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Sample records for sera proteases display

  1. Proteolytic Activation of the Essential Parasitophorous Vacuole Cysteine Protease SERA6 Accompanies Malaria Parasite Egress from Its Host Erythrocyte*

    PubMed Central

    Ruecker, Andrea; Shea, Michael; Hackett, Fiona; Suarez, Catherine; Hirst, Elizabeth M. A.; Milutinovic, Katarina; Withers-Martinez, Chrislaine; Blackman, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The malaria parasite replicates within an intraerythrocytic parasitophorous vacuole (PV). The PV and host cell membranes eventually rupture, releasing merozoites in a process called egress. Certain inhibitors of serine and cysteine proteases block egress, indicating a crucial role for proteases. The Plasmodium falciparum genome encodes nine serine-repeat antigens (SERAs), each of which contains a central domain homologous to the papain-like (clan CA, family C1) protease family. SERA5 and SERA6 are indispensable in blood-stage parasites, but the function of neither is known. Here we show that SERA6 localizes to the PV where it is precisely cleaved just prior to egress by an essential serine protease called PfSUB1. Mutations that replace the predicted catalytic Cys of SERA6, or that block SERA6 processing by PfSUB1, could not be stably introduced into the parasite genomic sera6 locus, indicating that SERA6 is an essential enzyme and that processing is important for its function. We demonstrate that cleavage of SERA6 by PfSUB1 converts it to an active cysteine protease. Our observations reveal a proteolytic activation step in the malarial PV that may be required for release of the parasite from its host erythrocyte. PMID:22984267

  2. Structural Insights into the Protease-like Antigen Plasmodium falciparum SERA5 and Its Noncanonical Active-Site Serine

    SciTech Connect

    Hodder, Anthony N.; Malby, Robyn L.; Clarke, Oliver B.; Fairlie, W. Douglas; Colman, Peter M.; Crabb, Brendan S.; Smith, Brian J.

    2009-08-28

    The sera genes of the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium encode a family of unique proteins that are maximally expressed at the time of egress of parasites from infected red blood cells. These multi-domain proteins are unique, containing a central papain-like cysteine-protease fragment enclosed between the disulfide-linked N- and C-terminal domains. However, the central fragment of several members of this family, including serine repeat antigen 5 (SERA5), contains a serine (S596) in place of the active-site cysteine. Here we report the crystal structure of the central protease-like domain of Plasmodium falciparum SERA5, revealing a number of anomalies in addition to the putative nucleophilic serine: (1) the structure of the putative active site is not conducive to binding substrate in the canonical cysteine-protease manner; (2) the side chain of D594 restricts access of substrate to the putative active site; and (3) the S{sub 2} specificity pocket is occupied by the side chain of Y735, reducing this site to a small depression on the protein surface. Attempts to determine the structure in complex with known inhibitors were not successful. Thus, despite having revealed its structure, the function of the catalytic domain of SERA5 remains an enigma.

  3. Subfamily-Specific Fluorescent Probes for Cysteine Proteases Display Dynamic Protease Activities during Seed Germination1

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Haibin; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; Oeljeklaus, Julian; Misas-Villamil, Johana C.; Wang, Zheming; Shindo, Takayuki; Bogyo, Matthew; Kaiser, Markus; van der Hoorn, Renier A.L.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine proteases are an important class of enzymes implicated in both developmental and defense-related programmed cell death and other biological processes in plants. Because there are dozens of cysteine proteases that are posttranslationally regulated by processing, environmental conditions, and inhibitors, new methodologies are required to study these pivotal enzymes individually. Here, we introduce fluorescence activity-based probes that specifically target three distinct cysteine protease subfamilies: aleurain-like proteases, cathepsin B-like proteases, and vacuolar processing enzymes. We applied protease activity profiling with these new probes on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) protease knockout lines and agroinfiltrated leaves to identify the probe targets and on other plant species to demonstrate their broad applicability. These probes revealed that most commercially available protease inhibitors target unexpected proteases in plants. When applied on germinating seeds, these probes reveal dynamic activities of aleurain-like proteases, cathepsin B-like proteases, and vacuolar processing enzymes, coinciding with the remobilization of seed storage proteins. PMID:26048883

  4. Development of a glutathione production process from proteinaceous biomass resources using protease-displaying Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Kim, Songhee; Yoshida, Hideyo; Kiriyama, Kentaro; Kondo, Takashi; Okai, Naoko; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2012-02-01

    Glutathione is a valuable tri-peptide that is widely used in the pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic industries. Glutathione is produced industrially by fermentation using Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and supplementation of fermentation with several amino acids can increase intracellular GSH content. More recently, however, focus has been given to protein as a resource for biofuel and fine chemical production. We demonstrate that expression of a protease on the cell surface of S. cerevisiae enables the direct use of keratin and soy protein as a source of amino acids and that these substrates enhanced intracellular GSH content. Furthermore, fermentation using soy protein also enhanced cell concentration. GSH fermentation from keratin and to a greater extent from soy protein using protease-displaying yeast yielded greater GSH productivity compared to GSH fermentation with amino acid supplementation. This protease-displaying yeast is potentially applicable to a variety of processes for the bio-production of value-added chemicals from proteinaceous biomass resources. PMID:22075633

  5. Intravirion display of a peptide corresponding to the dimer structure of protease attenuates HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Cartas, M; Singh, S P; Serio, D; Rizvi, T A; Kalyanaraman, V S; Goldsmith, C S; Zaki, S R; Weber, I T; Srinivasan, A

    2001-12-01

    Current treatment of HIV-1-infected individuals involves the administration of several drugs, all of which target either the reverse transcriptase or the protease activity of the virus. Unfortunately, the benefits of such treatments are compromised by the emergence of viruses exhibiting resistance to the drugs. This situation warrants new approaches for interfering with virus replication. Considering the activation of protease in the virus particles, a novel strategy to inhibit HIV-1 replication was tested targeting the dimerization domain of the protease. To test this idea, we have selected four residues from the C terminus of HIV-1 protease that map to the dimer interface region of the enzyme. We have exploited Vpr to display the peptides in the virus particles. The chimeric Vpr exhibited expression and virion incorporation similar to wildtype Vpr. The virus derived from the HIV-1 proviral DNA containing chimeric Vpr sequences registered a reduced level of replication in CEM and CEM X 174 cells in comparison with viruses containing wildtype Vpr. Similar results were observed in a single-round replication assay. These results suggest that the intravirion display of peptides targeting viral proteins is a powerful approach for developing antiviral agents and for dissecting the dynamic interactions between structural proteins during virus assembly and disassembly.

  6. Phage-displayed antibody fragments recognizing dengue 3 and dengue 4 viruses as tools for viral serotyping in sera from infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Cabezas, Sheila; Rojas, Gertrudis; Pavon, Alequis; Bernardo, Lidice; Castellanos, Yinet; Alvarez, Mayling; Pupo, Maritza; Guillen, Gerardo; Guzman, Maria G

    2009-01-01

    The current study shows the usefulness of dengue-3- and dengue-4-specific phage-displayed antibody fragments as tools for viral detection and serotyping in sera from infected individuals. C6/36 HT cells were inoculated with acute-phase sera from patients, and supernatants were collected daily and analyzed by ELISA using phage-displayed antibody fragments as serotype-specific detector reagents. Serotyping of most samples was possible as early as two to three days postinoculation. Results were comparable with those obtained by indirect immunofluorescence assay but were obtained in a shorter period of time (<1 week). Phage-displayed antibody fragments were better tools for diagnosis and serotyping than their soluble counterparts. Our approach combines the advantages of viral isolation and ELISA techniques. These results could be the basis for the development of a high-throughput method for identifying dengue virus serotypes, which is crucial for the management and control of the disease.

  7. Development of a surface display ELISA to detect anti-IgG antibodies against bovine αS1-casein in human sera.

    PubMed

    Saenger, Thorsten; Braukmann, Achim; Vordenbäumen, Stefan; Altendorfer, Irina; Bleck, Ellen; Hochwallner, Heidrun; Valenta, Rudolf; Schneider, Matthias; Jose, Joachim

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a surface display ELISA (SD-ELISA) for IgG-serum reaction against bovine casein αS1 (CSN1S1). In a SD-ELISA, the antigen is displayed on the surface of Escherichia coli using the autodisplay technology and whole cells of E. coli are used to coat the microplates for serum testing. After establishing the setup of the SD-ELISA with polyclonal rabbit antiserum against bovine CSN1S1, the SD-ELISA was validated with 20 human sera, of which 10 sera were proven to have an IgG-mediated reaction against bovine CSN1S1 and 10 sera were shown to be negative for this reaction. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis revealed sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 100% at a cut-off value of 0.133. Furthermore, human serum of 48 patients with known reactivity against human CSN1S1 (31 positive and 17 negative) was examined by the newly developed SD-ELISA to exclude cross-reactivity. Twenty human sera showed an IgG-mediated reaction against bovine CSN1S1. Eleven of these sera were positive for the reactivity against human CSN1S1, and nine were negative. In conclusion it was demonstrated that the performance of SD-ELISA is comparable to established ELISA without loss in sensitivity or specificity. Based on the advantages of this method - in particular no need for time-consuming and expensive antigen production and purification - the SD-ELISA is a potent alternative to convenient methods for identification and especially high-throughput screening of new antigens in the field of food allergies. PMID:24747146

  8. Development of a surface display ELISA to detect anti-IgG antibodies against bovine αS1-casein in human sera

    PubMed Central

    Saenger, Thorsten; Braukmann, Achim; Vordenbäumen, Stefan; Altendorfer, Irina; Bleck, Ellen; Hochwallner, Heidrun; Valenta, Rudolf; Schneider, Matthias; Jose, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a surface display ELISA (SD-ELISA) for IgG-serum reaction against bovine casein αS1 (CSN1S1). In a SD-ELISA, the antigen is displayed on the surface of Escherichia coli using the autodisplay technology and whole cells of E. coli are used to coat the microplates for serum testing. After establishing the setup of the SD-ELISA with polyclonal rabbit antiserum against bovine CSN1S1, the SD-ELISA was validated with 20 human sera, of which 10 sera were proven to have an IgG-mediated reaction against bovine CSN1S1 and 10 sera were shown to be negative for this reaction. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis revealed sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 100% at a cut-off value of 0.133. Furthermore, human serum of 48 patients with known reactivity against human CSN1S1 (31 positive and 17 negative) was examined by the newly developed SD-ELISA to exclude cross-reactivity. Twenty human sera showed an IgG-mediated reaction against bovine CSN1S1. Eleven of these sera were positive for the reactivity against human CSN1S1, and nine were negative. In conclusion it was demonstrated that the performance of SD-ELISA is comparable to established ELISA without loss in sensitivity or specificity. Based on the advantages of this method – in particular no need for time-consuming and expensive antigen production and purification – the SD-ELISA is a potent alternative to convenient methods for identification and especially high-throughput screening of new antigens in the field of food allergies. PMID:24747146

  9. Development of a surface display ELISA to detect anti-IgG antibodies against bovine αS1-casein in human sera.

    PubMed

    Saenger, Thorsten; Braukmann, Achim; Vordenbäumen, Stefan; Altendorfer, Irina; Bleck, Ellen; Hochwallner, Heidrun; Valenta, Rudolf; Schneider, Matthias; Jose, Joachim

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a surface display ELISA (SD-ELISA) for IgG-serum reaction against bovine casein αS1 (CSN1S1). In a SD-ELISA, the antigen is displayed on the surface of Escherichia coli using the autodisplay technology and whole cells of E. coli are used to coat the microplates for serum testing. After establishing the setup of the SD-ELISA with polyclonal rabbit antiserum against bovine CSN1S1, the SD-ELISA was validated with 20 human sera, of which 10 sera were proven to have an IgG-mediated reaction against bovine CSN1S1 and 10 sera were shown to be negative for this reaction. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis revealed sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 100% at a cut-off value of 0.133. Furthermore, human serum of 48 patients with known reactivity against human CSN1S1 (31 positive and 17 negative) was examined by the newly developed SD-ELISA to exclude cross-reactivity. Twenty human sera showed an IgG-mediated reaction against bovine CSN1S1. Eleven of these sera were positive for the reactivity against human CSN1S1, and nine were negative. In conclusion it was demonstrated that the performance of SD-ELISA is comparable to established ELISA without loss in sensitivity or specificity. Based on the advantages of this method - in particular no need for time-consuming and expensive antigen production and purification - the SD-ELISA is a potent alternative to convenient methods for identification and especially high-throughput screening of new antigens in the field of food allergies.

  10. SepM, a Streptococcal Protease Involved in Quorum Sensing, Displays Strict Substrate Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Saswati; Cao, Luyang; Kim, Albert

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus mutans, a causative agent of dental caries, relies on multiple quorum-sensing (QS) pathways that coordinate the expression of factors needed for colonization in the oral cavity. S. mutans uses small peptides as QS signaling molecules that typically are secreted into the outside milieu. Competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) is one such QS signaling molecule that functions through the ComDE two-component signal transduction pathway. CSP is secreted through NlmTE, a dedicated ABC transporter that cleaves off the N-terminal leader peptide to generate a mature peptide that is 21 residues long (CSP-21). We recently identified a surface-localized protease, SepM, which further cleaves the CSP-21 peptide at the C-terminal end and removes the last 3 residues to generate CSP-18. CSP-18 is the active QS molecule that interacts with the ComD sensor kinase to activate the QS pathway. In this study, we show that SepM specifically cleaves CSP-21 between the Ala18 and Leu19 residues. We also show that SepM recognizes only Ala at position 18 and Leu at position 19, although some CSP-18 variants with a substitution at position 18 can function equally as well as the QS peptide. Furthermore, we demonstrate that SepM homologs from other streptococci are capable of processing CSP-21 to generate functional CSP-18. IMPORTANCE SepM is a membrane-associated streptococcal protease that processes competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) to generate an active quorum-sensing molecule in S. mutans. SepM belongs to the S16 family of serine proteases, and in this study, we found that SepM behaves as an endopeptidase. SepM displays strict substrate specificity and cleaves the peptide bond between the Ala and Leu residues. This is the first report of an endopeptidase that specifically cleaves these two residues. PMID:26553848

  11. Peptide sequences identified by phage display are immunodominant functional motifs of Pet and Pic serine proteases secreted by Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri.

    PubMed

    Ulises, Hernández-Chiñas; Tatiana, Gazarian; Karlen, Gazarian; Guillermo, Mendoza-Hernández; Juan, Xicohtencatl-Cortes; Carlos, Eslava

    2009-12-01

    Plasmid-encoded toxin (Pet) and protein involved in colonization (Pic), are serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) secreted by enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), which display the GDSGSG sequence or the serine motif. Our research was directed to localize functional sites in both proteins using the phage display method. From a 12mer linear and a 7mer cysteine-constrained (C7C) libraries displayed on the M13 phage pIII protein we selected different mimotopes using IgG purified from sera of children naturally infected with EAEC producing Pet and Pic proteins, and anti-Pet and anti-Pic IgG purified from rabbits immunized with each one of these proteins. Children IgG selected a homologous group of sequences forming the consensus sequence, motif, PQPxK, and the motifs PGxI/LN and CxPDDSSxC were selected by the rabbit anti-Pet and anti-Pic IgGs, respectively. Analysis of the amino terminal region of a panel of SPATEs showed the presence in all of them of sequences matching the PGxI/LN or CxPDDSSxC motifs, and in a three-dimensional model (Modeller 9v2) designed for Pet, both these motifs were found in the globular portion of the protein, close to the protease active site GDSGSG. Antibodies induced in mice by mimotopes carrying the three aforementioned motifs were reactive with Pet, Pic, and with synthetic peptides carrying the immunogenic mimotope sequences TYPGYINHSKA and LLPQPPKLLLP, thus confirming that the peptide moiety of the selected phages induced the antibodies specific for the toxins. The antibodies induced in mice to the PGxI/LN and CxPDDSSxC mimotopes inhibited fodrin proteolysis and macrophage chemotaxis biological activities of Pet. Our results showed that we were able to generate, by a phage display procedure, mimotopes with sequence motifs PGxI/LN and CxPDDSSxC, and to identify them as functional motifs of the Pet, Pic and other SPATEs involved in their biological activities.

  12. The Lon protease from the haloalkaliphilic archaeon Natrialba magadii is transcriptionally linked to a cluster of putative membrane proteases and displays DNA-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Sastre, Diego E; Paggi, Roberto A; De Castro, Rosana E

    2011-05-20

    The ATP-dependent Lon protease is universally distributed in bacteria, eukaryotic organelles and archaea. In comparison with bacterial and eukaryal Lon proteases, the biology of the archaeal Lon has been studied to a limited extent. In this study, the gene encoding the Lon protease of the alkaliphilic haloarchaeon Natrialba magadii (Nmlon) was cloned and sequenced, and the genetic organization of Nmlon was examined at the transcriptional level. Nmlon encodes a 84 kDa polypeptide with a pI of 4.42 which contains the ATPase, protease and membrane targeting domains of the archaeal-type LonB proteases. Nmlon is part of an operon that encodes membrane proteases and it is transcribed as a polycistronic mRNA in N. magadii cells at different growth stages. Accordingly, NmLon was detected in cell membranes of N. magadii throughout growth by Western blot analysis using specific anti-NmLon antibodies. Interestingly, in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, purified NmLon bound double stranded as well as single stranded DNA in the presence of elevated salt concentrations. This finding shows that DNA-binding is conserved in the LonA and LonB subfamilies and suggests that Lon-DNA interaction may be relevant for its function in haloarchaea.

  13. Subclassification and Biochemical Analysis of Plant Papain-Like Cysteine Proteases Displays Subfamily-Specific Characteristics1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Richau, Kerstin H.; Kaschani, Farnusch; Verdoes, Martijn; Pansuriya, Twinkal C.; Niessen, Sherry; Stüber, Kurt; Colby, Tom; Overkleeft, Hermen S.; Bogyo, Matthew; Van der Hoorn, Renier A.L.

    2012-01-01

    Papain-like cysteine proteases (PLCPs) are a large class of proteolytic enzymes associated with development, immunity, and senescence. Although many properties have been described for individual proteases, the distribution of these characteristics has not been studied collectively. Here, we analyzed 723 plant PLCPs and classify them into nine subfamilies that are present throughout the plant kingdom. Analysis of these subfamilies revealed previously unreported distinct subfamily-specific functional and structural characteristics. For example, the NPIR and KDEL localization signals are distinctive for subfamilies, and the carboxyl-terminal granulin domain occurs in two PLCP subfamilies, in which some individual members probably evolved by deletion of the granulin domains. We also discovered a conserved double cysteine in the catalytic site of SAG12-like proteases and two subfamily-specific disulfides in RD19A-like proteases. Protease activity profiling of representatives of the PLCP subfamilies using novel fluorescent probes revealed striking polymorphic labeling profiles and remarkably distinct pH dependency. Competition assays with peptide-epoxide scanning libraries revealed common and unique inhibitory fingerprints. Finally, we expand the detection of PLCPs by identifying common and organ-specific protease activities and identify previously undetected proteases upon labeling with cell-penetrating probes in vivo. This study provides the plant protease research community with tools for further functional annotation of plant PLCPs. PMID:22371507

  14. PL-100, a novel HIV-1 protease inhibitor displaying a high genetic barrier to resistance: an in vitro selection study.

    PubMed

    Dandache, Serge; Coburn, Craig A; Oliveira, Maureen; Allison, Timothy J; Holloway, M Katharine; Wu, Jinzi J; Stranix, Brent R; Panchal, Chandra; Wainberg, Mark A; Vacca, Joseph P

    2008-12-01

    The development of new HIV inhibitors with distinct resistance profiles is essential in order to combat the development of multi-resistant viral strains. A drug discovery program based on the identification of compounds that are active against drug-resistant viruses has produced PL-100, a novel potent protease inhibitor (PI) that incorporates a lysine-based scaffold. A selection for resistance against PL-100 in cord blood mononuclear cells was performed, using the laboratory-adapted IIIb strain of HIV-1, and it was shown that resistance appears to develop slower against this compound than against amprenavir, which was studied as a control. Four mutations in protease (PR) were selected after 25 weeks: two flap mutations (K45R and M46I) and two novel active site mutations (T80I and P81S). Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that all four mutations were required to develop low-level resistance to PL-100, which is indicative of the high genetic barrier of the compound. Importantly, these mutations did not cause cross-resistance to currently marketed PIs. In contrast, the P81S mutation alone caused hypersensitivity to two other PIs, saquinavir (SQV) and nelfinavir (NFV). Analysis of p55Gag processing showed that a marked defect in protease activity caused by mutation P81S could only be compensated when K45R and M46I were present. These data correlated well with the replication capacity (RC) of the mutant viruses as measured by a standard viral growth assay, since only viruses containing all four mutations approached the RC of wild type virus. X-ray crystallography provided insight on the structural basis of the resistance conferred by the identified mutations. PMID:19040279

  15. Geranylated flavonoids displaying SARS-CoV papain-like protease inhibition from the fruits of Paulownia tomentosa.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung Keun; Curtis-Long, Marcus J; Lee, Kon Ho; Kim, Dae Wook; Ryu, Hyung Won; Yuk, Heung Joo; Park, Ki Hun

    2013-06-01

    SARS-CoV papain-like protease (PLpro) is an important antiviral target due to its key roles in SARS virus replication. The MeOH extracts of the fruits of the Paulownia tree yielded many small molecules capable of targeting PLpro. Five of these compounds were new geranylated flavonoids, tomentin A, tomentin B, tomentin C, tomentin D, tomentin E (1-5). Structure analysis of new compounds (1-5) by NMR showed that they all contain a 3,4-dihydro-2H-pyran moiety. This chemotype is very rare and is derived from cyclization of a geranyl group with a phenol functionality. Most compounds (1-12) inhibited PLpro in a dose dependent manner with IC50's raging between 5.0 and 14.4 μM. All new compounds having the dihydro-2H-pyran group showed better inhibition than their parent compounds (1 vs 11, 2 vs 9, 4 vs 12, 5 vs 6). In kinetic studies, 1-12 emerged to be reversible, mixed inhibitors. PMID:23623680

  16. Sera radiosterilization: studies and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Jorge H.; Fernández Degiorgi, Cristina; Quattrini, Daniel; Michelin, Severino; Smolko, Eduardo E.

    1995-02-01

    The application of ionizing radiation for sterilization of animal serum increased rapidly over the last few years, due to the fact that most radiation-resistant living organisms (fungi, bacteria, viruses, etc.) can be readily inactivated without damage to the serum. The quality of sera sterilized by ionizing radiation has been investigated. Radiosterilization was carried out in the frozen state at doses between 25 and 50 kGy. The source of gamma radiation was 60Co. To demonstrate that serum proteins did not suffer alterations during the process of irradiation, SDS-PAGE, electrofocusing and non equilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis of the sera were carried out before and after irradiation. The biological efficiency of the irradiated sera was demonstrated by growth curves of several cell lines in cell cultures supplemented with it. The results demonstrated that radiosterilization is a simple and effective method for sera.

  17. Supermarket Proteases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagar, William G.; Bullerwell, Lornie D.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory activity on enzymes. Uses common items found in the supermarket that contain protease enzymes, such as contact lens cleaner and meat tenderizer. Demonstrates the digestion of gelatin proteins as part of enzymatic reactions. (Author/SOE)

  18. Plasmodium falciparum SERA5 plays a non-enzymatic role in the malarial asexual blood-stage lifecycle

    PubMed Central

    Stallmach, Robert; Kavishwar, Manoli; Withers-Martinez, Chrislaine; Hackett, Fiona; Collins, Christine R; Howell, Steven A; Yeoh, Sharon; Knuepfer, Ellen; Atid, Avshalom J; Holder, Anthony A; Blackman, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum replicates in an intraerythrocytic parasitophorous vacuole (PV). The most abundant P. falciparum PV protein, called SERA5, is essential in blood stages and possesses a papain-like domain, prompting speculation that it functions as a proteolytic enzyme. Unusually however, SERA5 possesses a Ser residue (Ser596) at the position of the canonical catalytic Cys of papain-like proteases, and the function of SERA5 or whether it performs an enzymatic role is unknown. In this study, we failed to detect proteolytic activity associated with the Ser596-containing parasite-derived or recombinant protein. However, substitution of Ser596 with a Cys residue produced an active recombinant enzyme with characteristics of a cysteine protease, demonstrating that SERA5 can bind peptides. Using targeted homologous recombination in P. falciparum, we substituted Ser596 with Ala with no phenotypic consequences, proving that SERA5 does not perform an essential enzymatic role in the parasite. We could also replace an internal segment of SERA5 with an affinity-purification tag. In contrast, using almost identical targeting constructs, we could not truncate or C-terminally tag the SERA5 gene, or replace Ser596 with a bulky Arg residue. Our findings show that SERA5 plays an indispensable but non-enzymatic role in the P. falciparum blood-stage life cycle. PMID:25599609

  19. Proteases as Insecticidal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Robert L.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2010-01-01

    Proteases from a variety of sources (viruses, bacteria, fungi, plants, and insects) have toxicity towards insects. Some of these insecticidal proteases evolved as venom components, herbivore resistance factors, or microbial pathogenicity factors, while other proteases play roles in insect development or digestion, but exert an insecticidal effect when over-expressed from genetically engineered plants or microbial pathogens. Many of these proteases are cysteine proteases, although insect-toxic metalloproteases and serine proteases have also been examined. The sites of protease toxic activity range from the insect midgut to the hemocoel (body cavity) to the cuticle. This review discusses these insecticidal proteases along with their evaluation and use as potential pesticides. PMID:22069618

  20. Lactoferrin in canine sera: a pyometra study.

    PubMed

    Bartoskova, A; Adlerova, L; Kudlackova, H; Leva, L; Vitasek, R; Faldyna, M

    2009-07-01

    The concentration of lactoferrin was measured in canine sera from groups of healthy male dogs as well as pregnant and non-pregnant female dogs and was compared with that of bitches with pyometra. Lactoferrin concentrations were higher in bitches with pyometra. The role of elevated lactoferrin concentrations in the suppression of lymphocyte activity was examined in sera from bitches with pyometra in a series of investigations. Although the sera from bitches with pyometra were capable of suppressing lymphocyte activity, lactoferrin was not found to be involved in this action. PMID:19754566

  1. Recombinant expression and antigenic properties of a 32-kilodalton extracellular alkaline protease, representing a possible virulence factor from Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed Central

    Moser, M; Menz, G; Blaser, K; Crameri, R

    1994-01-01

    A 32-kDa nonglycosylated alkaline protease (EC 3.4.1.14) with elastolytic activity, secreted by the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus ATCC 42202, is suggested to be a virulence factor of this fungus. The enzyme is a serine protease of the subtilisin family, and its cDNA nucleotide sequence has recently been reported. We have cloned the cDNA encoding the mature protease into a high-level Escherichia coli expression plasmid and produced the recombinant protease as a fusion protein with a six-adjacent-histidine affinity tag at the carboxy terminus. Subsequently, the recombinant protease was purified to homogeneity, with affinity chromatography yielding 30 to 40 mg of recombinant protease per liter of E. coli culture. Refolded recombinant protease, in comparison with native protease, demonstrated weak enzymatic activity but similar immunochemical characteristics as analyzed by antigen-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), competition ELISA, and immunoblotting assays. To assess the allergenic potential of the protease, sera from patients with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis and sera from healthy control individuals were analyzed by ELISA and immunoblotting techniques. Sera from patients with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis did not have protease-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies and, remarkably, did not show significantly elevated protease-specific IgG antibody levels compared with those in sera from healthy control individuals. This suggests that the alkaline protease from A. fumigatus does not elicit IgE antibodies and has weak immunogenicity, a property which may explain fungus persistence in allergic individuals. Images PMID:8112866

  2. Geographic differentiation of polymorphism in the Plasmodium falciparum malaria vaccine candidate gene SERA5.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Kazuyuki; Arisue, Nobuko; Palacpac, Nirianne M Q; Yagi, Masanori; Tougan, Takahiro; Honma, Hajime; Ferreira, Marcelo U; Färnert, Anna; Björkman, Anders; Kaneko, Akira; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Hirayama, Kenji; Mita, Toshihiro; Horii, Toshihiro

    2012-02-21

    SERA5 is regarded as a promising malaria vaccine candidate of the most virulent human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. SERA5 is a 120 kDa abundantly expressed blood-stage protein containing a papain-like protease. Since substantial polymorphism in blood-stage vaccine candidates may potentially limit their efficacy, it is imperative to fully investigate polymorphism of the SERA5 gene (sera5). In this study, we performed evolutionary and population genetic analysis of sera5. The level of inter-species divergence (kS=0.076) between P. falciparum and Plasmodium reichenowi, a closely related chimpanzee malaria parasite is comparable to that of housekeeping protein genes. A signature of purifying selection was detected in the proenzyme and enzyme domains. Analysis of 445 near full-length P. falciparum sera5 sequences from nine countries in Africa, Southeast Asia, Oceania and South America revealed extensive variations in the number of octamer repeat (OR) and serine repeat (SR) regions as well as substantial level of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in non-repeat regions (2562 bp). Remarkably, a 14 amino acid sequence of SERA5 (amino acids 59-72) that is known to be the in vitro target of parasite growth inhibitory antibodies was found to be perfectly conserved in all 445 worldwide isolates of P. falciparum evaluated. Unlike other major vaccine target antigen genes such as merozoite surface protein-1, apical membrane antigen-1 or circumsporozoite protein, no strong evidence for positive selection was detected for SNPs in the non-repeat regions of sera5. A biased geographical distribution was observed in SNPs as well as in the haplotypes of the sera5 OR and SR regions. In Africa, OR- and SR-haplotypes with low frequency (<5%) and SNPs with minor allele frequency (<5%) were abundant and were mostly continent-specific. Consistently, significant genetic differentiation, assessed by the Wright's fixation index (Fst) of inter-population variance in allele frequencies

  3. Investigations with Protease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Din Yan

    1997-01-01

    Presents two simple and reliable ways for measuring protease activity that can be used for a variety of investigations in a range of biology class levels. The investigations use protease from a variety of sources. (DDR)

  4. Proteases from the Regenerating Gut of the Holothurian Eupentacta fraudatrix

    PubMed Central

    Lamash, Nina E.; Dolmatov, Igor Yu

    2013-01-01

    Four proteases with molecular masses of 132, 58, 53, and 47 kDa were detected in the digestive system of the holothurian Eupentacta fraudatrix. These proteases displayed the gelatinase activity and characteristics of zinc metalloproteinases. The 58 kDa protease had similar protease inhibitor sensitivity to that of mammalian matrix metalloproteinases. Zymographic assay revealed different lytic activities of all four proteases during intestine regeneration in the holothurian. The 132 kDa protease showed the highest activity at the first stage. During morphogenesis (stages 2–4 of regeneration), the highest activity was measured for the 53 and 58 kDa proteases. Inhibition of protease activity exerts a marked effect on regeneration, which was dependent on the time when 1,10-phenanthroline injections commenced. When metalloproteinases were inhibited at the second stage of regeneration, the restoration rates were decreased. However, such an effect proved to be reversible, and when inhibition ceased, the previous rate of regeneration was recovered. When protease activity is inhibited at the first stage, regeneration is completely abolished, and the animals die, suggesting that early activation of the proteases is crucial for triggering the regenerative process in holothurians. The role of the detected proteases in the regeneration processes of holothurians is discussed. PMID:23505505

  5. Serological Analysis of Immunogenic Properties of Recombinant Meningococcus IgA1 Protease-Based Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kotelnikova, O V; Zinchenko, A A; Vikhrov, A A; Alliluev, A P; Serova, O V; Gordeeva, E A; Zhigis, L S; Zueva, V S; Razgulyaeva, O A; Melikhova, T D; Nokel, E A; Drozhzhina, E Yu; Rumsh, L D

    2016-07-01

    Using the genome sequence of IgA1 protease of N. meningitidis of serogroup B, four recombinant proteins of different structure and molecular weight were constructed. These proteins were equal in inducing the formation of specific antibodies to IgA1 protease and had protective properties against meningococci. In the sera of immunized mice, anti-IgA1 protease antibodies were detected by whole-cell ELISA, which indicated the presence of IgA1 protease on the surface of these bacteria. We hypothesized that the protective properties of IgA1 protease-based antigens and IgA1 protease analogs could be realized not only via impairment of bacterium adhesion to the mucosa, but also via suppression of this pathogen in the organism. The presented findings seem promising for using these proteins as the basis for anti-meningococcus vaccine.

  6. Proteases as therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Craik, Charles S.; Page, Michael J.; Madison, Edwin L.

