density, but result in some genotype errors and a large number of missing genotype values. Imputation can reduce the number of missing values and can correct genotyping errors, but current methods of imputation require a reference genome and thus are not an option for most species. Results Genotyping by Sequencing (GBS) was used to produce highly saturated maps for a R. idaeus pseudo-testcross progeny. While low coverage and high variance in sequencing resulted in a large number of missing values for some individuals, a novel method of imputation based on maximum likelihood marker ordering from initial marker segregation overcame the challenge of missing values, and made map construction computationally tractable. The two resulting parental maps contained 4521 and 2391 molecular markers spanning 462.7 and 376.6 cM respectively over seven linkage groups. Detection of precise genomic regions with segregation distortion was possible because of map saturation. Microsatellites (SSRs) linked these results to published maps for cross-validation and map comparison. Conclusions GBS together with genome-independent imputation provides a rapid method for genetic map construction in any pseudo-testcross progeny. Our method of imputation estimates the correct genotype call of missing values and corrects genotyping errors that lead to inflated map size and reduced precision in marker placement. Comparison of SSRs to published R. idaeus maps showed that the linkage maps constructed with GBS and our method of imputation were robust, and marker positioning reliable. The high marker density allowed identification of genomic regions with segregation distortion in R. idaeus, which

  16. High-Throughput Mapping of Single-Neuron Projections by Sequencing of Barcoded RNA.

    PubMed

    Kebschull, Justus M; Garcia da Silva, Pedro; Reid, Ashlan P; Peikon, Ian D; Albeanu, Dinu F; Zador, Anthony M

    2016-09-07

    Neurons transmit information to distant brain regions via long-range axonal projections. In the mouse, area-to-area connections have only been systematically mapped using bulk labeling techniques, which obscure the diverse projections of intermingled single neurons. Here we describe MAPseq (Multiplexed Analysis of Projections by Sequencing), a technique that can map the projections of thousands or even millions of single neurons by labeling large sets of neurons with random RNA sequences ("barcodes"). Axons are filled with barcode mRNA, each putative projection area is dissected, and the barcode mRNA is extracted and sequenced. Applying MAPseq to the locus coeruleus (LC), we find that individual LC neurons have preferred cortical targets. By recasting neuroanatomy, which is traditionally viewed as a problem of microscopy, as a problem of sequencing, MAPseq harnesses advances in sequencing technology to permit high-throughput interrogation of brain circuits.

  17. A sequence-ready map for human chromosome 12q15-21.

    PubMed

    Lee, S G; Cho, K A; Choi, Y H; Montgomery, K; Lee, E; Miller, A; Kucherlapati, R; Song, K

    2000-01-01

    Construction of sequence-ready clone map is an essential step toward sequencing the human genome. We chose a region that is frequently amplified in liposarcoma between D12S350 and D12S106 in chromosome 12q15-21 to build a PAC/BAC clone contig map. This region was spanned by 4 YACs and contained 30 STS on the YAC and radiation hybrid (RH) framework maps, providing an average STS spacing of 160 kb if each YAC is approximately 1.2 Mb in size. To convert a STS-based YAC map to a STS-based contig map of bacterial clones, 22 non-polymorphic STS markers were used as probes to screen the high density gridded arrays of PAC and BAC clones by filter hybridizations, followed by assembly of clones into contigs by marker content. Contigs have been extended and joined by direct end sequencing of appropriate clones, generating new STSs and rescreening the library as necessary. Using these approaches, we have constructed 5 contigs covering the region with the largest single contig being 1.4 Mb and a final size estimation of 3.6 Mb. The map is comprised of 17 YACs, 187 PACs, 160 BACs, and 17 cosmids; onto this, 6 polymorphic, 97 non-polymorphic, 24 ESTs, and 4 gene-based markers are now placed in a unique order, providing an average resolution of approximately 28 kb. Of a total of 131 markers, 97 were developed in the present study. The sequence-ready map should provide a framework to generate complete DNA sequence and ultimately gene map of this segment of chromosome 12.

  18. Continuous intensity map optimization (CIMO): a novel approach to leaf sequencing in step and shoot IMRT.

    PubMed

    Cao, Daliang; Earl, Matthew A; Luan, Shuang; Shepard, David M

    2006-04-01

    A new leaf-sequencing approach has been developed that is designed to reduce the number of required beam segments for step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This approach to leaf sequencing is called continuous-intensity-map-optimization (CIMO). Using a simulated annealing algorithm, CIMO seeks to minimize differences between the optimized and sequenced intensity maps. Two distinguishing features of the CIMO algorithm are (1) CIMO does not require that each optimized intensity map be clustered into discrete levels and (2) CIMO is not rule-based but rather simultaneously optimizes both the aperture shapes and weights. To test the CIMO algorithm, ten IMRT patient cases were selected (four head-and-neck, two pancreas, two prostate, one brain, and one pelvis). For each case, the optimized intensity maps were extracted from the Pinnacle3 treatment planning system. The CIMO algorithm was applied, and the optimized aperture shapes and weights were loaded back into Pinnacle. A final dose calculation was performed using Pinnacle's convolution/superposition based dose calculation. On average, the CIMO algorithm provided a 54% reduction in the number of beam segments as compared with Pinnacle's leaf sequencer. The plans sequenced using the CIMO algorithm also provided improved target dose uniformity and a reduced discrepancy between the optimized and sequenced intensity maps. For ten clinical intensity maps, comparisons were performed between the CIMO algorithm and the power-of-two reduction algorithm of Xia and Verhey [Med. Phys. 25(8), 1424-1434 (1998)]. When the constraints of a Varian Millennium multileaf collimator were applied, the CIMO algorithm resulted in a 26% reduction in the number of segments. For an Elekta multileaf collimator, the CIMO algorithm resulted in a 67% reduction in the number of segments. An average leaf sequencing time of less than one minute per beam was observed.

  19. A High-Density Genetic Linkage Map for Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.): Based on Specific Length Amplified Fragment (SLAF) Sequencing and QTL Analysis of Fruit Traits in Cucumber

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wen-Ying; Huang, Long; Chen, Long; Yang, Jian-Tao; Wu, Jia-Ni; Qu, Mei-Ling; Yao, Dan-Qing; Guo, Chun-Li; Lian, Hong-Li; He, Huan-Le; Pan, Jun-Song; Cai, Run

    2016-01-01

    High-density genetic linkage map plays an important role in genome assembly and quantitative trait loci (QTL) fine mapping. Since the coming of next-generation sequencing, makes the structure of high-density linkage maps much more convenient and practical, which simplifies SNP discovery and high-throughput genotyping. In this research, a high-density linkage map of cucumber was structured using specific length amplified fragment sequencing, using 153 F2 populations of S1000 × S1002. The high-density genetic map composed 3,057 SLAFs, including 4,475 SNP markers on seven chromosomes, and spanned 1061.19 cM. The average genetic distance is 0.35 cM. Based on this high-density genome map, QTL analysis was performed on two cucumber fruit traits, fruit length and fruit diameter. There are 15 QTLs for the two fruit traits were detected. PMID:27148281

  20. Comparative mapping of human alphoid centromeric sequences in great apes

    SciTech Connect

    Archidiacono, N.; Antonacci, R.; Marzella, R.

    1994-09-01

    Metaphase spreads from chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes and Pan paniscus) and gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) have been hybridized in situ with 27 alphoid DNA probes specific for the centromere of human chromosomes, to investigate the evolutionary relationship between centromeric regions of human and great apes. The results showed that most human probes do not recognize their corresponding homologs in great apes. Chromosome X is the only chromosome showing localization consistency in all the four species. Each suprachromosomal family (SCF) exhibits a distinct and peculiar evolutionary history. SCF1 (chromosomes 1, 3, 6, 7, 19, 12, 16) is very heterogeneous: some probes gave intense signals, but always on non-homologous chromosomes; others did not produce any hybridization signal. All probes localized on SCF2 (chromosomes 2, 4, 8, 9, 13, 14, 15, 18, 20, 21, and 22) recognize a single chromosome: chromosome 11 (phylogenetic IX) in PTR and PPA; chromosome 4 (phylogenetic V) in GGO. SCF3 subsets (chromosomes 1, 11, 17, X) are substantially conserved in PTR and PPA, but not in GGO, with the exception restricted to chromosome X. No signals have been detected on PPA chromosomes I, III, IV, V, VI and in PTR chromosomes V, suggesting that the centromeric region of some chromsomes have probably lost homology with human alphoid sequences.

  1. High resolution genetic mapping by genome sequencing reveals genome duplication and tetraploid genetic structure of the diploid Miscanthus sinensis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xue-Feng; Jensen, Elaine; Alexandrov, Nickolai; Troukhan, Maxim; Zhang, Liping; Thomas-Jones, Sian; Farrar, Kerrie; Clifton-Brown, John; Donnison, Iain; Swaller, Timothy; Flavell, Richard

    2012-01-01

    We have created a high-resolution linkage map of Miscanthus sinensis, using genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), identifying all 19 linkage groups for the first time. The result is technically significant since Miscanthus has a very large and highly heterozygous genome, but has no or limited genomics information to date. The composite linkage map containing markers from both parental linkage maps is composed of 3,745 SNP markers spanning 2,396 cM on 19 linkage groups with a 0.64 cM average resolution. Comparative genomics analyses of the M. sinensis composite linkage map to the genomes of sorghum, maize, rice, and Brachypodium distachyon indicate that sorghum has the closest syntenic relationship to Miscanthus compared to other species. The comparative results revealed that each pair of the 19 M. sinensis linkages aligned to one sorghum chromosome, except for LG8, which mapped to two sorghum chromosomes (4 and 7), presumably due to a chromosome fusion event after genome duplication. The data also revealed several other chromosome rearrangements relative to sorghum, including two telomere-centromere inversions of the sorghum syntenic chromosome 7 in LG8 of M. sinensis and two paracentric inversions of sorghum syntenic chromosome 4 in LG7 and LG8 of M. sinensis. The results clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that the diploid M. sinensis is tetraploid origin consisting of two sub-genomes. This complete and high resolution composite linkage map will not only serve as a useful resource for novel QTL discoveries, but also enable informed deployment of the wealth of existing genomics resources of other species to the improvement of Miscanthus as a high biomass energy crop. In addition, it has utility as a reference for genome sequence assembly for the forthcoming whole genome sequencing of the Miscanthus genus.

  2. CloudAligner: A fast and full-featured MapReduce based tool for sequence mapping

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Research in genetics has developed rapidly recently due to the aid of next generation sequencing (NGS). However, massively-parallel NGS produces enormous amounts of data, which leads to storage, compatibility, scalability, and performance issues. The Cloud Computing and MapReduce framework, which utilizes hundreds or thousands of shared computers to map sequencing reads quickly and efficiently to reference genome sequences, appears to be a very promising solution for these issues. Consequently, it has been adopted by many organizations recently, and the initial results are very promising. However, since these are only initial steps toward this trend, the developed software does not provide adequate primary functions like bisulfite, pair-end mapping, etc., in on-site software such as RMAP or BS Seeker. In addition, existing MapReduce-based applications were not designed to process the long reads produced by the most recent second-generation and third-generation NGS instruments and, therefore, are inefficient. Last, it is difficult for a majority of biologists untrained in programming skills to use these tools because most were developed on Linux with a command line interface. Results To urge the trend of using Cloud technologies in genomics and prepare for advances in second- and third-generation DNA sequencing, we have built a Hadoop MapReduce-based application, CloudAligner, which achieves higher performance, covers most primary features, is more accurate, and has a user-friendly interface. It was also designed to be able to deal with long sequences. The performance gain of CloudAligner over Cloud-based counterparts (35 to 80%) mainly comes from the omission of the reduce phase. In comparison to local-based approaches, the performance gain of CloudAligner is from the partition and parallel processing of the huge reference genome as well as the reads. The source code of CloudAligner is available at http://cloudaligner.sourceforge.net/ and its web version

  3. Next-Gen Sequencing-Based Mapping and Identification of Ethyl Methanesulfonate-Induced Mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Millet, Yves; Ausubel, Frederick M; Borowsky, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Forward genetic analysis using ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis has proven to be a powerful tool in biological research, but identification and cloning of causal mutations by conventional genetic mapping approaches is a painstaking process. Recent advances in next-gen sequencing have greatly invigorated the process of identifying EMS-induced mutations corresponding to a specific phenotype in model genetic hosts, including the plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Next-gen sequencing of bulked F2 mutant recombinants produces a wealth of high-resolution genetic data, provides enhanced delimitation of the genomic location of mutations, and greatly reduces hands-on time while maintaining high accuracy and reproducibility. In this unit, a detailed procedure to simultaneously map and identify EMS mutations in Arabidopsis is described.

  4. Fast and cost-effective genetic mapping in apple using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Kyle M; Brown, Patrick; Cooke, Thomas F; Cann, Scott; Costa, Fabrizio; Bustamante, Carlos; Velasco, Riccardo; Troggio, Michela; Myles, Sean

    2014-07-16

    Next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) produces vast amounts of DNA sequence data, but it is not specifically designed to generate data suitable for genetic mapping. Recently developed DNA library preparation methods for NGS have helped solve this problem, however, by combining the use of reduced representation libraries with DNA sample barcoding to generate genome-wide genotype data from a common set of genetic markers across a large number of samples. Here we use such a method, called genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), to produce a data set for genetic mapping in an F1 population of apples (Malus × domestica) segregating for skin color. We show that GBS produces a relatively large, but extremely sparse, genotype matrix: over 270,000 SNPs were discovered but most SNPs have too much missing data across samples to be useful for genetic mapping. After filtering for genotype quality and missing data, only 6% of the 85 million DNA sequence reads contributed to useful genotype calls. Despite this limitation, using existing software and a set of simple heuristics, we generated a final genotype matrix containing 3967 SNPs from 89 DNA samples from a single lane of Illumina HiSeq and used it to create a saturated genetic linkage map and to identify a known QTL underlying apple skin color. We therefore demonstrate that GBS is a cost-effective method for generating genome-wide SNP data suitable for genetic mapping in a highly diverse and heterozygous agricultural species. We anticipate future improvements to the GBS analysis pipeline presented here that will enhance the utility of next-generation DNA sequence data for the purposes of genetic mapping across diverse species.

  5. Mapping Sensorimotor Sequences to Word Sequences: A Connectionist Model of Language Acquisition and Sentence Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takac, Martin; Benuskova, Lubica; Knott, Alistair

    2012-01-01

    In this article we present a neural network model of sentence generation. The network has both technical and conceptual innovations. Its main technical novelty is in its semantic representations: the messages which form the input to the network are structured as sequences, so that message elements are delivered to the network one at a time. Rather…

  6. Methylation-sensitive linking libraries enhance gene-enriched sequencing of complex genomes and map DNA methylation domains

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, William; Luo, Meizhong; Ma, Jianxin; Estep, Matt; Estill, James; He, Ruifeng; Talag, Jayson; Sisneros, Nicholas; Kudrna, David; Kim, HyeRan; Ammiraju, Jetty SS; Collura, Kristi; Bharti, Arvind K; Messing, Joachim; Wing, Rod A; SanMiguel, Phillip; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Soderlund, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Background Many plant genomes are resistant to whole-genome assembly due to an abundance of repetitive sequence, leading to the development of gene-rich sequencing techniques. Two such techniques are hypomethylated partial restriction (HMPR) and methylation spanning linker libraries (MSLL). These libraries differ from other gene-rich datasets in having larger insert sizes, and the MSLL clones are designed to provide reads localized to "epigenetic boundaries" where methylation begins or ends. Results A large-scale study in maize generated 40,299 HMPR sequences and 80,723 MSLL sequences, including MSLL clones exceeding 100 kb. The paired end reads of MSLL and HMPR clones were shown to be effective in linking existing gene-rich sequences into scaffolds. In addition, it was shown that the MSLL clones can be used for anchoring these scaffolds to a BAC-based physical map. The MSLL end reads effectively identified epigenetic boundaries, as indicated by their preferential alignment to regions upstream and downstream from annotated genes. The ability to precisely map long stretches of fully methylated DNA sequence is a unique outcome of MSLL analysis, and was also shown to provide evidence for errors in gene identification. MSLL clones were observed to be significantly more repeat-rich in their interiors than in their end reads, confirming the correlation between methylation and retroelement content. Both MSLL and HMPR reads were found to be substantially gene-enriched, with the SalI MSLL libraries being the most highly enriched (31% align to an EST contig), while the HMPR clones exhibited exceptional depletion of repetitive DNA (to ~11%). These two techniques were compared with other gene-enrichment methods, and shown to be complementary. Conclusion MSLL technology provides an unparalleled approach for mapping the epigenetic status of repetitive blocks and for identifying sequences mis-identified as genes. Although the types and natures of epigenetic boundaries are barely

  7. Fine-mapping diabetes-related traits, including insulin resistance, in heterogeneous stock rats.

    PubMed

    Solberg Woods, Leah C; Holl, Katie L; Oreper, Daniel; Xie, Yuying; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern; Valdar, William

    2012-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a disease of relative insulin deficiency resulting from both insulin resistance and beta cell failure. We have previously used heterogeneous stock (HS) rats to fine-map a locus for glucose tolerance. We show here that glucose intolerance in the founder strains of the HS colony is mediated by different mechanisms: insulin resistance in WKY and an insulin secretion defect in ACI, and we demonstrate a high degree of variability for measures of insulin resistance and insulin secretion in HS rats. As such, our goal was to use HS rats to fine-map several diabetes-related traits within a region on rat chromosome 1. We measured blood glucose and plasma insulin levels after a glucose tolerance test in 782 male HS rats. Using 97 SSLP markers, we genotyped a 68 Mb region on rat chromosome 1 previously implicated in glucose and insulin regulation. We used linkage disequilibrium mapping by mixed model regression with inferred descent to identify a region from 198.85 to 205.9 that contains one or more quantitative trait loci (QTL) for fasting insulin and a measure of insulin resistance, the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index. This region also encompasses loci identified for fasting glucose and Insulin_AUC (area under the curve). A separate <3 Mb QTL was identified for body weight. Using a novel penalized regression method we then estimated effects of alternative haplotype pairings under each locus. These studies highlight the utility of HS rats for fine-mapping genetic loci involved in the underlying causes of T2D.

  8. Substrate-Driven Mapping of the Degradome by Comparison of Sequence Logos

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Julian E.; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Huber, Roland G.; Kramer, Christian; Liedl, Klaus R.

    2013-01-01

    Sequence logos are frequently used to illustrate substrate preferences and specificity of proteases. Here, we employed the compiled substrates of the MEROPS database to introduce a novel metric for comparison of protease substrate preferences. The constructed similarity matrix of 62 proteases can be used to intuitively visualize similarities in protease substrate readout via principal component analysis and construction of protease specificity trees. Since our new metric is solely based on substrate data, we can engraft the protease tree including proteolytic enzymes of different evolutionary origin. Thereby, our analyses confirm pronounced overlaps in substrate recognition not only between proteases closely related on sequence basis but also between proteolytic enzymes of different evolutionary origin and catalytic type. To illustrate the applicability of our approach we analyze the distribution of targets of small molecules from the ChEMBL database in our substrate-based protease specificity trees. We observe a striking clustering of annotated targets in tree branches even though these grouped targets do not necessarily share similarity on protein sequence level. This highlights the value and applicability of knowledge acquired from peptide substrates in drug design of small molecules, e.g., for the prediction of off-target effects or drug repurposing. Consequently, our similarity metric allows to map the degradome and its associated drug target network via comparison of known substrate peptides. The substrate-driven view of protein-protein interfaces is not limited to the field of proteases but can be applied to any target class where a sufficient amount of known substrate data is available. PMID:24244149

  9. Simple sequence repeat-based consensus linkage map of Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xue-Xia; Xub, Shi-Jie; Li, Ming-Hui; Li, Mu-Wang; Huang, Jian-Hua; Dai, Fang-Yin; Marino, Susan W; Mills, David R; Zeng, Peiyu; Mita, Kazuei; Jia, Shi-Hai; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Wen-Bin; Xiang, Hui; Guo, Qiu-Hong; Xu, An-Ying; Kong, Xiang-Yin; Lin, Hong-Xuan; Shi, Yao-Zhou; Lu, Gang; Zhang, Xianglin; Huang, Wei; Yasukochi, Yuji; Sugasaki, Toshiyuki; Shimada, Toru; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Xiang, Zhong-Huai; Wang, Sheng-Yue; Goldsmith, Marian R; Lu, Cheng; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Huang, Yong-Ping

    2005-11-08

    We established a genetic linkage map employing 518 simple sequence repeat (SSR, or microsatellite) markers for Bombyx mori (silkworm), the economically and culturally important lepidopteran insect, as part of an international genomics program. A survey of six representative silkworm strains using 2,500 (CA)n- and (CT)n-based SSR markers revealed 17-24% polymorphism, indicating a high degree of homozygosity resulting from a long history of inbreeding. Twenty-nine SSR linkage groups were established in well characterized Dazao and C108 strains based on genotyping of 189 backcross progeny derived from an F(1) male mated with a C108 female. The clustering was further focused to 28 groups by genotyping 22 backcross progeny derived from an F(1) female mated with a C108 male. This set of SSR linkage groups was further assigned to the 28 chromosomes (established linkage groups) of silkworm aided by visible mutations and cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers developed from previously mapped genes, cDNA sequences, and cloned random amplified polymorphic DNAs. By integrating a visible mutation p (plain, larval marking) and 29 well conserved genes of insects onto this SSR-based linkage map, a second generation consensus silkworm genetic map with a range of 7-40 markers per linkage group and a total map length of approximately 3431.9 cM was constructed and its high efficiency for genotyping and potential application for synteny studies of Lepidoptera and other insects was demonstrated.

  10. Linkage Mapping and Comparative Genomics of Red Drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) Using Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hollenbeck, Christopher M; Portnoy, David S; Wetzel, Dana; Sherwood, Tracy A; Samollow, Paul B; Gold, John R

    2017-03-10

    Developments in next-generation sequencing allow genotyping of thousands of genetic markers across hundreds of individuals in a cost-effective manner. Because of this, it is now possible to rapidly produce dense genetic linkage maps for nonmodel species. Here, we report a dense genetic linkage map for red drum, a marine fish species of considerable economic importance in the southeastern United States and elsewhere. We used a prior microsatellite-based linkage map as a framework and incorporated 1794 haplotyped contigs derived from high-throughput, reduced representation DNA sequencing to produce a linkage map containing 1794 haplotyped restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) contigs, 437 anonymous microsatellites, and 44 expressed sequence-tag-linked microsatellites (EST-SSRs). A total of 274 candidate genes, identified from transcripts from a preliminary hydrocarbon exposure study, were localized to specific chromosomes, using a shared synteny approach. The linkage map will be a useful resource for red drum commercial and restoration aquaculture, and for better understanding and managing populations of red drum in the wild.

  11. Linkage Mapping and Comparative Genomics of Red Drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hollenbeck, Christopher M.; Portnoy, David S.; Wetzel, Dana; Sherwood, Tracy A.; Samollow, Paul B.; Gold, John R.

    2017-01-01

    Developments in next-generation sequencing allow genotyping of thousands of genetic markers across hundreds of individuals in a cost-effective manner. Because of this, it is now possible to rapidly produce dense genetic linkage maps for nonmodel species. Here, we report a dense genetic linkage map for red drum, a marine fish species of considerable economic importance in the southeastern United States and elsewhere. We used a prior microsatellite-based linkage map as a framework and incorporated 1794 haplotyped contigs derived from high-throughput, reduced representation DNA sequencing to produce a linkage map containing 1794 haplotyped restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) contigs, 437 anonymous microsatellites, and 44 expressed sequence-tag-linked microsatellites (EST-SSRs). A total of 274 candidate genes, identified from transcripts from a preliminary hydrocarbon exposure study, were localized to specific chromosomes, using a shared synteny approach. The linkage map will be a useful resource for red drum commercial and restoration aquaculture, and for better understanding and managing populations of red drum in the wild. PMID:28122951

  12. Rapid restriction mapping of cosmids by sequence-specific triple-helix-mediated affinity capture

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Huamin; Francisco, T.; Smith, L.M.; Guilfoyle, R.A.

    1996-01-15

    A simple and rapid strategy for restriction mapping based on sequence-specific triple-helix affinity capture (TAC) was developed. The strategy was applied to the analysis of cosmid clones by the construction of a new cosmid vector, ScosTriplex-II, containing two different triple-helix-forming sequences flanking the cloning site of the original SuperCos-1 cosmid vector. For restriction mapping, the recombinant cosmid DNA is digested with NotI restriction enzyme or with one of four intron-encoded endonucleases for excision of intact inserts followed by controlled partial digestion with a mapping enzyme used in conjunction with the corresponding methyltransferase. The partial digestion products are combined with biotinylated triple-helix-forming oligonucleotides to form a triple-helical complex. The triple-helix complexes are immobilized on streptavidin-coated magnetic beads, washed, and eluted with pH 9 buffer solution. The fragments are separated and directly sized by agarose gel electrophoresis. Bidirectional maps are obtained simultaneously by binding to the two different triple-helix-forming oligonucleotides. No probe labeling, gel drying, blotting to membranes, hybridization, or autoradiography is necessary. Also, TAC conditions that permit gel-free isolation of the terminal restriction fragments from cosmid inserts were found. These advantages afforded by ScosTriplex-II should facilitate the automation of cosmid restriction site fingerprinting needed for large-scale mapping and sequencing projects. 24 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Mapping sequenced E.coli genes by computer: software, strategies and examples.

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, K E; Miller, W; Werner, C; Ostell, J; Tolstoshev, C; Satterfield, S G

    1991-01-01

    Methods are presented for organizing and integrating DNA sequence data, restriction maps, and genetic maps for the same organism but from a variety of sources (databases, publications, personal communications). Proper software tools are essential for successful organization of such diverse data into an ordered, cohesive body of information, and a suite of novel software to support this endeavor is described. Though these tools automate much of the task, a variety of strategies is needed to cope with recalcitrant cases. We describe such strategies and illustrate their application with numerous examples. These strategies have allowed us to order, analyze, and display over one megabase of E. coli DNA sequence information. The integration task often exposes inconsistencies in the available data, perhaps caused by strain polymorphisms or human oversight, necessitating the application of sound biological judgment. The examples illustrate both the level of expertise required of the database curator and the knowledge gained as apparent inconsistencies are resolved. The software and mapping methods are applicable to the study of any genome for which a high resolution restriction map is available. They were developed to support a weakly coordinated sequencing effort involving many laboratories, but would also be useful for highly orchestrated sequencing projects. PMID:2011534

  14. A physical map of the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster: Cosmid contigs and sequence tagged sites

    SciTech Connect

    Madueno, E.; Modolell, J.; Papagiannakis, G.

    1995-04-01

    A physical map of the euchromatic X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster has been constructed by assembling contiguous arrays of cosmids that were selected by screening a library with DNA isolated from microamplified chromosomal divisions. This map, consisting of 893 cosmids, covers {approximately}64% of the euchromatic part of the chromosome. In addition, 568 sequence tagged sites (STS), in aggregate representing 120 kb of sequenced DNA, were derived from selected cosmids. Most of these STSs, spaced at an average distance of {approximately} 35 kb along the euchromatic region of the chromosome, represent DNA tags that can be used as entry points to the fruitfly genome. Furthermore, 42 genes have been placed on the physical map, either through the hybridization of specific probes to the cosmids or through the fact that they were represented among the STSs. These provide a link between the physical and the genetic maps of D. melanogaster. Nine novel genes have been tentatively identified in Drosophila on the basis of matches between STS sequences and sequences from other species. 32 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Raman-based system for DNA sequencing-mapping and other separations

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1994-01-01

    DNA sequencing and mapping are performed by using a Raman spectrometer with a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate to enhance the Raman signal. A SERS label is attached to a DNA fragment and then analyzed with the Raman spectrometer to identify the DNA fragment according to characteristics of the Raman spectrum generated.

  16. How Children Aged Seven to Twelve Organize the Opening Sequence in a Map Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filipi, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Using the methods of conversation analysis, the opening sequences of a map task in the interactions of sixteen children aged seven to twelve were analyzed. The analytical concerns driving the study were who started, how they started, and how children dealt with differential access to information and the identification of phases within the opening.…

  17. Raman-based system for DNA sequencing-mapping and other separations

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1994-04-26

    DNA sequencing and mapping are performed by using a Raman spectrometer with a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate to enhance the Raman signal. A SERS label is attached to a DNA fragment and then analyzed with the Raman spectrometer to identify the DNA fragment according to characteristics of the Raman spectrum generated. 11 figures.

  18. Saturated linkage map construction in Rubus idaeus using genotyping by sequencing and genome-independent imputation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid development of highly saturated genetic maps aids molecular breeding, which can accelerate gain per breeding cycle in woody perennial plants such as Rubus idaeus (red raspberry). Recently, robust genotyping methods based on high-throughput sequencing were developed, which provide high marker d...

  19. A complete DNA sequence map of the ovine Major Histocompatibility Complex

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The ovine Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) harbors clusters of genes involved in overall resistance/susceptibility of an animal to infectious pathogens. However, only a limited number of ovine MHC genes have been identified and no adequate sequence information is available, as compared to those of swine and bovine. We previously constructed a BAC clone-based physical map that covers entire class I, class II and class III region of ovine MHC. Here we describe the assembling of a complete DNA sequence map for the ovine MHC by shotgun sequencing of 26 overlapping BAC clones. Results DNA shotgun sequencing generated approximately 8-fold genome equivalent data that were successfully assembled into a finished sequence map of the ovine MHC. The sequence map spans approximately 2,434,000 nucleotides in length, covering almost all of the MHC loci currently known in the sheep and cattle. Gene annotation resulted in the identification of 177 protein-coding genes/ORFs, among which 145 were not previously reported in the sheep, and 10 were ovine species specific, absent in cattle or other mammals. A comparative sequence analyses among human, sheep and cattle revealed a high conservation in the MHC structure and loci order except for the class II, which were divided into IIa and IIb subregions in the sheep and cattle, separated by a large piece of non-MHC autosome of approximately 18.5 Mb. In addition, a total of 18 non-protein-coding microRNAs were predicted in the ovine MHC region for the first time. Conclusion An ovine MHC DNA sequence map was successfully assembled by shotgun sequencing of 26 overlapping BAC clone. This makes the sheep the second ruminant species for which the complete MHC sequence information is available for evolution and functional studies, following that of the bovine. The results of the comparative analysis support a hypothesis that an inversion of the ancestral chromosome containing the MHC has shaped the MHC structures of ruminants

  20. Image Encryption Algorithm Based on Hyperchaotic Maps and Nucleotide Sequences Database

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Image encryption technology is one of the main means to ensure the safety of image information. Using the characteristics of chaos, such as randomness, regularity, ergodicity, and initial value sensitiveness, combined with the unique space conformation of DNA molecules and their unique information storage and processing ability, an efficient method for image encryption based on the chaos theory and a DNA sequence database is proposed. In this paper, digital image encryption employs a process of transforming the image pixel gray value by using chaotic sequence scrambling image pixel location and establishing superchaotic mapping, which maps quaternary sequences and DNA sequences, and by combining with the logic of the transformation between DNA sequences. The bases are replaced under the displaced rules by using DNA coding in a certain number of iterations that are based on the enhanced quaternary hyperchaotic sequence; the sequence is generated by Chen chaos. The cipher feedback mode and chaos iteration are employed in the encryption process to enhance the confusion and diffusion properties of the algorithm. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the proposed scheme not only demonstrates excellent encryption but also effectively resists chosen-plaintext attack, statistical attack, and differential attack. PMID:28392799

  1. Trajectory design strategies applied to temporary comet capture including Poincaré maps and invariant manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haapala, A. F.; Howell, K. C.

    2013-07-01

    Temporary satellite capture (TSC) of Jupiter-family comets has been a focus of investigation within the astronomy community for decades. More recently, TSC has been approached from the perspective of dynamical systems theory, within the context of the circular restricted three-body problem (CR3BP). Thus, this problem serves as a testbed for exploring techniques that support trajectory design in similar dynamical regimes. In particular, an association between the invariant manifolds of libration point orbits and the paths of comets that experience TSC has been explored. In this investigation, TSC is further examined from the perspective of transit, that is, transition through the gateways associated with the collinear libration points, in the three-body problem. Periapsis Poincaré maps, previously employed for trajectory design in several investigations, are used to deliver insight into the nature of transit trajectories for energy levels near those associated with several Jupiter-family comets. The evolution of transit trajectories with increasing energy is explored, and the existence of solutions with similar characteristics to the paths of comets P/1996 R2, 82P/Gehrels 3, and 147P/Kushida-Muramatsu is demonstrated within the context of the planar CR3BP using planar periapsis maps. During TSC, the path of comet 111P/Helin-Roman-Crockett is highly inclined with respect to Jupiter; the motion of this comet is examined relative to invariant manifolds in the spatial CR3BP. A method to display the information contained in higher-dimensional Poincaré maps is also demonstrated, and is employed to locate a trajectory possessing the same qualitative characteristics as the path of 111P/Helin-Roman-Crockett.

  2. Improving the Mapping of Smith-Waterman Sequence Database Searches onto CUDA-Enabled GPUs

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liang-Tsung; Wu, Chao-Chin; Lai, Lien-Fu; Li, Yun-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Sequence alignment lies at heart of the bioinformatics. The Smith-Waterman algorithm is one of the key sequence search algorithms and has gained popularity due to improved implementations and rapidly increasing compute power. Recently, the Smith-Waterman algorithm has been successfully mapped onto the emerging general-purpose graphics processing units (GPUs). In this paper, we focused on how to improve the mapping, especially for short query sequences, by better usage of shared memory. We performed and evaluated the proposed method on two different platforms (Tesla C1060 and Tesla K20) and compared it with two classic methods in CUDASW++. Further, the performance on different numbers of threads and blocks has been analyzed. The results showed that the proposed method significantly improves Smith-Waterman algorithm on CUDA-enabled GPUs in proper allocation of block and thread numbers. PMID:26339591

  3. A Moldable Online Scheduling Algorithm and Its Application to Parallel Short Sequence Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saule, Erik; Bozdağ, Doruk; Catalyurek, Umit V.

    A crucial step in DNA sequence analysis is mapping short sequences generated by next-generation instruments to a reference genome. In this paper, we focus on efficient online scheduling of multi-user parallel short sequence mapping queries on a multiprocessor system. With the availability of parallel execution models, the problem at hand becomes a moldable task scheduling problem where the number of processors needed to execute a task is determined by the scheduler. We propose an online scheduling algorithm to minimize the stretch of the tasks in the system. This metric provides improved fairness to small tasks compared to flow time metric and suits well to the nature of the problem. Experimental evaluation on two workload scenarios indicate that the algorithm results in significantly smaller stretch compared to a recent algorithm and it is more fair to small sized tasks.

  4. SNP identification from RNA sequencing and linkage map construction of rubber tree for anchoring the draft genome.

    PubMed

    Shearman, Jeremy R; Sangsrakru, Duangjai; Jomchai, Nukoon; Ruang-Areerate, Panthita; Sonthirod, Chutima; Naktang, Chaiwat; Theerawattanasuk, Kanikar; Tragoonrung, Somvong; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke

    2015-01-01

    Hevea brasiliensis, or rubber tree, is an important crop species that accounts for the majority of natural latex production. The rubber tree nuclear genome consists of 18 chromosomes and is roughly 2.15 Gb. The current rubber tree reference genome assembly consists of 1,150,326 scaffolds ranging from 200 to 531,465 bp and totalling 1.1 Gb. Only 143 scaffolds, totalling 7.6 Mb, have been placed into linkage groups. We have performed RNA-seq on 6 varieties of rubber tree to identify SNPs and InDels and used this information to perform target sequence enrichment and high throughput sequencing to genotype a set of SNPs in 149 rubber tree offspring from a cross between RRIM 600 and RRII 105 rubber tree varieties. We used this information to generate a linkage map allowing for the anchoring of 24,424 contigs from 3,009 scaffolds, totalling 115 Mb or 10.4% of the published sequence, into 18 linkage groups. Each linkage group contains between 319 and 1367 SNPs, or 60 to 194 non-redundant marker positions, and ranges from 156 to 336 cM in length. This linkage map includes 20,143 of the 69,300 predicted genes from rubber tree and will be useful for mapping studies and improving the reference genome assembly.

  5. Dual-pathway multi-echo sequence for simultaneous frequency and T2 mapping

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Cheng-Chieh; Mei, Chang-Sheng; Duryea, Jeffrey; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Chao, Tzu-Cheng; Panych, Lawrence P.; Madore, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To present a dual-pathway multi-echo steady state sequence and reconstruction algorithm to capture T2, T2* and field map information. Methods Typically, pulse sequences based on spin echoes are needed for T2 mapping while gradient echoes are needed for field mapping, making it difficult to jointly acquire both types of information. A dual-pathway multi-echo pulse sequence is employed here to generate T2 and field maps from the same acquired data. The approach might be used, for example, to obtain both thermometry and tissue damage information during thermal therapies, or susceptibility and T2 information from a same head scan, or to generate bonus T2 maps during a knee scan. Results Quantitative T2, T2* and field maps were generated in gel phantoms, ex vivo bovine muscle, and twelve volunteers. T2 results were validated against a spin-echo reference standard: A linear regression based on ROI analysis in phantoms provided close agreement (slope/R2 = 0.99/0.998). A pixel-wise in vivo Bland-Altman analysis of R2=1/T2 showed a bias of 0.034 Hz (about 0.3%), as averaged over four volunteers. Ex vivo results, with and without motion, suggested that tissue damage detection based on T2 rather than temperature-dose measurements might prove more robust to motion. Conclusion T2, T2* and field maps were obtained simultaneously, from the same datasets, in thermometry, susceptibility-weighted imaging and knee-imaging contexts. PMID:26923150

  6. Dual-pathway multi-echo sequence for simultaneous frequency and T2 mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cheng-Chieh; Mei, Chang-Sheng; Duryea, Jeffrey; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Chao, Tzu-Cheng; Panych, Lawrence P.; Madore, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: To present a dual-pathway multi-echo steady state sequence and reconstruction algorithm to capture T2, T2∗ and field map information. Methods: Typically, pulse sequences based on spin echoes are needed for T2 mapping while gradient echoes are needed for field mapping, making it difficult to jointly acquire both types of information. A dual-pathway multi-echo pulse sequence is employed here to generate T2 and field maps from the same acquired data. The approach might be used, for example, to obtain both thermometry and tissue damage information during thermal therapies, or susceptibility and T2 information from a same head scan, or to generate bonus T2 maps during a knee scan. Results: Quantitative T2, T2∗ and field maps were generated in gel phantoms, ex vivo bovine muscle, and twelve volunteers. T2 results were validated against a spin-echo reference standard: A linear regression based on ROI analysis in phantoms provided close agreement (slope/R2 = 0.99/0.998). A pixel-wise in vivo Bland-Altman analysis of R2 = 1/T2 showed a bias of 0.034 Hz (about 0.3%), as averaged over four volunteers. Ex vivo results, with and without motion, suggested that tissue damage detection based on T2 rather than temperature-dose measurements might prove more robust to motion. Conclusion: T2, T2∗ and field maps were obtained simultaneously, from the same datasets, in thermometry, susceptibility-weighted imaging and knee-imaging contexts.

  7. Identification and Mapping of the Edwards Stratigraphic Sequence in the State of Chihuahua Assisted by ten ArcMap Based Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Pina, C.; Granados, A.; Goodell, P.

    2007-05-01

    Edwards Formation is a reef limestone that hosts one of the largest aquifers of the State of Texas. In 2004 the United States and Mexico signed an agreement intended to characterize and identify the shared binational underground resources. Texas Water Development Board Report 360 established for the Edwards Aquifer an area of more than 31,000 km2, half of which is in the State of Coahuila, Mexico (the agreement did not include the State of Chihuahua). This led to the idea that Chihuahua may also have hydrologic potential in the Edwards equivalent, where numerous large cavern systems are already recognized (Naica's Sword Cavern, and the Coyame, Nombre de Dios and Bocagrande Caverns). The objective of this study is to establish the existence, in the State of Chihuahua, of the stratigraphic sequence and geohydrologic properties such as faulting, sinkholes, and springs, within the Edwards equivalent. The Consejo de Recursos Minerales geologic map, INEGI's hydrologic study, petroleum, mining and hydrogeology studies of Chihuahua, and many others, constitute the database used. ArcMap is used to define the geologic framework and construct different thematic layers (structural, lithological, hydrological) that would aid in the identification of the stratigraphic sequence. The results show that all the Edwards Stratigraphic Sequence (ESS) exists in Chihuahua; that there are isolated areas of groundwater production in eastern Chihuahua possibly from ESS but this is not well established. Overall the ESS presents an unusual opportunity as a potentially productive aquifer in the State of Chihuahua.

  8. Geologic map of the southern Funeral Mountains including nearby groundwater discharge sites in Death Valley National Park, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fridrich, C.J.; Thompson, R.A.; Slate, J.L.; Berry, M.E.; Machette, M.N.

    2012-01-01

    This 1:50,000-scale geologic map covers the southern part of the Funeral Mountains, and adjoining parts of four structural basins—Furnace Creek, Amargosa Valley, Opera House, and central Death Valley—in California and Nevada. It extends over three full 7.5-minute quadrangles, and parts of eleven others—an area of about 1,000 square kilometers (km2). The boundaries of this map were drawn to include all of the known proximal hydrogeologic features that may affect the flow of groundwater that discharges from springs of the Furnace Creek basin, in the west-central part of the map. These springs provide the main potable water supply for Death Valley National Park. Major hydrogeologic features shown on this map include: (1) springs of the Furnace Creek basin, (2) a large Pleistocene groundwater discharge mound in the northeastern part of the map, (3) the exposed extent of limestones and dolomites that constitute the Paleozoic carbonate aquifer, and (4) the exposed extent of the alluvial conglomerates that constitute the Funeral Formation aquifer.

  9. TCGA's Pan-Cancer Efforts and Expansion to Include Whole Genome Sequence - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Carolyn Hutter, Ph.D., Program Director of NHGRI's Division of Genomic Medicine, discusses the expansion of TCGA's Pan-Cancer efforts to include the Pan-Cancer Analysis of Whole Genomes (PAWG) project.

  10. Initial sequence characterization of the rhabdoviruses of squamate reptiles, including a novel rhabdovirus from a caiman lizard (Dracaena guianensis).

    PubMed

    Wellehan, James F X; Pessier, Allan P; Archer, Linda L; Childress, April L; Jacobson, Elliott R; Tesh, Robert B

    2012-08-17

    Rhabdoviruses infect a variety of hosts, including non-avian reptiles. Consensus PCR techniques were used to obtain partial RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene sequence from five rhabdoviruses of South American lizards; Marco, Chaco, Timbo, Sena Madureira, and a rhabdovirus from a caiman lizard (Dracaena guianensis). The caiman lizard rhabdovirus formed inclusions in erythrocytes, which may be a route for infecting hematophagous insects. This is the first information on behavior of a rhabdovirus in squamates. We also obtained sequence from two rhabdoviruses of Australian lizards, confirming previous Charleville virus sequence and finding that, unlike a previous sequence report but in agreement with serologic reports, Almpiwar virus is clearly distinct from Charleville virus. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis revealed that most known rhabdoviruses of squamates cluster in the Almpiwar subgroup. The exception is Marco virus, which is found in the Hart Park group.

  11. Sequence analysis and mapping of the Sry gene in species of the subfamily Arvicolinae (rodentia).

    PubMed

    Acosta, M J; Marchal, J A; Romero-Fernández, I; Megías-Nogales, B; Modi, W S; Sánchez Baca, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The rodent subfamily Arvicolinae, which contains about 125 species, presents some interesting exceptions concerning Sry, the sex determining gene in mammals. In some species multiple Sry copies have been described on the Y chromosome and in the Iberian vole, Microtus cabrerae, several Sry sequences have been cloned and mapped not only on the Y but also on the X chromosome. Here we present a comparative analysis of Sry sequences from a total of 22 species. Our study demonstrates for the first time that for most North American species, as previously reported for the European species, multiple copies of the Sry gene exist on the Y chromosome. Furthermore, we have sequenced and analyzed the full sequence of Sry from several European species, showing that the sequence and structure of the gene in this group of species present the main features described for Sry in other mammals. Finally, FISH analyses on some of these species demonstrated that all Sry sequences, despite their functional status, mapped on the euchromatic short arm of the Y chromosome.

  12. FANSe: an accurate algorithm for quantitative mapping of large scale sequencing reads

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gong; Fedyunin, Ivan; Kirchner, Sebastian; Xiao, Chuanle; Valleriani, Angelo; Ignatova, Zoya

    2012-01-01

    The most crucial step in data processing from high-throughput sequencing applications is the accurate and sensitive alignment of the sequencing reads to reference genomes or transcriptomes. The accurate detection of insertions and deletions (indels) and errors introduced by the sequencing platform or by misreading of modified nucleotides is essential for the quantitative processing of the RNA-based sequencing (RNA-Seq) datasets and for the identification of genetic variations and modification patterns. We developed a new, fast and accurate algorithm for nucleic acid sequence analysis, FANSe, with adjustable mismatch allowance settings and ability to handle indels to accurately and quantitatively map millions of reads to small or large reference genomes. It is a seed-based algorithm which uses the whole read information for mapping and high sensitivity and low ambiguity are achieved by using short and non-overlapping reads. Furthermore, FANSe uses hotspot score to prioritize the processing of highly possible matches and implements modified Smith–Watermann refinement with reduced scoring matrix to accelerate the calculation without compromising its sensitivity. The FANSe algorithm stably processes datasets from various sequencing platforms, masked or unmasked and small or large genomes. It shows a remarkable coverage of low-abundance mRNAs which is important for quantitative processing of RNA-Seq datasets. PMID:22379138

  13. FANSe: an accurate algorithm for quantitative mapping of large scale sequencing reads.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gong; Fedyunin, Ivan; Kirchner, Sebastian; Xiao, Chuanle; Valleriani, Angelo; Ignatova, Zoya

    2012-06-01

    The most crucial step in data processing from high-throughput sequencing applications is the accurate and sensitive alignment of the sequencing reads to reference genomes or transcriptomes. The accurate detection of insertions and deletions (indels) and errors introduced by the sequencing platform or by misreading of modified nucleotides is essential for the quantitative processing of the RNA-based sequencing (RNA-Seq) datasets and for the identification of genetic variations and modification patterns. We developed a new, fast and accurate algorithm for nucleic acid sequence analysis, FANSe, with adjustable mismatch allowance settings and ability to handle indels to accurately and quantitatively map millions of reads to small or large reference genomes. It is a seed-based algorithm which uses the whole read information for mapping and high sensitivity and low ambiguity are achieved by using short and non-overlapping reads. Furthermore, FANSe uses hotspot score to prioritize the processing of highly possible matches and implements modified Smith-Watermann refinement with reduced scoring matrix to accelerate the calculation without compromising its sensitivity. The FANSe algorithm stably processes datasets from various sequencing platforms, masked or unmasked and small or large genomes. It shows a remarkable coverage of low-abundance mRNAs which is important for quantitative processing of RNA-Seq datasets.

  14. Nested Association Mapping of Stem Rust Resistance in Wheat Using Genotyping by Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, Matthew N.; Tsilo, Toi J.; Macharia, Godwin K.; Bhavani, Sridhar; Jin, Yue; Anderson, James A.

    2016-01-01

    We combined the recently developed genotyping by sequencing (GBS) method with joint mapping (also known as nested association mapping) to dissect and understand the genetic architecture controlling stem rust resistance in wheat (Triticum aestivum). Ten stem rust resistant wheat varieties were crossed to the susceptible line LMPG-6 to generate F6 recombinant inbred lines. The recombinant inbred line populations were phenotyped in Kenya, South Africa, and St. Paul, Minnesota, USA. By joint mapping of the 10 populations, we identified 59 minor and medium-effect QTL (explained phenotypic variance range of 1% – 20%) on 20 chromosomes that contributed towards adult plant resistance to North American Pgt races as well as the highly virulent Ug99 race group. Fifteen of the 59 QTL were detected in multiple environments. No epistatic relationship was detected among the QTL. While these numerous small- to medium-effect QTL are shared among the families, the founder parents were found to have different allelic effects for the QTL. Fourteen QTL identified by joint mapping were also detected in single-population mapping. As these QTL were mapped using SNP markers with known locations on the physical chromosomes, the genomic regions identified with QTL could be explored more in depth to discover candidate genes for stem rust resistance. The use of GBS-derived de novo SNPs in mapping resistance to stem rust shown in this study could be used as a model to conduct similar marker-trait association studies in other plant species. PMID:27186883

  15. A Novel Bioinformatics Strategy to Analyze Microbial Big Sequence Data for Efficient Knowledge Discovery: Batch-Learning Self-Organizing Map (BLSOM)

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Yuki; Abe, Takashi; Wada, Kennosuke; Wada, Yoshiko; Ikemura, Toshimichi

    2013-01-01

    With the remarkable increase of genomic sequence data of microorganisms, novel tools are needed for comprehensive analyses of the big sequence data available. The self-organizing map (SOM) is an effective tool for clustering and visualizing high-dimensional data, such as oligonucleotide composition on one map. By modifying the conventional SOM, we developed batch-learning SOM (BLSOM), which allowed classification of sequence fragments (e.g., 1 kb) according to phylotypes, solely depending on oligonucleotide composition. Metagenomics studies of uncultivable microorganisms in clinical and environmental samples should allow extensive surveys of genes important in life sciences. BLSOM is most suitable for phylogenetic assignment of metagenomic sequences, because fragmental sequences can be clustered according to phylotypes, solely depending on oligonucleotide composition. We first constructed oligonucleotide BLSOMs for all available sequences from genomes of known species, and by mapping metagenomic sequences on these large-scale BLSOMs, we can predict phylotypes of individual metagenomic sequences, revealing a microbial community structure of uncultured microorganisms, including viruses. BLSOM has shown that influenza viruses isolated from humans and birds clearly differ in oligonucleotide composition. Based on this host-dependent oligonucleotide composition, we have proposed strategies for predicting directional changes of virus sequences and for surveilling potentially hazardous strains when introduced into humans from non-human sources. PMID:27694768

  16. A Novel Bioinformatics Strategy to Analyze Microbial Big Sequence Data for Efficient Knowledge Discovery: Batch-Learning Self-Organizing Map (BLSOM).

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yuki; Abe, Takashi; Wada, Kennosuke; Wada, Yoshiko; Ikemura, Toshimichi

    2013-11-20

    With the remarkable increase of genomic sequence data of microorganisms, novel tools are needed for comprehensive analyses of the big sequence data available. The self-organizing map (SOM) is an effective tool for clustering and visualizing high-dimensional data, such as oligonucleotide composition on one map. By modifying the conventional SOM, we developed batch-learning SOM (BLSOM), which allowed classification of sequence fragments (e.g., 1 kb) according to phylotypes, solely depending on oligonucleotide composition. Metagenomics studies of uncultivable microorganisms in clinical and environmental samples should allow extensive surveys of genes important in life sciences. BLSOM is most suitable for phylogenetic assignment of metagenomic sequences, because fragmental sequences can be clustered according to phylotypes, solely depending on oligonucleotide composition. We first constructed oligonucleotide BLSOMs for all available sequences from genomes of known species, and by mapping metagenomic sequences on these large-scale BLSOMs, we can predict phylotypes of individual metagenomic sequences, revealing a microbial community structure of uncultured microorganisms, including viruses. BLSOM has shown that influenza viruses isolated from humans and birds clearly differ in oligonucleotide composition. Based on this host-dependent oligonucleotide composition, we have proposed strategies for predicting directional changes of virus sequences and for surveilling potentially hazardous strains when introduced into humans from non-human sources.

  17. Mapping sequence differences between thimet oligopeptidase and neurolysin implicates key residues in substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Ray, Kallol; Hines, Christina S; Rodgers, David W

    2002-09-01

    The highly homologous endopeptidases thimet oligopeptidase and neurolysin are both restricted to short peptide substrates and share many of the same cleavage sites on bioactive and synthetic peptides. They sometimes target different sites on the same peptide, however, and defining the determinants of differential recognition will help us to understand how both enzymes specifically target a wide variety of cleavage site sequences. We have mapped the positions of the 224 surface residues that differ in sequence between the two enzymes onto the surface of the neurolysin crystal structure. Although the deep active site channel accounts for about one quarter of the total surface area, only 11% of the residue differences map to this region. Four isolated sequence changes (R470/E469, R491/M490, N496/H495, and T499/R498; neurolysin residues given first) are well positioned to affect recognition of substrate peptides, and differences in cleavage site specificity can be largely rationalized on the basis of these changes. We also mapped the positions of three cysteine residues believed to be responsible for multimerization of thimet oligopeptidase, a process that inactivates the enzyme. These residues are clustered on the outside of one channel wall, where multimerization via disulfide formation is unlikely to block the substrate-binding site. Finally, we mapped the regulatory phosphorylation site in thimet oligopeptidase to a location on the outside of the molecule well away from the active site, which indicates this modification has an indirect effect on activity.

  18. Heterozygous Mapping Strategy (HetMappS) for High Resolution Genotyping-By-Sequencing Markers: A Case Study in Grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minghui; Londo, Jason P.; Acharya, Charlotte B.; Mitchell, Sharon E.; Sun, Qi; Reisch, Bruce; Cadle-Davidson, Lance

    2015-01-01

    Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) provides opportunities to generate high-resolution genetic maps at a low genotyping cost, but for highly heterozygous species, missing data and heterozygote undercalling complicate the creation of GBS genetic maps. To overcome these issues, we developed a publicly available, modular approach called HetMappS, which functions independently of parental genotypes and corrects for genotyping errors associated with heterozygosity. For linkage group formation, HetMappS includes both a reference-guided synteny pipeline and a reference-independent de novo pipeline. The de novo pipeline can be utilized for under-characterized or high diversity families that lack an appropriate reference. We applied both HetMappS pipelines in five half-sib F1 families involving genetically diverse Vitis spp. Starting with at least 116,466 putative SNPs per family, the HetMappS pipelines identified 10,440 to 17,267 phased pseudo-testcross (Pt) markers and generated high-confidence maps. Pt marker density exceeded crossover resolution in all cases; up to 5,560 non-redundant markers were used to generate parental maps ranging from 1,047 cM to 1,696 cM. The number of markers used was strongly correlated with family size in both de novo and synteny maps (r = 0.92 and 0.91, respectively). Comparisons between allele and tag frequencies suggested that many markers were in tandem repeats and mapped as single loci, while markers in regions of more than two repeats were removed during map curation. Both pipelines generated similar genetic maps, and genetic order was strongly correlated with the reference genome physical order in all cases. Independently created genetic maps from shared parents exhibited nearly identical results. Flower sex was mapped in three families and correctly localized to the known sex locus in all cases. The HetMappS pipeline could have wide application for genetic mapping in highly heterozygous species, and its modularity provides opportunities to

  19. Heterozygous Mapping Strategy (HetMappS) for High Resolution Genotyping-By-Sequencing Markers: A Case Study in Grapevine.