    2015-01-01

    Proteases are an expanding class of drugs that hold great promise. The U.S. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) has approved 12 protease therapies, and a number of next generation or completely new proteases are in clinical development. Although they are a well-recognized class of targets for inhibitors, proteases themselves have not typically been considered as a drug class despite their application in the clinic over the last several decades; initially as plasma fractions and later as purified products. Although the predominant use of proteases has been in treating cardiovascular disease, they are also emerging as useful agents in the treatment of sepsis, digestive disorders, inflammation, cystic fibrosis, retinal disorders, psoriasis and other diseases. In the present review, we outline the history of proteases as therapeutics, provide an overview of their current clinical application, and describe several approaches to improve and expand their clinical application. Undoubtedly, our ability to harness proteolysis for disease treatment will increase with our understanding of protease biology and the molecular mechanisms responsible. New technologies for rationally engineering proteases, as well as improved delivery options, will expand greatly the potential applications of these enzymes. The recognition that proteases are, in fact, an established class of safe and efficacious drugs will stimulate investigation of additional therapeutic applications for these enzymes. Proteases therefore have a bright future as a distinct therapeutic class with diverse clinical applications. PMID:21406063

  7. Cysteine protease of the nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis preferentially evokes an IgE/IgG1 antibody response in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, I; Yamada, M; Uchikawa, R; Matsuda, S; Arizono, N

    1995-01-01

    Some cysteine proteases such as papain and those of mites and schistosomes have potent allergenic properties. To clarify the allergenicity of nematode cysteine proteases, the enzyme was purified from the intestinal nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis using cation exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. The purified protease, of 16 kD and pI 8.5, showed maximum enzyme activity at pH 5.5 and substrate preference for Z-Phe-Arg-MCA. The specific inhibitors of cysteine protease leupeptin, iodoacetic acid, and E-64, completely suppressed the activity, indicating that the purified enzyme belongs to the cysteine protease family. Cysteine protease activity was found not only in somatic extract, but also in the excretory-secretory (ES) product of the nematode. When anti-cysteine protease immunoglobulin isotypes were examined in sera from rats infected with N. brasiliensis, a high level of IgG1 and a lower level of IgE antibody were detected. Depletion of IgG antibodies from the sera using protein G affinity columns resulted in a marked increase in reactivity of anti-cysteine protease IgE with the antigen, possibly due to the removal of competing IgG antibodies. In contrast to IgE and IgG1, production of anti-cysteine protease IgG2a was negligible. These results indicate that the nematode cysteine protease preferentially evokes an IgE/IgG1 antibody response. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7554403

  8. Malarial proteases and host cell egress: an ‘emerging’ cascade

    PubMed Central

    Blackman, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Malaria is a scourge of large swathes of the globe, stressing the need for a continuing effort to better understand the biology of its aetiological agent. Like all pathogens of the phylum Apicomplexa, the malaria parasite spends part of its life inside a host cell or cyst. It eventually needs to escape (egress) from this protective environment to progress through its life cycle. Egress of Plasmodium blood-stage merozoites, liver-stage merozoites and mosquito midgut sporozoites relies on protease activity, so the enzymes involved have potential as antimalarial drug targets. This review examines the role of parasite proteases in egress, in the light of current knowledge of the mechanics of the process. Proteases implicated in egress include the cytoskeleton-degrading malarial proteases falcipain-2 and plasmepsin II, plus a family of putative papain-like proteases called SERA. Recent revelations have shown that activation of the SERA proteases may be triggered by regulated secretion of a subtilisin-like serine protease called SUB1. These findings are discussed in the context of the potential for development of new chemotherapeutics targeting this stage in the parasite's life cycle. PMID:18503638

  9. Fibrin(ogen)olytic activity of bumblebee venom serine protease

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Yuling; Choo, Young Moo; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Jia Jingming; Cui Zheng; Wang Dong; Kim, Doh Hoon; Sohn, Hung Dae; Jin, Byung Rae

    2011-09-01

    Bee venom is a rich source of pharmacologically active components; it has been used as an immunotherapy to treat bee venom hypersensitivity, and venom therapy has been applied as an alternative medicine. Here, we present evidence that the serine protease found in bumblebee venom exhibits fibrin(ogen)olytic activity. Compared to honeybee venom, bumblebee venom contains a higher content of serine protease, which is one of its major components. Venom serine proteases from bumblebees did not cross-react with antibodies against the honeybee venom serine protease. We provide functional evidence indicating that bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) acts as a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. Bt-VSP activates prothrombin and directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. However, Bt-VSP is not a plasminogen activator, and its fibrinolytic activity is less than that of plasmin. Taken together, our results define roles for Bt-VSP as a prothrombin activator, a thrombin-like protease, and a plasmin-like protease. These findings offer significant insight into the allergic reaction sequence that is initiated by bee venom serine protease and its potential usefulness as a clinical agent in the field of hemostasis and thrombosis. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > Bumblebee venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) is a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. > Bt-VSP activates prothrombin. > Bt-VSP directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. > Bt-VSP is a hemostatically active protein that is a potent clinical agent.

  10. Selection of multiple human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants that encode viral proteases with decreased sensitivity to an inhibitor of the viral protease.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, A H; Michael, S F; Wehbie, R S; Knigge, M F; Paul, D A; Everitt, L; Kempf, D J; Norbeck, D W; Erickson, J W; Swanstrom, R

    1994-01-01

    Inhibitors of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease represent a promising addition to the available agents used to inhibit virus replication in a therapeutic setting. HIV-1 is capable of generating phenotypic variants in the face of a variety of selective pressures. The potential to generate variants with reduced sensitivity to a protease inhibitor was examined by selecting for virus growth in cell culture in the presence of the protease inhibitor A-77003. Virus variants grew out in the presence of the inhibitor, and these variants encoded proteases with reduced sensitivity to the inhibitor. Variants were identified that encoded changes in each of the three subsites of the protease that interact with the inhibitor. HIV-1 displays significant potential for altering its interaction with this protease inhibitor, suggesting the need for multiple protease inhibitors with varying specificities. Images PMID:8202533

  11. Heterologous flavivirus infection-enhancing antibodies in sera of Nigerians.

    PubMed

    Fagbami, A; Halstead, S B; Marchette, N; Larsen, K

    1988-01-01

    Human sera collected from Nigerians were examined for plaque reduction neutralizing and infection-enhancing antibodies against dengue 2, yellow fever, and West Nile viruses. Neutralization tests showed that 17 of 19 sera contained flavivirus neutralizing antibody; 11 were positive to all 3 viruses, 5 to dengue and yellow fever, and 1 to dengue virus only. Two sera had no detectable neutralizing antibody to any of the flaviviruses. Enhancement assays showed that 17 flavivirus neutralizing antibody-positive sera contained infection-enhancing antibodies to dengue 2, and 16 had antibody to yellow fever. Although 11 sera were positive for West Nile neutralizing antibody, 17 enhanced this virus. Heterologous infection-enhancing antibody titers were lower than the homologous ones. Broadly reacting sera and those with high neutralizing antibody titers produced the highest infection-enhancing antibody titers.

  12. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense adaptation to different mammalian sera is associated with VSG expression site plasticity.

    PubMed

    Cordon-Obras, Carlos; Cano, Jorge; González-Pacanowska, Dolores; Benito, Agustin; Navarro, Miguel; Bart, Jean-Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infection is widely considered an anthroponosis, although it has also been found in wild and domestic animals. Thus, fauna could act as reservoir, constraining the elimination of the parasite in hypo-endemic foci. To better understand the possible maintenance of T. b. gambiense in local fauna and investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptation, we generated adapted cells lines (ACLs) by in vitro culture of the parasites in different mammalian sera. Using specific antibodies against the Variant Surface Glycoproteins (VSGs) we found that serum ACLs exhibited different VSG variants when maintained in pig, goat or human sera. Although newly detected VSGs were independent of the sera used, the consistent appearance of different VSGs suggested remodelling of the co-transcribed genes at the telomeric Expression Site (VSG-ES). Thus, Expression Site Associated Genes (ESAGs) sequences were analysed to investigate possible polymorphism selection. ESAGs 6 and 7 genotypes, encoding the transferrin receptor (TfR), expressed in different ACLs were characterised. In addition, we quantified the ESAG6/7 mRNA levels and analysed transferrin (Tf) uptake. Interestingly, the best growth occurred in pig and human serum ACLs, which consistently exhibited a predominant ESAG7 genotype and higher Tf uptake than those obtained in calf and goat sera. We also detected an apparent selection of specific ESAG3 genotypes in the pig and human serum ACLs, suggesting that other ESAGs could be involved in the host adaptation processes. Altogether, these results suggest a model whereby VSG-ES remodelling allows the parasite to express a specific set of ESAGs to provide selective advantages in different hosts. Finally, pig serum ACLs display phenotypic adaptation parameters closely related to human serum ACLs but distinct to parasites grown in calf and goat sera. These results suggest a better suitability of swine to maintain T. b. gambiense infection supporting

  13. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense adaptation to different mammalian sera is associated with VSG expression site plasticity.

    PubMed

    Cordon-Obras, Carlos; Cano, Jorge; González-Pacanowska, Dolores; Benito, Agustin; Navarro, Miguel; Bart, Jean-Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infection is widely considered an anthroponosis, although it has also been found in wild and domestic animals. Thus, fauna could act as reservoir, constraining the elimination of the parasite in hypo-endemic foci. To better understand the possible maintenance of T. b. gambiense in local fauna and investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptation, we generated adapted cells lines (ACLs) by in vitro culture of the parasites in different mammalian sera. Using specific antibodies against the Variant Surface Glycoproteins (VSGs) we found that serum ACLs exhibited different VSG variants when maintained in pig, goat or human sera. Although newly detected VSGs were independent of the sera used, the consistent appearance of different VSGs suggested remodelling of the co-transcribed genes at the telomeric Expression Site (VSG-ES). Thus, Expression Site Associated Genes (ESAGs) sequences were analysed to investigate possible polymorphism selection. ESAGs 6 and 7 genotypes, encoding the transferrin receptor (TfR), expressed in different ACLs were characterised. In addition, we quantified the ESAG6/7 mRNA levels and analysed transferrin (Tf) uptake. Interestingly, the best growth occurred in pig and human serum ACLs, which consistently exhibited a predominant ESAG7 genotype and higher Tf uptake than those obtained in calf and goat sera. We also detected an apparent selection of specific ESAG3 genotypes in the pig and human serum ACLs, suggesting that other ESAGs could be involved in the host adaptation processes. Altogether, these results suggest a model whereby VSG-ES remodelling allows the parasite to express a specific set of ESAGs to provide selective advantages in different hosts. Finally, pig serum ACLs display phenotypic adaptation parameters closely related to human serum ACLs but distinct to parasites grown in calf and goat sera. These results suggest a better suitability of swine to maintain T. b. gambiense infection supporting

  14. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Adaptation to Different Mammalian Sera Is Associated with VSG Expression Site Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Cordon-Obras, Carlos; Cano, Jorge; González-Pacanowska, Dolores; Benito, Agustin; Navarro, Miguel; Bart, Jean-Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infection is widely considered an anthroponosis, although it has also been found in wild and domestic animals. Thus, fauna could act as reservoir, constraining the elimination of the parasite in hypo-endemic foci. To better understand the possible maintenance of T. b. gambiense in local fauna and investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptation, we generated adapted cells lines (ACLs) by in vitro culture of the parasites in different mammalian sera. Using specific antibodies against the Variant Surface Glycoproteins (VSGs) we found that serum ACLs exhibited different VSG variants when maintained in pig, goat or human sera. Although newly detected VSGs were independent of the sera used, the consistent appearance of different VSGs suggested remodelling of the co-transcribed genes at the telomeric Expression Site (VSG-ES). Thus, Expression Site Associated Genes (ESAGs) sequences were analysed to investigate possible polymorphism selection. ESAGs 6 and 7 genotypes, encoding the transferrin receptor (TfR), expressed in different ACLs were characterised. In addition, we quantified the ESAG6/7 mRNA levels and analysed transferrin (Tf) uptake. Interestingly, the best growth occurred in pig and human serum ACLs, which consistently exhibited a predominant ESAG7 genotype and higher Tf uptake than those obtained in calf and goat sera. We also detected an apparent selection of specific ESAG3 genotypes in the pig and human serum ACLs, suggesting that other ESAGs could be involved in the host adaptation processes. Altogether, these results suggest a model whereby VSG-ES remodelling allows the parasite to express a specific set of ESAGs to provide selective advantages in different hosts. Finally, pig serum ACLs display phenotypic adaptation parameters closely related to human serum ACLs but distinct to parasites grown in calf and goat sera. These results suggest a better suitability of swine to maintain T. b. gambiense infection supporting

  15. Yeast Endoplasmic Reticulum Sequestration Screening for the Engineering of Proteases from Libraries Expressed in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Yi, Li; Taft, Joseph M; Li, Qing; Gebhard, Mark C; Georgiou, George; Iverson, Brent L

    2015-01-01

    There is significant interest in engineering proteases with desired proteolytic properties. We describe a high-throughput fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) assay for detecting altered proteolytic activity of protease in yeast, at the single cell level. This assay relies on coupling yeast endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention, yeast surface display, and FACS analysis. The method described here allows facile screening of large libraries, and of either protease or substrate variants, including the screening of protease libraries against substrate libraries. We demonstrate the application of this technique in the screening of libraries of Tobacco Etch Virus protease (TEV-P) for altered proteolytic activities. In addition, the generality of this method is also validated by other proteases such as human granzyme K and the hepatitis C virus protease, and the human Abelson tyrosine kinase. PMID:26060071

  16. Pneumococcal IgA1 protease subverts specific protection by human IgA1.

    PubMed

    Janoff, E N; Rubins, J B; Fasching, C; Charboneau, D; Rahkola, J T; Plaut, A G; Weiser, J N

    2014-03-01

    Bacterial immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) proteases may sabotage the protective effects of IgA. In vitro, both exogenous and endogenously produced IgA1 protease inhibited phagocytic killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae by capsule-specific IgA1 human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) but not IgA2. These IgA1 proteases cleaved and reduced binding of the the effector Fcα1 heavy chain but not the antigen-binding F(ab)/light chain to pneumococcal surfaces. In vivo, IgA1 protease-resistant IgA2, but not IgA1 protease-sensitive IgA1, supported 60% survival in mice infected with wild-type S. pneumoniae. IgA1 hMAbs protected mice against IgA1 protease-deficient but not -producing pneumococci. Parallel mouse sera with human IgA2 showed more efficient complement-mediated reductions in pneumococci with neutrophils than did IgA1, particularly with protease-producing organisms. After natural human pneumococcal bacteremia, purified serum IgG inhibited IgA1 protease activity in 7 of 11 patients (64%). These observations provide the first evidence in vivo that IgA1 protease can circumvent killing of S. pneumoniae by human IgA. Acquisition of IgA1 protease-neutralizing IgG after infection directs attention to IgA1 protease both as a determinant of successful colonization and infection and as a potential vaccine candidate.

  17. Genotype dependent QSAR for HIV-1 protease inhibition.

    PubMed

    Boutton, Carlo W; De Bondt, Hendrik L; De Jonge, Marc R

    2005-03-24

    The development of drug-resistant viruses limits the therapeutic success of anti-HIV therapies. Some of these genetic HIV-variants display complex mutational patterns in their pol gene that codes for protease and reverse transcriptase, the most investigated molecular targets for antiretroviral therapy. In this paper, we present a computational structure-based approach to predict the resistance of a HIV-1 protease strain to amprenavir by calculating the interaction energy of the drug with HIV-1 protease. By considering the interaction energy per residue, we can identify what residue mutations contribute to drug-resistance. This approach is presented here as a structure-based tool for the prediction of resistance of HIV-1 protease toward amprenavir, with a view to use the drug-protein interaction-energy pattern in a lead-optimization procedure for the discovery of new anti-HIV drugs. PMID:15771454

  18. Effects of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis sera on cultured cholinergic neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Touzeau, G.; Kato, A.C.

    1983-03-01

    Dissociated monolayer cultures of chick ciliary ganglion neurons have been used to study the effects of control and ALS sera. The cultured neurons survive and extend neurites for a minimum of 2 weeks in a standard tissue culture medium that contains 10% heat-inactivated human serum. Three parameters of the neurons have been examined when cultured in control and ALS sera for 8 to 12 days: (1) neuronal survival, (2) activity of the enzyme choline acetyltransferase, and (3) synthesis of /sup 3/H-acetylcholine using /sup 3/H-choline as precursor. ALS sera cause a small decrease in these three parameters, but this difference is not significant.

  19. The Lon AAA+ protease.

    PubMed

    Gur, Eyal

    2013-01-01

    As the first ATP-dependent protease to be identified, Lon holds a special place in the history of cellular biology. In fact, the concept of ATP-dependent protein degradation was established through the findings that led to the discovery of Lon. Therefore, this chapter begins with a historical perspective, describing the milestones that led to the discovery of Lon and ATP-dependent proteolysis, starting from the early findings in the 1960s until the demonstration of Lon's ATP-dependent proteolytic activity in vitro, in 1981. Most of our knowledge on Lon derives from studies of the Escherichia coli Lon ortholog, and, therefore, most of this chapter relates to this particular enzyme. Nonetheless, Lon is not only found in most bacterial species, it is also found in Archaea and in the mitochondrion and chloroplast of eukaryotic cells. Therefore many of the conclusions gained from studies on the E. coli enzyme are relevant to Lon proteases in other organisms. Lon, more than any other bacterial or organellar protease, is associated with the degradation of misfolded proteins and protein quality control. In addition, Lon also degrades many regulatory proteins that are natively folded, thus it also plays a prominent role in regulation of physiological processes. Throughout the years, many Lon substrates have been identified, confirming its role in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including cell division, DNA replication, differentiation, and adaptation to stress conditions. Some examples of these functions are described and discussed here, as is the role of Lon in the degradation of misfolded proteins and in protein quality control. Finally, this chapter deals with the exquisite sensitivity of protein degradation inside a cell. How can a protease distinguish so many substrates from cellular proteins that should not be degraded? Can the specificity of a protease be regulated according to the physiological needs of a cell? This chapter thus broadly discusses the

  20. Laundry performance of subtilisin proteases.

    PubMed

    Wolff, A M; Showell, M S; Venegas, M G; Barnett, B L; Wertz, W C

    1996-01-01

    Effective laundry protease performance against susceptible stains depends upon both the enzyme itself and the environment in which it must work. In order to technically design superior laundry proteases, a model for protease's mechanism of action in detergents was developed which has been substantiated through-the-wash. While evaluation of this model and/or a given protease's effectiveness could be judged by a variety of methods, the utility of using visual wash performance comparisons, analytical, and stain characterization studies is described. Finally, data comparing the performance of wild type Subtilisin proteases with mutants designed via the projected model are given, demonstrating possible utility of the system.

  1. SERA: Simulation Environment for Radiotherapy Applications - Users Manual Version 1CO

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, James Robert; Wessol, Daniel Edward; Wemple, Charles Alan; Wheeler, Floyd J; Harkin, G. J.; Frandsen, M. W.; Albright, C. L.; Cohen, M.T.; Rossmeier, M.; Cogliati, J.J.

    2002-06-01

    This document is the user manual for the Simulation Environment for Radiotherapy Applications (SERA) software program developed for boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) patient treatment planning by researchers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and students and faculty at Montana State University (MSU) Computer Science Department. This manual corresponds to the final release of the program, Version 1C0, developed to run under the RedHat Linux Operating System (version 7.2 or newer) or the Solaris™ Operating System (version 2.6 or newer). SERA is a suite of command line or interactively launched software modules, including graphical, geometric reconstruction, and execution interface modules for developing BNCT treatment plans. The program allows the user to develop geometric models of the patient as derived from Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) images, perform dose computation for these geometric models, and display the computed doses on overlays of the original images as three dimensional representations. This manual provides a guide to the practical use of SERA, but is not an exhaustive treatment of each feature of the code.

  2. Fc-rosette inhibition by hypocomplementaemic systemic lupus erythematosus sera.

    PubMed

    Morito, T; Tanimoto, K; Hashimoto, Y; Horiuchi, Y; Juji, T

    1975-10-01

    Human red cells sensitized with one of the Rh antisera (Ripley) form rosettes (Fc-rosette) with human B lymphocytes and the rosettes are well inhibited by aggregated human IgG. Since sera of hypocomplementaemic patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have frequently been reported to contain immune complexes, they were used for the inhibition of Fc-rosette formation in this study. The results of Fc-rosette inhibition rates of the sera were inversely correlated with the serum CH50 levels. When the sera were separated into top, middle, and bottom fractions by ultracentrifugation, the bottom fractions showed more effective inhititions than the others. Similarly, the strongest inhibition was found in the void volume of the serum separated by Sephadex G200 gel filtration. Reduction and alkylation of IgG resulted in the loss of reactivity with Fc receptor of B lymphocytes, and the rosette inhibiting activities of the SLE sera were markedly reduced after reduction and alkylation. Some of anti-HLA sera were inhibitory for the Fc-rosette formation, while the tested sera did not contain anti-HLA activity assessed by the microcytotoxicity test. These results indicated that circulating immune complexes contained in the sera inhibit the rosette formation, and that the Fc-rosette inhibition test is a simple and relatively sensitive method for the detection of circulating immune complexes. Antinuclear antibody activities of the sera were tested by the indirect immunofluorescent method; however, clear correlations were not obtained between Fc-rosette inhibition rates and staining patterns of antinuclear antibodies. On the other hand, the positive groups of LE-test exhibited slightly greater inhibition rates of the rosette than the negative groups.

  3. Anti-Trypanosoma brucei activity of nonprimate zoo sera.

    PubMed

    Black, S J; Wang, Q; Makadzange, T; Li, Y L; Van Praagh, A; Loomis, M; Seed, J R

    1999-02-01

    Constitutive anti-Trypanosoma brucei subsp. brucei S 427 clone 1 and 22 activities were evaluated in sera from 22 species of nonprimate mammals. The sera fell into 5 categories. Sera from Cape buffalo, giraffe, and greater kudu showed a concentration-dependent inhibition of replication of the 2 clones of organisms, which was dependent on the presence of xanthine oxidase. Sera from warthog and springbok also severely limited trypanosome replication but lacked xanthine oxidase. Their antitrypanosome activity was inactivated by heating at 56 C for 30 min but not affected by absorbing with trypanosomes at 4 C. Sera from lion and leopard showed a concentration-dependent inhibition of the growth of T. brucei S427 clone 1 organisms, but not clone 22 organisms. These sera lacked xanthine oxidase. Their anti-T. brucei S 427 clone 1 activity was inactivated by heating at 56 C for 30 min but not removed by absorbing with trypanosomes. Serum from Grant's gazelle prevented replication of both T. brucei clones, lacked xanthine oxidase, and was not affected by heating at 56 C. Sera from waterbuck, Thompson's gazelle, sitatunga, Cape hartebeeste, gerenuk, Grant's zebra, cow, several cat, cougar, bobcat, and domestic cat were fully supportive of trypanosome replication irrespective of concentration tested up to a maximum of 48% v/v in culture medium. Sera from different individuals of the same mammal species had similar effects on trypanosomes, and samples collected from the same individual at different times also had similar activities indicating species-specific stable expression, or lack thereof, of constitutive serum antitrypanosome components.

  4. Fortified sera and their use in environmental virology.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, J L; Margolin, A B

    2000-05-01

    Four commercially available fortified sera were compared to fetal bovine serum (FBS) with regard to their ability to maintain or increase the sensitivity of the Buffalo green monkey (BGM) kidney cell line to viral infection. Nine virus strains and five wastewater samples were used. Fortified sera were comparable to FBS for the enumeration of some viruses by the plaque method and for the detection of virus in wastewater by the most-probable-number assay.

  5. From proteases to proteomics.

    PubMed

    Neurath, H

    2001-04-01

    This personal and professional autobiography covers the 50-yr period of 1950-2000 and includes the following topics: History of the University of Washington School of Medicine and its Department of Biochemistry (Mount Rainier and the University of Washington, recruiting faculty, biology, research programs); scientific editing (publication, Biochemistry, Protein Science, electronic publication); Europe revisited (Heidelberg, approaching retirement, the German Research Center, reunion in Vienna); and 50 yr of research on proteolytic enzymes (trypsin, carboxypeptidases, mast cell proteases, future developments).

  6. From proteases to proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Neurath, Hans

    2001-01-01

    This personal and professional autobiography covers the 50-yr period of 1950–2000 and includes the following topics: History of the University of Washington School of Medicine and its Department of Biochemistry (Mount Rainier and the University of Washington, recruiting faculty, biology, research programs); scientific editing (publication, Biochemistry, Protein Science, electronic publication); Europe revisited (Heidelberg, approaching retirement, the German Research Center, reunion in Vienna); and 50 yr of research on proteolytic enzymes (trypsin, carboxypeptidases, mast cell proteases, future developments). PMID:11274481

  7. Protease signalling: the cutting edge

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Boris; Turk, Dus̆an; Turk, Vito

    2012-01-01

    Protease research has undergone a major expansion in the last decade, largely due to the extremely rapid development of new technologies, such as quantitative proteomics and in-vivo imaging, as well as an extensive use of in-vivo models. These have led to identification of physiological substrates and resulted in a paradigm shift from the concept of proteases as protein-degrading enzymes to proteases as key signalling molecules. However, we are still at the beginning of an understanding of protease signalling pathways. We have only identified a minor subset of true physiological substrates for a limited number of proteases, and their physiological regulation is still not well understood. Similarly, links with other signalling systems are not well established. Herein, we will highlight current challenges in protease research. PMID:22367392

  8. Non-specific inhibitors of influenza viruses in normal sera

    PubMed Central

    Ananthanarayan, R.; Paniker, C. K. Jayaram

    1960-01-01

    The presence of non-specific inhibitors in immune influenza sera may falsify the antibody pattern as shown by the haemagglutination-inhibition test, and it is consequently often necessary to pre-treat sera in order to inactivate these inhibitors. A number of different methods are in use for this purpose. It was therefore thought useful to compare the efficacy of the various methods with different representative influenza strains and normal sera from eight animal species and acute-phase human sera. Tests were carried out with simple heating at 56°C, the use of receptor-destroying enzyme, the use of potassium periodate, and two methods involving the use of trypsin. No one technique was found to be universally applicable for all types of serum against all strains, and further testing with larger numbers of sera is advocated. It is felt that a combination of potassium periodate and trypsin with a change in concentration and times of action may be found advantageous. PMID:13793260

  9. Non-specific inhibitors of influenza viruses in normal sera.

    PubMed

    ANANTHANARAYAN, R; PANIKER, C K

    1960-01-01

    The presence of non-specific inhibitors in immune influenza sera may falsify the antibody pattern as shown by the haemagglutination-inhibition test, and it is consequently often necessary to pre-treat sera in order to inactivate these inhibitors. A number of different methods are in use for this purpose. It was therefore thought useful to compare the efficacy of the various methods with different representative influenza strains and normal sera from eight animal species and acute-phase human sera. Tests were carried out with simple heating at 56 degrees C, the use of receptor-destroying enzyme, the use of potassium periodate, and two methods involving the use of trypsin. No one technique was found to be universally applicable for all types of serum against all strains, and further testing with larger numbers of sera is advocated. It is felt that a combination of potassium periodate and trypsin with a change in concentration and times of action may be found advantageous.

  10. Protease-mediated drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Eva F.; Goyan, Rebecca L.; Kennedy, James C.; Mackay, M.; Mendes, M. A. K.; Pottier, Roy H.

    2003-12-01

    Drugs used in disease treatment can cause damage to both malignant and normal tissue. This toxicity limits the maximum therapeutic dose. Drug targeting is of high interest to increase the therapeutic efficacy of the drug without increasing systemic toxicity. Certain tissue abnormalities, disease processes, cancers, and infections are characterized by high levels of activity of specific extracellular and/or intracellular proteases. Abnormally high activity levels of specific proteases are present at sites of physical or chemical trauma, blood clots, malignant tumors, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, gingival disease, glomerulonerphritis, and acute pancreatitis. Abnormal protease activity is suspected in development of liver thrombosis, pulmonary emphysema, atherosclerosis, and muscular dystrophy. Inactiviating disease-associated proteases by the administration of appropriate protease inhibitors has had limited success. Instead, one could use such proteases to target drugs to treat the condition. Protease mediated drug delivery offers such a possibility. Solubilizing groups are attached to insoluble drugs via a polypeptide chain which is specifically cleavable by certian proteases. When the solubilized drug enounters the protease, the solubilizing moieties are cleaved, and the drug precipitates at the disease location. Thus, a smaller systemic dosage could result in a therapeutic drug concentration at the treatment site with less systemic toxicity.

  11. Immunoglobulin A1 protease production by Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Male, C J

    1979-01-01

    Bacterial strains of Haemophilus species and Streptococcus pneumoniae were examined for synthesis of the enzyme immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) protease. Of 36 H. influenzae strains examined, 35 produced IgA1 protease; strains included all six capsular types, unencapsulated variants of types b and d, and untypable H. influenzae. Eight Haemophilus strains (non-H. influenzae) were studied, and two produced IgA1 protease. All 10 strains of S. pneumoniae produced IgA1 protease; these strains included 9 different capsular polysaccharide types and 1 untypable strain. Both IgA1 proteases cleaved myeloma IgA1 and secretory IgA but not myeloma IgA2, IgM, or IgG as determined by immunoelectrophoresis. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that both enzymes cleaved IgA1 myeloma sera, but not IgA2, into two fragments. The apparent molecular weight of the cleaved fragments was dependent both on the apparent molecular weight of the cleaved fragments was dependent both on the specific IgA1 protease assayed and the specific IgA1 substrate utilized. It is postulated that both carbohydrate variation between the IgA1 substrates studied and the ability of S. pneumoniae glycosidases to cleave carbohydrates from glycoprotein offer an explanation for the different fragment sizes observed. Images PMID:40880

  12. Analysis of Cl and Na in Hyperimmune Sera by NAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, T. S.; Zamboni, C. B.; Marcelino, J. R.

    2011-08-01

    The Cl and Na concentration values in four types of hyperimmune sera (anti-Bothrops, anti-Diphtheria, anti-Rabies and anti-Tetanus) used for immunological therapy were determined using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). These data were compatible with the specifications established by the Word Health Organization (WHO-OMS) and with the Brazilian Official Pharmacopea (Pharmaceutical Code Official of the Country). These data are an important support for quality control of hyperimmune sera production at Butantan Institute (São Paulo city, Brazil), responsible for supplying the Brazilian market.

  13. Protease degradable electrospun fibrous hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Ryan J.; Bassin, Ethan J.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Electrospun nanofibers are promising in biomedical applications to replicate features of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). However, nearly all electrospun scaffolds are either non-degradable or degrade hydrolytically, whereas natural ECM degrades proteolytically, often through matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Here, we synthesize reactive macromers that contain protease-cleavable and fluorescent peptides and are able to form both isotropic hydrogels and electrospun fibrous hydrogels through a photoinitiated polymerization. These biomimetic scaffolds are susceptible to protease-mediated cleavage in vitro in a protease dose dependent manner and in vivo in a subcutaneous mouse model using transdermal fluorescent imaging to monitor degradation. Importantly, materials containing an alternate and non-protease-cleavable peptide sequence are stable in both in vitro and in vivo settings. To illustrate the specificity in degradation, scaffolds with mixed fiber populations support selective fiber degradation based on individual fiber degradability. Overall, this represents a novel biomimetic approach to generate protease-sensitive fibrous scaffolds for biomedical applications. PMID:25799370

  14. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  15. MALT1 Protease Activity Is Required for Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jong W.; Hoffman, Sandy; Beal, Allison M.; Dykon, Angela; Ringenberg, Michael A.; Hughes, Anna C.; Dare, Lauren; Anderson, Amber D.; Finger, Joshua; Kasparcova, Viera; Rickard, David; Berger, Scott B.; Ramanjulu, Joshi; Emery, John G.; Gough, Peter J.; Bertin, John; Foley, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    CARMA-BCL10-MALT1 signalosomes play important roles in antigen receptor signaling and other pathways. Previous studies have suggested that as part of this complex, MALT1 functions as both a scaffolding protein to activate NF-κB through recruitment of ubiquitin ligases, and as a protease to cleave and inactivate downstream inhibitory signaling proteins. However, our understanding of the relative importance of these two distinct MALT1 activities has been hampered by a lack of selective MALT1 protease inhibitors with suitable pharmacologic properties. To fully investigate the role of MALT1 protease activity, we generated mice homozygous for a protease-dead mutation in MALT1. We found that some, but not all, MALT1 functions in immune cells were dependent upon its protease activity. Protease-dead mice had defects in the generation of splenic marginal zone and peritoneal B1 B cells. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells displayed decreased T cell receptor-stimulated proliferation and IL-2 production while B cell receptor-stimulated proliferation was partially dependent on protease activity. In dendritic cells, stimulation of cytokine production through the Dectin-1, Dectin-2, and Mincle C-type lectin receptors was also found to be partially dependent upon protease activity. In vivo, protease-dead mice had reduced basal immunoglobulin levels, and showed defective responses to immunization with T-dependent and T-independent antigens. Surprisingly, despite these decreased responses, MALT1 protease-dead mice, but not MALT1 null mice, developed mixed inflammatory cell infiltrates in multiple organs, suggesting MALT1 protease activity plays a role in immune homeostasis. These findings highlight the importance of MALT1 protease activity in multiple immune cell types, and in integrating immune responses in vivo. PMID:25965667

  16. Autoantibodies against neuronal progenitors in sera from children with autism.

    PubMed

    Mazur-Kolecka, Bozena; Cohen, Ira L; Gonzalez, Maripaz; Jenkins, Edmund C; Kaczmarski, Wojciech; Brown, W Ted; Flory, Michael; Frackowiak, Janusz

    2014-04-01

    The pathological role of autoantibodies in development of CNS disorders is a new idea with growing interest among neuroscientists. The involvement of autoimmune response in the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has been suggested by the presence of multiple brain-specific autoantibodies in children with ASD and in their mothers. The possibility of the effect of autoimmunity on neurogenesis and postnatal brain plasticity has not been determined. The presence of autoantibodies against human neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) stimulated for neuronal differentiation in culture was tested in sera from children with autism (n=20) and age-matched controls (n=18) by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Immunoreactivity against multiple NPCs proteins of molecular sizes of approximately 55 kDa, 105 kDa, 150 kDa, and 210 kDa in sera from individuals with autism had a higher incidence and was stronger than in control sera which immunoreacted mainly with a 150 kDa protein. The sera from children with autism immunoreacted the strongest with NPCs expressing neuronal markers Tuj1 and doublecortin, but not astrocyte marker GFAP. The epitopes recognized by antibodies from sera were not human-specific because they detected also NPCs in situ in murine hippocampus. The autoimmune reactions against NPCs suggest an impaired tolerance to neural antigens in autism. These autoantibodies may be symptomatic for autism and furthermore, their presence suggests that autoimmunity may affect postnatal neuronal plasticity particularly after impairment of blood-brain barrier. Future studies will determine the diagnostic value of the presence of autoantibodies in autism and the therapeutic value of prevention of autoimmunity in autism. PMID:23838310

  17. Serine proteases of parasitic helminths.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Wen, Yun jun; Cai, Ya Nan; Vallée, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal; Liu, Ming Yuan; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2015-02-01

    Serine proteases form one of the most important families of enzymes and perform significant functions in a broad range of biological processes, such as intra- and extracellular protein metabolism, digestion, blood coagulation, regulation of development, and fertilization. A number of serine proteases have been identified in parasitic helminths that have putative roles in parasite development and nutrition, host tissues and cell invasion, anticoagulation, and immune evasion. In this review, we described the serine proteases that have been identified in parasitic helminths, including nematodes (Trichinella spiralis, T. pseudospiralis, Trichuris muris, Anisakis simplex, Ascaris suum, Onchocerca volvulus, O. lienalis, Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum, and Steinernema carpocapsae), cestodes (Spirometra mansoni, Echinococcus granulosus, and Schistocephalus solidus), and trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, and Schistosoma mansoni). Moreover, the possible biological functions of these serine proteases in the endogenous biological phenomena of these parasites and in the host-parasite interaction were also discussed. PMID:25748703

  18. Serine Proteases of Parasitic Helminths

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Wen, Yun jun; Cai, Ya Nan; Vallée, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal; Liu, Ming Yuan; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2015-01-01

    Serine proteases form one of the most important families of enzymes and perform significant functions in a broad range of biological processes, such as intra- and extracellular protein metabolism, digestion, blood coagulation, regulation of development, and fertilization. A number of serine proteases have been identified in parasitic helminths that have putative roles in parasite development and nutrition, host tissues and cell invasion, anticoagulation, and immune evasion. In this review, we described the serine proteases that have been identified in parasitic helminths, including nematodes (Trichinella spiralis, T. pseudospiralis, Trichuris muris, Anisakis simplex, Ascaris suum, Onchocerca volvulus, O. lienalis, Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum, and Steinernema carpocapsae), cestodes (Spirometra mansoni, Echinococcus granulosus, and Schistocephalus solidus), and trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, and Schistosoma mansoni). Moreover, the possible biological functions of these serine proteases in the endogenous biological phenomena of these parasites and in the host-parasite interaction were also discussed. PMID:25748703

  19. Determination of immune complexes in sera from dogs with various diseases by mastocytoma cell assay.

    PubMed Central

    Targowski, S

    1982-01-01

    Canine immunoglobulin G complexed with particulate or soluble antigen can bind to the Fc receptors on the mastocytoma cells. Attachment of immune complexes composed of immunoglobulin G and soluble antigen (ovalbumin) to mastocytoma cells was detected by an inhibition of rosette formation with indicator cells (sensitized sheep erythrocytes). Therefore, canine circulating immune complexes may also attach to mastocytoma cells and inhibit rosette formation (mastocytoma cell assay). Sera from 326 dogs with various diseases and from 50 clinically normal dogs were assayed for immune complexes. The incidence of immune complexes in sera from normal dogs was 6% as compared with 25% in dogs with various diseases. The immune complexes were demonstrated in 37% of sera from dogs with various neoplastic diseases, 40% of sera from dogs with diabetes, 24% of sera from dogs with hypothyroidism, 50% of sera from dogs with mycotic disease, 75% of sera from dogs with arthritis, 38% of sera from dogs with kidney disorders, 40% of sera from dogs with neurological diseases, 45% of sera from dogs with various parasitic diseases, and 27% of sera from dogs with liver disorders. Only 19% of sera from dogs admitted to the hospital for various surgeries gave positive results. The incidence of the positive sera from dogs with various diseases is discussed in regard to their counterparts of human diseases. PMID:6226676

  20. [On the effect of immune and normal sera on catalase].

    PubMed

    Shataeva, L K; Zaikina, N A

    1975-01-01

    Effect of specific immune and normal sera on catalase was studied. The sera activated the enzyme, partially protected catalase against UV-irradiation and heating and also against the effect of inhibitors. Antibodies against catalase were observed in the fraction of 7 S gamma-globulins of immune serum. In studies of heat denaturation of catalase the stabilizing effect of immune serum was more distinct than the influence of normal serum and its protein fractions. In presence of serum protein fractions there was a correlation between the enthalpy of heat denaturation of catalase and decrease in specificity of the protein, in respect to the enxyme, associated with it in a complex. Alterations in enthropy compensated completely the decrease in enthalpy. PMID:1210104

  1. Comparative genomics of mycobacterial proteases.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Guimarães, Michelle Lopes; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal

    2007-01-01

    Although proteases are recognized as important virulent factors in pathogenic microorganisms, little information is available so far regarding the potential role of these enzymes in diseases caused by mycobacteria. Here we use bioinformatic tools to compare the protease-coding genes present in the genome of Mycobacterium leprae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis. This analysis allowed a review of the nomenclature of the protease family present in mycobacteria. A special attention was devoted to the 'decaying genome' of M. leprae where a relatively high level of conservation of protease-coding genes was observed when compared to other genes families. A total of 39 genes out of the 49 found in M. bovis were identified in M. leprae. Of relevance, a core of well-conserved 38 protease genes shared by the four species was defined. This set of proteases is probably essential for survival in the host and disease outcome and may constitute novel targets for drug development leading to a more effective control of mycobacterial diseases.

  2. Crystal Structure of a Novel Viral Protease with a Serine/Lysine Catalytic Dyad Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman,A.; Lee, J.; Delmas, B.; Paetzel, M.

    2006-01-01

    The blotched snakehead virus (BSNV), an aquatic birnavirus, encodes a polyprotein (NH2-pVP2-X-VP4-VP3-COOH) that is processed through the proteolytic activity of its own protease (VP4) to liberate itself and the viral proteins pVP2, X and VP3. The protein pVP2 is further processed by VP4 to give rise to the capsid protein VP2 and four structural peptides. We report here the crystal structure of a VP4 protease from BSNV, which displays a catalytic serine/lysine dyad in its active site. This is the first crystal structure of a birnavirus protease and the first crystal structure of a viral protease that utilizes a lysine general base in its catalytic mechanism. The topology of the VP4 substrate binding site is consistent with the enzymes substrate specificity and a nucleophilic attack from the si-face of the substrates scissile bond. Despite low levels of sequence identity, VP4 shows similarities in its active site to other characterized Ser/Lys proteases such as signal peptidase, LexA protease and Lon protease. Together, the structure of VP4 provides insights into the mechanism of a recently characterized clan of serine proteases that utilize a lysine general base and reveals the structure of potential targets for antiviral therapy, especially for other related and economically important viruses, such as infectious bursal disease virus in poultry and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus in aquaculture.

  3. Use of sera from humans and dolphins with lacaziosis and sera from experimentally infected mice for Western Blot analyses of Lacazia loboi antigens.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Leonel; Belone, Andréa F F; Vilela, Raquel; Rehtanz, Manuela; Bossart, Gregory D; Reif, John S; Fair, Patricia A; Durden, Wendy N; St Leger, Judy; Travassos, Luiz R; Rosa, Patricia S

    2008-01-01

    Antibodies in the sera of patients with lacaziosis recognized an approximately 193-kDa antigen and other Lacazia loboi antigens. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis gp43 antigen was detected by all evaluated sera, but they failed to detect a protein with the same molecular mass in L. loboi extracts. This study is the first to examine the humoral response to L. loboi antigens by using multiple host sera.

  4. Peptidomimetic inhibitors of HIV protease.

    PubMed

    Randolph, John T; DeGoey, David A

    2004-01-01

    There are currently (July, 2002) six protease inhibitors approved for the treatment of HIV infection, each of which can be classified as peptidomimetic in structure. These agents, when used in combination with other antiretroviral agents, produce a sustained decrease in viral load, often to levels below the limits of quantifiable detection, and a significant reconstitution of the immune system. Therapeutic regimens containing one or more HIV protease inhibitors thus provide a highly effective method for disease management. The important role of protease inhibitors in HIV therapy, combined with numerous challenges remaining in HIV treatment, have resulted in a continued effort both to optimize regimens using the existing agents and to identify new protease inhibitors that may provide unique properties. This review will provide an overview of the discovery and clinical trials of the currently approved HIV protease inhibitors, followed by an examination of important aspects of therapy, such as pharmacokinetic enhancement, resistance and side effects. A description of new peptidomimetic compounds currently being investigated in the clinic and in preclinical discovery will follow. PMID:15193140

  5. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted. PMID:27048482

  6. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted.

  7. Characterisation of novel fungal and bacterial protease preparations and evaluation of their ability to hydrolyse meat myofibrillar and connective tissue proteins.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Kate; Ha, Minh; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din; Carne, Alan

    2015-04-01

    The catalytic capability of four commercially available food-grade fungal and bacterial protease preparations (AFP, FPII, F60K and HT) was evaluated over a range of pH, temperature and substrate conditions using esterase and caseinolytic activity assays and time course hydrolysis over 120 and 60 min of myofibrillar and connective tissue proteins, respectively. The protease preparations displayed similar casein hydrolysis kinetics and were active in hydrolysing BODIPY-FL casein to varying extents at postmortem aging meat pH (5.0-6.0). All of the four proteases exhibited selective hydrolytic activity towards meat myofibrillar proteins including myosin and actin. Significant hydrolysis of two meat tenderisation protein markers troponin T and desmin by the four proteases was detected by western blot. The results obtained indicate that the new fungal protease preparations AFP and FPII, bacterial protease preparation HT and the new source of fungal protease preparation F60K have potential for use in meat tenderising applications.

  8. A Fragment-Based Method to Discover Irreversible Covalent Inhibitors of Cysteine Proteases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A novel fragment-based drug discovery approach is reported which irreversibly tethers drug-like fragments to catalytic cysteines. We attached an electrophile to 100 fragments without significant alterations in the reactivity of the electrophile. A mass spectrometry assay discovered three nonpeptidic inhibitors of the cysteine protease papain. The identified compounds display the characteristics of irreversible inhibitors. The irreversible tethering system also displays specificity: the three identified papain inhibitors did not covalently react with UbcH7, USP08, or GST-tagged human rhinovirus 3C protease. PMID:24870364

  9. Prevalence of mycoplasma antibodies in lesser prairie-chicken sera.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Christian A; Crupper, Scott S; Applegate, Roger D; Robel, Robert J

    2002-01-01

    Serologic testing by the serum plate agglutination (SPA) procedure was performed to detect the presence of cross-reacting antibodies to Mycoplasma meleagridis, Mycoplasma synoviae, and Mycoplasma gallisepticum in lesser prairie-chickens (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) trapped over a 2-yr period in Finney and Kearny counties of southwestern Kansas. Sera examined from birds (n = 50) obtained in March-April 2000 tested positive for M meleagridis, M. synoviae, and M. gallisepticum at levels of 6%, 10%, and 10%, respectively, for the population examined. Mycoplasma meleagridis antibodies were detected in 3 samples (2.7%), M. synoviae antibodies in 2 samples (1.7%), and M. gallisepticum antibodies in 3 samples (2.7%) from birds (n = 112) collected in March-April 2001. Data obtained by SPA can result in false positives and should be verified by additional procedures such as the hemagglutination-inhibition test. Low amounts of sera prohibited this additional testing. Thus, the positive SPA results should be considered presumptive for the presence of Mycoplasma antibodies. Although Mycoplasma antibodies have been detected in wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) from Kingman and Butler counties in Kansas, this report is the first of possible mycoplasmosis in Finney and Kearny counties, Kansas. All birds testing positive by this procedure should be considered as potential carriers of Mycoplasma and should not be used in relocation efforts.

  10. Hydroxylated Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers in Paired Maternal and Cord Sera

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aimin; Park, June-Soo; Linderholm, Linda; Rhee, Alexandra; Petreas, Myrto; DeFranco, Emily A.; Dietrich, Kim N.; Ho, Shuk-mei

    2015-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were widely used as flame retardants in the past three decades. These compounds are lipophilic and easily cross the placenta from pregnant woman to fetus. It is not clear whether hydroxylated PBDEs (OH-PBDEs), with greater hydrophilicity, have different concentrations in maternal and cord serum samples. We analyzed PBDEs (BDE-28, -47, -99, -100, -153, -154, -209) and OH-PBDEs (6-OH-BDE-47, 5-OH-BDE-47, 4′-OH-BDE-49, 5′-OH-BDE-99) in 20 pairs of maternal and cord serum samples collected in Cincinnati, OH in 2011. The geometric mean concentration of ΣOH-BDEs (the sum of four OH-PBDEs) was 49.76 pg/ml in cord sera, higher than 32.84 pg/ml in maternal sera. Similarly, cord serum total BDEs had a higher geometric mean than maternal serum (45.51 vs. 32.07 ng/g lipid). Equal or higher levels of total OH-BDEs and total BDEs in cord serum were observed in 85% and 80% of the mother-neonate pairs, respectively. The study suggests fetuses might receive higher OH-PBDE and PBDE exposure than their mothers. PMID:23506475

  11. Changes of glycoprotein patterns in sera of humans under stress.

    PubMed

    Barisic, K; Lauc, G; Dumic, J; Pavlovic, M; Flogel, M

    1996-02-01

    Stress exhibits adverse effects on many vital processes in which glycoproteins play a significant role(e.g. cell-cell/matrix interactions, immune response, neoplastic growth, implantation, prenatal development), yet only scarce attention has been directed towards studying stress induced changes in glycoprotein patterns. Using SDS-electrophoresis, blotting and digoxigenin-labelled lectins (Sambucus nigra agglutinin, Galanthus nivalis agglutinin, Datura stramonium agglutinin, Maackia amurensis agglutinin and peanut (Arachis hypogaea) agglutinin),sera were analysed from 30 individuals chosen randomly from a severely stressed population of 309 male volunteers with no specific medical symptoms. Significant changes were found in glycoprotein pattern and content, compared with healthy controls of matching age and sex. Occasionally minor non-specific deviations from the reference values for several analytes (haemoglobin, glucose, bilirubin and alanine aminotransferase) were detected in the tested group, but glycoprotein GP4S (Mr = 45 000), detected by Datura stramonium agglutinin and Sambucus nigra agglutinin, appeared in 96.7% of samples of the stressed population. The same population also revealed an approximately 500-fold increase of GP37 in comparison with the control sera. These results suggest that stress, as a non-specific syndrome, induces specific biochemical changes, which could be of diagnostic relevance as risk makers before any more serious symptoms of stress-related consequences have developed.

  12. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  13. Proteases in Fas-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhivotovsky, B; Burgess, D H; Schlegel, J; Pörn, M I; Vanags, D; Orrenius, S

    1997-01-01

    Involvement of a unique family of cysteine proteases in the multistep apoptotic process has been documented. Cloning of several mammalian genes identifies some components of this cellular response. However, it is currently unclear which protease plays a role as a signal and/or effector of apoptosis. We summarize contributions to the data concerning proteases in Fas-mediated apoptosis.

  14. Identification of immunoreactive proteins of Chlamydia trachomatis by Western blot analysis of a two-dimensional electrophoresis map with patient sera.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Campillo, M; Bini, L; Comanducci, M; Raggiaschi, R; Marzocchi, B; Pallini, V; Ratti, G

    1999-08-01

    Western blots of two-dimensional electrophoretic maps of proteins from Chlamydia trachomatis were probed with sera from 17 seropositive patients with genital inflammatory disease. Immunoblot patterns (comprising 28 to 2 spots, average 14.8) were different for each patient; however, antibodies against a spot-cluster due to the chlamydia-specific antigen outer membrane protein-2 (OMP2) were observed in all sera. The next most frequent group of antibodies (15/17; 88%) recognized the hsp60 GroEL-like protein, described as immunopathogenic in chlamydial infections. Reactivity to the major surface-exposed and variable antigen major outer membrane protein (MOMP) was observed at a relatively lower frequency (13/17; 76%). The hsp70 DnaK-like protein was also frequently recognized (11/17; 64.7%) in this patient group. Besides the above confirmatory findings, the study detected several new immunoreactive proteins, with frequencies ranging from 11/17 to 1/17. Some were characterized also by N-terminal amino acid sequencing and homology searches. Amongst these were a novel outer membrane protein (OmpB) and, interestingly, five conserved bacterial proteins: four (23%) sera reacted with the RNA polymerase alpha-subunit, five (29%) recognized the ribosomal protein S1, eight (47%) the protein elongation factor EF-Tu, seven (41%) a putative stress-induced protease of the HtrA family, and seven sera (41%) the ribosomal protein L7/L12. Homologs of the last two proteins were shown to confer protective immunity in other bacterial infections. The data show that immunological sensitization processes commonly thought to play a role in chlamydial pathogenicity may be sustained not only by the hsp60 GroEl-like protein, but also by other conserved bacterial antigens, some of which may be also considered as potential vaccine candidates. PMID:10493131

  15. Display formats manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runnels, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The standards and procedures for the generation of operational display formats to be used in the Mission Control Center (MCC) display control system are presented. The required effort, forms, and fundamentals for the design, specifications, and production of display formats are identified. The principles of display design and system constraints controlling the creation of optimum operational displays for mission control are explained. The basic two types of MCC display systems for presenting information are described.

  16. Exogenous proteases for meat tenderization.

    PubMed

    Bekhit, Alaa A; Hopkins, David L; Geesink, Geert; Bekhit, Adnan A; Franks, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The use of exogenous proteases to improve meat tenderness has attracted much interest recently, with a view to consistent production of tender meat and added value to lower grade meat cuts. This review discusses the sources, characteristics, and use of exogenous proteases in meat tenderization to highlight the specificity of the proteases toward meat proteins and their impact on meat quality. Plant enzymes (such as papain, bromelain, and ficin) have been extensively investigated as meat tenderizers. New plant proteases (actinidin and zingibain) and microbial enzyme preparations have been of recent interest due to controlled meat tenderization and other advantages. Successful use of these enzymes in fresh meat requires their enzymatic kinetics and characteristics to be determined, together with an understanding of the impact of the surrounding environmental conditions of the meat (pH, temperature) on enzyme function. This enables the optimal conditions for tenderizing fresh meat to be established, and the elimination or reduction of any negative impacts on other quality attributes. PMID:24499119

  17. Purification and characterization of a protease from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1, an antigen common to all the serotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Negrete-Abascal, E; Tenorio, V R; Guerrero, A L; García, R M; Reyes, M E; de la Garza, M

    1998-01-01

    A high molecular-mass proteolytic enzyme of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1, was purified from culture supernatants (CSN) by using DEAE-cellulose and sepharose-4B-gelatin chromatography. In 10% SDS-polyacrylamide gels copolymerized with porcine gelatin, the protease showed a single band of activity of > 200 kDa. However, minor molecular-mass proteolytic bands were observed when the protease was electrophoresed in the presence of either 5% beta-mercaptoethanol, 50 mM dithiothreitol, or 0.25 M urea. Furthermore, when the > 200-kDa purified protein was passed through a sucrose gradient, several bands with proteolytic activity were found: 62, 90, 190, and 540 kDa. The proteolytic activity was increased in the presence of calcium or zinc and was not affected after being heated at 90 degrees C for 5 min. Proteolytic activities were also observed in CSN from all A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes and biotypes. The purified protease hydrolyzed porcine IgA and IgG in vitro. In addition, by immunoblot the protease was recognized by serum of naturally infected pigs with serotypes 1 and 5, and by serum of pigs experimentally infected with serotypes 1, 2, 8, or 9. Serum of a pig vaccinated with CSN of a serotype 3 strain also recognized the protease, but not sera of pigs vaccinated with a bacterin (serotype 1). Proteins from CSN of all the serotypes, which were precipitated with 70% (NH4)2SO4, were recognized by a polyclonal antibody raised against the purified protease. Taken together these results indicate that an antigenic protease is produced in vivo by all the serotypes of A. pleuropneumoniae. The results indicate that proteases could have a role in the disease and in the immune response of pigs infected with A. pleuropneumoniae. Images Figure 2A. Figure 2B. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5A. Figure 5B. Figure 6A. Figure 6B. PMID:9684047

  18. Antibody Phage Display Libraries: Contributions to Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Dantas-Barbosa, Carmela; de Macedo Brigido, Marcelo; Maranhao, Andrea Queiroz

    2012-01-01

    Since the advent of phage display technology, dating back to 1985, antibody libraries displayed on filamentous phage surfaces have been used to identify specific binders for many different purposes, including the recognition of tumors. Phage display represents a high-throughput technique for screening billions of random fusion antibodies against virtually any target on the surface or inside cancer cells, or even soluble markers found in patient serum. Many phage display derived binders targeting important tumor markers have been identified. Selection directed to tumoral cells’ surfaces lead to the identification of unknown tumoral markers. Also the improvement of methods that require smaller amounts of cells has opened the possibility to use this approach on patient samples. Robust techniques combining an antibody library displayed on the phage surface and protein microarray allowed the identification of auto antibodies recognized by patient sera. Many Ab molecules directly or indirectly targeting angiogenesis have been identified, and one of them, ramucirumab, has been tested in 27 phase I–III clinical trials in a broad array of cancers. Examples of such antibodies will be discussed here with emphasis on those used as probes for molecular imaging and other clinical trials. PMID:22754305

  19. Network Analyses Reveal Pervasive Functional Regulation Between Proteases in the Human Protease Web

    PubMed Central

    Fortelny, Nikolaus; Cox, Jennifer H.; Kappelhoff, Reinhild; Starr, Amanda E.; Lange, Philipp F.; Pavlidis, Paul; Overall, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Proteolytic processing is an irreversible posttranslational modification affecting a large portion of the proteome. Protease-cleaved mediators frequently exhibit altered activity, and biological pathways are often regulated by proteolytic processing. Many of these mechanisms have not been appreciated as being protease-dependent, and the potential in unraveling a complex new dimension of biological control is increasingly recognized. Proteases are currently believed to act individually or in isolated cascades. However, conclusive but scattered biochemical evidence indicates broader regulation of proteases by protease and inhibitor interactions. Therefore, to systematically study such interactions, we assembled curated protease cleavage and inhibition data into a global, computational representation, termed the protease web. This revealed that proteases pervasively influence the activity of other proteases directly or by cleaving intermediate proteases or protease inhibitors. The protease web spans four classes of proteases and inhibitors and so links both recently and classically described protease groups and cascades, which can no longer be viewed as operating in isolation in vivo. We demonstrated that this observation, termed reachability, is robust to alterations in the data and will only increase in the future as additional data are added. We further show how subnetworks of the web are operational in 23 different tissues reflecting different phenotypes. We applied our network to develop novel insights into biologically relevant protease interactions using cell-specific proteases of the polymorphonuclear leukocyte as a system. Predictions from the protease web on the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 8 (MMP8) and neutrophil elastase being linked by an inactivating cleavage of serpinA1 by MMP8 were validated and explain perplexing Mmp8 −/− versus wild-type polymorphonuclear chemokine cleavages in vivo. Our findings supply systematically derived and

  20. Biotechnology of Cold-Active Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Swati; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2013-01-01

    The bulk of Earth’s biosphere is cold (<5 °C) and inhabited by psychrophiles. Biocatalysts from psychrophilic organisms (psychrozymes) have attracted attention because of their application in the ongoing efforts to decrease energy consumption. Proteinases as a class represent the largest category of industrial enzymes. There has been an emphasis on employing cold-active proteases in detergents because this allows laundry operations at ambient temperatures. Proteases have been used in environmental bioremediation, food industry and molecular biology. In view of the present limited understanding and availability of cold-active proteases with diverse characteristics, it is essential to explore Earth’s surface more in search of an ideal cold-active protease. The understanding of molecular and mechanistic details of these proteases will open up new avenues to tailor proteases with the desired properties. A detailed account of the developments in the production and applications of cold-active proteases is presented in this review. PMID:24832807

  1. Anti-collagen antibodies in sera from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Beard, H K; Ryvar, R; Skingle, J; Greenbury, C L

    1980-01-01

    Anti-cartilage antibodies, demonstrable by immunofluorescence, were found in 3.3% of rheumatoid arthritis patients. In most of these patients antibodies to type II collagen were detected. In specificity studies on these anti-collagen antibodies, they appeared to be type specific, showing no reaction with collagen types I and III. Denatured type II collagen reacted much less well than native type II, but isolated peptides from different regions of the collagen molecule were differentiated by individual sera. Removal of the glycoside side chains from native type II collagen had no effect on its antigenicity. The findings suggest that these patients produce highly specific antibodies which react with the triple helix of type II collagen. PMID:6255015

  2. Anti-collagen antibodies in sera from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Beard, H K; Ryvar, R; Skingle, J; Greenbury, C L

    1980-11-01

    Anti-cartilage antibodies, demonstrable by immunofluorescence, were found in 3.3% of rheumatoid arthritis patients. In most of these patients antibodies to type II collagen were detected. In specificity studies on these anti-collagen antibodies, they appeared to be type specific, showing no reaction with collagen types I and III. Denatured type II collagen reacted much less well than native type II, but isolated peptides from different regions of the collagen molecule were differentiated by individual sera. Removal of the glycoside side chains from native type II collagen had no effect on its antigenicity. The findings suggest that these patients produce highly specific antibodies which react with the triple helix of type II collagen.

  3. Stability of human sera collected for clinical chemistry determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, F. M.

    1969-01-01

    Problems in collecting and shipping human sera for clinical chemical analyses affect their stability and require proper preservation methods. It is shown that glutamic pyruvate transaminase is very unstable and serum cannot be shipped unless the shipping time is carefully controlled and is less than two days under refrigeration. A limit of four days handling time and avoidance of light exposure are required in bilirubin testing of specimens. Addition of 11 mg of a 10 to 1 mixture of finely powdered sodium fluoride and thymol per ml of blood to preserve specimen stability en route to a central laboratory prevents glycolysis. A citrate buffer at pH 6.2 in serum to be tested for alkaline phosphatase lessens decline at room temperature.

  4. Electrochromic display device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, M. M.

    1984-07-01

    This invention relates to electrochromic devices. In one aspect it relates to electrically controllable display devices. In another aspect it relates to electrically tunable optical or light filters. In yet another aspect it relates to a chemical sensor device which employs a color changing film. There are many uses for electrically controllable display devices. A number of such devices have been in commercial use for some time. These display devices include liquid crystal displays, light emitting diode displays, plasma displays, and the like. Light emitting diode displays and plasma display panels both suffer from the fact that they are active. Light emissive devices which require substantial power for their operation, In addition, it is difficult to fabricate light emitting diode displays in a manner which renders them easily distinguishable under bright ambient illumination. Liquid crystal displays suffer from the disadvantage that they are operative only over a limited temperature range and have substantially no memory within the liquid crystal material.

  5. In Silico Screening on the Three-dimensional Model of the Plasmodium vivax SUB1 Protease Leads to the Validation of a Novel Anti-parasite Compound*

    PubMed Central

    Bouillon, Anthony; Giganti, David; Benedet, Christophe; Gorgette, Olivier; Pêtres, Stéphane; Crublet, Elodie; Girard-Blanc, Christine; Witkowski, Benoit; Ménard, Didier; Nilges, Michael; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Stoven, Véronique; Barale, Jean-Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Widespread drug resistance calls for the urgent development of new antimalarials that target novel steps in the life cycle of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. The essential subtilisin-like serine protease SUB1 of Plasmodium merozoites plays a dual role in egress from and invasion into host erythrocytes. It belongs to a new generation of attractive drug targets against which specific potent inhibitors are actively searched. We characterize here the P. vivax SUB1 enzyme and show that it displays a typical auto-processing pattern and apical localization in P. vivax merozoites. To search for small PvSUB1 inhibitors, we took advantage of the similarity of SUB1 with bacterial subtilisins and generated P. vivax SUB1 three-dimensional models. The structure-based virtual screening of a large commercial chemical compounds library identified 306 virtual best hits, of which 37 were experimentally confirmed inhibitors and 5 had Ki values of <50 μm for PvSUB1. Interestingly, they belong to different chemical families. The most promising competitive inhibitor of PvSUB1 (compound 2) was equally active on PfSUB1 and displayed anti-P. falciparum and Plasmodium berghei activity in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Compound 2 inhibited the endogenous PfSUB1 as illustrated by the inhibited maturation of its natural substrate PfSERA5 and inhibited parasite egress and subsequent erythrocyte invasion. These data indicate that the strategy of in silico screening of three-dimensional models to select for virtual inhibitors combined with stringent biological validation successfully identified several inhibitors of the PvSUB1 enzyme. The most promising hit proved to be a potent cross-inhibitor of PlasmodiumSUB1, laying the groundwork for the development of a globally active small compound antimalarial. PMID:23653352

  6. Intra-domain phage display (ID-PhD) of peptides and protein mini-domains censored from canonical pIII phage display

    PubMed Central

    Tjhung, Katrina F.; Deiss, Frédérique; Tran, Jessica; Chou, Ying; Derda, Ratmir

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe multivalent display of peptide and protein sequences typically censored from traditional N-terminal display on protein pIII of filamentous bacteriophage M13. Using site-directed mutagenesis of commercially available M13KE phage cloning vector, we introduced sites that permit efficient cloning using restriction enzymes between domains N1 and N2 of the pIII protein. As infectivity of phage is directly linked to the integrity of the connection between N1 and N2 domains, intra-domain phage display (ID-PhD) allows for simple quality control of the display and the natural variations in the displayed sequences. Additionally, direct linkage to phage propagation allows efficient monitoring of sequence cleavage, providing a convenient system for selection and evolution of protease-susceptible or protease-resistant sequences. As an example of the benefits of such an ID-PhD system, we displayed a negatively charged FLAG sequence, which is known to be post-translationally excised from pIII when displayed on the N-terminus, as well as positively charged sequences which suppress production of phage when displayed on the N-terminus. ID-PhD of FLAG exhibited sub-nanomolar apparent Kd suggesting multivalent nature of the display. A TEV-protease recognition sequence (TEVrs) co-expressed in tandem with FLAG, allowed us to demonstrate that 99.9997% of the phage displayed the FLAG-TEVrs tandem and can be recognized and cleaved by TEV-protease. The residual 0.0003% consisted of phage clones that have excised the insert from their genome. ID-PhD is also amenable to display of protein mini-domains, such as the 33-residue minimized Z-domain of protein A. We show that it is thus possible to use ID-PhD for multivalent display and selection of mini-domain proteins (Affibodies, scFv, etc.). PMID:25972845

  7. Intra-domain phage display (ID-PhD) of peptides and protein mini-domains censored from canonical pIII phage display.

    PubMed

    Tjhung, Katrina F; Deiss, Frédérique; Tran, Jessica; Chou, Ying; Derda, Ratmir

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe multivalent display of peptide and protein sequences typically censored from traditional N-terminal display on protein pIII of filamentous bacteriophage M13. Using site-directed mutagenesis of commercially available M13KE phage cloning vector, we introduced sites that permit efficient cloning using restriction enzymes between domains N1 and N2 of the pIII protein. As infectivity of phage is directly linked to the integrity of the connection between N1 and N2 domains, intra-domain phage display (ID-PhD) allows for simple quality control of the display and the natural variations in the displayed sequences. Additionally, direct linkage to phage propagation allows efficient monitoring of sequence cleavage, providing a convenient system for selection and evolution of protease-susceptible or protease-resistant sequences. As an example of the benefits of such an ID-PhD system, we displayed a negatively charged FLAG sequence, which is known to be post-translationally excised from pIII when displayed on the N-terminus, as well as positively charged sequences which suppress production of phage when displayed on the N-terminus. ID-PhD of FLAG exhibited sub-nanomolar apparent Kd suggesting multivalent nature of the display. A TEV-protease recognition sequence (TEVrs) co-expressed in tandem with FLAG, allowed us to demonstrate that 99.9997% of the phage displayed the FLAG-TEVrs tandem and can be recognized and cleaved by TEV-protease. The residual 0.0003% consisted of phage clones that have excised the insert from their genome. ID-PhD is also amenable to display of protein mini-domains, such as the 33-residue minimized Z-domain of protein A. We show that it is thus possible to use ID-PhD for multivalent display and selection of mini-domain proteins (Affibodies, scFv, etc.). PMID:25972845

  8. System status display information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, L. G.; Erickson, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    The system Status Display is an electronic display system which provides the flight crew with enhanced capabilities for monitoring and managing aircraft systems. Guidelines for the design of the electronic system displays were established. The technical approach involved the application of a system engineering approach to the design of candidate displays and the evaluation of a Hernative concepts by part-task simulation. The system engineering and selection of candidate displays are covered.