    PubMed

    Hyma, Katie E; Barba, Paola; Wang, Minghui; Londo, Jason P; Acharya, Charlotte B; Mitchell, Sharon E; Sun, Qi; Reisch, Bruce; Cadle-Davidson, Lance

    2015-01-01

    Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) provides opportunities to generate high-resolution genetic maps at a low genotyping cost, but for highly heterozygous species, missing data and heterozygote undercalling complicate the creation of GBS genetic maps. To overcome these issues, we developed a publicly available, modular approach called HetMappS, which functions independently of parental genotypes and corrects for genotyping errors associated with heterozygosity. For linkage group formation, HetMappS includes both a reference-guided synteny pipeline and a reference-independent de novo pipeline. The de novo pipeline can be utilized for under-characterized or high diversity families that lack an appropriate reference. We applied both HetMappS pipelines in five half-sib F1 families involving genetically diverse Vitis spp. Starting with at least 116,466 putative SNPs per family, the HetMappS pipelines identified 10,440 to 17,267 phased pseudo-testcross (Pt) markers and generated high-confidence maps. Pt marker density exceeded crossover resolution in all cases; up to 5,560 non-redundant markers were used to generate parental maps ranging from 1,047 cM to 1,696 cM. The number of markers used was strongly correlated with family size in both de novo and synteny maps (r = 0.92 and 0.91, respectively). Comparisons between allele and tag frequencies suggested that many markers were in tandem repeats and mapped as single loci, while markers in regions of more than two repeats were removed during map curation. Both pipelines generated similar genetic maps, and genetic order was strongly correlated with the reference genome physical order in all cases. Independently created genetic maps from shared parents exhibited nearly identical results. Flower sex was mapped in three families and correctly localized to the known sex locus in all cases. The HetMappS pipeline could have wide application for genetic mapping in highly heterozygous species, and its modularity provides opportunities to

  20. Construction of an integrated pepper map using RFLP, SSR, CAPS, AFLP, WRKY, rRAMP, and BAC end sequences.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heung-Ryul; Bae, Ik-Hyun; Park, Soung-Woo; Kim, Hyoun-Joung; Min, Woong-Ki; Han, Jung-Heon; Kim, Ki-Taek; Kim, Byung-Dong

    2009-01-31

    Map-based cloning to find genes of interest, markerassisted selection (MAS), and marker-assisted breeding (MAB) all require good genetic maps with high reproducible markers. For map construction as well as chromosome assignment, development of single copy PCR-based markers and map integration process are necessary. In this study, the 132 markers (57 STS from BAC-end sequences, 13 STS from RFLP, and 62 SSR) were newly developed as single copy type PCR-based markers. They were used together with 1830 markers previously developed in our lab to construct an integrated map with the Joinmap 3.0 program. This integrated map contained 169 SSR, 354 RFLP, 23 STS from BAC-end sequences, 6 STS from RFLP, 152 AFLP, 51 WRKY, and 99 rRAMP markers on 12 chromosomes. The integrated map contained four genetic maps of two interspecific (Capsicum annuum 'TF68' and C. chinense 'Habanero') and two intraspecific (C. annuum 'CM334' and C. annuum 'Chilsungcho') populations of peppers. This constructed integrated map consisted of 805 markers (map distance of 1858 cM) in interspecific populations and 745 markers (map distance of 1892 cM) in intraspecific populations. The used pepper STS were first developed from end sequences of BAC clones from Capsicum annuum 'CM334'. This integrated map will provide useful information for construction of future pepper genetic maps and for assignment of linkage groups to pepper chromosomes.

  1. A sequence-based map of Arabidopsis genes with mutant phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Meinke, David W; Meinke, Laura K; Showalter, Thomas C; Schissel, Anna M; Mueller, Lukas A; Tzafrir, Iris

    2003-02-01

    The classical genetic map of Arabidopsis contains 462 genes with mutant phenotypes. Chromosomal locations of these genes have been determined over the past 25 years based on recombination frequencies with visible and molecular markers. The most recent update of the classical map was published in a special genome issue of Science that dealt with Arabidopsis (D.W. Meinke, J.M. Cherry, C. Dean, S.D. Rounsley, M. Koornneef [1998] Science 282: 662-682). We present here a comprehensive list and sequence-based map of 620 cloned genes with mutant phenotypes. This map documents for the first time the exact locations of large numbers of Arabidopsis genes that give a phenotype when disrupted by mutation. Such a community-based physical map should have broad applications in Arabidopsis research and should serve as a replacement for the classical genetic map in the future. Assembling a comprehensive list of genes with a loss-of-function phenotype will also focus attention on essential genes that are not functionally redundant and ultimately contribute to the identification of the minimal gene set required to make a flowering plant.

  2. Using pressure map sequences for recognition of on bed rehabilitation exercises.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Chun; Liu, Jason J; Xu, Wenyao; Alshurafa, Nabil; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2014-03-01

    Physical rehabilitation is an important process for patients recovering after surgery. In this paper, we propose and develop a framework to monitor on-bed range of motion exercises that allows physical therapists to evaluate patient adherence to set exercise programs. Using a dense pressure sensitive bedsheet, a sequence of pressure maps are produced and analyzed using manifold learning techniques. We compare two methods, Local Linear Embedding and Isomap, to reduce the dimensionality of the pressure map data. Once the image sequences are converted into a low dimensional manifold, the manifolds can be compared to expected prior data for the rehabilitation exercises. Furthermore, a measure to compare the similarity of manifolds is presented along with experimental results for five on-bed rehabilitation exercises. The evaluation of this framework shows that exercise compliance can be tracked accurately according to prescribed treatment programs.

  3. Molecular cytogenetic mapping of Cucumis sativus and C. melo using highly repetitive DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Koo, Dal-Hoe; Nam, Young-Woo; Choi, Doil; Bang, Jae-Wook; de Jong, Hans; Hur, Yoonkang

    2010-04-01

    Chromosomes often serve as one of the most important molecular aspects of studying the evolution of species. Indeed, most of the crucial mutations that led to differentiation of species during the evolution have occurred at the chromosomal level. Furthermore, the analysis of pachytene chromosomes appears to be an invaluable tool for the study of evolution due to its effectiveness in chromosome identification and precise physical gene mapping. By applying fluorescence in situ hybridization of 45S rDNA and CsCent1 probes to cucumber pachytene chromosomes, here, we demonstrate that cucumber chromosomes 1 and 2 may have evolved from fusions of ancestral karyotype with chromosome number n = 12. This conclusion is further supported by the centromeric sequence similarity between cucumber and melon, which suggests that these sequences evolved from a common ancestor. It may be after or during speciation that these sequences were specifically amplified, after which they diverged and specific sequence variants were homogenized. Additionally, a structural change on the centromeric region of cucumber chromosome 4 was revealed by fiber-FISH using the mitochondrial-related repetitive sequences, BAC-E38 and CsCent1. These showed the former sequences being integrated into the latter in multiple regions. The data presented here are useful resources for comparative genomics and cytogenetics of Cucumis and, in particular, the ongoing genome sequencing project of cucumber.

  4. A high-density SNP Map of sunflower derived from RAD-sequencing facilitating fine-mapping of the rust resistance gene R12.

    PubMed

    Talukder, Zahirul I; Gong, Li; Hulke, Brent S; Pegadaraju, Venkatramana; Song, Qijian; Schultz, Quentin; Qi, Lili

    2014-01-01

    A high-resolution genetic map of sunflower was constructed by integrating SNP data from three F2 mapping populations (HA 89/RHA 464, B-line/RHA 464, and CR 29/RHA 468). The consensus map spanned a total length of 1443.84 cM, and consisted of 5,019 SNP markers derived from RAD tag sequencing and 118 publicly available SSR markers distributed in 17 linkage groups, corresponding to the haploid chromosome number of sunflower. The maximum interval between markers in the consensus map is 12.37 cM and the average distance is 0.28 cM between adjacent markers. Despite a few short-distance inversions in marker order, the consensus map showed high levels of collinearity among individual maps with an average Spearman's rank correlation coefficient of 0.972 across the genome. The order of the SSR markers on the consensus map was also in agreement with the order of the individual map and with previously published sunflower maps. Three individual and one consensus maps revealed the uneven distribution of markers across the genome. Additionally, we performed fine mapping and marker validation of the rust resistance gene R12, providing closely linked SNP markers for marker-assisted selection of this gene in sunflower breeding programs. This high resolution consensus map will serve as a valuable tool to the sunflower community for studying marker-trait association of important agronomic traits, marker assisted breeding, map-based gene cloning, and comparative mapping.

  5. Genetic mapping and exome sequencing identify variants associated with five novel diseases.

    PubMed

    Puffenberger, Erik G; Jinks, Robert N; Sougnez, Carrie; Cibulskis, Kristian; Willert, Rebecca A; Achilly, Nathan P; Cassidy, Ryan P; Fiorentini, Christopher J; Heiken, Kory F; Lawrence, Johnny J; Mahoney, Molly H; Miller, Christopher J; Nair, Devika T; Politi, Kristin A; Worcester, Kimberly N; Setton, Roni A; Dipiazza, Rosa; Sherman, Eric A; Eastman, James T; Francklyn, Christopher; Robey-Bond, Susan; Rider, Nicholas L; Gabriel, Stacey; Morton, D Holmes; Strauss, Kevin A

    2012-01-01

    The Clinic for Special Children (CSC) has integrated biochemical and molecular methods into a rural pediatric practice serving Old Order Amish and Mennonite (Plain) children. Among the Plain people, we have used single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays to genetically map recessive disorders to large autozygous haplotype blocks (mean = 4.4 Mb) that contain many genes (mean = 79). For some, uninformative mapping or large gene lists preclude disease-gene identification by Sanger sequencing. Seven such conditions were selected for exome sequencing at the Broad Institute; all had been previously mapped at the CSC using low density SNP microarrays coupled with autozygosity and linkage analyses. Using between 1 and 5 patient samples per disorder, we identified sequence variants in the known disease-causing genes SLC6A3 and FLVCR1, and present evidence to strongly support the pathogenicity of variants identified in TUBGCP6, BRAT1, SNIP1, CRADD, and HARS. Our results reveal the power of coupling new genotyping technologies to population-specific genetic knowledge and robust clinical data.

  6. Genetic Mapping and Exome Sequencing Identify Variants Associated with Five Novel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Puffenberger, Erik G.; Jinks, Robert N.; Sougnez, Carrie; Cibulskis, Kristian; Willert, Rebecca A.; Achilly, Nathan P.; Cassidy, Ryan P.; Fiorentini, Christopher J.; Heiken, Kory F.; Lawrence, Johnny J.; Mahoney, Molly H.; Miller, Christopher J.; Nair, Devika T.; Politi, Kristin A.; Worcester, Kimberly N.; Setton, Roni A.; DiPiazza, Rosa; Sherman, Eric A.; Eastman, James T.; Francklyn, Christopher; Robey-Bond, Susan; Rider, Nicholas L.; Gabriel, Stacey; Morton, D. Holmes; Strauss, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    The Clinic for Special Children (CSC) has integrated biochemical and molecular methods into a rural pediatric practice serving Old Order Amish and Mennonite (Plain) children. Among the Plain people, we have used single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays to genetically map recessive disorders to large autozygous haplotype blocks (mean = 4.4 Mb) that contain many genes (mean = 79). For some, uninformative mapping or large gene lists preclude disease-gene identification by Sanger sequencing. Seven such conditions were selected for exome sequencing at the Broad Institute; all had been previously mapped at the CSC using low density SNP microarrays coupled with autozygosity and linkage analyses. Using between 1 and 5 patient samples per disorder, we identified sequence variants in the known disease-causing genes SLC6A3 and FLVCR1, and present evidence to strongly support the pathogenicity of variants identified in TUBGCP6, BRAT1, SNIP1, CRADD, and HARS. Our results reveal the power of coupling new genotyping technologies to population-specific genetic knowledge and robust clinical data. PMID:22279524

  7. Genomic shotgun array: a procedure linking large-scale DNA sequencing with regional transcript mapping.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling-Hui; Li, Jian-Chiuan; Lin, Yung-Feng; Lin, Chung-Yen; Chen, Chung-Yung; Tsai, Shih-Feng

    2004-02-11

    To facilitate transcript mapping and to investigate alterations in genomic structure and gene expression in a defined genomic target, we developed a novel microarray-based method to detect transcriptional activity of the human chromosome 4q22-24 region. Loss of heterozygosity of human 4q22-24 is frequently observed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). One hundred and eighteen well-characterized genes have been identified from this region. We took previously sequenced shotgun subclones as templates to amplify overlapping sequences for the genomic segment and constructed a chromosome-region-specific microarray. Using genomic DNA fragments as probes, we detected transcriptional activity from within this region among five different tissues. The hybridization results indicate that there are new transcripts that have not yet been identified by other methods. The existence of new transcripts encoded by genes in this region was confirmed by PCR cloning or cDNA library screening. The procedure reported here allows coupling of shotgun sequencing with transcript mapping and, potentially, detailed analysis of gene expression and chromosomal copy of the genomic sequence for the putative HCC tumor suppressor gene(s) in the 4q candidate region.

  8. SAGETTARIUS: a program to reduce the number of tags mapped to multiple transcripts and to plan SAGE sequencing stages

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Laurent; Wu, Yan; Guerin, Eric; Plewniak, Frédéric; Poch, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    SAGE (Serial Analysis of Gene Expression) experiments generate short nucleotide sequences called ‘tags’ which are assumed to map unambiguously to their original transcripts (1 tag to 1 transcript mapping). Nevertheless, many tags are generated that do not map to any transcript or map to multiple transcripts. Current bioinformatics resources, such as SAGEmap and TAGmapper, have focused on reducing the number of unmapped tags. Here, we describe SAGETTARIUS, a new high-throughput program that performs successive precise Nla3 and Sau3A tag to transcript mapping, based on specifically designed Virtual Tag (VT) libraries. First, SAGETTARIUS decreases the number of tags mapped to multiple transcripts. Among the various mapping resources compared, SAGETTARIUS performed the best in this respect by decreasing up to 11% the number of multiply mapped tags. Second, SAGETTARIUS allows the establishment of a guideline for SAGE experiment sequencing efforts through efficient mapping of the CRT (Cytoplasmic Ribosomal protein Transcripts)-specific tags. Using all publicly available human and mouse Nla3 SAGE experiments, we show that sequencing 100 000 tags is sufficient to map almost all CRT-specific tags and that four sequencing stages can be identified when carrying out a human or mouse SAGE project. SAGETTARIUS is web interfaced and freely accessible to academic users. PMID:17884916

  9. SAGETTARIUS: a program to reduce the number of tags mapped to multiple transcripts and to plan SAGE sequencing stages.

    PubMed

    Bianchetti, Laurent; Wu, Yan; Guerin, Eric; Plewniak, Frédéric; Poch, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    SAGE (Serial Analysis of Gene Expression) experiments generate short nucleotide sequences called 'tags' which are assumed to map unambiguously to their original transcripts (1 tag to 1 transcript mapping). Nevertheless, many tags are generated that do not map to any transcript or map to multiple transcripts. Current bioinformatics resources, such as SAGEmap and TAGmapper, have focused on reducing the number of unmapped tags. Here, we describe SAGETTARIUS, a new high-throughput program that performs successive precise Nla3 and Sau3A tag to transcript mapping, based on specifically designed Virtual Tag (VT) libraries. First, SAGETTARIUS decreases the number of tags mapped to multiple transcripts. Among the various mapping resources compared, SAGETTARIUS performed the best in this respect by decreasing up to 11% the number of multiply mapped tags. Second, SAGETTARIUS allows the establishment of a guideline for SAGE experiment sequencing efforts through efficient mapping of the CRT (Cytoplasmic Ribosomal protein Transcripts)-specific tags. Using all publicly available human and mouse Nla3 SAGE experiments, we show that sequencing 100,000 tags is sufficient to map almost all CRT-specific tags and that four sequencing stages can be identified when carrying out a human or mouse SAGE project. SAGETTARIUS is web interfaced and freely accessible to academic users.

  10. Transcriptome sequencing to produce SNP-based genetic maps of onion.

    PubMed

    Duangjit, J; Bohanec, B; Chan, A P; Town, C D; Havey, M J

    2013-08-01

    We used the Roche-454 platform to sequence from normalized cDNA libraries from each of two inbred lines of onion (OH1 and 5225). From approximately 1.6 million reads from each inbred, 27,065 and 33,254 cDNA contigs were assembled from OH1 and 5225, respectively. In total, 3,364 well supported single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on 1,716 cDNA contigs were identified between these two inbreds. One SNP on each of 1,256 contigs was randomly selected for genotyping. OH1 and 5225 were crossed and 182 gynogenic haploids extracted from hybrid plants were used for SNP mapping. A total of 597 SNPs segregated in the OH1 × 5225 haploid family and a genetic map of ten linkage groups (LOD ≥8) was constructed. Three hundred and thirty-nine of the newly identified SNPs were also mapped using a previously developed segregating family from BYG15-23 × AC43, and 223 common SNPs were used to join the two maps. Because these new SNPs are in expressed regions of the genome and commonly occur among onion germplasms, they will be useful for genetic mapping, gene tagging, marker-aided selection, quality control of seed lots, and fingerprinting of cultivars.

  11. ngs_backbone: a pipeline for read cleaning, mapping and SNP calling using Next Generation Sequence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The possibilities offered by next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms are revolutionizing biotechnological laboratories. Moreover, the combination of NGS sequencing and affordable high-throughput genotyping technologies is facilitating the rapid discovery and use of SNPs in non-model species. However, this abundance of sequences and polymorphisms creates new software needs. To fulfill these needs, we have developed a powerful, yet easy-to-use application. Results The ngs_backbone software is a parallel pipeline capable of analyzing Sanger, 454, Illumina and SOLiD (Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection) sequence reads. Its main supported analyses are: read cleaning, transcriptome assembly and annotation, read mapping and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) calling and selection. In order to build a truly useful tool, the software development was paired with a laboratory experiment. All public tomato Sanger EST reads plus 14.2 million Illumina reads were employed to test the tool and predict polymorphism in tomato. The cleaned reads were mapped to the SGN tomato transcriptome obtaining a coverage of 4.2 for Sanger and 8.5 for Illumina. 23,360 single nucleotide variations (SNVs) were predicted. A total of 76 SNVs were experimentally validated, and 85% were found to be real. Conclusions ngs_backbone is a new software package capable of analyzing sequences produced by NGS technologies and predicting SNVs with great accuracy. In our tomato example, we created a highly polymorphic collection of SNVs that will be a useful resource for tomato researchers and breeders. The software developed along with its documentation is freely available under the AGPL license and can be downloaded from http://bioinf.comav.upv.es/ngs_backbone/ or http://github.com/JoseBlanca/franklin. PMID:21635747

  12. Mapping and sequencing of the canine NRAMP1 gene and identification of mutations in leishmaniasis-susceptible dogs.

    PubMed

    Altet, Laura; Francino, Olga; Solano-Gallego, Laia; Renier, Corinne; Sánchez, Armand

    2002-06-01

    The NRAMP1 gene (Slc11a1) encodes an ion transporter protein involved in the control of intraphagosomal replication of parasites and in macrophage activation. It has been described in mice as the determinant of natural resistance or susceptibility to infection with antigenically unrelated pathogens, including Leishmania. Our aims were to sequence and map the canine Slc11a1 gene and to identify mutations that may be associated with resistance or susceptibility to Leishmania infection. The canine Slc11a1 gene has been mapped to dog chromosome CFA37 and covers 9 kb, including a 700-bp promoter region, 15 exons, and a polymorphic microsatellite in intron 1. It encodes a 547-amino-acid protein that has over 87% identity with the Slc11a1 proteins of different mammalian species. A case-control study with 33 resistant and 84 susceptible dogs showed an association between allele 145 of the microsatellite and susceptible dogs. Sequence variant analysis was performed by direct sequencing of the cDNA and the promoter region of four unrelated beagles experimentally infected with Leishmania infantum to search for possible functional mutations. Two of the dogs were classified as susceptible and the other two were classified as resistant based on their immune responses. Two important mutations were found in susceptible dogs: a G-rich region in the promoter that was common to both animals and a complete deletion of exon 11, which encodes the consensus transport motif of the protein, in the unique susceptible dog that needed an additional and prolonged treatment to avoid continuous relapses. A study with a larger dog population would be required to prove the association of these sequence variants with disease susceptibility.

  13. Mapping and Sequencing of the Canine NRAMP1 Gene and Identification of Mutations in Leishmaniasis-Susceptible Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Altet, Laura; Francino, Olga; Solano-Gallego, Laia; Renier, Corinne; Sánchez, Armand

    2002-01-01

    The NRAMP1 gene (Slc11a1) encodes an ion transporter protein involved in the control of intraphagosomal replication of parasites and in macrophage activation. It has been described in mice as the determinant of natural resistance or susceptibility to infection with antigenically unrelated pathogens, including Leishmania. Our aims were to sequence and map the canine Slc11a1 gene and to identify mutations that may be associated with resistance or susceptibility to Leishmania infection. The canine Slc11a1 gene has been mapped to dog chromosome CFA37 and covers 9 kb, including a 700-bp promoter region, 15 exons, and a polymorphic microsatellite in intron 1. It encodes a 547-amino-acid protein that has over 87% identity with the Slc11a1 proteins of different mammalian species. A case-control study with 33 resistant and 84 susceptible dogs showed an association between allele 145 of the microsatellite and susceptible dogs. Sequence variant analysis was performed by direct sequencing of the cDNA and the promoter region of four unrelated beagles experimentally infected with Leishmania infantum to search for possible functional mutations. Two of the dogs were classified as susceptible and the other two were classified as resistant based on their immune responses. Two important mutations were found in susceptible dogs: a G-rich region in the promoter that was common to both animals and a complete deletion of exon 11, which encodes the consensus transport motif of the protein, in the unique susceptible dog that needed an additional and prolonged treatment to avoid continuous relapses. A study with a larger dog population would be required to prove the association of these sequence variants with disease susceptibility. PMID:12010961

  14. Description of durum wheat linkage map and comparative sequence analysis of wheat mapped DArT markers with rice and Brachypodium genomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of wheat to the world economy, together with progresses in high-throughput next-generation DNA sequencing, have accelerated initiatives of genetic research for wheat improvement. The availability of high density linkage maps is crucial to identify genotype-phenotype associations, but also for anchoring BAC contigs to genetic maps, a strategy followed for sequencing the wheat genome. Results Here we report a genetic linkage map in a durum wheat segregating population and the study of mapped DArT markers. The linkage map consists of 126 gSSR, 31 EST-SSR and 351 DArT markers distributed in 24 linkage groups for a total length of 1,272 cM. Through bioinformatic approaches we have analysed 327 DArT clones to reveal their redundancy, syntenic and functional aspects. The DNA sequences of 174 DArT markers were assembled into a non-redundant set of 60 marker clusters. This explained the generation of clusters in very small chromosome regions across genomes. Of these DArT markers, 61 showed highly significant (Expectation < E-10) BLAST similarity to gene sequences in public databases of model species such as Brachypodium and rice. Based on sequence alignments, the analysis revealed a mosaic gene conservation, with 54 and 72 genes present in rice and Brachypodium species, respectively. Conclusions In the present manuscript we provide a detailed DArT markers characterization and the basis for future efforts in durum wheat map comparing. PMID:24304553

  15. Genetic Mapping and QTL Analysis of Growth-Related Traits in Pinctada fucata Using Restriction-Site Associated DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaoguo; He, Maoxian

    2014-01-01

    The pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata (P. fucata), is one of the marine bivalves that is predominantly cultured for pearl production. To obtain more genetic information for breeding purposes, we constructed a high-density linkage map of P. fucata and identified quantitative trait loci (QTL) for growth-related traits. One F1 family, which included the two parents, 48 largest progeny and 50 smallest progeny, was sampled to construct a linkage map using restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-Seq). With low coverage data, 1956.53 million clean reads and 86,342 candidate RAD loci were generated. A total of 1373 segregating SNPs were used to construct a sex-average linkage map. This spanned 1091.81 centimorgans (cM), with 14 linkage groups and an average marker interval of 1.41 cM. The genetic linkage map coverage, Coa, was 97.24%. Thirty-nine QTL-peak loci, for seven growth-related traits, were identified using the single-marker analysis, nonparametric mapping Kruskal-Wallis (KW) test. Parameters included three for shell height, six for shell length, five for shell width, four for hinge length, 11 for total weight, eight for soft tissue weight and two for shell weight. The QTL peak loci for shell height, shell length and shell weight were all located in linkage group 6. The genotype frequencies of most QTL peak loci showed significant differences between the large subpopulation and the small subpopulation (P<0.05). These results highlight the effectiveness of RAD-Seq as a tool for generation of QTL-targeted and genome-wide marker data in the non-model animal, P. fucata, and its possible utility in marker-assisted selection (MAS). PMID:25369421

  16. Sequencing Spo11 Oligonucleotides for Mapping Meiotic DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Lam, Isabel; Mohibullah, Neeman; Keeney, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Meiosis is a specialized form of cell division resulting in reproductive cells with a reduced, usually haploid, genome complement. A key step after premeiotic DNA replication is the occurrence of homologous recombination at multiple places throughout the genome, initiated with the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by the topoisomerase-like protein Spo11. DSBs are distributed non-randomly in genomes, and understanding the mechanisms that shape this distribution is important for understanding how meiotic recombination influences heredity and genome evolution. Several methods exist for mapping where Spo11 acts. Of these, sequencing of Spo11-associated oligonucleotides (Spo11 oligos) is the most precise, specifying the locations of DNA breaks to the base pair. In this chapter we detail the steps involved in Spo11-oligo mapping in the SK1 strain of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, from harvesting cells of highly synchronous meiotic cultures, through preparation of sequencing libraries, to the mapping pipeline used for processing the data.

  17. Differentiation of strains in Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by DNA sequence polymorphisms, including rapid identification of M. bovis BCG.

    PubMed Central

    Frothingham, R

    1995-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex includes M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. microti, and M. africanum. Seven strains of the M. tuberculosis complex were sequenced in a region of about 300 bp which contains multiple 15-bp tandem repeats and which is part of a 1,551-bp open reading frame. Four distinct sequences were obtained, each defining a sequevar. A sequevar includes the strain or strains with a given sequence. The type strain M. tuberculosis TMC 102 (H37Rv) was designated sequevar MED-G. When compared to MED-G, sequevar LONG had an insertion of one 15-bp tandem repeat and sequevar SHORT had a deletion of one tandem repeat. Sequevar MED-C had a G-->C substitution, coding for the conservative change Ser-->Thr. BanI cuts only sequevar MED-C at the site of the substitution. PCR-restriction enzyme analysis was used to determine the sequevars of 92 M. tuberculosis complex strains. All 23 M. bovis BCG strains belonged to sequevar MED-C. The M. africanum type strain was sequevar SHORT. The remaining 68 strains of M. tuberculosis, M. bovis (not BCG), and M. microti were sequevars LONG (3 strains) or MED-G (65 strains). PCR-restriction enzyme analysis was applied to reference strains and clinical isolates with a worldwide distribution. This method provides rapid, sensitive, and specific identification of the important vaccine strain M. bovis BCG. PMID:7790448

  18. Mitochondrial DNA sequence evolution and phylogeny of the Atlantic Alcidae, including the extinct great auk (Pinguinus impennis).

    PubMed

    Moum, Truls; Arnason, Ulfur; Arnason, Einar

    2002-09-01

    The Atlantic auk assemblage includes four extant species, razorbill (Alca torda), dovekie (Alle alle), common murre (Uria aalge), and thick-billed murre (U. lomvia), and one recently extinct species, the flightless great auk (Pinguinus impennis). To determine the phylogenetic relationships among the species, a contiguous 4.2-kb region of the mitochondrial genome from the extant species was amplified using PCR. This region included one ribosomal RNA gene, four transfer RNA genes, two protein-coding genes, the control region, and intergenic spacers. Sets of PCR primers for amplifying the same region from great auk were designed from sequences of the extant species. The authenticity of the great auk sequence was ascertained by alternative amplifications, cloning, and separate analyses in an independent laboratory. Phylogenetic analyses of the entire assemblage, made possible by the great auk sequence, fully resolved the phylogenetic relationships and split it into two primary lineages, Uria versus Alle, Alca, and Pinguinus. A sister group relationship was identified between Alca and Pinguinus to the exclusion of ALLE: Phylogenetically, the flightless great auk originated late relative to other divergences within the assemblage. This suggests that three highly divergent species in terms of adaptive specializations, Alca, Alle, and Pinguinus, evolved from a single lineage in the Atlantic Ocean, in a process similar to the initial adaptive radiation of alcids in the Pacific Ocean.

  19. Sequencing and mapping hemoglobin gene clusters in the australian model dasyurid marsupial sminthopsis macroura

    SciTech Connect

    De Leo, A.A.; Wheeler, D.; Lefevre, C.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Hope, R.; Kuliwaba, J.; Nicholas, K.R.; Westermanc, M.; Graves, J.A.M.

    2004-07-26

    Comparing globin genes and their flanking sequences across many species has allowed globin gene evolution to be reconstructed in great detail. Marsupial globin sequences have proved to be of exceptional significance. A previous finding of a beta-like omega gene in the alpha cluster in the tammar wallaby suggested that the alpha and beta cluster evolved via genome duplication and loss rather than tandem duplication. To confirm and extend this important finding we isolated and sequenced BACs containing the alpha and beta loci from the distantly related Australian marsupial Sminthopsis macroura. We report that the alpha gene lies in the same BAC as the beta-like omega gene, implying that the alpha-omega juxtaposition is likely to be conserved in all marsupials. The LUC7L gene was found 3' of the S. macroura alpha locus, a gene order shared with humans but not mouse, chicken or fugu. Sequencing a BAC contig that contained the S. macroura beta globin and epsilon globin loci showed that the globin cluster is flanked by olfactory genes, demonstrating a gene arrangement conserved for over 180 MY. Analysis of the region 5' to the S. macroura epsilon globin gene revealed a region similar to the eutherian LCR, containing sequences and potential transcription factor binding sites with homology to eutherian hypersensitive sites 1 to 5. FISH mapping of BACs containing S. macroura alpha and beta globin genes located the beta globin cluster on chromosome 3q and the alpha locus close to the centromere on 1q, resolving contradictory map locations obtained by previous radioactive in situ hybridization.

  20. Chromosomal mapping, sequence and transcription analysis of the porcine fertilin beta gene (ADAM2).

    PubMed

    Day, A E; Quilter, C R; Sargent, C A; Mileham, A J

    2003-10-01

    Fertilin beta (ADAM2) forms a part of the heterodimeric surface protein fertilin, found on the plasma membrane of mammalian sperm, and has been implicated in the process of sperm-egg fusion. Analysis of cDNA products obtained from adult porcine testis mRNA has presented a sequence corresponding to 2620 bp of the ADAM2 gene. This sequence contained an open reading frame encoding a 735-amino acid protein and homologous to ADAM2 genes known in other mammalian species. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of genomic DNA showed that the 2620 bp of cDNA sequence comprises at least 21 exons and spans approximately 76 kb of genomic DNA, with its size and structure being relatively conserved between mouse, human and pig. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to map ADAM2 to chromosome 15 of the pig, using a bacterial artificial chromosome clone from the PigE BAC library. This finding is consistent with comparative mapping experiments performed between pig and human chromosomes. Analysis of nine mRNA samples, by reverse transcriptase-PCR, from different porcine tissues has also suggested that expression of ADAM2 is limited to the testis, a finding that is consistent with other mammalian species.

  1. Reconstructing mitochondrial genomes directly from genomic next-generation sequencing reads—a baiting and iterative mapping approach

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Christoph; Bachmann, Lutz; Chevreux, Bastien

    2013-01-01

    We present an in silico approach for the reconstruction of complete mitochondrial genomes of non-model organisms directly from next-generation sequencing (NGS) data—mitochondrial baiting and iterative mapping (MITObim). The method is straightforward even if only (i) distantly related mitochondrial genomes or (ii) mitochondrial barcode sequences are available as starting-reference sequences or seeds, respectively. We demonstrate the efficiency of the approach in case studies using real NGS data sets of the two monogenean ectoparasites species Gyrodactylus thymalli and Gyrodactylus derjavinoides including their respective teleost hosts European grayling (Thymallus thymallus) and Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). MITObim appeared superior to existing tools in terms of accuracy, runtime and memory requirements and fully automatically recovered mitochondrial genomes exceeding 99.5% accuracy from total genomic DNA derived NGS data sets in <24 h using a standard desktop computer. The approach overcomes the limitations of traditional strategies for obtaining mitochondrial genomes for species with little or no mitochondrial sequence information at hand and represents a fast and highly efficient in silico alternative to laborious conventional strategies relying on initial long-range PCR. We furthermore demonstrate the applicability of MITObim for metagenomic/pooled data sets using simulated data. MITObim is an easy to use tool even for biologists with modest bioinformatics experience. The software is made available as open source pipeline under the MIT license at https://github.com/chrishah/MITObim. PMID:23661685

  2. Reconstructing mitochondrial genomes directly from genomic next-generation sequencing reads--a baiting and iterative mapping approach.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Christoph; Bachmann, Lutz; Chevreux, Bastien

    2013-07-01

    We present an in silico approach for the reconstruction of complete mitochondrial genomes of non-model organisms directly from next-generation sequencing (NGS) data-mitochondrial baiting and iterative mapping (MITObim). The method is straightforward even if only (i) distantly related mitochondrial genomes or (ii) mitochondrial barcode sequences are available as starting-reference sequences or seeds, respectively. We demonstrate the efficiency of the approach in case studies using real NGS data sets of the two monogenean ectoparasites species Gyrodactylus thymalli and Gyrodactylus derjavinoides including their respective teleost hosts European grayling (Thymallus thymallus) and Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). MITObim appeared superior to existing tools in terms of accuracy, runtime and memory requirements and fully automatically recovered mitochondrial genomes exceeding 99.5% accuracy from total genomic DNA derived NGS data sets in <24 h using a standard desktop computer. The approach overcomes the limitations of traditional strategies for obtaining mitochondrial genomes for species with little or no mitochondrial sequence information at hand and represents a fast and highly efficient in silico alternative to laborious conventional strategies relying on initial long-range PCR. We furthermore demonstrate the applicability of MITObim for metagenomic/pooled data sets using simulated data. MITObim is an easy to use tool even for biologists with modest bioinformatics experience. The software is made available as open source pipeline under the MIT license at https://github.com/chrishah/MITObim.

  3. Geologic map of southwestern Sequoia National Park and vicinity, Tulare County, California, including the Mineral King metamorphic pendant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisson, T. W.; Moore, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    From the late 1940s to the early 1990s, scientists of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) mapped the geology of most of Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, California, and published the results as a series of 15-minute (1:62,500 scale) Geologic Quadrangles. The southwest corner of Sequoia National Park, encompassing the Mineral King and eastern edge of the Kaweah 15-minute topographic quadrangles, however, remained unfinished. At the request of the National Park Service's Geologic Resources Division (NPS-GRD), the USGS has mapped the geology of that area using 7.5-minute (1:24,000 scale) topographic bases and high-resolution ortho-imagery. With partial support from NPS-GRD, the major plutons in the map area were dated by the U-Pb zircon method with the Stanford-USGS SHRIMP-RG ion microprobe. Highlights include: (1) Identification of the Early Cretaceous volcano-plutonic suite of Mineral King (informally named), consisting of three deformed granodiorite plutons and the major metarhyolite tuffs of the Mineral King metamorphic pendant. Members of the suite erupted or intruded at 130-140 Ma (pluton ages: this study; rhyolite ages: lower-intercept concordia from zircon results of Busby-Spera, 1983, Princeton Ph.D. thesis, and from Klemetti et al., 2011, AGU abstract) during the pause of igneous activity between emplacement of the Jurassic and Cretaceous Sierran batholiths. (2) Some of the deformation of the Mineral King metamorphic pendant is demonstrably Cretaceous, with evidence including map-scale folding of Early Cretaceous metarhyolite tuff, and an isoclinally folded aplite dike dated at 98 Ma, concurrent with the large 98-Ma granodiorite of Castle Creek that intruded the Mineral King pendant on the west. (3) A 21-km-long magmatic synform within the 99-100 Ma granite of Coyote Pass that is defined both by inward-dipping mafic inclusions (enclaves) and by sporadic, cm-thick, sharply defined mineral layering. The west margin of the granite of Coyote Pass overlies

  4. Small genomes: New initiatives in mapping and sequencing. Workshop summary report

    SciTech Connect

    McKenney, K.; Robb, F.

    1993-12-31

    The workshop was held 5--7 July 1993 at the Center for Advanced Research in Biotechnology (CARB) and hosted by the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute (UMBI) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The objective of this workshop was to bring together individuals interested in DNA technologies and to determine the impact of these current and potential improvements of the speed and cost-effectiveness of mapping and sequencing on the planning of future small genome projects. A major goal of the workshop was to spur the collaboration of more diverse groups of scientists working on this topic, and to minimize competitiveness as an inhibitory factor to progress.

  5. Mapping and sequencing the human genome: Science, ethics, and public policy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, J.D.

    1993-03-31

    Development of Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome: Science, Ethics, and Public Policy followed the standard process of curriculum development at the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS), the process is described. The production of this module was a collaborative effort between BSCS and the American Medical Association (AMA). Appendix A contains a copy of the module. Copies of reports sent to the Department of Energy (DOE) during the development process are contained in Appendix B; all reports should be on file at DOE. Appendix B also contains copies of status reports submitted to the BSCS Board of Directors.

  6. Genetic linkage map of Chinese native variety faba bean (Vicia faba L.) based on simple sequence repeat markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker is a powerful tool for construction of genetic linkage map which can be applied for locating quantitative trait loci (QTL) and marker-assisted selection (MAS). In this study, a genetic map of faba bean was constructed with SSR markers using a population of 129 F2 ...

  7. Heterozygous mapping strategy (HetMapps)for high resolution genotyping-by-sequencing markers: a case study in grapevine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) provides opportunities to generate high-resolution genetic maps at a low per-sample genotyping cost, but missing data and under-calling of heterozygotes complicate the creation of GBS linkage maps for highly heterozygous species. To overcome these issues, we developed ...

  8. Including Faults Detected By Near-Surface Seismic Methods in the USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps - Some Restrictions Apply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. A.; Haller, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    Every 6 years, the USGS updates the National Seismic Hazard Maps (new version released July 2014) that are intended to help society reduce risk from earthquakes. These maps affect hundreds of billions of dollars in construction costs each year as they are used to develop seismic-design criteria of buildings, bridges, highways, railroads, and provide data for risk assessment that help determine insurance rates. Seismic source characterization, an essential component of hazard model development, ranges from detailed trench excavations across faults at the ground surface to less detailed analysis of broad regions defined mainly on the basis of historical seismicity. Though it is a priority for the USGS to discover new Quaternary fault sources, the discovered faults only become a part of the hazard model if there are corresponding constraints on their geometry (length and depth extent) and slip-rate (or recurrence interval). When combined with fault geometry and slip-rate constraints, near-surface seismic studies that detect young (Quaternary) faults have become important parts of the hazard source model. Examples of seismic imaging studies with significant hazard impact include the Southern Whidbey Island fault, Washington; Santa Monica fault, San Andreas fault, and Palos Verdes fault zone, California; and Commerce fault, Missouri. There are many more faults in the hazard model in the western U.S. than in the expansive region east of the Rocky Mountains due to the higher rate of tectonic deformation, frequent surface-rupturing earthquakes and, in some cases, lower erosion rates. However, the recent increase in earthquakes in the central U.S. has revealed previously unknown faults for which we need additional constraints before we can include them in the seismic hazard maps. Some of these new faults may be opportunities for seismic imaging studies to provide basic data on location, dip, style of faulting, and recurrence.

  9. OligoHeatMap (OHM): an online tool to estimate and display hybridizations of oligonucleotides onto DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Croce, Olivier; Chevenet, François; Christen, Richard

    2008-07-01

    The efficiency of molecular methods involving DNA/DNA hybridizations depends on the accurate prediction of the melting temperature (T(m)) of the duplex. Many softwares are available for T(m) calculations, but difficulties arise when one wishes to check if a given oligomer (PCR primer or probe) hybridizes well or not on more than a single sequence. Moreover, the presence of mismatches within the duplex is not sufficient to estimate specificity as it does not always significantly decrease the T(m). OHM (OligoHeatMap) is an online tool able to provide estimates of T(m) for a set of oligomers and a set of aligned sequences, not only as text files of complete results but also in a graphical way: T(m) values are translated into colors and displayed as a heat map image, either stand alone or to be used by softwares such as TreeDyn to be included in a phylogenetic tree. OHM is freely available at http://bioinfo.unice.fr/ohm/, with links to the full source code and online help.

  10. Linking the human cytogenetic map with nucleotide sequence: the CCAP clone set.

    PubMed

    Jang, Wonhee; Yonescu, Raluca; Knutsen, Turid; Brown, Theresa; Reppert, Tricia; Sirotkin, Karl; Schuler, Gregory D; Ried, Thomas; Kirsch, Ilan R

    2006-07-15

    We present the completed dataset and clone repository of the Cancer Chromosome Aberration Project (CCAP), an initiative developed and funded through the intramural program of the U.S. National Cancer Institute, to provide seamless linkage of human cytogenetic markers with the primary nucleotide sequence of the human genome. Spaced at 1-2 Mb intervals across the human genome, 1,339 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones have been localized to chromosomal bands through high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping. Of these clones, 99.8% can be positioned on the primary human genome sequence and 95% are placed at or close to their precise nucleotide starts and stops. This dataset can be studied and manipulated within generally available public Web sites. The clones are available from a commercial repository. The CCAP BAC clone set provides anchors for the interrogation of gene and sequence involvement in oncogenic and developmental disorders when the starting point is the recognition of a structural, numerical, or interstitial chromosomal aberration. This dataset also provides a current view of the quality and coherence of the available genome sequence and insight into the nucleotide and three-dimensional structures that manifest as Giemsa light and dark chromosomal banding patterns.

  11. SBH and the integration of complementary approaches in the mapping, sequencing, and understanding of complex genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Labat, I.; Vicentic, A.; Gemmell, A.; Stavropoulos, N.; Jarvis, J.

    1992-01-01

    A variant of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) is being developed with a potential to inexpensively determine up to 100 million base pairs per year. The method comprises (1) arraying short clones in 864-well plates; (2) growth of the M13 clones or PCR of the inserts; (3) automated spotting of DNAs by corresponding pin-arrays; (4) hybridization of dotted samples with 200-3000 [sup 32]P- or [sup 33]P-labeled 6- to 8-mer probes; and (5) scoring hybridization signals using storage phosphor plates. Some 200 7- to 8-mers can provide an inventory of the genes if CDNA clones are hybridized, or can define the order of 2-kb genomic clones, creating physical and structural maps with 100-bp resolution; the distribution of G+C, LINEs, SINEs, and gene families would be revealed. cDNAs that represent new genes and genomic clones in regions of interest selected by SBH can be sequenced by a gel method. Uniformly distributed clones from the previous step will be hybridized with 2000--3000 6- to 8-mers. As a result, approximately 50--60% of the genomic regions containing members of large repetitive and gene families and those families represented in GenBank would be completely sequenced. In the less redundant regions, every base pair is expected to be read with 3-4 probes, but the complete sequence can not be reconstructed. Such partial sequences allow the inference of similarity and the recognition of coding, regulatory, and repetitive sequences, as well as study of the evolutionary processes all the way up to the species delineation.

  12. SBH and the integration of complementary approaches in the mapping, sequencing, and understanding of complex genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Labat, I.; Vicentic, A.; Gemmell, A.; Stavropoulos, N.; Jarvis, J.

    1992-12-01

    A variant of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) is being developed with a potential to inexpensively determine up to 100 million base pairs per year. The method comprises (1) arraying short clones in 864-well plates; (2) growth of the M13 clones or PCR of the inserts; (3) automated spotting of DNAs by corresponding pin-arrays; (4) hybridization of dotted samples with 200-3000 {sup 32}P- or {sup 33}P-labeled 6- to 8-mer probes; and (5) scoring hybridization signals using storage phosphor plates. Some 200 7- to 8-mers can provide an inventory of the genes if CDNA clones are hybridized, or can define the order of 2-kb genomic clones, creating physical and structural maps with 100-bp resolution; the distribution of G+C, LINEs, SINEs, and gene families would be revealed. cDNAs that represent new genes and genomic clones in regions of interest selected by SBH can be sequenced by a gel method. Uniformly distributed clones from the previous step will be hybridized with 2000--3000 6- to 8-mers. As a result, approximately 50--60% of the genomic regions containing members of large repetitive and gene families and those families represented in GenBank would be completely sequenced. In the less redundant regions, every base pair is expected to be read with 3-4 probes, but the complete sequence can not be reconstructed. Such partial sequences allow the inference of similarity and the recognition of coding, regulatory, and repetitive sequences, as well as study of the evolutionary processes all the way up to the species delineation.

  13. rasbhari: Optimizing Spaced Seeds for Database Searching, Read Mapping and Alignment-Free Sequence Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Lars; Leimeister, Chris-André; Morgenstern, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Many algorithms for sequence analysis rely on word matching or word statistics. Often, these approaches can be improved if binary patterns representing match and don’t-care positions are used as a filter, such that only those positions of words are considered that correspond to the match positions of the patterns. The performance of these approaches, however, depends on the underlying patterns. Herein, we show that the overlap complexity of a pattern set that was introduced by Ilie and Ilie is closely related to the variance of the number of matches between two evolutionarily related sequences with respect to this pattern set. We propose a modified hill-climbing algorithm to optimize pattern sets for database searching, read mapping and alignment-free sequence comparison of nucleic-acid sequences; our implementation of this algorithm is called rasbhari. Depending on the application at hand, rasbhari can either minimize the overlap complexity of pattern sets, maximize their sensitivity in database searching or minimize the variance of the number of pattern-based matches in alignment-free sequence comparison. We show that, for database searching, rasbhari generates pattern sets with slightly higher sensitivity than existing approaches. In our Spaced Words approach to alignment-free sequence comparison, pattern sets calculated with rasbhari led to more accurate estimates of phylogenetic distances than the randomly generated pattern sets that we previously used. Finally, we used rasbhari to generate patterns for short read classification with CLARK-S. Here too, the sensitivity of the results could be improved, compared to the default patterns of the program. We integrated rasbhari into Spaced Words; the source code of rasbhari is freely available at http://rasbhari.gobics.de/ PMID:27760124

  14. Construction of a high-density genetic map for grape using next generation restriction-site associated DNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic mapping and QTL detection are powerful methodologies in plant improvement and breeding. Construction of a high-density and high-quality genetic map would be of great benefit in the production of superior grapes to meet human demand. High throughput and low cost of the recently developed next generation sequencing (NGS) technology have resulted in its wide application in genome research. Sequencing restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) might be an efficient strategy to simplify genotyping. Combining NGS with RAD has proven to be powerful for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker development. Results An F1 population of 100 individual plants was developed. In-silico digestion-site prediction was used to select an appropriate restriction enzyme for construction of a RAD sequencing library. Next generation RAD sequencing was applied to genotype the F1 population and its parents. Applying a cluster strategy for SNP modulation, a total of 1,814 high-quality SNP markers were developed: 1,121 of these were mapped to the female genetic map, 759 to the male map, and 1,646 to the integrated map. A comparison of the genetic maps to the published Vitis vinifera genome revealed both conservation and variations. Conclusions The applicability of next generation RAD sequencing for genotyping a grape F1 population was demonstrated, leading to the successful development of a genetic map with high density and quality using our designed SNP markers. Detailed analysis revealed that this newly developed genetic map can be used for a variety of genome investigations, such as QTL detection, sequence assembly and genome comparison. PMID:22908993

  15. A High-Density SNP Map of Sunflower Derived from RAD-Sequencing Facilitating Fine-Mapping of the Rust Resistance Gene R12

    PubMed Central

    Talukder, Zahirul I.; Gong, Li; Hulke, Brent S.; Pegadaraju, Venkatramana; Song, Qijian; Schultz, Quentin; Qi, Lili

    2014-01-01

    A high-resolution genetic map of sunflower was constructed by integrating SNP data from three F2 mapping populations (HA 89/RHA 464, B-line/RHA 464, and CR 29/RHA 468). The consensus map spanned a total length of 1443.84 cM, and consisted of 5,019 SNP markers derived from RAD tag sequencing and 118 publicly available SSR markers distributed in 17 linkage groups, corresponding to the haploid chromosome number of sunflower. The maximum interval between markers in the consensus map is 12.37 cM and the average distance is 0.28 cM between adjacent markers. Despite a few short-distance inversions in marker order, the consensus map showed high levels of collinearity among individual maps with an average Spearman's rank correlation coefficient of 0.972 across the genome. The order of the SSR markers on the consensus map was also in agreement with the order of the individual map and with previously published sunflower maps. Three individual and one consensus maps revealed the uneven distribution of markers across the genome. Additionally, we performed fine mapping and marker validation of the rust resistance gene R12, providing closely linked SNP markers for marker-assisted selection of this gene in sunflower breeding programs. This high resolution consensus map will serve as a valuable tool to the sunflower community for studying marker-trait association of important agronomic traits, marker assisted breeding, map-based gene cloning, and comparative mapping. PMID:25014030

  16. Progress towards the construction of a sequence-ready physical map of the 3AS chromosome arm of hexaploid wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The large genome size (~17 Gb), polyploid nature, and repetitive sequence content (>90%) of hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum) present a challenge for constructing physical maps, which are fundamental resources to aid genomic sequencing and annotation, and gene cloning. One approach to reduce the c...

  17. Mapping autosomal recessive intellectual disability: combined microarray and exome sequencing identifies 26 novel candidate genes in 192 consanguineous families.

    PubMed

    Harripaul, R; Vasli, N; Mikhailov, A; Rafiq, M A; Mittal, K; Windpassinger, C; Sheikh, T I; Noor, A; Mahmood, H; Downey, S; Johnson, M; Vleuten, K; Bell, L; Ilyas, M; Khan, F S; Khan, V; Moradi, M; Ayaz, M; Naeem, F; Heidari, A; Ahmed, I; Ghadami, S; Agha, Z; Zeinali, S; Qamar, R; Mozhdehipanah, H; John, P; Mir, A; Ansar, M; French, L; Ayub, M; Vincent, J B

    2017-04-11

    Approximately 1% of the global population is affected by intellectual disability (ID), and the majority receive no molecular diagnosis. Previous studies have indicated high levels of genetic heterogeneity, with estimates of more than 2500 autosomal ID genes, the majority of which are autosomal recessive (AR). Here, we combined microarray genotyping, homozygosity-by-descent (HBD) mapping, copy number variation (CNV) analysis, and whole exome sequencing (WES) to identify disease genes/mutations in 192 multiplex Pakistani and Iranian consanguineous families with non-syndromic ID. We identified definite or candidate mutations (or CNVs) in 51% of families in 72 different genes, including 26 not previously reported for ARID. The new ARID genes include nine with loss-of-function mutations (ABI2, MAPK8, MPDZ, PIDD1, SLAIN1, TBC1D23, TRAPPC6B, UBA7 and USP44), and missense mutations include the first reports of variants in BDNF or TET1 associated with ID. The genes identified also showed overlap with de novo gene sets for other neuropsychiatric disorders. Transcriptional studies showed prominent expression in the prenatal brain. The high yield of AR mutations for ID indicated that this approach has excellent clinical potential and should inform clinical diagnostics, including clinical whole exome and genome sequencing, for populations in which consanguinity is common. As with other AR disorders, the relevance will also apply to outbred populations.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 11 April 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.60.

  18. Information on a Major New Initiative: Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome (1986 DOE Memorandum)

    SciTech Connect

    DeLisi, Charles

    1986-05-06

    In the history of the Human Genome Program, Dr. Charles DeLisi and Dr. Alvin Trivelpiece of the Department of Energy (DOE) were instrumental in moving the seeds of the program forward. This May 1986 memo from DeLisi to Trivelpiece, director of DOE's Office of Energy Research, documents this fact. Following the March 1986 Santa Fe workshop on the subject of mapping and sequencing the human genome, Delisi's memo outlines workshop conclusions, explains the relevance of this project to DOE and the importance of the Department's laboratories and capabilities, notes the critical experience of DOE in managing projects of this scale and potential magnitude, and recognizes the fact that the project will impact biomedical science in ways which could not be fully anticipated at the time. Subsequently, program guidance was further sought from the DOE Health Effects Research Advisory Committee (HERAC) and the April 1987 HERAC report recommmended that DOE and the nation commit to a large, multidisciplinary, scientific and technological undertaking to map and sequence the human genome.

  19. Information on a Major New Initiative: Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome (1986 DOE Memorandum)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    DeLisi, Charles (Associate Director, Health and Environmental Research, DOE Office of Energy Research)

    1986-05-06

    In the history of the Human Genome Program, Dr. Charles DeLisi and Dr. Alvin Trivelpiece of the Department of Energy (DOE) were instrumental in moving the seeds of the program forward. This May 1986 memo from DeLisi to Trivelpiece, Director of DOE's Office of Energy Research, documents this fact. Following the March 1986 Santa Fe workshop on the subject of mapping and sequencing the human genome, DeLisi's memo outlines workshop conclusions, explains the relevance of this project to DOE and the importance of the Department's laboratories and capabilities, notes the critical experience of DOE in managing projects of this scale and potential magnitude, and recognizes the fact that the project will impact biomedical science in ways which could not be fully anticipated at the time. Subsequently, program guidance was further sought from the DOE Health Effects Research Advisory Committee (HERAC) and the April 1987 HERAC report recommended that DOE and the nation commit to a large, multidisciplinary, scientific and technological undertaking to map and sequence the human genome.

  20. Isolation and refined regional mapping of expressed sequences from human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, F.T.; Yu, J.; Patterson, D.

    1994-10-01

    To increase candidate genes from human chromosome 21 for the analysis of Down syndrome and other genetic diseases localized on this chromosome, we have isolated and studied 9 cDNA clones encoded by chromosome 21. For isolating cDNAs, single-copy microclones from a chromosome 21 microdissection library were used in direct screening of various cDNA libraries. Seven of the cDNA clones have been regionally mapped on chromosome 21 using a comprehensive hybrid mapping panel comprising 24 cell hybrids that divide the chromosome into 33 subregions. These cDNA clones with refined mapping positions should be useful for identification and cloning of genes responsible for the specific component phenotypes of Down syndrome and other diseases on chromosome 21, including progressive myoclonus epilepsy in 21q22.3. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Connectivity mapping using a combined gene signature from multiple colorectal cancer datasets identified candidate drugs including existing chemotherapies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background While the discovery of new drugs is a complex, lengthy and costly process, identifying new uses for existing drugs is a cost-effective approach to therapeutic discovery. Connectivity mapping integrates gene expression profiling with advanced algorithms to connect genes, diseases and small molecule compounds and has been applied in a large number of studies to identify potential drugs, particularly to facilitate drug repurposing. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a commonly diagnosed cancer with high mortality rates, presenting a worldwide health problem. With the advancement of high throughput omics technologies, a number of large scale gene expression profiling studies have been conducted on CRCs, providing multiple datasets in gene expression data repositories. In this work, we systematically apply gene expression connectivity mapping to multiple CRC datasets to identify candidate therapeutics to this disease. Results We developed a robust method to compile a combined gene signature for colorectal cancer across multiple datasets. Connectivity mapping analysis with this signature of 148 genes identified 10 candidate compounds, including irinotecan and etoposide, which are chemotherapy drugs currently used to treat CRCs. These results indicate that we have discovered high quality connections between the CRC disease state and the candidate compounds, and that the gene signature we created may be used as a potential therapeutic target in treating the disease. The method we proposed is highly effective in generating quality gene signature through multiple datasets; the publication of the combined CRC gene signature and the list of candidate compounds from this work will benefit both cancer and systems biology research communities for further development and investigations. PMID:26356760

  2. Mapping whole genome shotgun sequence and variant calling in mammalian species without their reference genomes.

    PubMed

    Kalbfleisch, Ted; Heaton, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    Genomics research in mammals has produced reference genome sequences that are essential for identifying variation associated with disease.  High quality reference genome sequences are now available for humans, model species, and economically important agricultural animals.  Comparisons between these species have provided unique insights into mammalian gene function.  However, the number of species with reference genomes is small compared to those needed for studying molecular evolutionary relationships in the tree of life.  For example, among the even-toed ungulates there are approximately 300 species whose phylogenetic relationships have been calculated in the 10k trees project.  Only six of these have reference genomes:  cattle, swine, sheep, goat, water buffalo, and bison.  Although reference sequences will eventually be developed for additional hoof stock, the resources in terms of time, money, infrastructure and expertise required to develop a quality reference genome may be unattainable for most species for at least another decade.  In this work we mapped 35 Gb of next generation sequence data of a Katahdin sheep to its own species' reference genome ( Ovis aries Oar3.1) and to that of a species that diverged 15 to 30 million years ago ( Bos taurus UMD3.1).  In total, 56% of reads covered 76% of UMD3.1 to an average depth of 6.8 reads per site, 83 million variants were identified, of which 78 million were homozygous and likely represent interspecies nucleotide differences. Excluding repeat regions and sex chromosomes, nearly 3.7 million heterozygous sites were identified in this animal vs. bovine UMD3.1, representing polymorphisms occurring in sheep.  Of these, 41% could be readily mapped to orthologous positions in ovine Oar3.1 with 80% corroborated as heterozygous.  These variant sites, identified via interspecies mapping could be used for comparative genomics, disease association studies, and ultimately to understand mammalian gene

  3. Crop Type Mapping from a Sequence of Terrasar-X Images with Dynamic Conditional Random Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenduiywo, B. K.; Bargiel, D.; Soergel, U.