  9. Type II Transmembrane Serine Proteases*

    PubMed Central

    Bugge, Thomas H.; Antalis, Toni M.; Wu, Qingyu

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of genome and expressed sequence tag data bases at the turn of the millennium unveiled a new protease family named the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) in a Journal of Biological Chemistry minireview (Hooper, J. D., Clements, J. A., Quigley, J. P., and Antalis, T. M. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 857–860). Since then, the number of known TTSPs has more than doubled, and more importantly, our understanding of the physiological functions of individual TTSPs and their contribution to human disease has greatly increased. Progress has also been made in identifying molecular substrates and endogenous inhibitors. This minireview summarizes the current knowledge of the rapidly advancing TTSP field. PMID:19487698

  10. Isolation and characterization of two serine proteases from metagenomic libraries of the Gobi and Death Valley deserts.

    PubMed

    Neveu, Julie; Regeard, Christophe; DuBow, Michael S

    2011-08-01

    The screening of environmental DNA metagenome libraries for functional activities can provide an important source of new molecules and enzymes. In this study, we identified 17 potential protease-producing clones from two metagenomic libraries derived from samples of surface sand from the Gobi and Death Valley deserts. Two of the proteases, DV1 and M30, were purified and biochemically examined. These two proteases displayed a molecular mass of 41.5 kDa and 45.7 kDa, respectively, on SDS polyacrylamide gels. Alignments with known protease sequences showed less than 55% amino acid sequence identity. These two serine proteases appear to belong to the subtilisin (S8A) family and displayed several unique biochemical properties. Protease DV1 had an optimum pH of 8 and an optimal activity at 55°C, while protease M30 had an optimum pH >11 and optimal activity at 40°C. The properties of these enzymes make them potentially useful for biotechnological applications and again demonstrate that metagenomic approaches can be useful, especially when coupled with the study of novel environments such as deserts.

  11. Molecular Imaging of Proteases in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunan; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2010-01-01

    Proteases play important roles during tumor angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Various molecular imaging techniques have been employed for protease imaging: optical (both fluorescence and bioluminescence), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET). In this review, we will summarize the current status of imaging proteases in cancer with these techniques. Optical imaging of proteases, in particular with fluorescence, is the most intensively validated and many of the imaging probes are already commercially available. It is generally agreed that the use of activatable probes is the most accurate and appropriate means for measuring protease activity. Molecular imaging of proteases with other techniques (i.e. MRI, SPECT, and PET) has not been well-documented in the literature which certainly deserves much future effort. Optical imaging and molecular MRI of protease activity has very limited potential for clinical investigation. PET/SPECT imaging is suitable for clinical investigation; however the optimal probes for PET/SPECT imaging of proteases in cancer have yet to be developed. Successful development of protease imaging probes with optimal in vivo stability, tumor targeting efficacy, and desirable pharmacokinetics for clinical translation will eventually improve cancer patient management. Not limited to cancer, these protease-targeted imaging probes will also have broad applications in other diseases such as arthritis, atherosclerosis, and myocardial infarction. PMID:20234801

  12. A new chymotrypsin-like serine protease involved in dietary protein digestion in a primitive animal, Scorpio maurus: purification and biochemical characterization

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Most recent works on chymotrypsins have been focused on marine animals and insects. However, no study was reported in chelicerate. Results Scorpion chymotrypsin-like protease (SCP) was purified to homogeneity from delipidated hepatopancreases. The protease NH2-terminal sequence exhibited more than 60% monoacids identity with those of insect putative peptidases. The protease displayed no sequence homology with classical proteases. From this point of view, the protease recalls the case of the scorpion lipase which displayed no sequence homology with known lipases. The scorpion amylase purified and characterized by our time, has an amino-acids sequence similar to those of mammalian amylases. The enzyme was characterized with respect its biochemical properties: it was active on a chymotrypsin substrate and had an apparent molecular mass of 25 kDa, like the classically known chymotrypsins. The dependence of the SCP activity and stability on pH and temperature was similar to that of mammalian chymotrypsin proteases. However, the SCP displayed a lower specific activity and a boarder pH activity range (from 6 to 9). Conclusion lower animal have a less evaluated digestive organ: a hepatopancreas, whereas, higher ones possess individualized pancreas and liver. A new chymotrypsin-like protease was purified for the first time from the scorpion hepatopancreas. Its biochemical characterization showed new features as compared to classical chymotrypsin-higher-animals proteases. PMID:21777432

  13. Seamless tiled display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubin, Matthew B. (Inventor); Larson, Brent D. (Inventor); Kolosowsky, Aleksandra (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A modular and scalable seamless tiled display apparatus includes multiple display devices, a screen, and multiple lens assemblies. Each display device is subdivided into multiple sections, and each section is configured to display a sectional image. One of the lens assemblies is optically coupled to each of the sections of each of the display devices to project the sectional image displayed on that section onto the screen. The multiple lens assemblies are configured to merge the projected sectional images to form a single tiled image. The projected sectional images may be merged on the screen by magnifying and shifting the images in an appropriate manner. The magnification and shifting of these images eliminates any visual effect on the tiled display that may result from dead-band regions defined between each pair of adjacent sections on each display device, and due to gaps between multiple display devices.

  14. Diagnostic Efficacy of a Recombinant Cysteine Protease of Spirometra erinacei Larvae for Serodiagnosis of Sparganosis

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, S.M. Mazidur; Kim, Jae-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    The mature domain of a cysteine protease of Spirometra erinacei plerocercoid larva (i.e., sparganum) was expressed in Escherichia coli, and its value as an antigen for the serodiagnosis of sparganosis was investigated. The recombinant protein (rSepCp-1) has the molecular weight of 23.4 kDa, and strongly reacted with the sparganum positive human or mice sera but not with negative sera by immunoblotting. ELISA with rSepCp-1 protein or sparganum crude antigen (SeC) was evaluated for the serodiagnosis of sparganosis using patient's sera. The sensitivity and specificity of ELISA using rSepCp-1 protein were 95.0% (19/20) and 99.1% (111/112), respectively. In contrast, the sensitivity and specificity of ELISA with SeC were 100% (20/20) and 96.4% (108/112), respectively. Moreover, in experimentally infected mice, the sensitivity and specificity of both ELISA assays were 100% for the detection of anti-sparganum IgG. It is suggested that the rSepCp-1 protein-based ELISA could provide a highly sensitive and specific assay for the diagnosis of sparganosis. PMID:24623880

  15. Advances in protease engineering for laundry detergents.

    PubMed

    Vojcic, Ljubica; Pitzler, Christian; Körfer, Georgette; Jakob, Felix; Ronny Martinez; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2015-12-25

    Proteases are essential ingredients in modern laundry detergents. Over the past 30 years, subtilisin proteases employed in the laundry detergent industry have been engineered by directed evolution and rational design to tailor their properties towards industrial demands. This comprehensive review discusses recent success stories in subtilisin protease engineering. Advances in protease engineering for laundry detergents comprise simultaneous improvement of thermal resistance and activity at low temperatures, a rational strategy to modulate pH profiles, and a general hypothesis for how to increase promiscuous activity towards the production of peroxycarboxylic acids as mild bleaching agents. The three protease engineering campaigns presented provide in-depth analysis of protease properties and have identified principles that can be applied to improve or generate enzyme variants for industrial applications beyond laundry detergents.

  16. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  17. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  18. Crystal structures of Bacillus subtilis Lon protease.

    PubMed

    Duman, Ramona E; Löwe, Jan

    2010-08-27

    Lon ATP-dependent proteases are key components of the protein quality control systems of bacterial cells and eukaryotic organelles. Eubacterial Lon proteases contain an N-terminal domain, an ATPase domain, and a protease domain, all in one polypeptide chain. The N-terminal domain is thought to be involved in substrate recognition, the ATPase domain in substrate unfolding and translocation into the protease chamber, and the protease domain in the hydrolysis of polypeptides into small peptide fragments. Like other AAA+ ATPases and self-compartmentalising proteases, Lon functions as an oligomeric complex, although the subunit stoichiometry is currently unclear. Here, we present crystal structures of truncated versions of Lon protease from Bacillus subtilis (BsLon), which reveal previously unknown architectural features of Lon complexes. Our analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy show different oligomerisation of Lon proteases from two different bacterial species, Aquifex aeolicus and B. subtilis. The structure of BsLon-AP shows a hexameric complex consisting of a small part of the N-terminal domain, the ATPase, and protease domains. The structure shows the approximate arrangement of the three functional domains of Lon. It also reveals a resemblance between the architecture of Lon proteases and the bacterial proteasome-like protease HslUV. Our second structure, BsLon-N, represents the first 209 amino acids of the N-terminal domain of BsLon and consists of a globular domain, similar in structure to the E. coli Lon N-terminal domain, and an additional four-helix bundle, which is part of a predicted coiled-coil region. An unexpected dimeric interaction between BsLon-N monomers reveals the possibility that Lon complexes may be stabilised by coiled-coil interactions between neighbouring N-terminal domains. Together, BsLon-N and BsLon-AP are 36 amino acids short of offering a complete picture of a full-length Lon protease.

  19. Biased Signaling of Protease-Activated Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Peishen; Metcalf, Matthew; Bunnett, Nigel W.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their role in protein degradation and digestion, proteases can also function as hormone-like signaling molecules that regulate vital patho-physiological processes, including inflammation, hemostasis, pain, and repair mechanisms. Certain proteases can signal to cells by cleaving protease-activated receptors (PARs), a family of four G protein-coupled receptors. PARs are expressed by almost all cell types, control important physiological and disease-relevant processes, and are an emerging therapeutic target for major diseases. Most information about PAR activation and function derives from studies of a few proteases, for example thrombin in the case of PAR1, PAR3, and PAR4, and trypsin in the case of PAR2 and PAR4. These proteases cleave PARs at established sites with the extracellular N-terminal domains, and expose tethered ligands that stabilize conformations of the cleaved receptors that activate the canonical pathways of G protein- and/or β-arrestin-dependent signaling. However, a growing number of proteases have been identified that cleave PARs at divergent sites to activate distinct patterns of receptor signaling and trafficking. The capacity of these proteases to trigger distinct signaling pathways is referred to as biased signaling, and can lead to unique patho-physiological outcomes. Given that a different repertoire of proteases are activated in various patho-physiological conditions that may activate PARs by different mechanisms, signaling bias may account for the divergent actions of proteases and PARs. Moreover, therapies that target disease-relevant biased signaling pathways may be more effective and selective approaches for the treatment of protease- and PAR-driven diseases. Thus, rather than mediating the actions of a few proteases, PARs may integrate the biological actions of a wide spectrum of proteases in different patho-physiological conditions. PMID:24860547

  20. EMU helmet mounted display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marmolejo, Jose (Inventor); Smith, Stephen (Inventor); Plough, Alan (Inventor); Clarke, Robert (Inventor); Mclean, William (Inventor); Fournier, Joseph (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A helmet mounted display device is disclosed for projecting a display on a flat combiner surface located above the line of sight where the display is produced by two independent optical channels with independent LCD image generators. The display has a fully overlapped field of view on the combiner surface and the focus can be adjusted from a near field of four feet to infinity.

  1. Profiling antibodies to class II HLA in transplant patient sera.

    PubMed

    McMurtrey, Curtis; Lowe, Dave; Buchli, Rico; Daga, Sunil; Royer, Derek; Humphrey, Alisha; Cate, Steven; Osborn, Sean; Mojsilovic, Aleksandar; VanGundy, Rodney; Bardet, Wilfried; Duty, Andrew; Mojsilovic, Danijela; Jackson, Kenneth; Stastny, Peter; Briggs, David; Zehnder, Daniel; Higgins, Rob; Hildebrand, William

    2014-03-01

    Immunizing events including pregnancy, transfusions, and transplantation promote strong alloantibody responses to HLA. Such alloantibodies to HLA preclude organ transplantation, foster hyperacute rejection, and contribute to chronic transplant failure. Diagnostic antibody-screening assays detect alloreactive antibodies, yet key attributes including antibody concentration and isotype remain largely unexplored. The goal here was to provide a detailed profile of allogeneic antibodies to class II HLA. Methodologically, alloantibodies were purified from sensitized patient sera using an HLA-DR11 immunoaffinity column and subsequently categorized. Antibodies to DR11 were found to fix complement, exist at a median serum concentration of 2.3μg/mL, consist of all isotypes, and isotypes IgG2, IgM, and IgE were elevated. Because multimeric isotypes can confound diagnostic determinations of antibody concentration, IgM and IgA isotypes were removed and DR11-IgG tested alone. Despite removal of multimeric isotypes, patient-to-patient antibody concentrations did not correlate with MFI values. In conclusion, allogeneic antibody responses to DR11 are comprised of all antibody isotypes at differing proportions, these combined isotypes fix complement at nominal serum concentrations, and enhancements other than the removal of IgM and IgA multimeric isotypes may be required if MFI is to be used as a means of determining anti-HLA serum antibody concentrations in diagnostic clinical assays.

  2. Trace elements in sera from patients with renal disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Yoshinori; Nakai, Keiko; Sera, Kouichiro; Sato, Michirou

    1999-04-01

    In hemodialysis (HD) patients, an accumulation of trace elements such as aluminum, copper, silicon and vanadium has been reported. Aluminum-caused encephalopathy and aluminum-related bone diseases are important trace element-related complications. Using particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) we determined concentrations of aluminum, silicon, copper, zinc, selenium and bromine in sera of 29 patients with HD, 14 nondialysis patients with renal disease (RD) and 27 normal controls. The concentration of serum silicon of the patients with HD was 107.4 ± 61.3 μmol/l, which is markedly higher than that of normal controls (48.3 ± 25.8 μmol/l, p < 0.0001). The serum concentrations of zinc and bromine in patients with HD were 11.9 ± 1.7 and 21.3 ± 3.0 μmol/l, respectively. Both were markedly lower than those of normal controls (15.6 ± 2.6, 69.2 ± 8.3 μmol/l, p < 0.0001). The concentrations of aluminium and bromine in the serum of patients with RD were 171.9 ± 64.3 and 81.9 ± 11.6 μmol/l, which were markedly higher than those of normal controls ( p < 0.0001, p < 0.001). No significant differences were observed in the concentration of copper and selenium among three groups.

  3. Roe deer sera used for TBE surveillance in Austria.

    PubMed

    Duscher, Georg Gerhard; Wetscher, Monika; Baumgartner, Raphaela; Walder, Gernot

    2015-06-01

    A large majority of Austrian citizens are aware of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE), consequently reflected by a high vaccination rate of 85%. In return, risk assessment and disease mapping on human cases might be hampered due to high and inhomogeneous vaccination rates and travel habitats of humans. The roe deer was used to obtain a starting point for the integral view on the actual risk of TBE in Austria. The roe deer exhibits several attributes which makes it suitable as an indicator species: the roe deer has a restricted home range and it is known to be a heavy tick carrier. Furthermore it sero-converts after infection with TBE, but no outbreak occurs. Sera from 945 roe deer were obtained from all over Austria and screened with IFAT for the antibodies against TBE. Twenty-two positive samples, 2.4%, and 17 samples at the borderline titre of 1:16 were identified. The majority of the positive samples, 70.6%, were located in known TBE areas based on human cases. Further research is needed to confirm or reject new endemic foci of TBE transmission. PMID:25869034

  4. Roe deer sera used for TBE surveillance in Austria.

    PubMed

    Duscher, Georg Gerhard; Wetscher, Monika; Baumgartner, Raphaela; Walder, Gernot

    2015-06-01

    A large majority of Austrian citizens are aware of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE), consequently reflected by a high vaccination rate of 85%. In return, risk assessment and disease mapping on human cases might be hampered due to high and inhomogeneous vaccination rates and travel habitats of humans. The roe deer was used to obtain a starting point for the integral view on the actual risk of TBE in Austria. The roe deer exhibits several attributes which makes it suitable as an indicator species: the roe deer has a restricted home range and it is known to be a heavy tick carrier. Furthermore it sero-converts after infection with TBE, but no outbreak occurs. Sera from 945 roe deer were obtained from all over Austria and screened with IFAT for the antibodies against TBE. Twenty-two positive samples, 2.4%, and 17 samples at the borderline titre of 1:16 were identified. The majority of the positive samples, 70.6%, were located in known TBE areas based on human cases. Further research is needed to confirm or reject new endemic foci of TBE transmission.

  5. Drug binding in sera deficient in lipoproteins, albumin or orosomucoid.

    PubMed Central

    Pike, E; Kierulf, P; Skuterud, B; Bredesen, J E; Lunde, P K

    1983-01-01

    The relative role of lipoproteins, albumin and orosomucoid in the serum binding variation of various drugs was examined by separate removal of these proteins. Lipoproteins were removed from serum by ultracentrifugation, albumin by affinity chromatography and orosomucoid by immunoprecipitation. Removal of the lipoproteins did not affect the serum binding of the acidic (phenytoin) and neutral (digitoxin) drugs tested, nor the basic drugs disopyramide, quinidine or propranolol. A reduction in binding of amitryptyline, nortriptyline, doxepin and desmethyldoxepin was observed. Removal of albumin did, with some exception for nortriptyline, not affect the serum binding of the basic drugs tested. A pronounced reduction in the binding of phenytoin and digitoxin was observed. Removal of orosomucoid did not affect the binding of the acidic and neutral drugs tested. A reduction in the binding of all the basic drugs tested was observed, especially for disopyramide whose binding almost disappeared. Quinidine, propranolol, phenytoin and digitoxin all bound to isolated lipoproteins, but the removal of lipoproteins had no effect on the total serum binding for these drugs. Hence, the use of deficient sera provides valuable information as to the quantitative role of the various proteins in drug binding, whereas studies using purified proteins are often necessary to examine the mechanisms of the drug protein interactions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:6626414

  6. XVD Image Display Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Andres, Paul M.; Mortensen, Helen B.; Parizher, Vadim; McAuley, Myche; Bartholomew, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The XVD [X-Windows VICAR (video image communication and retrieval) Display] computer program offers an interactive display of VICAR and PDS (planetary data systems) images. It is designed to efficiently display multiple-GB images and runs on Solaris, Linux, or Mac OS X systems using X-Windows.

  7. Screens and Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edstrom, Malin

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the characteristics of different computer screen technologies including the possible harmful effects on health of cathode ray tube (CRT) terminals. CRT's are compared to other technologies including liquid crystal displays, plasma displays, electroluminiscence displays, and light emitting diodes. A chart comparing the different…

  8. Digital video display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zygielbaum, A. I.; Martin, W. L.; Engle, A.

    1973-01-01

    System displays image data in real time on 120,000-element raster scan with 2, 4, or 8 shades of grey. Designed for displaying planetary range Doppler data, system can be used for X-Y plotting, displaying alphanumerics, and providing image animation.

  9. Proteolytic crosstalk in multi-protease networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, Curtis T.; Mather, William H.

    2016-04-01

    Processive proteases, such as ClpXP in E. coli, are conserved enzyme assemblies that can recognize and rapidly degrade proteins. These proteases are used for a number of purposes, including degrading mistranslated proteins and controlling cellular stress response. However, proteolytic machinery within the cell is limited in capacity and can lead to a bottleneck in protein degradation, whereby many proteins compete (‘queue’) for proteolytic resources. Previous work has demonstrated that such queueing can lead to pronounced statistical relationships between different protein counts when proteins compete for a single common protease. However, real cells contain many different proteases, e.g. ClpXP, ClpAP, and Lon in E. coli, and it is not clear how competition between proteins for multiple classes of protease would influence the dynamics of cellular networks. In the present work, we theoretically demonstrate that a multi-protease proteolytic bottleneck can substantially couple the dynamics for both simple and complex (oscillatory) networks, even between substrates with substantially different affinities for protease. For these networks, queueing often leads to strong positive correlations between protein counts, and these correlations are strongest near the queueing theoretic point of balance. Furthermore, we find that the qualitative behavior of these networks depends on the relative size of the absolute affinity of substrate to protease compared to the cross affinity of substrate to protease, leading in certain regimes to priority queue statistics.

  10. A novel protease homolog differentially expressed in breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Anisowicz, A.; Sotiropoulou, G.; Stenman, G.; Mok, S. C.; Sager, R.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Using differential display (DD), we discovered a new member of the serine protease family of protein-cleaving enzymes, named protease M. The gene is most closely related by sequence to the kallikreins, to prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and to trypsin. The diagnostic use of PSA in prostate cancer suggested that a related molecule might be a predictor for breast or ovarian cancer. This, in turn, led to studies designed to characterize the protein and to screen for its expression in cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The isolation of protease M by DD, the cloning and sequencing of the cDNA, and the comparison of the predicted protein structure with related proteins are described, as are methods to produce recombinant proteins and polyclonal antibody preparations. Protease M expression was examined in mammary, prostate, and ovarian cancer, as well as normal, cells and tissues. Stable transfectants expressing the protease M gene were produced in mammary carcinoma cells. RESULTS: Protease M was localized by fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis to chromosome 19q13.3, in a region to which other kallikreins and PSA also map. The gene is expressed in the primary mammary carcinoma lines tested but not in the corresponding cell lines of metastatic origin. It is strongly expressed in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines. The enzyme activity could not be established, because of difficulties in producing sufficient recombinant protein, a common problem with proteases. Transfectants were selected that overexpress the mRNA, but the protein levels remained very low. CONCLUSIONS: Protease M expression (mRNA) may be a useful marker in the detection of primary mammary carcinomas, as well as primary ovarian cancers. Other medical applications are also likely, based on sequence relatedness to trypsin and PSA. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 8 PMID:8898378

  11. Autoimmune reactivity of sera to hepatocyte plasma membrane in type 1 autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, I; Ikuno, N; Omagari, K; Kinoshita, H; Oka, M; Yamaguchi, H; Kohno, S; Mackay, I R

    2000-01-01

    Type 1 autoimmune hepatitis (AIH-1) is an organ-specific autoimmune liver disease for which no tissue-specific autoantigen has yet been identified. We examined the reactivity by sensitive immunoblotting with enhanced chemiluminescence (IB-ECL) of 43 sera from patients with AIH-1 and 182 sera from patients with other diseases on hepatocyte plasma membrane derived from rat or human liver (RHPM, HHPM) and separated by aqueous two-phase partition. The sera studied were from patients with AIH-1, primary biliary cirrhosis, chronic viral hepatitis, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); and from normal subjects. Specificity of reactivity by IB-ECL was sought: (i) by testing sera on human or rat liver membrane; (ii) by testing sera on liver or kidney membrane; (iii) by serial titration of reactive sera; and (iv) by testing reactive sera from AIH-1 before and after successful treatment with prednisolone. The results were that in AIH-1 there were multiple reactive components which were not species-specific, since they were detected with both RHPM and HHPM, but were mostly tissue-specific for liver. There was no significant correlation between antinuclear antibodies (ANA) titer and the frequencies of sera reactivities against RHPM. Most of these reactive components were demonstrable at a lesser frequency in other liver diseases and in SLE. There was a striking decrease in reactivity by IB-ECL of AIH-1 sera with liver membrane after clinical remission, further suggesting that differences between AIH-1 and other inflammatory liver diseases and SLE are predominantly quantitative rather than qualitative. However, our study did point to candidate liver membrane antigens with molecular sizes of 136, 116, 81, and 49 kDa, additional to components previously described by others. The molecular identification of these prominent reactants with AIH-1 sera could prove informative for ascertaining pathogenesis.

  12. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Rosenberg, Alan H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest.

  13. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Rosenberg, A.H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest. 1 fig.

  14. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-01-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  15. Polyplanar optic display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.; Biscardi, C.; Brewster, C.; DeSanto, L.; Beiser, L.

    1997-07-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. This display screen is 2 inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. The new display uses a 100 milliwatt green solid state laser (532 nm) as its optical source. In order to produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP{trademark}) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments, Inc. A variable astigmatic focusing system is used to produce a stigmatic image on the viewing face of the POD. In addition to the optical design, the authors discuss the electronic interfacing to the DLP{trademark} chip, the opto-mechanical design and viewing angle characteristics.

  16. Protease-degradable electrospun fibrous hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Ryan J.; Bassin, Ethan J.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2015-03-01

    Electrospun nanofibres are promising in biomedical applications to replicate features of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). However, nearly all electrospun scaffolds are either non-degradable or degrade hydrolytically, whereas natural ECM degrades proteolytically, often through matrix metalloproteinases. Here we synthesize reactive macromers that contain protease-cleavable and fluorescent peptides and are able to form both isotropic hydrogels and electrospun fibrous hydrogels through a photoinitiated polymerization. These biomimetic scaffolds are susceptible to protease-mediated cleavage in vitro in a protease dose-dependent manner and in vivo in a subcutaneous mouse model using transdermal fluorescent imaging to monitor degradation. Importantly, materials containing an alternate and non-protease-cleavable peptide sequence are stable in both in vitro and in vivo settings. To illustrate the specificity in degradation, scaffolds with mixed fibre populations support selective fibre degradation based on individual fibre degradability. Overall, this represents a novel biomimetic approach to generate protease-sensitive fibrous scaffolds for biomedical applications.

  17. Display innovations through glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Lori L.

    2016-03-01

    Prevailing trends in thin, lightweight, high-resolution, and added functionality, such as touch sensing, continue to drive innovation in the display market. While display volumes grow, so do consumers’ need for portability, enhanced optical performance, and mechanical reliability. Technical advancements in glass design and process have enabled display innovations in these areas while supporting industry growth. Opportunities for further innovation remain open for glass manufacturers to drive new applications, enhanced functionality, and increased demand.

  18. Displaying Data As Movies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Judith G.

    1992-01-01

    NMSB Movie computer program displays large sets of data (more than million individual values). Presentation dynamic, rapidly displaying sequential image "frames" in main "movie" window. Any sequence of two-dimensional sets of data scaled between 0 and 255 (1-byte resolution) displayed as movie. Time- or slice-wise progression of data illustrated. Originally written to present data from three-dimensional ultrasonic scans of damaged aerospace composite materials, illustrates data acquired by thermal-analysis systems measuring rates of heating and cooling of various materials. Developed on Macintosh IIx computer with 8-bit color display adapter and 8 megabytes of memory using Symantec Corporation's Think C, version 4.0.

  19. Interactive holographic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Jung-Young; Lee, Beam-Ryeol; Kim, Jin-Woong; Chernyshov, Oleksii O.; Park, Min-Chul

    2014-06-01

    A holographic display which is capable of displaying floating holographic images is introduced. The display is for user interaction with the image on the display. It consists of two parts; multiplexed holographic image generation and a spherical mirror. The time multiplexed image from 2 X 10 DMD frames appeared on PDLC screen is imaged by the spherical mirror and becomes a floating image. This image is combined spatially with two layered TV images appearing behind. Since the floating holographic image has a real spatial position and depth, it allows a user to interact with the image.

  20. JAVA Stereo Display Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Karina

    2008-01-01

    This toolkit provides a common interface for displaying graphical user interface (GUI) components in stereo using either specialized stereo display hardware (e.g., liquid crystal shutter or polarized glasses) or anaglyph display (red/blue glasses) on standard workstation displays. An application using this toolkit will work without modification in either environment, allowing stereo software to reach a wider audience without sacrificing high-quality display on dedicated hardware. The toolkit is written in Java for use with the Swing GUI Toolkit and has cross-platform compatibility. It hooks into the graphics system, allowing any standard Swing component to be displayed in stereo. It uses the OpenGL graphics library to control the stereo hardware and to perform the rendering. It also supports anaglyph and special stereo hardware using the same API (application-program interface), and has the ability to simulate color stereo in anaglyph mode by combining the red band of the left image with the green/blue bands of the right image. This is a low-level toolkit that accomplishes simply the display of components (including the JadeDisplay image display component). It does not include higher-level functions such as disparity adjustment, 3D cursor, or overlays all of which can be built using this toolkit.

  1. Generation of bioactive peptide hydrolysates from cattle plasma using plant and fungal proteases.

    PubMed

    Bah, Clara S F; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A; McConnell, Michelle A; Carne, Alan

    2016-12-15

    Four protease preparations from plant and fungal sources (papain, bromelain, FP400 and FPII) were used to hydrolyse plasma which was separated from slaughterhouse cattle blood. The o-phthaldialdehyde assay was used to follow the release of TCA-soluble peptides over a 24h period. Hydrolysis profiles were displayed using SDS-PAGE. The in vitro antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the hydrolysates were determined. The results showed that hydrolysates of cattle plasma generated with fungal protease FPII had higher antioxidant activities. Overall than hydrolysates generated with papain, bromelain and FP400. None of the hydrolysates demonstrated antimicrobial activity. The FPII peptide hydrolysate was fractionated using gel permeation chromatography, OFFGEL isoelectric focusing and RP-HPLC. The RP-HPLC fraction with highest antioxidant activity contained 15 novel peptide sequences. The use of protease FPII to hydrolyse cattle plasma resulted in a hydrolysate with high antioxidant properties and unique peptide sequences. PMID:27451160

  2. Generation of bioactive peptide hydrolysates from cattle plasma using plant and fungal proteases.

    PubMed

    Bah, Clara S F; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A; McConnell, Michelle A; Carne, Alan

    2016-12-15

    Four protease preparations from plant and fungal sources (papain, bromelain, FP400 and FPII) were used to hydrolyse plasma which was separated from slaughterhouse cattle blood. The o-phthaldialdehyde assay was used to follow the release of TCA-soluble peptides over a 24h period. Hydrolysis profiles were displayed using SDS-PAGE. The in vitro antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the hydrolysates were determined. The results showed that hydrolysates of cattle plasma generated with fungal protease FPII had higher antioxidant activities. Overall than hydrolysates generated with papain, bromelain and FP400. None of the hydrolysates demonstrated antimicrobial activity. The FPII peptide hydrolysate was fractionated using gel permeation chromatography, OFFGEL isoelectric focusing and RP-HPLC. The RP-HPLC fraction with highest antioxidant activity contained 15 novel peptide sequences. The use of protease FPII to hydrolyse cattle plasma resulted in a hydrolysate with high antioxidant properties and unique peptide sequences.

  3. Suppression of lymphocyte proliferative responses by sera from patients with American visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Barral, A; Carvalho, E M; Badaró, R; Barral-Netto, M

    1986-07-01

    We examined the effect of sera from 11 patients with American visceral leishmaniasis on mitogen-driven lymphocyte proliferative capacity. All sera inhibited lymphocyte proliferation of patients' peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) when stimulated by either phytohemagglutinin, Concanavalin A or pokeweed mitogen. Serum was also strongly inhibitory for Concanavalin A-pulsed normal volunteers' PMBC. The effect of the serum was not due to cytotoxicity, inadequate nutritional support or altered kinetics of DNA synthesis. High levels of IgM or IgG (both total and antiparasite) and high levels of triglycerides were found in patients' sera.

  4. [Rational method of obtaining sera with a high titre of virus-neutralizing antibodies. Report 2].

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, A T; Omel'chenko, T N; Tsetlin, E M

    1978-02-01

    In addition to report I (ZHMEI, 1977, No. 1) a study was made of 9 more schemes of rabbit immunization with the poliomyelitis virus, type I, for the purpose of obtaining the neutralizing sera of high titre. Vitamins A and C were used in the experiments in the capacity of the activators of the organism reaction; Freund's adjuvant of different make was tested; different reimmunization periods and different amounts of the adjuvant were administered. Titration of rabbit sera in the process of immunization and reimmunization showed immunization into the lymph nodes with the subsequent single reimmunization in one month to be the most effective and economical method of obtaining high effective sera.

  5. Resistance of extraocular motoneuron terminals to effects of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis sera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosier, D. R.; Siklos, L.; Appel, S. H.

    2000-01-01

    In sporadic ALS (s-ALS), axon terminals contain increased intracellular calcium. Passively transferred sera from patients with s-ALS increase intracellular calcium in spinal motoneuron terminals in vivo and enhance spontaneous transmitter release, a calcium-dependent process. In this study, passive transfer of s-ALS sera increased spontaneous release from spinal but not extraocular motoneuron terminals, suggesting that the resistance to physiologic abnormalities induced by s-ALS sera in mice parallels the resistance of extraocular motoneurons to dysfunction and degeneration in ALS.

  6. Cordysobin, a novel alkaline serine protease with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity from the medicinal mushroom Cordyceps sobolifera.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shou-Xian; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Zhao, Shuang; Xu, Feng; Geng, Xiao-Li; Wang, He-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    A novel serine protease, designated as cordysobin, was purified from dried fruiting bodies of the mushroom Cordyceps sobolifera. The isolation procedure utilized ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and SP-Sepharose followed by gel filtration on Superdex 75. The protease did not adsorb on DEAE-cellulose but bound to SP-Sepharose. In sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), the protease resolved as a single band with an apparent molecular mass of 31 kDa. Its optimal pH was 10.0, and the optimal temperature was 65°C. The protease displayed a K(m) value of 0.41 μM and 13.44 μM·min⁻¹ using Suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-MCA as substrate at pH 10.0 and 37°C. Protease activity was enhanced by the Fe²⁺ ion at low concentration range of 1.25-10 mM and was strongly inhibited by Hg²⁺ up to 1.25 mM. The protease was strongly inhibited by chymostatin and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), suggesting that it is a serine protease. It manifested significant inhibitory activity toward HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with an IC₅₀ value of 8.2×10⁻³ μM, which is the highest anti-HIV-1 RT activity of reported mushroom proteins. PMID:22014786

  7. Purification and characterization of the subtilisin-like protease of Streptococcus suis that contributes to its virulence.

    PubMed

    Bonifait, Laetitia; Vaillancourt, Katy; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Frenette, Michel; Grenier, Daniel

    2011-03-24

    Streptococcus suis is a major swine pathogen that is responsible for severe infections such as meningitis, endocarditis, and septicemia. S. suis is also recognized as a zoonotic agent and expresses several virulence factors. The recently identified subtilisin-like protease (SspA) of S. suis plays an important role in the pathogenicity of this bacterium in animal models. The objective of the present study was to clone, purify, and characterize the SspA of serotype 2 S. suis P1/7. The SSU0757 gene encoding SspA was amplified and a 4798-bp DNA fragment was obtained. It was cloned into the expression plasmid pBAD/HisB and then inserted into Escherichia coli to overproduce the protein. The recombinant protease was purified by chromatography procedures and showed a molecular weight of 170 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Its activity was optimal at pH 7 and at temperatures ranging from 25°C to 37°C. It had a high specificity for the chromogenic substrate succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNa while specific inhibitors of serine proteases inhibited its activity. In addition to degrading gelatin, the protease hydrolyzed the Aα chain of fibrinogen, which prevented fibrin formation by thrombin. The recombinant subtilisin-like protease also showed toxicity towards brain microvascular endothelial cells. Lastly, sera from pigs infected with S. suis reacted with the recombinant SspA, indicating that it is produced during infections. In conclusion, the SspA of S. suis shared similarities with subtilisin-like proteases produced by other pathogenic streptococci and may contribute to the pathogenic process of S. suis infections.

  8. Mast cell proteases as pharmacological targets.

    PubMed

    Caughey, George H

    2016-05-01

    Mast cells are rich in proteases, which are the major proteins of intracellular granules and are released with histamine and heparin by activated cells. Most of these proteases are active in the granule as well as outside of the mast cell when secreted, and can cleave targets near degranulating mast cells and in adjoining tissue compartments. Some proteases released from mast cells reach the bloodstream and may have far-reaching actions. In terms of relative amounts, the major mast cell proteases include the tryptases, chymases, cathepsin G, carboxypeptidase A3, dipeptidylpeptidase I/cathepsin C, and cathepsins L and S. Some mast cells also produce granzyme B, plasminogen activators, and matrix metalloproteinases. Tryptases and chymases are almost entirely mast cell-specific, whereas other proteases, such as cathepsins G, C, and L are expressed by a variety of inflammatory cells. Carboxypeptidase A3 expression is a property shared by basophils and mast cells. Other proteases, such as mastins, are largely basophil-specific, although human basophils are protease-deficient compared with their murine counterparts. The major classes of mast cell proteases have been targeted for development of therapeutic inhibitors. Also, a human β-tryptase has been proposed as a potential drug itself, to inactivate of snake venins. Diseases linked to mast cell proteases include allergic diseases, such as asthma, eczema, and anaphylaxis, but also include non-allergic diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune arthritis, atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, hypertension, myocardial infarction, heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and scarring diseases of lungs and other organs. In some cases, studies performed in mouse models suggest protective or homeostatic roles for specific proteases (or groups of proteases) in infections by bacteria, worms and other parasites, and even in allergic inflammation. At the same time, a clearer picture has emerged of differences in the

  9. Gene expression and activity of digestive proteases in Daphnia: effects of cyanobacterial protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The frequency of cyanobacterial blooms has increased worldwide, and these blooms have been claimed to be a major factor leading to the decline of the most important freshwater herbivores, i.e. representatives of the genus Daphnia. This suppression of Daphnia is partly attributed to the presence of biologically active secondary metabolites in cyanobacteria. Among these metabolites, protease inhibitors are found in almost every natural cyanobacterial bloom and have been shown to specifically inhibit Daphnia's digestive proteases in vitro, but to date no physiological responses of these serine proteases to cyanobacterial protease inhibitors in Daphnia have been reported in situ at the protein and genetic levels. Results Nine digestive proteases were detected in D. magna using activity-stained SDS-PAGE. Subsequent analyses by LC-MS/MS and database search led to the identification of respective protease genes. D. magna responded to dietary protease inhibitors by up-regulation of the expression of these respective proteases at the RNA-level and by the induction of new and less sensitive protease isoforms at the protein level. The up-regulation in response to dietary trypsin- and chymotrypsin-inhibitors ranged from 1.4-fold to 25.6-fold. These physiological responses of Daphnia, i.e. up-regulation of protease expression and the induction of isoforms, took place even after feeding on 20% cyanobacterial food for only 24 h. These physiological responses proved to be independent from microcystin effects. Conclusion Here for the first time it was shown in situ that a D. magna clone responds physiologically to dietary cyanobacterial protease inhibitors by phenotypic plasticity of the targets of these specific inhibitors, i.e. Daphnia gut proteases. These regulatory responses are adaptive for D. magna, as they increase the capacity for protein digestion in the presence of dietary protease inhibitors. The type and extent of these responses in protease expression might

  10. Polyplanar optical display electronics

    SciTech Connect

    DeSanto, L.; Biscardi, C.

    1997-07-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. The prototype ten inch display is two inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. In order to achieve a long lifetime, the new display uses a 100 milliwatt green solid-state laser (10,000 hr. life) at 532 nm as its light source. To produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP{trademark}) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments. In order to use the solid-state laser as the light source and also fit within the constraints of the B-52 display, the Digital Micromirror Device (DMD{trademark}) circuit board is removed from the Texas Instruments DLP light engine assembly. Due to the compact architecture of the projection system within the display chassis, the DMD{trademark} chip is operated remotely from the Texas Instruments circuit board. The authors discuss the operation of the DMD{trademark} divorced from the light engine and the interfacing of the DMD{trademark} board with various video formats (CVBS, Y/C or S-video and RGB) including the format specific to the B-52 aircraft. A brief discussion of the electronics required to drive the laser is also presented.

  11. Display and Presentation Boards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midgley, Thomas Keith

    The use of display and presentation boards as tools to help teachers/trainers convey messages more clearly is briefly discussed, and 24 different types of display and presentation boards are described and illustrated; i.e., chalk, paste-up, hook-n-loop, electric, flannel, scroll, communication planning, acetate pocket, slot, pin-tack, preview,…

  12. Split image optical display

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2007-05-29

    A video image is displayed from an optical panel by splitting the image into a plurality of image components, and then projecting the image components through corresponding portions of the panel to collectively form the image. Depth of the display is correspondingly reduced.

  13. Split image optical display

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2005-05-31

    A video image is displayed from an optical panel by splitting the image into a plurality of image components, and then projecting the image components through corresponding portions of the panel to collectively form the image. Depth of the display is correspondingly reduced.

  14. Effective Monitor Display Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, William

    1999-01-01

    Describes some of the factors that affect computer monitor display design and provides suggestions and insights into how screen displays can be designed more effectively. Topics include color, font choices, organizational structure of text, space outline, and general principles. (Author/LRW)

  15. Displaying Images Of Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Michael D.; Evans, Frank; Nakamura, Daniel I.

    1991-01-01

    Interactive Image Display Program (IMDISP) is interactive image-displaying utility program for IBM personal computer (PC, XT, and AT models) and compatibles. Magnifications, contrasts, and/or subsampling selected for whole or partial images. IMDISP developed for use with CD-ROM (Compact Disk Read-Only Memory) storage system. Written in C language (94 percent) and Assembler (6 percent).

  16. Displays enabling mobile multimedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Jyrki

    2007-02-01

    With the rapid advances in telecommunications networks, mobile multimedia delivery to handsets is now a reality. While a truly immersive multimedia experience is still far ahead in the mobile world, significant advances have been made in the constituent audio-visual technologies to make this become possible. One of the critical components in multimedia delivery is the mobile handset display. While such alternatives as headset-style near-to-eye displays, autostereoscopic displays, mini-projectors, and roll-out flexible displays can deliver either a larger virtual screen size than the pocketable dimensions of the mobile device can offer, or an added degree of immersion by adding the illusion of the third dimension in the viewing experience, there are still challenges in the full deployment of such displays in real-life mobile communication terminals. Meanwhile, direct-view display technologies have developed steadily, and can provide a development platform for an even better viewing experience for multimedia in the near future. The paper presents an overview of the mobile display technology space with an emphasis on the advances and potential in developing direct-view displays further to meet the goal of enabling multimedia in the mobile domain.

  17. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to an extracellular Pseudomonas cepacia protease.

    PubMed Central

    Kooi, C; Cox, A; Darling, P; Sokol, P A

    1994-01-01

    Pseudomonas cepacia produces at least two extracellular proteases with apparent molecular masses of 36,000 and 40,000 Da. The 36-kDa protease has high proteolytic activity and the 40-kDa protease has low proteolytic activity with hide powder azure as a substrate. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were raised against the purified 36- and 40-kDa proteases. Several MAbs directed against the 36-kDa protease were found to recognize the 40-kDa protease by Western immunoblot analysis. Similarly, a MAb directed against the 40-kDa protease recognized the 36-kDa protease, suggesting that these two proteases may be immunologically related. A MAb directed against the 36-kDa protease, designated 36-6-8, and a MAb directed against the 40-kDa protease (MAb G-11) cross-reacted with other extracellular proteases, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase and alkaline protease, Pseudomonas pseudomallei protease, and the Vibrio cholerae hemagglutinin/protease. MAb 36-6-8 neutralized the P. cepacia 36-kDa protease, P. aeruginosa elastase, P. pseudomallei protease, and V. cholerae hemagglutinin/protease but did not affect P. aeruginosa alkaline protease activity. In contrast, MAb G-11 to the 40-kDa protease neutralized only the P. cepacia 36-kDa protease. This evidence suggests that the neutralizing MAb, 36-6-8, recognizes an epitope conserved among some metalloproteases. This epitope may lie at or near the active site of the P. cepacia 36-kDa protease and P. aeruginosa elastase. Images PMID:7516312

  18. Identification and characterization of specific binding proteins for growth hormone in normal human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Herington, A C; Ymer, S; Stevenson, J

    1986-01-01

    The well-recognized "big" forms (45,000-100,000 mol wt) of immunoreactive human growth hormone (hGH) in human serum have been reported to be random aggregates or formal polymers. However, we have now investigated the possibility that they are protein-bound forms. After incubation of monomeric 125I-hGH with normal serum, gel chromatography indicated a peak of bound 125I-hGH (at approximately 120,000 mol wt), which was completely displaced by excess unlabeled hGH. When serum alone was chromatographed two peaks of specific binding were subsequently detected, the major peak, eluting between 74,000 and 85,000 mol wt corresponded to the 125I-hGH-binding protein complex observed at approximately 120,000 mol wt. Using a mini-gel filtration system for separating bound from free hormone, binding of 125I-hGH by normal human serum was dependent on time (equilibrium was reached in 2 h at 21 degrees C), temperature (21 degrees C greater than 37 degrees C), Ca2+ and serum concentrations. Binding was reversible and highly specific for hGH, not being displayed by GH or prolactins from several species. Scatchard analysis revealed linear plots with an affinity (KA) of 0.32 +/- 0.06 X 10(9) M-1 (n = 7). Human serum with low endogenous hGH levels, when added to rabbit liver membranes, decreased the binding of 125I-hGH in this tissue in a dose-dependent manner. These data indicate that human sera contain a specific, high affinity binding protein for hGH and that this may account, at least in part, for the known size heterogeneity of GH in serum. Its effect on GH binding to target tissues may indicate a role for the binding protein in the regulation of GH action. PMID:3711337

  19. System status display evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, Leland G.

    1988-01-01

    The System Status Display is an electronic display system which provides the crew with an enhanced capability for monitoring and managing the aircraft systems. A flight simulation in a fixed base cockpit simulator was used to evaluate alternative design concepts for this display system. The alternative concepts included pictorial versus alphanumeric text formats, multifunction versus dedicated controls, and integration of the procedures with the system status information versus paper checklists. Twelve pilots manually flew approach patterns with the different concepts. System malfunctions occurred which required the pilots to respond to the alert by reconfiguring the system. The pictorial display, the multifunction control interfaces collocated with the system display, and the procedures integrated with the status information all had shorter event processing times and lower subjective workloads.

  20. Defense display market assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    1998-09-01

    This paper addresses the number, function and size of principal military displays and establishes a basis to determine the opportunities for technology insertion in the immediate future and into the next millennium. Principal military displays are defined as those occupying appreciable crewstation real-estate and/or those without which the platform could not carry out its intended mission. DoD 'office' applications are excluded from this study. The military displays market is specified by such parameters as active area and footprint size, and other characteristics such as luminance, gray scale, resolution, angle, color, video capability, and night vision imaging system (NVIS) compatibility. Funded, future acquisitions, planned and predicted crewstation modification kits, and form-fit upgrades are taken into account. This paper provides an overview of the DoD niche market, allowing both government and industry a necessary reference by which to meet DoD requirements for military displays in a timely and cost-effective manner. The aggregate DoD market for direct-view and large-area military displays is presently estimated to be in excess of 242,000. Miniature displays are those which must be magnified to be viewed, involve a significantly different manufacturing paradigm and are used in helmet mounted displays and thermal weapon sight applications. Some 114,000 miniature displays are presently included within Service weapon system acquisition plans. For vendor production planning purposes it is noted that foreign military sales could substantially increase these quantities. The vanishing vendor syndrome (VVS) for older display technologies continues to be a growing, pervasive problem throughout DoD, which consequently must leverage the more modern display technologies being developed for civil- commercial markets.

  1. Biochemical characterization of a detergent-stable serine alkaline protease from Caldicoprobacter guelmensis.

    PubMed

    Bouacem, Khelifa; Bouanane-Darenfed, Amel; Laribi-Habchi, Hassiba; Elhoul, Mouna Ben; Hmida-Sayari, Aïda; Hacene, Hocine; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Jaouadi, Bassem; Bejar, Samir

    2015-11-01

    Caldicoprobacter guelmensis isolated from the hydrothermal hot spring of Guelma (Algeria) produced high amounts of extracellular thermostable serine alkaline protease (called SAPCG) (23,000U/mL). The latter was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation, UNO Q-6 FPLC and Zorbex PSM 300 HPLC, and submitted to biochemical characterization assays. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) analysis revealed that the purified enzyme was a monomer, with a molecular mass of 55,824.19Da. The 19 N-terminal residue sequence of SAPCG showed high homology with those of microbial proteases. The enzyme was completely inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and diiodopropyl fluorophosphates (DFP), which suggested its belonging to the serine protease family. It showed optimum protease activity at pH 10 and 70°C with casein as a substrate. The thermoactivity and thermostability of SAPCG were enhanced in the presence of 2mM Ca(2+). Its half-life times at 80 and 90°C were 180 and 60min, respectively. Interestingly, the SAPCG protease exhibited significant compatibility with iSiS and Persil, and wash performance analysis revealed that it could remove blood-stains effectively. Overall, SAPCG displayed a number of attractive properties that make it a promising candidate for future applications as an additive in detergent formulations.

  2. Serine Protease Catalysis: A Computational Study of Tetrahedral Intermediates and Inhibitory Adducts.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Phong D; Mansoorabadi, Steven O; Frey, Perry A

    2016-08-01

    Peptide boronic acids and peptidyl trifluoromethyl ketones (TFKs) inhibit serine proteases by forming monoanionic, tetrahedral adducts to serine in the active sites. Investigators regard these adducts as analogs of monoanionic, tetrahedral intermediates. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations and fractional charge analysis show that tetrahedral adducts of model peptidyl TFKs are structurally and electrostatically very similar to corresponding tetrahedral intermediates. In contrast, the DFT calculations show the structures and electrostatic properties of analogous peptide boronate adducts to be significantly different. The peptide boronates display highly electrostatically positive boron, with correspondingly negative ligands in the tetrahedra. In addition, the computed boron-oxygen and boron-carbon bond lengths in peptide boronates (which are identical or very similar to the corresponding bonds in a peptide boronate adduct of α-lytic protease determined by X-ray crystallography at subangstrom resolution) are significantly longer than the corresponding bond lengths in model tetrahedral intermediates. Since protease-peptidyl TFKs incorporate low-barrier hydrogen bonds (LBHBs) between an active site histidine and aspartate, while the protease-peptide boronates do not, these data complement the spectroscopic and chemical evidence for the participation of LBHBs in catalysis by serine proteases. Moreover, while the potency of these classes of inhibitors can be correlated to the structures of the peptide moieties, the present results indicate that the strength of their bonds to serine contribute significantly to their inhibitory properties. PMID:27387593

  3. Isolation of two aspartyl proteases from Trichoderma asperellum expressed during colonization of cucumber roots.

    PubMed

    Viterbo, Ada; Harel, Michal; Chet, Ilan

    2004-09-01

    Trichoderma asperellum and cucumber seedlings were used as a model to study the modulation of Trichoderma gene expression during plant root colonization. Seedlings were grown in an aseptic hydroponics medium and inoculated with Trichoderma spore suspension. Proteins differentially secreted into the medium were isolated. Three major proteins of fungal origin were identified: two arabinofuranosidases (Abf1 and Abf2) and an aspartyl protease. Differential mRNA display was conducted on Trichoderma mycelia interacting and non-interacting, with the plant roots. Among the differentially regulated clones another aspartyl protease was identified. Sequencing of the genes revealed that the first aspartyl protease is a close homologue of PapA from T. harzianum and the other, of AP1 from Botryotinia fuckeliana. RT-PCR analysis confirms that the proteases are induced in response to plant roots attachment and are expressed in planta. papA, but not papB, is also induced in plate confrontation assays with the plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. These data suggest that the identified proteases play a role in Trichoderma both as a mycoparasite and as a plant opportunistic symbiont.

  4. Some properties of the intestinal proteases of the rabbitfish, Siganus canaliculatus (Park).

    PubMed

    Sabapathy, U; Teo, L H

    1995-06-01

    Some properties of the intestinal proteases of the rabbitfish were examined. At 25°C, both trypsin and chymotrypsin showed pH optima of 8.0. Leucine aminopeptidase, however, displayed maximum activity in the pH range, 7.0-9.0. Leucine aminopeptidase had the highest optimum temperature (60°C), and chymotrypsin, the lowest (30°C). The optimum temperature of trypsin was 55°C. The activation energy, Ea, was found to be 8.24 for trypsin and 8.50 kcal mol(-1) for chymotrypsin. The Ea for leucine aminopeptidase was 6.29 kcal mol(-1) above 40°C and 1.73 kcal mol(-1) below 40°C. Substrate concentration-velocity plots showed that all three enzymes followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics; the Km and Vmax were estimated for the three enzymes. The effects of various protease inhibitors on enzyme activity were also examined and confirmed the protease classes to which each enzyme belonged. The three proteases examined have similar properties to proteases in other fishes.

  5. Vibrio cholerae hemagglutinin(HA)/protease: An extracellular metalloprotease with multiple pathogenic activities.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Jorge A; Silva, Anisia J

    2016-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae of serogroup O1 and O139, the etiological agent of the diarrheal disease cholera, expresses the extracellular Zn-dependent metalloprotease hemagglutinin (HA)/protease also reported as vibriolysin. This enzyme is also produced by non-O1/O139 (non-cholera) strains that cause mild, sporadic illness (i.e. gastroenteritis, wound or ear infections). Orthologs of HA/protease are present in other members of the Vibrionaceae family pathogenic to humans and fish. HA/protease belongs to the M4 neutral peptidase family and displays significant amino acid sequence homology to Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase (LasB) and Bacillus thermoproteolyticus thermolysin. It exhibits a broad range of potentially pathogenic activities in cell culture and animal models. These activities range from the covalent modification of other toxins, the degradation of the protective mucus barrier and disruption of intestinal tight junctions. Here we review (i) the structure and regulation of HA/protease expression, (ii) its interaction with other toxins and the intestinal mucosa and (iii) discuss the possible role(s) of HA/protease in the pathogenesis of cholera. PMID:26952544

  6. Detection of proteases from Sporosarcina aquimarina and Algoriphagus antarcticus isolated from Antarctic soil.

    PubMed

    Santos, Anderson F; Pires, Fabiano; Jesus, Hugo E; Santos, André L S; Peixoto, Raquel; Rosado, Alexandre S; D'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Branquinha, Marta H

    2015-03-01

    Two psychrophilic bacterial samples were isolated from King George Island soil, in Antarctica. The phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA (rrs) gene led to the correlation with the closest related isolates as Sporosarcina aquimarina (99%) and Algoriphagus antarcticus (99%), with query coverage of 99% and 98%, respectively. The spent culture media from both isolates displayed proteolytic activities detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis containing gelatin as protein substrate. Under the employed conditions, S. aquimarina showed a 55 kDa protease with the best activity detected at pH 7.0 and at 27°C. A. antarcticus also showed a single extracellular protease, however its molecular mass was around 90kDa and its best activity was detected at pH 9.0 and at 37°C. The proteases from both isolates were inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline and EDTA, two metalloprotease inhibitors. This is the first record of protease detection in both species, and our results may contribute to broaden the basic knowledge of proteases from the Antarctica environment and may help prospecting future biotechnological applications of these enzymes.

  7. Regulation of protease production in Clostridium sporogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, C; Macfarlane, G T

    1990-01-01

    The physiological and nutritional factors that regulate protease synthesis in Clostridium sporogenes C25 were studied in batch and continuous cultures. Formation of extracellular proteases occurred at the end of active growth and during the stationary phase in batch cultures. Protease production was inversely related to growth rate in glucose-excess and glucose-limited chemostats over the range D = 0.05 to 0.70 h-1. In pulse experiments, glucose, ammonia, phosphate, and some amino acids (tryptophan, proline, tyrosine, and isoleucine) strongly repressed protease synthesis. This repression was not relieved by addition of 4 mM cyclic AMP, cyclic GMP, or dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Protease formation was markedly inhibited by 4 mM ATP and ADP, but GTP and GDP had little effect on the process. It is concluded that protease production by C. sporogenes is strongly influenced by the amount of energy available to the cells, with the highest levels of protease synthesis occurring under energy-limiting conditions. PMID:2268158

  8. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Paula Monteiro; Bittencourt, Mona Lisa de Assis; Caprara, Carolina Canielles; de Freitas, Marcela; de Almeida, Renata Paula Coppini; Silveira, Dâmaris; Fonseca, Yris Maria; Ferreira, Edivaldo Ximenes; Pessoa, Adalberto; Magalhães, Pérola Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy sauce production. Proteases can be produced in large quantities in a short time by established methods of fermentation. The parameters such as variation in C/N ratio, presence of some sugars, besides several other physical factors are important in the development of fermentation process. Proteases of fungal origin can be produced cost effectively, have an advantage faster production, the ease with which the enzymes can be modified and mycelium can be easily removed by filtration. The production of proteases has been carried out using submerged fermentation, but conditions in solid state fermentation lead to several potential advantages for the production of fungal enzymes. This review focuses on the production of fungal proteases, their distribution, structural-functional aspects, physical and chemical parameters, and the use of these enzymes in industrial applications. PMID:26273247

  9. Extracellular proteases of Trichoderma species. A review.

    PubMed

    Kredics, L; Antal, Zsuzsanna; Szekeres, A; Hatvani, L; Manczinger, L; Vágvölgyi, Cs; Nagy, Erzsébet

    2005-01-01

    Cellulolytic, xylanolytic, chitinolytic and beta-1,3-glucanolytic enzyme systems of species belonging to the filamentous fungal genus Trichoderma have been investigated in details and are well characterised. The ability of Trichoderma strains to produce extracellular proteases has also been known for a long time, however, the proteolytic enzyme system is relatively unknown in this genus. Fortunately, in the recent years more and more attention is focused on the research in this field. The role of Trichoderma proteases in the biological control of plant pathogenic fungi and nematodes has been demonstrated, and it is also suspected that they may be important for the competitive saprophytic ability of green mould isolates and may represent potential virulence factors of Trichoderma strains as emerging fungal pathogens of clinical importance. The aim of this review is to summarize the information available about the extracellular proteases of Trichoderma. Numerous studies are available about the extracellular proteolytic enzyme profiles of Trichoderma strains and about the effect of abiotic environmental factors on protease activities. A number of protease enzymes have been purified to homogeneity and some protease encoding genes have been cloned and characterized. These results will be reviewed and the role of Trichoderma proteases in biological control as well as their advantages and disadvantages in biotechnology will be discussed. PMID:16003937

  10. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Paula Monteiro; Bittencourt, Mona Lisa de Assis; Caprara, Carolina Canielles; de Freitas, Marcela; de Almeida, Renata Paula Coppini; Silveira, Dâmaris; Fonseca, Yris Maria; Ferreira Filho, Edivaldo Ximenes; Pessoa Junior, Adalberto; Magalhães, Pérola Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy sauce production. Proteases can be produced in large quantities in a short time by established methods of fermentation. The parameters such as variation in C/N ratio, presence of some sugars, besides several other physical factors are important in the development of fermentation process. Proteases of fungal origin can be produced cost effectively, have an advantage faster production, the ease with which the enzymes can be modified and mycelium can be easily removed by filtration. The production of proteases has been carried out using submerged fermentation, but conditions in solid state fermentation lead to several potential advantages for the production of fungal enzymes. This review focuses on the production of fungal proteases, their distribution, structural-functional aspects, physical and chemical parameters, and the use of these enzymes in industrial applications. PMID:26273247

  11. Detection of anti-aquaporin-4 autoantibodies in the sera of Chinese neuromyelitis optica patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Miao; Su, Weiheng; Wang, Jie; Pisani, Francesco; Frigeri, Antonio; Ma, Tonghui

    2013-03-15

    In this study, we recruited 10 neuromyelitis optica patients, two multiple sclerosis patients and two myelitis patients. Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79) cells transfected with a human aquaporin-4-mCherry fusion protein gene were used to detect anti-aquaporin-4 antibody in neuromyelitis optica patient sera by immunofluorescence. Anti-aquaporin-4 autoantibody was stably detected by immunofluorescence in neuromyelitis optica patient sera exclusively. The sensitivity of the assay for neuromyelitis optica was 90% and the specificity for neuromyelitis optica was 100%. The anti-aquaporin-4 antibody titers in sera were tested with serial dilutions until the signal disappeared. A positive correlation was detected between Expanded Disability Status Scale scores and serum anti-aquaporin-4 antibody titers. The anti-aquaporin-4 antibody assay is highly sensitive and specific in the sera of Chinese neuromyelitis optica patients. Detection of aquaporin-4 autoantibody is important for the diagnosis and treatment of neuromyelitis optica.

  12. HISTORIC IMAGE: VIEW OF CA. 1890SERA ROSTRUM, DEMOLISHED. PHOTOGRAPH CA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HISTORIC IMAGE: VIEW OF CA. 1890S-ERA ROSTRUM, DEMOLISHED. PHOTOGRAPH CA. 1930S. CEMETERY MAINTENANCE LEDGER, NCA HISTORY COLLECTION. - Alexandria National Cemetery, 1450 Wilkes Street, Alexandria, Independent City, VA

  13. Protease nexin-1 regulates retinal vascular development.

    PubMed

    Selbonne, Sonia; Francois, Deborah; Raoul, William; Boulaftali, Yacine; Sennlaub, Florian; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Bouton, Marie-Christine; Arocas, Véronique

    2015-10-01

    We recently identified protease nexin-1 (PN-1) or serpinE2, as a possibly underestimated player in maintaining angiogenic balance. Here, we used the well-characterized postnatal vascular development of newborn mouse retina to further investigate the role and the mechanism of action of PN-1 in physiological angiogenesis. The development of retinal vasculature was analysed by endothelial cell staining with isolectin B4. PN-1-deficient (PN-1(-/-)) retina displayed increased vascularization in the postnatal period, with elevated capillary thickness and density, compared to their wild-type littermate (WT). Moreover, PN-1(-/-) retina presented more veins/arteries than WT retina. The kinetics of retinal vasculature development, retinal VEGF expression and overall retinal structure were similar in WT and PN-1(-/-) mice, but we observed a hyperproliferation of vascular cells in PN-1(-/-) retina. Expression of PN-1 was analysed by immunoblotting and X-Gal staining of retinas from mice expressing beta-galactosidase under a PN-1 promoter. PN-1 was highly expressed in the first week following birth and then progressively decreased to a low level in adult retina where it localized on the retinal arteries. PCR arrays performed on mouse retinal RNA identified two angiogenesis-related factors, midkine and Smad5, that were overexpressed in PN-1(-/-) newborn mice and this was confirmed by RT-PCR. Both the higher vascularization and the overexpression of midkine and Smad5 mRNA were also observed in gastrocnemius muscle of PN-1(-/-) mice, suggesting that PN-1 interferes with these pathways. Together, our results demonstrate that PN-1 strongly limits physiological angiogenesis and suggest that modulation of PN-1 expression could represent a new way to regulate angiogenesis.

  14. Cysteine Proteases from Bloodfeeding Arthropod Ectoparasites

    PubMed Central

    Sojka, Daniel; Francischetti, Ivo M. B.; Calvo, Eric; Kotsyfakis, Michalis

    2012-01-01

    Cysteine proteases have been discovered in various bloodfeeding ectoparasites. Here, we assemble the available information about the function of these peptidases and reveal their role in hematophagy and parasite development. While most of the data shed light on key proteolytic events that play a role in arthropod physiology, we also report on the association of cysteine proteases with arthropod vectorial capacity. With emphasis on ticks, specifically Ixodes ricinus, we finally propose a model about the contribution of cysteine peptidases to blood digestion, and how their concerted action with other tick midgut proteases leads to the absorbance of nutrients by the midgut epithelial cells. PMID:21660665

  15. HIV-1 Protease: Structure, Dynamics and Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, John M.; Ishima, R.; Torchia, D.A.; Weber, Irene T.

    2008-06-03

    The HIV-1 protease is synthesized as part of a large Gag-Pol precursor protein. It is responsible for its own release from the precursor and the processing of the Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins into the mature structural and functional proteins required for virus maturation. Because of its indispensable role, the mature HIV-1 protease dimer has proven to be a successful target for the development of antiviral agents. In the last 5 years, a major emphasis in protease research has been to improve inhibitor design and treatment regimens.

  16. Pertussis antibodies in the sera of children exposed to Bordetella pertussis by vaccination or infection.

    PubMed

    Dolby, J M; Stephens, S

    1973-03-01

    Low agglutinin titres to pertussis suspensions were found in 99% of sera from a group comprising healthy adults and non-vaccinated, non-infected infants of 1-6 months of age. These are attributable to agglutinins to heat-stable antigens and/or heat labile agglutinogen 1, and cross-absorption tests must be done on the sera in order to distinguish between the two. Agglutinins to agglutinogens 2 and 3 were found in only about 20% of adult sera. Bactericidal antibody was low in titre or absent in all sera from non-exposed individuals.Raised bactericidal antibody titres and the presence of agglutinins 2 and 3 were attributed to exposure to Bordetella pertussis antigens, either as vaccine or as infection. The variation, amongst both vaccinated and infected children, was very great. A vaccinated child who became ill responded to the infection in much the same way as a non-vaccinated child. We were unable to relate the immunity of the child to the titres either of agglutinins or of the bactericidal antibody.The protective ability of sera from vaccinated or infected children measured in mice against small, lethal brain infections was also unrelated to the state of immunity in the children, but this protective ability was correlated with the complement-mediated bactericidal antibody titres of the sera.The distribution of agglutinins, bactericidal antibody, and anti-haemagglutinin in serum IgG and IgM was different in vaccinated and infected children. PMID:4348456

  17. Plasmodium vivax: N-terminal diversity in the blood stage SERA genes from Indian isolates.

    PubMed

    Rahul, C N; Shiva Krishna, K; Meera, M; Phadke, Sandhya; Rajesh, Vidya

    2015-06-01

    Worldwide malaria risk due to Plasmodium vivax makes development of vaccine against P. vivax, a high priority. Serine Repeat Antigen of P. vivax (PvSERA) is a multigene family of blood stage proteins with 12 homologues. Sequence diversity studies are important for understanding them as potential vaccine candidates. No information on N-terminal diversity of these genes is available in literature. In this paper, we evaluate the genetic polymorphism of N-terminal regions of the highly expressed member PvSERA4 and PvSERA5 genes from Indian field isolates. Our results show that PvSERA4 has deletions and insertions in Glutamine rich tetrameric repeat units contributing to its diversity. PvSERA5 also exhibits high genetic diversity with non-synonymous substitutions leading to identification of novel haplotypes from India. Our first report helps in elucidating the allelic variants of PvSERA genes in this region and contributes to evaluating their efficacy as vaccine candidates.