    2016-06-01

    Crop phenology is dynamic as it changes with times of the year. Such biophysical processes also look spectrally different to remote sensing satellites. Some crops may depict similar spectral properties if their phenology coincide, but differ later when their phenology diverge. Thus, conventional approaches that select only images from phenological stages where crops are distinguishable for classification, have low discrimination. In contrast, stacking images within a cropping season limits discrimination to a single feature space that can suffer from overlapping classes. Since crop backscatter varies with time, it can aid discrimination. Therefore, our main objective is to develop a crop sequence classification method using multitemporal TerraSAR-X images. We adopt first order markov assumption in undirected temporal graph sequence. This property is exploited to implement Dynamic Conditional Random Fields (DCRFs). Our DCRFs model has a repeated structure of temporally connected Conditional Random Fields (CRFs). Each node in the sequence is connected to its predecessor via conditional probability matrix. The matrix is computed using posterior class probabilities from association potential. This way, there is a mutual temporal exchange of phenological information observed in TerraSAR-X images. When compared to independent epoch classification, the designed DCRF model improved crop discrimination at each epoch in the sequence. However, government, insurers, agricultural market traders and other stakeholders are interested in the quantity of a certain crop in a season. Therefore, we further develop a DCRF ensemble classifier. The ensemble produces an optimal crop map by maximizing over posterior class probabilities selected from the sequence based on maximum F1-score and weighted by correctness. Our ensemble technique is compared to standard approach of stacking all images as bands for classification using Maximum Likelihood Classifier (MLC) and standard CRFs. It

  4. A consensus linkage map for sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) from two pedigrees, based on microsatellites and expressed sequence tags.

    PubMed

    Tani, Naoki; Takahashi, Tomokazu; Iwata, Hiroyoshi; Mukai, Yuzuru; Ujino-Ihara, Tokuko; Matsumoto, Asako; Yoshimura, Kensuke; Yoshimaru, Hiroshi; Murai, Masafumi; Nagasaka, Kazutoshi; Tsumura, Yoshihiko

    2003-11-01

    A consensus map for sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) was constructed by integrating linkage data from two unrelated third-generation pedigrees, one derived from a full-sib cross and the other by self-pollination of F1 individuals. The progeny segregation data of the first pedigree were derived from cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences, microsatellites, restriction fragment length polymorphisms, and single nucleotide polymorphisms. The data of the second pedigree were derived from cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences, isozyme markers, morphological traits, random amplified polymorphic DNA markers, and restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Linkage analyses were done for the first pedigree with JoinMap 3.0, using its parameter set for progeny derived by cross-pollination, and for the second pedigree with the parameter set for progeny derived from selfing of F1 individuals. The 11 chromosomes of C. japonica are represented in the consensus map. A total of 438 markers were assigned to 11 large linkage groups, 1 small linkage group, and 1 nonintegrated linkage group from the second pedigree; their total length was 1372.2 cM. On average, the consensus map showed 1 marker every 3.0 cM. PCR-based codominant DNA markers such as cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences and microsatellite markers were distributed in all linkage groups and occupied about half of mapped loci. These markers are very useful for integration of different linkage maps, QTL mapping, and comparative mapping for evolutional study, especially for species with a large genome size such as conifers.

  5. A high-density genetic map of cucumber derived from Specific Length Amplified Fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuewen; Xu, Ruixue; Zhu, Biyun; Yu, Ting; Qu, Wenqin; Lu, Lu; Xu, Qiang; Qi, Xiaohua; Chen, Xuehao

    2015-01-01

    High-density genetic map provides an essential framework for accurate and efficient genome assembly and QTL fine mapping. Construction of high-density genetic maps appears more feasible since the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS), which eases SNP discovery and high-throughput genotyping of large population. In this research, a high-density genetic map of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) was successfully constructed across an F2 population by a recently developed Specific Length Amplified Fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) method. In total, 18.69 GB of data containing 93,460,000 paired-end reads were obtained after preprocessing. The average sequencing depth was 44.92 in the D8 (female parent), 42.16 in the Jin5-508 (male parent), and 5.01 in each progeny. 79,092 high-quality SLAFs were detected, of which 6784 SLAFs were polymorphic, and 1892 of the polymorphic markers met the requirements for constructing genetic map. The genetic map spanned 845.87 cm with an average genetic distance of 0.45 cm. It is a reliable linkage map for fine mapping and molecular breeding of cucumber for its high marker density and well-ordered markers. PMID:25610449

  6. A de novo next generation genomic sequence assembler based on string graph and MapReduce cloud computing framework

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background State-of-the-art high-throughput sequencers, e.g., the Illumina HiSeq series, generate sequencing reads that are longer than 150 bp up to a total of 600 Gbp of data per run. The high-throughput sequencers generate lengthier reads with greater sequencing depth than those generated by previous technologies. Two major challenges exist in using the high-throughput technology for de novo assembly of genomes. First, the amount of physical memory may be insufficient to store the data structure of the assembly algorithm, even for high-end multicore processors. Moreover, the graph-theoretical model used to capture intersection relationships of the reads may contain structural defects that are not well managed by existing assembly algorithms. Results We developed a distributed genome assembler based on string graphs and MapReduce framework, known as the CloudBrush. The assembler includes a novel edge-adjustment algorithm to detect structural defects by examining the neighboring reads of a specific read for sequencing errors and adjusting the edges of the string graph, if necessary. CloudBrush is evaluated against GAGE benchmarks to compare its assembly quality with the other assemblers. The results show that our assemblies have a moderate N50, a low misassembly rate of misjoins, and indels of > 5 bp. In addition, we have introduced two measures, known as precision and recall, to address the issues of faithfully aligned contigs to target genomes. Compared with the assembly tools used in the GAGE benchmarks, CloudBrush is shown to produce contigs with high precision and recall. We also verified the effectiveness of the edge-adjustment algorithm using simulated datasets and ran CloudBrush on a nematode dataset using a commercial cloud. CloudBrush assembler is available at https://github.com/ice91/CloudBrush. PMID:23282094

  7. Transposon Tc1-derived, sequence-tagged sites in Caenorhabditis elegans as markers for gene mapping

    PubMed Central

    Korswagen, Hendrik C.; Durbin, Richard M.; Smits, Miriam T.; Plasterk, Ronald H. A.

    1996-01-01

    We present an approach to map large numbers of Tc1 transposon insertions in the genome of Caenorhabditis elegans. Strains have been described that contain up to 500 polymorphic Tc1 insertions. From these we have cloned and shotgun sequenced over 2000 Tc1 flanks, resulting in an estimated set of 400 or more distinct Tc1 insertion alleles. Alignment of these sequences revealed a weak Tc1 insertion site consensus sequence that was symmetric around the invariant TA target site and reads CAYATATRTG. The Tc1 flanking sequences were compared with 40 Mbp of a C. elegans genome sequence. We found 151 insertions within the sequenced area, a density of ≈1 Tc1 insertion in every 265 kb. As the rest of the C. elegans genome sequence is obtained, remaining Tc1 alleles will fall into place. These mapped Tc1 insertions can serve two functions: (i) insertions in or near genes can be used to isolate deletion derivatives that have that gene mutated; and (ii) they represent a dense collection of polymorphic sequence-tagged sites. We demonstrate a strategy to use these Tc1 sequence-tagged sites in fine-mapping mutations. PMID:8962114

  8. A high-density gene map of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) based on exome sequence capture genotyping.

    PubMed

    Neves, Leandro Gomide; Davis, John M; Barbazuk, William B; Kirst, Matias

    2014-01-10

    Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) is an economically and ecologically important conifer for which a suite of genomic resources is being generated. Despite recent attempts to sequence the large genome of conifers, their assembly and the positioning of genes remains largely incomplete. The interspecific synteny in pines suggests that a gene-based map would be useful to support genome assemblies and analysis of conifers. To establish a reference gene-based genetic map, we performed exome sequencing of 14729 genes on a mapping population of 72 haploid samples, generating a resource of 7434 sequence variants segregating for 3787 genes. Most markers are single-nucleotide polymorphisms, although short insertions/deletions and multiple nucleotide polymorphisms also were used. Marker segregation in the population was used to generate a high-density, gene-based genetic map. A total of 2841 genes were mapped to pine's 12 linkage groups with an average of one marker every 0.58 cM. Capture data were used to detect gene presence/absence variations and position 65 genes on the map. We compared the marker order of genes previously mapped in loblolly pine and found high agreement. We estimated that 4123 genes had enough sequencing depth for reliable detection of markers, suggesting a high marker conversation rate of 92% (3787/4123). This is possible because a significant portion of the gene is captured and sequenced, increasing the chances of identifying a polymorphic site for characterization and mapping. This sub-centiMorgan genetic map provides a valuable resource for gene positioning on chromosomes and guide for the assembly of a reference pine genome.

  9. Genome-Wide Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms Discovery and High-Density Genetic Map Construction in Cauliflower Using Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenqing; Gu, Honghui; Sheng, Xiaoguang; Yu, Huifang; Wang, Jiansheng; Huang, Long; Wang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Molecular markers and genetic maps play an important role in plant genomics and breeding studies. Cauliflower is an important and distinctive vegetable; however, very few molecular resources have been reported for this species. In this study, a novel, specific-locus amplified fragment (SLAF) sequencing strategy was employed for large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery and high-density genetic map construction in a double-haploid, segregating population of cauliflower. A total of 12.47 Gb raw data containing 77.92 M pair-end reads were obtained after processing and 6815 polymorphic SLAFs between the two parents were detected. The average sequencing depths reached 52.66-fold for the female parent and 49.35-fold for the male parent. Subsequently, these polymorphic SLAFs were used to genotype the population and further filtered based on several criteria to construct a genetic linkage map of cauliflower. Finally, 1776 high-quality SLAF markers, including 2741 SNPs, constituted the linkage map with average data integrity of 95.68%. The final map spanned a total genetic length of 890.01 cM with an average marker interval of 0.50 cM, and covered 364.9 Mb of the reference genome. The markers and genetic map developed in this study could provide an important foundation not only for comparative genomics studies within Brassica oleracea species but also for quantitative trait loci identification and molecular breeding of cauliflower.

  10. The Genome Analysis Toolkit: a MapReduce framework for analyzing next-generation DNA sequencing data.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Aaron; Hanna, Matthew; Banks, Eric; Sivachenko, Andrey; Cibulskis, Kristian; Kernytsky, Andrew; Garimella, Kiran; Altshuler, David; Gabriel, Stacey; Daly, Mark; DePristo, Mark A

    2010-09-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) projects, such as the 1000 Genomes Project, are already revolutionizing our understanding of genetic variation among individuals. However, the massive data sets generated by NGS--the 1000 Genome pilot alone includes nearly five terabases--make writing feature-rich, efficient, and robust analysis tools difficult for even computationally sophisticated individuals. Indeed, many professionals are limited in the scope and the ease with which they can answer scientific questions by the complexity of accessing and manipulating the data produced by these machines. Here, we discuss our Genome Analysis Toolkit (GATK), a structured programming framework designed to ease the development of efficient and robust analysis tools for next-generation DNA sequencers using the functional programming philosophy of MapReduce. The GATK provides a small but rich set of data access patterns that encompass the majority of analysis tool needs. Separating specific analysis calculations from common data management infrastructure enables us to optimize the GATK framework for correctness, stability, and CPU and memory efficiency and to enable distributed and shared memory parallelization. We highlight the capabilities of the GATK by describing the implementation and application of robust, scale-tolerant tools like coverage calculators and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) calling. We conclude that the GATK programming framework enables developers and analysts to quickly and easily write efficient and robust NGS tools, many of which have already been incorporated into large-scale sequencing projects like the 1000 Genomes Project and The Cancer Genome Atlas.

  11. Successful cord blood transplantation for a CHARGE syndrome with CHD7 mutation showing DiGeorge sequence including hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hirosuke; Takada, Hidetoshi; Kusuda, Takeshi; Goto, Takako; Ochiai, Masayuki; Kinjo, Tadamune; Muneuchi, Jun; Takahata, Yasushi; Takahashi, Naomi; Morio, Tomohiro; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Hara, Toshiro

    2010-07-01

    It is rare that coloboma, heart anomalies, choanal atresia, retarded growth and development, and genital and ear anomalies (CHARGE) syndrome patients have DiGeorge sequence showing severe immunodeficiency due to the defect of the thymus. Although the only treatment to achieve immunological recovery for these patients in countries where thymic transplantation is not ethically approved would be hematopoietic cell transplantation, long-term survival has not been obtained in most patients. On the other hand, it is still not clarified whether hypoparathyroidism is one of the manifestations of CHARGE syndrome. We observed a CHARGE syndrome patient with chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7 mutation showing DiGeorge sequence including the defect of T cells accompanied with the aplasia of the thymus, severe hypoparathyroidism, and conotruncal cardiac anomaly. He received unrelated cord blood transplantation without conditioning at 4 months of age. Recovery of T cell number and of proliferative response against mitogens was achieved by peripheral expansion of mature T cells in cord blood without thymic output. Although he is still suffering from severe hypoparathyroidism, he is alive without serious infections for 10 months.

  12. HBLAST: Parallelised sequence similarity--A Hadoop MapReducable basic local alignment search tool.

    PubMed

    O'Driscoll, Aisling; Belogrudov, Vladislav; Carroll, John; Kropp, Kai; Walsh, Paul; Ghazal, Peter; Sleator, Roy D

    2015-04-01

    The recent exponential growth of genomic databases has resulted in the common task of sequence alignment becoming one of the major bottlenecks in the field of computational biology. It is typical for these large datasets and complex computations to require cost prohibitive High Performance Computing (HPC) to function. As such, parallelised solutions have been proposed but many exhibit scalability limitations and are incapable of effectively processing "Big Data" - the name attributed to datasets that are extremely large, complex and require rapid processing. The Hadoop framework, comprised of distributed storage and a parallelised programming framework known as MapReduce, is specifically designed to work with such datasets but it is not trivial to efficiently redesign and implement bioinformatics algorithms according to this paradigm. The parallelisation strategy of "divide and conquer" for alignment algorithms can be applied to both data sets and input query sequences. However, scalability is still an issue due to memory constraints or large databases, with very large database segmentation leading to additional performance decline. Herein, we present Hadoop Blast (HBlast), a parallelised BLAST algorithm that proposes a flexible method to partition both databases and input query sequences using "virtual partitioning". HBlast presents improved scalability over existing solutions and well balanced computational work load while keeping database segmentation and recompilation to a minimum. Enhanced BLAST search performance on cheap memory constrained hardware has significant implications for in field clinical diagnostic testing; enabling faster and more accurate identification of pathogenic DNA in human blood or tissue samples.

  13. Mapping vaccinia virus DNA replication origins at nucleotide level by deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Senkevich, Tatiana G; Bruno, Daniel; Martens, Craig; Porcella, Stephen F; Wolf, Yuri I; Moss, Bernard

    2015-09-01

    Poxviruses reproduce in the host cytoplasm and encode most or all of the enzymes and factors needed for expression and synthesis of their double-stranded DNA genomes. Nevertheless, the mode of poxvirus DNA replication and the nature and location of the replication origins remain unknown. A current but unsubstantiated model posits only leading strand synthesis starting at a nick near one covalently closed end of the genome and continuing around the other end to generate a concatemer that is subsequently resolved into unit genomes. The existence of specific origins has been questioned because any plasmid can replicate in cells infected by vaccinia virus (VACV), the prototype poxvirus. We applied directional deep sequencing of short single-stranded DNA fragments enriched for RNA-primed nascent strands isolated from the cytoplasm of VACV-infected cells to pinpoint replication origins. The origins were identified as the switching points of the fragment directions, which correspond to the transition from continuous to discontinuous DNA synthesis. Origins containing a prominent initiation point mapped to a sequence within the hairpin loop at one end of the VACV genome and to the same sequence within the concatemeric junction of replication intermediates. These findings support a model for poxvirus genome replication that involves leading and lagging strand synthesis and is consistent with the requirements for primase and ligase activities as well as earlier electron microscopic and biochemical studies implicating a replication origin at the end of the VACV genome.

  14. Refined mapping of X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder and sequencing of candidate genes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder with systemic manifestations in males (PDR) is very rare. Affected males are characterized by cutaneous and visceral symptoms suggestive of abnormally regulated inXammation. A genetic linkage study of a large Canadian kindred previously mapped the PDR gene to a greater than 40 Mb interval of Xp22–p21. The aim of this study was to identify the causative gene for PDR. The Canadian pedigree was expanded and additional PDR families recruited. Genetic linkage was performed using newer microsatellite markers. Positional and functional candidate genes were screened by PCR and sequencing of coding exons in affected males. The location of the PDR gene was narrowed to a ~4.9 Mb interval of Xp22.11–p21.3 between markers DXS1052 and DXS1061. All annotated coding exons within this interval were sequenced in one affected male from each of the three multiplex families as well as one singleton, but no causative mutation was identiWed. Sequencing of other X-linked genes outside of the linked interval also failed to identify the cause of PDR but revealed a novel nonsynonymous cSNP in the GRPR gene in the Maltese population. PDR is most likely due to a mutation within the linked interval not affecting currently annotated coding exons. PMID:18404279

  15. A High-Density SNP-Based Linkage Map of the Chicken Genome Reveals Sequence Features Correlated With Recombination Rate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The resolution of the widely used chicken consensus linkage map was highly enlarged by genotyping a total of 12,945 SNPs on the three existing mapping populations in chicken; the Wageningen (WU), East Lansing (EL) and Uppsala (UPP) mapping populations. A total of 8608 SNPs could be included on the m...

  16. Application of the High Resolution Melting analysis for genetic mapping of Sequence Tagged Site markers in narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.).

    PubMed

    Kamel, Katarzyna A; Kroc, Magdalena; Święcicki, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Sequence tagged site (STS) markers are valuable tools for genetic and physical mapping that can be successfully used in comparative analyses among related species. Current challenges for molecular markers genotyping in plants include the lack of fast, sensitive and inexpensive methods suitable for sequence variant detection. In contrast, high resolution melting (HRM) is a simple and high-throughput assay, which has been widely applied in sequence polymorphism identification as well as in the studies of genetic variability and genotyping. The present study is the first attempt to use the HRM analysis to genotype STS markers in narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.). The sensitivity and utility of this method was confirmed by the sequence polymorphism detection based on melting curve profiles in the parental genotypes and progeny of the narrow-leafed lupin mapping population. Application of different approaches, including amplicon size and a simulated heterozygote analysis, has allowed for successful genetic mapping of 16 new STS markers in the narrow-leafed lupin genome.

  17. Drawing a high-resolution functional map of adeno-associated virus capsid by massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Kei; Enoki, Tatsuji; Kawano, Yasuhiro; Veraz, Michael; Nakai, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsid engineering is an emerging approach to advance gene therapy. However, a systematic analysis on how each capsid amino acid contributes to multiple functions remains challenging. Here we show proof-of-principle and successful application of a novel approach, termed AAV Barcode-Seq, that allows us to characterize phenotypes of hundreds of different AAV strains in a high-throughput manner and therefore overcomes technical difficulties in the systematic analysis. In this approach, we generate DNA barcode-tagged AAV libraries and determine a spectrum of phenotypes of each AAV strain by Illumina barcode sequencing. By applying this method to AAV capsid mutant libraries tagged with DNA barcodes, we can draw a high-resolution map of AAV capsid amino acids important for the structural integrity and functions including receptor binding, tropism, neutralization and blood clearance. Thus, Barcode-Seq provides a new tool to generate a valuable resource for virus and gene therapy research.

  18. The Iccare web server: an attempt to merge sequence and mapping information for plant and animal species.

    PubMed

    Muller, Cédric; Denis, Mathieu; Gentzbittel, Laurent; Faraut, Thomas

    2004-07-01

    The Iccare web server, http://genopole.toulouse.inra.fr/bioinfo/Iccare, provides a simple yet efficient tool for crude EST (expressed sequence tag) annotation specifically dedicated to comparative mapping approaches. Iccare uses all the EST and mRNA sequences from public databases for an organism of interest (query species) and compares them to all the transcripts of one reference organism (Homo sapiens or Arabidopsis thaliana). The results are displayed according to the location of the genes on the chromosomes of the reference organism. Gene structure information and sequence similarities are combined in a graphical representation in order to pinpoint the nature of the transcript query sequence. The user can subsequently design primers or probes for the purpose of physical or genetic mapping. In addition to the query organisms already available in Iccare, users can perform a tailor-made search with their own sequences against the animal or plant reference organism genes.

  19. Microbial genome program report: Optical approaches for physical mapping and sequence assembly of the Deinococcus radiodurans chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, David C.

    1999-11-23

    Maps of genomic or cloned DNA are frequently constructed by analyzing the cleavage patterns produced by restriction enzymes. Restriction enzymes are remarkable reagents that faithfully cleave only at specific sequences of between 4 and 8 nucleotides, which vary according to the specific enzymes. Restriction enzymes are reliable, numerous, and easily obtainable and presently, there are approximately 250 different sequences represented among thousands of enzymes. Restriction maps characterize gene structure and even entire genomes. Furthermore, such maps provide a useful scaffold for the alignment and verification of sequence data. Restriction maps generated by computer and predicted from the sequence are aligned with the actual restriction map. Restriction enzyme action has traditionally been assayed by gel electrophoresis. This technique separates cleaved molecules on the basis of their nobilities under the influence of an applied electrical field, within a gel separation matrix (small fragments have a greater mobility than large ones). Although gel electrophoresis distinguishes different sized DNA fragments (known as a fingerprint), the original order of these fragments remains unknown. The subsequent task of determining the order of such fragments is a labor intensive task, especially when making restriction maps of whole genomes, and therefore despite its obvious utility to genome analysis, it is not widely used.

  20. Read-mapping using personalized diploid reference genome for RNA sequencing data reduced bias for detecting allele-specific expression

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shuai; Qin, Zhaohui

    2014-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have been applied extensively in many areas of genetics and genomics research. A fundamental problem when comes to analyzing NGS data is mapping short sequencing reads back to the reference genome. Most of existing software packages rely on a single uniform reference genome and do not automatically take into the consideration of genetic variants. On the other hand, large proportions of incorrectly mapped reads affect the correct interpretation of the NGS experimental results. As an example, Degner et al. showed that detecting allele-specific expression from RNA sequencing data was biased toward the reference allele. In this study, we developed a method that utilize DirectX 11 enabled graphics processing unit (GPU)’s parallel computing power to produces a personalized diploid reference genome based on all known genetic variants of that particular individual. We show that using such a personalized diploid reference genome can improve mapping accuracy and significantly reduce the bias toward reference allele in allele-specific expression analysis. Our method can be applied to any individual that has genotype information obtained either from array-based genotyping or resequencing. Besides the reference genome, no additional changes to alignment algorithm are needed for performing read mapping therefore one can utilize any of the existing read mapping tools and achieve the improved read mapping result. C++ and GPU compute shader source code of the software program is available at: http://code.google.com/p/diploid-mapping/downloads/list. PMID:25621316

  1. Read-mapping using personalized diploid reference genome for RNA sequencing data reduced bias for detecting allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuai; Qin, Zhaohui

    2012-10-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have been applied extensively in many areas of genetics and genomics research. A fundamental problem when comes to analyzing NGS data is mapping short sequencing reads back to the reference genome. Most of existing software packages rely on a single uniform reference genome and do not automatically take into the consideration of genetic variants. On the other hand, large proportions of incorrectly mapped reads affect the correct interpretation of the NGS experimental results. As an example, Degner et al. showed that detecting allele-specific expression from RNA sequencing data was biased toward the reference allele. In this study, we developed a method that utilize DirectX 11 enabled graphics processing unit (GPU)'s parallel computing power to produces a personalized diploid reference genome based on all known genetic variants of that particular individual. We show that using such a personalized diploid reference genome can improve mapping accuracy and significantly reduce the bias toward reference allele in allele-specific expression analysis. Our method can be applied to any individual that has genotype information obtained either from array-based genotyping or resequencing. Besides the reference genome, no additional changes to alignment algorithm are needed for performing read mapping therefore one can utilize any of the existing read mapping tools and achieve the improved read mapping result. C++ and GPU compute shader source code of the software program is available at: http://code.google.com/p/diploid-mapping/downloads/list.

  2. Mapping specificity landscapes of RNA-protein interactions by high throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Jankowsky, Eckhard; Harris, Michael E

    2017-03-02

    To function in a biological setting, RNA binding proteins (RBPs) have to discriminate between alternative binding sites in RNAs. This discrimination can occur in the ground state of an RNA-protein binding reaction, in its transition state, or in both. The extent by which RBPs discriminate at these reaction states defines RBP specificity landscapes. Here, we describe the HiTS-Kin and HiTS-EQ techniques, which combine kinetic and equilibrium binding experiments with high throughput sequencing to quantitatively assess substrate discrimination for large numbers of substrate variants at ground and transition states of RNA-protein binding reactions. We discuss experimental design, practical considerations and data analysis and outline how a combination of HiTS-Kin and HiTS-EQ allows the mapping of RBP specificity landscapes.

  3. Mapping of attenuating sequences of an avirulent poliovirus type 2 strain.

    PubMed

    Moss, E G; O'Neill, R E; Racaniello, V R

    1989-05-01

    A mouse model for poliomyelitis was used to identify genomic sequences that attenuate neurovirulence of poliovirus strain P2/P712. This type 2 strain is avirulent in primates and mice yet grows as well as virulent strains in cell culture. The approach used was to exchange portions of the genome of the mouse-virulent P2/Lansing strain with the corresponding region from P2/P712 to identify sequences that could attenuate Lansing neurovirulence in mice. A full-length infectious cDNA of P2/P712 was assembled and used to construct recombinants between P2/P712 and P2/Lansing. The results of neurovirulence testing of 11 recombinants indicated that strong attenuating determinants are located in the 5' noncoding region of P2/P712 and a region encoding capsid protein VP1 and 2Apro, 2B, and part of 2C. An attenuating determinant was further localized to between nucleotides 456 and 628 of P2/P712. A third sequence from P2/P712, nucleotides 752 to 2268, encoding VP4, VP2, and part of VP3, was weakly attenuating. The sequence from nucleotide 4454, approximately halfway through the 2C-coding region, to the end of the P2/P712 genome did not contain attenuating determinants. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that P2/P712 differs from the type 2 Sabin vaccine strain by only 22 nucleotides. Six differences lead to amino acid changes in the coding region, and four differences are in the 5' noncoding region. These studies show that, like the type 1 and type 3 Sabin vaccine strains, the attenuated type 2 strain P712 contains multiple attenuating sequences, including strongly attenuating sequences in the 5' noncoding region of the genome.

  4. Mapping DNA methylation by transverse current sequencing: Reduction of noise from neighboring nucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Jose; Massey, Steven; Kalitsov, Alan; Velev, Julian

    Nanopore sequencing via transverse current has emerged as a competitive candidate for mapping DNA methylation without needed bisulfite-treatment, fluorescent tag, or PCR amplification. By eliminating the error producing amplification step, long read lengths become feasible, which greatly simplifies the assembly process and reduces the time and the cost inherent in current technologies. However, due to the large error rates of nanopore sequencing, single base resolution has not been reached. A very important source of noise is the intrinsic structural noise in the electric signature of the nucleotide arising from the influence of neighboring nucleotides. In this work we perform calculations of the tunneling current through DNA molecules in nanopores using the non-equilibrium electron transport method within an effective multi-orbital tight-binding model derived from first-principles calculations. We develop a base-calling algorithm accounting for the correlations of the current through neighboring bases, which in principle can reduce the error rate below any desired precision. Using this method we show that we can clearly distinguish DNA methylation and other base modifications based on the reading of the tunneling current.

  5. The Genomic Scrapheap Challenge; Extracting Relevant Data from Unmapped Whole Genome Sequencing Reads, Including Strain Specific Genomic Segments, in Rats

    PubMed Central

    van der Weide, Robin H.; Simonis, Marieke; Hermsen, Roel; Toonen, Pim; Cuppen, Edwin; de Ligt, Joep

    2016-01-01

    Unmapped next-generation sequencing reads are typically ignored while they contain biologically relevant information. We systematically analyzed unmapped reads from whole genome sequencing of 33 inbred rat strains. High quality reads were selected and enriched for biologically relevant sequences; similarity-based analysis revealed clustering similar to previously reported phylogenetic trees. Our results demonstrate that on average 20% of all unmapped reads harbor sequences that can be used to improve reference genomes and generate hypotheses on potential genotype-phenotype relationships. Analysis pipelines would benefit from incorporating the described methods and reference genomes would benefit from inclusion of the genomic segments obtained through these efforts. PMID:27501045

  6. The Genomic Scrapheap Challenge; Extracting Relevant Data from Unmapped Whole Genome Sequencing Reads, Including Strain Specific Genomic Segments, in Rats.

    PubMed

    van der Weide, Robin H; Simonis, Marieke; Hermsen, Roel; Toonen, Pim; Cuppen, Edwin; de Ligt, Joep

    2016-01-01

    Unmapped next-generation sequencing reads are typically ignored while they contain biologically relevant information. We systematically analyzed unmapped reads from whole genome sequencing of 33 inbred rat strains. High quality reads were selected and enriched for biologically relevant sequences; similarity-based analysis revealed clustering similar to previously reported phylogenetic trees. Our results demonstrate that on average 20% of all unmapped reads harbor sequences that can be used to improve reference genomes and generate hypotheses on potential genotype-phenotype relationships. Analysis pipelines would benefit from incorporating the described methods and reference genomes would benefit from inclusion of the genomic segments obtained through these efforts.

  7. Integrated Georeferencing of Stereo Image Sequences Captured with a Stereovision Mobile Mapping System - Approaches and Practical Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugster, H.; Huber, F.; Nebiker, S.; Gisi, A.

    2012-07-01

    Stereovision based mobile mapping systems enable the efficient capturing of directly georeferenced stereo pairs. With today's camera and onboard storage technologies imagery can be captured at high data rates resulting in dense stereo sequences. These georeferenced stereo sequences provide a highly detailed and accurate digital representation of the roadside environment which builds the foundation for a wide range of 3d mapping applications and image-based geo web-services. Georeferenced stereo images are ideally suited for the 3d mapping of street furniture and visible infrastructure objects, pavement inspection, asset management tasks or image based change detection. As in most mobile mapping systems, the georeferencing of the mapping sensors and observations - in our case of the imaging sensors - normally relies on direct georeferencing based on INS/GNSS navigation sensors. However, in urban canyons the achievable direct georeferencing accuracy of the dynamically captured stereo image sequences is often insufficient or at least degraded. Furthermore, many of the mentioned application scenarios require homogeneous georeferencing accuracy within a local reference frame over the entire mapping perimeter. To achieve these demands georeferencing approaches are presented and cost efficient workflows are discussed which allows validating and updating the INS/GNSS based trajectory with independently estimated positions in cases of prolonged GNSS signal outages in order to increase the georeferencing accuracy up to the project requirements.

  8. Whole-genome shotgun optical mapping of Rhodobacter sphaeroides strain 2.4. 1 and its use for whole-genome shotgun sequence assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Shou, S.; Kvikstad, E.; Kile, A.; Severin, J.; Forrest, D.; Runnheim, R.; Churas, C.; Hickman, J. W.; Mackenzie, C.; Choudhary, M.; Donohue, T.; Kaplan, S.; Schwartz, D. C.

    2003-09-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 is a facultative photoheterotrophic bacterium with tremendous metabolic diversity, which has significantly contributed to our understanding of the molecular genetics of photosynthesis, photoheterotrophy, nitrogen fixation, hydrogen metabolism, carbon dioxide fixation, taxis, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis. To further understand this remarkable bacterium, and to accelerate an ongoing sequencing project, two whole-genome restriction maps (EcoRI and HindIII) of R. sphaeroides strain 2.4.1 were constructed using shotgun optical mapping. The approach directly mapped genomic DNA by the random mapping of single molecules. The two maps were used to facilitate sequence assembly by providing an optical scaffold for high-resolution alignment and verification of sequence contigs. Our results show that such maps facilitated the closure of sequence gaps by the early detection of nascent sequence contigs during the course of the whole-genome shotgun sequencing process.

  9. AlignerBoost: A Generalized Software Toolkit for Boosting Next-Gen Sequencing Mapping Accuracy Using a Bayesian-Based Mapping Quality Framework

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qi; Grice, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate mapping of next-generation sequencing (NGS) reads to reference genomes is crucial for almost all NGS applications and downstream analyses. Various repetitive elements in human and other higher eukaryotic genomes contribute in large part to ambiguously (non-uniquely) mapped reads. Most available NGS aligners attempt to address this by either removing all non-uniquely mapping reads, or reporting one random or "best" hit based on simple heuristics. Accurate estimation of the mapping quality of NGS reads is therefore critical albeit completely lacking at present. Here we developed a generalized software toolkit "AlignerBoost", which utilizes a Bayesian-based framework to accurately estimate mapping quality of ambiguously mapped NGS reads. We tested AlignerBoost with both simulated and real DNA-seq and RNA-seq datasets at various thresholds. In most cases, but especially for reads falling within repetitive regions, AlignerBoost dramatically increases the mapping precision of modern NGS aligners without significantly compromising the sensitivity even without mapping quality filters. When using higher mapping quality cutoffs, AlignerBoost achieves a much lower false mapping rate while exhibiting comparable or higher sensitivity compared to the aligner default modes, therefore significantly boosting the detection power of NGS aligners even using extreme thresholds. AlignerBoost is also SNP-aware, and higher quality alignments can be achieved if provided with known SNPs. AlignerBoost’s algorithm is computationally efficient, and can process one million alignments within 30 seconds on a typical desktop computer. AlignerBoost is implemented as a uniform Java application and is freely available at https://github.com/Grice-Lab/AlignerBoost. PMID:27706155

  10. SHARAKU: an algorithm for aligning and clustering read mapping profiles of deep sequencing in non-coding RNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Mariko; Amano, Kojiro; Abe, Masaya; Seki, Misato; Hase, Sumitaka; Sato, Kengo; Sakakibara, Yasubumi

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Deep sequencing of the transcripts of regulatory non-coding RNA generates footprints of post-transcriptional processes. After obtaining sequence reads, the short reads are mapped to a reference genome, and specific mapping patterns can be detected called read mapping profiles, which are distinct from random non-functional degradation patterns. These patterns reflect the maturation processes that lead to the production of shorter RNA sequences. Recent next-generation sequencing studies have revealed not only the typical maturation process of miRNAs but also the various processing mechanisms of small RNAs derived from tRNAs and snoRNAs. Results: We developed an algorithm termed SHARAKU to align two read mapping profiles of next-generation sequencing outputs for non-coding RNAs. In contrast with previous work, SHARAKU incorporates the primary and secondary sequence structures into an alignment of read mapping profiles to allow for the detection of common processing patterns. Using a benchmark simulated dataset, SHARAKU exhibited superior performance to previous methods for correctly clustering the read mapping profiles with respect to 5′-end processing and 3′-end processing from degradation patterns and in detecting similar processing patterns in deriving the shorter RNAs. Further, using experimental data of small RNA sequencing for the common marmoset brain, SHARAKU succeeded in identifying the significant clusters of read mapping profiles for similar processing patterns of small derived RNA families expressed in the brain. Availability and Implementation: The source code of our program SHARAKU is available at http://www.dna.bio.keio.ac.jp/sharaku/, and the simulated dataset used in this work is available at the same link. Accession code: The sequence data from the whole RNA transcripts in the hippocampus of the left brain used in this work is available from the DNA DataBank of Japan (DDBJ) Sequence Read Archive (DRA) under the accession number DRA

  11. Genotyping by Sequencing Using Specific Allelic Capture to Build a High-Density Genetic Map of Durum Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Holtz, Yan; Ardisson, Morgane; Ranwez, Vincent; Besnard, Alban; Leroy, Philippe; Poux, Gérard; Roumet, Pierre; Viader, Véronique; Santoni, Sylvain; David, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Targeted sequence capture is a promising technology which helps reduce costs for sequencing and genotyping numerous genomic regions in large sets of individuals. Bait sequences are designed to capture specific alleles previously discovered in parents or reference populations. We studied a set of 135 RILs originating from a cross between an emmer cultivar (Dic2) and a recent durum elite cultivar (Silur). Six thousand sequence baits were designed to target Dic2 vs. Silur polymorphisms discovered in a previous RNAseq study. These baits were exposed to genomic DNA of the RIL population. Eighty percent of the targeted SNPs were recovered, 65% of which were of high quality and coverage. The final high density genetic map consisted of more than 3,000 markers, whose genetic and physical mapping were consistent with those obtained with large arrays. PMID:27171472

  12. Genotyping by Sequencing Using Specific Allelic Capture to Build a High-Density Genetic Map of Durum Wheat.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Yan; Ardisson, Morgane; Ranwez, Vincent; Besnard, Alban; Leroy, Philippe; Poux, Gérard; Roumet, Pierre; Viader, Véronique; Santoni, Sylvain; David, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Targeted sequence capture is a promising technology which helps reduce costs for sequencing and genotyping numerous genomic regions in large sets of individuals. Bait sequences are designed to capture specific alleles previously discovered in parents or reference populations. We studied a set of 135 RILs originating from a cross between an emmer cultivar (Dic2) and a recent durum elite cultivar (Silur). Six thousand sequence baits were designed to target Dic2 vs. Silur polymorphisms discovered in a previous RNAseq study. These baits were exposed to genomic DNA of the RIL population. Eighty percent of the targeted SNPs were recovered, 65% of which were of high quality and coverage. The final high density genetic map consisted of more than 3,000 markers, whose genetic and physical mapping were consistent with those obtained with large arrays.

  13. Sequenced Alleles of the Caenorhabditis Elegans Sex-Determining Gene Her-1 Include a Novel Class of Conditional Promoter Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Perry, M. D.; Trent, C.; Robertson, B.; Chamblin, C.; Wood, W. B.

    1994-01-01

    In the control of Caenorhabditis elegans sex determination, the her-1 gene must normally be activated to allow male development of XO animals and deactivated to allow hermaphrodite development of XX animals. The gene is regulated at the transcriptional level and has two nested male-specific transcripts. The larger of these encodes a small, novel, cysteine-rich protein responsible for masculinizing activity. Of the 32 extant mutant alleles, 30 cause partial or complete loss of masculinizing function (lf), while 2 are gain-of-function (gf) alleles resulting in abnormal masculinization of XX animals. We have identified the DNA sequence changes in each of these 32 alleles. Most affect the protein coding functions of the gene, but six are in the promoter region, including the two gf mutations. These two mutations may define a binding site for negative regulators of her-1. Three of the four remaining promoter mutations are single base changes that cause, surprisingly, temperature-sensitive loss of her-1 function. Such conditional promoter mutations have previously not been found among either prokaryotic or eukaryotic mutants analyzed at the molecular level. PMID:7828816

  14. Walking, cloning, and mapping with YACs in 3q27: Localization of five ESTs including three members of the cystatin gene family and identification of CpG islands

    SciTech Connect

    James, L.A.; Ogilvie, D.J.; Anand, R.

    1996-03-05

    Using yeast artificial chromosomes, we have generated a high-resolution physical map for 2.7 Mb of human chromosomal region 3q27. The YAC clones group into three contigs, one of which has also been linked to the CEPH YAC contig map of human chromosome 3. Fluorescence in situ hybridization has been used to order the contigs on the chromosome and to estimate the distance between them. Expressed sequence tags for five genes, including three members of the cystatin gene family and a gene thought to be involved in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, have been placed within the YAC contigs, and 12 putative CpG islands have been identified. These YACs provide a useful resource to complete the physical mapping of 3q27 and to begin identification and characterization of further genes that are located there. 27 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. A nonhomogeneous hidden markov model for gene mapping based on next-generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Ghavidel, Fatemeh Zamanzad; Claesen, Jürgen; Burzykowski, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    The analysis of polygenetic characteristics for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) remains an important challenge. QTL analysis requires two or more strains of organisms that differ substantially in the (poly-)genetic trait of interest, resulting in a heterozygous offspring. The offspring with the trait of interest is selected and subsequently screened for molecular markers such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with next-generation sequencing. Gene mapping relies on the co-segregation between genes and/or markers. Genes and/or markers that are linked to a QTL influencing the trait will segregate more frequently with this locus. For each identified marker, observed mismatch frequencies between the reads of the offspring and the parental reference strains can be modeled by a multinomial distribution with the probabilities depending on the state of an underlying, unobserved Markov process. The states indicate whether the SNP is located in a (vicinity of a) QTL or not. Consequently, genomic loci associated with the QTL can be discovered by analyzing hidden states along the genome. The aforementioned hidden Markov model assumes that the identified SNPs are equally distributed along the chromosome and does not take the distance between neighboring SNPs into account. The distance between the neighboring SNPs could influence the chance of co-segregation between genes and markers. To address this issue, we propose a nonhomogeneous hidden Markov model with a transition matrix that depends on a set of distance-varying observed covariates. The application of the model is illustrated on the data from a study of ethanol tolerance in yeast.

  16. Tracking the evolution of sex chromosome systems in Melanoplinae grasshoppers through chromosomal mapping of repetitive DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The accumulation of repetitive DNA during sex chromosome differentiation is a common feature of many eukaryotes and becomes more evident after recombination has been restricted or abolished. The accumulated repetitive sequences include multigene families, microsatellites, satellite DNAs and mobile elements, all of which are important for the structural remodeling of heterochromatin. In grasshoppers, derived sex chromosome systems, such as neo-XY♂/XX♀ and neo-X1X2Y♂/X1X1X2X2♀, are frequently observed in the Melanoplinae subfamily. However, no studies concerning the evolution of sex chromosomes in Melanoplinae have addressed the role of the repetitive DNA sequences. To further investigate the evolution of sex chromosomes in grasshoppers, we used classical cytogenetic and FISH analyses to examine the repetitive DNA sequences in six phylogenetically related Melanoplinae species with X0♂/XX♀, neo-XY♂/XX♀ and neo-X1X2Y♂/X1X1X2X2♀ sex chromosome systems. Results Our data indicate a non-spreading of heterochromatic blocks and pool of repetitive DNAs (C0t-1 DNA) in the sex chromosomes; however, the spreading of multigene families among the neo-sex chromosomes of Eurotettix and Dichromatos was remarkable, particularly for 5S rDNA. In autosomes, FISH mapping of multigene families revealed distinct patterns of chromosomal organization at the intra- and intergenomic levels. Conclusions These results suggest a common origin and subsequent differential accumulation of repetitive DNAs in the sex chromosomes of Dichromatos and an independent origin of the sex chromosomes of the neo-XY and neo-X1X2Y systems. Our data indicate a possible role for repetitive DNAs in the diversification of sex chromosome systems in grasshoppers. PMID:23937327

  17. Mapping the sex determination locus in the Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) using RAD sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) is a high-value, niche market species for cold-water marine aquaculture. Production of monosex female stocks is desirable in commercial production since females grow faster and mature later than males. Understanding the sex determination mechanism and developing sex-associated markers will shorten the time for the development of monosex female production, thus decreasing the costs of farming. Results Halibut juveniles were masculinised with 17 α-methyldihydrotestosterone (MDHT) and grown to maturity. Progeny groups from four treated males were reared and sexed. Two of these groups (n = 26 and 70) consisted of only females, while the other two (n = 30 and 71) contained balanced sex ratios (50% and 48% females respectively). DNA from parents and offspring from the two mixed-sex families were used as a template for Restriction-site Associated DNA (RAD) sequencing. The 648 million raw reads produced 90,105 unique RAD-tags. A linkage map was constructed based on 5703 Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers and 7 microsatellites consisting of 24 linkage groups, which corresponds to the number of chromosome pairs in this species. A major sex determining locus was mapped to linkage group 13 in both families. Assays for 10 SNPs with significant association with phenotypic sex were tested in both population data and in 3 additional families. Using a variety of machine-learning algorithms 97% correct classification could be obtained with the 3% of errors being phenotypic males predicted to be females. Conclusion Altogether our findings support the hypothesis that the Atlantic halibut has an XX/XY sex determination system. Assays are described for sex-associated DNA markers developed from the RAD sequencing analysis to fast track progeny testing and implement monosex female halibut production for an immediate improvement in productivity. These should also help to speed up the inclusion of neomales derived

  18. Measurement of Myocardial T1ρ with a Motion Corrected, Parametric Mapping Sequence in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Mohammed; Han, Yuchi; Witschey, Walter R. T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a robust T1ρ magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence for assessment of myocardial disease in humans. Materials and Methods We developed a breath-held T1ρ mapping method using a single-shot, T1ρ-prepared balanced steady-state free-precession (bSSFP) sequence. The magnetization trajectory was simulated to identify sources of T1ρ error. To limit motion artifacts, an optical flow-based image registration method was used to align T1ρ images. The reproducibility and accuracy of these methods was assessed in phantoms and 10 healthy subjects. Results are shown in 1 patient with pre-ventricular contractions (PVCs), 1 patient with chronic myocardial infarction (MI) and 2 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Results In phantoms, the mean bias was 1.0 ± 2.7 msec (100 msec phantom) and 0.9 ± 0.9 msec (60 msec phantom) at 60 bpm and 2.2 ± 3.2 msec (100 msec) and 1.4 ± 0.9 msec (60 msec) at 80 bpm. The coefficient of variation (COV) was 2.2 (100 msec) and 1.3 (60 msec) at 60 bpm and 2.6 (100 msec) and 1.4 (60 msec) at 80 bpm. Motion correction improved the alignment of T1ρ images in subjects, as determined by the increase in Dice Score Coefficient (DSC) from 0.76 to 0.88. T1ρ reproducibility was high (COV < 0.05, intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.85–0.97). Mean myocardial T1ρ value in healthy subjects was 63.5 ± 4.6 msec. There was good correspondence between late-gadolinium enhanced (LGE) MRI and increased T1ρ relaxation times in patients. Conclusion Single-shot, motion corrected, spin echo, spin lock MRI permits 2D T1ρ mapping in a breath-hold with good accuracy and precision. PMID:27003184

  19. Construction of high resolution genetic linkage maps to improve the soybean genome sequence assembly Glyma1.01

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A landmark in soybean research, Glyma1.01, the first whole genome sequence of variety Williams 82 (Glycine max L. Merr.) was completed in 2010 and is widely used. However, because the assembly was primarily built based on the linkage maps constructed with a limited number of markers and recombinant...

  20. An evaluation of genotyping by sequencing (GBS) to map the Breviaristatum-e (ari-e) locus in cultivated barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We explored the use of genotyping by sequencing (GBS) on a recombinant inbred line population (GPMx) derived from a cross between the two-rowed barley cultivar ‘Golden Promise’ (ari-e.GP/Vrs1) and the six-rowed cultivar ‘Morex’ (Ari-e/vrs1) to map plant height. We identified three Quantitative Trait...

  1. A high-density simple sequence repeat and single nucleotide polymorphism genetic map of the tetraploid cotton genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton genome complexity was investigated with a saturated molecular genetic map that combined several sets of microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSR) and the first major public set of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in cotton genomes (Gossypium spp.), and that was constructed ...

  2. A comprehensive expressed sequence tag linkage map for tiger salamander and Mexican axolotl: enabling gene mapping and comparative genomics in Ambystoma.

    PubMed

    Smith, J J; Kump, D K; Walker, J A; Parichy, D M; Voss, S R

    2005-11-01

    Expressed sequence tag (EST) markers were developed for Ambystoma tigrinum tigrinum (Eastern tiger salamander) and for A. mexicanum (Mexican axolotl) to generate the first comprehensive linkage map for these model amphibians. We identified 14 large linkage groups (125.5-836.7 cM) that presumably correspond to the 14 haploid chromosomes in the Ambystoma genome. The extent of genome coverage for these linkage groups is apparently high because the total map size (5251 cM) falls within the range of theoretical estimates and is consistent with independent empirical estimates. Unlike most vertebrate species, linkage map size in Ambystoma is not strongly correlated with chromosome arm number. Presumably, the large physical genome size ( approximately 30 Gbp) is a major determinant of map size in Ambystoma. To demonstrate the utility of this resource, we mapped the position of two historically significant A. mexicanum mutants, white and melanoid, and also met, a quantitative trait locus (QTL) that contributes to variation in metamorphic timing. This new collection of EST-based PCR markers will better enable the Ambystoma system by facilitating development of new molecular probes, and the linkage map will allow comparative studies of this important vertebrate group.

  3. Novel repeated DNA sequences in safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) (Asteraceae): cloning, sequencing, and physical mapping by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Raina, S N; Sharma, S; Sasakuma, T; Kishii, M; Vaishnavi, S

    2005-01-01

    Two novel repetitive DNA sequences, pCtKpnI-1 and pCtKpnI-2, were isolated from Carthamus tinctorius (2n = 2x = 24) and cloned. Both represent tandemly repeated sequences. The pCtKpnI-1 and pCtKpnI-2 clones constitute repeat units of 343-345 bp and 367 bp, respectively, with 63% sequence heterogeneity between the two. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was employed on metaphase chromosomes of C. tinctorius using, simultaneously, pCtKpnI-1 and pCtKpnI-2 repeated sequences. The pCtKpnI-1 sequence was found to be exclusively localized at subtelomeric regions on most of the chromosomes. On the other hand, sequence of the pCtKpnI-2 clone was distributed on two nucleolar and one nonnucleolar chromosome pairs. The satellite, and the intervening chromosome segment between the primary and secondary constrictions, in the two nucleolar chromosome pairs were wholly constituted by pCtKpnI-2 repeated sequence. The pCtKpnI-2 repeated sequence, showing partial homology to intergenic spacer (IGS) of 18S-25S ribosomal RNA genes of an Asteraceae taxon (Centaurea stoebe), and the 18S-25S rRNA gene clusters were located at independent, but juxtaposed sites in the nucleolar chromosomes. Variability in the number, size, and location of the two repeated sequences provided identification of most of the chromosomes in the otherwise not too distinctive homologues within the complement. This article reports the start of a molecular cytogenetics program targeting the genome of safflower, a major world oil crop about whose genetics very little is known.

  4. Using Genotyping by Sequencing to Map Two Novel Anthracnose Resistance Loci in Sorghum bicolor

    PubMed Central

    J. Felderhoff, Terry; M. McIntyre, Lauren; Saballos, Ana; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum sublineola is an aggressive fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. The obvious symptoms of anthracnose are leaf blight and stem rot. Sorghum, the fifth most widely grown cereal crop in the world, can be highly susceptible to the disease, most notably in hot and humid environments. In the southeastern United States the acreage of sorghum has been increasing steadily in recent years, spurred by growing interest in producing biofuels, bio-based products, and animal feed. Resistance to anthracnose is, therefore, of paramount importance for successful sorghum production in this region. To identify anthracnose resistance loci present in the highly resistant cultivar ‘Bk7’, a biparental mapping population of F3:4 and F4:5 sorghum lines was generated by crossing ‘Bk7’ with the susceptible inbred ‘Early Hegari-Sart’. Lines were phenotyped in three environments and in two different years following natural infection. The population was genotyped by sequencing. Following a stringent custom filtering protocol, totals of 5186 and 2759 informative SNP markers were identified in the two populations. Segregation data and association analysis identified resistance loci on chromosomes 7 and 9, with the resistance alleles derived from ‘Bk7’. Both loci contain multiple classes of defense-related genes based on sequence similarity and gene ontologies. Genetic analysis following an independent selection experiment of lines derived from a cross between ‘Bk7’ and sweet sorghum ‘Mer81-4’ narrowed the resistance locus on chromosome 9 substantially, validating this QTL. As observed in other species, sorghum appears to have regions of clustered resistance genes. Further characterization of these regions will facilitate the development of novel germplasm with resistance to anthracnose and other diseases. PMID:27194807

  5. Using genotyping by sequencing to map two novel anthracnose resistance Loci in Sorghum bicolor

    DOE PAGES

    Felderhoff, Terry J.; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Saballos, Ana; ...

    2016-05-18

    Colletotrichum sublineola is an aggressive fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. The obvious symptoms of anthracnose are leaf blight and stem rot. Sorghum, the fifth most widely grown cereal crop in the world, can be highly susceptible to the disease, most notably in hot and humid environments. In the southeastern United States the acreage of sorghum has been increasing steadily in recent years, spurred by growing interest in producing biofuels, bio-based products, and animal feed. Resistance to anthracnose is, therefore, of paramount importance for successful sorghum production in this region. To identify anthracnose resistance locimore » present in the highly resistant cultivar ‘Bk7’, a biparental mapping population of F3:4 and F4:5 sorghum lines was generated by crossing ‘Bk7’ with the susceptible inbred ‘Early Hegari-Sart’. Lines were phenotyped in three environments and in two different years following natural infection. The population was genotyped by sequencing. Following a stringent custom filtering protocol, totals of 5186 and 2759 informative SNP markers were identified in the two populations. Segregation data and association analysis identified resistance loci on chromosomes 7 and 9, with the resistance alleles derived from ‘Bk7’. Both loci contain multiple classes of defense-related genes based on sequence similarity and gene ontologies. In addition, genetic analysis following an independent selection experiment of lines derived from a cross between ‘Bk7’ and sweet sorghum ‘Mer81-4’ narrowed the resistance locus on chromosome 9 substantially, validating this QTL. As observed in other species, sorghum appears to have regions of clustered resistance genes. Further characterization of these regions will facilitate the development of novel germplasm with resistance to anthracnose and other diseases.« less

  6. Construction of a linkage map based on retrotransposon insertion polymorphisms in sweetpotato via high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Monden, Yuki; Hara, Takuya; Okada, Yoshihiro; Jahana, Osamu; Kobayashi, Akira; Tabuchi, Hiroaki; Onaga, Shoko; Tahara, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is an outcrossing hexaploid species with a large number of chromosomes (2n = 6x = 90). Although sweetpotato is one of the world's most important crops, genetic analysis of the species has been hindered by its genetic complexity combined with the lack of a whole genome sequence. In the present study, we constructed a genetic linkage map based on retrotransposon insertion polymorphisms using a mapping population derived from a cross between 'Purple Sweet Lord' (PSL) and '90IDN-47' cultivars. High-throughput sequencing and subsequent data analyses identified many Rtsp-1 retrotransposon insertion sites, and their allele dosages (simplex, duplex, triplex, or double-simplex) were determined based on segregation ratios in the mapping population. Using a pseudo-testcross strategy, 43 and 47 linkage groups were generated for PSL and 90IDN-47, respectively. Interestingly, most of these insertions (~90%) were present in a simplex manner, indicating their utility for linkage map construction in polyploid species. Additionally, our approach led to savings of time and labor for genotyping. Although the number of markers herein was insufficient for map-based cloning, our trial analysis exhibited the utility of retrotransposon-based markers for linkage map construction in sweetpotato.