  18. Effects of proposed adipogenic factors in fetal swine sera upon preadipocyte development

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, T.G.; Hausman, G.J.; Martin, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    Genetic obesity has been detected in fetal pigs which suggests primary factors that cause the obesity develop prenatally. Growth hormone and thyroid hormones have been implicated as regulatory factors in fetal serum for preadipocyte differentiation. This experiment examined effects of growth hormone (GH) and thyroxine (T4) addition upon preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation when supplemented to deficient fetal pig sea. Hormones were added to decapitated fetal pig (Decap) sera to concentrations present in intact littermate (Reference) sera. Primary stromal-vascular cell cultures were prepared from rat inguinal adipose tissue. Cells were incubated with 5% decap or reference sera and hormones in media 199 during: days 1 to 5 for a /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation assay; days 1 to 15 for assay of ..cap alpha..-glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase; days 5 to 14 for a complete differentiation assay. Decap sera promoted less proliferation and enzyme differentiation than reference sera with no effect of GH addition. GH reduced detection of lipid accumulating cells on percol density gradients by 81%. T4 addition stimulated preadipocyte multiplication and produced a 30% increase in completely differentiated preadipocytes. These results indicate thyroid hormones are important components of fetal sera for regulation of preadipocyte development, whereas GH may only affect cellular metabolism.

  19. Protease and protease inhibitory activity in pregnant and postpartum involuting uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Milwidsky, A.; Beller, U.; Palti, Z.; Mayer, M.

    1982-08-15

    The presence of two distinct proteolytic activities in the rat uterus was confirmed with /sup 14/C-labeled globin used as a sensitive protein substrate and following release of label into the trichloroacetic acid-soluble supernatant fraction. Protease I is a cytoplasmic acid protease while protease II is associated with the pellet fraction, can be extracted by 0.6 M sodium chloride, and is active at pH 7.0. Protease I activity is low during pregnancy and markedly increases at term achieving maximal activity at day 3 post partum with a subsequent decline to preterm activity values. Lactation did not affect the uterine protease I activity. Protease II activity is not significantly different during pregnancy, at term, and post partum. The presence of an inhibitor of protease I was suggested by a decrease in enzyme activity with an increased cytosolic protein concentration. The inhibitor also lessened bovine trypsin activity but had no effect on protease II. Although its inhibitory potency on trypsin fluctuated during the various uterine physiologic stages, these changes appeared to be statistically insignificant. Human uterine samples were also found to contain the two protease activities with similar changes in protease I post partum. It is suggested that, both in the rat and in man, uterine involution post partum is associated with a marked increase in activity of acid cytosolic protease, while a particulate neutral protease and a soluble inhibitor of trypsin, which are also present in uterine cells, do not appear to play a significant role in the dissolution of uterine tissues after parturition.

  20. 43-kilodalton glycoprotein from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis: immunochemical reactions with sera from patients with paracoccidioidomycosis, histoplasmosis, or Jorge Lobo's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Puccia, R; Travassos, L R

    1991-01-01

    Sera from patients with paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), histoplasmosis (HP), or Jorge Lobo's disease (JL) were titrated against purified gp43 from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis by using both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoprecipitation (IPP) reactions with 125I-labeled antigens. In IPP, PCM sera and other sera could be distinguished on the basis of serum titers, whereas in ELISA, 53% of the HP sera and 29% of the JL sera reacted similarly to the PCM sera. To investigate the possible role of the carbohydrate epitopes in these reactions, we compared the reactivities of sera from several patients with native and deglycosylated gp43. Competition experiments were carried out with monosaccharides as inhibitors. The results suggest that greater than 85% of the reactions of the PCM sera with gp43 involved peptide epitopes. Cross-reactions with HP and JL sera in ELISA were predominantly attributed to periodate-sensitive carbohydrate epitopes containing galactosyl residues. HP and JL sera which reacted strongly with gp43 in ELISA were only weakly reactive or did not react in IPP with labeled antigens in solution. Moreover, ELISA reactions could be significantly inhibited either by monosaccharides or by periodate treatment. Apparently, carbohydrate epitopes in gp43 are more accessible to the antibodies when the molecule is bound to a plastic substrate than when it is in solution. Structural changes in the gp43 antigen arising by N deglycosylation abolish reactivity with PCM sera and support the existence of conformational peptide epitopes. Images PMID:1722220

  1. Gardens on Display.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinheimer, Margaret

    1998-01-01

    Discusses display gardens and their development by students. Presents guidelines for construction and size consideration and describes details of an outdoor garden, volcanic garden, and shoe box dioramas. (DDR)

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus 1 protease expressed in Escherichia coli behaves as a dimeric aspartic protease.

    PubMed Central

    Meek, T D; Dayton, B D; Metcalf, B W; Dreyer, G B; Strickler, J E; Gorniak, J G; Rosenberg, M; Moore, M L; Magaard, V W; Debouck, C

    1989-01-01

    Recombinant human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) protease, purified from a bacterial expression system, processed a recombinant form of its natural substrate, Pr55gag, into protein fragments that possess molecular weights commensurate with those of the virion gag proteins. Molecular weights of the protease obtained under denaturing and nondenaturing conditions (11,000 and 22,000, respectively) and chemical crosslinking studies were consistent with a dimeric structure for the active enzyme. The protease appropriately cleaved the nonapeptide Ac-Arg-Ala-Ser-Gln-Asn-Tyr-Pro-Val-Val-NH2 between the tyrosine and proline residues. HIV-1 protease was sensitive to inactivators of the aspartic proteases. The aspartic protease inactivator 1,2-epoxy-3-(4-nitrophenoxy)propane produced irreversible, time-dependent inactivation of the protease. The pH-dependent kinetics of this inactivator were consistent with the requirement of an unprotonated carboxyl group in the active site of the enzyme, suggesting that HIV-1 protease is also an aspartic protease. Images PMID:2648384

  3. Military display performance parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Meyer, Frederick

    2012-06-01

    The military display market is analyzed in terms of four of its segments: avionics, vetronics, dismounted soldier, and command and control. Requirements are summarized for a number of technology-driving parameters, to include luminance, night vision imaging system compatibility, gray levels, resolution, dimming range, viewing angle, video capability, altitude, temperature, shock and vibration, etc., for direct-view and virtual-view displays in cockpits and crew stations. Technical specifications are discussed for selected programs.

  4. Secreted fungal aspartic proteases: A review.

    PubMed

    Mandujano-González, Virginia; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Angel; Mercado-Flores, Yuridia

    2016-01-01

    The aspartic proteases, also called aspartyl and aspartate proteases or acid proteases (E.C.3.4.23), belong to the endopeptidase family and are characterized by the conserved sequence Asp-Gly-Thr at the active site. These enzymes are found in a wide variety of microorganisms in which they perform important functions related to nutrition and pathogenesis. In addition, their high activity and stability at acid pH make them attractive for industrial application in the food industry; specifically, they are used as milk-coagulating agents in cheese production or serve to improve the taste of some foods. This review presents an analysis of the characteristics and properties of secreted microbial aspartic proteases and their potential for commercial application. PMID:27137097

  5. Secreted fungal aspartic proteases: A review.

    PubMed

    Mandujano-González, Virginia; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Angel; Mercado-Flores, Yuridia

    2016-01-01

    The aspartic proteases, also called aspartyl and aspartate proteases or acid proteases (E.C.3.4.23), belong to the endopeptidase family and are characterized by the conserved sequence Asp-Gly-Thr at the active site. These enzymes are found in a wide variety of microorganisms in which they perform important functions related to nutrition and pathogenesis. In addition, their high activity and stability at acid pH make them attractive for industrial application in the food industry; specifically, they are used as milk-coagulating agents in cheese production or serve to improve the taste of some foods. This review presents an analysis of the characteristics and properties of secreted microbial aspartic proteases and their potential for commercial application.

  6. Vanadium inhibition of serine and cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Guerrieri, N; Cerletti, P; De Vincentiis, M; Salvati, A; Scippa, S

    1999-03-01

    A study was made on the effect of vanadium, in both the tetravalent state in vanadyl sulphate and in the pentavalent state in sodium meta-vanadate, and ortho-vanadate, on the proteolysis of azocasein by two serine proteases, trypsin and subtilisin and two cysteine proteases bromelain and papain. Also the proteolysis of bovine azoalbumin by serine proteases was considered. An inhibitory effect was present in all cases, except meta-vanadate with subtilisin. The oxidation level of vanadium by itself did not determine the inhibition kinetics, which also depended on the type and composition of the vanadium containing molecule and on the enzyme assayed. The pattern of inhibition was similar for proteases belonging to the same class. The highest inhibition was obtained with meta-vanadate on papain and with vanadyl sulphate on bromelain.

  7. Bioinformatics of proteases in the MEROPS database.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Alan J

    2004-05-01

    Proteolytic enzymes represent approximately approximately 2% of the total number of proteins present in all types of organisms. Many of these enzymes are of medical importance, and those that are of potential interest as drug targets can be divided into the endogenous enzymes encoded in the human genome, and the exogenous proteases encoded in the genomes of disease-causing organisms. There are also naturally occurring inhibitors of proteases, some of which have pharmaceutical relevance. The MEROPS database provides a rich source of information on proteases and their inhibitors. Storage and retrieval of this information is facilitated by the use of a hierarchical classification system (which was pioneered by the compilers of the database) in which homologous proteases and their inhibitors are divided into clans and families. PMID:15216937

  8. Raster graphics display library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsrud, Anders; Stephenson, Michael B.

    1987-01-01

    The Raster Graphics Display Library (RGDL) is a high level subroutine package that give the advanced raster graphics display capabilities needed. The RGDL uses FORTRAN source code routines to build subroutines modular enough to use as stand-alone routines in a black box type of environment. Six examples are presented which will teach the use of RGDL in the fastest, most complete way possible. Routines within the display library that are used to produce raster graphics are presented in alphabetical order, each on a separate page. Each user-callable routine is described by function and calling parameters. All common blocks that are used in the display library are listed and the use of each variable within each common block is discussed. A reference on the include files that are necessary to compile the display library is contained. Each include file and its purpose are listed. The link map for MOVIE.BYU version 6, a general purpose computer graphics display system that uses RGDL software, is also contained.

  9. Electrically sensing protease activity with nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukwikila, Mikiembo; Howorka, Stefan

    2010-11-01

    The enzymatic activity of a protease was electrically detected using nanopore recordings. A peptide substrate was tethered to microscale beads, and cleavage by the enzyme trypsin released a soluble fragment that was electrophoretically driven through the α-hemolysin protein pore, leading to detectable blockades in the ionic current. Owing to its simplicity, this approach to sense enzymatic activity may be applied to other proteases.

  10. Purification and Characterization of Serine Proteases That Exhibit Caspase-Like Activity and Are Associated with Programmed Cell Death in Avena sativa

    PubMed Central

    Coffeen, Warren C.; Wolpert, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Victoria blight of Avena sativa (oat) is caused by the fungus Cochliobolus victoriae, which is pathogenic because of the production of the toxin victorin. The victorin-induced response in sensitive A. sativa has been characterized as a form of programmed cell death (PCD) and displays morphological and biochemical features similar to apoptosis, including chromatin condensation, DNA laddering, cell shrinkage, altered mitochondrial function, and ordered, substrate-specific proteolytic events. Victorin-induced proteolysis of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is shown to be prevented by caspase-specific and general protease inhibitors. Evidence is presented for a signaling cascade leading to Rubisco proteolysis that involves multiple proteases. Furthermore, two proteases that are apparently involved in the Rubisco proteolytic cascade were purified and characterized. These proteases exhibit caspase specificity and display amino acid sequences homologous to plant subtilisin-like Ser proteases. The proteases are constitutively present in an active form and are relocalized to the extracellular fluid after induction of PCD by either victorin or heat shock. The role of the enzymes as processive proteases involved in a signal cascade during the PCD response is discussed. PMID:15020745

  11. Intramolecular Interactions between the Protease and Structural Domains Are Important for the Functions of Serine Protease Autotransporters▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Casey; Malik, Huma; Nassman, Deana; Huang, Antony; Tariq, Fayha; Oelschlaeger, Peter; Stathopoulos, Christos

    2010-01-01

    Autotransporter (AT) is a protein secretion pathway found in Gram-negative bacteria featuring a multidomain polypeptide with a signal sequence, a passenger domain, and a translocator domain. An AT subfamily named serine protease ATs of the family Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) is characterized by the presence of a conserved serine protease motif in the passenger domain which contributes to bacterial pathogenesis. The goal of the current study is to determine the importance of the passenger domain conserved residues in the SPATE proteolytic and adhesive functions using the temperature-sensitive hemagglutinin (Tsh) protein as our model. To begin, mutations of 21 fully conserved residues in the four passenger domain conserved motifs were constructed by PCR-based site-directed mutagenesis. Seventeen mutants exhibited a wild-type secretion level; among these mutants, eight displayed reduced proteolytic activities in Tsh-specific oligopeptide and mucin cleavage assays. These eight mutants also demonstrated lower affinities to extracellular matrix proteins, collagen IV, and fibronectin. These eight conserved residues were analyzed by molecular graphics modeling to demonstrate their intramolecular interactions with the catalytic triad and other key residues. Additional mutations were made to confirm the above interactions in order to demonstrate their significance to the SPATE functions. Altogether our data suggest that certain conserved residues in the SPATE passenger domain are important for both the proteolytic and adhesive activities of SPATE by maintaining the proper protein structure via intramolecular interactions between the protease and β-helical domains. Here, we provide new insight into the structure-function relationship of the SPATEs and the functional roles of their conserved residues. PMID:20479079

  12. Protease activation in glycerol-based deep eutectic solvents

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Baker, Gary A.; Holmes, Shaletha

    2011-01-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) consisting of mixtures of a choline salt (chloride or acetate form) and glycerol are prepared as easily accessible, biodegradable, and inexpensive alternatives to conventional aprotic cation-anion paired ionic liquids. These DES systems display excellent fluidity coupled with thermal stability to nearly 200 °C. In this work, the transesterification activities of cross-linked proteases (subtilisin and α-chymotrypsin), immobilized on chitosan, were individually examined in these novel DESs. In the 1:2 molar ratio mixture of choline chloride/glycerol containing 3% (v/v) water, cross-linked subtilisin exhibited an excellent activity (2.9 μmo l min−1 g−1) in conjunction with a selectivity of 98% in the transesterification reaction of N-acetyl-L-phenylalanine ethyl ester with 1-propanol. These highly encouraging results advocate more extensive exploration of DESs in protease-mediated biotransformations of additional polar substrates and use of DESs in biocatalysis more generally. PMID:21909232

  13. HIV Protease Inhibitors and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Anuurad, Erdembileg; Bremer, Andrew; Berglund, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the current scientific literature and recent clinical trials on HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) and their potential role in the pathogenesis of lipodystrophy and metabolic disorders. Recent findings HIV PI treatment may affect the normal stimulatory effect of insulin on glucose and fat storage. Further, chronic inflammation from HIV infection and PI treatment trigger cellular homeostatic stress responses with adverse effects on intermediary metabolism. The physiologic outcome is such that total adipocyte storage capacity is decreased, and the remaining adipocytes resist further fat storage. This process leads to a pathologic cycle of lipodystrophy and lipotoxicity, a pro-atherogenic lipid profile, and a clinical phenotype of increased central body fat distribution similar to the metabolic syndrome. Summary PIs are a key component of antiretroviral therapy and have dramatically improved the life expectancy of HIV-infected individuals. However, they are also associated with abnormalities in glucose/lipid metabolism and body fat distribution. Further studies are needed to better define the pathogenesis of PI-associated metabolic and body fat changes and their potential treatment. PMID:20717021

  14. ADAM Proteases and Gastrointestinal Function.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jennifer C; Rustagi, Shelly; Dempsey, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) are a family of cell surface proteases that regulate diverse cellular functions, including cell adhesion, migration, cellular signaling, and proteolysis. Proteolytically active ADAMs are responsible for ectodomain shedding of membrane-associated proteins. ADAMs rapidly modulate key cell signaling pathways in response to changes in the extracellular environment (e.g., inflammation) and play a central role in coordinating intercellular communication within the local microenvironment. ADAM10 and ADAM17 are the most studied members of the ADAM family in the gastrointestinal tract. ADAMs regulate many cellular processes associated with intestinal development, cell fate specification, and the maintenance of intestinal stem cell/progenitor populations. Several signaling pathway molecules that undergo ectodomain shedding by ADAMs [e.g., ligands and receptors from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ErbB and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) receptor (TNFR) families] help drive and control intestinal inflammation and injury/repair responses. Dysregulation of these processes through aberrant ADAM expression or sustained ADAM activity is linked to chronic inflammation, inflammation-associated cancer, and tumorigenesis.

  15. Neutral serine proteases of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kettritz, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs) exercise tissue-degrading and microbial-killing effects. The spectrum of NSP-mediated functions grows continuously, not least because of methodological progress. Sensitive and specific FRET substrates were developed to study the proteolytic activity of each NSP member. Advanced biochemical methods are beginning to characterize common and specific NSP substrates. The resulting novel information indicates that NSPs contribute not only to genuine inflammatory neutrophil functions but also to autoimmunity, metabolic conditions, and cancer. Tight regulatory mechanisms control the proteolytic potential of NSPs. However, not all NSP functions depend on their enzymatic activity. Proteinase-3 (PR3) is somewhat unique among the NSPs for PR3 functions as an autoantigen. Patients with small-vessel vasculitis develop autoantibodies to PR3 that bind their target antigens on the neutrophil surface and trigger neutrophil activation. These activated cells subsequently contribute to vascular necrosis with life-threatening multiorgan failure. This article discusses various aspects of NSP biology and highlights translational aspects with strong clinical implications. PMID:27558338

  16. ADAM Proteases and Gastrointestinal Function

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jennifer C.; Rustagi, Shelly; Dempsey, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) are a family of cell surface proteases that regulate diverse cellular functions, including cell adhesion, migration, cellular signaling, and proteolysis. Proteolytically active ADAMs are responsible for ectodomain shedding of membrane-associated proteins. ADAMs rapidly modulate key cell signaling pathways in response to changes in the extracellular environment (e.g., inflammation) and play a central role in coordinating intercellular communication within the local microenvironment. ADAM10 and ADAM17 are the most studied members of the ADAM family in the gastrointestinal tract. ADAMs regulate many cellular processes associated with intestinal development, cell fate specification, and the maintenance of intestinal stem cell/progenitor populations. Several signaling pathway molecules that undergo ectodomain shedding by ADAMs [e.g., ligands and receptors from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ErbB and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) receptor (TNFR) families] help drive and control intestinal inflammation and injury/repair responses. Dysregulation of these processes through aberrant ADAM expression or sustained ADAM activity is linked to chronic inflammation, inflammation-associated cancer, and tumorigenesis. PMID:26667078

  17. Stimulation of the herpes simplex virus type I protease by antichaeotrophic salts.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, G; DiIanni, C L; O'Boyle, D R; Stevens, J; Weinheimer, S P; Deckman, I C; Matusick-Kumar, L; Colonno, R J

    1995-12-15

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 protease is expressed as an 80,000-dalton polypeptide, encoded within the 635-amino acid open reading frame of the UL26 gene. The two known protein substrates for this enzyme are the protease itself and the capsid assembly protein ICP35 (Liu, F., and Roizman, B. (1991) J. Virol. 65, 5149-5156). In this report we describe the use of a rapid and quantitative assay for characterizing the protease. The assay uses a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing the COOH-terminal cleavage site of ICP35 as the substrate (GST-56). The protease consists of N0, the NH2-terminal 247 amino acid catalytic domain of the UL26 gene product, also expressed as a GST fusion protein. Upon cleavage with N0, a single 25-mer peptide is released from GST-56, which is soluble in trichloroacetic acid. Using this assay, the protease displayed a pH optimum between 7 and 9 but most importantly had an absolute requirement for high concentrations of an antichaeotrophic agent. Strong salting out salts such as Na2SO4 and KPO4 (> or = 1 M) stimulated activity, whereas NaCl and KCl had no effect. The degree of stimulation by 1.25 M Na2SO4 and KPO4 were 100-150- and 200-300-fold, respectively. Using the fluorescent probe 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate, the protease was shown to bind the dye in the presence of 1.25 M Na2SO4 or KPO4, but not at low ionic strength or in the presence of 1.25 or 2.2 M NaCl. This binding was most likely at the protease active site because a high affinity cleavage site peptide, but not a control peptide, could displace the dye. In addition to cleaving GST-56, the herpes simplex virus type I protease also cleaved the purified 56-mer peptide. Circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopy showed the peptide to be primarily random coil under physiological conditions, suggesting that antichaeotrophic agents affect the conformation of the substrate as well as the protease.

  18. Carbohydrate protease conjugates: Stabilized proteases for peptide synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wartchow, C.A.; Wang, Peng; Bednarski, M.D.; Callstrom, M.R. |

    1995-12-31

    The synthesis of oligopeptides using stable carbohydrate protease conjugates (CPCs) was examined in acetonitrile solvent systems. CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin] was used for the preparation of peptides containing histidine, phenylalanine, tryptophan in the P{sub 1} position in 60-93% yield. The CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin]-catalyzed synthesis of octamer Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-OEt from Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-OMe was achieved in 71% yield demonstrating that synthesis peptides containing both hydrophylic and hydrophobic amino acids. The P{sub 2} specificity of papain for aromatic residues was utilized for the 2 + 3 coupling of Z-Tyr-Gly-OMe to H{sub 2}N-Gly-Phe-Leu-OH to generate the leucine enkephalin derivative in 79% yield. Although papain is nonspecific for the hydrolysis of N-benzyloxycarbonyl amino acid methyl esters in aqueous solution, the rates of synthesis for these derivitives with nucleophile leucine tert-butyl ester differed by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. CPC[thermolysin] was used to prepare the aspartame precursor Z-Asp-Phe-OMe in 90% yield. The increased stability of CPCs prepared from periodate-modified poly(2-methacryl- amido-2-deoxy-D-glucose), poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose), and poly(5-methacryl-amido-5-deoxy-D-ribose), carbohydrate materials designed to increase the aldehyde concentration in aqueous solution, suggests that the stability of CPCs is directly related to the aldehyde concentration of the carbohydrate material. Periodate oxidation of poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose) followed by covalent attachment to {alpha}-chymotrypsin gave a CPC with catalytic activity in potassium phosphate buffer at 90{degrees}C for 2 h. 1 fig., 1 tab., 40 refs.

  19. Dichroic Liquid Crystal Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadur, Birendra

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * DICHROIC DYES * Chemical Structure * Chemical and Photochemical Stability * THEORETICAL MODELLING * DEFECTS CAUSED BY PROLONGED LIGHT IRRADIATION * CHEMICAL STRUCTURE AND PHOTOSTABILITY * OTHER PARAMETERS AFFECTING PHOTOSTABILITY * CELL PREPARATION * DICHROIC PARAMETERS AND THEIR MEASUREMENTS * Order Parameter and Dichroic Ratio Of Dyes * Absorbance, Order Parameter and Dichroic Ratio Measurements * IMPACT OF DYE STRUCTURE AND LIQUID CRYSTAL HOST ON PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF A DICHROIC MIXTURE * Order Parameter and Dichroic Ratio * EFFECT OF LENGTH OF DICHROIC DYES ON THE ORDER PARAMETER * EFFECT OF THE BREADTH OF DYE ON THE ORDER PARAMETER * EFFECT OF THE HOST ON THE ORDER PARAMETER * TEMPERATURE VARIATION OF THE ORDER PARAMETER OF DYES IN A LIQUID CRYSTAL HOST * IMPACT OF DYE CONCENTRATION ON THE ORDER PARAMETER * Temperature Range * Viscosity * Dielectric Constant and Anisotropy * Refractive Indices and Birefringence * solubility43,153-156 * Absorption Wavelength and Auxochromic Groups * Molecular Engineering of Dichroic Dyes * OPTICAL, ELECTRO-OPTICAL AND LIFE PARAMETERS * Colour And CIE Colour space120,160-166 * CIE 1931 COLOUR SPACE * CIE 1976 CHROMATICITY DIAGRAM * CIE UNIFORM COLOUR SPACES & COLOUR DIFFERENCE FORMULAE120,160-166 * Electro-Optical Parameters120 * LUMINANCE * CONTRAST AND CONTRAST RATIO * SWITCHING SPEED * Life Parameters and Failure Modes * DICHROIC MIXTURE FORMULATION * Monochrome Mixture * Black Mixture * ACHROMATIC BLACK MIXTURE FOR HEILMEIER DISPLAYS * Effect of Illuminant on Display Colour * Colour of the Field-On State * Effect of Dye Linewidth * Optimum Centroid Wavelengths * Effect of Dye Concentration * Mixture Formulation Using More Than Three Dyes * ACHROMATIC MIXTURE FOR WHITE-TAYLOR TYPE DISPLAYS * HEILMEIER DISPLAYS * Theoretical Modelling * Threshold Characteristic * Effects of Dye Concentration on Electro-optical Parameters * Effect of Cholesteric Doping * Effect of Alignment

  20. Evaluation of liver fluke recombinant cathepsin B-1 protease as a serodiagnostic antigen for human opisthorchiasis.

    PubMed

    Sripa, Jittiyawadee; Brindley, Paul J; Sripa, Banchob; Loukas, Alex; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Laha, Thewarach

    2012-03-01

    A cathepsin B-like cysteine protease belonging to family C1 is abundantly expressed in the transcriptome and proteome of the carcinogenic liver fluke of humans, Opisthorchis viverrini. This enzyme is present in excretory/secretory (ES) products released by parasites cultured in vitro. This study evaluated the performance of recombinant O. viverrini cathepsin B1 (rOv-CB-1) as an antigen for immunodiagnosis of opisthorchiasis. The full length Ov-CB-1 cDNA was cloned and recombinant protein was produced in catalytically active form in Pichia pastoris. The recombinant Ov-CB-1 (rOv-CB-1) was affinity purified via nickel-NTA chromatography and tested in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) with human sera from an opisthorchiasis endemic area. Sera from egg-positive O. viverrini infections produced a strong IgG antibody response to rOv-CB-1 both in ELISA and immunoblot analysis. The sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA test was 67% and 81%, respectively. These findings support the feasibility of using recombinant Ov-CB-1 in ELISA for the serodiagnosis of human opisthorchiasis. PMID:21704728

  1. Phage and Yeast Display.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jared; Marasco, Wayne A

    2015-02-01

    Despite the availability of antimicrobial drugs, the continued development of microbial resistance--established through escape mutations and the emergence of resistant strains--limits their clinical utility. The discovery of novel, therapeutic, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) offers viable clinical alternatives in the treatment and prophylaxis of infectious diseases. Human mAb-based therapies are typically nontoxic in patients and demonstrate high specificity for the intended microbial target. This specificity prevents negative impacts on the patient microbiome and avoids driving the resistance of nontarget species. The in vitro selection of human antibody fragment libraries displayed on phage or yeast surfaces represents a group of well-established technologies capable of generating human mAbs. The advantage of these forms of microbial display is the large repertoire of human antibody fragments present during a single selection campaign. Furthermore, the in vitro selection environments of microbial surface display allow for the rapid isolation of antibodies--and their encoding genes--against infectious pathogens and their toxins that are impractical within in vivo systems, such as murine hybridomas. This article focuses on the technologies of phage display and yeast display, as these strategies relate to the discovery of human mAbs for the treatment and vaccine development of infectious diseases. PMID:26104550

  2. Protease Inhibitors Targeting Coronavirus and Filovirus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanchen; Vedantham, Punitha; Lu, Kai; Agudelo, Juliet; Carrion, Ricardo; Nunneley, Jerritt W.; Barnard, Dale; Pöhlmann, Stefan; McKerrow, James H.; Renslo, Adam R.; Simmons, Graham

    2016-01-01

    In order to gain entry into cells, diverse viruses, including Ebola virus, SARS-coronavirus and the emerging MERS-coronavirus, depend on activation of their envelope glycoproteins by host cell proteases. The respective enzymes are thus excellent targets for antiviral intervention. In cell culture, activation of Ebola virus, as well as SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can be accomplished by the endosomal cysteine proteases, cathepsin L (CTSL) and cathepsin B (CTSB). In addition, SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can use serine proteases localized at the cell surface, for their activation. However, it is currently unclear which protease(s) facilitate viral spread in the infected host. We report here that the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777, ((2S)-N-[(1E,3S)-1-(benzenesulfonyl)-5-phenylpent-1-en-3-yl]-2-{[(E)-4-methylpiperazine-1-carbonyl]amino}-3-phenylpropanamide) and closely-related vinylsulfones act as broad-spectrum antivirals by targeting cathepsin-mediated cell entry. K11777 is already in advanced stages of development for a number of parasitic diseases, such as Chagas disease, and has proven to be safe and effective in a range of animal models. K11777 inhibition of SARS-CoV and Ebola virus entry was observed in the sub-nanomolar range. In order to assess, whether cysteine or serine proteases promote viral spread in the host, we compared the antiviral activity of an optimized K11777-derivative with that of camostat, an inhibitor of TMPRSS2 and related serine proteases. Employing a pathogenic animal model of SARS-CoV infection, we demonstrated that viral spread and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV is driven by serine rather than cysteine proteases and can be effectively prevented by camostat. Camostat has been clinically used to treat chronic pancreatitis, and thus represents an exciting potential therapeutic for respiratory coronavirus infections. Our results indicate that camostat, or similar serine protease inhibitors, might be an effective option for treatment of SARS and

  3. A Camelid-derived Antibody Fragment Targeting the Active Site of a Serine Protease Balances between Inhibitor and Substrate Behavior.

    PubMed

    Kromann-Hansen, Tobias; Oldenburg, Emil; Yung, Kristen Wing Yu; Ghassabeh, Gholamreza H; Muyldermans, Serge; Declerck, Paul J; Huang, Mingdong; Andreasen, Peter A; Ngo, Jacky Chi Ki

    2016-07-15

    A peptide segment that binds the active site of a serine protease in a substrate-like manner may behave like an inhibitor or a substrate. However, there is sparse information on which factors determine the behavior a particular peptide segment will exhibit. Here, we describe the first x-ray crystal structure of a nanobody in complex with a serine protease. The nanobody displays a new type of interaction between an antibody and a serine protease as it inserts its complementary determining region-H3 loop into the active site of the protease in a substrate-like manner. The unique binding mechanism causes the nanobody to behave as a strong inhibitor as well as a poor substrate. Intriguingly, its substrate behavior is incomplete, as 30-40% of the nanobody remained intact and inhibitory after prolonged incubation with the protease. Biochemical analysis reveals that an intra-loop interaction network within the complementary determining region-H3 of the nanobody balances its inhibitor versus substrate behavior. Collectively, our results unveil molecular factors, which may be a general mechanism to determine the substrate versus inhibitor behavior of other protease inhibitors.

  4. Mapping protease substrates using a biotinylated phage substrate library.

    SciTech Connect

    Scholle, M. D.; Kriplani, U.; Pabon, A.; Sishtla, K.; Glucksman, M. J.; Kay, B. K.; Biosciences Division; Chicago Medical School

    2005-05-05

    We describe a bacteriophage M13 substrate library encoding the AviTag (BirA substrate) and combinatorial heptamer peptides displayed at the N terminus of the mature form of capsid protein III. Phages are biotinylated efficiently (> or = 50%) when grown in E. coli cells coexpressing BirA, and such viral particles can be immobilized on a streptavidin-coated support and released by protease cleavage within the combinatorial peptide. We have used this library to map the specificity of human Factor Xa and a neuropeptidase, neurolysin (EC3.4.24.16). Validation by analysis of isolated peptide substrates has revealed that neurolysin recognizes the motif hydrophobic-X-Pro-Arg-hydrophobic, where Arg-hydrophobic is the scissile bond.

  5. Detection of Borreliae in Archived Sera from Patients with Clinically Suspect Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sin Hang; Vigliotti, Jessica S.; Vigliotti, Veronica S.; Jones, William; Shearer, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The diagnoses of Lyme disease based on clinical manifestations, serological findings and detection of infectious agents often contradict each other. We tested 52 blind-coded serum samples, including 20 pre-treatment and 12 post-treatment sera from clinically suspect Lyme disease patients, for the presence of residual Lyme disease infectious agents, using nested PCR amplification of a signature segment of the borrelial 16S ribosomal RNA gene for detection and direct DNA sequencing of the PCR amplicon for molecular validation. These archived sera were split from the samples drawn for the 2-tier serology tests performed by a CDC-approved laboratory, and are used as reference materials for evaluating new diagnostic reagents. Of the 12 post-treatment serum samples, we found DNA evidence of a novel borrelia of uncertain significance in one, which was also positive for the 2-tier serology test. The rest of the post-treatment sera and all 20 control sera were PCR-negative. Of the 20 pre-treatment sera from clinically suspect early Lyme disease patients, we found Borrelia miyamotoi in one which was 2-tier serology-negative, and a Borrelia burgdorferi in two—one negative and one positive for 2-tier serology. We conclude that a sensitive and reliable DNA-based test is needed to support the diagnosis of Lyme disease and Lyme disease-like borreliosis. PMID:24619223

  6. Inhibition of adenovirus DNA synthesis in vitro by sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, M.S.; Friefeld, B.R.; Keiser, H.D.