  7. Construction of a linkage map based on retrotransposon insertion polymorphisms in sweetpotato via high-throughput sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Monden, Yuki; Hara, Takuya; Okada, Yoshihiro; Jahana, Osamu; Kobayashi, Akira; Tabuchi, Hiroaki; Onaga, Shoko; Tahara, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is an outcrossing hexaploid species with a large number of chromosomes (2n = 6x = 90). Although sweetpotato is one of the world’s most important crops, genetic analysis of the species has been hindered by its genetic complexity combined with the lack of a whole genome sequence. In the present study, we constructed a genetic linkage map based on retrotransposon insertion polymorphisms using a mapping population derived from a cross between ‘Purple Sweet Lord’ (PSL) and ‘90IDN-47’ cultivars. High-throughput sequencing and subsequent data analyses identified many Rtsp-1 retrotransposon insertion sites, and their allele dosages (simplex, duplex, triplex, or double-simplex) were determined based on segregation ratios in the mapping population. Using a pseudo-testcross strategy, 43 and 47 linkage groups were generated for PSL and 90IDN-47, respectively. Interestingly, most of these insertions (~90%) were present in a simplex manner, indicating their utility for linkage map construction in polyploid species. Additionally, our approach led to savings of time and labor for genotyping. Although the number of markers herein was insufficient for map-based cloning, our trial analysis exhibited the utility of retrotransposon-based markers for linkage map construction in sweetpotato. PMID:26069444

  8. Wideband Arrhythmia-Insensitive-Rapid (AIR) Pulse Sequence for Cardiac T1 mapping without Image Artifacts induced by ICD

    PubMed Central

    Hong, KyungPyo; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Wall, T. Scott; Drakos, Stavros G.; Kim, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate a wideband arrhythmia-insensitive-rapid (AIR) pulse sequence for cardiac T1 mapping without image artifacts induced by implantable-cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). Methods We developed a wideband AIR pulse sequence by incorporating a saturation pulse with wide frequency bandwidth (8.9 kHz), in order to achieve uniform T1 weighting in the heart with ICD. We tested the performance of original and “wideband” AIR cardiac T1 mapping pulse sequences in phantom and human experiments at 1.5T. Results In 5 phantoms representing native myocardium and blood and post-contrast blood/tissue T1 values, compared with the control T1 values measured with an inversion-recovery pulse sequence without ICD, T1 values measured with original AIR with ICD were considerably lower (absolute percent error >29%), whereas T1 values measured with wideband AIR with ICD were similar (absolute percent error <5%). Similarly, in 11 human subjects, compared with the control T1 values measured with original AIR without ICD, T1 measured with original AIR with ICD was significantly lower (absolute percent error >10.1%), whereas T1 measured with wideband AIR with ICD was similar (absolute percent error <2.0%). Conclusion This study demonstrates the feasibility of a wideband pulse sequence for cardiac T1 mapping without significant image artifacts induced by ICD. PMID:25975192

  9. Haplotype mapping and sequence analysis of the mouse Nramp gene predict susceptibility to infection with intracellular parasites

    SciTech Connect

    Malo, D.; Hu, Jinxin; Schurr, E.

    1994-09-01

    The mouse chromosome 1 locus Bcg (Ity, Lsh) controls the capacity of the tissue macrophage to restrict the replication of antigenically unrelated intracellular parasites and therefore determines the natural resistance (BCG-R, dominant) or susceptibility (BCG-S, recessive) of inbred mouse strains to infection with diverse pathogens. We have used a positional cloning strategy based on genetic and physical mapping, YAC cloning, and exon trapping to isolate a candidate gene for Beg (Nramp) that encodes a predicted macrophage-specific transport protein. We have analyzed a total of 27 inbred mouse strains of BCG-R and BCG-S phenotypes for the presence of nucleotide sequence variations within the coding portion of Nramp and have carried out haplotype typing of the corresponding chromosome 1 region in these mice, using 11 additional polymorphic markers mapping in the immediate vicinity of Nramp. cDNA cloning and nucleotide sequencing identified 5 nucleotide sequence variations within Nramp in the inbred strains.

  10. Interactive segmentation of tongue contours in ultrasound video sequences using quality maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghrenassia, Sarah; Ménard, Lucie; Laporte, Catherine

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging is an effective and non invasive way of studying the tongue motions involved in normal and pathological speech, and the results of US studies are of interest for the development of new strategies in speech therapy. State-of-the-art tongue shape analysis techniques based on US images depend on semi-automated tongue segmentation and tracking techniques. Recent work has mostly focused on improving the accuracy of the tracking techniques themselves. However, occasional errors remain inevitable, regardless of the technique used, and the tongue tracking process must thus be supervised by a speech scientist who will correct these errors manually or semi-automatically. This paper proposes an interactive framework to facilitate this process. In this framework, the user is guided towards potentially problematic portions of the US image sequence by a segmentation quality map that is based on the normalized energy of an active contour model and automatically produced during tracking. When a problematic segmentation is identified, corrections to the segmented contour can be made on one image and propagated both forward and backward in the problematic subsequence, thereby improving the user experience. The interactive tools were tested in combination with two different tracking algorithms. Preliminary results illustrate the potential of the proposed framework, suggesting that the proposed framework generally improves user interaction time, with little change in segmentation repeatability.

  11. A genetic map of melon highly enriched with fruit quality QTLs and EST markers, including sugar and carotenoid metabolism genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genetic map of melon enriched for fruit traits was constructed, using a recombinant inbred (RI) population developed from a cross between representatives of the two subspecies of Cucumis melo L.: PI 414723 (subspecies agrestis) and 'Dulce' (subspecies melo). Phenotyping of 99 RI lines was conducte...

  12. Construction of High-Density Linkage Maps of Populus deltoides × P. simonii Using Restriction-Site Associated DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Chunfa; Li, Huogen; Wang, Ying; Li, Xuran; Ou, Jiajia; Wang, Deyuan; Xu, Houxi; Ma, Chao; Lang, Xianye; Liu, Guangxin; Zhang, Bo; Shi, Jisen

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous linkage maps have been constructed in the genus Populus, they are typically sparse and thus have limited applications due to low throughput of traditional molecular markers. Restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RADSeq) technology allows us to identify a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) across genomes of many individuals in a fast and cost-effective way, and makes it possible to construct high-density genetic linkage maps. We performed RADSeq for 299 progeny and their two parents in an F1 hybrid population generated by crossing the female Populus deltoides ‘I-69’ and male Populus simonii ‘L3’. A total of 2,545 high quality SNP markers were obtained and two parent-specific linkage maps were constructed. The female genetic map contained 1601 SNPs and 20 linkage groups, spanning 4,249.12 cM of the genome with an average distance of 2.69 cM between adjacent markers, while the male map consisted of 940 SNPs and also 20 linkage groups with a total length of 3,816.24 cM and an average marker interval distance of 4.15 cM. Finally, our analysis revealed that synteny and collinearity are highly conserved between the parental linkage maps and the reference genome of P. trichocarpa. We demonstrated that RAD sequencing is a powerful technique capable of rapidly generating a large number of SNPs for constructing genetic maps in outbred forest trees. The high-quality linkage maps constructed here provided reliable genetic resources to facilitate locating quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control growth and wood quality traits in the hybrid population. PMID:26964097

  13. Construction of High-Density Linkage Maps of Populus deltoides × P. simonii Using Restriction-Site Associated DNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tong, Chunfa; Li, Huogen; Wang, Ying; Li, Xuran; Ou, Jiajia; Wang, Deyuan; Xu, Houxi; Ma, Chao; Lang, Xianye; Liu, Guangxin; Zhang, Bo; Shi, Jisen

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous linkage maps have been constructed in the genus Populus, they are typically sparse and thus have limited applications due to low throughput of traditional molecular markers. Restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RADSeq) technology allows us to identify a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) across genomes of many individuals in a fast and cost-effective way, and makes it possible to construct high-density genetic linkage maps. We performed RADSeq for 299 progeny and their two parents in an F1 hybrid population generated by crossing the female Populus deltoides 'I-69' and male Populus simonii 'L3'. A total of 2,545 high quality SNP markers were obtained and two parent-specific linkage maps were constructed. The female genetic map contained 1601 SNPs and 20 linkage groups, spanning 4,249.12 cM of the genome with an average distance of 2.69 cM between adjacent markers, while the male map consisted of 940 SNPs and also 20 linkage groups with a total length of 3,816.24 cM and an average marker interval distance of 4.15 cM. Finally, our analysis revealed that synteny and collinearity are highly conserved between the parental linkage maps and the reference genome of P. trichocarpa. We demonstrated that RAD sequencing is a powerful technique capable of rapidly generating a large number of SNPs for constructing genetic maps in outbred forest trees. The high-quality linkage maps constructed here provided reliable genetic resources to facilitate locating quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control growth and wood quality traits in the hybrid population.

  14. OBLIMAP 2.0: a fast climate model-ice sheet model coupler including online embeddable mapping routines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reerink, Thomas J.; van de Berg, Willem Jan; van de Wal, Roderik S. W.

    2016-11-01

    This paper accompanies the second OBLIMAP open-source release. The package is developed to map climate fields between a general circulation model (GCM) and an ice sheet model (ISM) in both directions by using optimal aligned oblique projections, which minimize distortions. The curvature of the surfaces of the GCM and ISM grid differ, both grids may be irregularly spaced and the ratio of the grids is allowed to differ largely. OBLIMAP's stand-alone version is able to map data sets that differ in various aspects on the same ISM grid. Each grid may either coincide with the surface of a sphere, an ellipsoid or a flat plane, while the grid types might differ. Re-projection of, for example, ISM data sets is also facilitated. This is demonstrated by relevant applications concerning the major ice caps. As the stand-alone version also applies to the reverse mapping direction, it can be used as an offline coupler. Furthermore, OBLIMAP 2.0 is an embeddable GCM-ISM coupler, suited for high-frequency online coupled experiments. A new fast scan method is presented for structured grids as an alternative for the former time-consuming grid search strategy, realising a performance gain of several orders of magnitude and enabling the mapping of high-resolution data sets with a much larger number of grid nodes. Further, a highly flexible masked mapping option is added. The limitation of the fast scan method with respect to unstructured and adaptive grids is discussed together with a possible future parallel Message Passing Interface (MPI) implementation.

  15. Nested association mapping of stem rust resistance in wheat using genotyping by sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nested association mapping is an approach to map trait loci in which families within populations are interconnected by a common parent. By implementing joint-linkage association analysis, this approach is able to map causative loci with higher power and resolution compared to biparental linkage mapp...

  16. The Locus Lookup Tool at MaizeGDB: Identification of Genomic Regions in Maize by Integrating Sequence Information with Physical and Genetic Maps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods to automatically integrate sequence information with physical and genetic maps are scarce. The Locus Lookup Tool enables researchers to define windows of genomic sequence likely to contain loci of interest where only genetic or physical mapping associations are reported. Using the Locus Look...

  17. Radiation hybrid maps of D-genome of Aegilops tauschii and their application in sequence assembly of large and complex plant genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The large and complex genome of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L., ~17 Gb) requires high-resolution genome maps saturated with ordered markers to assist in anchoring and orienting BAC contigs/ sequence scaffolds for whole genome sequence assembly. Radiation hybrid (RH) mapping has proven to be an e...

  18. Pitfalls of mapping high throughput sequencing data to repetitive sequences: Piwi’s genomic targets still not identified

    PubMed Central

    Marinov, Georgi K.; Wang, Jie; Handler, Dominik; Wold, Barbara J.; Weng, Zhiping; Hannon, Gregory J.; Aravin, Alexei A.; Zamore, Phillip D.; Brennecke, Julius; Toth, Katalin Fejes

    2015-01-01

    Huang et al. (2013) recently reported that chromatin immuno-precipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) reveals the genome-wide sites of occupancy by Piwi - a piRNA-guided Argonaute protein central to transposon silencing in Drosophila. Their study also reported that loss of Piwi causes widespread rewiring of transcriptional patterns as evidenced by changes in RNA polymerase II occupancy across the genome. Here we reanalyze their underlying deep sequencing data and report that the data do not support the author’s central conclusions. PMID:25805138

  19. Genome Evolution and Meiotic Maps by Massively Parallel DNA Sequencing: Spotted Gar, an Outgroup for the Teleost Genome Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Amores, Angel; Catchen, Julian; Ferrara, Allyse; Fontenot, Quenton; Postlethwait, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Genomic resources for hundreds of species of evolutionary, agricultural, economic, and medical importance are unavailable due to the expense of well-assembled genome sequences and difficulties with multigenerational studies. Teleost fish provide many models for human disease but possess anciently duplicated genomes that sometimes obfuscate connectivity. Genomic information representing a fish lineage that diverged before the teleost genome duplication (TGD) would provide an outgroup for exploring the mechanisms of evolution after whole-genome duplication. We exploited massively parallel DNA sequencing to develop meiotic maps with thrift and speed by genotyping F1 offspring of a single female and a single male spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus) collected directly from nature utilizing only polymorphisms existing in these two wild individuals. Using Stacks, software that automates the calling of genotypes from polymorphisms assayed by Illumina sequencing, we constructed a map containing 8406 markers. RNA-seq on two map-cross larvae provided a reference transcriptome that identified nearly 1000 mapped protein-coding markers and allowed genome-wide analysis of conserved synteny. Results showed that the gar lineage diverged from teleosts before the TGD and its genome is organized more similarly to that of humans than teleosts. Thus, spotted gar provides a critical link between medical models in teleost fish, to which gar is biologically similar, and humans, to which gar is genomically similar. Application of our F1 dense mapping strategy to species with no prior genome information promises to facilitate comparative genomics and provide a scaffold for ordering the numerous contigs arising from next generation genome sequencing. PMID:21828280

  20. Rapid and inexpensive whole-genome genotyping-by-sequencing for crossover localization and fine-scale genetic mapping.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Beth A; Patel, Vipul; Weigel, Detlef; Schneeberger, Korbinian

    2015-01-13

    The reshuffling of existing genetic variation during meiosis is important both during evolution and in breeding. The reassortment of genetic variants relies on the formation of crossovers (COs) between homologous chromosomes. The pattern of genome-wide CO distributions can be rapidly and precisely established by the short-read sequencing of individuals from F2 populations, which in turn are useful for quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. Although sequencing costs have decreased precipitously in recent years, the costs of library preparation for hundreds of individuals have remained high. To enable rapid and inexpensive CO detection and QTL mapping using low-coverage whole-genome sequencing of large mapping populations, we have developed a new method for library preparation along with Trained Individual GenomE Reconstruction, a probabilistic method for genotype and CO predictions for recombinant individuals. In an example case with hundreds of F2 individuals from two Arabidopsis thaliana accessions, we resolved most CO breakpoints to within 2 kb and reduced a major flowering time QTL to a 9-kb interval. In addition, an extended region of unusually low recombination revealed a 1.8-Mb inversion polymorphism on the long arm of chromosome 4. We observed no significant differences in the frequency and distribution of COs between F2 individuals with and without a functional copy of the DNA helicase gene RECQ4A. In summary, we present a new, cost-efficient method for large-scale, high-precision genotyping-by-sequencing.

  1. PRIMAL: Page Rank-Based Indoor Mapping and Localization Using Gene-Sequenced Unlabeled WLAN Received Signal Strength

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mu; Zhang, Qiao; Xu, Kunjie; Tian, Zengshan; Wang, Yanmeng; He, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Due to the wide deployment of wireless local area networks (WLAN), received signal strength (RSS)-based indoor WLAN localization has attracted considerable attention in both academia and industry. In this paper, we propose a novel page rank-based indoor mapping and localization (PRIMAL) by using the gene-sequenced unlabeled WLAN RSS for simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). Specifically, first of all, based on the observation of the motion patterns of the people in the target environment, we use the Allen logic to construct the mobility graph to characterize the connectivity among different areas of interest. Second, the concept of gene sequencing is utilized to assemble the sporadically-collected RSS sequences into a signal graph based on the transition relations among different RSS sequences. Third, we apply the graph drawing approach to exhibit both the mobility graph and signal graph in a more readable manner. Finally, the page rank (PR) algorithm is proposed to construct the mapping from the signal graph into the mobility graph. The experimental results show that the proposed approach achieves satisfactory localization accuracy and meanwhile avoids the intensive time and labor cost involved in the conventional location fingerprinting-based indoor WLAN localization. PMID:26404274

  2. UV cross-link mapping of the substrate-binding site of an RNase P ribozyme to a target mRNA sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Kilani, A F; Liu, F

    1999-01-01

    RNase P ribozyme cleaves an RNA helix that resembles the acceptor stem and T-stem structure of its natural ptRNA substrate. When covalently linked with a guide sequence, the ribozyme can function as a sequence-specific endonuclease and cleave any target RNA sequences that base pair with the guide sequence. Using a site-directed ultraviolet (UV) cross-linking approach, we have mapped the regions of the ribozyme that are in close proximity to a substrate that contains the mRNA sequence encoding thymidine kinase of human herpes simplex virus 1. Our data suggest that the cleavage site of the mRNA substrate is positioned at the same regions of the ribozyme that bind to the cleavage site of a ptRNA. The mRNA-binding domains include regions that interact with the acceptor stem and T-stem and in addition, regions that are unique and not in close contact with a ptRNA. Identification of the mRNA-binding site provides a foundation to study how RNase P ribozymes achieve their sequence specificity and facilitates the development of gene-targeting ribozymes. PMID:10496224

  3. easyPAC: A Tool for Fast Prediction, Testing and Reference Mapping of Degenerate PCR Primers from Alignments or Consensus Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkranz, David

    2012-01-01

    The PCR-amplification of unknown homologous or paralogous genes generally relies on PCR primers predicted from multi sequence alignments. But increasing sequence divergence can induce the need to use degenerate primers which entails the problem of testing the characteristics, unwanted interactions and potential mispriming of degenerate primers. Here I introduce easyPAC, a new software for the prediction of degenerate primers from multi sequence alignments or single consensus sequences. As a major innovation, easyPAC allows to apply all customary primer test procedures to degenerate primer sequences including fast mapping to reference files. Thus, easyPAC simplifies and expedites the designing of specific degenerate primers enormously. Degenerate primers suggested by easyPAC were used in PCR amplification with subsequent de novo sequencing of TDRD1 exon 11 homologs from several representatives of the haplorrhine primate phylogeny. The results demonstrate the efficient performance of the suggested primers and therefore show that easyPAC can advance upcoming comparative genetic studies.

  4. High-throughput sequencing of Campylobacter jejuni insertion mutant libraries reveals mapA as a fitness factor for chicken colonization.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeremiah G; Livny, Jonathan; Dirita, Victor J

    2014-06-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of gastrointestinal infections worldwide, due primarily to its ability to asymptomatically colonize the gastrointestinal tracts of agriculturally relevant animals, including chickens. Infection often occurs following consumption of meat that was contaminated by C. jejuni during harvest. Because of this, much interest lies in understanding the mechanisms that allow C. jejuni to colonize the chicken gastrointestinal tract. To address this, we generated a C. jejuni transposon mutant library that is amenable to insertion sequencing and introduced this mutant pool into day-of-hatch chicks. Following deep sequencing of C. jejuni mutants in the cecal outputs, several novel factors required for efficient colonization of the chicken gastrointestinal tract were identified, including the predicted outer membrane protein MapA. A mutant strain lacking mapA was constructed and found to be significantly reduced for chicken colonization in both competitive infections and monoinfections. Further, we found that mapA is required for in vitro competition with wild-type C. jejuni but is dispensable for growth in monoculture.

  5. Whole genome sequence analysis of circulating Bluetongue virus serotype 11 strains from the United States including two domestic canine isolates.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Natasha N; Jasperson, Dane C; Dubovi, Edward J; Johnson, Donna J; Ostlund, Eileen N; Wilson, William C

    2015-07-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is a vector-transmitted pathogen that typically infects and causes disease in domestic and wild ruminants. BTV is also known to infect domestic canines as discovered when dogs were vaccinated with a BTV-contaminated vaccine. Canine BTV infections have been documented through serological surveys, and natural infection by the Culicoides vector has been suggested. The report of isolation of BTV serotype 11 (BTV-11) from 2 separate domestic canine abortion cases in the states of Texas in 2011 and Kansas in 2012, were apparently unrelated to BTV-contaminated vaccination or consumption of BTV-contaminated raw meat as had been previously speculated. To elucidate the origin and relationship of these 2 domestic canine BTV-11 isolates, whole genome sequencing was performed. Six additional BTV-11 field isolates from Texas, Florida, and Washington, submitted for diagnostic investigation during 2011 and 2013, were also fully sequenced and analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis indicates that the BTV-11 domestic canine isolates are virtually identical, and both share high identity with 2 BTV-11 isolates identified from white-tailed deer in Texas in 2011. The results of the current study further support the hypothesis that a BTV-11 strain circulating in the Midwestern states could have been transmitted to the dogs by the infected Culicoides vector. Our study also expands the short list of available BTV-11 sequences, which may aid BTV surveillance and epidemiology.

  6. Toward a high-resolution Plasmodium falciparum linkage map: Polymorphic markers from hundreds of simple sequence repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Xin-Zhuan; Wellems, T.E.

    1996-05-01

    A total of 5.7 simple sequence repeats (SSRs or {open_quotes}microsatellites{close_quotes}) were identified from Plasmodium falciparum sequences in GenBank and from inserts in a genomic DNA library. Oligonucleotide primers from sequences that flank 224 of these SSRs were synthesized and used in PCR assays to test for simple sequence length polymorphisms (SSLPs). Of the 224 SSRs, 188 showed SSLPs were assigned to chromosome linkage groups by physical mapping and by comparing their inheritance patterns against those of restriction fragment length polymorphism markers in a genetic cross (HB3XDd2). The predominant SSLPs in P. falciparum were found to contain [TA]{sub n}, and [TAA]{sub n}, a feature that is reminiscent of plant genomes and is consistent with the proposed algal-like origin of malaria parasites. Since such SSLPs are abundant and readily isolated, they are a powerful resource for genetic analysis of P. falciparum. 38 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Use of sequence-bounding surfaces for correlation and mapping in nonmarine, Incised-Valley reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Leckie, D.A.; Vanbeselaere, N.

    1995-11-01

    One of the problems with the application of sequence stratigraphy to nonmarine sediments is the use of effective surfaces for correlations. This case study from the Mannville Group of southern Saskatchewan demonstrates how major, regional bounding surfaces can be identified and correlated to produce a suite of maps that can be used for exploration purposes. In southern Saskatchewan, Cretaceous Mannville sediments, termed the Pense, Cantuar, and Success (S2) formations, overlie Jurassic S1 and older deposits. The interval, which is up to 100 m thick, was deposited over 40 to 50 m.y. and is riddled with unconformities and weathered horizons. Detailed stratigraphic correlations using well logs are difficult, imprecise, and highly suspect unless corroborated by core control. Jurassic Success S1 sediment was deposited in a restricted shallow-marine environment. The S2 was deposited as a sheet of quartzose, braided fluvial sandstone that unconformably cuts into the S1. The overlying Cantuar Formation consists of dominantly lithic sandstone, siltstone, and shale overlying a basal quartzose unit. The base of the Cantuar Formation has a high local relief and in places has eroded long, wide valleys into the Success and older Jurassic strata. The valleys were hundreds of kilometers long and up to 74 in deep. Remnants of the Success sediment are preserved as isolated, buried cuestas on the margins of the valley walls. Cantuar sediments represent the infill of an extensive valley system that took millions of years to fill. The fill was from meandering streams with abundant paleosols, shallow lacustrine, and splay deposits. The top of the Cantuar Formation is represented by chert and quartzose sandstones deposited in a north-south-trending estuarine system with several tributaries. Several play types, which are dominantly stratigraphic, have been identified and are related to the valley incision, valley fill, and preserved erosional cuesta remnants.

  8. Three-dimensional chemical mapping by EFTEM-TomoJ including improvement of SNR by PCA and ART reconstruction of volume by noise suppression.

    PubMed

    Messaoudi, Cédric; Aschman, Nicolas; Cunha, Marcel; Oikawa, Tetsuo; Sorzano, Carlos O Sanchez; Marco, Sergio

    2013-12-01

    Electron tomography is becoming one of the most used methods for structural analysis at nanometric scale in biological and materials sciences. Combined with chemical mapping, it provides qualitative and semiquantitative information on the distribution of chemical elements on a given sample. Due to the current difficulties in obtaining three-dimensional (3D) maps by energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), the use of 3D chemical mapping has not been widely adopted by the electron microscopy community. The lack of specialized software further complicates the issue, especially in the case of data with a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Moreover, data interpretation is rendered difficult by the absence of efficient segmentation tools. Thus, specialized software for the computation of 3D maps by EFTEM needs to include optimized methods for image series alignment, algorithms to improve SNR, different background subtraction models, and methods to facilitate map segmentation. Here we present a software package (EFTEM-TomoJ, which can be downloaded from http://u759.curie.fr/fr/download/softwares/EFTEM-TomoJ), specifically dedicated to computation of EFTEM 3D chemical maps including noise filtering by image reconstitution based on multivariate statistical analysis. We also present an algorithm named BgART (for background removing algebraic reconstruction technique) allowing the discrimination between background and signal and improving the reconstructed volume in an iterative way.

  9. Association mapping of disease resistance traits in rainbow trout using restriction site associated DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Nathan R; LaPatra, Scott E; Overturf, Ken; Towner, Richard; Narum, Shawn R

    2014-10-28

    Recent advances in genotyping-by-sequencing have enabled genome-wide association studies in nonmodel species including those in aquaculture programs. As with other aquaculture species, rainbow trout and steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are susceptible to disease and outbreaks can lead to significant losses. Fish culturists have therefore been pursuing strategies to prevent losses to common pathogens such as Flavobacterium psychrophilum (the etiological agent for bacterial cold water disease [CWD]) and infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) by adjusting feed formulations, vaccine development, and selective breeding. However, discovery of genetic markers linked to disease resistance offers the potential to use marker-assisted selection to increase resistance and reduce outbreaks. For this study we sampled juvenile fish from 40 families from 2-yr classes that either survived or died after controlled exposure to either CWD or IHNV. Restriction site-associated DNA sequencing produced 4661 polymorphic single-nucleotide polymorphism loci after strict filtering. Genotypes from individual survivors and mortalities were then used to test for association between disease resistance and genotype at each locus using the program TASSEL. After we accounted for kinship and stratification of the samples, tests revealed 12 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers that were highly associated with resistance to CWD and 19 markers associated with resistance to IHNV. These markers are candidates for further investigation and are expected to be useful for marker assisted selection in future broodstock selection for various aquaculture programs.

  10. Mapping of sex-linked genes onto the genome sequence using various aberrations of the Z chromosome in Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Tsuguru; Abe, Hiroaki; Katsuma, Susumu; Mita, Kazuei; Shimada, Toru

    2008-12-01

    Many strains of Bombyx mori carry chromosomal aberrations, and they are useful resources for integration between phenotypes and genomic sequences. We compared the molecular structures of three kinds of Z chromosomes, i.e., two strains with chromosome deletions and one strain with translocation involving the Z chromosome. Using polymerase chain reaction markers, we showed that: (1) the Z(1) chromosome lacks more than 6Mb, including the proximal end; (2) the Z(Vg) chromosome lacks 1.5Mb in the interstitial portion; and (3) the +(od)p(Sa)+(p)W carries a 0.6-Mb Z-derived fragment surrounding the +(od) gene. The breakpoint junctions of these deletions and a translocation were precisely determined. Through deletion mapping, we narrowed down the regions where distinct oily (od), vestigial (Vg), and muscle dystrophy (Md) are located and identified a candidate gene for od. A retroposon-mediated deletion in BmBLOS2--the Bombyx gene homologous to human "biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex-1, subunit 2''--was detected in the od mutant. Although the genes responsible for Vg and Md were not definitively identified, we propose the candidate genes on the basis of their locations and phenotypes.

  11. SNP Assay Development for Linkage Map Construction, Anchoring Whole-Genome Sequence, and Other Genetic and Genomic Applications in Common Bean

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Qijian; Jia, Gaofeng; Hyten, David L.; ...

    2015-08-28

    A total of 992,682 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was identified as ideal for Illumina Infinium II BeadChip design after sequencing a diverse set of 17 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L) varieties with the aid of next-generation sequencing technology. From these, two BeadChips each with >5000 SNPs were designed. The BARCBean6K_1 BeadChip was selected for the purpose of optimizing polymorphism among market classes and, when possible, SNPs were targeted to sequence scaffolds in the Phaseolus vulgaris 14× genome assembly with sequence lengths >10 kb. The BARCBean6K_2 BeadChip was designed with the objective of anchoring additional scaffolds and to facilitate orientation of largemore » scaffolds. Analysis of 267 F2 plants from a cross of varieties Stampede × Red Hawk with the two BeadChips resulted in linkage maps with a total of 7040 markers including 7015 SNPs. With the linkage map, a total of 432.3 Mb of sequence from 2766 scaffolds was anchored to create the Phaseolus vulgaris v1.0 assembly, which accounted for approximately 89% of the 487 Mb of available sequence scaffolds of the Phaseolus vulgaris v0.9 assembly. A core set of 6000 SNPs (BARCBean6K_3 BeadChip) with high genotyping quality and polymorphism was selected based on the genotyping of 365 dry bean and 134 snap bean accessions with the BARCBean6K_1 and BARCBean6K_2 BeadChips. The BARCBean6K_3 BeadChip is a useful tool for genetics and genomics research and it is widely used by breeders and geneticists in the United States and abroad.« less

  12. SNP Assay Development for Linkage Map Construction, Anchoring Whole-Genome Sequence, and Other Genetic and Genomic Applications in Common Bean

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qijian; Jia, Gaofeng; Hyten, David L.; Jenkins, Jerry; Hwang, Eun-Young; Schroeder, Steven G.; Osorno, Juan M.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jackson, Scott A.; McClean, Phillip E.; Cregan, Perry B.

    2015-01-01

    A total of 992,682 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was identified as ideal for Illumina Infinium II BeadChip design after sequencing a diverse set of 17 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L) varieties with the aid of next-generation sequencing technology. From these, two BeadChips each with >5000 SNPs were designed. The BARCBean6K_1 BeadChip was selected for the purpose of optimizing polymorphism among market classes and, when possible, SNPs were targeted to sequence scaffolds in the Phaseolus vulgaris 14× genome assembly with sequence lengths >10 kb. The BARCBean6K_2 BeadChip was designed with the objective of anchoring additional scaffolds and to facilitate orientation of large scaffolds. Analysis of 267 F2 plants from a cross of varieties Stampede × Red Hawk with the two BeadChips resulted in linkage maps with a total of 7040 markers including 7015 SNPs. With the linkage map, a total of 432.3 Mb of sequence from 2766 scaffolds was anchored to create the Phaseolus vulgaris v1.0 assembly, which accounted for approximately 89% of the 487 Mb of available sequence scaffolds of the Phaseolus vulgaris v0.9 assembly. A core set of 6000 SNPs (BARCBean6K_3 BeadChip) with high genotyping quality and polymorphism was selected based on the genotyping of 365 dry bean and 134 snap bean accessions with the BARCBean6K_1 and BARCBean6K_2 BeadChips. The BARCBean6K_3 BeadChip is a useful tool for genetics and genomics research and it is widely used by breeders and geneticists in the United States and abroad. PMID:26318155

  13. SNP Assay Development for Linkage Map Construction, Anchoring Whole-Genome Sequence, and Other Genetic and Genomic Applications in Common Bean

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Qijian; Jia, Gaofeng; Hyten, David L.; Jenkins, Jerry; Hwang, Eun-Young; Schroeder, Steven G.; Osorno, Juan M.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jackson, Scott A.; McClean, Phillip E.; Cregan, Perry B.

    2015-08-28

    A total of 992,682 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was identified as ideal for Illumina Infinium II BeadChip design after sequencing a diverse set of 17 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L) varieties with the aid of next-generation sequencing technology. From these, two BeadChips each with >5000 SNPs were designed. The BARCBean6K_1 BeadChip was selected for the purpose of optimizing polymorphism among market classes and, when possible, SNPs were targeted to sequence scaffolds in the Phaseolus vulgaris 14× genome assembly with sequence lengths >10 kb. The BARCBean6K_2 BeadChip was designed with the objective of anchoring additional scaffolds and to facilitate orientation of large scaffolds. Analysis of 267 F2 plants from a cross of varieties Stampede × Red Hawk with the two BeadChips resulted in linkage maps with a total of 7040 markers including 7015 SNPs. With the linkage map, a total of 432.3 Mb of sequence from 2766 scaffolds was anchored to create the Phaseolus vulgaris v1.0 assembly, which accounted for approximately 89% of the 487 Mb of available sequence scaffolds of the Phaseolus vulgaris v0.9 assembly. A core set of 6000 SNPs (BARCBean6K_3 BeadChip) with high genotyping quality and polymorphism was selected based on the genotyping of 365 dry bean and 134 snap bean accessions with the BARCBean6K_1 and BARCBean6K_2 BeadChips. The BARCBean6K_3 BeadChip is a useful tool for genetics and genomics research and it is widely used by breeders and geneticists in the United States and abroad.

  14. Seq2Logo: a method for construction and visualization of amino acid binding motifs and sequence profiles including sequence weighting, pseudo counts and two-sided representation of amino acid enrichment and depletion

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Martin Christen Frølund; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Seq2Logo is a web-based sequence logo generator. Sequence logos are a graphical representation of the information content stored in a multiple sequence alignment (MSA) and provide a compact and highly intuitive representation of the position-specific amino acid composition of binding motifs, active sites, etc. in biological sequences. Accurate generation of sequence logos is often compromised by sequence redundancy and low number of observations. Moreover, most methods available for sequence logo generation focus on displaying the position-specific enrichment of amino acids, discarding the equally valuable information related to amino acid depletion. Seq2logo aims at resolving these issues allowing the user to include sequence weighting to correct for data redundancy, pseudo counts to correct for low number of observations and different logotype representations each capturing different aspects related to amino acid enrichment and depletion. Besides allowing input in the format of peptides and MSA, Seq2Logo accepts input as Blast sequence profiles, providing easy access for non-expert end-users to characterize and identify functionally conserved/variable amino acids in any given protein of interest. The output from the server is a sequence logo and a PSSM. Seq2Logo is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/biotools/Seq2Logo (14 May 2012, date last accessed). PMID:22638583

  15. Seq2Logo: a method for construction and visualization of amino acid binding motifs and sequence profiles including sequence weighting, pseudo counts and two-sided representation of amino acid enrichment and depletion.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Martin Christen Frølund; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-07-01

    Seq2Logo is a web-based sequence logo generator. Sequence logos are a graphical representation of the information content stored in a multiple sequence alignment (MSA) and provide a compact and highly intuitive representation of the position-specific amino acid composition of binding motifs, active sites, etc. in biological sequences. Accurate generation of sequence logos is often compromised by sequence redundancy and low number of observations. Moreover, most methods available for sequence logo generation focus on displaying the position-specific enrichment of amino acids, discarding the equally valuable information related to amino acid depletion. Seq2logo aims at resolving these issues allowing the user to include sequence weighting to correct for data redundancy, pseudo counts to correct for low number of observations and different logotype representations each capturing different aspects related to amino acid enrichment and depletion. Besides allowing input in the format of peptides and MSA, Seq2Logo accepts input as Blast sequence profiles, providing easy access for non-expert end-users to characterize and identify functionally conserved/variable amino acids in any given protein of interest. The output from the server is a sequence logo and a PSSM. Seq2Logo is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/biotools/Seq2Logo (14 May 2012, date last accessed).

  16. Glacial and periglacial geomorphology and its paleoclimatological significance in three North Ethiopian Mountains, including a detailed geomorphological map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickx, Hanne; Jacob, Miro; Frankl, Amaury; Nyssen, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Geomorphological investigations and detailed mapping of past and present (peri)glacial landforms are required in order to understand the impact of climatic anomalies. The Ethiopian Highlands show a great variety in past and contemporary climate, and therefore, in the occurrence of glacial and periglacial landforms. However, only a few mountain areas have been studied, and detailed geomorphological understanding is lacking. In order to allow a fine reconstruction of the impact of the past glacial cycle on the geomorphology, vegetation complexes, and temperature anomalies, a detailed geomorphological map of three mountain areas (Mt. Ferrah Amba, 12°51‧N 39°29‧E; Mt. Lib Amba, 12°04‧N 39°22‧; and Mt. Abuna Yosef, 12°08‧N 39°11‧E) was produced. In all three study areas, inactive solifluction lobes, presumably from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), were found. In the highest study area of Abuna Yosef, three sites were discovered bearing morainic material from small late Pleistocene glaciers. These marginal glaciers occurred below the modeled snowline and existed because of local topo-climatic conditions. Evidence of such Pleistocene avalanche-fed glaciers in Ethiopia (and Africa) has not been produced earlier. Current frost action is limited to frost cracks and small-scale patterned ground phenomena. The depression of the altitudinal belts of periglacial and glacial processes during the last cold period was assessed through periglacial and glacial landform mapping and comparisons with data from other mountain areas taking latitude into account. The depression of glacial and periglacial belts of approximately 600 m implies a temperature drop around 6 °C in the last cold period. This cooling is in line with temperature depressions elsewhere in East Africa during the LGM. This study serves as a case study for all the intermediate mountains (3500-4200 m) of the North Ethiopian highlands.

  17. Mapping whole genome shotgun sequence and variant calling in mammalian species without their reference genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomics research in mammals has produced reference genome sequences that are essential for identifying variation associated with disease. High quality reference genome sequences are now available for humans, model species, and economically important agricultural animals. Comparisons between these s...

  18. Genomic organization and sequence of the human NRAMP gene: identification and mapping of a promoter region polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Blackwell, J. M.; Barton, C. H.; White, J. K.; Searle, S.; Baker, A. M.; Williams, H.; Shaw, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Murine Nramp is a candidate for the macrophage resistance gene Ity/Lsh/Bcg. Sequence analysis of human NRAMP was undertaken to determine its role in man. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A yeast artificial chromosome carrying NRAMP was subcloned and positive clones sequenced. The transcriptional start site was mapped using 5' RACE PCR. Polymorphic variants were amplified by PCR. Linkage analysis was used to map NRAMP. RESULTS: NRAMP spans 12kb and has 15 exons encoding a 550 amino acid protein showing 85% identity (92% similarity) with Nramp. Two conserved PKC sites occur in exon 2 encoding the Pro/Ser rich SH3 binding domain, and in exon 3. Striking sequence similarities (57 and 53%) were observed with yeast mitochondrial proteins, SMF1 and SMF2, especially within putative functional domains: exon 6 encoding the second transmembrane spanning domain, site of the murine susceptibility mutation; and exon 11 encoding a conserved transport motif. No mutations comparable to the murine susceptibility mutation were found. The transcriptional initiation site mapped 148 bp 5' of the translational initiation codon. 440bp of 5' flanking sequence contained putative promoter region elements: 6 interferon-gamma response elements, 3 W-elements, 3 NF kappa B binding sites and 1 AP-1 site. Nine purine-rich GGAA core motifs for the myeloid-specific PU.1 transcription factor were identified, two combining with imperfect AP1-like sites to create PEA3 motifs. TATA, GC and CCAAT boxes were absent. A possible enhancer element containing the Z-DNA forming dinucleotide repeat t(gt),ac(gt),ac(gt),g was polymorphic (4 alleles; n = 4,9,10,11), and was used to map NRAMP to 2q35. CONCLUSIONS: This analysis provides important resources to study the role of NRAMP in human disease. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:8529098

  19. Construction of the first high-density genetic linkage map of Salvia miltiorrhiza using specific length amplified fragment (SLAF) sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tian; Guo, Linlin; Pan, Yuling; Zhao, Qi; Wang , Jianhua; Song, Zhenqiao

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is an important medicinal crop in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Knowledge of its genetic foundation is limited because sufficient molecular markers have not been developed, and therefore a high-density genetic linkage map is incomplete. Specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) is a recently developed high-throughput strategy for large-scale SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) discovery and genotyping based on next generation sequencing (NGS). In this study, genomic DNA extracted from two parents and their 96 F1 individuals was subjected to high-throughput sequencing and SLAF library construction. A total of 155.96 Mb of data containing 155,958,181 pair-end reads were obtained after preprocessing. The average coverage of each SLAF marker was 83.43-fold for the parents compared with 10.36-fold for the F1 offspring. The final linkage map consists of 5,164 SLAFs in 8 linkage groups (LGs) and spans 1,516.43 cM, with an average distance of 0.29 cM between adjacent markers. The results will not only provide a platform for mapping quantitative trait loci but also offer a critical new tool for S. miltiorrhiza biotechnology and comparative genomics as well as a valuable reference for TCM studies. PMID:27040179

  20. Construction of the first high-density genetic linkage map of Salvia miltiorrhiza using specific length amplified fragment (SLAF) sequencing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian; Guo, Linlin; Pan, Yuling; Zhao, Qi; Wang, Jianhua; Song, Zhenqiao

    2016-04-04

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is an important medicinal crop in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Knowledge of its genetic foundation is limited because sufficient molecular markers have not been developed, and therefore a high-density genetic linkage map is incomplete. Specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) is a recently developed high-throughput strategy for large-scale SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) discovery and genotyping based on next generation sequencing (NGS). In this study, genomic DNA extracted from two parents and their 96 F1 individuals was subjected to high-throughput sequencing and SLAF library construction. A total of 155.96 Mb of data containing 155,958,181 pair-end reads were obtained after preprocessing. The average coverage of each SLAF marker was 83.43-fold for the parents compared with 10.36-fold for the F1 offspring. The final linkage map consists of 5,164 SLAFs in 8 linkage groups (LGs) and spans 1,516.43 cM, with an average distance of 0.29 cM between adjacent markers. The results will not only provide a platform for mapping quantitative trait loci but also offer a critical new tool for S. miltiorrhiza biotechnology and comparative genomics as well as a valuable reference for TCM studies.

  1. Construction of a High-Density American Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) Composite Map Using Genotyping-by-Sequencing for Multi-pedigree Linkage Mapping.

    PubMed

    Schlautman, Brandon; Covarrubias-Pazaran, Giovanny; Diaz-Garcia, Luis; Iorizzo, Massimo; Polashock, James; Grygleski, Edward; Vorsa, Nicholi; Zalapa, Juan

    2017-04-03

    The American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) is a recently domesticated, economically important, fruit crop with limited molecular resources. New genetic resources could accelerate genetic gain in cranberry through characterization of its genomic structure and by enabling molecular-assisted breeding strategies. To increase the availability of cranberry genomic resources, genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) was used to discover and genotype thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within three interrelated cranberry full-sib populations. Additional simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci were added to the SNP datasets and used to construct bin maps for the parents of the populations, which were then merged to create the first high-density cranberry composite map containing 6073 markers (5437 SNPs and 636 SSRs) on 12 linkage groups (LGs) spanning 1124 cM. Interestingly, higher rates of recombination were observed in maternal than paternal gametes. The large number of markers in common (mean of 57.3) and the high degree of observed collinearity (mean Pair-wise Spearman rank correlations >0.99) between the LGs of the parental maps demonstrates the utility of GBS in cranberry for identifying polymorphic SNP loci that are transferable between pedigrees and populations in future trait-association studies. Furthermore, the high-density of markers anchored within the component maps allowed identification of segregation distortion regions, placement of centromeres on each of the 12 LGs, and anchoring of genomic scaffolds. Collectively, the results represent an important contribution to the current understanding of cranberry genomic structure and to the availability of molecular tools for future genetic research and breeding efforts in cranberry.

  2. Construction of a High-Density American Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) Composite Map Using Genotyping-by-Sequencing for Multi-pedigree Linkage Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Schlautman, Brandon; Covarrubias-Pazaran, Giovanny; Diaz-Garcia, Luis; Iorizzo, Massimo; Polashock, James; Grygleski, Edward; Vorsa, Nicholi; Zalapa, Juan

    2017-01-01

    The American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) is a recently domesticated, economically important, fruit crop with limited molecular resources. New genetic resources could accelerate genetic gain in cranberry through characterization of its genomic structure and by enabling molecular-assisted breeding strategies. To increase the availability of cranberry genomic resources, genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) was used to discover and genotype thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within three interrelated cranberry full-sib populations. Additional simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci were added to the SNP datasets and used to construct bin maps for the parents of the populations, which were then merged to create the first high-density cranberry composite map containing 6073 markers (5437 SNPs and 636 SSRs) on 12 linkage groups (LGs) spanning 1124 cM. Interestingly, higher rates of recombination were observed in maternal than paternal gametes. The large number of markers in common (mean of 57.3) and the high degree of observed collinearity (mean Pair-wise Spearman rank correlations >0.99) between the LGs of the parental maps demonstrates the utility of GBS in cranberry for identifying polymorphic SNP loci that are transferable between pedigrees and populations in future trait-association studies. Furthermore, the high-density of markers anchored within the component maps allowed identification of segregation distortion regions, placement of centromeres on each of the 12 LGs, and anchoring of genomic scaffolds. Collectively, the results represent an important contribution to the current understanding of cranberry genomic structure and to the availability of molecular tools for future genetic research and breeding efforts in cranberry. PMID:28250016

  3. Reliable in silico identification of sequence polymorphisms and their application for extending the genetic map of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Holtgräwe, Daniela; Sörensen, Thomas Rosleff; Viehöver, Prisca; Schneider, Jessica; Schulz, Britta; Borchardt, Dietrich; Kraft, Thomas; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Weisshaar, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Molecular markers are a highly valuable tool for creating genetic maps. Like in many other crops, sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) breeding is increasingly supported by the application of such genetic markers. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based markers have a high potential for automated analysis and high-throughput genotyping. We developed a bioinformatics workflow that uses Sanger and 2nd-generation sequence data for detection, evaluation and verification of new transcript-associated SNPs from sugar beet. RNAseq data from one parent of an established mapping population were produced by 454-FLX sequencing and compared to Sanger ESTs derived from the other parent. The workflow established for SNP detection considers the quality values of both types of reads, provides polymorphic alignments as well as selection criteria for reliable SNP detection and allows painless generation of new genetic markers within genes. We obtained a total of 14,323 genic SNPs and InDels. According to empirically optimised settings for the quality parameters, we classified these SNPs into four usability categories. Validation of a subset of the in silico detected SNPs by genotyping the mapping population indicated a high success rate of the SNP detection. Finally, a total of 307 new markers were integrated with existing data into a new genetic map of sugar beet which offers improved resolution and the integration of terminal markers.

  4. Exploring a Nonmodel Teleost Genome Through RAD Sequencing-Linkage Mapping in Common Pandora, Pagellus erythrinus and Comparative Genomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Manousaki, Tereza; Tsakogiannis, Alexandros; Taggart, John B; Palaiokostas, Christos; Tsaparis, Dimitris; Lagnel, Jacques; Chatziplis, Dimitrios; Magoulas, Antonios; Papandroulakis, Nikos; Mylonas, Constantinos C; Tsigenopoulos, Costas S

    2015-12-29

    Common pandora (Pagellus erythrinus) is a benthopelagic marine fish belonging to the teleost family Sparidae, and a newly recruited species in Mediterranean aquaculture. The paucity of genetic information relating to sparids, despite their growing economic value for aquaculture, provides the impetus for exploring the genomics of this fish group. Genomic tool development, such as genetic linkage maps provision, lays the groundwork for linking genotype to phenotype, allowing fine-mapping of loci responsible for beneficial traits. In this study, we applied ddRAD methodology to identify polymorphic markers in a full-sib family of common pandora. Employing the Illumina MiSeq platform, we sampled and sequenced a size-selected genomic fraction of 99 individuals, which led to the identification of 920 polymorphic loci. Downstream mapping analysis resulted in the construction of 24 robust linkage groups, corresponding to the karyotype of the species. The common pandora linkage map showed varying degrees of conserved synteny with four other teleost genomes, namely the European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax), Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), and medaka (Oryzias latipes), suggesting a conserved genomic evolution in Sparidae. Our work exploits the possibilities of genotyping by sequencing to gain novel insights into genome structure and evolution. Such information will boost the study of cultured species and will set the foundation for a deeper understanding of the complex evolutionary history of teleosts.

  5. Genetic mapping of legume orthologs reveals high conservation of synteny between lentil species and the sequenced genomes of Medicago and chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Gujaria-Verma, Neha; Vail, Sally L.; Carrasquilla-Garcia, Noelia; Penmetsa, R. Varma; Cook, Douglas R.; Farmer, Andrew D.; Vandenberg, Albert; Bett, Kirstin E.

    2014-01-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is a global food crop with increasing importance for food security in south Asia and other regions. Lens ervoides, a wild relative of cultivated lentil, is an important source of agronomic trait variation. Lens is a member of the galegoid clade of the Papilionoideae family, which includes other important dietary legumes such as chickpea (Cicer arietinum) and pea (Pisum sativum), and the sequenced model legume Medicago truncatula. Understanding the genetic structure of Lens spp. in relation to more fully sequenced legumes would allow leveraging of genomic resources. A set of 1107 TOG-based amplicons were identified in L. ervoides and a subset thereof used to design SNP markers for mapping. A map of L. ervoides consisting of 377 SNP markers spread across seven linkage groups was developed using a GoldenGate genotyping array and single SNP marker assays. Comparison with maps of M. truncatula and L. culinaris documented considerable shared synteny and led to the identification of a few major translocations and a major inversion that distinguish Lens from M. truncatula, as well as a translocation that distinguishes L. culinaris from L. ervoides. The identification of chromosome-level differences among Lens spp. will aid in the understanding of introgression of genes from L. ervoides into cultivated L. culinaris, furthering genetic research and breeding applications in lentil. PMID:25538716

  6. A chromosome bin map of 2148 expressed sequence tag loci of wheat homoeologous group 7.

    PubMed

    Hossain, K G; Kalavacharla, V; Lazo, G R; Hegstad, J; Wentz, M J; Kianian, P M A; Simons, K; Gehlhar, S; Rust, J L; Syamala, R R; Obeori, K; Bhamidimarri, S; Karunadharma, P; Chao, S; Anderson, O D; Qi, L L; Echalier, B; Gill, B S; Linkiewicz, A M; Ratnasiri, A; Dubcovsky, J; Akhunov, E D; Dvorák, J; Miftahudin; Ross, K; Gustafson, J P; Radhawa, H S; Dilbirligi, M; Gill, K S; Peng, J H; Lapitan, N L V; Greene, R A; Bermudez-Kandianis, C E; Sorrells, M E; Feril, O; Pathan, M S; Nguyen, H T; Gonzalez-Hernandez, J L; Conley, E J; Anderson, J A; Choi, D W; Fenton, D; Close, T J; McGuire, P E; Qualset, C O; Kianian, S F

    2004-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a high-density chromosome bin map of homoeologous group 7 in hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), to identify gene distribution in these chromosomes, and to perform comparative studies of wheat with rice and barley. We mapped 2148 loci from 919 EST clones onto group 7 chromosomes of wheat. In the majority of cases the numbers of loci were significantly lower in the centromeric regions and tended to increase in the distal regions. The level of duplicated loci in this group was 24% with most of these loci being localized toward the distal regions. One hundred nineteen EST probes that hybridized to three fragments and mapped to the three group 7 chromosomes were designated landmark probes and were used to construct a consensus homoeologous group 7 map. An additional 49 probes that mapped to 7AS, 7DS, and the ancestral translocated segment involving 7BS also were designated landmarks. Landmark probe orders and comparative maps of wheat, rice, and barley were produced on the basis of corresponding rice BAC/PAC and genetic markers that mapped on chromosomes 6 and 8 of rice. Identification of landmark ESTs and development of consensus maps may provide a framework of conserved coding regions predating the evolution of wheat genomes.

  7. Chromosome mapping of repetitive sequences in Anostomidae species: implications for genomic and sex chromosome evolution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Members of the Anostomidae family provide an interesting model system for the study of the influence of repetitive elements on genome composition, mainly because they possess numerous heterochromatic segments and a peculiar system of female heterogamety that is restricted to a few species of the Leporinus genus. The aim of this study was to isolate and identify important new repetitive DNA elements in Anostomidae through restriction enzyme digestion, followed by cloning, characterisation and chromosome mapping of this fragment. To identify repetitive elements in other Leporinus species and expand on studies of repetitive elements in Anostomidae, hybridisation experiments were also performed using previously described probes of LeSpeI repetitive elements. Results The 628-base pair (bp) LeSpeII fragment was hybridised to metaphase cells of L. elongatus individuals as well as those of L. macrocephalus, L. obtusidens, L. striatus, L. lacustris, L. friderici, Schizodon borellii and S. isognathus. In L. elongatus, both male and female cells contained small clusters of LeSpeII repetitive elements dispersed on all of the chromosomes, with enrichment near most of the terminal portions of the chromosomes. In the female sex chromosomes of L. elongatus (Z2,Z2/W1W2), however, this repeated element was absent. In the remaining species, a dispersed pattern of hybridisation was observed on all chromosomes irrespective of whether or not they were sex chromosomes. The repetitive element LeSpeI produced positive hybridisations signals only in L. elongatus, L. macrocephalus and L. obtusidens, i.e., species with differentiated sex chromosomes. In the remaining species, the LeSpeI element did not produce hybridisation signals. Conclusions Results are discussed in terms of the effects of repetitive sequences on the differentiation of the Anostomidae genome, especially with respect to sex chromosome evolution. LeSpeII showed hybridisation patterns typical of Long Interspersed

  8. B1-insensitive T2 mapping of healthy thigh muscles using a T2-prepared 3D TSE sequence

    PubMed Central

    Klupp, Elisabeth; Weidlich, Dominik; Schlaeger, Sarah; Baum, Thomas; Cervantes, Barbara; Deschauer, Marcus; Kooijman, Hendrik; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Zimmer, Claus; Kirschke, Jan S.; Karampinos, Dimitrios C.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To propose a T2-prepared 3D turbo spin echo (T2prep 3D TSE) sequence for B1-insensitive skeletal muscle T2 mapping and compare its performance with 2D and 3D multi-echo spin echo (MESE) for T2 mapping in thigh muscles of healthy subjects. Methods The performance of 2D MESE, 3D MESE and the proposed T2prep 3D TSE in the presence of transmit B1 and B0 inhomogeneities was first simulated. The thigh muscles of ten young and healthy subjects were then scanned on a 3 T system and T2 mapping was performed using the three sequences. Transmit B1-maps and proton density fat fraction (PDFF) maps were also acquired. The subjects were scanned three times to assess reproducibility. T2 values were compared among sequences and their sensitivity to B1 inhomogeneities was compared to simulation results. Correlations were also determined between T2 values, PDFF and B1. Results The left rectus femoris muscle showed the largest B1 deviations from the nominal value (from 54.2% to 92.9%). Significant negative correlations between T2 values and B1 values were found in the left rectus femoris muscle for 3D MESE (r = -0.72, p<0.001) and 2D MESE (r = -0.71, p<0.001), but not for T2prep 3D TSE (r = -0.32, p = 0.09). Reproducibility of T2 expressed by root mean square coefficients of variation (RMSCVs) were equal to 3.5% in T2prep 3D TSE, 2.6% in 3D MESE and 2.4% in 2D MESE. Significant differences between T2 values of 3D sequences (T2prep 3D TSE and 3D MESE) and 2D MESE were found in all muscles with the highest values for 2D MESE (p<0.05). No significant correlations were found between PDFF and T2 values. Conclusion A strong influence of an inhomogeneous B1 field on the T2 values of 3D MESE and 2D MESE was shown, whereas the proposed T2prep 3D TSE gives B1-insensitive and reproducible thigh muscle T2 mapping. PMID:28196133

  9. The alternatively-included 11a sequence modifies the effects of Mena on actin cytoskeletal organization and cell behavior

    PubMed Central

    Balsamo, Michele; Mondal, Chandrani; Carmona, Guillaume; McClain, Leslie M.; Riquelme, Daisy N.; Tadros, Jenny; Ma, Duan; Vasile, Eliza; Condeelis, John S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Gertler, Frank B.

    2016-01-01

    During tumor progression, alternative splicing gives rise to different Mena protein isoforms. We analyzed how Mena11a, an isoform enriched in epithelia and epithelial-like cells, affects Mena-dependent regulation of actin dynamics and cell behavior. While other Mena isoforms promote actin polymerization and drive membrane protrusion, we find that Mena11a decreases actin polymerization and growth factor-stimulated membrane protrusion at lamellipodia. Ectopic Mena11a expression slows mesenchymal-like cell motility, while isoform-specific depletion of endogenous Mena11a in epithelial-like tumor cells perturbs cell:cell junctions and increases membrane protrusion and overall cell motility. Mena11a can dampen membrane protrusion and reduce actin polymerization in the absence of other Mena isoforms, indicating that it is not simply an inactive Mena isoform. We identify a phosphorylation site within 11a that is required for some Mena11a-specific functions. RNA-seq data analysis from patient cohorts demonstrates that the difference between mRNAs encoding constitutive Mena sequences and those containing the 11a exon correlates with metastasis in colorectal cancer, suggesting that 11a exon exclusion contributes to invasive phenotypes and leads to poor clinical outcomes. PMID:27748415

  10. The alternatively-included 11a sequence modifies the effects of Mena on actin cytoskeletal organization and cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Balsamo, Michele; Mondal, Chandrani; Carmona, Guillaume; McClain, Leslie M; Riquelme, Daisy N; Tadros, Jenny; Ma, Duan; Vasile, Eliza; Condeelis, John S; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Gertler, Frank B

    2016-10-17

    During tumor progression, alternative splicing gives rise to different Mena protein isoforms. We analyzed how Mena11a, an isoform enriched in epithelia and epithelial-like cells, affects Mena-dependent regulation of actin dynamics and cell behavior. While other Mena isoforms promote actin polymerization and drive membrane protrusion, we find that Mena11a decreases actin polymerization and growth factor-stimulated membrane protrusion at lamellipodia. Ectopic Mena11a expression slows mesenchymal-like cell motility, while isoform-specific depletion of endogenous Mena11a in epithelial-like tumor cells perturbs cell:cell junctions and increases membrane protrusion and overall cell motility. Mena11a can dampen membrane protrusion and reduce actin polymerization in the absence of other Mena isoforms, indicating that it is not simply an inactive Mena isoform. We identify a phosphorylation site within 11a that is required for some Mena11a-specific functions. RNA-seq data analysis from patient cohorts demonstrates that the difference between mRNAs encoding constitutive Mena sequences and those containing the 11a exon correlates with metastasis in colorectal cancer, suggesting that 11a exon exclusion contributes to invasive phenotypes and leads to poor clinical outcomes.

  11. Enlarging the scope of cell penetrating prenylated peptides to include farnesylated “CAAX” box sequences and diverse cell types

    PubMed Central

    Ochocki, Joshua D.; Igbavboa, Urule; Wood, W. Gibson; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.; Distefano, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Protein prenylation is a post-translational modification that is present in a large number of proteins; it has been proposed to be responsible for membrane association and protein-protein interactions which contribute to its role in signal transduction pathways. Research has been aimed at inhibiting prenylation with farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) based on the finding that the farnesylated protein Ras is implicated in 30% of human cancers. Despite numerous studies on the enzymology of prenylation in vitro, many questions remain about the process of prenylation as it occurs in living cells. Here we describe the preparation of a series of farnesylated peptides that contain sequences recognized by protein farnesyltransferase. Using a combination of flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, we show that these peptides enter a variety of different cell types. A related peptide where the farnesyl group has been replaced by a disulfide-linked decyl group is also shown to be able to efficiently enter cells. These results highlight the applicability of these peptides as a platform for further study of protein prenylation and subsequent processing in live cells. PMID:20584014

  12. Mapping of DNA instability at the fragile X to a trinucleotide repeat sequence p(CCG)n

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, E.J.; Pritchard, M.; Lynch, M.; Yu, S.; Holman, K.; Baker, E.; Sutherland, G.R.; Richards, R.I. ); Warren, S.T. ); Schlessinger, D. )

    1991-06-21

    The sequence of a Pst I restriction fragment was determined that demonstrates instability in fragile X syndrome pedigrees. The region of instability was localized to a trinucleotide repeat p(CCG)n. The sequences flanking this repeat were identical in normal and affected individuals. The breakpoints in two somatic cell hybrids constructed to break at the fragile sites also mapped to this repeat sequence. The repeat exhibits instability both when cloned in a nonhomologous host and after amplification by the polymerase chain reaction. These results suggest variation in the trinucleotide repeat copy number as the molecular basis for the instability and possibly the fragile site. This would account for the observed properties of this region in vivo and in vitro.

  13. Combining SNP discovery from next-generation sequencing data with bulked segregant analysis (BSA) to fine-map genes in polyploid wheat

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are providing new ways to accelerate fine-mapping and gene isolation in many species. To date, the majority of these efforts have focused on diploid organisms with readily available whole genome sequence information. In this study, as a proof of concept, we tested the use of NGS for SNP discovery in tetraploid wheat lines differing for the previously cloned grain protein content (GPC) gene GPC-B1. Bulked segregant analysis (BSA) was used to define a subset of putative SNPs within the candidate gene region, which were then used to fine-map GPC-B1. Results We used Illumina paired end technology to sequence mRNA (RNAseq) from near isogenic lines differing across a ~30-cM interval including the GPC-B1 locus. After discriminating for SNPs between the two homoeologous wheat genomes and additional quality filtering, we identified inter-varietal SNPs in wheat unigenes between the parental lines. The relative frequency of these SNPs was examined by RNAseq in two bulked samples made up of homozygous recombinant lines differing for their GPC phenotype. SNPs that were enriched at least 3-fold in the corresponding pool (6.5% of all SNPs) were further evaluated. Marker assays were designed for a subset of the enriched SNPs and mapped using DNA from individuals of each bulk. Thirty nine new SNP markers, corresponding to 67% of the validated SNPs, mapped across a 12.2-cM interval including GPC-B1. This translated to 1 SNP marker per 0.31 cM defining the GPC-B1 gene to within 13-18 genes in syntenic cereal genomes and to a 0.4 cM interval in wheat. Conclusions This study exemplifies the use of RNAseq for SNP discovery in polyploid species and supports the use of BSA as an effective way to target SNPs to specific genetic intervals to fine-map genes in unsequenced genomes. PMID:22280551

  14. Structural organization and expression of amplified chromosomal sequences, which include the rudimentary gene, in cultured Drosophila cells resistant to N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate.

    PubMed

    Laval, M; Azou, Y; Miassod, R

    1989-12-01

    We have used 160 kilobases of cloned Drosophila genomic DNA from the rudimentary (r) region to examine the organization of amplified DNA in Drosophila cells resistant to 10 mM N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALAr cells) obtained by stepwise selection. Evidence for the direct tandem linkage of the amplified sequences is presented. The pattern and intensity of amplified bands as well as the presence of novel junctions in the DNA sequence of PALAr cells indicate that there are two types of units of 150 and 120 kilobases long. The sequence of the smaller unit is entirely included within the larger one. The longer of the two units is present twice while the shorter one is amplified eightfold as compared to the level of the relevant DNA sequences in the wild-type. These data are consistent with a model in which successive crossing-over events over several cell cycles lead to amplification of the selected r gene and flanking sequences. However, these data can also be accounted for by a totally different mechanism in which multiple copies of DNA are generated by rolling circle replication. Transcription units other than the r gene are present within the 150 kilobase region of amplified DNA. These are found to be overexpressed in PALAr cells, though some transcripts are underrepresented relative to the copy number of the corresponding coding sequences.

  15. Mutation analysis of TRPS1 gene including core promoter, 5'UTR, and 3'UTR regulatory sequences with insight into their organization.

    PubMed

    Solc, Roman; Klugerova, Michaela; Vcelak, Josef; Baxova, Alice; Kuklik, Miloslav; Vseticka, Jan; Beharka, Rastislav; Hirschfeldova, Katerina

    2017-01-01

    The TRPS1 protein is a potent regulator of proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The TRPS1 gene aberrations are strongly associated with rare trichorhinophalangeal syndrome (TRPS) development. We have conducted MLPA analysis to capture deletion within the crucial 8q24.1 chromosomal region in combination with mutation analysis of TRPS1 gene including core promoter, 5'UTR, and 3'UTR sequences in nine TRPS patients. Low complexity or extent of untranslated regulatory sequences avoided them from analysis in previous studies. Amplicon based next generation sequencing used in our study bridge over these technical limitations. Finally, we have made extended in silico analysis of TRPS1 gene regulatory sequences organization. Single contiguous deletion and an intragenic deletion intervening several exons were detected. Mutation analysis revealed five TRPS1 gene aberrations (two structural rearrangements, two nonsense mutations, and one missense substitution) reaching the overall detection rate of 78%. Several polymorphic variants were detected within the analysed regulatory sequences but without proposed pathogenic effect. In silico analysis suggested alternative promoter usage and diverse expression effectivity for different TRPS1 transcripts. Haploinsufficiency of TRPS1 gene was responsible for most of the TRPS phenotype. Structure of TRPS1 gene regulatory sequences is indicative of generally low single allele expression and its tight control.

  16. MCTP system model based on linear programming optimization of apertures obtained from sequencing patient image data maps

    SciTech Connect

    Ureba, A.; Salguero, F. J.; Barbeiro, A. R.; Jimenez-Ortega, E.; Baeza, J. A.; Leal, A.; Miras, H.; Linares, R.; Perucha, M.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The authors present a hybrid direct multileaf collimator (MLC) aperture optimization model exclusively based on sequencing of patient imaging data to be implemented on a Monte Carlo treatment planning system (MC-TPS) to allow the explicit radiation transport simulation of advanced radiotherapy treatments with optimal results in efficient times for clinical practice. Methods: The planning system (called CARMEN) is a full MC-TPS, controlled through aMATLAB interface, which is based on the sequencing of a novel map, called “biophysical” map, which is generated from enhanced image data of patients to achieve a set of segments actually deliverable. In order to reduce the required computation time, the conventional fluence map has been replaced by the biophysical map which is sequenced to provide direct apertures that will later be weighted by means of an optimization algorithm based on linear programming. A ray-casting algorithm throughout the patient CT assembles information about the found structures, the mass thickness crossed, as well as PET values. Data are recorded to generate a biophysical map for each gantry angle. These maps are the input files for a home-made sequencer developed to take into account the interactions of photons and electrons with the MLC. For each linac (Axesse of Elekta and Primus of Siemens) and energy beam studied (6, 9, 12, 15 MeV and 6 MV), phase space files were simulated with the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc code. The dose calculation in patient was carried out with the BEAMDOSE code. This code is a modified version of EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc able to calculate the beamlet dose in order to combine them with different weights during the optimization process. Results: Three complex radiotherapy treatments were selected to check the reliability of CARMEN in situations where the MC calculation can offer an added value: A head-and-neck case (Case I) with three targets delineated on PET/CT images and a demanding dose-escalation; a partial breast

  17. The map-based genome sequence of Spirodela polyrhiza aligned with its chromosomes, a reference for karyotype evolution.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hieu Xuan; Vu, Giang Thi Ha; Wang, Wenqin; Appenroth, Klaus J; Messing, Joachim; Schubert, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Duckweeds are aquatic monocotyledonous plants of potential economic interest with fast vegetative propagation, comprising 37 species with variable genome sizes (0.158-1.88 Gbp). The genomic sequence of Spirodela polyrhiza, the smallest and the most ancient duckweed genome, needs to be aligned to its chromosomes as a reference and prerequisite to study the genome and karyotype evolution of other duckweed species. We selected physically mapped bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) containing Spirodela DNA inserts with little or no repetitive elements as probes for multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mcFISH), using an optimized BAC pooling strategy, to validate its physical map and correlate it with its chromosome complement. By consecutive mcFISH analyses, we assigned the originally assembled 32 pseudomolecules (supercontigs) of the genomic sequences to the 20 chromosomes of S. polyrhiza. A Spirodela cytogenetic map containing 96 BAC markers with an average distance of 0.89 Mbp was constructed. Using a cocktail of 41 BACs in three colors, all chromosome pairs could be individualized simultaneously. Seven ancestral blocks emerged from duplicated chromosome segments of 19 Spirodela chromosomes. The chromosomally integrated genome of S. polyrhiza and the established prerequisites for comparative chromosome painting enable future studies on the chromosome homoeology and karyotype evolution of duckweed species.

  18. Evolutionarily conserved sequences of striated muscle myosin heavy chain isoforms. Epitope mapping by cDNA expression.

    PubMed

    Miller, J B; Teal, S B; Stockdale, F E

    1989-08-05

    A cDNA expression strategy was used to localize amino acid sequences which were specific for fast, as opposed to slow, isoforms of the chicken skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) and which were conserved in vertebrate evolution. Five monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), termed F18, F27, F30, F47, and F59, were prepared that reacted with all of the known chicken fast MHC isoforms but did not react with any of the known chicken slow nor with smooth muscle MHC isoforms. The epitopes recognized by mAbs F18, F30, F47, and F59 were on the globular head fragment of the MHC, whereas the epitope recognized by mAb F27 was on the helical tail or rod fragment. Reactivity of all five mAbs also was confined to fast MHCs in the rat, with the exception of mAb F59, which also reacted with the beta-cardiac MHC, the single slow MHC isoform common to both the rat heart and skeletal muscle. None of the five epitopes was expressed on amphioxus, nematode, or Dictyostelium MHC. The F27 and F59 epitopes were found on shark, electric ray, goldfish, newt, frog, turtle, chicken, quail, rabbit, and rat MHCs. The epitopes recognized by these mAbs were conserved, therefore, to varying degrees through vertebrate evolution and differed in sequence from homologous regions of a number of invertebrate MHCs and myosin-like proteins. The sequence of those epitopes on the head were mapped using a two-part cDNA expression strategy. First, Bal31 exonuclease digestion was used to rapidly generate fragments of a chicken embryonic fast MHC cDNA that were progressively deleted from the 3' end. These cDNA fragments were expressed as beta-galactosidase/MHC fusion proteins using the pUR290 vector; the fusion proteins were tested by immunoblotting for reactivity with the mAbs; and the approximate locations of the epitopes were determined from the sizes of the cDNA fragments that encoded a particular epitope. The epitopes were then precisely mapped by expression of overlapping cDNA fragments of known sequence that

  19. The Role of the Carboxyl-Terminal Sequence of Tau and MAP2 in the Pathogenesis of Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ce; Miyasaka, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    Dementia includes several diseases characterized by acquired and irreversible brain dysfunctions that interfere with daily life. According to the etiology, dementia can be induced by poisoning or metabolic disorders, and other cases of dementia have a clear pathogenesis. However, half of neurodegenerative diseases have an unclear pathogenesis and etiology. Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Lewy body dementia and frontal-temporal dementia are the three most common types of dementia. These neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the appearance of the following specific protein inclusions: amyloid beta and tau in AD; α-synuclein in Lewy body dementia; and tau, TDP-43, or FUS in frontal-temporal dementia. Thus far, studies on the pathogenesis of dementia mainly focus aberrant inclusions formed by the aforementioned proteins. As a historically heavily studied protein tau is likely to be associated with the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases that cause dementia. The role of tau in neurodegeneration has been unknown for many years. However, both pathological and genetic analyses have helped tau become gradually recognized as an important factor in the pathogenesis of tauopathy. Currently, especially in the field of AD, tau is attracting more attention and is being considered a potential target for drug development. In this review article, previously discovered biochemical and pathological features of tau are highlighted, and current opinions regarding the neurotoxicity of tau are summarized. Additionally, we introduce key amino acid sequences responsible for tau neurotoxicity from our studies using transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans. Finally, a new hypothesis regarding the roles of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and tau in the pathogenesis of tauopathy is discussed. PMID:28082867

  20. Microsatellite primers resource developed from the mapped sequence scaffolds of Nisqually-1 genome. Submitted to New Phytologist

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Tongming; ZHANG, Dr. XINYE; Gunter, Lee E; Li, Shuxian; Wullschleger, Stan D; Huang, Prof. Minren; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2009-01-01

    In this study, 148 428 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer pairs were designed from the unambiguously mapped sequence scaffolds of the Nisqually-1 genome. The physical position of the priming sites were identified along each of the 19 Populus chromosomes, and it was specified whether the priming sequences belong to intronic, intergenic, exonic or UTR regions. A subset of 150 SSR loci were amplified and a high amplification success rate (72%) was obtained in P. tremuloides, which belongs to a divergent subgenus of Populus relative to Nisqually-1. PCR reactions showed that the amplification success rate of exonic primer pairs was much higher than that of the intronic/intergenic primer pairs. Applying ANOVA and regression analyses to the flanking sequences of microsatellites, the repeat lengths, the GC contents of the repeats, the repeat motif numbers, the repeat motif length and the base composition of the repeat motif, it was determined that only the base composition of the repeat motif and the repeat motif length significantly affect the microsatellite variability in P. tremuloides samples. The SSR primer resource developed in this study provides a database for selecting highly transferable SSR markers with known physical position in the Populus genome and provides a comprehensive genetic tool to extend the genome sequence of Nisqually-1 to genetic studies in different Populus species.

  1. Accurate Breakpoint Mapping in Apparently Balanced Translocation Families with Discordant Phenotypes Using Whole Genome Mate-Pair Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Aristidou, Constantia; Koufaris, Costas; Theodosiou, Athina; Bak, Mads; Mehrjouy, Mana M.; Behjati, Farkhondeh; Tanteles, George; Christophidou-Anastasiadou, Violetta; Tommerup, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Familial apparently balanced translocations (ABTs) segregating with discordant phenotypes are extremely challenging for interpretation and counseling due to the scarcity of publications and lack of routine techniques for quick investigation. Recently, next generation sequencing has emerged as an efficacious methodology for precise detection of translocation breakpoints. However, studies so far have mainly focused on de novo translocations. The present study focuses specifically on familial cases in order to shed some light to this diagnostic dilemma. Whole-genome mate-pair sequencing (WG-MPS) was applied to map the breakpoints in nine two-way ABT carriers from four families. Translocation breakpoints and patient-specific structural variants were validated by Sanger sequencing and quantitative Real Time PCR, respectively. Identical sequencing patterns and breakpoints were identified in affected and non-affected members carrying the same translocations. PTCD1, ATP5J2-PTCD1, CADPS2, and STPG1 were disrupted by the translocations in three families, rendering them initially as possible disease candidate genes. However, subsequent mutation screening and structural variant analysis did not reveal any pathogenic mutations or unique variants in the affected individuals that could explain the phenotypic differences between carriers of the same translocations. In conclusion, we suggest that NGS-based methods, such as WG-MPS, can be successfully used for detailed mapping of translocation breakpoints, which can also be used in routine clinical investigation of ABT cases. Unlike de novo translocations, no associations were determined here between familial two-way ABTs and the phenotype of the affected members, in which the presence of cryptic imbalances and complex chromosomal rearrangements has been excluded. Future whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing will potentially reveal unidentified mutations in the patients underlying the discordant phenotypes within each family. In

  2. The complete genome sequence of the Alphaentomopoxvirus Anomala cuprea entomopoxvirus, including its terminal hairpin loop sequences, suggests a potentially unique mode of apoptosis inhibition and mode of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Wataru; Miyamoto, Kazuhisa; Wada, Sanae

    2014-03-01

    Complete genome sequence of Anomala cuprea entomopoxvirus, which belongs to the genus Alphaentomopoxvirus, including its terminal hairpin loop sequences, is reported. This is the first genome sequence of Alphaentomopoxvirus reported, and hairpin loops in entomopoxviruses have not previously been sequenced. The genome is 245,717 bp, which is smaller than had previously been estimated for Alphaentomopoxvirus. The inverted terminal repeats are quite long, and experimental results suggest that one genome molecule has one type of hairpin at one end and another type at the other end. The genome contains unexpected ORFs, e.g., that for the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 of eukaryotes. The BIR and RING domains found in a single ORF for an inhibitor of apoptosis in baculoviruses and entomopoxviruses occurred in two different, widely separated ORFs. Furthermore, an ORF in the genome contains a serpin domain that was previously found in vertebrate poxviruses for apoptosis inhibition but not in insect viruses.

  3. AFSM sequencing approach: a simple and rapid method for genome-wide SNP and methylation site discovery and genetic mapping

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhiqiang; Zou, Meiling; Zhang, Shengkui; Feng, Binxiao; Wang, Wenquan

    2014-01-01

    We describe methods for the assessment of amplified-fragment single nucleotide polymorphism and methylation (AFSM) sites using a quick and simple molecular marker-assisted breeding strategy based on the use of two restriction enzyme pairs (EcoRI-MspI and EcoRI-HpaII) and a next-generation sequencing platform. Two sets of 85 adapter pairs were developed to concurrently identify SNPs, indels and methylation sites for 85 lines of cassava population in this study. In addition to SNPs and indels, the simplicity of the AFSM protocol makes it particularly suitable for high-throughput full methylation and hemi-methylation analyses. To further demonstrate the ease of this approach, a cassava genetic linkage map was constructed. This approach should be widely applicable for genetic mapping in a variety of organisms and will improve the application of crop genomics in assisted breeding. PMID:25466435

  4. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cook-Deegan, R.M.; Venter, J.C.; Gilbert, W.; Mulligan, J.; Mansfield, B.K.

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  5. Expressed sequence tags from cephalic chemosensory organs of the northern walnut husk fly, Rhagoletis suavis, including a putative canonical odorant receptor.

    PubMed

    Ramsdell, Karlene M M; Lyons-Sobaski, Sheila A; Robertson, Hugh M; Walden, Kimberly K O; Feder, Jeffrey L; Wanner, Kevin; Berlocher, Stewart H

    2010-01-01

    Rhagoletis fruit flies are important both as major agricultural pests and as model organisms for the study of adaptation to new host plants and host race formation. Response to fruit odor plays a critical role in such adaptation. To better understand olfaction in Rhagoletis, an expressed sequence tag (EST) study was carried out on the antennae and maxillary palps of Rhagoletis suavis (Loew) (Diptera: Tephritidae), a common pest of walnuts in eastern United States. After cDNA cloning and sequencing, 544 ESTs were annotated. Of these, 66% had an open reading frame and could be matched to a previously sequenced gene. Based on BLAST sequence homology, 9% (49 of 544 sequences) were nuclear genes potentially involved in olfaction. The most significant finding is a putative odorant receptor (OR), RSOr1, that is homologous to Drosophila melanogaster Or49a and Or85f. This is the first tephritid OR discovered that might recognize a specific odorant. Other olfactory genes recovered included odorant binding proteins, chemosensory proteins, and putative odorant degrading enzymes.

  6. Myocardial Mapping With Cardiac Magnetic Resonance: The Diagnostic Value of Novel Sequences.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Javier; LaRocca, Gina; Mirelis, Jesús G

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance has evolved into a crucial modality for the evaluation of cardiomyopathy due to its ability to characterize myocardial structure and function. In the last few years, interest has increased in the potential of "mapping" techniques that provide direct and objective quantification of myocardial properties such as T1, T2, and T2* times. These approaches enable the detection of abnormalities that affect the myocardium in a diffuse fashion and/or may be too subtle for visual recognition. This article reviews the current state of myocardial T1 and T2-mapping in both health and disease.

  7. Genotyping-by-Sequencing SNP Identification for Crops without a Reference Genome: Using Transcriptome Based Mapping as an Alternative Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Berthouly-Salazar, Cécile; Mariac, Cédric; Couderc, Marie; Pouzadoux, Juliette; Floc’h, Jean-Baptiste; Vigouroux, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing opens the way for genomic studies of diversity even for non-model crops and animals. Genome reduction techniques are becoming progressively more popular as they allow a fraction of the genome to be sequenced for multiple individuals and/or populations. These techniques are an efficient way to explore genome diversity in non-model crops and animals for which no reference genome is available. Genome reduction techniques emerged with the development of specific pipelines such as UNEAK (Universal Network Enabled Analysis Kit) and Stacks. However, even for non-model crops and animals, transcriptomes are easier to obtain, thereby making it possible to directly map reads. We investigate the direct use of transcriptome as an alternative strategy. Our specific objective was to compare SNPs obtained from the UNEAK pipeline as well as SNPs obtained by directly mapping genotyping-by-sequencing reads on a transcriptome. We assessed the feasibility of both SNP datasets, UNEAK and transcriptome mapping, to investigate the diversity of 91 samples of wild pearl millet sampled across its distribution area. Both approaches produced several tens of thousands of single nucleotide variants, but differed in the way the variants were identified, leading to differences in the frequency spectrum associated with marked differences in the assessment of diversity. Difference in the frequency spectrum significantly biased a large set of diversity analyses as well as detection of selection approaches. However, whatever the approach, we found very similar inference of genetic structure, with three major genetic groups from West, Central, and East Africa. For non-model crops, using transcriptome data as a reference is thus a particularly promising way to obtain a more thorough analysis of datasets generated using genome reduction techniques. PMID:27379109

  8. Genotyping-by-Sequencing SNP Identification for Crops without a Reference Genome: Using Transcriptome Based Mapping as an Alternative Strategy.

    PubMed

    Berthouly-Salazar, Cécile; Mariac, Cédric; Couderc, Marie; Pouzadoux, Juliette; Floc'h, Jean-Baptiste; Vigouroux, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing opens the way for genomic studies of diversity even for non-model crops and animals. Genome reduction techniques are becoming progressively more popular as they allow a fraction of the genome to be sequenced for multiple individuals and/or populations. These techniques are an efficient way to explore genome diversity in non-model crops and animals for which no reference genome is available. Genome reduction techniques emerged with the development of specific pipelines such as UNEAK (Universal Network Enabled Analysis Kit) and Stacks. However, even for non-model crops and animals, transcriptomes are easier to obtain, thereby making it possible to directly map reads. We investigate the direct use of transcriptome as an alternative strategy. Our specific objective was to compare SNPs obtained from the UNEAK pipeline as well as SNPs obtained by directly mapping genotyping-by-sequencing reads on a transcriptome. We assessed the feasibility of both SNP datasets, UNEAK and transcriptome mapping, to investigate the diversity of 91 samples of wild pearl millet sampled across its distribution area. Both approaches produced several tens of thousands of single nucleotide variants, but differed in the way the variants were identified, leading to differences in the frequency spectrum associated with marked differences in the assessment of diversity. Difference in the frequency spectrum significantly biased a large set of diversity analyses as well as detection of selection approaches. However, whatever the approach, we found very similar inference of genetic structure, with three major genetic groups from West, Central, and East Africa. For non-model crops, using transcriptome data as a reference is thus a particularly promising way to obtain a more thorough analysis of datasets generated using genome reduction techniques.

  9. e2g: an interactive web-based server for efficiently mapping large EST and cDNA sets to genomic sequences.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Jan; Sczyrba, Alexander; Kurtz, Stefan; Giegerich, Robert

    2004-07-01

    e2g is a web-based server which efficiently maps large expressed sequence tag (EST) and cDNA datasets to genomic DNA. It significantly extends the volume of data that can be mapped in reasonable time, and makes this improved efficiency available as a web service. Our server hosts large collections of EST sequences (e.g. 4.1 million mouse ESTs of 1.87 Gb) in precomputed indexed data structures for efficient sequence comparison. The user can upload a genomic DNA sequence of interest and rapidly compare this to the complete collection of ESTs on the server. This delivers a mapping of the ESTs on the genomic DNA. The e2g web interface provides a graphical overview of the mapping. Alignments of the mapped EST regions with parts of the genomic sequence are visualized. Zooming functions allow the user to interactively explore the results. Mapped sequences can be downloaded for further analysis. e2g is available on the Bielefeld University Bioinformatics Server at http://bibiserv.techfak.uni-bielefeld.de/e2g/.

  10. Application of Genotyping-By-Sequencing for selection of locus-specific BAC clones to construct physical maps and identify candidate genes in Vitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) is widely used for linkage and association mapping, its potential for physical mapping and candidate gene identification in under-characterized species has not been fully realized. Eight half-sib Vitis families (480 progeny) were genotyped using GBS and phenotyp...

  11. Development of high-density linkage map and tagging leaf spot resistance in pearl millet using genotyping-by-sequencing markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pearl millet is an important forage and grain crop in many parts of the world. Genome mapping studies are a prerequisite for tagging agronomically important traits. Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS) markers can be used to build high density linkage maps even in species lacking a reference genome. A re...

  12. Anopheles darlingi polytene chromosomes: revised maps including newly described inversions and evidence for population structure in Manaus

    PubMed Central

    Cornel, Anthony J; Brisco, Katherine K; Tadei, Wanderli P; Secundino, Nágila FC; Rafael, Miriam S; Galardo, Allan KR; Medeiros, Jansen F; Pessoa, Felipe AC; Ríos-Velásquez, Claudia M; Lee, Yoosook; Pimenta, Paulo FP; Lanzaro, Gregory C

    2016-01-01

    Salivary gland polytene chromosomes of 4th instar Anopheles darlingi Root were examined from multiple locations in the Brazilian Amazon. Minor modifications were made to existing polytene photomaps. These included changes to the breakpoint positions of several previously described paracentric inversions and descriptions of four new paracentric inversions, two on the right arm of chromosome 3 and two on the left arm of chromosome 3 that were found in multiple locations. A total of 18 inversions on the X (n = 1) chromosome, chromosome 2 (n = 7) and 3 (n = 11) were scored for 83 individuals from Manaus, Macapá and Porto Velho municipalities. The frequency of 2Ra inversion karyotypes in Manaus shows significant deficiency of heterozygotes (p < 0.0009). No significant linkage disequilibrium was found between inversions on chromosome 2 and 3. We hypothesize that at least two sympatric subpopulations exist within the An. darlingi population at Manaus based on inversion frequencies. PMID:27223867

  13. Sequence composition and mapping of BACs of cotton homoeologous chromosomes 11 and 21

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interest in cotton chromosome 11 and its homoeologous chromosome 21 derives from the discovery of resistance (R) or pathogen-induced R genes underlying QTLs involved in root-knot nematode, reniform nematode, Fusarium wilt, Verticillium wilt, and black root rot resistance. Genetic and QTL mapping eff...

  14. High-resolution mapping and transcriptional activity analysis of chicken centromere sequences on giant lampbrush chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Krasikova, Alla; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Zlotina, Anna

    2012-12-01

    Exploration into morphofunctional organisation of centromere DNA sequences is important for understanding the mechanisms of kinetochore specification and assembly. In-depth epigenetic analysis of DNA fragments associated with centromeric nucleosome proteins has demonstrated unique features of centromere organisation in chicken karyotype: there are both mature centromeres, which comprise chromosome-specific homogeneous arrays of tandem repeats, and recently evolved primitive centromeres, which consist of non-tandemly organised DNA sequences. In this work, we describe the arrangement and transcriptional activity of chicken centromere repeats for Cen1, Cen2, Cen3, Cen4, Cen7, Cen8, and Cen11 and non-repetitive centromere sequences of chromosomes 5, 27, and Z using highly elongated lampbrush chromosomes, which are characteristic of the diplotene stage of oogenesis. The degree of chromatin packaging and fine spatial organisations of tandemly repetitive and non-tandemly repetitive centromeric sequences significantly differ at the lampbrush stage. Using DNA/RNA FISH, we have demonstrated that during the lampbrush stage, DNA sequences are transcribed within the centromere regions of chromosomes that lack centromere-specific tandem repeats. In contrast, chromosome-specific centromeric repeats Cen1, Cen2, Cen3, Cen4, Cen7, Cen8, and Cen11 do not demonstrate any transcriptional activity during the lampbrush stage. In addition, we found that CNM repeat cluster localises adjacent to non-repetitive centromeric sequences in chicken microchromosome 27 indicating that centromere region in this chromosome is repeat-rich. Cross-species FISH allowed localisation of the sequences homologous to centromeric DNA of chicken chromosomes 5 and 27 in centromere regions of quail orthologous chromosomes.

  15. Whole-genome profiling and shotgun sequencing delivers an anchored, gene-decorated, physical map assembly of bread wheat chromosome 6A.

    PubMed

    Poursarebani, Naser; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Simková, Hana; Safář, Jan; Witsenboer, Hanneke; van Oeveren, Jan; Doležel, Jaroslav; Mayer, Klaus F X; Stein, Nils; Schnurbusch, Thorsten

    2014-07-01

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is the most important staple food crop for 35% of the world's population. International efforts are underway to facilitate an increase in wheat production, of which the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC) plays an important role. As part of this effort, we have developed a sequence-based physical map of wheat chromosome 6A using whole-genome profiling (WGP™). The bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contig assembly tools fingerprinted contig (fpc) and linear topological contig (ltc) were used and their contig assemblies were compared. A detailed investigation of the contigs structure revealed that ltc created a highly robust assembly compared with those formed by fpc. The ltc assemblies contained 1217 contigs for the short arm and 1113 contigs for the long arm, with an L50 of 1 Mb. To facilitate in silico anchoring, WGP™ tags underlying BAC contigs were extended by wheat and wheat progenitor genome sequence information. Sequence data were used for in silico anchoring against genetic markers with known sequences, of which almost 79% of the physical map could be anchored. Moreover, the assigned sequence information led to the 'decoration' of the respective physical map with 3359 anchored genes. Thus, this robust and genetically anchored physical map will serve as a framework for the sequencing of wheat chromosome 6A, and is of immediate use for map-based isolation of agronomically important genes/quantitative trait loci located on this chromosome.

  16. Genome-wide base-resolution mapping of DNA methylation in single cells using single-cell bisulfite sequencing (scBS-seq).

    PubMed

    Clark, Stephen J; Smallwood, Sébastien A; Lee, Heather J; Krueger, Felix; Reik, Wolf; Kelsey, Gavin

    2017-03-01

    DNA methylation (DNAme) is an important epigenetic mark in diverse species. Our current understanding of DNAme is based on measurements from bulk cell samples, which obscures intercellular differences and prevents analyses of rare cell types. Thus, the ability to measure DNAme in single cells has the potential to make important contributions to the understanding of several key biological processes, such as embryonic development, disease progression and aging. We have recently reported a method for generating genome-wide DNAme maps from single cells, using single-cell bisulfite sequencing (scBS-seq), allowing the quantitative measurement of DNAme at up to 50% of CpG dinucleotides throughout the mouse genome. Here we present a detailed protocol for scBS-seq that includes our most recent developments to optimize recovery of CpGs, mapping efficiency and success rate; reduce hands-on time; and increase sample throughput with the option of using an automated liquid handler. We provide step-by-step instructions for each stage of the method, comprising cell lysis and bisulfite (BS) conversion, preamplification and adaptor tagging, library amplification, sequencing and, lastly, alignment and methylation calling. An individual with relevant molecular biology expertise can complete library preparation within 3 d. Subsequent computational steps require 1-3 d for someone with bioinformatics expertise.

  17. Mapping the acquisition of the number word sequence in the first year of school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Peter

    2017-03-01

    Learning to count and to produce the correct sequence of number words in English is not a simple process. In NSW government schools taking part in Early Action for Success, over 800 students in each of the first 3 years of school were assessed every 5 weeks over the school year to determine the highest correct oral count they could produce. Rather than displaying a steady increase in the accurate sequence of the number words produced, the kindergarten data reported here identified clear, substantial hurdles in the acquisition of the counting sequence. The large-scale, longitudinal data also provided evidence of learning to count through the teens being facilitated by the semi-regular structure of the number words in English. Instead of occurring as hurdles to starting the next counting sequence, number words corresponding to some multiples of ten (10, 20 and 100) acted as if they were rest points. These rest points appear to be artefacts of how the counting sequence is acquired.

  18. Mapping the acquisition of the number word sequence in the first year of school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Learning to count and to produce the correct sequence of number words in English is not a simple process. In NSW government schools taking part in Early Action for Success, over 800 students in each of the first 3 years of school were assessed every 5 weeks over the school year to determine the highest correct oral count they could produce. Rather than displaying a steady increase in the accurate sequence of the number words produced, the kindergarten data reported here identified clear, substantial hurdles in the acquisition of the counting sequence. The large-scale, longitudinal data also provided evidence of learning to count through the teens being facilitated by the semi-regular structure of the number words in English. Instead of occurring as hurdles to starting the next counting sequence, number words corresponding to some multiples of ten (10, 20 and 100) acted as if they were rest points. These rest points appear to be artefacts of how the counting sequence is acquired.

  19. A first generation physical map of the medaka genome in BACs essential for positional cloning and clone-by-clone based genomic sequencing.

    PubMed

    Khorasani, Maryam Zadeh; Hennig, Steffen; Imre, Gabriele; Asakawa, Shuichi; Palczewski, Stefanie; Berger, Anja; Hori, Hiroshi; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Mitani, Hiroshi; Shima, Akihiro; Lehrach, Hans; Wittbrodt, Jochen; Kondoh, Hisato; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Himmelbauer, Heinz

    2004-07-01

    In order to realize the full potential of the medaka as a model system for developmental biology and genetics, characterized genomic resources need to be established, culminating in the sequence of the medaka genome. To facilitate the map-based cloning of genes underlying induced mutations and to provide templates for clone-based genomic sequencing, we have created a first-generation physical map of the medaka genome in bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. In particular, we exploited the synteny to the closely related genome of the pufferfish, Takifugu rubripes, by marker content mapping. As a first step, we clustered 103,144 public medaka EST sequences to obtain a set of 21,121 non-redundant sequence entities. Avoiding oversampling of gene-dense regions, 11,254 of EST clusters were successfully matched against the draft sequence of the fugu genome, and 2363 genes were selected for the BAC map project. We designed 35mer oligonucleotide probes from the selected genes and hybridized them against 64,500 BAC clones of strains Cab and Hd-rR, representing 14-fold coverage of the medaka genome. Our data set is further supplemented with 437 results generated from PCR-amplified inserts of medaka cDNA clones and BAC end-fragment markers. Our current, edited, first generation medaka BAC map consists of 902 map segments that cover about 74% of the medaka genome. The map contains 2721 markers. Of these, 2534 are from expressed sequences, equivalent to a non-redundant set of 2328 loci. The 934 markers (724 different) are anchored to the medaka genetic map. Thus, genetic map assignments provide immediate access to underlying clones and contigs, simplifying molecular access to candidate gene regions and their characterization.

  20. Mapping DNA-protein interactions in large genomes by sequence tag analysis of genomic enrichment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonghwan; Bhinge, Akshay A; Morgan, Xochitl C; Iyer, Vishwanath R

    2005-01-01

    Identifying the chromosomal targets of transcription factors is important for reconstructing the transcriptional regulatory networks underlying global gene expression programs. We have developed an unbiased genomic method called sequence tag analysis of genomic enrichment (STAGE) to identify the direct binding targets of transcription factors in vivo. STAGE is based on high-throughput sequencing of concatemerized tags derived from target DNA enriched by chromatin immunoprecipitation. We first used STAGE in yeast to confirm that RNA polymerase III genes are the most prominent targets of the TATA-box binding protein. We optimized the STAGE protocol and developed analysis methods to allow the identification of transcription factor targets in human cells. We used STAGE to identify several previously unknown binding targets of human transcription factor E2F4 that we independently validated by promoter-specific PCR and microarray hybridization. STAGE provides a means of identifying the chromosomal targets of DNA-associated proteins in any sequenced genome.

  1. Construction of High Density Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium L.) Linkage Maps Using Microsatellite Markers and SNPs Detected by Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS).

    PubMed

    Guajardo, Verónica; Solís, Simón; Sagredo, Boris; Gainza, Felipe; Muñoz, Carlos; Gasic, Ksenija; Hinrichsen, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Linkage maps are valuable tools in genetic and genomic studies. For sweet cherry, linkage maps have been constructed using mainly microsatellite markers (SSRs) and, recently, using single nucleotide polymorphism markers (SNPs) from a cherry 6K SNP array. Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), a new methodology based on high-throughput sequencing, holds great promise for identification of high number of SNPs and construction of high density linkage maps. In this study, GBS was used to identify SNPs from an intra-specific sweet cherry cross. A total of 8,476 high quality SNPs were selected for mapping. The physical position for each SNP was determined using the peach genome, Peach v1.0, as reference, and a homogeneous distribution of markers along the eight peach scaffolds was obtained. On average, 65.6% of the SNPs were present in genic regions and 49.8% were located in exonic regions. In addition to the SNPs, a group of SSRs was also used for construction of linkage maps. Parental and consensus high density maps were constructed by genotyping 166 siblings from a 'Rainier' x 'Rivedel' (Ra x Ri) cross. Using Ra x Ri population, 462, 489 and 985 markers were mapped into eight linkage groups in 'Rainier', 'Rivedel' and the Ra x Ri map, respectively, with 80% of mapped SNPs located in genic regions. Obtained maps spanned 549.5, 582.6 and 731.3 cM for 'Rainier', 'Rivedel' and consensus maps, respectively, with an average distance of 1.2 cM between adjacent markers for both 'Rainier' and 'Rivedel' maps and of 0.7 cM for Ra x Ri map. High synteny and co-linearity was observed between obtained maps and with Peach v1.0. These new high density linkage maps provide valuable information on the sweet cherry genome, and serve as the basis for identification of QTLs and genes relevant for the breeding of the species.

  2. Analysis of the herpes simplex virus type 1 OriS sequence: mapping of functional domains.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, D W; Deb, S P; Klauer, J S; Deb, S

    1991-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) OriS region resides within a 90-bp sequence that contains two binding sites for the origin-binding protein (OBP), designated sites I and II. A third presumptive OBP-binding site (III) within OriS has strong sequence similarity to sites I and II, but no sequence-specific OBP binding has yet been demonstrated at this site. We have generated mutations in sites I, II, and III and determined their replication efficiencies in a transient in vivo assay in the presence of a helper virus. Mutations in any one of the sites reduced DNA replication significantly. To study the role of OriS sequence elements in site I and the presumptive site III in DNA replication, we have also generated a series of mutations that span from site I across the presumptive binding site III. These mutants were tested for their ability to replicate and for the ability to bind OBP by using gel shift analyses. The results indicate that mutations across site I drastically reduce DNA replication. Triple-base-pair substitution mutations that fall within the crucial OBP-binding domain, 5'-YGYTCGCACT-3' (where Y represents C or T), show a reduced level of OBP binding and DNA replication. Substitution mutations in site I that are outside this crucial binding sequence show a more detrimental effect on DNA replication than on OBP binding. This suggests that these sequences are required for initiation of DNA replication but are not critical for OBP binding. Mutations across the presumptive OBP-binding site III also resulted in a loss in efficiency of DNA replication. These mutations influenced OBP binding to OriS in gel shift assays, even though the mutated sequences are not contained within known OBP-binding sites. Replacement of the wild-type site III with a perfect OBP-binding site I results in a drastic reduction of DNA replication. Thus, our DNA replication assays and in vitro DNA-binding studies suggest that the binding of the origin sequence by OBP is not the only

  3. Synchronization and cluster sequences in modular and evolving map-based neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslennikov, Oleg V.; Nekorkin, Vladimir I.

    2016-06-01

    The impact of modularity and time delay for spiking neural networks is considered in the first part of this report. We show for different complex topologies that time delay controls regimes of inter-module synchronization as well as the oscillatory rate of modules. In the second part of the work we study a paradigmatic model of the evolving neural network whose topology is influenced by nodal dynamics which results in generating different cluster sequences. We show the conditions under which the sequences are robust to small perturbations of initial conditions, parameter detuning, and noise, while at the same are selective to information stimuli.

  4. Integration of the draft sequence and physical map as a framework for genomic research in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) and wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. and Zucc.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean is a model for the legume research community due to its importance as a crop, a well populated genetic map, and the availability of a genome sequence. Even though a whole genome shotgun sequence and Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) libraries are available, a high-resolution chromosome-b...

  5. In vivo MEMRI characterization of brain metastases using a 3D Look-Locker T1-mapping sequence

    PubMed Central

    Castets, Charles R.; Koonjoo, Néha; Hertanu, Andreea; Voisin, Pierre; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Miraux, Sylvain; Ribot, Emeline J.

    2016-01-01

    Although MEMRI (Manganese Enhanced MRI) informations were obtained on primary tumors in small animals, MEMRI data on metastases are lacking. Thus, our goal was to determine if 3D Look-Locker T1 mapping was an efficient method to evaluate Mn ions transport in brain metastases in vivo. The high spatial resolution in 3D (156 × 156 × 218 μm) of the sequence enabled to detect metastases of 0.3 mm3. In parallel, the T1 quantitation enabled to distinguish three populations of MDA-MB-231 derived brain metastases after MnCl2 intravenous injection: one with a healthy blood-tumor barrier that did not internalize Mn2+ ions, and two others, which T1 shortened drastically by 54.2% or 24%. Subsequent scans of the mice, enabled by the fast acquisition (23 min), demonstrated that these T1 reached back their pre-injection values in 24 h. Contrarily to metastases, the T1 of U87-MG glioma remained 26.2% shorter for one week. In vitro results supported the involvement of the Transient Receptor Potential channels and the Calcium-Sensing Receptor in the uptake and efflux of Mn2+ ions, respectively. This study highlights the ability of the 3D Look-Locker T1 mapping sequence to study heterogeneities (i) amongst brain metastases and (ii) between metastases and glioma regarding Mn transport. PMID:27995976

  6. Novel Sequence-Based Mapping of Recently Emerging H5NX Influenza Viruses Reveals Pandemic Vaccine Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christopher S.; DeDiego, Marta L.; Thakar, Juilee; Topham, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, an avian influenza virus, H5NX subclade 2.3.4.4, emerged and spread to North America. This subclade has frequently reassorted, leading to multiple novel viruses capable of human infection. Four cases of human infections, three leading to death, have already occurred. Existing vaccine strains do not protect against these new viruses, raising a need to identify new vaccine candidate strains. We have developed a novel sequence-based mapping (SBM) tool capable of visualizing complex protein sequence data sets using a single intuitive map. We applied SBM on the complete set of avian H5 viruses in order to better understand hemagglutinin protein variance amongst H5 viruses and identify any patterns associated with this variation. The analysis successfully identified the original reassortments that lead to the emergence of this new subclade of H5 viruses, as well as their known unusual ability to re-assort among neuraminidase subtypes. In addition, our analysis revealed distinct clusters of 2.3.4.4 variants that would not be covered by existing strains in the H5 vaccine stockpile. The results suggest that our method may be useful for pandemic candidate vaccine virus selection. PMID:27494186

  7. Transcriptome sequencing to produce SNP-based genetic maps of onion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used the 454 platform to sequence from normalized cDNA libraries from each of two parental inbred lines of onion: 5225 is a red, doubled-haploid onion and OH1 is a yellow inbred that shows high frequency of gynogenic haploid production. From approximately 1.6 million reads from each inbred, 27,06...

  8. Transcriptome sequencing to produce SNP-based genetic maps of onion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used the 454 platform to sequence from normalized cDNA libraries from each of two inbred lines of onion (OH1 and 5225). From approximately 1.6 million reads from each inbred, 27,065 and 33,254 cDNA contigs were assembled from OH1 and 5225, respectively. In total, 3,364 single nucleotide polymorph...

  9. Application of genotyping-by-sequencing for mapping disease resistance in grapevine breeding families

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS) is a low-cost, high-throughput, method for genome-wide polymorphism discovery and genotyping adjacent to restriction sites. Since 2010, GBS has been applied for the genotyping of over 12,000 grape breeding lines, with a primary focus on identifying markers predictive ...

  10. Mapping of sequences required for mouse neurovirulence of poliovirus type 2 Lansing.

    PubMed

    La Monica, N; Meriam, C; Racaniello, V R

    1986-02-01

    Intracerebral inoculation of mice with poliovirus type 2 Lansing induces a fatal paralysis, while most other poliovirus strains are unable to cause disease in the mouse. To determine the molecular basis for Lansing virus neurovirulence, we determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the Lansing viral genome from cloned cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence was compared with that of two mouse-avirulent strains. There are 83 amino acid differences between the Lansing and Sabin type 2 strain and 179 differences between the Lansing and Mahoney type 1 strain scattered throughout the genome. To further localize Lansing sequences important for mouse neurovirulence, four intertypic recombinants were isolated by exchanging DNA restriction fragments between the Lansing 2 and Mahoney 1 infectious poliovirus cDNA clones. Plasmids were transfected into HeLa cells, and infectious recombinant viruses were recovered. All four recombinant viruses, which contained the Lansing capsid region and different amounts of the Mahoney genome, were neurovirulent for 18- to 21-day-old Swiss-Webster mice by the intracerebral route. The genome of neurovirulent recombinant PRV5.1 contained only nucleotides 631 to 3413 from Lansing, encoding primarily the viral capsid proteins. Therefore, the ability of Lansing virus to cause paralysis in mice is due to the viral capsid. The Lansing capsid sequence differs from that of the mouse avirulent Sabin 2 strain at 32 of 879 amino acid positions: 1 in VP4, 5 in VP2, 4 in VP3, and 22 in VP1.

  11. The nitrate reductase-encoding gene of Volvox carteri: map location, sequence and induction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Gruber, H; Goetinck, S D; Kirk, D L; Schmitt, R

    1992-10-12

    The nitrate reductase (NR) structural gene (nitA) of Volvox carteri has been cloned and characterized. There is a single copy of this gene in the genome, and RFLP (restriction-fragment length polymorphism) analysis assigns it to the previously defined nitA/chlR locus on linkage group IX, 20-30 cM from the two beta-tubulin-encoding loci. Determination of the 5871-nt sequence of the coding region of genomic clones, and comparisons to a cDNA sequence, revealed ten introns and eleven exons that encode a 864-aa polypeptide. Detailed comparisons with higher-plant and fungal NRs indicate that, whereas the aa sequence is strongly conserved within functional domains for the flavin adenine dinucleotide-, heme- and molybdenum-pterin cofactor-binding sites, substantial differences in the aa sequence occur in the N-terminal end and the two inter-domain regions. Two potential transcription start points 439 and 452 nt upstream from the start codon and a polyadenylation signal 355 nt downstream from the stop codon have been identified by primer-extension analysis and cDNA sequencing, respectively. Accumulation of the nitA transcript is both induced by nitrate and repressed by ammonium and urea: after the organism is transferred from ammonium to nitrate as the nitrogen source, a 3.6-kb NR transcript is readily detectable on Northern blots by 10 min, reaches maximum abundance by 30 min, and then rapidly declines to an intermediate level that is subsequently maintained. Substantial induction by nitrate is observed at the end of the dark portion of the daily light/dark cycle, but the inductive response peaks in the first hour of the light period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. A map of human genome variation from population-scale sequencing.

    PubMed

    Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Altshuler, David; Auton, Adam; Brooks, Lisa D; Durbin, Richard M; Gibbs, Richard A; Hurles, Matt E; McVean, Gil A

    2010-10-28

    The 1000 Genomes Project aims to provide a deep characterization of human genome sequence variation as a foundation for investigating the relationship between genotype and phenotype. Here we present results of the pilot phase of the project, designed to develop and compare different strategies for genome-wide sequencing with high-throughput platforms. We undertook three projects: low-coverage whole-genome sequencing of 179 individuals from four populations; high-coverage sequencing of two mother-father-child trios; and exon-targeted sequencing of 697 individuals from seven populations. We describe the location, allele frequency and local haplotype structure of approximately 15 million single nucleotide polymorphisms, 1 million short insertions and deletions, and 20,000 structural variants, most of which were previously undescribed. We show that, because we have catalogued the vast majority of common variation, over 95% of the currently accessible variants found in any individual are present in this data set. On average, each person is found to carry approximately 250 to 300 loss-of-function variants in annotated genes and 50 to 100 variants previously implicated in inherited disorders. We demonstrate how these results can be used to inform association and functional studies. From the two trios, we directly estimate the rate of de novo germline base substitution mutations to be approximately 10(-8) per base pair per generation. We explore the data with regard to signatures of natural selection, and identify a marked reduction of genetic variation in the neighbourhood of genes, due to selection at linked sites. These methods and public data will support the next phase of human genetic research.

  13. Development of a 690 K SNP array in catfish and its application for genetic mapping and validation of the reference genome sequence

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qifan; Fu, Qiang; Li, Yun; Waldbieser, Geoff; Bosworth, Brian; Liu, Shikai; Yang, Yujia; Bao, Lisui; Yuan, Zihao; Li, Ning; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2017-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are capable of providing the highest level of genome coverage for genomic and genetic analysis because of their abundance and relatively even distribution in the genome. Such a capacity, however, cannot be achieved without an efficient genotyping platform such as SNP arrays. In this work, we developed a high-density SNP array with 690,662 unique SNPs (herein 690 K array) that were relatively evenly distributed across the entire genome, and covered 98.6% of the reference genome sequence. Here we also report linkage mapping using the 690 K array, which allowed mapping of over 250,000 SNPs on the linkage map, the highest marker density among all the constructed linkage maps. These markers were mapped to 29 linkage groups (LGs) with 30,591 unique marker positions. This linkage map anchored 1,602 scaffolds of the reference genome sequence to LGs, accounting for over 97% of the total genome assembly. A total of 1,007 previously unmapped scaffolds were placed to LGs, allowing validation and in few instances correction of the reference genome sequence assembly. This linkage map should serve as a valuable resource for various genetic and genomic analyses, especially for GWAS and QTL mapping for genes associated with economically important traits. PMID:28079141

  14. Development of a 690 K SNP array in catfish and its application for genetic mapping and validation of the reference genome sequence.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qifan; Fu, Qiang; Li, Yun; Waldbieser, Geoff; Bosworth, Brian; Liu, Shikai; Yang, Yujia; Bao, Lisui; Yuan, Zihao; Li, Ning; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2017-01-12

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are capable of providing the highest level of genome coverage for genomic and genetic analysis because of their abundance and relatively even distribution in the genome. Such a capacity, however, cannot be achieved without an efficient genotyping platform such as SNP arrays. In this work, we developed a high-density SNP array with 690,662 unique SNPs (herein 690 K array) that were relatively evenly distributed across the entire genome, and covered 98.6% of the reference genome sequence. Here we also report linkage mapping using the 690 K array, which allowed mapping of over 250,000 SNPs on the linkage map, the highest marker density among all the constructed linkage maps. These markers were mapped to 29 linkage groups (LGs) with 30,591 unique marker positions. This linkage map anchored 1,602 scaffolds of the reference genome sequence to LGs, accounting for over 97% of the total genome assembly. A total of 1,007 previously unmapped scaffolds were placed to LGs, allowing validation and in few instances correction of the reference genome sequence assembly. This linkage map should serve as a valuable resource for various genetic and genomic analyses, especially for GWAS and QTL mapping for genes associated with economically important traits.