    1982-12-01

    Sera containing antinuclear antibodies from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and related disorders were tested for their effect on the synthesis of adenovirus (Ad) DNA in an in vitro replication system. After being heated at 60/sup 0/C for 1 h, some sera from patients with SLE inhibited Ad DNA synthesis by 60 to 100%. Antibodies to double-stranded DNA were present in 15 of the 16 inhibitory sera, and inhibitory activity copurified with anti-double-stranded DNA in the immunoglobulin G fraction. These SLE sera did not inhibit the DNA polymerases ..cap alpha.., BETA, ..gamma.. and had no antibody to the 72,000-dalton DNA-binding protein necessary for Ad DNA synthesis. The presence of antibodies to single-stranded DNA and a variety of saline-extractable antigens (Sm, Ha, nRNP, and rRNP) did not correlate with SLE serum inhibitory activity. Methods previously developed for studying the individual steps in Ad DNA replication were used to determine the site of inhibition by the SLE sera that contained antibody to double-stranded DNA. Concentrations of the SLE inhibitor that decreased the elongation of Ad DNA by greater than 85% had no effect on either the initiation of Ad DNA synthesis or the polymerization of the first 26 deoxyribonucleotides.

  7. Detection of borreliae in archived sera from patients with clinically suspect Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sin Hang; Vigliotti, Jessica S; Vigliotti, Veronica S; Jones, William; Shearer, David M

    2014-03-11

    The diagnoses of Lyme disease based on clinical manifestations, serological findings and detection of infectious agents often contradict each other. We tested 52 blind-coded serum samples, including 20 pre-treatment and 12 post-treatment sera from clinically suspect Lyme disease patients, for the presence of residual Lyme disease infectious agents, using nested PCR amplification of a signature segment of the borrelial 16S ribosomal RNA gene for detection and direct DNA sequencing of the PCR amplicon for molecular validation. These archived sera were split from the samples drawn for the 2-tier serology tests performed by a CDC-approved laboratory, and are used as reference materials for evaluating new diagnostic reagents. Of the 12 post-treatment serum samples, we found DNA evidence of a novel borrelia of uncertain significance in one, which was also positive for the 2-tier serology test. The rest of the post-treatment sera and all 20 control sera were PCR-negative. Of the 20 pre-treatment sera from clinically suspect early Lyme disease patients, we found Borrelia miyamotoi in one which was 2-tier serology-negative, and a Borrelia burgdorferi in two-one negative and one positive for 2-tier serology. We conclude that a sensitive and reliable DNA-based test is needed to support the diagnosis of Lyme disease and Lyme disease-like borreliosis.

  8. Antibodies against Ku protein in sera from patients with autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Yaneva, M; Arnett, F C

    1989-01-01

    Immunoaffinity-purified Ku protein was used to screen sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma, myositis and Sjögren's syndrome for anti-Ku antibodies in a quantitative immunoblot assay. Sixteen percent of the 159 studied sera were reactive with the Ku protein; significantly increased frequencies of anti-Ku antibodies were found in SLE (19%) and scleroderma (14%) sera. Patients with myositis and Sjögren's syndrome showed similar frequencies. All positive sera had antibodies to the 86 kD subunit of Ku protein; only one serum did not react with 70 kD subunit. Frequencies of other autoantibodies were compared in anti-Ku positive and negative patients. Only anti-Sm antibodies, especially in the absence of anti-nRNP, appear to be associated with the presence of anti-Ku antibodies. A strong correlation between anti-Ku antibodies and the class II HLA antigen DQw1 (89% of the positive sera) was observed, suggesting participation of MHC genes in the mounting of the anti-Ku immune response. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2665976

  9. Comparison of dengue virus antigens in sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from dengue infected patients.

    PubMed

    Kittigul, L; Meethien, N; Sujirarat, D; Kittigul, C; Vasanavat, S

    1997-12-01

    The presence of dengue virus antigens in acute sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from dengue infected patients were determined by a biotin-streptavidin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (BS-ELISA). The frequency of the antigens detected in PBMC was higher than that in sera (53.8% vs 18.9%). In comparison with sera, the detection rate in PBMC was greater than six times: 7 cases were positive only in sera whereas 44 cases were positive only in PBMC, p < 0.001. The presence of the antigens in the sera did not depend on the severity of the disease, i.e. dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever (grades I and II) or dengue shock syndrome (grades III and IV). In contrast, the presence of the antigens in PBMC increased from 36.8% to 100% when the infection was more severe. The dengue virus antigens could be detected in the samples collected between day 2 and day 7 after onset of the disease with the highest rate of detection (68.8%) in PBMC collected on day 4. The data suggest the use of PBMC with access to the appropriate acute-phase specimen for detection of dengue virus antigens.

  10. Crewstation display interface standardization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Gregory J.

    1999-08-01

    Military sensors and crewstation displays are all moving to digital-based technologies, an epochal shift from the previous world of analog interfaces throughout the video chain. It is no longer possible to specify a sensor and display to the same interface specification such as the venerable RS-170 and RS- 343 standards without paying an unacceptable resolution penalty. Consequently a new standard is required to allow sensor and display manufacturers to easily design system interfaces without relying on cumbersome, costly and unique interface control documents. This paper presents one possible hardware and protocol standard based on FibreChannel technology, and solicits inputs into the standards setting process which is now in progress.

  11. EKG and ultrasonoscope display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert D. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A system is disclosed which permits simultaneous display of an EKG waveform in real time in conjunction with a two-dimensional cross-sectional image of the heart, so that the EKG waveform can be directly compared with dimensional changes in the heart. The apparatus of the invention includes an ultrasonoscope for producing a C-scan cross-sectional image of the heart. An EKG monitor circuit along with EKG logic circuitry is combined with the ultrasonoscope circuitry to produce on the same oscilloscope screen a continuous vertical trace showing the EKG waveform simultaneously with the heart image. The logic circuitry controls the oscilloscope display such that the display of both heart and EKG waveforms occurs on a real time basis.

  12. Displays, deja vu.

    PubMed

    Huntoon, R B

    1985-02-01

    Developments in electronic displays and computers have enabled avionics designers to present the pilot with ever-increasing amounts of information in greater detail and with more accuracy. However, technicological developments have not always brought about enhancement of the pilot's role as aircraft systems manager. In fact, there is evidence that the new technology may add to the pilot's workload to the extent that his performance decreases. Recent articles and reports of research indicate that application of human factor principles and procedures to: (1) develop appropriate display formats, (2) consider the total avionics suite as an integrated system, and (3) simplify or summarize related data will significantly improve total aircraft performance. Indeed, development of the "chip" and new display techniques create an imperative demand for human factor considerations early in system design, ensuring that user evaluation, information integration, and simplification are intrinsic qualities of the system.

  13. New soluble ATP-dependent protease, Ti, in Escherichia coli that is distinct from protease La

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, C.H.; Hwang, B.J.; Park, W.J.; Goldberg, A.L.

    1987-05-01

    E. coli must contain other ATP-requiring proteolytic systems in addition to protease La (the lon gene product). A new ATP-dependent protease was purified from lon cells which lack protease La, as shown by immuno-blotting. This enzyme hydrolyzes (TH)casein to acid-soluble products in the presence of ATP (or dATP) and MgS . Nonhydrolyzable ATP analogs, other nucleoside triphosphates and AMP can not replace ATP. Therefore, ATP hydrolysis appears necessary for proteolysis. The enzyme appears to be a serine protease, but also contains essential thiol residues. Unlike protease La, it is not inhibited by vanadate, heparin, or the defective R9 subunit of protease La. On gel filtration, this enzyme has an apparent Mr of 340,000 and is comprised of two components of 190,000D and 130,000D, which can be separated by phosphocellulose chromatography. By themselves, these components do not show ATP-dependent proteolysis, but when mixed, full activity is restored. These finding and similar ones of Maurizi and Gottesman indicate that E. coli contain two soluble ATP-dependent proteases, which function by different mechanisms. This new enzyme may contribute to the rapid breakdown of abnormal polypeptides or of normal proteins during starvation. The authors propose to name it protease Ti.

  14. Escherichia coli contains a soluble ATP-dependent protease (Ti) distinct from protease La

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, B.J.; Park, W.J.; Chung, C.H.; Goldberg, A.L.

    1987-08-01

    The energy requirement for protein breakdown in Escherichia coli has generally been attributed to the ATP-dependence of protease La, the lon gene product. The authors have partially purified another ATP-dependent protease from lon/sup -/ cells that lack protease La (as shown by immunoblotting). This enzyme hydrolyzes (/sup 3/H)methyl-casein to acid-soluble products in the presence of ATP and Mg/sup 2 +/. ATP hydrolysis appears necessary for proteolytic activity. Since this enzyme is inhibited by diisopropyl fluorophosphate, it appears to be a serine protease, but it also contains essential thiol residues. They propose to name this enzyme protease Ti. It differs from protease La in nucleotide specificity, inhibitor sensitivity, and subunit composition. On gel filtration, protease Ti has an apparent molecular weight of 370,000. It can be fractionated by phosphocellulose chromatography or by DEAE chromatography into two components with apparent molecular weights of 260,000 and 140,000. When separated, they do not show preteolytic activity. One of these components, by itself, has ATPase activity and is labile in the absence of ATP. The other contains the diisopropyl fluorophosphate-sensitive proteolytic site. These results and the similar findings of Katayama-Fujimura et al. indicate that E. coli contains two ATP-hydrolyzing proteases, which differ in many biochemical features and probably in their physiological roles.

  15. Ara12 subtilisin-like protease from Arabidopsis thaliana: purification, substrate specificity and tissue localization.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, John M U; Simpson, David J; Hyman, Stefan C; Ndimba, Bongani K; Slabas, Antoni R

    2003-01-01

    A C-terminal portion of Ara12 subtilisin-like protease (residues 542-757) was expressed in Escherichia coli cells as a fusion protein bound to maltose binding protein. Polyclonal antisera raised against the expressed protein were used to examine the tissue specificity and subcellular localization of Ara12. The protease was found predominantly in the silique and stem of plants, but was hardly detectable in leaf and not seen in root tissue. The distribution observed using immunological techniques is different from that seen by an RNA analysis study, which demonstrated similar mRNA abundance in the stem and leaves. Using immunogold labelling, Ara12 was shown to have an extracellular localization and was found in the intercellular spaces in stem tissue. Ara12 protease was purified to homogeneity from Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension cultures by anion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Proteolytic activity of Ara12 was inhibited by a number of serine protease inhibitors, but was almost unaffected by inhibitors of other catalytic classes of proteases. Optimal proteolytic activity was displayed under acidic conditions (pH 5.0). Ara12 activity was relatively thermostable and was stimulated in the presence of Ca2+ ions. Substrate specificity studies were conducted using a series of internally quenched fluorogenic peptide substrates. At the P1 position of substrates, hydrophobic residues, such as Phe and Ala, were preferred to Arg, whilst at the P1' position, Asp, Leu and Ala were most favoured. Possible functions of Ara12 are discussed in the light of the involvement of a number of plant subtilisin-like proteases in morphogenesis. PMID:12413398

  16. Activation of human pro-urokinase by unrelated proteases secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Beaufort, Nathalie; Seweryn, Paulina; de Bentzmann, Sophie; Tang, Aihua; Kellermann, Josef; Grebenchtchikov, Nicolai; Schmitt, Manfred; Sommerhoff, Christian P; Pidard, Dominique; Magdolen, Viktor

    2010-06-15

    Pathogenic bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, interact with and engage the host plasminogen (Plg) activation system, which encompasses the urokinase (uPA)-type Plg activator, and is involved in extracellular proteolysis, including matrilysis and fibrinolysis. We hypothesized that secreted bacterial proteases might contribute to the activation of this major extracellular proteolytic system, thereby participating in bacterial dissemination. We report that LasB, a thermolysin-like metalloprotease secreted by Ps. aeruginosa, converts the human uPA zymogen into its active form (kcat=4.9 s-1, Km=8.9 microM). Accordingly, whereas the extracellular secretome from the LasB-expressing pseudomonal strain PAO1 efficiently activates pro-uPA, the secretome from the isogenic LasB-deficient strain PDO240 is markedly less potent in pro-uPA activation. Still, both secretomes induce some metalloprotease-independent activation of the human zymogen. The latter involves a serine protease, which we identified via both recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli and purification from pseudomonal cultures as protease IV (PIV; kcat=0.73 s-1, Km=6.2 microM). In contrast, neither secretomes nor the pure proteases activate Plg. Along with this, LasB converts Plg into mini-Plg and angiostatin, whereas, as reported previously, it processes the uPA receptor, inactivates the plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, and activates pro-matrix metalloproteinase 2. PIV does not target these factors at all. To conclude, LasB and PIV, although belonging to different protease families and displaying quite different substrate specificities, both activate the urokinase-type precursor of the Plg activation cascade. Direct pro-uPA activation, as also reported for other bacterial proteases, might be a frequent phenomenon that contributes to bacterial virulence.

  17. Thin display optical projector

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    1999-01-01

    An optical system (20) projects light into a planar optical display (10). The display includes laminated optical waveguides (12) defining an inlet face (14) at one end and an outlet screen (16) at an opposite end. A first mirror (26) collimates light from a light source (18) along a first axis, and distributes the light along a second axis. A second mirror (28) collimates the light from the first mirror along the second axis to illuminate the inlet face and produce an image on the screen.

  18. Integrated display scanner

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2004-12-21

    A display scanner includes an optical panel having a plurality of stacked optical waveguides. The waveguides define an inlet face at one end and a screen at an opposite end, with each waveguide having a core laminated between cladding. A projector projects a scan beam of light into the panel inlet face for transmission from the screen as a scan line to scan a barcode. A light sensor at the inlet face detects a return beam reflected from the barcode into the screen. A decoder decodes the return beam detected by the sensor for reading the barcode. In an exemplary embodiment, the optical panel also displays a visual image thereon.

  19. SERA-1, the First Supersonic Rocket Developed in the Frame of PERSEUS Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, C.; Pernon, S.; Oswald, J.

    2015-09-01

    SERA-1 is the first supersonic rocket developed in the frame of PERSEUS, a French project that promotes students activities in space launch vehicle fields. The objective of the rocket was to validate technologies for supersonic flights (Mach > 1 .2), to allow a complete restitution of the trajectory and the atmosphere met during the flight, and to qualify PERSEUS procedures for the sizing of atmospheric demonstrators of a future nanosatellites launcher. The project took place on almost 2 school years from September, 2012 till June, 2014. SERA-1 has successfully flown on May 7th, 2014 from Esrange Space Center at Kiruna (Sweden) during a one week students launch campaign as part of EASP program. SERA-1 is a 3 m long, 25 kg lift-off mass rocket that was propelled by a Pro98-6G Green3 CESARONI engine. It has reached an altitude of about 5 500 m with a maximum speed greater than Mach 1.3.

  20. Hyperimmune antirabies sera titration by standard mouse neutralization and counterimmunoelectrophoresis tests, comparing results of different laboratories.

    PubMed

    Díaz, A M; Valentini, E J; Albas, A; Fuches, R M; Gallina, N M

    1995-01-01

    To determine the rabies antibody level of twenty-four hyperimmune equine sera, Standard Mouse Neutralization (SMN) and Couterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) tests were carried out, both at the Instituto Butantan (IB) and Instituto Panamericano de Proteccíon de Alimentos y Zoonosis (INPPAZ). Statistical analysis has shown a correlation (r) of 0.9317 between the SMN and CIE performed at the IB, while at the INPPAZ it scored 0.974. Comparison of CIE data of both laboratories yielded a correlation of 0.845. The CIE technique has shown to be a sensitive and efficient as the SMN in titrating antirabies hyperimmune equine sera. Based on CIE results, a simple, rapid and inexpensive technique, titers of sera antibody can be rellably estimated in SMN test.

  1. A Serological Survey of Sera from Domestic Animals on Easter Island

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, P.; Gray, D. P.; Gibbs, H. C.; Murphy, D. A.

    1968-01-01

    Animals' sera collected on Easter Island from December 1964 to February 1965 were tested by appropriate methods for the presence of antibodies to various infections. These included, ornithosis, Q-fever, brucellosis, Johne's disease, leptospirosis, toxoplasmosis and vesicular stomatitis viruses. It appeared that the cattle and sheep were exposed to the ornithosis group of agents. The sheep were also exposed to toxoplasmosis. The low-grade reactions observed on the cattle sera with the leptospira and brucella antigens were not sufficient to indicate past infection. All sera tested with Q-fever and Johne's disease antigens gave negative reactions. The results suggested that neither strain of vesicular stomatitis virus had yet been introduced into this restricted animal population. PMID:4233830

  2. Drivers license display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokoski, Francine J.

    1997-01-01

    Carjackings are only one of a growing class of law enforcement problems associated with increasingly violent crimes and accidents involving automobiles plays weapons, drugs and alcohol. Police traffic stops have become increasingly dangerous, with an officer having no information about a vehicle's potentially armed driver until approaching him. There are 15 million alcoholics in the US and 90 percent of them have drivers licenses. Many of them continue driving even after their licenses have ben revoked or suspended. There are thousands of unlicensed truck drivers in the country, and also thousands who routinely exceed safe operating periods without rest; often using drugs in an attempt to stay alert. MIKOS has developed the Drivers License Display Systems to reduce these and other related risks. Although every state requires the continuous display of vehicle registration information on every vehicle using public roads, no state yet requires the display of driver license information. The technology exists to provide that feature as an add-on to current vehicles for nominal cost. An initial voluntary market is expected to include: municipal, rental, and high value vehicles which are most likely to be mis-appropriated. It is anticipated that state regulations will eventually require such systems in the future, beginning with commercial vehicles, and then extending to high risk drivers and eventually all vehicles. The MIKOS system offers a dual-display approach which can be deployed now, and which will utilize all existing state licenses without requiring standardization.

  3. Refreshing Refreshable Braille Displays.

    PubMed

    Russomanno, Alexander; O'Modhrain, Sile; Gillespie, R Brent; Rodger, Matthew W M

    2015-01-01

    The increased access to books afforded to blind people via e-publishing has given them long-sought independence for both recreational and educational reading. In most cases, blind readers access materials using speech output. For some content such as highly technical texts, music, and graphics, speech is not an appropriate access modality as it does not promote deep understanding. Therefore blind braille readers often prefer electronic braille displays. But, these are prohibitively expensive. The search is on, therefore, for a low-cost refreshable display that would go beyond current technologies and deliver graphical content as well as text. And many solutions have been proposed, some of which reduce costs by restricting the number of characters that can be displayed, even down to a single braille cell. In this paper, we demonstrate that restricting tactile cues during braille reading leads to poorer performance in a letter recognition task. In particular, we show that lack of sliding contact between the fingertip and the braille reading surface results in more errors and that the number of errors increases as a function of presentation speed. These findings suggest that single cell displays which do not incorporate sliding contact are likely to be less effective for braille reading. PMID:25879973

  4. Christmas Light Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Arthur; Renfro, Timothy

    2012-03-01

    The Digital Electronics class at McMurry University created a Christmas light display that toggles the power of different strands of lights, according to what frequencies are played in a song, as an example of an analog to digital circuit. This was accomplished using a BA3830S IC six-band audio filter and six solid-state relays.

  5. Refreshing Refreshable Braille Displays.

    PubMed

    Russomanno, Alexander; O'Modhrain, Sile; Gillespie, R Brent; Rodger, Matthew W M

    2015-01-01

    The increased access to books afforded to blind people via e-publishing has given them long-sought independence for both recreational and educational reading. In most cases, blind readers access materials using speech output. For some content such as highly technical texts, music, and graphics, speech is not an appropriate access modality as it does not promote deep understanding. Therefore blind braille readers often prefer electronic braille displays. But, these are prohibitively expensive. The search is on, therefore, for a low-cost refreshable display that would go beyond current technologies and deliver graphical content as well as text. And many solutions have been proposed, some of which reduce costs by restricting the number of characters that can be displayed, even down to a single braille cell. In this paper, we demonstrate that restricting tactile cues during braille reading leads to poorer performance in a letter recognition task. In particular, we show that lack of sliding contact between the fingertip and the braille reading surface results in more errors and that the number of errors increases as a function of presentation speed. These findings suggest that single cell displays which do not incorporate sliding contact are likely to be less effective for braille reading.

  6. Interpreting sero-epidemiological studies for influenza in a context of non-bracketing sera

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Tim K.; Fang, Vicky J.; Perera, Ranawaka A. P. M.; Ip, Dennis K. M.; Leung, Gabriel M.; Malik Peiris, J. S.; Cauchemez, Simon; Cowling, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Background In influenza epidemiology, analysis of paired sera collected from people before and after influenza seasons has been used for decades to study the cumulative incidence of influenza virus infections in populations. However, interpretation becomes challenging when sera are collected after the start or before the end of an epidemic, and do not neatly bracket the epidemic. Methods Serum samples were collected longitudinally in a community-based study. Most participants provided their first serum after the start of circulation of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in 2009. We developed a Bayesian hierarchical model to correct for non-bracketing sera and estimate the cumulative incidence of infection from the serological data and surveillance data in Hong Kong. Results We analysed 4843 sera from 2097 unvaccinated participants in the study, collected from April 2009 through December 2010. After accounting for non-bracketing, we estimated that the cumulative incidence of H1N1pdm09 virus infection was 45.1% (95% credible interval, CI: 40.2%, 49.2%), 16.5% (95% CI: 13.0%, 19.7%) and 11.3% (95% CI: 5.9%, 17.5%) for children 0–18y, adults 19–50y and older adults >50y respectively. Including all available data substantially increased precision compared to a simpler analysis based only on sera collected at 6-month intervals in a subset of participants. Conclusions We developed a framework for the analysis of antibody titers that accounted for the timing of sera collection with respect to influenza activity and permitted robust estimation of the cumulative incidence of infection during an epidemic. PMID:26427725

  7. Virtual acoustic displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.

    1991-01-01

    A 3D auditory display can potentially enhance information transfer by combining directional and iconic information in a quite naturalistic representation of dynamic objects in the interface. Another aspect of auditory spatial clues is that, in conjunction with other modalities, it can act as a potentiator of information in the display. For example, visual and auditory cues together can reinforce the information content of the display and provide a greater sense of presence or realism in a manner not readily achievable by either modality alone. This phenomenon will be particularly useful in telepresence applications, such as advanced teleconferencing environments, shared electronic workspaces, and monitoring telerobotic activities in remote or hazardous situations. Thus, the combination of direct spatial cues with good principles of iconic design could provide an extremely powerful and information-rich display which is also quite easy to use. An alternative approach, recently developed at ARC, generates externalized, 3D sound cues over headphones in realtime using digital signal processing. Here, the synthesis technique involves the digital generation of stimuli using Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTF's) measured in the two ear-canals of individual subjects. Other similar approaches include an analog system developed by Loomis, et. al., (1990) and digital systems which make use of transforms derived from normative mannikins and simulations of room acoustics. Such an interface also requires the careful psychophysical evaluation of listener's ability to accurately localize the virtual or synthetic sound sources. From an applied standpoint, measurement of each potential listener's HRTF's may not be possible in practice. For experienced listeners, localization performance was only slightly degraded compared to a subject's inherent ability. Alternatively, even inexperienced listeners may be able to adapt to a particular set of HRTF's as long as they provide adequate

  8. Production of alkaline protease from Cellulosimicrobium cellulans

    PubMed Central

    Ferracini-Santos, Luciana; Sato, Hélia H

    2009-01-01

    Cellulosimicrobium cellulans is one of the microorganisms that produces a wide variety of yeast cell wall-degrading enzymes, β-1,3-glucanase, protease and chitinase. Dried cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used as carbon and nitrogen source for cell growth and protease production. The medium components KH2PO4, KOH and dried yeast cells showed a significant effect (p<0.05) on the factorial fractional design. A second design was prepared using two factors: pH and percentage of dried yeast cells. The results showed that the culture medium for the maximum production of protease was 0.2 g/l of MgSO4.7H2O, 2.0 g/l of (NH4)2SO4 and 8% of dried yeast cells in 0.15M phosphate buffer at pH 8.0. The maximum alkaline protease production was 7.0 ± 0.27 U/ml over the center point. Crude protease showed best activity at 50ºC and pH 7.0-8.0, and was stable at 50ºC. PMID:24031317

  9. Protease Inhibitors from Plants with Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Young; Park, Seong-Cheol; Hwang, Indeok; Cheong, Hyeonsook; Nah, Jae-Woon; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Park, Yoonkyung

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobial proteins (peptides) are known to play important roles in the innate host defense mechanisms of most living organisms, including plants, insects, amphibians and mammals. They are also known to possess potent antibiotic activity against bacteria, fungi, and even certain viruses. Recently, the rapid emergence of microbial pathogens that are resistant to currently available antibiotics has triggered considerable interest in the isolation and investigation of the mode of action of antimicrobial proteins (peptides). Plants produce a variety of proteins (peptides) that are involved in the defense against pathogens and invading organisms, including ribosome-inactivating proteins, lectins, protease inhibitors and antifungal peptides (proteins). Specially, the protease inhibitors can inhibit aspartic, serine and cysteine proteinases. Increased levels of trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitors correlated with the plants resistance to the pathogen. Usually, the purification of antimicrobial proteins (peptides) with protease inhibitor activity was accomplished by salt-extraction, ultrafiltration and C18 reverse phase chromatography, successfully. We discuss the relation between antimicrobial and anti-protease activity in this review. Protease inhibitors from plants potently inhibited the growth of a variety of pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains and are therefore excellent candidates for use as the lead compounds for the development of novel antimicrobial agents. PMID:19582234

  10. Recent advances and concepts in substrate specificity determination of proteases using tailored libraries of fluorogenic substrates with unnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Rut, Wioletta; Kasperkiewicz, Paulina; Byzia, Anna; Poreba, Marcin; Groborz, Katarzyna; Drag, Marcin

    2015-04-01

    Substrate specificity of proteases can be determined using several methods among which the most frequently used are positional scanning library, proteomics and phage display. Classic approaches can deliver information about preferences for natural amino acids in binding pockets of virtually all proteases. However, recent studies demonstrate the ability to obtain much more information by application of unnatural amino acids to positional scanning library approaches. This knowledge can be used for the design of more active and specific substrates, inhibitors and activity based probes. In this minireview we describe recent strategies and concepts for the design and application of fluorogenic substrates library tailored for exopeptidases and endopeptidases.

  11. Amount, avidity, and specificity of antibodies to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in normal human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Grzybowski, J; Trafny, E A; Wrembel-Wargocka, J; Patzer, J; Dzierzanowska, D; Zawistowska-Marciniak, I; Kłos, M

    1989-01-01

    Seventy-two normal human sera from healthy blood donors were tested by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in order to determine the amounts and avidities of immunoglobulins M and G antibodies to lipopolysaccharides of seven Fisher's immunotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and to exotoxin A. The patterns of specificity for seven immunotypes in all individual sera were determined. These data show a predominance of antibodies directed to Fisher's immunotypes 7 and 4 in the human population tested and may reflect frequency of occurrence of immunotypes outside the hospital environment. PMID:2502560

  12. [Use of the radial hemolysis method for determining influenza virus antibodies in human sera].

    PubMed

    Demidova, S A

    1980-01-01

    Radial hemolysis was used for detection of influenza virus antibody in sera from children and adults in various epidemic outbreaks of 1977-1979. RH is highly sensitive, and the presence of inhibitors does not affect the titration results. The results of RH correlate well with those of the HI and CF tests. The 7S immunoglobulins were active in RH, 19S produced no hemolysis zone. In sera from children under 3 years no correlation between antibody titers by H1 and RH tests was observed in the acute period of the disease but it appeared within 2-3 weeks.

  13. [The use of the lectin test for detecting antineuraminidase antibodies in the sera of vaccinated subjects].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, V T; Slepushkin, A N; Burtseva, E I; Balandin, D I; Varecková, E; Rudenko, L G; Obrosova-Serova, N P

    1991-01-01

    The lectin test (a microvariant) was used to study the immunogenicity of live attenuated and inactivated virion divaccines of influenza A (H1N1 + H3N2) and influenza B vaccines in children 3 to 15 years of age. A good correlation was found between the general level of seroconversion of antineuraminidase and antihemagglutinin antibodies in the sera examined. This method is simple and may be useful for titration of large numbers of sera in studies on the immunogenicity of influenza vaccines or peculiarities of anti-influenza humoral immunity.

  14. Determination of rotavirus serotype-specific antibodies in sera by competitive enhanced enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Beards, G M; Desselberger, U

    1989-01-01

    A method is described for the specific detection of antibody to individual rotavirus serotypes in sera. A competitive enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was developed in which rotavirus serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies against VP7 compete with antibodies in test sera for rotavirus serotype-specific antigen bound to a solid phase. There was an excellent correlation between serotype-specific EIA results and serotype-specific neutralization titres (r = 0.915, P = less than 0.001). The value of this method for rotavirus epidemiology and vaccine trials is discussed.

  15. Quantitation of Circulating Neuropilin-1 in Human, Monkey, Mouse, and Rat Sera by ELISA.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanmei; Meng, Y Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) is a single spanning transmembrane glycoprotein that acts as a co-receptor for class 3 semaphorins and vascular endothelial growth factors. Naturally occurring soluble NRP1 isoforms containing partial extracellular domain (ECD) have been reported. In addition to soluble NRP1, full-length NRP1 ECD has also been identified in human and animal sera. Here, we describe primate and rodent NRP1 ELISAs that measure total circulating NRP1 including soluble NPR1 and NRP1 ECD in human, monkey, mouse, and rat sera.

  16. Autophagy induction by sera from women undergoing an in vitro fertilization cycle varies with subsequent outcome.

    PubMed

    Sisti, Giovanni; Kanninen, Tomi T; Di Tommaso, Mariarosaria; Witkin, Steven S; Spandorfer, Steven D

    2016-09-01

    Autophagy maintains intracellular homeostasis during placental development and embryogenesis. We evaluated if differences in the autophagy-inducing capacity of sera from women undergoing an in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle predicted subsequent pregnancy outcome. In this retrospective study, sera collected from 94 women at the time of intrauterine embryo implantation were incubated with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy donors. The PBMCs were lysed and autophagy induction measured by determination of the p62 concentration. A reduced capacity for autophagy induction was associated with defective implantation while an elevated level of autophagy was associated with ectopic pregnancy. PMID:27343871

  17. A cyclohexanecarboxamide derivative with inhibitory effects on Schistosoma mansoni cercarial serine protease and penetration of mice skin by the parasite.

    PubMed

    Bahgat, Mahmoud; Aboul-Enein, Mohamed N; El Azzouny, Aida A; Maghraby, Amany; Ruppel, Andreas; Soliman, Wael M

    2009-01-01

    A cyclohexanecarboxamide derivative, N-phenyl-N-[1-(piperidine-1-carbonyl)cyclohexyl] benzamide (MNRC-5), was evaluated for its inhibitory effects on Schistosoma mansoni cercarial serine protease activity and cercarial penetration. MNRC-5 exerted an inhibitory effect on S. mansoni cercarial serine protease at serial concentrations of the specific chromogenic substrate Boc-Val-Leu-Gly-Arg-PNA for such enzyme family and the inhibitory coefficient (Ki) value was deduced. Moreover, topical treatment of mice tails with the most potent inhibitory concentration of MNRC-5 formulated in jojoba oil successfully blocked cercarial penetration as demonstrated by a significant reduction (75%; p < 0.05) in the recovered S. mansoni worms from treated mice in comparison to control ones whose tails were painted with jojoba oil base containing no MNRC-5. In addition, the IgM and IgG reactivities to crude S. mansoni cercarial, worm and egg antigens were generally lower in sera from treated infected mice than untreated infected mice. In conclusion, we report on a new serine protease inhibitor capable for blocking penetration of host skin by S. mansoni cercariae as measured by lowering worm burden and decrease in the levels of both IgM and IgG towards different bilharzial antigens upon topical treatment.

  18. Protease Inhibitors from Marine Actinobacteria as a Potential Source for Antimalarial Compound

    PubMed Central

    Karthik, L.; Kumar, Gaurav; Keswani, Tarun; Bhattacharyya, Arindam; Chandar, S. Sarath; Bhaskara Rao, K. V.

    2014-01-01

    The study was planned to screen the marine actinobacterial extract for the protease inhibitor activity and its anti- Pf activity under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Out of 100 isolates, only 3 isolates exhibited moderate to high protease inhibitor activities on trypsin, chymotrypsin and proteinase K. Based on protease inhibitor activity 3 isolates were chosen for further studies. The potential isolate was characterized by polyphasic approach and identified as Streptomyces sp LK3 (JF710608). The lead compound was identified as peptide from Streptomyces sp LK3. The double-reciprocal plot displayed inhibition mode is non-competitive and it confirms the irreversible nature of protease inhibitor. The peptide from Streptomyces sp LK3 extract showed significant anti plasmodial activity (IC50: 25.78 µg/ml). In in vivo model, the highest level of parasitemia suppression (≈45%) was observed in 600 mg/kg of the peptide. These analyses revealed no significant changes were observed in the spleen and liver tissue during 8 dpi. The results confirmed up-regulation of TGF-β and down regulation of TNF-α in tissue and serum level in PbA infected peptide treated mice compared to PbA infection. The results obtained infer that the peptide possesses anti- Pf activity activity. It suggests that the extracts have novel metabolites and could be considered as a potential source for drug development. PMID:24618707

  19. Structure of granzyme C reveals an unusual mechanism of protease autoinhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiserman, Dion; Buckle, Ashley M.; Van Damme, Petra; Irving, James A.; Law, Ruby H.P.; Matthews, Antony Y.; Bashtannyk-Puhalovich, Tanya; Langendorf, Chris; Thompson, Philip; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Gevaert, Kris; Whisstock, James C.; Bird, Phillip I.