  15. Mapping a nucleolar targeting sequence of an RNA binding nucleolar protein, Nop25

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Takashi; Suzuki, Shunji . E-mail: suzukis@yamanashi.ac.jp; Kanno, Motoko; Sugiyama, Hironobu; Takahashi, Hisaaki; Tanaka, Junya

    2006-06-10

    Nop25 is a putative RNA binding nucleolar protein associated with rRNA transcription. The present study was undertaken to determine the mechanism of Nop25 localization in the nucleolus. Deletion experiments of Nop25 amino acid sequence showed Nop25 to contain a nuclear targeting sequence in the N-terminal and a nucleolar targeting sequence in the C-terminal. By expressing derivative peptides from the C-terminal as GFP-fusion proteins in the cells, a lysine and arginine residue-enriched peptide (KRKHPRRAQDSTKKPPSATRTSKTQRRRR) allowed a GFP-fusion protein to be transported and fully retained in the nucleolus. When the peptide was fused with cMyc epitope and expressed in the cells, a cMyc epitope was then detected in the nucleolus. Nop25 did not localize in the nucleolus by deletion of the peptide from Nop25. Furthermore, deletion of a subdomain (KRKHPRRAQ) in the peptide or amino acid substitution of lysine and arginine residues in the subdomain resulted in the loss of Nop25 nucleolar localization. These results suggest that the lysine and arginine residue-enriched peptide is the most prominent nucleolar targeting sequence of Nop25 and that the long stretch of basic residues might play an important role in the nucleolar localization of Nop25. Although Nop25 contained putative SUMOylation, phosphorylation and glycosylation sites, the amino acid substitution in these sites had no effect on the nucleolar localization, thus suggesting that these post-translational modifications did not contribute to the localization of Nop25 in the nucleolus. The treatment of the cells, which expressed a GFP-fusion protein with a nucleolar targeting sequence of Nop25, with RNase A resulted in a complete dislocation of the protein from the nucleolus. These data suggested that the nucleolar targeting sequence might therefore play an important role in the binding of Nop25 to RNA molecules and that the RNA binding of Nop25 might be essential for the nucleolar localization of Nop25.

  16. Enhanced immunogenicity of a sequence derived from hepatitis B virus surface antigen in a composite peptide that includes the immunostimulatory region from human interleukin 1.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, K V; Nayak, A R

    1990-01-01

    The effect on immunogenicity of coupling the immunostimulatory nonapeptide sequence (residues 163-171) from human interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta) to a small immunogen was examined. A 21-amino acid sequence spanning positions 12-32 on the large protein of hepatitis B surface antigen was chosen as a model. Three peptides were synthesized corresponding to the IL-1 beta-derived sequence [peptide IL-(163-171)], the hepatitis B surface antigen-derived sequence [peptide S1-(12-32)] and a composite peptide that included both these sequences separated by a spacer of two glycine residues [peptide S1-(12-32)-IL-(163-171)]. In an in vitro thymocyte proliferation assay, both peptides S1-(12-32)-IL-(163-171) and IL-(163-171) showed comparable activity, whereas peptide S1-(12-32) was inactive. Groups of five to seven mice each from C3H/CH, BALB/c, SJL/J, and C57BL/6 strains were immunized with equimolar amounts of either peptide S1-(12-32), peptide S1-(12-32)-IL-(163-171), or a mixture of peptides S1-(12-32) and IL-(163-171), and sera were screened for anti-S1-(12-32) antibodies. In all strains, peptide S1-(12-32)-IL-(163-171) elicited an increased primary and secondary anti-S1-(12-32) antibody response compared to the other two groups. Further, peptide S1-(12-32)-IL-(163-171) also induced an increased number of responders to primary immunization, though the number of responders was quantitative in all groups following secondary immunization. At least part of the enhanced immunogenicity of the S1-(12-32) sequence in peptide S1-(12-32)-IL-(163-171) appears to be due to augmented T-helper cell activity. These results suggest that coupling of the immunostimulatory IL-1 beta-derived sequence in tandem with an immunogen may confer inbuilt adjuvanticity. PMID:2371286

  17. Comprehensive sequence-flux mapping of a levoglucosan utilization pathway in E. coli

    DOE PAGES

    Klesmith, Justin R.; Bacik, John -Paul; Michalczyk, Ryszard; ...

    2015-09-14

    Synthetic metabolic pathways often suffer from low specific productivity, and new methods that quickly assess pathway functionality for many thousands of variants are urgently needed. Here we present an approach that enables the rapid and parallel determination of sequence effects on flux for complete gene-encoding sequences. We show that this method can be used to determine the effects of over 8000 single point mutants of a pyrolysis oil catabolic pathway implanted in Escherichia coli. Experimental sequence-function data sets predicted whether fitness-enhancing mutations to the enzyme levoglucosan kinase resulted from enhanced catalytic efficiency or enzyme stability. A structure of one designmore » incorporating 38 mutations elucidated the structural basis of high fitness mutations. One design incorporating 15 beneficial mutations supported a 15-fold improvement in growth rate and greater than 24-fold improvement in enzyme activity relative to the starting pathway. Lastly, this technique can be extended to improve a wide variety of designed pathways.« less

  18. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence

    SciTech Connect

    D'Aiuto, L.; Marzella, R.; Archidiacono, N.; Rocchi, M. ); Antonacci, R. )

    1993-11-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    D'Aiuto, L; Antonacci, R; Marzella, R; Archidiacono, N; Rocchi, M

    1993-11-01

    We have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed.

  20. Identification and DNA sequence analysis of 15 new {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin variants, including two PI*QO alleles and one deficient PI*M allele

    SciTech Connect

    Faber, J.P.; Kirchgesser, M.; Schwaab, R.; Bidlingmaier, F.; Poller, W.; Weidinger, S.; Olek, K. |

    1994-12-01

    The authors have investigated the molecular basis of 15 new {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin ({alpha}1AT) variants. Phenotyping by isoelectric focusing (IEF) was used as a screening method to detect {alpha}1AT variants at the protein level. Genotyping was then performed by sequence analysis of all coding exons, exon-intron junctions, and the hepatocyte-specific promotor region including exon Ic. Three of these rare variants are alleles of clinical relevance, associated with undetectable or very low serum levels of {alpha}1AT: the PI*Q0saarbruecken allele generated by a 1-bp C-nucleotide insertion within a stretch of seven cytosines spanning residues 360-362, resulting in a 3{prime} frameshift and the acquisition of a stop codon at residue 376; a point mutation in the PI*Q0lisbon allele, resulting in a single amino acid substitution Thr{sup 68}(ACC){yields}Ile(ATC); and an in-frame trinucleotide deletion {Delta}Phe{sup 51} (TTC) in the highly deficient PI*Mpalermo allele. The remaining 12 alleles are associated with normal {alpha}1AT serum levels and are characterized by point mutations causing single amino acid substitutions in all but one case. This exception is a silent mutation, which does not affect the amino acid sequence. The limitation of IEF compared with DNA sequence analysis, for identification of new variants, their generation by mutagenesis, and the clinical relevance of the three deficiency alleles are discussed.

  1. Bioinformatic prediction of G protein-coupled receptor encoding sequences from the transcriptome of the foreleg, including the Haller's organ, of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus australis.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Sergio; Guerrero, Felix D; Kellogg, Anastasia; Heekin, Andrew M; Leung, Ming-Ying

    2017-01-01

    The cattle tick of Australia, Rhipicephalus australis, is a vector for microbial parasites that cause serious bovine diseases. The Haller's organ, located in the tick's forelegs, is crucial for host detection and mating. To facilitate the development of new technologies for better control of this agricultural pest, we aimed to sequence and annotate the transcriptome of the R. australis forelegs and associated tissues, including the Haller's organ. As G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are an important family of eukaryotic proteins studied as pharmaceutical targets in humans, we prioritized the identification and classification of the GPCRs expressed in the foreleg tissues. The two forelegs from adult R. australis were excised, RNA extracted, and pyrosequenced with 454 technology. Reads were assembled into unigenes and annotated by sequence similarity. Python scripts were written to find open reading frames (ORFs) from each unigene. These ORFs were analyzed by different GPCR prediction approaches based on sequence alignments, support vector machines, hidden Markov models, and principal component analysis. GPCRs consistently predicted by multiple methods were further studied by phylogenetic analysis and 3D homology modeling. From 4,782 assembled unigenes, 40,907 possible ORFs were predicted. Using Blastp, Pfam, GPCRpred, TMHMM, and PCA-GPCR, a basic set of 46 GPCR candidates were compiled and a phylogenetic tree was constructed. With further screening of tertiary structures predicted by RaptorX, 6 likely GPCRs emerged and the strongest candidate was classified by PCA-GPCR to be a GABAB receptor.

  2. Bioinformatic prediction of G protein-coupled receptor encoding sequences from the transcriptome of the foreleg, including the Haller’s organ, of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus australis

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, Sergio; Guerrero, Felix D.; Kellogg, Anastasia; Heekin, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    The cattle tick of Australia, Rhipicephalus australis, is a vector for microbial parasites that cause serious bovine diseases. The Haller’s organ, located in the tick’s forelegs, is crucial for host detection and mating. To facilitate the development of new technologies for better control of this agricultural pest, we aimed to sequence and annotate the transcriptome of the R. australis forelegs and associated tissues, including the Haller's organ. As G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are an important family of eukaryotic proteins studied as pharmaceutical targets in humans, we prioritized the identification and classification of the GPCRs expressed in the foreleg tissues. The two forelegs from adult R. australis were excised, RNA extracted, and pyrosequenced with 454 technology. Reads were assembled into unigenes and annotated by sequence similarity. Python scripts were written to find open reading frames (ORFs) from each unigene. These ORFs were analyzed by different GPCR prediction approaches based on sequence alignments, support vector machines, hidden Markov models, and principal component analysis. GPCRs consistently predicted by multiple methods were further studied by phylogenetic analysis and 3D homology modeling. From 4,782 assembled unigenes, 40,907 possible ORFs were predicted. Using Blastp, Pfam, GPCRpred, TMHMM, and PCA-GPCR, a basic set of 46 GPCR candidates were compiled and a phylogenetic tree was constructed. With further screening of tertiary structures predicted by RaptorX, 6 likely GPCRs emerged and the strongest candidate was classified by PCA-GPCR to be a GABAB receptor. PMID:28231302

  3. Interim Report on Multiple Sequence Alignments and TaqMan Signature Mapping to Phylogenetic Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S; Jaing, C

    2012-03-27

    The goal of this project is to develop forensic genotyping assays for select agent viruses, addressing a significant capability gap for the viral bioforensics and law enforcement community. We used a multipronged approach combining bioinformatics analysis, PCR-enriched samples, microarrays and TaqMan assays to develop high resolution and cost effective genotyping methods for strain level forensic discrimination of viruses. We have leveraged substantial experience and efficiency gained through year 1 on software development, SNP discovery, TaqMan signature design and phylogenetic signature mapping to scale up the development of forensics signatures in year 2. In this report, we have summarized the Taqman signature development for South American hemorrhagic fever viruses, tick-borne encephalitis viruses and henipaviruses, Old World Arenaviruses, filoviruses, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus and Japanese encephalitis virus.

  4. Mapping the magnetospheric structure at outburst of the pre-main sequence close binary AK Sco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez De Castro, Ana

    2013-10-01

    Pre-main sequence {PMS} binaries are surrounded by circumbinary disks from which matter falls onto both components. The material dragged from the circumbinary disk flows onto each star through independent streams channelled by the variable gravitational field. The action of the bar-like potential is most prominent in high eccentricity systems made of two equal mass stars. AK Sco is a unique PMS system composed of two F5 stars that get as close as 11.3 stellar radii at periastron {e=0.47}. AK Sco is an ideal laboratory to study matter infall in binaries and its role in orbit circularization. Our team has reported recently, the discovery of an unexpected 1.3mHz ultra low frequency {ULF} oscillation in the ultraviolet light curve at periastron passage. The oscillation lasted 0.6% of the orbital period. According to our numerical simulations, the cirscumstellar structures get in contact at periastron producing an accretion outburst that triggered of the oscillation. If confirmed, this would unveil a new mechanism for angular momentum loss during pre-main sequence evolution and a new type of interacting binary. The objective of this project is to identify the source of the oscillation and the physical structure of the accretion flow before, during and after the oscillation is triggered. Since the accretion flow radiates in the ultraviolet range, this study requires an ultraviolet {UV} spectroscopic monitoring.

  5. Sequence mapping of epoxide adducts in human hemoglobin with LC-tandem MS and the SALSA algorithm.

    PubMed

    Badghisi, Hamid; Liebler, Daniel C

    2002-06-01

    The rapid development and integration of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) has enabled the high-throughput identification of proteins and driven the expanding field of proteomics. LC-MS-MS also offers an attractive general approach to the analysis of xenobiotic adducts on proteins. The aim of this study was to examine the combined use of LC-MS-MS and the SALSA algorithm as a general approach to map xenobiotic adducts on proteins at the level of amino acid sequence. Hemoglobin (Hb) adducts are commonly used as biomarkers for exposure to environmental toxicants. Human Hb was incubated with styrene oxide, ethylene oxide, and butadiene dioxide (40 mM) to form adducts, digested with trypsin and analyzed by LC-MS-MS on a ThermoFinnigan LCQ ion trap MS instrument. Data-dependent scanning was used for acquisition of MS-MS spectra. The SALSA algorithm was used to detect MS-MS spectra of native and modified Hb peptides. The adducted sites identified are the N-terminal valines of both Hbalpha and Hbbeta, glutamic acid 7, cysteine 93, and histidines 77, 97, and 143 of the beta chain and histidine 45 of the alpha chain. Specific shifts in the b- and y-ion series in MS-MS spectra confirmed the locations of each adduct. This approach offers a means to simultaneously identify multiple Hb adducts resulting from exposures to known or unknown toxicants. Combined application of LC-MS-MS and SALSA thus provides a general means of mapping protein modifications at the level of amino acid sequence.

  6. Mapping of KIT adjacent sequences on canid autosomes and B chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Yudkin, D V; Trifonov, V A; Kukekova, A V; Vorobieva, N V; Rubtsova, N V; Yang, F; Acland, G M; Ferguson-Smith, M A; Graphodatsky, A S

    2007-01-01

    B chromosomes are often considered to be one of the most mysterious elements of karyotypes (Camacho, 2004). It is generally believed that mammalian B chromosomes do not contain any protein coding genes. The discovery of a conserved KIT gene in Canidae B chromosomes has changed this view. Here we performed analysis of sequences surrounding KIT in B chromosomes of the fox and raccoon dog. The presence of the RPL23A pseudogene was shown in canid B chromosomes. The 3' end fragment of the KDR gene was found in raccoon dog B chromosomes. The size of the B-specific fragment homologous to the autosome fragment was estimated to be a minimum of 480 kbp in both species. The origin and evolution of B chromosomes in Canidae are discussed.

  7. Fine mapping of genome activation in bovine embryos by RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Alexander; Krebs, Stefan; Zakhartchenko, Valeri; Schwalb, Björn; Blum, Helmut; Wolf, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    During maternal-to-embryonic transition control of embryonic development gradually switches from maternal RNAs and proteins stored in the oocyte to gene products generated after embryonic genome activation (EGA). Detailed insight into the onset of embryonic transcription is obscured by the presence of maternal transcripts. Using the bovine model system, we established by RNA sequencing a comprehensive catalogue of transcripts in germinal vesicle and metaphase II oocytes, and in embryos at the four-cell, eight-cell, 16-cell, and blastocyst stages. These were produced by in vitro fertilization of Bos taurus taurus oocytes with sperm from a Bos taurus indicus bull to facilitate parent-specific transcriptome analysis. Transcripts from 12.4 to 13.7 × 103 different genes were detected in the various developmental stages. EGA was analyzed by (i) detection of embryonic transcripts, which are not present in oocytes; (ii) detection of transcripts from the paternal allele; and (iii) detection of primary transcripts with intronic sequences. These strategies revealed (i) 220, (ii) 937, and (iii) 6,848 genes to be activated from the four-cell to the blastocyst stage. The largest proportion of gene activation [i.e., (i) 59%, (ii) 42%, and (iii) 58%] was found in eight-cell embryos, indicating major EGA at this stage. Gene ontology analysis of genes activated at the four-cell stage identified categories related to RNA processing, translation, and transport, consistent with preparation for major EGA. Our study provides the largest transcriptome data set of bovine oocyte maturation and early embryonic development and detailed insight into the timing of embryonic activation of specific genes. PMID:24591639

  8. Comprehensive processing of high throughput small RNA sequencing data including quality checking, normalization and differential expression analysis using the UEA sRNA Workbench.

    PubMed

    Beckers, Matthew L; Mohorianu, Irina; Stocks, Matthew B; Applegate, Christopher; Dalmay, Tamas; Moulton, Vincent

    2017-03-13

    Recently High Throughput Sequencing (HTS) has revealed compelling details about the small RNA (sRNA) population in eukaryotes. These 20-25 nt non-coding RNAs can influence gene expression by acting as guides for the sequence-specific regulatory mechanism known as RNA silencing. The increase in sequencing depth and number of samples per project enables a better understanding of the role sRNAs play by facilitating the study of expression patterns. However, the intricacy of the biological hypotheses coupled with a lack of appropriate tools often leads to inadequate mining of the available data and thus, an incomplete description of the biological mechanisms involved. To enable a comprehensive study of differential expression in sRNA datasets we present a new interactive pipeline that guides researchers through the various stages of data pre-processing and analysis. This includes various tools, some of which we specifically developed for sRNA analysis, for quality checking and normalization of sRNA samples as well as tools for the detection of differentially expressed sRNAs and identification of the resulting expression patterns. The pipeline is available within the UEA sRNA Workbench, a user-friendly software package for the processing of sRNA datasets. We demonstrate the use of the pipeline on a H. sapiens dataset; additional examples on a B. terrestris dataset and on an A. thaliana dataset are described in the supplementary information. A comparison with existing approaches is also included, which exemplifies some of the issues that need to be addressed for sRNA analysis, and how the new pipeline may be used to do this.

  9. Chromosomal Mapping of Repetitive DNA Sequences in the Genus Bryconamericus (Characidae) and DNA Barcoding to Differentiate Populations.

    PubMed

    Santos, Angélica Rossotti Dos; Usso, Mariana Campaner; Gouveia, Juceli Gonzalez; Araya-Jaime, Cristian; Frantine-Silva, Wilson; Giuliano-Caetano, Lucia; Foresti, Fausto; Dias, Ana Lúcia

    2017-03-29

    The mapping of repetitive DNA sites by fluorescence in situ hybridization has been widely used for karyotype studies in different species of fish, especially when dealing with related species or even genera presenting high chromosome variability. This study analyzed three populations of Bryconamericus, with diploid number preserved, but with different karyotype formulae. Bryconamericus ecai, from the Forquetinha river/RS, presented three new cytotypes, increasing the number of karyotype forms to seven in this population. Other two populations of Bryconamericus sp. from the Vermelho stream/PR and Cambuta river/PR exhibited interpopulation variation. The chromosome mapping of rDNA sites revealed unique markings among the three populations, showing inter- and intrapopulation variability located in the terminal region. The molecular analysis using DNA barcoding complementing the cytogenetic analysis also showed differentiation among the three populations. The U2 small nuclear DNA repetitive sequence exhibited conserved features, being located in the interstitial region of a single chromosome pair. This is the first report on its occurrence in the genus Bryconamericus. Data obtained revealed a karyotype variability already assigned to the genus, along with polymorphism of ribosomal sites, demonstrating that this group of fish can be undergoing a divergent evolutionary process, constituting a substantive model for studies of chromosomal evolution.

  10. Carriage and acquisition rates of Clostridium difficile in hospitalized horses, including molecular characterization, multilocus sequence typing and antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial isolates.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, C; Taminiau, B; Brévers, B; Avesani, V; Van Broeck, J; Leroux, A A; Amory, H; Delmée, M; Daube, G

    2014-08-06

    Clostridium difficile has been identified as a significant agent of diarrhoea and enterocolitis in both foals and adult horses. Hospitalization, antibiotic therapy or changes in diet may contribute to the development of C. difficile infection. Horses admitted to a care unit are therefore at greater risk of being colonized. The aim of this study was to investigate the carriage of C. difficile in hospitalized horses and the possible influence of some risk factors in colonization. During a seven-month period, faecal samples and data relating the clinical history of horses admitted to a veterinary teaching hospital were collected. C. difficile isolates were characterized through toxin profiles, cytotoxicity activity, PCR-ribotyping, antimicrobial resistance and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Ten isolates were obtained with a total of seven different PCR-ribotypes, including PCR-ribotype 014. Five of them were identified as toxinogenic. A high resistance to gentamicin, clindamycin and ceftiofur was found. MLST revealed four different sequencing types (ST), which included ST11, ST26, ST2 and ST15, and phylogenetic analysis showed that most of the isolates clustered in the same lineage. Clinical history suggests that horses frequently harbour toxigenic and non-toxigenic C. difficile and that in most cases they are colonized regardless of the reason for hospitalization; the development of diarrhoea is more unusual.

  11. Mapping and Validation of the Major Sex-Determining Region in Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L.) Using RAD Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohd G. Q.; Taggart, John B.; Gharbi, Karim; McAndrew, Brendan J.; Penman, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Sex in Oreochromis niloticus (Nile tilapia) is principally determined by an XX/XY locus but other genetic and environmental factors also influence sex ratio. Restriction Associated DNA (RAD) sequencing was used in two families derived from crossing XY males with females from an isogenic clonal line, in order to identify Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and map the sex-determining region(s). We constructed a linkage map with 3,802 SNPs, which corresponded to 3,280 informative markers, and identified a major sex-determining region on linkage group 1, explaining nearly 96% of the phenotypic variance. This sex-determining region was mapped in a 2 cM interval, corresponding to approximately 1.2 Mb in the O. niloticus draft genome. In order to validate this, a diverse family (4 families; 96 individuals in total) and population (40 broodstock individuals) test panel were genotyped for five of the SNPs showing the highest association with phenotypic sex. From the expanded data set, SNPs Oni23063 and Oni28137 showed the highest association, which persisted both in the case of family and population data. Across the entire dataset all females were found to be homozygous for these two SNPs. Males were heterozygous, with the exception of five individuals in the population and two in the family dataset. These fish possessed the homozygous genotype expected of females. Progeny sex ratios (over 95% females) from two of the males with the “female” genotype indicated that they were neomales (XX males). Sex reversal induced by elevated temperature during sexual differentiation also resulted in phenotypic males with the “female” genotype. This study narrows down the region containing the main sex-determining locus, and provides genetic markers tightly linked to this locus, with an association that persisted across the population. These markers will be of use in refining the production of genetically male O. niloticus for aquaculture. PMID:23874606

  12. A Saturated Genetic Linkage Map of Autotetraploid Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Developed Using Genotyping-by-Sequencing Is Highly Syntenous with the Medicago truncatula Genome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuehui; Wei, Yanling; Acharya, Ananta; Jiang, Qingzhen; Kang, Junmei; Brummer, E. Charles

    2014-01-01

    A genetic linkage map is a valuable tool for quantitative trait locus mapping, map-based gene cloning, comparative mapping, and whole-genome assembly. Alfalfa, one of the most important forage crops in the world, is autotetraploid, allogamous, and highly heterozygous, characteristics that have impeded the construction of a high-density linkage map using traditional genetic marker systems. Using genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), we constructed low-cost, reasonably high-density linkage maps for both maternal and paternal parental genomes of an autotetraploid alfalfa F1 population. The resulting maps contain 3591 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers on 64 linkage groups across both parents, with an average density of one marker per 1.5 and 1.0 cM for the maternal and paternal haplotype maps, respectively. Chromosome assignments were made based on homology of markers to the M. truncatula genome. Four linkage groups representing the four haplotypes of each alfalfa chromosome were assigned to each of the eight Medicago chromosomes in both the maternal and paternal parents. The alfalfa linkage groups were highly syntenous with M. truncatula, and clearly identified the known translocation between Chromosomes 4 and 8. In addition, a small inversion on Chromosome 1 was identified between M. truncatula and M. sativa. GBS enabled us to develop a saturated linkage map for alfalfa that greatly improved genome coverage relative to previous maps and that will facilitate investigation of genome structure. GBS could be used in breeding populations to accelerate molecular breeding in alfalfa. PMID:25147192

  13. A saturated genetic linkage map of autotetraploid alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) developed using genotyping-by-sequencing is highly syntenous with the Medicago truncatula genome.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuehui; Wei, Yanling; Acharya, Ananta; Jiang, Qingzhen; Kang, Junmei; Brummer, E Charles

    2014-08-21

    A genetic linkage map is a valuable tool for quantitative trait locus mapping, map-based gene cloning, comparative mapping, and whole-genome assembly. Alfalfa, one of the most important forage crops in the world, is autotetraploid, allogamous, and highly heterozygous, characteristics that have impeded the construction of a high-density linkage map using traditional genetic marker systems. Using genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), we constructed low-cost, reasonably high-density linkage maps for both maternal and paternal parental genomes of an autotetraploid alfalfa F1 population. The resulting maps contain 3591 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers on 64 linkage groups across both parents, with an average density of one marker per 1.5 and 1.0 cM for the maternal and paternal haplotype maps, respectively. Chromosome assignments were made based on homology of markers to the M. truncatula genome. Four linkage groups representing the four haplotypes of each alfalfa chromosome were assigned to each of the eight Medicago chromosomes in both the maternal and paternal parents. The alfalfa linkage groups were highly syntenous with M. truncatula, and clearly identified the known translocation between Chromosomes 4 and 8. In addition, a small inversion on Chromosome 1 was identified between M. truncatula and M. sativa. GBS enabled us to develop a saturated linkage map for alfalfa that greatly improved genome coverage relative to previous maps and that will facilitate investigation of genome structure. GBS could be used in breeding populations to accelerate molecular breeding in alfalfa.

  14. The human sorbitol dehydrogenase gene: cDNA cloning, sequence determination, and mapping by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, F.K.; Chung, S. ); Cheung, M.C. )

    1994-05-15

    The cDNA for human sorbitol dehydrogenase (SORD) has been cloned and sequenced. It translates into a peptide of 356 amino acid residues, one more than the sequence previously reported from peptide analysis. An extra alanine was found at the acetyl-blocked N-terminal, between positions 1 and 4. This matches the rat cDNA, which also has 356 amino acids, with an extra proline at position 3. Four other mismatches were also observed, but these are all amino acid substitutions that occur outside proposed functionally important regions. Further work must be performed to determine whether these discrepancies represent polymorphic forms of the enzyme. The SORD gene was mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization and found to occupy a single site on chromosome 15q15, indicating that it is a single-copy gene. This was confirmed by Southern blot hybridization. SORD is thought to be involved in the etiology of diabetic complications, and its deficiency has been linked to congenital cataracts. The cloned gene could be used as a probe to study the role of this enzyme in the pathogenesis of these diseases. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Construction of a high-density integrated genetic linkage map of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) using genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS).

    PubMed

    Pootakham, Wirulda; Ruang-Areerate, Panthita; Jomchai, Nukoon; Sonthirod, Chutima; Sangsrakru, Duangjai; Yoocha, Thippawan; Theerawattanasuk, Kanikar; Nirapathpongporn, Kanlaya; Romruensukharom, Phayao; Tragoonrung, Somvong; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke

    2015-01-01

    Construction of linkage maps is crucial for genetic studies and marker-assisted breeding programs. Recent advances in next generation sequencing technologies allow for the generation of high-density linkage maps, especially in non-model species lacking extensive genomic resources. Here, we constructed a high-density integrated genetic linkage map of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis), the sole commercial producer of high-quality natural rubber. We applied a genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) technique to simultaneously discover and genotype single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in two rubber tree populations. A total of 21,353 single nucleotide substitutions were identified, 55% of which represented transition events. GBS-based genetic maps of populations P and C comprised 1704 and 1719 markers and encompassed 2041 cM and 1874 cM, respectively. The average marker densities of these two maps were one SNP in 1.23-1.25 cM. A total of 1114 shared SNP markers were used to merge the two component maps. An integrated linkage map consisted of 2321 markers and spanned the cumulative length of 2052 cM. The composite map showed a substantial improvement in marker density, with one SNP marker in every 0.89 cM. To our knowledge, this is the most saturated genetic map in rubber tree to date. This integrated map allowed us to anchor 28,965 contigs, covering 135 Mb or 12% of the published rubber tree genome. We demonstrated that GBS is a robust and cost-effective approach for generating a common set of genome-wide SNP data suitable for constructing integrated linkage maps from multiple populations in a highly heterozygous agricultural species.

  16. Construction of a high-density integrated genetic linkage map of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) using genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS)

    PubMed Central

    Pootakham, Wirulda; Ruang-Areerate, Panthita; Jomchai, Nukoon; Sonthirod, Chutima; Sangsrakru, Duangjai; Yoocha, Thippawan; Theerawattanasuk, Kanikar; Nirapathpongporn, Kanlaya; Romruensukharom, Phayao; Tragoonrung, Somvong; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke

    2015-01-01

    Construction of linkage maps is crucial for genetic studies and marker-assisted breeding programs. Recent advances in next generation sequencing technologies allow for the generation of high-density linkage maps, especially in non-model species lacking extensive genomic resources. Here, we constructed a high-density integrated genetic linkage map of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis), the sole commercial producer of high-quality natural rubber. We applied a genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) technique to simultaneously discover and genotype single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in two rubber tree populations. A total of 21,353 single nucleotide substitutions were identified, 55% of which represented transition events. GBS-based genetic maps of populations P and C comprised 1704 and 1719 markers and encompassed 2041 cM and 1874 cM, respectively. The average marker densities of these two maps were one SNP in 1.23–1.25 cM. A total of 1114 shared SNP markers were used to merge the two component maps. An integrated linkage map consisted of 2321 markers and spanned the cumulative length of 2052 cM. The composite map showed a substantial improvement in marker density, with one SNP marker in every 0.89 cM. To our knowledge, this is the most saturated genetic map in rubber tree to date. This integrated map allowed us to anchor 28,965 contigs, covering 135 Mb or 12% of the published rubber tree genome. We demonstrated that GBS is a robust and cost-effective approach for generating a common set of genome-wide SNP data suitable for constructing integrated linkage maps from multiple populations in a highly heterozygous agricultural species. PMID:26074933

  17. A high-density genetic recombination map of sequence-tagged sites for sorghum, as a framework for comparative structural and evolutionary genomics of tropical grains and grasses.

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, John E; Abbey, Colette; Anderson, Sharon; Chang, Charlene; Draye, Xavier; Hoppe, Alison H; Jessup, Russell; Lemke, Cornelia; Lennington, Jennifer; Li, Zhikang; Lin, Yann-Rong; Liu, Sin-Chieh; Luo, Lijun; Marler, Barry S; Ming, Reiguang; Mitchell, Sharon E; Qiang, Dou; Reischmann, Kim; Schulze, Stefan R; Skinner, D Neil; Wang, Yue-Wen; Kresovich, Stephen; Schertz, Keith F; Paterson, Andrew H

    2003-01-01

    We report a genetic recombination map for Sorghum of 2512 loci spaced at average 0.4 cM ( approximately 300 kb) intervals based on 2050 RFLP probes, including 865 heterologous probes that foster comparative genomics of Saccharum (sugarcane), Zea (maize), Oryza (rice), Pennisetum (millet, buffelgrass), the Triticeae (wheat, barley, oat, rye), and Arabidopsis. Mapped loci identify 61.5% of the recombination events in this progeny set and reveal strong positive crossover interference acting across intervals of sequence-tagged sites will foster many structural, functional and evolutionary genomic studies in major food, feed, and biomass crops. PMID:14504243

  18. Histogram-based characterization of healthy and ischemic brain tissues using multiparametric MR imaging including apparent diffusion coefficient maps and relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Bernarding, J; Braun, J; Hohmann, J; Mansmann, U; Hoehn-Berlage, M; Stapf, C; Wolf, K J; Tolxdorff, T

    2000-01-01

    Decreased, renormalized, or increased values of the calculated apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) are observed in stroke models. A quantitative description of corresponding tissue states using ADC values may be extended to include true relaxation times. A histogram-based segmentation is well suited for characterizing tissues according to specific parameter combinations irrespective of the heterogeneity found for human healthy and ischemic brain tissues. In a new approach, navigated diffusion-weighted images and ADC maps were incorporated into voxel-based parameter sets of relaxation times (T1, T2), and T1- or T2-weighted images, followed by a supervised histogram-based analysis. Healthy tissues were segmented by incorporating T1 relaxation into the data set, ischemic regions by combining T2- or diffusion-weighted images with ADC maps. Mean values of healthy and pathologic tissues were determined, spatial distributions of the parameter vectors were visualized using color-encoded overlays. One to six days after stroke, ischemic regions exhibited reduced relative mean ADC values.

  19. Sequence composition of BAC clones and SSR markers mapped to Upland cotton chromosomes 11 and 21 targeting resistance to soil-borne pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Congli; Ulloa, Mauricio; Shi, Xinyi; Yuan, Xiaohui; Saski, Christopher; Yu, John Z.; Roberts, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and physical framework mapping in cotton (Gossypium spp.) were used to discover putative gene sequences involved in resistance to common soil-borne pathogens. Chromosome (Chr) 11 and its homoeologous Chr 21 of Upland cotton (G. hirsutum) are foci for discovery of resistance (R) or pathogen-induced R (PR) genes underlying QTLs involved in response to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita), reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis), Fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. vasinfectum), Verticillium wilt (Verticillium dahliae), and black root rot (Thielaviopsis basicola). Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from a BAC library developed from the Upland cotton Acala Maxxa were mapped on Chr 11 and Chr 21. DNA sequence through Gene Ontology (GO) of 99 of 256 Chr 11 and 109 of 239 Chr 21 previously mapped SSRs revealed response elements to internal and external stimulus, stress, signaling process, and cell death. The reconciliation between genetic and physical mapping of gene annotations from new DNA sequences of 20 BAC clones revealed 467 (Chr 11) and 285 (Chr 21) G. hirsutum putative coding sequences, plus 146 (Chr 11) and 98 (Chr 21) predicted genes. GO functional profiling of Unigenes uncovered genes involved in different metabolic functions and stress response elements (SRE). Our results revealed that Chrs 11 and 21 harbor resistance gene rich genomic regions. Sequence comparisons with the ancestral diploid D5 (G. raimondii), A2 (G. arboreum) and domesticated tetraploid TM-1 AD1 (G. hirsutum) genomes revealed abundance of transposable elements and confirmed the richness of resistance gene motifs in these chromosomes. The sequence information of SSR markers and BAC clones and the genetic mapping of BAC clones provide enhanced genetic and physical frameworks of resistance gene-rich regions of the cotton genome, thereby aiding discovery of R and PR genes and breeding for resistance to cotton diseases. PMID

  20. Accuracy, Precision, and Reproducibility of Four T1 Mapping Sequences: A Head-to-Head Comparison of MOLLI, ShMOLLI, SASHA, and SAPPHIRE

    PubMed Central

    Roujol, Sébastien; Weingärtner, Sebastian; Foppa, Murilo; Chow, Kelvin; Kawaji, Keigo; Ngo, Long H.; Kellman, Peter; Manning, Warren J.; Thompson, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare accuracy, precision, and reproducibility of four commonly used myocardial T1 mapping sequences: modified Look-Locker inversion recovery (MOLLI), shortened MOLLI (ShMOLLI), saturation recovery single-shot acquisition (SASHA), and saturation pulse prepared heart rate independent inversion recovery (SAPPHIRE). Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant study was approved by the institutional review board. All subjects provided written informed consent. Accuracy, precision, and reproducibility of the four T1 mapping sequences were first compared in phantom experiments. In vivo analysis was performed in seven healthy subjects (mean age ± standard deviation, 38 years ± 19; four men, three women) who were imaged twice on two separate days. In vivo reproducibility of native T1 mapping and extracellular volume (ECV) were measured. Differences between the sequences were assessed by using Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon rank sum tests (phantom data) and mixed-effect models (in vivo data). Results T1 mapping accuracy in phantoms was lower with ShMOLLI (62 msec) and MOLLI (44 msec) than with SASHA (13 msec; P < .05) and SAPPHIRE (12 msec; P < .05). MOLLI had similar precision to ShMOLLI (4.0 msec vs 5.6 msec; P = .07) but higher precision than SAPPHIRE (6.8 msec; P = .002) and SASHA (8.7 msec; P < .001). All sequences had similar reproducibility in phantoms (P = .1). The four sequences had similar in vivo reproducibility for native T1 mapping (∼25–50 msec; P > .05) and ECV quantification (∼0.01–0.02; P > .05). Conclusion SASHA and SAPPHIRE yield higher accuracy, lower precision, and similar reproducibility compared with MOLLI and ShMOLLI for T1 measurement. Different sequences yield different ECV values; however, all sequences have similar reproducibility for ECV quantification. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:24702727

  1. SPITZER IRS SPECTRAL MAPPING OF THE TOOMRE SEQUENCE: SPATIAL VARIATIONS OF PAH, GAS, AND DUST PROPERTIES IN NEARBY MAJOR MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Haan, S.; Armus, L.; Laine, S.; Surace, J. A.; Diaz-Santos, T.; Beirao, P.; Stierwalt, S.; Charmandaris, V.; Smith, J. D.; Schweizer, F.; Murphy, E. J.; Brandl, B.; Evans, A. S.; Hibbard, J. E.; Yun, M.; Jarrett, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    We have mapped the key mid-IR diagnostics in eight major merger systems of the Toomre sequence (NGC 4676, NGC 7592, NGC 6621, NGC 2623, NGC 6240, NGC 520, NGC 3921, and NGC 7252) using the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. With these maps, we explore the variation of the ionized-gas, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), and warm gas (H{sub 2}) properties across the sequence and within the galaxies. While the global PAH interband strength and ionized gas flux ratios ([Ne III]/[Ne II]) are similar to those of normal star-forming galaxies, the distribution of the spatially resolved PAH and fine structure line flux ratios is significantly different from one system to the other. Rather than a constant H{sub 2}/PAH flux ratio, we find that the relation between the H{sub 2} and PAH fluxes is characterized by a power law with a roughly constant exponent (0.61 {+-} 0.05) over all merger components and spatial scales. While following the same power law on local scales, three galaxies have a factor of 10 larger integrated (i.e., global) H{sub 2}/PAH flux ratio than the rest of the sample, even larger than what it is in most nearby active galactic nuclei. These findings suggest a common dominant excitation mechanism for H{sub 2} emission over a large range of global H{sub 2}/PAH flux ratios in major mergers. Early-merger systems show a different distribution between the cold (CO J = 1-0) and warm (H{sub 2}) molecular gas components, which is likely due to the merger interaction. Strong evidence for buried star formation in the overlap region of the merging galaxies is found in two merger systems (NGC 6621 and NGC 7592) as seen in the PAH, [Ne II], [Ne III], and warm gas line emission, but with no apparent corresponding CO (J = 1-0) emission. The minimum of the 11.3/7.7 {mu}m PAH interband strength ratio is typically located in the nuclei of galaxies, while the [Ne III/[Ne II] ratio increases with distance from the nucleus. Our findings also demonstrate that the variations of

  2. Hybrid sequencing and map finding (HySeMaFi): optional strategies for extensively deciphering gene splicing and expression in organisms without reference genome

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Guogui; Cheng, Xu; Luo, Ping; Liang, Fan; Wang, Zhen; Yu, Guoliang; Li, Xin; Wang, Depeng; Bao, Manzhu

    2017-01-01

    Using second-generation sequencing (SGS) RNA-Seq strategies, extensive alterative splicing prediction is impractical and high variability of isoforms expression quantification is inevitable in organisms without true reference dataset. we report the development of a novel analysis method, termed hybrid sequencing and map finding (HySeMaFi) which combines the specific strengths of third-generation sequencing (TGS) (PacBio SMRT sequencing) and SGS (Illumina Hi-Seq/MiSeq sequencing) to effectively decipher gene splicing and to reliably estimate the isoforms abundance. Error-corrected long reads from TGS are capable of capturing full length transcripts or as large partial transcript fragments. Both true and false isoforms, from a particular gene, as well as that containing all possible exons, could be generated by employing different assembly methods in SGS. We first develop an effective method which can establish the mapping relationship between the error-corrected long reads and the longest assembled contig in every corresponding gene. According to the mapping data, the true splicing pattern of the genes was reliably detected, and quantification of the isoforms was also effectively determined. HySeMaFi is also the optimal strategy by which to decipher the full exon expression of a specific gene when the longest mapped contigs were chosen as the reference set. PMID:28272530

  3. Detection and mapping of homologous, repeated and amplified DNA sequences by DNA renaturation in agarose gels.

    PubMed Central

    Roninson, I B

    1983-01-01

    A new molecular hybridization approach to the analysis of complex genomes has been developed. Tracer and driver DNAs were digested with the same restriction enzyme(s), and tracer DNA was labeled with 32P using T4 DNA polymerase. Tracer DNA was mixed with an excess amount of driver, and the mixture was electrophoresed in an agarose gel. Following electrophoresis, DNA was alkali-denatured in situ and allowed to reanneal in the gel, so that tracer DNA fragments could hybridize to the driver only when homologous driver DNA sequences were present at the same place in the gel, i.e. within a restriction fragment of the same size. After reannealing, unhybridized single-stranded DNA was digested in situ with S1 nuclease. The hybridized tracer DNA was detected by autoradiography. The general applicability of this technique was demonstrated in the following experiments. The common EcoRI restriction fragments were identified in the genomes of E. coli and four other species of bacteria. Two of these fragments are conserved in all Enterobacteriaceae. In other experiments, repeated EcoRI fragments of eukaryotic DNA were visualized as bands of various intensity after reassociation of a total genomic restriction digest in the gel. The situation of gene amplification was modeled by the addition of varying amounts of lambda phage DNA to eukaryotic DNA prior to restriction enzyme digestion. Restriction fragments of lambda DNA were detectable at a ratio of 15 copies per chicken genome and 30 copies per human genome. This approach was used to detect amplified DNA fragments in methotrexate (MTX)-resistant mouse cells and to identify commonly amplified fragments in two independently derived MTX-resistant lines. Images PMID:6310499

  4. Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome: Science, Ethics, and Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutter, Mary Ann G.; Drexler, Edward; McCullough, Laurence B.; McInerney, Joseph D.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Rossiter, Belinda; Zola, John

    The human genome project started in 1989 with the collaboration of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This document aims to develop an understanding among students of the human genome project and relevant issues. Topics include the science and technology of the human genome project, and the ethical and…

  5. Morphology and SSU rDNA sequence analysis of two hypotrichous ciliates (Protozoa, Ciliophora, Hypotrichia) including the new species Metaurostylopsis parastruederkypkeae n. sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Borong; Wang, Chundi; Huang, Jie; Shi, Yuhong; Chen, Xiangrui

    2016-10-01

    The morphology and phylogeny of two hypotrichous ciliates, Metaurostylopsis parastruederkypkeae n. sp. and Neourostylopsis flavicana (Wang et al., 2011) Chen et al., 2013 were investigated based on morphology, infraciliature and the small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA gene (rRNA) sequence. The new species, M. parastruederkypkeae n. sp. was identified according to its characteristics: body shape ellipsoidal, size about (165-200) × (45-60) μm in vivo, cell color reddish; two types of cortical granules including wheat grain-like and yellow-greenish larger ones along the marginal cirri rows and dorsal kineties and dot-like and reddish smaller ones, grouped around marginal cirri on ventral side and arranged in short lines on dorsal side; 26-41 adoral membranelles; three frontal and one parabuccal, five to seven frontoterminal, one buccal, and three to six transverse cirri; seven to thirteen midventral pairs; five to nine unpaired ventral cirri, five to seven left and three to five right marginal rows; and three complete dorsal kineties. Phylogenetic analysis based on SSU rDNA sequences showed that both Metaurostylopsis and Neourostylopsis are monophyletic. As the internal relationship between and within both genera are not clear, further studies on the species in these two genera are necessary. The key characteristics of all known twelve Metaurostylopsis-Apourostylopsis-Neourostylopsis species complex were updated.

  6. The utility of multiple molecular methods including whole genome sequencing as tools to differentiate Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Berenger, Byron M; Berry, Chrystal; Peterson, Trevor; Fach, Patrick; Delannoy, Sabine; Li, Vincent; Tschetter, Lorelee; Nadon, Celine; Honish, Lance; Louie, Marie; Chui, Linda

    2015-01-01

    A standardised method for determining Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain relatedness using whole genome sequencing or virulence gene profiling is not yet established. We sought to assess the capacity of either high-throughput polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of 49 virulence genes, core-genome single nt variants (SNVs) or k-mer clustering to discriminate between outbreak-associated and sporadic E. coli O157:H7 isolates. Three outbreaks and multiple sporadic isolates from the province of Alberta, Canada were included in the study. Two of the outbreaks occurred concurrently in 2014 and one occurred in 2012. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) were employed as comparator typing methods. The virulence gene profiles of isolates from the 2012 and 2014 Alberta outbreak events and contemporary sporadic isolates were mostly identical; therefore the set of virulence genes chosen in this study were not discriminatory enough to distinguish between outbreak clusters. Concordant with PFGE and MLVA results, core genome SNV and k-mer phylogenies clustered isolates from the 2012 and 2014 outbreaks as distinct events. k-mer phylogenies demonstrated increased discriminatory power compared with core SNV phylogenies. Prior to the widespread implementation of whole genome sequencing for routine public health use, issues surrounding cost, technical expertise, software standardisation, and data sharing/comparisons must be addressed.

  7. Constructing physical and genomic maps for Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici,the wheat stripe rust pathogen, by comparing its EST sequences to the genomic sequence of P. graminis f. sp. tritici,the wheat stem rust pathogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The wheat stripe rust fungus, Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), does not have a known alternate host for sexual reproduction, which makes it impossible to study gene linkages through classic genetic and molecular mapping approaches. In this study, we compared 4,219 Pst expression sequence t...

  8. Assessment of the evaluation of liver T1 mapping imaging applying virtual ECG gating on a modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) pulse sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Seung-Man; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Suk-Jun; Choe, Bo-Young

    2014-10-01

    A T1 mapping calculation error may occur in a physicochemical environment with large relaxivity. We evaluated through a simulated electrocardiogram (ECG) the administration of a contrast with high relaxivity and its effect on the heart rate by using a modified Look-Locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) pulse sequence. The agarose 2% phantom of high relaxivity environment was developed by diluting gadoxetic acid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T1 contrast media. The gold standard T1 determination was based on coronal single section imaging with a 2D inversion-recovery turbo spin echo sequence (2D-IRTSE) in a 3T MR unit. Using the identical 3T MR scanner, we acquired T1 mapping for the MOLLI pulse sequence with various virtual heart rates. T1 mapping data of the two different pulse sequences ( i.e., 2D-IRTSE and MOLLI) were measured to investigate the accuracy and the specificity. An in vivo study was conducted in the same manner as the phantom experiments for liver T1 mapping imaging in three healthy volunteers. The MOLLI pulse sequence showed an error rate of less than 10% at a contrast agent concentration of 0.4 mmol/L, and significant error, compared with the reference value, was observed at 0.6 mmol/L or higher. The percentage error of the T1 value did not correlated with the RR ( i.e., the time between heart beats) change that was observed (P =.270). Based on the in-vivo liver test, T1 mapping imaging of an abdominal organ as the liver can be successfully achieved using the applied virtual ECG gating on the MOLLI sequence.

  9. One Size Doesn't Fit All - RefEditor: Building Personalized Diploid Reference Genome to Improve Read Mapping and Genotype Calling in Next Generation Sequencing Studies.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuai; Johnston, H Richard; Zhang, Guosheng; Li, Yun; Hu, Yi-Juan; Qin, Zhaohui S

    2015-08-01

    With rapid decline of the sequencing cost, researchers today rush to embrace whole genome sequencing (WGS), or whole exome sequencing (WES) approach as the next powerful tool for relating genetic variants to human diseases and phenotypes. A fundamental step in analyzing WGS and WES data is mapping short sequencing reads back to the reference genome. This is an important issue because incorrectly mapped reads affect the downstream variant discovery, genotype calling and association analysis. Although many read mapping algorithms have been developed, the majority of them uses the universal reference genome and do not take sequence variants into consideration. Given that genetic variants are ubiquitous, it is highly desirable if they can be factored into the read mapping procedure. In this work, we developed a novel strategy that utilizes genotypes obtained a priori to customize the universal haploid reference genome into a personalized diploid reference genome. The new strategy is implemented in a program named RefEditor. When applying RefEditor to real data, we achieved encouraging improvements in read mapping, variant discovery and genotype calling. Compared to standard approaches, RefEditor can significantly increase genotype calling consistency (from 43% to 61% at 4X coverage; from 82% to 92% at 20X coverage) and reduce Mendelian inconsistency across various sequencing depths. Because many WGS and WES studies are conducted on cohorts that have been genotyped using array-based genotyping platforms previously or concurrently, we believe the proposed strategy will be of high value in practice, which can also be applied to the scenario where multiple NGS experiments are conducted on the same cohort. The RefEditor sources are available at https://github.com/superyuan/refeditor.

  10. Discovery of candidate disease genes in ENU-induced mouse mutants by large-scale sequencing, including a splice-site mutation in nucleoredoxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An accurate and precisely annotated genome assembly is a fundamental requirement for functional genomic analysis. Here, the complete DNA sequence and gene annotation of mouse Chromosome 11 was used to test the efficacy of large-scale sequencing for mutation identification. We re-sequenced the 14,000...

  11. A reference linkage map for Eucalyptus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic linkage maps are invaluable resources in plant research. They provide a key tool for many genetic applications including: mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL); comparative mapping; identifying unlinked (i.e. independent) DNA markers for fingerprinting, population genetics and phylogenetics; assisting genome sequence assembly; relating physical and recombination distances along the genome and map-based cloning of genes. Eucalypts are the dominant tree species in most Australian ecosystems and of economic importance globally as plantation trees. The genome sequence of E. grandis has recently been released providing unprecedented opportunities for genetic and genomic research in the genus. A robust reference linkage map containing sequence-based molecular markers is needed to capitalise on this resource. Several high density linkage maps have recently been constructed for the main commercial forestry species in the genus (E. grandis, E. urophylla and E. globulus) using sequenced Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) and microsatellite markers. To provide a single reference linkage map for eucalypts a composite map was produced through the integration of data from seven independent mapping experiments (1950 individuals) using a marker-merging method. Results The composite map totalled 1107 cM and contained 4101 markers; comprising 3880 DArT, 213 microsatellite and eight candidate genes. Eighty-one DArT markers were mapped to two or more linkage groups, resulting in the 4101 markers being mapped to 4191 map positions. Approximately 13% of DArT markers mapped to identical map positions, thus the composite map contained 3634 unique loci at an average interval of 0.31 cM. Conclusion The composite map represents the most saturated linkage map yet produced in Eucalyptus. As the majority of DArT markers contained on the map have been sequenced, the map provides a direct link to the E. grandis genome sequence and will serve as an important reference for

  12. Genetic Diversity and Association Mapping for Agromorphological and Grain Quality Traits of a Structured Collection of Durum Wheat Landraces Including subsp. durum, turgidum and diccocon

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, Patricia; Royo, Conxita; González, Mirvana; Carrillo, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Association mapping was performed for 18 agromorphological and grain quality traits in a set of 183 Spanish landraces, including subspecies durum, turgidum and dicoccon, genotyped with 749 DArT (Diversity Array Technology) markers. Large genetic and phenotypic variability was detected, being the level of diversity among the chromosomes and genomes heterogeneous, and sometimes complementary, among subspecies. Overall, 356 were monomorphic in at least one subspecies, mainly in dicoccon, and some of them coincidental between subspecies, especially between turgidum and dicoccon. Several of those fixed markers were associated to plant responses to environmental stresses or linked to genes subjected to selection during tetraploid wheat domestication process. A total of 85 stable MTAs (marker–trait associations) have been identified for the agromorphological and quality parameters, some of them common among subspecies and others subspecies-specific. For all the traits, we have found MTAs explaining more than 10% of the phenotypic variation in any of the three subspecies. The number of MTAs on the B genome exceeded that on the A genome in subsp. durum, equalled in turgidum and was below in dicoccon. The validation of several adaptive and quality trait MTAs by combining the association mapping with an analysis of the signature of selection, identifying the putative gene function of the marker, or by coincidences with previous reports, showed that our approach was successful for the detection of MTAs and the high potential of the collection to identify marker–trait associations. Novel MTAs not previously reported, some of them subspecies specific, have been described and provide new information about the genetic control of complex traits. PMID:27846306

  13. Sequence composition of BAC clones and SSR markers mapped to Upland cotton chromosomes 11 and 21 targeting resistance to soil-borne pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic and physical framework mapping in cotton (Gossypium spp.) were used to discover putative gene sequences involved in resistance to common soil-borne pathogens. Chromosome (Chr) 11 and its homoeologous Chr 21 of Upland cotton (G. hirsutum) is a focus for discovery of resistance (R) or pathoge...

  14. BAC-end sequence-based SNP mining in Allotetraploid Cotton (Gossypium) utilizing re-sequencing data, phylogenetic inferences and perspectives for genetic mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library and BAC-end sequences for Gossypium hirsutum L. have recently been developed. Here we report on genomic-based genome-wide SNP mining utilizing re-sequencing data with a BAC-end sequence reference for twelve G. hirsutum L. lines, one G. barbadense L. li...

  15. Maps of open chromatin highlight cell type-restricted patterns of regulatory sequence variation at hematological trait loci.

    PubMed

    Paul, Dirk S; Albers, Cornelis A; Rendon, Augusto; Voss, Katrin; Stephens, Jonathan; van der Harst, Pim; Chambers, John C; Soranzo, Nicole; Ouwehand, Willem H; Deloukas, Panos

    2013-07-01

    Nearly three-quarters of the 143 genetic signals associated with platelet and erythrocyte phenotypes identified by meta-analyses of genome-wide association (GWA) studies are located at non-protein-coding regions. Here, we assessed the role of candidate regulatory variants associated with cell type-restricted, closely related hematological quantitative traits in biologically relevant hematopoietic cell types. We used formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements followed by next-generation sequencing (FAIRE-seq) to map regions of open chromatin in three primary human blood cells of the myeloid lineage. In the precursors of platelets and erythrocytes, as well as in monocytes, we found that open chromatin signatures reflect the corresponding hematopoietic lineages of the studied cell types and associate with the cell type-specific gene expression patterns. Dependent on their signal strength, open chromatin regions showed correlation with promoter and enhancer histone marks, distance to the transcription start site, and ontology classes of nearby genes. Cell type-restricted regions of open chromatin were enriched in sequence variants associated with hematological indices. The majority (63.6%) of such candidate functional variants at platelet quantitative trait loci (QTLs) coincided with binding sites of five transcription factors key in regulating megakaryopoiesis. We experimentally tested 13 candidate regulatory variants at 10 platelet QTLs and found that 10 (76.9%) affected protein binding, suggesting that this is a frequent mechanism by which regulatory variants influence quantitative trait levels. Our findings demonstrate that combining large-scale GWA data with open chromatin profiles of relevant cell types can be a powerful means of dissecting the genetic architecture of closely related quantitative traits.

  16. Using genotyping by sequencing to map two novel anthracnose resistance Loci in Sorghum bicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Felderhoff, Terry J.; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Saballos, Ana; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2016-05-18

    Colletotrichum sublineola is an aggressive fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. The obvious symptoms of anthracnose are leaf blight and stem rot. Sorghum, the fifth most widely grown cereal crop in the world, can be highly susceptible to the disease, most notably in hot and humid environments. In the southeastern United States the acreage of sorghum has been increasing steadily in recent years, spurred by growing interest in producing biofuels, bio-based products, and animal feed. Resistance to anthracnose is, therefore, of paramount importance for successful sorghum production in this region. To identify anthracnose resistance loci present in the highly resistant cultivar ‘Bk7’, a biparental mapping population of F3:4 and F4:5 sorghum lines was generated by crossing ‘Bk7’ with the susceptible inbred ‘Early Hegari-Sart’. Lines were phenotyped in three environments and in two different years following natural infection. The population was genotyped by sequencing. Following a stringent custom filtering protocol, totals of 5186 and 2759 informative SNP markers were identified in the two populations. Segregation data and association analysis identified resistance loci on chromosomes 7 and 9, with the resistance alleles derived from ‘Bk7’. Both loci contain multiple classes of defense-related genes based on sequence similarity and gene ontologies. In addition, genetic analysis following an independent selection experiment of lines derived from a cross between ‘Bk7’ and sweet sorghum ‘Mer81-4’ narrowed the resistance locus on chromosome 9 substantially, validating this QTL. As observed in other species, sorghum appears to have regions of clustered resistance genes. Further characterization of these regions will facilitate the development of novel germplasm with resistance to anthracnose and other diseases.

  17. Determination of the sequence of intersecting lines from laser toner and seal ink by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy and scanning electron microscope / energy dispersive X-ray mapping.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanfeng; Li, Bing

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to verify that the combination of Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy and scanning electron microscope / energy dispersive X-ray mapping could be applied to line intersection problems. The spectral data of red seal ink, laser toner and their intersections, such as peak location and peak intensity, were described. Relative peak height ratios of different chemical components in intersecting lines were used to distinguish the sequences. Energy dispersive X-ray mapping characteristics of intersecting areas were also detailed. The results show that both the laser toner and the seal ink appear on the surface of intersections, regardless of the sequence. The distribution of the two inks on the surface is influenced not only by the sequence of heterogeneous lines but also by diffusion. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy and scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray mapping are able to explore the chemical components and the corresponding elemental distribution in the intersections. The combination of these two techniques has provided a reliable method for sequencing intersecting lines of red seal ink and laser toner, and more importantly, this method may be a basis for sequencing superimposed lines from other writing instruments.

  18. Genome sequencing and mapping reveal loss of heterozygosity as a mechanism for rapid adaptation in the vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici

    PubMed Central

    Lamour, Kurt H.; Mudge, Joann; Gobena, Daniel; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar P.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Kuo, Alan; Miller, Neil A.; Rice, Brandon J.; Raffaele, Sylvain; Cano, Liliana M.; Bharti, Arvind K.; Donahoo, Ryan S.; Finley, Sabra; Huitema, Edgar; Hulvey, Jon; Platt, Darren; Salamov, Asaf; Savidor, Alon; Sharma, Rahul; Stam, Remco; Storey, Dylan; Thines, Marco; Win, Joe; Haas, Brian J.; Dinwiddie, Darrell L.; Jenkins, Jerry; Knight, James R.; Affourtit, Jason P.; Han, Cliff S.; Chertkov, Olga; Lindquist, Erika A.; Detter, Chris; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kamoun, Sophien; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2013-01-01

    The oomycete vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici has shown remarkable adaptation to fungicides and new hosts. Like other members of this destructive genus, P. capsici has an explosive epidemiology, rapidly producing massive numbers of asexual spores on infected hosts. In addition, P. capsici can remain dormant for years as sexually-recombined oospores, making it difficult to produce crops at infested sites, and allowing outcrossing populations to maintain significant genetic variation. Genome sequencing, development of a high-density genetic map, and integrative genomic/genetic characterization of P. capsici field isolates and intercross progeny revealed significant mitotic loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and higher levels of SNVs than those reported for humans, plants, and P. infestans. LOH was detected in clonally propagated field isolates and sexual progeny, cumulatively affecting >30% of the genome. LOH altered genotypes for more than 11,000 single nucleotide variant (SNV) sites and showed a strong association with changes in mating type and pathogenicity. Overall, it appears that LOH may provide a rapid mechanism for fixing alleles and may be an important component of adaptability for P. capsici. PMID:22712506

  19. Genome Sequencing and Mapping Reveal Loss of Heterozygosity as a Mechanism for Rapid Adaptation in the Vegetable Pathogen Phytophthora capsici

    SciTech Connect

    Lamour, Kurt H.; Mudge, Joann; Gobena, Daniel; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar P.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Kuo, Alan; Miller, Neil A.; Rice, Brandon J.; Raffaele, Sylvain; Cano, Liliana M.; Bharti, Arvind K.; Donahoo, Ryan S.; Finely, Sabra; Huitema, Edgar; Hulvey, Jon; Platt, Darren; Salamov, Asaf; Savidor, Alon; Sharma, Rahul; Stam, Remco; Sotrey, Dylan; Thines, Marco; Win, Joe; Haas, Brian J.; Dinwiddie, Darrell L.; Jenkins, Jerry; Knight, James R.; Affourtit, Jason P.; Han, Cliff S.; Chertkov, Olga; Lindquist, Erika A.; Detter, Chris; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kamoun, Sophien; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2012-02-07

    The oomycete vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici has shown remarkable adaptation to fungicides and new hosts. Like other members of this destructive genus, P. capsici has an explosive epidemiology, rapidly producing massive numbers of asexual spores on infected hosts. In addition, P. capsici can remain dormant for years as sexually recombined oospores, making it difficult to produce crops at infested sites, and allowing outcrossing populations to maintain significant genetic variation. Genome sequencing, development of a high-density genetic map, and integrative genomic or genetic characterization of P. capsici field isolates and intercross progeny revealed significant mitotic loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in diverse isolates. LOH was detected in clonally propagated field isolates and sexual progeny, cumulatively affecting >30percent of the genome. LOH altered genotypes for more than 11,000 single-nucleotide variant sites and showed a strong association with changes in mating type and pathogenicity. Overall, it appears that LOH may provide a rapid mechanism for fixing alleles and may be an important component of adaptability for P. capsici.

  20. Genome sequencing and mapping reveal loss of heterozygosity as a mechanism for rapid adaptation in the vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici.

    PubMed

    Lamour, Kurt H; Mudge, Joann; Gobena, Daniel; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar P; Schmutz, Jeremy; Kuo, Alan; Miller, Neil A; Rice, Brandon J; Raffaele, Sylvain; Cano, Liliana M; Bharti, Arvind K; Donahoo, Ryan S; Finley, Sabra; Huitema, Edgar; Hulvey, Jon; Platt, Darren; Salamov, Asaf; Savidor, Alon; Sharma, Rahul; Stam, Remco; Storey, Dylan; Thines, Marco; Win, Joe; Haas, Brian J; Dinwiddie, Darrell L; Jenkins, Jerry; Knight, James R; Affourtit, Jason P; Han, Cliff S; Chertkov, Olga; Lindquist, Erika A; Detter, Chris; Grigoriev, Igor V; Kamoun, Sophien; Kingsmore, Stephen F

    2012-10-01

    The oomycete vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici has shown remarkable adaptation to fungicides and new hosts. Like other members of this destructive genus, P. capsici has an explosive epidemiology, rapidly producing massive numbers of asexual spores on infected hosts. In addition, P. capsici can remain dormant for years as sexually recombined oospores, making it difficult to produce crops at infested sites, and allowing outcrossing populations to maintain significant genetic variation. Genome sequencing, development of a high-density genetic map, and integrative genomic or genetic characterization of P. capsici field isolates and intercross progeny revealed significant mitotic loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in diverse isolates. LOH was detected in clonally propagated field isolates and sexual progeny, cumulatively affecting >30% of the genome. LOH altered genotypes for more than 11,000 single-nucleotide variant sites and showed a strong association with changes in mating type and pathogenicity. Overall, it appears that LOH may provide a rapid mechanism for fixing alleles and may be an important component of adaptability for P. capsici.

  1. Single-cell sequencing maps gene expression to mutational phylogenies in PDGF- and EGF-driven gliomas.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sören; Liu, Siyuan John; Di Lullo, Elizabeth; Malatesta, Martina; Pollen, Alex A; Nowakowski, Tomasz J; Kohanbash, Gary; Aghi, Manish; Kriegstein, Arnold R; Lim, Daniel A; Diaz, Aaron

    2016-11-25

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive type of primary brain tumor. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors are frequently amplified and/or possess gain-of-function mutations in GBM However, clinical trials of tyrosine-kinase inhibitors have shown disappointing efficacy, in part due to intra-tumor heterogeneity. To assess the effect of clonal heterogeneity on gene expression, we derived an approach to map single-cell expression profiles to sequentially acquired mutations identified from exome sequencing. Using 288 single cells, we constructed high-resolution phylogenies of EGF-driven and PDGF-driven GBMs, modeling transcriptional kinetics during tumor evolution. Descending the phylogenetic tree of a PDGF-driven tumor corresponded to a progressive induction of an oligodendrocyte progenitor-like cell type, expressing pro-angiogenic factors. In contrast, phylogenetic analysis of an EGFR-amplified tumor showed an up-regulation of pro-invasive genes. An in-frame deletion in a specific dimerization domain of PDGF receptor correlates with an up-regulation of growth pathways in a proneural GBM and enhances proliferation when ectopically expressed in glioma cell lines. In-frame deletions in this domain are frequent in public GBM data.

  2. Construction of a Genetic Linkage Map Based on Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Markers and Development of Sequence-Tagged Site Markers for Marker-Assisted Selection of the Sporeless Trait in the Oyster Mushroom (Pleurotus eryngii)

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Jun; Obatake, Yasushi; Murakami, Shigeyuki; Fukumasa, Yukitaka; Matsumoto, Teruyuki

    2012-01-01

    A large number of spores from fruiting bodies can lead to allergic reactions and other problems during the cultivation of edible mushrooms, including Pleurotus eryngii (DC.) Quél. A cultivar harboring a sporulation-deficient (sporeless) mutation would be useful for preventing these problems, but traditional breeding requires extensive time and labor. In this study, using a sporeless P. eryngii strain, we constructed a genetic linkage map to introduce a molecular breeding program like marker-assisted selection. Based on the segregation of 294 amplified fragment length polymorphism markers, two mating type factors, and the sporeless trait, the linkage map consisted of 11 linkage groups with a total length of 837.2 centimorgans (cM). The gene region responsible for the sporeless trait was located in linkage group IX with 32 amplified fragment length polymorphism markers and the B mating type factor. We also identified eight markers closely linked (within 1.2 cM) to the sporeless locus using bulked-segregant analysis-based amplified fragment length polymorphism. One such amplified fragment length polymorphism marker was converted into two sequence-tagged site markers, SD488-I and SD488-II. Using 14 wild isolates, sequence-tagged site analysis indicated the potential usefulness of the combination of two sequence-tagged site markers in cross-breeding of the sporeless strain. It also suggested that a map constructed for P. eryngii has adequate accuracy for marker-assisted selection. PMID:22210222

  3. The First High-Density Genetic Map Construction in Tree Peony (Paeonia Sect. Moutan) using Genotyping by Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Cai, Changfu; Cheng, Fang-Yun; Wu, Jing; Zhong, Yuan; Liu, Gaixiu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic linkage maps, permitting the elucidation of genome structure, are one of most powerful genomic tools to accelerate marker-assisted breeding. However, due to a lack of sufficient user-friendly molecular markers, no genetic linkage map has been developed for tree peonies (Paeonia Sect. Moutan), a group of important horticultural plants worldwide. Specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) is a recent molecular marker development technology that enable the large-scale discovery and genotyping of sequence-based marker in genome-wide. In this study, we performed SLAF sequencing of an F1 population, derived from the cross P. ostti 'FenDanBai' × P. × suffruticosa 'HongQiao', to identify sufficient high-quality markers for the construction of high-density genetic linkage map in tree peonies. After SLAF sequencing, a total of 78 Gb sequencing data and 285,403,225 pair-end reads were generated. We detected 309,198 high-quality SLAFs from these data, of which 85,124 (27.5%) were polymorphic. Subsequently, 3518 of the polymorphic markers, which were successfully encoded in to Mendelian segregation types, and were in conformity with the criteria of high-quality markers, were defined as effective markers and used for genetic linkage mapping. Finally, we constructed an integrated genetic map, which comprised 1189 markers on the five linkage groups, and spanned 920.699 centiMorgans (cM) with an average inter-marker distance of 0.774 cM. There were 1115 'SNP-only' markers, 18 'InDel-only' markers, and 56 'SNP&InDel' markers on the map. Among these markers, 450 (37.85%) showed significant segregation distortion (P < 0.05). In conclusion, this investigation reported the first large-scale marker development and high-density linkage map construction for tree peony. The results of this study will serve as a solid foundation not only for marker-assisted breeding, but also for genome sequence assembly for tree peony.

  4. Geologic map and map database of northeastern San Francisco Bay region, California, [including] most of Solano County and parts of Napa, Marin, Contra Costa, San Joaquin, Sacramento, Yolo, and Sonoma Counties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graymer, Russell Walter; Jones, David Lawrence; Brabb, Earl E.

    2002-01-01

    This digital map database, compiled from previously published and unpublished data, and new mapping by the authors, represents the general distribution of bedrock and surficial deposits in the mapped area. Together with the accompanying text file (nesfmf.ps, nesfmf.pdf, nesfmf.txt), it provides current information on the geologic structure and stratigraphy of the area covered. The database delineates map units that are identified by general age and lithology following the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. The scale of the source maps limits the spatial resolution (scale) of the database to 1:62,500 or smaller.

  5. Development of cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers and a CAPS-based genetic linkage map in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus [Thunb.] Matsum. and Nakai) constructed using whole-genome re-sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shi; Gao, Peng; Zhu, Qianglong; Luan, Feishi; Davis, Angela R; Wang, Xiaolu

    2016-03-01

    Cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) markers are useful tools for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). This study detected and converted SNP sites into CAPS markers based on high-throughput re-sequencing data in watermelon, for linkage map construction and quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis. Two inbred lines, Cream of Saskatchewan (COS) and LSW-177 had been re-sequenced and analyzed by Perl self-compiled script for CAPS marker development. 88.7% and 78.5% of the assembled sequences of the two parental materials could map to the reference watermelon genome, respectively. Comparative assembled genome data analysis provided 225,693 and 19,268 SNPs and indels between the two materials. 532 pairs of CAPS markers were designed with 16 restriction enzymes, among which 271 pairs of primers gave distinct bands of the expected length and polymorphic bands, via PCR and enzyme digestion, with a polymorphic rate of 50.94%. Using the new CAPS markers, an initial CAPS-based genetic linkage map was constructed with the F2 population, spanning 1836.51 cM with 11 linkage groups and 301 markers. 12 QTLs were detected related to fruit flesh color, length, width, shape index, and brix content. These newly CAPS markers will be a valuable resource for breeding programs and genetic studies of watermelon.

  6. Development of cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers and a CAPS-based genetic linkage map in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus [Thunb.] Matsum. and Nakai) constructed using whole-genome re-sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shi; Gao, Peng; Zhu, Qianglong; Luan, Feishi; Davis, Angela R.; Wang, Xiaolu

    2016-01-01

    Cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) markers are useful tools for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). This study detected and converted SNP sites into CAPS markers based on high-throughput re-sequencing data in watermelon, for linkage map construction and quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis. Two inbred lines, Cream of Saskatchewan (COS) and LSW-177 had been re-sequenced and analyzed by Perl self-compiled script for CAPS marker development. 88.7% and 78.5% of the assembled sequences of the two parental materials could map to the reference watermelon genome, respectively. Comparative assembled genome data analysis provided 225,693 and 19,268 SNPs and indels between the two materials. 532 pairs of CAPS markers were designed with 16 restriction enzymes, among which 271 pairs of primers gave distinct bands of the expected length and polymorphic bands, via PCR and enzyme digestion, with a polymorphic rate of 50.94%. Using the new CAPS markers, an initial CAPS-based genetic linkage map was constructed with the F2 population, spanning 1836.51 cM with 11 linkage groups and 301 markers. 12 QTLs were detected related to fruit flesh color, length, width, shape index, and brix content. These newly CAPS markers will be a valuable resource for breeding programs and genetic studies of watermelon. PMID:27162496

  7. An Expressed Sequence Tag (EST)-enriched genetic map of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus): a useful framework for comparative genomics across model and farmed teleosts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) is a relevant species in European aquaculture. The small turbot genome provides a source for genomics strategies to use in order to understand the genetic basis of productive traits, particularly those related to sex, growth and pathogen resistance. Genetic maps represent essential genomic screening tools allowing to localize quantitative trait loci (QTL) and to identify candidate genes through comparative mapping. This information is the backbone to develop marker-assisted selection (MAS) programs in aquaculture. Expressed sequenced tag (EST) resources have largely increased in turbot, thus supplying numerous type I markers suitable for extending the previous linkage map, which was mostly based on anonymous loci. The aim of this study was to construct a higher-resolution turbot genetic map using EST-linked markers, which will turn out to be useful for comparative mapping studies. Results A consensus gene-enriched genetic map of the turbot was constructed using 463 SNP and microsatellite markers in nine reference families. This map contains 438 markers, 180 EST-linked, clustered at 24 linkage groups. Linkage and comparative genomics evidences suggested additional linkage group fusions toward the consolidation of turbot map according to karyotype information. The linkage map showed a total length of 1402.7 cM with low average intermarker distance (3.7 cM; ~2 Mb). A global 1.6:1 female-to-male recombination frequency (RF) ratio was observed, although largely variable among linkage groups and chromosome regions. Comparative sequence analysis revealed large macrosyntenic patterns against model teleost genomes, significant hits decreasing from stickleback (54%) to zebrafish (20%). Comparative mapping supported particular chromosome rearrangements within Acanthopterygii and aided to assign unallocated markers to specific turbot linkage groups. Conclusions The new gene-enriched high-resolution turbot map represents a

  8. Bioinformatic analyses of the publicly accessible crustacean expressed sequence tags (ESTs) reveal numerous novel neuropeptide-encoding precursor proteins, including ones from members of several little studied taxa.

    PubMed

    Christie, Andrew E; Durkin, Christopher S; Hartline, Niko; Ohno, Paul; Lenz, Petra H

    2010-05-15

    ESTs have been generated for many crustacean species, providing an invaluable resource for peptide discovery in members of this arthropod subphylum. Here, these data were mined for novel peptide-encoding transcripts, with the mature peptides encoded by them predicted using a combination of online peptide prediction programs and homology to known arthropod sequences. In total, 70 mature full-length/partial peptides representing members of 16 families/subfamilies were predicted, the vast majority being novel; the species from which the peptides were identified included members of the Branchiopoda (Daphnia carinata and Triops cancriformis), Maxillopoda (Caligus clemensi, Caligus rogercresseyi, Lepeophtheirus salmonis and Lernaeocera branchialis) and Malacostraca (Euphausia superba, Marsupenaeus japonicus, Penaeus monodon, Homarus americanus, Petrolisthes cinctipes, Callinectes sapidus and Portunus trituberculatus). Of particular note were the identifications of an intermediate between the insect adipokinetic hormones and crustacean red pigment concentrating hormone and a modified crustacean cardioactive peptide from the daphnid D. carinata; Arg(7)-corazonin was also deduced from this species, the first identification of a corazonin from a non-decapod crustacean. Our data also include the first reports of members of the calcitonin-like diuretic hormone, FMRFamide-related peptide (neuropeptide F subfamily) and orcokinin families from members of the Copepoda. Moreover, the prediction of a bursicon alpha from the euphausid E. superba represents the first peptide identified from any member of the basal eucaridean order Euphausiacea. In addition, large collections of insect eclosion hormone- and neuroparsin-like peptides were identified from a variety of species, greatly expanding the number of known members of these families in crustaceans.

  9. Construction of a High-Density Genetic Map Based on Large-Scale Marker Development in Mango Using Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing (SLAF-seq)

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chun; Shu, Bo; Yao, Quangsheng; Wu, Hongxia; Xu, Wentian; Wang, Songbiao

    2016-01-01

    Genetic maps are particularly important and valuable tools for quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping and marker assisted selection (MAS) of plant with desirable traits. In this study, 173 F1 plants from a cross between Mangifera indica L. “Jin-Hwang” and M. indica L. “Irwin” and their parent plants were subjected to high-throughput sequencing and specific-locus amplified fragment (SLAF) library construction. After preprocessing, 66.02 Gb of raw data containing 330.64 M reads were obtained. A total of 318,414 SLAFs were detected, of which 156,368 were polymorphic. Finally, 6594 SLAFs were organized into a linkage map consisting of 20 linkage groups (LGs). The total length of the map was 3148.28 cM and the average distance between adjacent markers was 0.48 cM. This map could be considered, to our knowledge, the first high-density genetic map of mango, and might form the basis for fine QTL mapping and MAS of mango. PMID:27625670

  10. High-resolution physical mapping of a 250-kb region of human chromosome 11q24 by genomic sequence sampling (GSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Selleri, L.; Smith, M.W.; Holmsen, A.L.

    1995-04-10

    A physical map of the region of human chromosome 11q24 containing the FLI1 gene, disrupted by the t(11;22) translocation in Ewing sarcoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumors, was analyzed by genomic sequence sampling. Using a 4- to 5-fold coverage chromosome 11-specific library, 22 region-specific cosmid clones were identified by phenol emulsion reassociation hybridization, with a 245-kb yeast artificial chromosome clone containing the FLI1 gene, and by directed {open_quotes}walking{close_quotes} techniques. Cosmid contigs were constructed by individual clone fingerprinting using restriction enzyme digestion and assembly with the Genome Reconstruction and AsseMbly (GRAM) computer algorithm. The relative orientation and spacing of cosmid contigs with respect to the chromosome were determined by the structural analysis of cosmid clones and by direct visual in situ hybridization mapping. Each cosmid clone in the contig was subjected to {open_quotes}one-pass{close_quotes} end sequencing, and the resulting ordered sequence fragments represent {approximately}5% of the complete DNA sequence, making the entire region accessible by PCR amplification. The sequence samples were analyzed for putative exons, repetitive DNAs, and simple sequence repeats using a variety of computer algorithms. Based upon the computer predictions, Southern and Northern blot experiments led to the independent identification and localization of the FLI1 gene as well as a previously unknown gene located in this region of chromosome 11q24. This approach to high-resolution physical analysis of human chromosomes allows the assembly of detailed sequence-based maps. 62 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Combining Next Generation Sequencing with Bulked Segregant Analysis to Fine Map a Stem Moisture Locus in Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench).

    PubMed

    Han, Yucui; Lv, Peng; Hou, Shenglin; Li, Suying; Ji, Guisu; Ma, Xue; Du, Ruiheng; Liu, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    Sorghum is one of the most promising bioenergy crops. Stem juice yield, together with stem sugar concentration, determines sugar yield in sweet sorghum. Bulked segregant analysis (BSA) is a gene mapping technique for identifying genomic regions containing genetic loci affecting a trait of interest that when combined with deep sequencing could effectively accelerate the gene mapping process. In this study, a dry stem sorghum landrace was characterized and the stem water controlling locus, qSW6, was fine mapped using QTL analysis and the combined BSA and deep sequencing technologies. Results showed that: (i) In sorghum variety Jiliang 2, stem water content was around 80% before flowering stage. It dropped to 75% during grain filling with little difference between different internodes. In landrace G21, stem water content keeps dropping after the flag leaf stage. The drop from 71% at flowering time progressed to 60% at grain filling time. Large differences exist between different internodes with the lowest (51%) at the 7th and 8th internodes at dough stage. (ii) A quantitative trait locus (QTL) controlling stem water content mapped on chromosome 6 between SSR markers Ch6-2 and gpsb069 explained about 34.7-56.9% of the phenotypic variation for the 5th to 10th internodes, respectively. (iii) BSA and deep sequencing analysis narrowed the associated region to 339 kb containing 38 putative genes. The results could help reveal molecular mechanisms underlying juice yield of sorghum and thus to improve total sugar yield.

  12. Combining Next Generation Sequencing with Bulked Segregant Analysis to Fine Map a Stem Moisture Locus in Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench)

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shenglin; Li, Suying; Ji, Guisu; Ma, Xue; Du, Ruiheng; Liu, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    Sorghum is one of the most promising bioenergy crops. Stem juice yield, together with stem sugar concentration, determines sugar yield in sweet sorghum. Bulked segregant analysis (BSA) is a gene mapping technique for identifying genomic regions containing genetic loci affecting a trait of interest that when combined with deep sequencing could effectively accelerate the gene mapping process. In this study, a dry stem sorghum landrace was characterized and the stem water controlling locus, qSW6, was fine mapped using QTL analysis and the combined BSA and deep sequencing technologies. Results showed that: (i) In sorghum variety Jiliang 2, stem water content was around 80% before flowering stage. It dropped to 75% during grain filling with little difference between different internodes. In landrace G21, stem water content keeps dropping after the flag leaf stage. The drop from 71% at flowering time progressed to 60% at grain filling time. Large differences exist between different internodes with the lowest (51%) at the 7th and 8th internodes at dough stage. (ii) A quantitative trait locus (QTL) controlling stem water content mapped on chromosome 6 between SSR markers Ch6-2 and gpsb069 explained about 34.7-56.9% of the phenotypic variation for the 5th to 10th internodes, respectively. (iii) BSA and deep sequencing analysis narrowed the associated region to 339 kb containing 38 putative genes. The results could help reveal molecular mechanisms underlying juice yield of sorghum and thus to improve total sugar yield. PMID:25984727

  13. Leveraging 3D Wheeler Diagrams and relative time mapping in seismic data to improve stratigraphic interpretation: Application, Assumptions, and Sequence Stratigraphic Revelations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goggin, L. R.

    2014-12-01

    Our understanding of subsurface stratigraphic relationships is guided by stratigraphic concepts that were developed using many varieties and scales of data including paleontological samples, cuttings and core, outcrop analogs, well logs, and seismic. Subsurface stratigraphic correlations are strongly influenced by the type, density, and distribution of the data available. The exploration geologist typically interprets 2D and 3D seismic reflections to define prospects and plays. In structurally simple areas, he or she often assumes that seismic reflectors mark depositional boundaries that are essentially time-synchronous events represented by a single wavelet character. In reality, seismic reflectors usually display spatial wavelet variability, seldom resolve individual beds and are the product of the amplitude expression of a range of lithologic changes that encompasses a range of geologic time and depositional processes. Our assumption that seismic reflections are time-synchronous can lead to errors in stratigraphic correlation that only become evident when our prediction of well or field performance is unrealized. To mitigate the potential for this correlation error, we must modify how we interpret seismic data. In this presentation we will focus on the concept of defining or approximating time-correlative surfaces in seismic data, leverage concepts of the Wheeler transform to place these seismic reflectors into the relative time domain and then examine the diachronous nature of these time-mapped surfaces in 3D. We will then explore how the 3D mapping of time-correlative surfaces fits sequence stratigraphic concepts and discuss whether this new approach requires us to change our interpretation paradigms.

  14. BAC-End Sequence-Based SNP Mining in Allotetraploid Cotton (Gossypium) Utilizing Resequencing Data, Phylogenetic Inferences, and Perspectives for Genetic Mapping.

    PubMed

    Hulse-Kemp, Amanda M; Ashrafi, Hamid; Stoffel, Kevin; Zheng, Xiuting; Saski, Christopher A; Scheffler, Brian E; Fang, David D; Chen, Z Jeffrey; Van Deynze, Allen; Stelly, David M

    2015-04-09

    A bacterial artificial chromosome library and BAC-end sequences for cultivated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) have recently been developed. This report presents genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mining utilizing resequencing data with BAC-end sequences as a reference by alignment of 12 G. hirsutum L. lines, one G. barbadense L. line, and one G. longicalyx Hutch and Lee line. A total of 132,262 intraspecific SNPs have been developed for G. hirsutum, whereas 223,138 and 470,631 interspecific SNPs have been developed for G. barbadense and G. longicalyx, respectively. Using a set of interspecific SNPs, 11 randomly selected and 77 SNPs that are putatively associated with the homeologous chromosome pair 12 and 26, we mapped 77 SNPs into two linkage groups representing these chromosomes, spanning a total of 236.2 cM in an interspecific F2 population (G. barbadense 3-79 × G. hirsutum TM-1). The mapping results validated the approach for reliably producing large numbers of both intraspecific and interspecific SNPs aligned to BAC-ends. This will allow for future construction of high-density integrated physical and genetic maps for cotton and other complex polyploid genomes. The methods developed will allow for future Gossypium resequencing data to be automatically genotyped for identified SNPs along the BAC-end sequence reference for anchoring sequence assemblies and comparative studies.

  15. Genome-Wide Mapping of Growth-Related Quantitative Trait Loci in Orange-Spotted Grouper (Epinephelus coioides) Using Double Digest Restriction-Site Associated DNA Sequencing (ddRADseq)

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hui; You, Xinxin; Li, Jia; Liu, Hankui; Meng, Zining; Xiao, Ling; Zhang, Haifa; Lin, Hao-Ran; Zhang, Yong; Shi, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) is essential for the discovery of genetic structures that related to complex quantitative traits. In this study, we identified 264,072 raw SNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) by double digest restriction site associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq), and utilized 3029 of these SNPs to construct a genetic linkage map in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) using a regression mapping algorithm. The genetic map contained 24 linkage groups (LGs) spanning a total genetic distance of 1231.98 cM. Twenty-seven significant growth-related QTLs were identified. Furthermore, we identified 17 genes (fez2, alg3, ece2, arvcf, sla27a4, sgk223, camk2, prrc2b, mchr1, sardh, pappa, syk, tert, wdrcp91, ftz-f1, mate1 and notch1) including three (tert, ftz-f1 and notch1) that have been reported to be involved in fish growth. To summarize, we mapped growth-related QTLs in the orange-spotted grouper. These QTLs will be useful in marker-assisted selection (MAS) efforts to improve growth-related traits in this economically important fish. PMID:27058532

  16. A gene-derived SNP-based high resolution linkage map of carrot including the location of QTL conditioning root and leaf anthocyanin pigmentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Purple carrots accumulate large quantities of anthocyanins in their roots and leaves. These flavonoid pigments possess antioxidant activity and are implicated in providing health benefits. The lack of informative and saturated linkage maps associated with well characterized populations s...

  17. Physical mapping of the major early-onset familial Alzheimer`s disease locus on chromosome 14 and analysis of candidate gene sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Tanzi, R.E.; Romano, D.M.; Crowley, A.C.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic studies of kindreds displaying evidence for familial AD (FAD) have led to the localization of gene defects responsible for this disorder on chromosomes 14, 19, and 21. A minor early-onset FAD gene on chromosome 21 has been identified to enode the amyloid precursor protein (APP), and the late-onset FAD susceptibility locus on chromosome 19 has been shown to be in linkage disequilibrium with the E4 allele of the APOE gene. Meanwhile, the locus responsible for the major form of early-onset FAD on chromosome 14q24 has not yet been identified. By recombinational analysis, we have refined the minimal candidate region containing the gene defect to approximately 3 megabases in 14q24. We will describe our laboratory`s progress on attempts to finely localize this locus, as well as test known candidate genes from this region for either inclusion in the minimal candidate region or the presence of pathogenic mutations. Candidate genes that have been tested so far include cFOS, heat shock protein 70 member (HSF2A), transforming growth factor beta (TGFB3), the trifunctional protein C1-THF synthase (MTHFD), bradykinin receptor (BR), and the E2k component of a-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase. HSP2A, E2k, MTHFD, and BR do not map to the current defined minimal candidate region; however, sequence analysis must be performed to confirm exclusion of these genes as true candidates. Meanwhile, no pathogenic mutations have yet been found in cFOS or TGFB3. We have also isolated a large number of novel transcribed sequences from the minimal candidate region in the form of {open_quotes}trapped exons{close_quotes} from cosmids identified by hybridization to select YAC clones; we are currently in the process of searching for pathogenic mutations in these exons in affected individuals from FAD families.

  18. Harnessing the sorghum genome sequence:development of a genome-wide microsattelite (SSR) resource for swift genetic mapping and map based cloning in sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorghum is the second cereal crop to have a full genome completely sequenced (Nature (2009), 457:551). This achievement is widely recognized as a scientific milestone for grass genetics and genomics in general. However, the true worth of genetic information lies in translating the sequence informa...

  19. AN APPROACH TO REVEALING BLOOD FLUKE LIFE CYCLES, TAXONOMY, AND DIVERSITY: PROVISION OF KEY REFERENCE DATA INCLUDING DNA SEQUENCE FROM SINGLE LIFE CYCLE STAGES

    PubMed Central

    Brant, Sara V.; Morgan, Jess A. T.; Mkoji, Gerald M.; Snyder, Scott D.; Rajapakse, R. P. V. Jayanthe; Loker, Eric S.

    2008-01-01

    Revealing diversity among extant blood flukes, and the patterns of relationships among them, has been hindered by the difficulty of determining if specimens described from different life cycle stages, hosts, geographic localities, and times represent the same or different species. Persistent collection of all available life cycle stages and provision of exact collection localities, host identification, reference DNA sequences for the parasite, and voucher specimens eventually will provide the framework needed to piece together individual life cycles and facilitate reconciliation with classical taxonomic descriptions, including those based on single life cycle stages. It also provides a means to document unique or rare species that might only ever be recovered from a single life cycle stage. With an emphasis on the value of new information from field collections of any available life cycle stages, here we provide data for several blood fluke cercariae from freshwater snails from Kenya, Uganda, and Australia. Similar data are provided for adult worms of Macrobilharzia macrobilharzia and miracidia of Bivitellobilharzia nairi. Some schistosome and sanguinicolid cercariae that we recovered have peculiar morphological features, and our phylogenetic analyses (18S and 28S rDNA and mtDNA CO1) suggest that 2 of the new schistosome specimens likely represent previously unknown lineages. Our results also provide new insights into 2 of the 4 remaining schistosome genera yet to be extensively characterized with respect to their position in molecular phylogenies, Macrobilharzia and Bivitellobilharzia. The accessibility of each life cycle stage is likely to vary dramatically from one parasite species to the next, and our examples validate the potential usefulness of information gleaned from even one such stage, whatever it might be. PMID:16629320

  20. An approach to revealing blood fluke life cycles, taxonomy, and diversity: provision of key reference data including DNA sequence from single life cycle stages.

    PubMed

    Brant, Sara V; Morgan, Jess A T; Mkoji, Gerald M; Snyder, Scott D; Rajapakse, R P V Jayanthe; Loker, Eric S

    2006-02-01

    Revealing diversity among extant blood flukes, and the patterns of relationships among them, has been hindered by the difficulty of determining if specimens described from different life cycle stages, hosts, geographic localities, and times represent the same or different species. Persistent collection of all available life cycle stages and provision of exact collection localities, host identification, reference DNA sequences for the parasite, and voucher specimens eventually will provide the framework needed to piece together individual life cycles and facilitate reconciliation with classical taxonomic descriptions, including those based on single life cycle stages. It also provides a means to document unique or rare species that might only ever be recovered from a single life cycle stage. With an emphasis on the value of new information from field collections of any available life cycle stages, here we provide data for several blood fluke cercariae from freshwater snails from Kenya, Uganda, and Australia. Similar data are provided for adult worms of Macrobilharzia macrobilharzia and miracidia of Bivitellobilharzia nairi. Some schistosome and sanguinicolid cercariae that we recovered have peculiar morphological features, and our phylogenetic analyses (18S and 28S rDNA and mtDNA CO1) suggest that 2 of the new schistosome specimens likely represent previously unknown lineages. Our results also provide new insights into 2 of the 4 remaining schistosome genera yet to be extensively characterized with respect to their position in molecular phylogenies, Macrobilharzia and Bivitellobilharzia. The accessibility of each life cycle stage is likely to vary dramatically from one parasite species to the next, and our examples validate the potential usefulness of information gleaned from even one such stage, whatever it might be.

  1. A White Campion (Silene latifolia) floral expressed sequence tag (EST) library: annotation, EST-SSR characterization, transferability, and utility for comparative mapping

    PubMed Central

    Moccia, Maria Domenica; Oger-Desfeux, Christine; Marais, Gabriel AB; Widmer, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Background Expressed sequence tag (EST) databases represent a valuable resource for the identification of genes in organisms with uncharacterized genomes and for development of molecular markers. One class of markers derived from EST sequences are simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, also known as EST-SSRs. These are useful in plant genetic and evolutionary studies because they are located in transcribed genes and a putative function can often be inferred from homology searches. Another important feature of EST-SSR markers is their expected high level of transferability to related species that makes them very promising for comparative mapping. In the present study we constructed a normalized EST library from floral tissue of Silene latifolia with the aim to identify expressed genes and to develop polymorphic molecular markers. Results We obtained a total of 3662 high quality sequences from a normalized Silene cDNA library. These represent 3105 unigenes, with 73% of unigenes matching genes in other species. We found 255 sequences containing one or more SSR motifs. More than 60% of these SSRs were trinucleotides. A total of 30 microsatellite loci were identified from 106 ESTs having sufficient flanking sequences for primer design. The inheritance of these loci was tested via segregation analyses and their usefulness for linkage mapping was assessed in an interspecific cross. Tests for crossamplification of the EST-SSR loci in other Silene species established their applicability to related species. Conclusion The newly characterized genes and gene-derived markers from our Silene EST library represent a valuable genetic resource for future studies on Silene latifolia and related species. The polymorphism and transferability of EST-SSR markers facilitate comparative linkage mapping and analyses of genetic diversity in the genus Silene. PMID:19467153

  2. Determination of the optimal cell-penetrating peptide sequence for intestinal insulin delivery based on molecular orbital analysis with self-organizing maps.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Noriyasu; Kikuchi, Shingo; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko; Terasawa, Yoshiaki; Yasuda, Akihito; Yamamoto, Shuichi; Ida, Nobuo; Nishio, Reiji; Takayama, Kozo

    2013-02-01

    Our recent work has shown that the intestinal absorption of insulin can be improved significantly by coadministration of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), especially penetratin. However, a relatively high dose of penetratin is required to adequately stimulate the intestinal absorption of insulin. Therefore, in this study, we sought to determine the CPP that most effectively enhanced intestinal insulin absorption. An in situ loop absorption study using 26 penetratin analogues suggested that the chain length, hydrophobicity, and amphipathicity of the CPPs, as well as their basicity, contribute to their absorption-enhancing efficiency. Moreover, a molecular orbital method with self-organizing maps (SOMs) classification suggested that multiple factors, including the molecular weight, basicity, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy, absolute hardness, and chemical potential of CPPs, are associated with their effects on intestinal insulin absorption. Furthermore, the new CPPs proposed by SOM clustering had a marked capacity to interact with insulin, and their ability to enhance insulin absorption was much stronger than that of the original penetratin. Therefore, the peptide sequence that optimally enhances intestinal insulin absorption could be defined by SOM with the molecular orbital method, and our present work emphasizes the utility of such methodologies in the development of effective drug delivery systems.

  3. Fine mapping of chromosome 5p15.33 based on a targeted deep sequencing and high density genotyping identifies novel lung cancer susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Kachuri, Linda; Amos, Christopher I; McKay, James D; Johansson, Mattias; Vineis, Paolo; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Johansson, Mikael; Quirós, J Ramón; Sieri, Sabina; Travis, Ruth C; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Le Marchand, Loic; Henderson, Brian E; Wilkens, Lynne; Goodman, Gary E; Chen, Chu; Doherty, Jennifer A; Christiani, David C; Wei, Yongyue; Su, Li; Tworoger, Shelley; Zhang, Xuehong; Kraft, Peter; Zaridze, David; Field, John K; Marcus, Michael W; Davies, Michael P A; Hyde, Russell; Caporaso, Neil E; Landi, Maria Teresa; Severi, Gianluca; Giles, Graham G; Liu, Geoffrey; McLaughlin, John R; Li, Yafang; Xiao, Xiangjun; Fehringer, Gord; Zong, Xuchen; Denroche, Robert E; Zuzarte, Philip C; McPherson, John D; Brennan, Paul; Hung, Rayjean J

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome 5p15.33 has been identified as a lung cancer susceptibility locus, however the underlying causal mechanisms were not fully elucidated. Previous fine-mapping studies of this locus have relied on imputation or investigated a small number of known, common variants. This study represents a significant advance over previous research by investigating a large number of novel, rare variants, as well as their underlying mechanisms through telomere length. Variants for this fine-mapping study were identified through a targeted deep sequencing (average depth of coverage greater than 4000×) of 576 individuals. Subsequently, 4652 SNPs, including 1108 novel SNPs, were genotyped in 5164 cases and 5716 controls of European ancestry. After adjusting for known risk loci, rs2736100 and rs401681, we identified a new, independent lung cancer susceptibility variant in LPCAT1: rs139852726 (OR = 0.46, P = 4.73×10(-9)), and three new adenocarcinoma risk variants in TERT: rs61748181 (OR = 0.53, P = 2.64×10(-6)), rs112290073 (OR = 1.85, P = 1.27×10(-5)), rs138895564 (OR = 2.16, P = 2.06×10(-5); among young cases, OR = 3.77, P = 8.41×10(-4)). In addition, we found that rs139852726 (P = 1.44×10(-3)) was associated with telomere length in a sample of 922 healthy individuals. The gene-based SKAT-O analysis implicated TERT as the most relevant gene in the 5p15.33 region for adenocarcinoma (P = 7.84×10(-7)) and lung cancer (P = 2.37×10(-5)) risk. In this largest fine-mapping study to investigate a large number of rare and novel variants within 5p15.33, we identified novel lung and adenocarcinoma susceptibility loci with large effects and provided support for the role of telomere length as the potential underlying mechanism.

  4. Discovery and mapping of a new expressed sequence tag-single nucleotide polymorphism and simple sequence repeat panel for large-scale genetic studies and breeding of Theobroma cacao L.

    PubMed

    Allegre, Mathilde; Argout, Xavier; Boccara, Michel; Fouet, Olivier; Roguet, Yolande; Bérard, Aurélie; Thévenin, Jean Marc; Chauveau, Aurélie; Rivallan, Ronan; Clement, Didier; Courtois, Brigitte; Gramacho, Karina; Boland-Augé, Anne; Tahi, Mathias; Umaharan, Pathmanathan; Brunel, Dominique; Lanaud, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Theobroma cacao is an economically important tree of several tropical countries. Its genetic improvement is essential to provide protection against major diseases and improve chocolate quality. We discovered and mapped new expressed sequence tag-single nucleotide polymorphism (EST-SNP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and constructed a high-density genetic map. By screening 149 650 ESTs, 5246 SNPs were detected in silico, of which 1536 corresponded to genes with a putative function, while 851 had a clear polymorphic pattern across a collection of genetic resources. In addition, 409 new SSR markers were detected on the Criollo genome. Lastly, 681 new EST-SNPs and 163 new SSRs were added to the pre-existing 418 co-dominant markers to construct a large consensus genetic map. This high-density map and the set of new genetic markers identified in this study are a milestone in cocoa genomics and for marker-assisted breeding. The data are available at http://tropgenedb.cirad.fr.

  5. High-resolution cytogenetic mapping of 342 new cosmid markers including 43 RFLP markers on human chromosome 17 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Inazawa, Johji; Ariyama, Takeshi; Abe, Tatsuo ); Saito, Hiroko; Nakamura, Yusuke )

    1993-07-01

    The authors have constructed a high-resolution cytogenetic map of human chromosome 17 with 342 cosmid markers, each newly isolated from a cosmid library constructed from a human-mouse hybrid cell line containing a single human chromosome 17. Direct mapping on R- and/or G-banded (pro)metaphase chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization localized these markers throughout the chromosome, although density was highest in the R-band-dominant regions of 17p13, 17p11.2, 17q11.2-q12, 17q21.3, 17q23, and 17q25. By screening some of the cosmid clones, they identified 71 polymorphic systems with 43 markers; 11 of these are VNTRs. As the high-resolution cytogenetic map contains a large number of markers, it can provide useful landmarks for a contig map of chromosome 17. Furthermore, the map will contribute to positional cloning of aberrant genes responsible for inherited diseases such as Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS), Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), and familial early-onset breast cancer, as well as putative tumor suppressor genes on this chromosome. 47 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Purification to homogeneity and partial amino acid sequence of a fragment which includes the methyl acceptor site of the human DNA repair protein for O6-methylguanine.

    PubMed

    Major, G N; Gardner, E J; Carne, A F; Lawley, P D

    1990-03-25

    DNA repair by O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (O6-MT) is accomplished by removal by the enzyme of the methyl group from premutagenic O6-methylguanine-DNA, thereby restoring native guanine in DNA. The methyl group is transferred to an acceptor site cysteine thiol group in the enzyme, which causes the irreversible inactivation of O6-MT. We detected a variety of different forms of the methylated, inactivated enzyme in crude extracts of human spleen of molecular weights higher and lower than the usually observed 21-24kDa for the human O6-MT. Several apparent fragments of the methylated form of the protein were purified to homogeneity following reaction of partially-purified extract enzyme with O6-[3H-CH3]methylguanine-DNA substrate. One of these fragments yielded amino acid sequence information spanning fifteen residues, which was identified as probably belonging to human methyltransferase by virtue of both its significant sequence homology to three procaryote forms of O6-MT encoded by the ada, ogt (both from E. coli) and dat (B. subtilis) genes, and sequence position of the radiolabelled methyl group which matched the position of the conserved procaryote methyl acceptor site cysteine residue. Statistical prediction of secondary structure indicated good homologies between the human fragment and corresponding regions of the constitutive form of O6-MT in procaryotes (ogt and dat gene products), but not with the inducible ada protein, indicating the possibility that we had obtained partial amino acid sequence for a non-inducible form of the human enzyme. The identity of the fragment sequence as belonging to human methyltransferase was more recently confirmed by comparison with cDNA-derived amino acid sequence from the cloned human O6-MT gene from HeLa cells (1). The two sequences compared well, with only three out of fifteen amino acids being different (and two of them by only one nucleotide in each codon).

  7. Genome wide characterization of simple sequence repeats in watermelon genome and their application in comparative mapping and genetic diversity analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple sequence repeats (SSR) or microsatellite markers are one of the most informative and versatile DNA-based markers. The use of next-generation sequencing technologies allow whole genome sequencing and make it possible to develop large numbers of SSRs through bioinformatic analysis of genome da...

  8. Fine mapping of complex traits in non-model species: using next generation sequencing and advanced intercross lines in Japanese quail

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background As for other non-model species, genetic analyses in quail will benefit greatly from a higher marker density, now attainable thanks to the evolution of sequencing and genotyping technologies. Our objective was to obtain the first genome wide panel of Japanese quail SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) and to use it for the fine mapping of a QTL for a fear-related behaviour, namely tonic immobility, previously localized on Coturnix japonica chromosome 1. To this aim, two reduced representations of the genome were analysed through high-throughput 454 sequencing: AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) fragments as representatives of genomic DNA, and EST (Expressed Sequence Tag) as representatives of the transcriptome. Results The sequencing runs produced 399,189 and 1,106,762 sequence reads from cDNA and genomic fragments, respectively. They covered over 434 Mb of sequence in total and allowed us to detect 17,433 putative SNP. Among them, 384 were used to genotype two Advanced Intercross Lines (AIL) obtained from three quail lines differing for duration of tonic immobility. Despite the absence of genotyping for founder individuals in the analysis, the previously identified candidate region on chromosome 1 was refined and led to the identification of a candidate gene. Conclusions These data confirm the efficiency of transcript and AFLP-sequencing for SNP discovery in a non-model species, and its application to the fine mapping of a complex trait. Our results reveal a significant association of duration of tonic immobility with a genomic region comprising the DMD (dystrophin) gene. Further characterization of this candidate gene is needed to decipher its putative role in tonic immobility in Coturnix. PMID:23066875

  9. Improved rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) for mapping both the 5' and 3' terminal sequences of paramyxovirus genomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuo; Yu, Meng; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Hai-Yan; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2005-12-01

    Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) is a powerful PCR-based technique for determination of RNA terminal sequences. However, most of the RACE methods reported in the literature are developed specifically for the mapping of eukaryotic transcripts with 3' poly-A tail and 5' cap structure. In this study, an improved RACE strategy was developed which allows both 5' and 3' RACE of paramyxovirus genomic RNA using the same set of common molecular biology reagents without having to rely on expensive RACE kits. Mapping of RNA genome terminal sequences is an essential part of characterizing novel paramyxoviruses since these sequences contain important signals for genome replication and transcription, and are important molecular markers for studying virus evolution. The usefulness of this strategy was demonstrated by rapid characterization of both genome ends for a novel paramyxovirus recently isolated from human kidney primary cells. The RACE strategy described in this paper is simple, cost-effective and can be used to map genome ends of any RNA viruses.

  10. Extraintestinal Pathogenic and Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli, Including Sequence Type 131 (ST131), from Retail Chicken Breasts in the United States in 2013.

    PubMed

    Johnson, James R; Porter, Stephen B; Johnston, Brian; Thuras, Paul; Clock, Sarah; Crupain, Michael; Rangan, Urvashi

    2017-03-15

    Chicken meat products are hypothesized to be vehicles for transmitting antimicrobial-resistant and extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) to consumers. To reassess this hypothesis in the current era of heightened concerns about antimicrobial use in food animals, we analyzed 175 chicken-source E. coli isolates from a 2013 Consumer Reports national survey. Isolates were screened by PCR for ExPEC-defining virulence genes. The 25 ExPEC isolates (12% of 175) and a 2:1 randomly selected set of 50 non-ExPEC isolates were assessed for their phylogenetic/clonal backgrounds and virulence genotypes for comparison with their resistance profiles and the claims on the retail packaging label ("organic," "no antibiotics," and "natural"). Compared with the findings for non-ExPEC isolates, the group of ExPEC isolates had a higher prevalence of phylogroup B2 isolates (44% versus 4%; P < 0.001) and a lower prevalence of phylogroup A isolates (4% versus 30%; P = 0.001), a higher prevalence of multiple individual virulence genes, higher virulence scores (median, 11 [range, 4 to 16] versus 8 [range, 1 to 14]; P = 0.001), and higher resistance scores (median, 4 [range, 0 to 8] versus 3 [range, 0 to 10]; P < 0.001). All five isolates of sequence type 131 (ST131) were ExPEC (P = 0.003), were as extensively resistant as the other isolates tested, and had higher virulence scores than the other isolates tested (median, 12 [range, 11 to 13] versus 8 [range, 1 to 16]; P = 0.005). Organic labeling predicted lower resistance scores (median, 2 [range, 0 to 3] versus 4 [range, 0 to 10]; P = 0.008) but no difference in ExPEC status or virulence scores. These findings document a persisting reservoir of extensively antimicrobial-resistant ExPEC isolates, including isolates from ST131, in retail chicken products in the United States, suggesting a potential public health threat.IMPORTANCE We found that among Escherichia coli isolates from retail chicken meat products purchased across the

  11. Nuclear gene for mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase of Neurospora crassa: isolation, sequence, chromosomal mapping, and evidence that the leu-5 locus specifies structural information.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, C M; Metzenberg, R L; Rajbhandary, U L

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized the nuclear gene for the mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) of Neurospora crassa and have established that a defect in this structural gene is responsible for the leu-5 phenotype. We have purified mitochondrial LeuRS protein, determined its N-terminal sequence, and used this sequence information to identify and isolate a full-length genomic DNA clone. The 3.7-kilobase-pair region representing the structural gene and flanking regions has been sequenced. The 5' ends of the mRNA were mapped by S1 nuclease protection, and the 3' ends were determined from the sequence of cDNA clones. The gene contains a single short intron, 60 base pairs long. The methionine-initiated open reading frame specifies a 52-amino-acid mitochondrial targeting sequence followed by a 942-amino-acid protein. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses mapped the mitochondrial LeuRS structural gene to linkage group V, exactly where the leu-5 mutation had been mapped before. We show that the leu-5 strain has a defect in the structural gene for mitochondrial LeuRS by restoring growth under restrictive conditions for this strain after transformation with a wild-type copy of the mitochondrial LeuRS gene. We have cloned the mutant allele present in the leu-5 strain and identified the defect as being due to a Thr-to-Pro change in mitochondrial LeuRS. Finally, we have used immunoblotting to show that despite the apparent lack of mitochondrial LeuRS activity in leu-5 extracts, the leu-5 strain contains levels of mitochondrial LeuRS protein to similar to those of the wild-type strain. Images PMID:2574823

  12. Planetary maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1992-01-01

    An important goal of the USGS planetary mapping program is to systematically map the geology of the Moon, Mars, Venus, and Mercury, and the satellites of the outer planets. These geologic maps are published in the USGS Miscellaneous Investigations (I) Series. Planetary maps on sale at the USGS include shaded-relief maps, topographic maps, geologic maps, and controlled photomosaics. Controlled photomosaics are assembled from two or more photographs or images using a network of points of known latitude and longitude. The images used for most of these planetary maps are electronic images, obtained from orbiting television cameras, various optical-mechanical systems. Photographic film was only used to map Earth's Moon.

  13. High-Density Genetic Mapping with Interspecific Hybrids of Two Sea Urchins, Strongylocentrotus nudus and S. intermedius, by RAD Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zunchun; Liu, Shikai; Dong, Ying; Gao, Shan; Chen, Zhong; Jiang, Jingwei; Yang, Aifu; Sun, Hongjuan; Guan, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Bei; Wang, Bai

    2015-01-01

    Sea urchins have long been used as research model organisms for developmental biology and evolutionary studies. Some of them are also important aquaculture species in East Asia. In this work, we report the construction of RAD-tag based high-density genetic maps by genotyping F1 interspecific hybrids derived from a crossing between a female sea urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus and a male Strongylocentrotus intermedius. With polymorphisms present in these two wild individuals, we constructed a female meiotic map containing 3,080 markers for S. nudus, and a male meiotic map for S. intermedius which contains 1,577 markers. Using the linkage maps, we were able to anchor a total of 1,591 scaffolds (495.9 Mb) accounting for 60.8% of the genome assembly of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. A genome-wide scan resulted in the identification of one putative QTL for body size which spanned from 25.3 cM to 30.3 cM. This study showed the efficiency of RAD-Seq based high-density genetic map construction using F1 progenies for species with no prior genomic information. The genetic maps are essential for QTL mapping and are useful as framework to order and orientate contiguous scaffolds from sea urchin genome assembly. The integration of the genetic map with genome assembly would provide an unprecedented opportunity to conduct QTL analysis, comparative genomics, and population genetics studies.

  14. High-Density Genetic Mapping with Interspecific Hybrids of Two Sea Urchins, Strongylocentrotus nudus and S. intermedius, by RAD Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ying; Gao, Shan; Chen, Zhong; Jiang, Jingwei; Yang, Aifu; Sun, Hongjuan; Guan, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Bei; Wang, Bai

    2015-01-01

    Sea urchins have long been used as research model organisms for developmental biology and evolutionary studies. Some of them are also important aquaculture species in East Asia. In this work, we report the construction of RAD-tag based high-density genetic maps by genotyping F1 interspecific hybrids derived from a crossing between a female sea urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus and a male Strongylocentrotus intermedius. With polymorphisms present in these two wild individuals, we constructed a female meiotic map containing 3,080 markers for S. nudus, and a male meiotic map for S. intermedius which contains 1,577 markers. Using the linkage maps, we were able to anchor a total of 1,591 scaffolds (495.9 Mb) accounting for 60.8% of the genome assembly of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. A genome-wide scan resulted in the identification of one putative QTL for body size which spanned from 25.3 cM to 30.3 cM. This study showed the efficiency of RAD-Seq based high-density genetic map construction using F1 progenies for species with no prior genomic information. The genetic maps are essential for QTL mapping and are useful as framework to order and orientate contiguous scaffolds from sea urchin genome assembly. The integration of the genetic map with genome assembly would provide an unprecedented opportunity to conduct QTL analysis, comparative genomics, and population genetics studies. PMID:26398139

  15. The Oryza map alignment project: Construction, alignment and analysis of 12 BAC fingerprint/end sequence framework physical maps that represent the 10 genome types of genus Oryza

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Oryza Map Alignment Project (OMAP) provides the first comprehensive experimental system for understanding the evolution, physiology and biochemistry of a full genus in plants or animals. We have constructed twelve deep-coverage BAC libraries that are representative of both diploid and tetraploid...

  16. Whole-Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens EK007-RG4, a Promising Biocontrol Agent against a Broad Range of Bacteria, Including the Fire Blight Bacterium Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Roghayeh; Tarighi, Saeed; Behravan, Javad; Taheri, Parissa; Kjøller, Annelise Helene; Brejnrod, Asker; Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the first draft whole-genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain EK007-RG4, which was isolated from the phylloplane of a pear tree. P. fluorescens EK007-RG4 displays strong antagonism against Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent for fire blight disease, in addition to several other pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria. PMID:28360179

  17. Extension of the Legionella pneumophila sequence-based typing scheme to include strains carrying a variant of the N-acylneuraminate cytidylyltransferase gene.

    PubMed

    Mentasti, M; Underwood, A; Lück, C; Kozak-Muiznieks, N A; Harrison, T G; Fry, N K

    2014-07-01

    Sequence-based typing (SBT) combined with monoclonal antibody subgrouping of Legionella pneumophila isolates is at present considered to be the reference standard during epidemiological investigation of Legionnaires' disease outbreaks. In some isolates of L. pneumophila, the seventh allele of the standard SBT scheme, neuA, is not amplified, because a homologue that is refractory to amplification with the standard neuA primers is present. Consequently, a complete seven-allele profile, and hence a sequence type, cannot be obtained. Subsequently, primers were designed to amplify both neuA and the homologue, but these yielded suboptimal sequencing results. In this study, novel primers specific for the neuA homologue were designed and internationally validated by members of the ESCMID Study Group for Legionella Infections at national and regional Legionella reference laboratories with a modified version of the online L. pneumophila sequence quality tool. To date, the addition of the neuAh target to the SBT protocol has allowed full typing data to be obtained for 108 isolates of 11 different serogroups, namely 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 13, and 14, which could not previously be typed with the standard SBT neuA primers. Further studies are necessary to determine why it is still not possible to obtain either a neuA or a neuAh allele from three serogroup 11 isolates.

  18. Nucleotide sequence of Marchantia polymorpha chloroplast DNA: a region possibly encoding three tRNAs and three proteins including a homologue of E. coli ribosomal protein S14.

    PubMed Central

    Umesono, K; Inokuchi, H; Ohyama, K; Ozeki, H

    1984-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a region of Marchantia polymorpha chloroplast DNA was determined. On this DNA sequence (3.38kb), three open reading frames (ORFs) and three putative tRNA genes were detected in the following order: -ORF701-tRNASer(UGA)-ORF702-tRNAGly(GCC)-initiator tRNAMet(CAU)-ORF703-. The ORF703 is composed of 100 codons in which those for lysine (15%) and arginine (11%) are abundant, and could be accounted for as a counterpart of E. coli ribosomal protein S14 since they share 45% homology in the amino acid sequences. The ORF701 appears to code for a membrane protein, showing a periodic appearance of seven clusters of hydrophobic amino acids. Although the mechanisms remain unknown, the ORF701 causes a streptomycin-sensitive phenotype in resistant mutants of E. coli. The ORFs and tRNA genes are separated from each other by extremely AT-rich spacers containing sequences of dyad symmetry. The third letter positions of the codons in the ORFs are also rich in A and T residues. PMID:6393057

  19. Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus strain Deutsch, 5 BAC clone sequencing, including two encoding Cytochrome P450s and one encoding CzEst9 carboxylesterase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, has a genome over 2.4 times the size of the human genome, and with over 70% of repetitive DNA, this genome would prove very costly to sequence at today's prices and difficult to assemble and analyze. BAC clones give insight into the genome struct...

  20. Mapping of Schistosomiasis and Soil-Transmitted Helminths in Namibia: The First Large-Scale Protocol to Formally Include Rapid Diagnostic Tests

    PubMed Central

    Sousa-Figueiredo, José Carlos; Stanton, Michelle C.; Katokele, Stark; Arinaitwe, Moses; Adriko, Moses; Balfour, Lexi; Reiff, Mark; Lancaster, Warren; Noden, Bruce H.; Bock, Ronnie; Stothard, J. Russell

    2015-01-01

    Background Namibia is now ready to begin mass drug administration of praziquantel and albendazole against schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths, respectively. Although historical data identifies areas of transmission of these neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), there is a need to update epidemiological data. For this reason, Namibia adopted a new protocol for mapping of schistosomiasis and geohelminths, formally integrating rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for infections and morbidity. In this article, we explain the protocol in detail, and introduce the concept of ‘mapping resolution’, as well as present results and treatment recommendations for northern Namibia. Methods/Findings/Interpretation This new protocol allowed a large sample to be surveyed (N = 17 896 children from 299 schools) at relatively low cost (7 USD per person mapped) and very quickly (28 working days). All children were analysed by RDTs, but only a sub-sample was also diagnosed by light microscopy. Overall prevalence of schistosomiasis in the surveyed areas was 9.0%, highly associated with poorer access to potable water (OR = 1.5, P<0.001) and defective (OR = 1.2, P<0.001) or absent sanitation infrastructure (OR = 2.0, P<0.001). Overall prevalence of geohelminths, more particularly hookworm infection, was 12.2%, highly associated with presence of faecal occult blood (OR = 1.9, P<0.001). Prevalence maps were produced and hot spots identified to better guide the national programme in drug administration, as well as targeted improvements in water, sanitation and hygiene. The RDTs employed (circulating cathodic antigen and microhaematuria for Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium, respectively) performed well, with sensitivities above 80% and specificities above 95%. Conclusion/Significance This protocol is cost-effective and sensitive to budget limitations and the potential economic and logistical strains placed on the national Ministries of Health. Here we present a high resolution map

  1. Mutation analysis in nephronophthisis using a combined approach of homozygosity mapping, CEL I endonuclease cleavage, and direct sequencing.

    PubMed

    Otto, Edgar A; Helou, Juliana; Allen, Susan J; O'Toole, John F; Wise, Eric L; Ashraf, Shazia; Attanasio, Massimo; Zhou, Weibin; Wolf, Matthias T F; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2008-03-01

    Nephronophthisis (NPHP), an autosomal recessive kidney disease, is the most frequent genetic cause of chronic renal failure in the first three decades of life. Mutations in eight genes (NPHP1-8) have been identified. We here describe a combined approach for mutation screening of NPHP1, NPHP2, NPHP3, NPHP4, and NPHP5 in a worldwide cohort of 470 unrelated patients with NPHP. First, homozygous NPHP1 deletions were detected in 97 patients (21%) by multiplex PCR. Second, 25 patients with infantile NPHP were screened for mutations in inversin (NPHP2/INVS). We detected a novel compound heterozygous frameshift mutation (p.[Q485fs]+[R687fs]), and a homozygous nonsense mutation (p.R899X). Third, 37 patients presenting with NPHP and retinitis pigmentosa (Senior-Løken syndrome [SLS]) were screened for NPHP5/IQCB1 mutations by direct sequencing. We discovered five different (three novel) homozygous premature termination codon (PTC) mutations (p.F142fsX; p.R461X; p.R489X; p.W444X; and c.488-1G>A). The remaining 366 patients were further investigated for mutations in NPHP1, NPHP3, and NPHP4. We applied a "homozygosity only" strategy and typed three highly polymorphic microsatellite markers at the respective loci. A total of 32, eight, and 14 patients showed homozygosity, and were screened by heteroduplex crude celery extract (CEL I) endonuclease digests. The sensitivity of CEL I was established as 92%, as it detected 73 out of 79 different known mutations simply on agarose gels. A total of 10 novel PTC mutations were found in NPHP1 (p.P186fs, p.R347X, p.V492fs, p.Y509X, and c.1884+1G>A), in NPHP3 (c.3812+2T>C and p.R1259X), and in NPHP4 (p.R59X, p.T1004fs, and p.V1091fs). The combined homozygosity mapping and CEL I endonuclease mutation analysis approach allowed us to identify rare mutations in a large cohort of patients at low cost.

  2. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, mutagenesis, and mapping of the Bacillus subtilis pbpD gene, which codes for penicillin-binding protein 4.

    PubMed Central

    Popham, D L; Setlow, P

    1994-01-01

    The gene encoding penicillin-binding protein 4 (PBP 4) of Bacillus subtilis, pbpD, was cloned by two independent methods. PBP 4 was purified, and the amino acid sequence of a cyanogen bromide digestion product was used to design an oligonucleotide probe for identification of the gene. An oligonucleotide probe designed to hybridize to genes encoding class A high-molecular-weight PBPs also identified this gene. DNA sequence analysis of the cloned DNA revealed that (i) the amino acid sequence of PBP 4 was similar to those of other class A high-molecular-weight PBPs and (ii) pbpD appeared to be cotranscribed with a downstream gene (termed orf2) of unknown function. The orf2 gene is followed by an apparent non-protein-coding region which exhibits nucleotide sequence similarity with at least two other regions of the chromosome and which has a high potential for secondary structure formation. Mutations in pbpD resulted in the disappearance of PBP 4 but had no obvious effect on growth, cell division, sporulation, spore heat resistance, or spore germination. Expression of a transcriptional fusion of pbpD to lacZ increased throughout growth, decreased during sporulation, and was induced approximately 45 min into spore germination. A single transcription start site was detected just upstream of pbpD. The pbpD locus was mapped to the 275 to 280 degrees region of the chromosomal genetic map. Images PMID:7961491

  3. Mass production of SNP markers in a nonmodel passerine bird through RAD sequencing and contig mapping to the zebra finch genome.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Yann X C; Lhuillier, Emeline; Cézard, Timothée; Bertrand, Joris A M; Delahaie, Boris; Cornuault, Josselin; Duval, Thomas; Bouchez, Olivier; Milá, Borja; Thébaud, Christophe

    2013-09-01

    Here, we present an adaptation of restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) to the Illumina HiSeq2000 technology that we used to produce SNP markers in very large quantities at low cost per unit in the Réunion grey white-eye (Zosterops borbonicus), a nonmodel passerine bird species with no reference genome. We sequenced a set of six pools of 18-25 individuals using a single sequencing lane. This allowed us to build around 600 000 contigs, among which at least 386 000 could be mapped to the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) genome. This yielded more than 80 000 SNPs that could be mapped unambiguously and are evenly distributed across the genome. Thus, our approach provides a good illustration of the high potential of paired-end RAD sequencing of pooled DNA samples combined with comparative assembly to the zebra finch genome to build large contigs and characterize vast numbers of informative SNPs in nonmodel passerine bird species in a very efficient and cost-effective way.

  4. Large-scale SNP discovery and construction of a high-density genetic map of Colossoma macropomum through genotyping-by-sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, José de Ribamar da Silva; Liu, Shikai; Pértille, Fábio; Perazza, Caio Augusto; Villela, Priscilla Marqui Schmidt; de Almeida-Val, Vera Maria Fonseca; Hilsdorf, Alexandre Wagner Silva; Liu, Zhanjiang; Coutinho, Luiz Lehmann

    2017-01-01

    Colossoma macropomum, or tambaqui, is the largest native Characiform species found in the Amazon and Orinoco river basins, yet few resources for genetic studies and the genetic improvement of tambaqui exist. In this study, we identified a large number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for tambaqui and constructed a high-resolution genetic linkage map from a full-sib family of 124 individuals and their parents using the genotyping by sequencing method. In all, 68,584 SNPs were initially identified using minimum minor allele frequency (MAF) of 5%. Filtering parameters were used to select high-quality markers for linkage analysis. We selected 7,734 SNPs for linkage mapping, resulting in 27 linkage groups with a minimum logarithm of odds (LOD) of 8 and maximum recombination fraction of 0.35. The final genetic map contains 7,192 successfully mapped markers that span a total of 2,811 cM, with an average marker interval of 0.39 cM. Comparative genomic analysis between tambaqui and zebrafish revealed variable levels of genomic conservation across the 27 linkage groups which allowed for functional SNP annotations. The large-scale SNP discovery obtained here, allowed us to build a high-density linkage map in tambaqui, which will be useful to enhance genetic studies that can be applied in breeding programs. PMID:28387238

  5. CONSTRUCTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A TENTATIVE AMPLIFIED FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM-SIMPLE SEQUENCE REPEAT LINKAGE MAP OF LAMINARIA (LAMINARIALES, PHAEOPHYTA)(1).

    PubMed

    Yang, Guanpin; Sun, Ying; Shi, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Linan; Guo, Shanshan; Li, Bingjun; Li, Xiaojie; Li, Zhiling; Cong, Yizhou; Zhao, Yushan; Wang, Wenquan

    2009-08-01

    A tentative amplified fragment length polymorphism-simple sequence repeat (AFLP-SSR) linkage map of Laminaria was constructed using a haploid population of 40 gametophyte clones isolated from an individual of Dongfang No. 2, the first commercially cultured hybrid of a female gametophyte clone of L. japonica Aresch. [=Saccharina japonica (Aresch.) C. E. Lane, C. Mayes et G. W. Saunders] and a male one of L. longissima Miyabe [=Saccharina longissima (Miyabe) C. E. Lane, C. Mayes et G. W. Saunders]. To the map, 263 markers (255 AFLP, seven SSR, and the gametophyte sex) were assigned. The map consisted of 25 linkage groups (LGs) with ≥ four markers, five triplets, and 15 doublets, which is 1,629.0 centiMorgans (cM) in length, covering 66% of Laminaria genome. The maximum space between loci is 24.63 cM. A putative sex-determining region was identified in LG2 , which was characterized by a dense marker distribution around the gametophyte sex locus. The linkage map itself and the methodology associated with its construction will facilitate the genetic study and further trials of the linkage map construction of Laminaria.

  6. Functional annotation of mammalian genomic DNA sequence by chemical mutagenesis: a fine-structure genetic mutation map of a 1- to 2-cM segment of mouse chromosome 7 corresponding to human chromosome 11p14-p15.

    PubMed

    Rinchik, Eugene M; Carpenter, Donald A; Johnson, Dabney K

    2002-01-22

    Eleven independent, recessive, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutations that map to a approximately 1- to 2-cM region of mouse chromosome (Chr) 7 homologous to human Chr 11p14-p15 were recovered from a screen of 1,218 gametes. These mutations were initially identified in a hemizygous state opposite a large p-locus deletion and subsequently were mapped to finer genomic intervals by crosses to a panel of smaller p deletions. The 11 mutations also were classified into seven complementation groups by pairwise crosses. Four complementation groups were defined by seven prenatally lethal mutations, including a group (l7R3) comprised of two alleles of obvious differing severity. Two allelic mutations (at the psrt locus) result in a severe seizure and runting syndrome, but one mutation (at the fit2 locus) results in a more benign runting phenotype. This experiment has added seven loci, defined by phenotypes of presumed point mutations, to the genetic map of a small (1-2 cM) region of mouse Chr 7 and will facilitate the task of functional annotation of DNA sequence and transcription maps both in the mouse and the corresponding human 11p14-p15 homology region.

  7. A Sequence-Anchored Linkage Map of the Plant–Parasitic Nematode Meloidogyne hapla Reveals Exceptionally High Genome-Wide Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Varghese P.; Fudali, Sylwia L.; Schaff, Jennifer E.; Liu, Qingli; Scholl, Elizabeth H.; Opperman, Charles H.; Bird, David McK; Williamson, Valerie M.

    2012-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) cause major yield losses to many of the world’s crops, but efforts to understand how these pests recognize and interact with their hosts have been hampered by a lack of genetic resources. Starting with progeny of a cross between inbred strains (VW8 and VW9) of Meloidogyne hapla that differed in host range and behavioral traits, we exploited the novel, facultative meiotic parthenogenic reproductive mode of this species to produce a genetic linkage map. Molecular markers were derived from SNPs identified between the sequenced and annotated VW9 genome and de novo sequence of VW8. Genotypes were assessed in 183 F2 lines. The colinearity of the genetic and physical maps supported the veracity of both. Analysis of local crossover intervals revealed that the average recombination rate is exceptionally high compared with that in other metazoans. In addition, F2 lines are largely homozygous for markers flanking crossover points, and thus resemble recombinant inbred lines. We suggest that the unusually high recombination rate may be an adaptation to generate within-population genetic diversity in this organism. This work presents the most comprehensive linkage map of a parasitic nematode to date and, together with genomic and transcript sequence resources, empowers M. hapla as a tractable model. Alongside the molecular map, these progeny lines can be used for analyses of genome organization and the inheritance of phenotypic traits that have key functions in modulating parasitism, behavior, and survival and for the eventual identification of the responsible genes. PMID:22870404

  8. High-resolution chromosome mapping of BACs using multi-colour FISH and pooled-BAC FISH as a backbone for sequencing tomato chromosome 6.

    PubMed

    Szinay, Dóra; Chang, Song-Bin; Khrustaleva, Ludmila; Peters, Sander; Schijlen, Elio; Bai, Yuling; Stiekema, Willem J; van Ham, Roeland C H J; de Jong, Hans; Klein Lankhorst, René M

    2008-11-01

    Within the framework of the International Solanaceae Genome Project, the genome of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is currently being sequenced. We follow a 'BAC-by-BAC' approach that aims to deliver high-quality sequences of the euchromatin part of the tomato genome. BACs are selected from various libraries of the tomato genome on the basis of markers from the F2.2000 linkage map. Prior to sequencing, we validated the precise physical location of the selected BACs on the chromosomes by five-colour high-resolution fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping. This paper describes the strategies and results of cytogenetic mapping for chromosome 6 using 75 seed BACs for FISH on pachytene complements. The cytogenetic map obtained showed discrepancies between the actual chromosomal positions of these BACs and their markers on the linkage group. These discrepancies were most notable in the pericentromere heterochromatin, thus confirming previously described suppression of cross-over recombination in that region. In a so called pooled-BAC FISH, we hybridized all seed BACs simultaneously and found a few large gaps in the euchromatin parts of the long arm that are still devoid of seed BACs and are too large for coverage by expanding BAC contigs. Combining FISH with pooled BACs and newly recruited seed BACs will thus aid in efficient targeting of novel seed BACs into these areas. Finally, we established the occurrence of repetitive DNA in heterochromatin/euchromatin borders by combining BAC FISH with hybridization of a labelled repetitive DNA fraction (Cot-100). This strategy provides an excellent means to establish the borders between euchromatin and heterochromatin in this chromosome.

  9. Novel SSR Markers from BAC-End Sequences, DArT Arrays and a Comprehensive Genetic Map with 1,291 Marker Loci for Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Spurthi N.; Varghese, Nicy; Shah, Trushar M.; Penmetsa, R. Varma; Thirunavukkarasu, Nepolean; Gudipati, Srivani; Gaur, Pooran M.; Kulwal, Pawan L.; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; KaviKishor, Polavarapu B.; Winter, Peter; Kahl, Günter; Town, Christopher D.; Kilian, Andrzej; Cook, Douglas R.; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2011-01-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is the third most important cool season food legume, cultivated in arid and semi-arid regions of the world. The goal of this study was to develop novel molecular markers such as microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers from bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-end sequences (BESs) and diversity arrays technology (DArT) markers, and to construct a high-density genetic map based on recombinant inbred line (RIL) population ICC 4958 (C. arietinum)×PI 489777 (C. reticulatum). A BAC-library comprising 55,680 clones was constructed and 46,270 BESs were generated. Mining of these BESs provided 6,845 SSRs, and primer pairs were designed for 1,344 SSRs. In parallel, DArT arrays with ca. 15,000 clones were developed, and 5,397 clones were found polymorphic among 94 genotypes tested. Screening of newly developed BES-SSR markers and DArT arrays on the parental genotypes of the RIL mapping population showed polymorphism with 253 BES-SSR markers and 675 DArT markers. Segregation data obtained for these polymorphic markers and 494 markers data compiled from published reports or collaborators were used for constructing the genetic map. As a result, a comprehensive genetic map comprising 1,291 markers on eight linkage groups (LGs) spanning a total of 845.56 cM distance was developed (http://cmap.icrisat.ac.in/cmap/sm/cp/thudi/). The number of markers per linkage group ranged from 68 (LG 8) to 218 (LG 3) with an average inter-marker distance of 0.65 cM. While the developed resource of molecular markers will be useful for genetic diversity, genetic mapping and molecular breeding applications, the comprehensive genetic map with integrated BES-SSR markers will facilitate its anchoring to the physical map (under construction) to accelerate map-based cloning of genes in chickpea and comparative genome evolution studies in legumes. PMID:22102885

  10. Nucleotide sequence of the Rhodobacter capsulatus fruK gene, which encodes fructose-1-phosphate kinase: evidence for a kinase superfamily including both phosphofructokinases of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, L F; Reizer, A; Reizer, J; Cai, B; Tomich, J M; Saier, M H

    1991-01-01

    The fruK gene encoding fructose-1-phosphate kinase (FruK), located within the fructose (fru)-catabolic operon of Rhodobacter capsulatus, was sequenced. FruK of R. capsulatus (316 amino acids; molecular weight = 31,232) is the same size as and is homologous to FruK of Escherichia coli, phosphofructokinase B (PfkB) of E. coli, phosphotagatokinase of Staphylococcus aureus, and ribokinase of E. coli. These proteins therefore make up a family of homologous proteins, termed the PfkB family. A phylogenetic tree for this new family was constructed. Sequence comparisons plus chemical inactivation studies suggested the lack of involvement of specific residues in catalysis. Although the Rhodobacter FruK differed markedly from the other enzymes within the PfkB family with respect to amino acid composition, these enzymes exhibited similar predicted secondary structural features. A large internal segment of the Rhodobacter FruK was found to be similar in sequence to the domain bearing the sugar bisphosphate-binding region of the large subunit of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of plants and bacteria. Proteins of the PfkB family did not exhibit statistically significant sequence identity with PfkA of E. coli. PfkA, however, is homologous to other prokaryotic and eukaryotic ATP- and PPi-dependent Pfks (the PfkA family). These eukaryotic, ATP-dependent enzymes each consist of a homotetramer (mammalian) or a heterooctamer (yeasts), with each subunit containing an internal duplication of the size of the entire PfkA protein of E. coli. In some of these enzymes, additional domains are present. A phylogenetic tree was constructed for the PfkA family and revealed that the bacterial enzymes closely resemble the N-terminal domains of the eukaryotic enzyme subunits whereas the C-terminal domains have diverged more extensively. The PPi-dependent Pfk of potato is only distantly related to the ATP-dependent enzymes. On the basis of their similar functions, sizes, predicted

  11. Development of a high-density intra-specific linkage map of lettuce using genotyping by sequencing (GBS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) has been developed as an affordable application of next-generation sequencing for the purposes of discovering and genotyping SNPs in a variety of crop species and populations. In this study we employed a double restriction enzyme digestion protocol (HindIII and NlaIII)...

  12. Identification and characterisation of functional expressed sequence tags-derived simple sequence repeat (eSSR) markers for genetic linkage mapping of Schistosoma mansoni juvenile resistance and susceptibility loci in Biomphalaria glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Ittiprasert, Wannaporn; Miller, André; Su, Xin-zhuan; Mu, Jianbing; Bhusudsawang, Ganlayarat; Ukoskit, Kitipat; Knight, Matty

    2013-01-01

    Biomphalaria glabrata susceptibility to Schistosoma mansoni has a strong genetic component, offering the possibility for investigating host–parasite interactions at the molecular level, perhaps leading to novel control approaches. The identification, mapping and molecular characterisation of genes that influence the outcome of parasitic infection in the intermediate snail host is, therefore, seen as fundamental to the control of schistosomiasis. To better understand the evolutionary processes driving disease resistance/susceptibility phenotypes, we previously identified polymorphic random amplification of polymorphic DNA and genomic simple sequence repeats from B. glabrata. In the present study we identified and characterised polymorphic expressed simple sequence repeats markers (Bg-eSSR) from existing B. glabrata expressed sequence tags. Using these markers, and with previously identified genomic simple sequence repeats, genetic linkage mapping for parasite refractory and susceptibility phenotypes, the first known for B. glabrata, was initiated. Data mining of 54,309 expressed sequence tag, produced 660 expressed simple sequence repeats of which dinucleotide motifs (TA)n were the most common (37.88%), followed by trinucleotide (29.55%), mononucleotide (18.64%) and tetranucleotide (10.15%). Penta- and hexanucleotide motifs represented <3% of the Bg-eSSRs identified. While the majority (71%) of Bg-eSSRs were monomorphic between resistant and susceptible snails, several were, however, useful for the construction of a genetic linkage map based on their inheritance in segregating F2 progeny snails derived from crossing juvenile BS-90 and NMRI snails. Polymorphic Bg-eSSRs assorted into six linkage groups at a logarithm of odds score of 3. Interestingly, the heritability of four markers (Prim1_910, Prim1_771, Prim6_1024 and Prim7_823) with juvenile snail resistance were, by t-test, significant (P < 0.05) while an allelic marker, Prim24_524, showed linkage with the

  13. Development of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and construction of an SSR-based linkage map in Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.).

    PubMed

    Hirata, Mariko; Cai, Hongwei; Inoue, Maiko; Yuyama, Nana; Miura, Yuichi; Komatsu, Toshinori; Takamizo, Tadashi; Fujimori, Masahiro

    2006-07-01

    In order to develop simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers in Italian ryegrass, we constructed a genomic library enriched for (CA)n-containing SSR repeats. A total of 1,544 clones were sequenced, of which 1,044 (67.6%) contained SSR motifs, and 395 unique clones were chosen for primer design. Three hundred and fifty-seven of these clones amplified products of the expected size in both parents of a two-way pseudo-testcross F(1) mapping population, and 260 primer pairs detected genetic polymorphism in the F(1) population. Genetic loci detected by a total of 218 primer pairs were assigned to locations on seven linkage groups, representing the seven chromosomes of the haploid Italian ryegrass karyotype. The SSR markers covered 887.8 cM of the female map and 795.8 cM of the male map. The average distance between two flanking SSR markers was 3.2 cM. The SSR markers developed in this study will be useful in cultivar discrimination, linkage analysis, and marker-assisted selection of Italian ryegrass and closely related species.

  14. Group epitope mapping considering relaxation of the ligand (GEM-CRL): Including longitudinal relaxation rates in the analysis of saturation transfer difference (STD) experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Sebastian; Patel, Mitul K.; Errey, James C.; Davis, Benjamin G.; Jones, Jonathan A.; Claridge, Timothy D. W.

    2010-03-01

    In the application of saturation transfer difference (STD) experiments to the study of protein-ligand interactions, the relaxation of the ligand is one of the major influences on the experimentally observed STD factors, making interpretation of these difficult when attempting to define a group epitope map (GEM). In this paper, we describe a simplification of the relaxation matrix that may be applied under specified experimental conditions, which results in a simplified equation reflecting the directly transferred magnetisation rate from the protein onto the ligand, defined as the summation over the whole protein of the protein-ligand cross-relaxation multiplied by with the fractional saturation of the protein protons. In this, the relaxation of the ligand is accounted for implicitly by inclusion of the experimentally determined longitudinal relaxation rates. The conditions under which this "group epitope mapping considering relaxation of the ligand" (GEM-CRL) can be applied were tested on a theoretical model system, which demonstrated only minor deviations from that predicted by the full relaxation matrix calculations (CORCEMA-ST) [7]. Furthermore, CORCEMA-ST calculations of two protein-saccharide complexes (Jacalin and TreR) with known crystal structures were performed and compared with experimental GEM-CRL data. It could be shown that the GEM-CRL methodology is superior to the classical group epitope mapping approach currently used for defining ligand-protein proximities. GEM-CRL is also useful for the interpretation of CORCEMA-ST results, because the transferred magnetisation rate provides an additional parameter for the comparison between measured and calculated values. The independence of this parameter from the above mentioned factors can thereby enhance the value of CORCEMA-ST calculations.

  15. Refined mapping and YAC contig construction of the X-linked cleft palate and ankyloglossia locus (CPX) including the proximal X-Y homology breakpoint within Xq21.3

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, S.A.; Brennan, L.; Richardson, M.

    1996-01-01

    The gene for X-linked cleft palate (CPX) has previously been mapped in an Icelandic kindred between the unordered proximal markers DXS1002/DXS349/DXS95 and the distal marker DXYS1X, which maps to the proximal end of the X-Y homology region in Xq21.3. Using six sequence-tagged sites (STSs) within the region, a total of 91 yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones were isolated and overlapped in a single contig that spans approximately 3.1 Mb between DXS1002 and DXYS1X. The order of microsatellite and STS markers in this was established as DXS1002-DXS1168-DXS349-DXS95-DXS364-DXS1196-DXS472-DXS1217-DXYS1X. A long-range restriction map of this region was created using eight nonchimeric, overlapping YAC clones. Analysis of newly positioned polymorphic markers in recombinant individuals from the Icelandic family has enabled us to identify DXS1196 and DXS1217 as the flanking markers for CPX. The maximum physical distance containing the CPX gene has been estimated to be 2.0 Mb, which is spanned by a minimum set of five nonchimeric YAC clones. In addition, YAC end clone and STS analyses have pinpointed the location of the proximal boundary of the X-Y homology region within the map. 40 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Genomic and transcriptomic resources for assassin flies including the complete genome sequence of Proctacanthus coquilletti (Insecta: Diptera: Asilidae) and 16 representative transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Dikow, Rebecca B; Frandsen, Paul B; Turcatel, Mauren; Dikow, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    A high-quality draft genome for Proctacanthus coquilletti (Insecta: Diptera: Asilidae) is presented along with transcriptomes for 16 Diptera species from five families: Asilidae, Apioceridae, Bombyliidae, Mydidae, and Tabanidae. Genome sequencing reveals that P. coquilletti has a genome size of approximately 210 Mbp and remarkably low heterozygosity (0.47%) and few repeats (15%). These characteristics helped produce a highly contiguous (N50 = 862 kbp) assembly, particularly given that only a single 2 × 250 bp PCR-free Illumina library was sequenced. A phylogenomic hypothesis is presented based on thousands of putative orthologs across the 16 transcriptomes. Phylogenetic relationships support the sister group relationship of Apioceridae + Mydidae to Asilidae. A time-calibrated phylogeny is also presented, with seven fossil calibration points, which suggests an older age of the split among Apioceridae, Asilidae, and Mydidae (158 mya) and Apioceridae and Mydidae (135 mya) than proposed in the AToL FlyTree project. Future studies will be able to take advantage of the resources presented here in order to produce large scale phylogenomic and evolutionary studies of assassin fly phylogeny, life histories, or venom. The bioinformatics tools and workflow presented here will be useful to others wishing to generate de novo genomic resources in species-rich taxa without a closely-related reference genome.

  17. Whole genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of Bluetongue virus serotype 2 strains isolated in the Americas including a novel strain from the western United States.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Natasha N; Mayo, Christie E; Jasperson, Dane C; Crossley, Beate M; Breitmeyer, Richard E; Johnson, Donna J; Ostlund, Eileen N; MacLachlan, N James; Wilson, William C

    2014-07-01

    Bluetongue is a potentially fatal arboviral disease of domestic and wild ruminants that is characterized by widespread edema and tissue necrosis. Bluetongue virus (BTV) serotypes 10, 11, 13, and 17 occur throughout much of the United States, whereas serotype 2 (BTV-2) was previously only detected in the southeastern United States. Since 1998, 10 other BTV serotypes have also been isolated from ruminants in the southeastern United States. In 2010, BTV-2 was identified in California for the first time, and preliminary sequence analysis indicated that the virus isolate was closely related to BTV strains circulating in the southeastern United States. In the current study, the whole genome sequence of the California strain of BTV-2 was compared with those of other BTV-2 strains in the Americas. The results of the analysis suggest co-circulation of genetically distinct viruses in the southeastern United States, and further suggest that the 2010 western isolate is closely related to southeastern strains of BTV. Although it remains uncertain as to how this novel virus was translocated to California, the findings of the current study underscore the need for ongoing surveillance of this economically important livestock disease.

  18. Genomic and transcriptomic resources for assassin flies including the complete genome sequence of Proctacanthus coquilletti (Insecta: Diptera: Asilidae) and 16 representative transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Frandsen, Paul B.; Turcatel, Mauren

    2017-01-01

    A high-quality draft genome for Proctacanthus coquilletti (Insecta: Diptera: Asilidae) is presented along with transcriptomes for 16 Diptera species from five families: Asilidae, Apioceridae, Bombyliidae, Mydidae, and Tabanidae. Genome sequencing reveals that P. coquilletti has a genome size of approximately 210 Mbp and remarkably low heterozygosity (0.47%) and few repeats (15%). These characteristics helped produce a highly contiguous (N50 = 862 kbp) assembly, particularly given that only a single 2 × 250 bp PCR-free Illumina library was sequenced. A phylogenomic hypothesis is presented based on thousands of putative orthologs across the 16 transcriptomes. Phylogenetic relationships support the sister group relationship of Apioceridae + Mydidae to Asilidae. A time-calibrated phylogeny is also presented, with seven fossil calibration points, which suggests an older age of the split among Apioceridae, Asilidae, and Mydidae (158 mya) and Apioceridae and Mydidae (135 mya) than proposed in the AToL FlyTree project. Future studies will be able to take advantage of the resources presented here in order to produce large scale phylogenomic and evolutionary studies of assassin fly phylogeny, life histories, or venom. The bioinformatics tools and workflow presented here will be useful to others wishing to generate de novo genomic resources in species-rich taxa without a closely-related reference genome. PMID:28168115

  19. Boolean map saliency combined with motion feature used for dim and small target detection in infrared video sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyang; Peng, Zhenming; Zhang, Ping

    2016-10-01

    Infrared dim and small target detection plays an important role in infrared search and tracking systems. In this paper, a novel infrared dim and small target detection method based on Boolean map saliency and motion feature is proposed. Infrared targets are the most salient parts in images, with high gray level and continuous moving trajectory. Utilizing this property, we build a feature space containing gray level feature and motion feature. The gray level feature is the intensity of input images, while the motion feature is obtained by motion charge in consecutive frames. In the second step, the Boolean map saliency approach is implemented on the gray level feature and motion feature to obtain the gray saliency map and motion saliency map. In the third step, two saliency maps are combined together to get the final result. Numerical experiments have verified the effectiveness of the proposed method. The final detection result can not only get an accurate detection result, but also with fewer false alarms, which is suitable for practical use.

  20. CISN Display - Reliable Delivery of Real-time Earthquake Information, Including Rapid Notification and ShakeMap to Critical End Users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rico, H.; Hauksson, E.; Thomas, E.; Friberg, P.; Given, D.

    2002-12-01

    The California Integrated Seismic Network (CISN) Display is part of a Web-enabled earthquake notification system alerting users in near real-time of seismicity, and also valuable geophysical information following a large earthquake. It will replace the Caltech/USGS Broadcast of Earthquakes (CUBE) and Rapid Earthquake Data Integration (REDI) Display as the principal means of delivering graphical earthquake information to users at emergency operations centers, and other organizations. Features distinguishing the CISN Display from other GUI tools are a state-full client/server relationship, a scalable message format supporting automated hyperlink creation, and a configurable platform-independent client with a GIS mapping tool; supporting the decision-making activities of critical users. The CISN Display is the front-end of a client/server architecture known as the QuakeWatch system. It is comprised of the CISN Display (and other potential clients), message queues, server, server "feeder" modules, and messaging middleware, schema and generators. It is written in Java, making it platform-independent, and offering the latest in Internet technologies. QuakeWatch's object-oriented design allows components to be easily upgraded through a well-defined set of application programming interfaces (APIs). Central to the CISN Display's role as a gateway to other earthquake products is its comprehensive XML-schema. The message model starts with the CUBE message format, but extends it by provisioning additional attributes for currently available products, and those yet to be considered. The supporting metadata in the XML-message provides the data necessary for the client to create a hyperlink and associate it with a unique event ID. Earthquake products deliverable to the CISN Display are ShakeMap, Ground Displacement, Focal Mechanisms, Rapid Notifications, OES Reports, and Earthquake Commentaries. Leveraging the power of the XML-format, the CISN Display provides prompt access to

  1. Heterozygosities and genetic relationship of tea cultivars revealed by simple sequence repeat markers and implications for breeding and genetic mapping programs.

    PubMed

    Tan, L Q; Zhang, C C; Qi, G N; Wang, L Y; Wei, K; Chen, S X; Zou, Y; Wu, L Y; Cheng, H

    2015-03-06

    Genetic maps are essential tools for quantitative trait locus analysis and marker-assisted selection breeding. In order to select parents that are highly heterozygous for genetic mapping, the heterozygosity (HS) of 24 tea cultivars (Camellia sinensis) was analyzed with 72 simple sequence repeat markers. In total, 359 alleles were obtained with an average of 4.99 per marker. The HS varied greatly from 37.5 to 71.0% with an average of 51.3%. On average, tea cultivars from Fujian Province showed a higher level of heterozygosity (59.8%) than those from Zhejiang (48.5%) and Yunnan (44.5%), and the 12 national tea cultivars were generally more heterozygous than the 12 provincial cultivars. Unweighted pair-group analysis using the arithmetic average grouping divided the 24 cultivars into 2 groups that are consistent with the morphological classification. All dual combinations of the 24 cultivars were studied to calculate the percentage of mappable markers when using pseudo-testcross mapping strategy, and results showed that this value also varied greatly from 51.4 to 90.3%. The genetic relationships and HS differences among different cultivars were discussed, and tea cultivars with high HS were recommended as cross parents for genetic mapping programs.

  2. Identification of novel mutations including a double mutation in patients with inherited cardiomyopathy by a targeted sequencing approach using the Ion Torrent PGM system

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, YUE; CAO, HONG; SONG, YINDI; FENG, YUE; DING, XIAOXUE; PANG, MINGJIE; ZHANG, YUNMEI; ZHANG, HONG; DING, JIAHUAN; XIA, XUESHAN

    2016-01-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathy is the major cause of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and heart failure (HF). The disease is associated with extensive genetic heterogeneity; pathogenic mutations in cardiac sarcomere protein genes, cytoskeletal protein genes and nuclear envelope protein genes have been linked to its etiology. Early diagnosis is conducive to clinical monitoring and allows for presymptomatic interventions as needed. In the present study, the entire coding sequences and flanking regions of 12 major disease (cardiomyopathy)-related genes [namely myosin, heavy chain 7, cardiac muscle, β (MYH7); myosin binding protein C, cardiac (MYBPC3); lamin A/C (LMNA); troponin I type 3 (cardiac) (TNNI3); troponin T type 2 (cardiac) (TNNT2); actin, α, cardiac muscle 1 (ACTC1); tropomyosin 1 (α) (TPM1); sodium channel, voltage gated, type V alpha subunit (SCN5A); myosin, light chain 2, regulatory, cardiac, slow (MYL2); myosin, heavy chain 6, cardiac muscle, α (MYH6); myosin, light chain 3, alkali, ventricular, skeletal, slow (MYL3); and protein kinase, AMP-activated, gamma 2 non-catalytic subunit (PRKAG2)] in 8 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and in 8 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) were amplified and then sequenced using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) system. As a result, a novel heterozygous mutation (MYH7, p.Asn885Thr) and a variant of uncertain significance (TNNT2, p.Arg296His) were identified in 2 patients with HCM. These 2 missense mutations, which were absent in the samples obtained from the 200 healthy control subjects, altered the amino acid that was evolutionarily conserved among a number of vertebrate species; this illustrates that these 2 non-synonymous mutations play a role in the pathogenesis of HCM. Moreover, a double heterozygous mutation (PRKAG2, p.Gly100Ser plus MYH7, p.Arg719Trp) was identified in a patient with severe familial HCM, for the first time to the best of our knowledge. This patient provided us with more

  3. Estimation of two-dimensional intraventricular velocity and pressure maps by digital processing conventional color-Doppler sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Damien; Del Alamo, Juan C.; Tanne, David; Cortina, Cristina; Yotti, Raquel; Fernandez-Aviles, Francisco; Bermejo, Javier

    2008-11-01

    Clinical echocardiographic quantification of blood flow in the left ventricle is limited because Doppler methods only provide one velocity component. We developed a new technique to obtain two-dimensional flow maps from conventional transthoracic echocardiographic acquisitions. Velocity and pressure maps were calculated from color-Doppler velocity (apical long-axis view) by solving the continuity and Euler equations under the assumptions of zero transverse fluxes of mass and momentum. This technique is fast, clinically-compliant and does not require any specific training. Particle image velocimetry experiments performed in an atrioventricular duplicator showed that the circulation and size of the diastolic vortex was quantified accurately. Micromanometer measurements in pigs showed that apex-base pressure differences extracted from two-dimensional maps qualitatively agreed with micromanometer data. Initial clinical measurements in healthy volunteers showed a large prograde vortex. Additional retrograde vortices appeared in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and left ventricular hypertrophy.

  4. Mapping-by-Sequencing Identifies HvPHYTOCHROME C as a Candidate Gene for the early maturity 5 Locus Modulating the Circadian Clock and Photoperiodic Flowering in Barley

    PubMed Central

    Pankin, Artem; Campoli, Chiara; Dong, Xue; Kilian, Benjamin; Sharma, Rajiv; Himmelbach, Axel; Saini, Reena; Davis, Seth J; Stein, Nils; Schneeberger, Korbinian; von Korff, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Phytochromes play an important role in light signaling and photoperiodic control of flowering time in plants. Here we propose that the red/far-red light photoreceptor HvPHYTOCHROME C (HvPHYC), carrying a mutation in a conserved region of the GAF domain, is a candidate underlying the early maturity 5 locus in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). We fine mapped the gene using a mapping-by-sequencing approach applied on the whole-exome capture data from bulked early flowering segregants derived from a backcross of the Bowman(eam5) introgression line. We demonstrate that eam5 disrupts circadian expression of clock genes. Moreover, it interacts with the major photoperiod response gene Ppd-H1 to accelerate flowering under noninductive short days. Our results suggest that HvPHYC participates in transmission of light signals to the circadian clock and thus modulates light-dependent processes such as photoperiodic regulation of flowering. PMID:24996910

  5. Construction of a chromosome-assigned, sequence-tagged linkage map for the radish, Raphanus sativus L. and QTL analysis of morphological traits

    PubMed Central

    Hashida, Tomoko; Nakatsuji, Ryoichi; Budahn, Holger; Schrader, Otto; Peterka, Herbert; Fujimura, Tatsuhito; Kubo, Nakao; Hirai, Masashi

    2013-01-01

    The radish displays great morphological variation but the genetic factors underlying this variability are mostly unknown. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling radish morphological traits, we cultivated 94 F4 and F5 recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross between the rat-tail radish and the Japanese radish cultivar ‘Harufuku’ inbred lines. Eight morphological traits (ovule and seed numbers per silique, plant shape, pubescence and root formation) were measured for investigation. We constructed a map composed of 322 markers with a total length of 673.6 cM. The linkage groups were assigned to the radish chromosomes using disomic rape-radish chromosome-addition lines. On the map, eight and 10 QTLs were identified in 2008 and 2009, respectively. The chromosome-linkage group correspondence, the sequence-specific markers and the QTLs detected here will provide useful information for further genetic studies and for selection during radish breeding programs. PMID:23853517

  6. Two patients with overlapping de novo duplications of the long arm of chromosome 9, including one case with Di George sequence.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, V; Rosinsky, B; Chin, J; Berry-Kravis, E

    1994-01-01

    Duplications of chromosome 9q are rare. We describe the cytogenetic and phenotypic findings in 2 patients, one with a large duplication covering most of 9q(q12-q33.2) and one with a smaller duplication (q21.12-q22.1) who had Di George sequence (DGS). The chromosome 9 origin of the extra material in the second case was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with a whole chromosome 9 paint. Microdeletions of chromosome 22 are common in DGS and have been reported in CHARGE association. This is the first report of an association of a chromosome 9 abnormality with DGS in the absence of a chromosome 22 abnormality and the seventh report of a patient with a duplication of a large portion of 9q (q11-q13 to q32-q33).

  7. Two patients with overlapping de novo duplications of the long arm of chromosome 9, including one case with Di George sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Lindgren, V.; Rosinsky, B.; Chin, J.; Berry-Kravis, E.

    1994-01-01

    Duplications of chromosome 9q are rare. The authors describe the cytogenetic and phenotypic findings in 2 patients, one with a large duplication covering most of 9q (q12-q33.2) and one with a smaller duplication (q21.12-q22.1) who had Di George sequence (DGS). The chromosome 9 origin of the extra material in the second case was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with a whole chromosome 9 paint. Microdeletions of chromosome 22 are common in DGS and have been reported in CHARGE association. This is the first report of an association of a chromosome 9 abnormality with DGS in the absence of a chromosome 22 abnormality and the seventh report of a patient with a duplication of a large portion of 9q (q11-q13 to q32-q33). 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Generalized Smooth Transition Map Between Tent and Logistic Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed, Wafaa S.; Fahmy, Hossam A. H.; Rezk, Ahmed A.; Radwan, Ahmed G.

    There is a continuous demand on novel chaotic generators to be employed in various modeling and pseudo-random number generation applications. This paper proposes a new chaotic map which is a general form for one-dimensional discrete-time maps employing the power function with the tent and logistic maps as special cases. The proposed map uses extra parameters to provide responses that fit multiple applications for which conventional maps were not enough. The proposed generalization covers also maps whose iterative relations are not based on polynomials, i.e. with fractional powers. We introduce a framework for analyzing the proposed map mathematically and predicting its behavior for various combinations of its parameters. In addition, we present and explain the transition map which results in intermediate responses as the parameters vary from their values corresponding to tent map to those corresponding to logistic map case. We study the properties of the proposed map including graph of the map equation, general bifurcation diagram and its key-points, output sequences, and maximum Lyapunov exponent. We present further explorations such as effects of scaling, system response with respect to the new parameters, and operating ranges other than transition region. Finally, a stream cipher system based on the generalized transition map validates its utility for image encryption applications. The system allows the construction of more efficient encryption keys which enhances its sensitivity and other cryptographic properties.

  9. Nucleotide sequence and genetic analysis of the Azotobacter chroococcum nifUSVWZM gene cluster, including a new gene (nifP) which encodes a serine acetyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D J; Jones, R; Woodley, P R; Wilborn, J R; Robson, R L

    1991-01-01

    Nucleotide sequence was obtained for a region of 7,099 bp spanning the nifU, nifS, nifV, nifW, nifZ, and nifM genes from Azotobacter chroococcum. Chromosomal mutations constructed at several sites within the locus confirmed a requirement for this region for expression of the molybdenum nitrogenase in this organism. The genes are tightly clustered and ordered as in Klebsiella pneumoniae except for two additional open reading frames (ORFs) between nifV and nifW. The arrangement of genes in A. chroococcum closely matches that described for Azotobacter vinelandii. The polypeptide encoded by ORF4 immediately downstream from nifV is 41% identical over 186 amino acids to the product of the cysE gene from Escherichia coli, which encodes serine acetyltransferase (SAT), a key enzyme in cysteine biosynthesis. Plasmids which potentially express ORF4 complemented E. coli JM39, a cysteine auxotroph which lacks SAT. SAT activity was detected in crude extracts of one such complemented strain. A strain of A. chroococcum carrying a chromosomal disruption of ORF4 grew normally with ammonium as the N source but more slowly than the parental strain when N2 was the sole N source. These data suggest that ORF4 encodes a nif-specific SAT required for optimizing expression of nitrogenase activity. ORF4 was assigned the name nifP. nifP may be required to boost rates of synthesis or intracellular concentrations of cysteine or methionine. Sequence identity between nifV and leuA gene products suggests that nifV may catalyze a condensation reaction analogous to that carried out by isopropylmalate synthase (LEUA) but in which acetyl coenzyme and alpha-ketoglutarate are substrates for the formation of homocitrate, the proposed product of NIFV activity. PMID:1885524

  10. Identification of novel mutations including a double mutation in patients with inherited cardiomyopathy by a targeted sequencing approach using the Ion Torrent PGM system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Cao, Hong; Song, Yindi; Feng, Yue; Ding, Xiaoxue; Pang, Mingjie; Zhang, Yunmei; Zhang, Hong; Ding, Jiahuan; Xia, Xueshan

    2016-06-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathy is the major cause of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and heart failure (HF). The disease is associated with extensive genetic heterogeneity; pathogenic mutations in cardiac sarcomere protein genes, cytoskeletal protein genes and nuclear envelope protein genes have been linked to its etiology. Early diagnosis is conducive to clinical monitoring and allows for presymptomatic interventions as needed. In the present study, the entire coding sequences and flanking regions of 12 major disease (cardiomyopathy)-related genes [namely myosin, heavy chain 7, cardiac muscle, β (MYH7); myosin binding protein C, cardiac (MYBPC3); lamin A/C (LMNA); troponin I type 3 (cardiac) (TNNI3); troponin T type 2 (cardiac) (TNNT2); actin, α, cardiac muscle 1 (ACTC1); tropomyosin 1 (α) (TPM1); sodium channel, voltage gated, type V alpha subunit (SCN5A); myosin, light chain 2, regulatory, cardiac, slow (MYL2); myosin, heavy chain 6, cardiac muscle, α (MYH6); myosin, light chain 3, alkali, ventricular, skeletal, slow (MYL3); and protein kinase, AMP-activated, gamma 2 non-catalytic subunit  (PRKAG2)] in 8 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and in 8 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) were amplified and then sequenced using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) system. As a result, a novel heterozygous mutation (MYH7, p.Asn885Thr) and a variant of uncertain significance (TNNT2, p.Arg296His) were identified in 2 patients with HCM. These 2 missense mutations, which were absent in the samples obtained from the 200 healthy control subjects, altered the amino acid that was evolutionarily conserved among a number of vertebrate species; this illustrates that these 2 non-synonymous mutations play a role in the pathogenesis of HCM. Moreover, a double heterozygous mutation (PRKAG2, p.Gly100Ser plus MYH7, p.Arg719Trp) was identified in a patient with severe familial HCM, for the first time to the best of our

  11. In-gel microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis of proteins combined with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for mapping protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Sun, Difei; Wang, Nan; Li, Liang

    2014-01-07

    We report an enabling method for mapping the protein sequence with high sequence coverage. This method combines the high separation power of gel electrophoresis for protein separation with the high sequence coverage capability of microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis (MAAH) mass spectrometry (MS). In-gel MAAH using 25% trifluoroacetic acid was developed and optimized for degrading the gel-separated protein into small peptides suitable for tandem MS sequencing. For bovine serum albumin (BSA) (∼67 kDa), with 4 μg of protein loading onto a gel for separation, followed by excising the protein gel band for in-gel MAAH and then injecting ∼2 μg of the resultant peptides into a liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer for analysis, 689 ± 54 (n = 3) unique peptides were identified with a protein sequence coverage of 99 ± 1%. Both the number of peptides detected and sequence coverage decreased as the sample amount decreased, mainly due to background interference: 316 ± 59 peptides and 94 ± 3% coverage for 2 μg loading, 136 ± 19 and 76 ± 5% for 1 μg loading, and 30 ± 2 and 32 ± 2% for 0.5 μg loading. To demonstrate the general applicability of the method, 10 gel bands from gel electrophoresis of an albumin-depleted human plasma sample were excised for in-gel MAAH LC-MS analysis. In total, 19 relatively high abundance proteins with molecular weights ranging from ∼8 to ∼160 kD could be mapped with coverage of 100% for six proteins (MW 8759 to 68 425 Da), 96-98% for five proteins (MW 11 458 to 36 431 Da), 92% for three proteins (MW 15 971 to 36 431 Da), 80-87% for four proteins (MW 42 287 to 162 134 Da), and 56% for one protein (MW 51 358 Da). Finally, to demonstrate the applicability of the method for more detailed analysis of complex protein mixtures, two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis was combined with in-gel MAAH, affinity purification, and LC-MS/MS to characterize six bovine alpha-S1-casein phosphoprotein

  12. Comparison of quantitative trait loci for adaptive traits between oak and chestnut based on an expressed sequence tag consensus map.

    PubMed

    Casasoli, Manuela; Derory, Jeremy; Morera-Dutrey, Caroline; Brendel, Oliver; Porth, Ilga; Guehl, Jean-Marc; Villani, Fiorella; Kremer, Antoine

    2006-01-01

    A comparative genetic and QTL mapping was performed between Quercus robur L. and Castanea sativa Mill., two major forest tree species belonging to the Fagaceae family. Oak EST-derived markers (STSs) were used to align the 12 linkage groups of the two species. Fifty-one and 45 STSs were mapped in oak and chestnut, respectively. These STSs, added to SSR markers previously mapped in both species, provided a total number of 55 orthologous molecular markers for comparative mapping within the Fagaceae family. Homeologous genomic regions identified between oak and chestnut allowed us to compare QTL positions for three important adaptive traits. Colocation of the QTL controlling the timing of bud burst was significant between the two species. However, conservation of QTL for height growth was not supported by statistical tests. No QTL for carbon isotope discrimination was conserved between the two species. Putative candidate genes for bud burst can be identified on the basis of colocations between EST-derived markers and QTL.

  13. Comparison of Quantitative Trait Loci for Adaptive Traits Between Oak and Chestnut Based on an Expressed Sequence Tag Consensus Map

    PubMed Central

    Casasoli, Manuela; Derory, Jeremy; Morera-Dutrey, Caroline; Brendel, Oliver; Porth, Ilga; Guehl, Jean-Marc; Villani, Fiorella; Kremer, Antoine

    2006-01-01

    A comparative genetic and QTL mapping was performed between Quercus robur L. and Castanea sativa Mill., two major forest tree species belonging to the Fagaceae family. Oak EST-derived markers (STSs) were used to align the 12 linkage groups of the two species. Fifty-one and 45 STSs were mapped in oak and chestnut, respectively. These STSs, added to SSR markers previously mapped in both species, provided a total number of 55 orthologous molecular markers for comparative mapping within the Fagaceae family. Homeologous genomic regions identified between oak and chestnut allowed us to compare QTL positions for three important adaptive traits. Colocation of the QTL controlling the timing of bud burst was significant between the two species. However, conservation of QTL for height growth was not supported by statistical tests. No QTL for carbon isotope discrimination was conserved between the two species. Putative candidate genes for bud burst can be identified on the basis of colocations between EST-derived markers and QTL. PMID:16204213

  14. QTL Mapping for Grain Yield, Flowering Time, and Stay-Green Traits in Sorghum with Genotyping-by-Sequencing Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular breeding can complement traditional breeding approaches to achieve genetic gains in a more efficient way. In the present study, genetic mapping was conducted in a sorghum recombinant inbred line (RIL) population developed from Tx436 (a non-stay-green high food quality inbred) × 00MN7645 (a...

  15. Structural analysis of a Lotus japonicus genome. III. Sequence features and mapping of sixty-two TAC clones which cover the 6.7 Mb regions of the genome.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Takakazu; Asamizu, Erika; Kato, Tomohiko; Sato, Shusei; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Tabata, Satoshi

    2003-02-28

    A total of sixty-two clones were selected from a TAC (transformation-competent artificial chromosome) genomic library of the Lotus japonicus accession MG-20 based on the sequence information of expressed sequence tags (ESTs), cDNA and gene information, and their nucleotide sequences were determined. The length of the sequenced regions in this study is 6,682,189 bp, and the total length of the regions sequenced so far is 18,711,484 bp together with the nucleotide sequences of 121 TAC clones previously reported. By comparison with the sequences in protein and EST databases and analysis with computer programs for gene modeling, a total of 573 potential protein-coding genes with known or predicted functions, 91 gene segments and 272 pseudogenes were identified in the newly sequenced regions. Each of the sequenced clones was localized onto the linkage map of two accessions of L. japonicus, Gifu B-129 and Miyakojima MG-20, using simple sequence repeat length polymorphism (SSLP) or derived cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (dCAPS) markers generated based on the nucleotide sequences of the clones. The sequence data, gene information and mapping information are available through the World Wide Web at http://www.kazusa.or.jp/lotus/.