    2009-05-21

    Proteases act in important homeostatic pathways and are tightly regulated. Here, we report an unusual structural mechanism of regulation observed by the 2.5-{angstrom} X-ray crystal structure of the serine protease, granzyme C. Although the active-site triad residues adopt canonical conformations, the oxyanion hole is improperly formed, and access to the primary specificity (S1) pocket is blocked through a reversible rearrangement involving Phe-191. Specifically, a register shift in the 190-strand preceding the active-site serine leads to Phe-191 filling the S1 pocket. Mutation of a unique Glu-Glu motif at positions 192-193 unlocks the enzyme, which displays chymase activity, and proteomic analysis confirms that activity of the wild-type protease can be released through interactions with an appropriate substrate. The 2.5-{angstrom} structure of the unlocked enzyme reveals unprecedented flexibility in the 190-strand preceding the active-site serine that results in Phe-191 vacating the S1 pocket. Overall, these observations describe a broadly applicable mechanism of protease regulation that cannot be predicted by template-based modeling or bioinformatic approaches alone.

  20. Secreted proteases from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 degrade porcine gelatin, hemoglobin and immunoglobulin A.

    PubMed Central

    Negrete-Abascal, E; Tenorio, V R; Serrano, J J; Garcia, C; de la Garza, M

    1994-01-01

    It was found that 48 hour cultures of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae secreted proteases into the medium. Electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels (10%) copolymerized with porcine gelatin (0.1%), of the 70% (NH4)2SO4 precipitate from the culture supernatants, displayed protease activities of different molecular weights: > 200, 200, 90, 80, 70 and 50 kDa. They had activity over a broad range of pHs (4-8), with an optimal pH of 6-7. All were inhibited by 10 mM EDTA, and reactivated by 10 mM calcium. They were stable at -20 degrees C for more than a month. The proteases also degraded porcine IgA and porcine, human, and bovine hemoglobin, although they appeared to be less active against the hemoglobins. The IgA was totally cleaved in 48 h, using supernatants concentrated with polyvinyl pyrrolidone or the 70% (NH4)2SO4. Extracellular proteases could play a role in virulence. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:8004545

  1. Neutrophil-Derived Proteases Escalate Inflammation through Activation of IL-36 Family Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Henry, Conor M; Sullivan, Graeme P; Clancy, Danielle M; Afonina, Inna S; Kulms, Dagmar; Martin, Seamus J

    2016-02-01

    Recent evidence has strongly implicated the IL-1 family cytokines IL-36α, IL-36β, and IL-36γ as key initiators of skin inflammation. Similar to the other members of the IL-1 family, IL-36 cytokines are expressed as inactive precursors and require proteolytic processing for activation; however, the responsible proteases are unknown. Here, we show that IL-36α, IL-36β, and IL-36γ are activated differentially by the neutrophil granule-derived proteases cathepsin G, elastase, and proteinase-3, increasing their biological activity ~500-fold. Active IL-36 promoted a strong pro-inflammatory signature in primary keratinocytes and was sufficient to perturb skin differentiation in a reconstituted 3D human skin model, producing features resembling psoriasis. Furthermore, skin eluates from psoriasis patients displayed significantly elevated cathepsin G-like activity that was sufficient to activate IL-36β. These data identify neutrophil granule proteases as potent IL-36-activating enzymes, adding to our understanding of how neutrophils escalate inflammatory reactions. Inhibition of neutrophil-derived proteases may therefore have therapeutic benefits in psoriasis. PMID:26776523

  2. In Vitro Characterization of Chain Depolymerization Activities of SUMO-Specific Proteases.

    PubMed

    Eckhoff, Julia; Dohmen, R Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    SUMO-specific proteases, known as Ulps in baker's yeast and SENPs in humans, have important roles in controlling the dynamics of SUMO-modified proteins. They display distinct modes of action and specificity, in that they may act on the SUMO precursor, mono-sumoylated, and/or polysumoylated proteins, and they might be specific for substrates with certain SUMO paralogs. SUMO chains may be dismantled either by endo or exo mechanisms. Biochemical characterization of a protease usually requires purification of the protein of interest. Developing a purification protocol, however, can be very difficult, and in some cases, isolation of a protease in its pure form may go along with a substantial loss of activity. To characterize the reaction mechanism of Ulps, we have developed an in vitro assay, which makes use of substrates endowed with artificial poly-SUMO chains of defined lengths, and S. cerevisiae Ulp enzymes in crude extract from E. coli. This fast and economic approach should be applicable to SUMO-specific proteases from other species as well. PMID:27631802

  3. Serine protease inhibitors of parasitic helminths.

    PubMed

    Molehin, Adebayo J; Gobert, Geoffrey N; McManus, Donald P

    2012-05-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (serpins) are a superfamily of structurally conserved proteins that inhibit serine proteases and play key physiological roles in numerous biological systems such as blood coagulation, complement activation and inflammation. A number of serpins have now been identified in parasitic helminths with putative involvement in immune regulation and in parasite survival through interference with the host immune response. This review describes the serpins and smapins (small serine protease inhibitors) that have been identified in Ascaris spp., Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum Onchocerca volvulus, Haemonchus contortus, Trichinella spiralis, Trichostrongylus vitrinus, Anisakis simplex, Trichuris suis, Schistosoma spp., Clonorchis sinensis, Paragonimus westermani and Echinococcus spp. and discusses their possible biological functions, including roles in host-parasite interplay and their evolutionary relationships. PMID:22310379

  4. Coagulation, Protease Activated Receptors and Viral Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Antoniak, Silvio; Mackman, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    The coagulation protease cascade plays an essential role in hemostasis. In addition, a clot contributes to host defense by limiting the spread of pathogens. Coagulation proteases induce intracellular signaling by cleavage of cell surface receptors called protease-activated receptors (PARs). These receptors allow cells to sense changes in the extracellular environment, such as infection. Viruses activate the coagulation cascade by inducing tissue factor expression and by disrupting the endothelium. Virus infection of the heart can cause myocarditis, cardiac remodeling and heart failure. Recent studies using a mouse model have shown that tissue factor, thrombin and PAR-1 signaling all positively regulate the innate immune during viral myocarditis. In contrast, PAR-2 signaling was found to inhibit interferon-β expression and the innate immune response. These observations suggest that anticoagulants may impair the innate immune response to viral infection and that inhibition of PAR-2 may be a new target to reduce viral myocarditis.. PMID:24203054

  5. Subtilisin-like proteases in nematodes.

    PubMed

    Poole, Catherine B; Jin, Jingmin; McReynolds, Larry A

    2007-09-01

    Cleavage by subtilisin-like proteases (subtilases) is an essential step in post-translational processing of proteins found in organisms ranging from yeast to mammals. Our knowledge of the diversity of this protease family in nematodes is aided by the rapid increase in sequence information, especially from the Brugia malayi genome project. Genetic studies of the subtilases in Caenorhabitis elegans give valuable insight into the biological function of these proteases in other nematode species. In this review, we focus on the subtilases in filarial nematodes as well as other parasitic and free-living nematodes in comparison to what is known in C. elegans. Topics to be addressed include expansion and diversity of the subtilase gene family during evolution, enhanced complexity created by alternative RNA splicing, molecular and biochemical characterization of the different subtilases and the challenges of designing subtilase-specific inhibitors for parasitic nematodes. PMID:17570539

  6. Conformational selection in trypsin-like proteases

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, Nicola; Vogt, Austin D.; Gohara, David W.; Di Cera, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    For over four decades, two competing mechanisms of ligand recognition – conformational selection and induced-fit - have dominated our interpretation of protein allostery. Defining the mechanism broadens our understanding of the system and impacts our ability to design effective drugs and new therapeutics. Recent kinetics studies demonstrate that trypsin-like proteases exist in equilibrium between two forms: one fully accessible to substrate (E) and the other with the active site occluded (E*). Analysis of the structural database confirms existence of the E* and E forms and vouches for the allosteric nature of the trypsin fold. Allostery in terms of conformational selection establishes an important paradigm in the protease field and enables protein engineers to expand the repertoire of proteases as therapeutics. PMID:22664096

  7. Dataset of cocoa aspartic protease cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Janek, Katharina; Niewienda, Agathe; Wöstemeyer, Johannes; Voigt, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    The data provide information in support of the research article, "The cleavage specificity of the aspartic protease of cocoa beans involved in the generation of the cocoa-specific aroma precursors" (Janek et al., 2016) [1]. Three different protein substrates were partially digested with the aspartic protease isolated from cocoa beans and commercial pepsin, respectively. The obtained peptide fragments were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS) and identified using the MASCOT server. The N- and C-terminal ends of the peptide fragments were used to identify the corresponding in-vitro cleavage sites by comparison with the amino acid sequences of the substrate proteins. The same procedure was applied to identify the cleavage sites used by the cocoa aspartic protease during cocoa fermentation starting from the published amino acid sequences of oligopeptides isolated from fermented cocoa beans. PMID:27508221

  8. Nidovirus papain-like proteases: multifunctional enzymes with protease, deubiquitinating and deISGylating activities

    PubMed Central

    Mielech, Anna M.; Chen, Yafang; Mesecar, Andrew D.; Baker, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    Coronaviruses and arteriviruses, members of the order Nidovirales, are positive strand RNA viruses that encode large replicase polyproteins that are processed by viral proteases to generate the nonstructural proteins which mediate viral RNA synthesis. The viral papain-like proteases (PLPs) are critical for processing the amino-terminal end of the replicase and are attractive targets for antiviral therapies. With the analysis of the papain-like protease of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), came the realization of the multifunctional nature of these enzymes. Structural and enzymatic studies revealed that SARS-CoV PLpro can act as both a protease to cleave peptide bonds and also as a deubiquitinating (DUB) enzyme to cleave the isopeptide bonds found in polyubiquitin chains. Furthermore, viral DUBs can also remove the protective effect of conjugated ubiquitin-like molecules such as interferon stimulated gene 15 (ISG15). Extension of these studies to other coronaviruses and arteriviruses led to the realization that viral protease/DUB activity is conserved in many family members. Overexpression studies revealed that viral protease/DUB activity can modulate or block activation of the innate immune response pathway. Importantly, mutations that alter DUB activity but not viral protease activity have been identified and arteriviruses expressing DUB mutants stimulated higher levels of acute inflammatory cytokines after infection. Further understanding of the multifunctional nature of the Nidovirus PLP/DUBs may facilitate vaccine development. Here, we review studies describing the PLPs’ enzymatic activity and their role in virus pathogenesis. PMID:24512893

  9. Serine Protease(s) Secreted by the Nematode Trichuris muris Degrade the Mucus Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Hasnain, Sumaira Z.; McGuckin, Michael A.; Grencis, Richard K.; Thornton, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The polymeric mucin component of the intestinal mucus barrier changes during nematode infection to provide not only physical protection but also to directly affect pathogenic nematodes and aid expulsion. Despite this, the direct interaction of the nematodes with the mucins and the mucus barrier has not previously been addressed. We used the well-established Trichuris muris nematode model to investigate the effect on mucins of the complex mixture of immunogenic proteins secreted by the nematode called excretory/secretory products (ESPs). Different regimes of T. muris infection were used to simulate chronic (low dose) or acute (high dose) infection. Mucus/mucins isolated from mice and from the human intestinal cell line, LS174T, were treated with ESPs. We demonstrate that serine protease(s) secreted by the nematode have the ability to change the properties of the mucus barrier, making it more porous by degrading the mucin component of the mucus gel. Specifically, the serine protease(s) acted on the N-terminal polymerising domain of the major intestinal mucin Muc2, resulting in depolymerisation of Muc2 polymers. Importantly, the respiratory/gastric mucin Muc5ac, which is induced in the intestine and is critical for worm expulsion, was protected from the depolymerising effect exerted by ESPs. Furthermore, serine protease inhibitors (Serpins) which may protect the mucins, in particular Muc2, from depolymerisation, were highly expressed in mice resistant to chronic infection. Thus, we demonstrate that nematodes secrete serine protease(s) to degrade mucins within the mucus barrier, which may modify the niche of the parasite to prevent clearance from the host or facilitate efficient mating and egg laying from the posterior end of the parasite that is in intimate contact with the mucus barrier. However, during a TH2-mediated worm expulsion response, serpins, Muc5ac and increased levels of Muc2 protect the barrier from degradation by the nematode secreted protease(s). PMID

  10. Text File Display Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vavrus, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    LOOK program permits user to examine text file in pseudorandom access manner. Program provides user with way of rapidly examining contents of ASCII text file. LOOK opens text file for input only and accesses it in blockwise fashion. Handles text formatting and displays text lines on screen. User moves forward or backward in file by any number of lines or blocks. Provides ability to "scroll" text at various speeds in forward or backward directions.

  11. Microgap flat panel display

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.

    1998-01-01

    A microgap flat panel display which includes a thin gas-filled display tube that utilizes switched X-Y "pixel" strips to trigger electron avalanches and activate a phosphor at a given location on a display screen. The panel utilizes the principal of electron multiplication in a gas subjected to a high electric field to provide sufficient electron current to activate standard luminescent phosphors located on an anode. The X-Y conductive strips of a few micron widths may for example, be deposited on opposite sides of a thin insulating substrate, or on one side of the adjacent substrates and function as a cathode. The X-Y strips are separated from the anode by a gap filled with a suitable gas. Electrical bias is selectively switched onto X and Y strips to activate a "pixel" in the region where these strips overlap. A small amount of a long-lived radioisotope is used to initiate an electron avalanche in the overlap region when bias is applied. The avalanche travels through the gas filled gap and activates a luminescent phosphor of a selected color. The bias is adjusted to give a proportional electron multiplication to control brightness for given pixel.

  12. Microgap flat panel display

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.

    1998-12-08

    A microgap flat panel display is disclosed which includes a thin gas-filled display tube that utilizes switched X-Y ``pixel`` strips to trigger electron avalanches and activate a phosphor at a given location on a display screen. The panel utilizes the principal of electron multiplication in a gas subjected to a high electric field to provide sufficient electron current to activate standard luminescent phosphors located on an anode. The X-Y conductive strips of a few micron widths may for example, be deposited on opposite sides of a thin insulating substrate, or on one side of the adjacent substrates and function as a cathode. The X-Y strips are separated from the anode by a gap filled with a suitable gas. Electrical bias is selectively switched onto X and Y strips to activate a ``pixel`` in the region where these strips overlap. A small amount of a long-lived radioisotope is used to initiate an electron avalanche in the overlap region when bias is applied. The avalanche travels through the gas filled gap and activates a luminescent phosphor of a selected color. The bias is adjusted to give a proportional electron multiplication to control brightness for given pixel. 6 figs.

  13. Attention-Seeking Displays

    PubMed Central

    Számadó, Szabolcs

    2015-01-01

    Animal communication abounds with extravagant displays. These signals are usually interpreted as costly signals of quality. However, there is another important function for these signals: to call the attention of the receiver to the signaller. While there is abundant empirical evidence to show the importance of this stage, it is not yet incorporated into standard signalling theory. Here I investigate a general model of signalling - based on a basic action-response game - that incorporates this searching stage. I show that giving attention-seeking displays and searching for them can be an ESS. This is a very general result and holds regardless whether only the high quality signallers or both high and low types give them. These signals need not be costly at the equilibrium and they need not be honest signals of any quality, as their function is not to signal quality but simply to call the attention of the potential receivers. These kind of displays are probably more common than their current weight in the literature would suggest. PMID:26287489

  14. Engine monitoring display study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornsby, Mary E.

    1992-01-01

    The current study is part of a larger NASA effort to develop displays for an engine-monitoring system to enable the crew to monitor engine parameter trends more effectively. The objective was to evaluate the operational utility of adding three types of information to the basic Boeing Engine Indicating and Crew Alerting System (EICAS) display formats: alphanumeric alerting messages for engine parameters whose values exceed caution or warning limits; alphanumeric messages to monitor engine parameters that deviate from expected values; and a graphic depiction of the range of expected values for current conditions. Ten training and line pilots each flew 15 simulated flight scenarios with five variants of the basic EICAS format; these variants included different combinations of the added information. The pilots detected engine problems more quickly when engine alerting messages were included in the display; adding a graphic depiction of the range of expected values did not affect detection speed. The pilots rated both types of alphanumeric messages (alert and monitor parameter) as more useful and easier to interpret than the graphic depiction. Integrating engine parameter messages into the EICAS alerting system appears to be both useful and preferred.

  15. Current and Novel Inhibitors of HIV Protease

    PubMed Central

    Pokorná, Jana; Machala, Ladislav; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Konvalinka, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The design, development and clinical success of HIV protease inhibitors represent one of the most remarkable achievements of molecular medicine. This review describes all nine currently available FDA-approved protease inhibitors, discusses their pharmacokinetic properties, off-target activities, side-effects, and resistance profiles. The compounds in the various stages of clinical development are also introduced, as well as alternative approaches, aiming at other functional domains of HIV PR. The potential of these novel compounds to open new way to the rational drug design of human viruses is critically assessed. PMID:21994591

  16. Using specificity to strategically target proteases

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Mark D.; Craik, Charles S.

    2009-01-01

    Proteases are a family of naturally occurring enzymes in the body whose dysregulation has been implicated in numerous diseases and cancers. Their ability to selectively and catalytically turnover substrate adds both signal amplification and functionality as parameters for the detection of disease. This review will focus on the development of activity-based methodologies to characterize proteases, and in particular, the use of positional scanning, synthetic combinatorial libraries (PS-SCL’s), and substrate activity screening (SAS) assays. The use of these approaches to better understand a protease’s natural substrate will be discussed as well as the technologies that emerged. PMID:18434168

  17. Detection of protease and protease activity using a single nanoscrescent SERS probe

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gang L.; Ellman, Jonathan A.; Lee, Luke P.; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    2013-01-29

    This invention pertains to the in vitro detection of proteases using a single peptide-conjugate nanocrescent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes with at least nanomolar sensitivity. The probe enables detection of proteolytic activity in extremely small volume and at low concentration. In certain embodiments the probes comprise an indicator for the detection of an active protease, where the indicator comprises a nanocrescent attached to a peptide, where said peptide comprises a recognition site for the protease and a Raman tag attached to the peptide.

  18. Stage Cylindrical Immersive Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramyan, Lucy; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Powell, Mark W.; Mittman, David S.; Shams, Khawaja S.

    2011-01-01

    Panoramic images with a wide field of view intend to provide a better understanding of an environment by placing objects of the environment on one seamless image. However, understanding the sizes and relative positions of the objects in a panorama is not intuitive and prone to errors because the field of view is unnatural to human perception. Scientists are often faced with the difficult task of interpreting the sizes and relative positions of objects in an environment when viewing an image of the environment on computer monitors or prints. A panorama can display an object that appears to be to the right of the viewer when it is, in fact, behind the viewer. This misinterpretation can be very costly, especially when the environment is remote and/or only accessible by unmanned vehicles. A 270 cylindrical display has been developed that surrounds the viewer with carefully calibrated panoramic imagery that correctly engages their natural kinesthetic senses and provides a more accurate awareness of the environment. The cylindrical immersive display offers a more natural window to the environment than a standard cubic CAVE (Cave Automatic Virtual Environment), and the geometry allows multiple collocated users to simultaneously view data and share important decision-making tasks. A CAVE is an immersive virtual reality environment that allows one or more users to absorb themselves in a virtual environment. A common CAVE setup is a room-sized cube where the cube sides act as projection planes. By nature, all cubic CAVEs face a problem with edge matching at edges and corners of the display. Modern immersive displays have found ways to minimize seams by creating very tight edges, and rely on the user to ignore the seam. One significant deficiency of flat-walled CAVEs is that the sense of orientation and perspective within the scene is broken across adjacent walls. On any single wall, parallel lines properly converge at their vanishing point as they should, and the sense of

  19. Suppression of in vitro megakaryopoiesis by maternal sera containing anti-HPA-1a antibodies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Jian; Bussel, James B; Lakkaraja, Madhavi; Ferrer-Marin, Francisca; Ghevaert, Cedric; Feldman, Henry A; McFarland, Janice G; Chavda, Chaitanya; Sola-Visner, Martha

    2015-09-01

    Incompatibility of the human platelet antigen-1 (HPA-1) system is the most common cause of fetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (F/NAIT) and is thought to be mediated by accelerated clearance of antibody-opsonized fetal platelets. We evaluated the effect of maternal sera containing anti-HPA-1a antibodies (F/NAIT sera) on in vitro megakaryopoiesis. Compared with control maternal sera, 14 out of 17 F/NAIT sera significantly reduced megakaryocyte (MK) number. This finding was associated with increased apoptosis and cell death of early MKs/MK progenitors, but normal maturation and differentiation of surviving MKs. An analysis of platelet counts in infants born to mothers following antenatal intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) ± prednisone therapy demonstrated a significant and moderately strong correlation between the MK growth in cultures and the infants' platelet counts at birth. These findings suggest that maternal anti-HPA-1a antibodies can suppress fetal megakaryopoiesis by inducing early cell death and that this influences the neonatal platelet count. Thus, the ability of maternal antibodies to suppress MK growth is a potential predictive factor for the fetal response to maternal IVIG therapy.

  20. The relevance of coagulation factor X protection of adenoviruses in human sera

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, M R; Doszpoly, A; Turner, G; Nicklin, S A; Baker, A H

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous delivery of adenoviruses is the optimal route for many gene therapy applications. Once in the blood, coagulation factor X (FX) binds to the adenovirus capsid and protects the virion from natural antibody and classical complement-mediated neutralisation in mice. However, to date, no studies have examined the relevance of this FX/viral immune protective mechanism in human samples. In this study, we assessed the effects of blocking FX on adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) activity in the presence of human serum. FX prevented human IgM binding directly to the virus. In individual human sera samples (n=25), approximately half of those screened inhibited adenovirus transduction only when the Ad5–FX interaction was blocked, demonstrating that FX protected the virus from neutralising components in a large proportion of human sera. In contrast, the remainder of sera tested had no inhibitory effects on Ad5 transduction and FX armament was not required for effective gene transfer. In human sera in which FX had a protective role, Ad5 induced lower levels of complement activation in the presence of FX. We therefore demonstrate for the first time the importance of Ad–FX protection in human samples and highlight subject variability and species-specific differences as key considerations for adenoviral gene therapy. PMID:27014840

  1. Sera from patients with chronic Lyme disease protect mice from Lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Fikrig, E; Bockenstedt, L K; Barthold, S W; Chen, M; Tao, H; Ali-Salaam, P; Telford, S R; Flavell, R A

    1994-03-01

    Sera from selected patients with Lyme disease in different stages were used to passively immunize mice against Borrelia burgdorferi challenge to determine if human antibodies could protect the animals from infection. Sera from 2 patients with late-stage Lyme disease that contained strong antibody reactivity to proteins in B. burgdorferi lysates, including antibodies to the outer surface proteins (Osps) A and B, partly protected mice from infection after challenge with a small inoculum (10(2)) of B. burgdorferi. Mice immunized with sera from either of these 2 patients developed significantly fewer infections from the borreliae (patient 1 serum, 5%; patient 2 serum, 25%) relative to control mice (patient 1 serum, 90%; patient 2 serum, 74%). In contrast, sera from 2 patients with early or late Lyme disease that lacked antibodies reactive to OspA and OspB did not confer protection. Immunity appeared to be related, at least in part, to the presence of a strong humoral response to the Osps. These results suggest that during prolonged infection, some patients develop an immune response that may be partly protective against reinfection with B. burgdorferi. Therefore, although most patients do not mount a strong humoral response to the Osps during natural infection, vaccination with an Osp may elicit protective immunity.

  2. A high-throughput neutralizing assay for antibodies and sera against hepatitis E virus

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wei; Tang, Zi-Min; Wen, Gui-Ping; Wang, Si-Ling; Ji, Wen-Fang; Yang, Min; Ying, Dong; Zheng, Zi-Zheng; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the aetiological agent of enterically transmitted hepatitis. The traditional methods for evaluating neutralizing antibody titres against HEV are real-time PCR and the immunofluorescence foci assay (IFA), which are poorly repeatable and operationally complicated, factors that limit their applicability to high-throughput assays. In this study, we developed a novel high-throughput neutralizing assay based on biotin-conjugated p239 (HEV recombinant capsid proteins, a.a. 368–606) and staining with allophycocyanin-conjugated streptavidin (streptavidin APC) to amplify the fluorescence signal. A linear regression analysis indicated that there was a high degree of correlation between IFA and the novel assay. Using this method, we quantitatively evaluated the neutralization of sera from HEV-infected and vaccinated macaques. The anti-HEV IgG level had good concordance with the neutralizing titres of macaque sera. However, the neutralization titres of the sera were also influenced by anti-HEV IgM responses. Further analysis also indicated that, although vaccination with HEV vaccine stimulated higher anti-HEV IgG and neutralization titres than infection with HEV in macaques, the proportions of neutralizing antibodies in the infected macaques’ sera were higher than in the vaccinated macaques with the same anti-HEV IgG levels. Thus, the infection more efficiently stimulated neutralizing antibody responses. PMID:27122081

  3. Proapoptotic CD95L levels in normal human serum and sera of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Olimón-Andalón, Vicente; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Ratkovich-González, Sarah; Uribe-López, Aida; Mariscal-Ramírez, Ignacio; Delgadillo-Cristerna, Raúl; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo; Hernández-Flores, Georgina; de Celis, Ruth; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro; Jave-Suárez, Luis F

    2015-05-01

    The CD95 pathway is a critical apoptotic pathway used by immune cells to avoid cancer development. CD95 ligand (CD95L) is found in several forms, as a cell membrane-associated form, a soluble metalloprotease-cleaved form, and a soluble but membrane-bound CD95L released on cell-derived exosomes. In this study, we used a cell-based assay to evaluate the activity of proapoptotic CD95L in sera from healthy individuals and breast cancer patients. We confirmed that our cell-based assay using Jurkat cells was sensitive to the presence of proapoptotic CD95L in serum, and apoptosis induction by mechanisms other than CD95 was discriminated using apoptosis-resistant Jurkat subclones. Our results indicated a proapoptotic potential of normal serum that involved CD95L. Sera from breast cancer patients exhibited significantly decreased apoptosis induction, due to increased CD95 receptor levels compared with healthy women. Apoptotic potential tended to decrease as the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System grade increased, and we observed restoration of proapoptotic potential after tumor removal. The CD95L in serum responsible for apoptotic induction was associated with high-molecular-weight particles, perhaps with exosomes. The sera of healthy individuals generally contain a proapoptotic environment, and this property is mainly maintained by the presence of CD95L. Furthermore, measurement of CD95L-mediated apoptosis induction by sera could be a useful parameter to be evaluated during cancer development and therapeutic response.

  4. Kentucky Report (Annual Report to SERA-IEG8 Tall Fescue Toxicosis/Endophyte Workshop)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A number of updates on research projects conducted within Kentucky concerning tall fescue (Lolium arundinacium) and its symbiotic endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum) were presented at the annual SERA-IEG 8 workshop including a number with Forage-Animal Production Research Unit scientist collaborat...

  5. Sperm-related antigens, antibodies, and circulating immune complexes in sera of recently vasectomized men.

    PubMed Central

    Witkin, S S; Zelikovsky, G; Bongiovanni, A M; Geller, N; Good, R A; Day, N K

    1982-01-01

    Sera from 35 men were collected before and at timed intervals subsequent to vasectomy and examined for the presence of (a) antibody reactive with human spermatozoa, (b) sperm-related antigen, and (c) circulating immune complexes (CIC). Fewer than 10% of the men examined were ever positive for antisperm antibodies. However, sperm-related antigens were elevated in the sera of 18, 18, and 26% of the mean at 2 wk, 2 mo, and 4 mo postvasectomy, respectively. CIC were detected in the sera of some vasectomized men by three different assays. The CIC in patients' sera were precipitated with polyethylene glycol, dissociated, and the individual CIC components identified by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Most, but not all, of the CIC contained antigen reactive with antisperm immunoglobulin (Ig)G and some also contained complement components C3 and/or Clq. IgA was identified in some of the CIC positive for IgG and sperm antigen and two men had IgM-containing CIC. Analysis of the CIC by sucrose gradient centrifugation revealed them to be heterogeneous in size. PMID:7085887

  6. Reproduction and sera embryotoxicity after immunization of monkeys with the laminin peptides YIGSR, RGD, and IKVAV.

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, B J; Klein, N W; Conrad, S H; Ruppenthal, G C; Sackett, G P; Weeks, B S; Kleinman, H K

    1995-01-01

    Monkeys with excellent reproductive histories were immunized with the laminin peptides YIGSR, RGD, IKVAV, and YD, a control sequence with no known biological function. Sera from the YIGSR-immunized monkey became toxic, causing neural tube defects in whole rat embryo cultures, and this monkey experienced fetal loss after immunization. Sera from the RGD-immunized monkey also became embryotoxic in culture after immunization, but this monkey appeared to become infertile as she failed to initiate a pregnancy for at least 2 years after immunization. In contrast, embryos cultured on sera from the IKVAV- or YD-immunized monkeys were predominantly normal and both monkeys completed successful pregnancies. Antibody levels to the respective peptides or to laminin were not predictive of embryotoxicity, but antibody binding to homogenized yolk sacs as well as to yolk sacs of cultured embryos was associated with sera embryotoxicity and reproductive outcomes in vivo. These observations suggested that the laminin sequences YIGSR and RGD may play a role in immune-mediated reproductive failure by reacting directly with embryonic tissue and could provide a basis for identifying individuals at risk for both spontaneous abortion and infertility. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7624326

  7. Suppression of in vitro megakaryopoiesis by maternal sera containing anti-HPA-1a antibodies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Jian; Bussel, James B; Lakkaraja, Madhavi; Ferrer-Marin, Francisca; Ghevaert, Cedric; Feldman, Henry A; McFarland, Janice G; Chavda, Chaitanya; Sola-Visner, Martha

    2015-09-01

    Incompatibility of the human platelet antigen-1 (HPA-1) system is the most common cause of fetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (F/NAIT) and is thought to be mediated by accelerated clearance of antibody-opsonized fetal platelets. We evaluated the effect of maternal sera containing anti-HPA-1a antibodies (F/NAIT sera) on in vitro megakaryopoiesis. Compared with control maternal sera, 14 out of 17 F/NAIT sera significantly reduced megakaryocyte (MK) number. This finding was associated with increased apoptosis and cell death of early MKs/MK progenitors, but normal maturation and differentiation of surviving MKs. An analysis of platelet counts in infants born to mothers following antenatal intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) ± prednisone therapy demonstrated a significant and moderately strong correlation between the MK growth in cultures and the infants' platelet counts at birth. These findings suggest that maternal anti-HPA-1a antibodies can suppress fetal megakaryopoiesis by inducing early cell death and that this influences the neonatal platelet count. Thus, the ability of maternal antibodies to suppress MK growth is a potential predictive factor for the fetal response to maternal IVIG therapy. PMID:26209661

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Porcine Parvovirus 2 Recovered from Swine Sera

    PubMed Central

    Kluge, M.; Franco, A. C.; Giongo, A.; Valdez, F. P.; Saddi, T. M.; Brito, W. M. E. D.; Roehe, P. M.

    2016-01-01

    A complete genomic sequence of porcine parvovirus 2 (PPV-2) was detected by viral metagenome analysis on swine sera. A phylogenetic analysis of this genome reveals that it is highly similar to previously reported North American PPV-2 genomes. The complete PPV-2 sequence is 5,426 nucleotides long. PMID:26823583

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Porcine Parvovirus 2 Recovered from Swine Sera.

    PubMed

    Campos, F S; Kluge, M; Franco, A C; Giongo, A; Valdez, F P; Saddi, T M; Brito, W M E D; Roehe, P M

    2016-01-28

    A complete genomic sequence of porcine parvovirus 2 (PPV-2) was detected by viral metagenome analysis on swine sera. A phylogenetic analysis of this genome reveals that it is highly similar to previously reported North American PPV-2 genomes. The complete PPV-2 sequence is 5,426 nucleotides long.

  10. Automation of a hemagglutination-inhibition test for parainfluenza 3 antibodies in bovine sera.

    PubMed

    Webert, D W; Cohen, D

    1971-07-01

    An automated hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) test for the "shipping fever" strain (SF-4) of parainfluenza 3 antibody in bovine sera was developed and compared to manual tube and microtiter test procedures. The automated system operating at 60 samples per hr provided the most test results per specified time period, and the manual tube test provided the least. The manual microtiter test and the automated system at 40 samples per hr, falling between the two above procedures, were comparable in the number of sera that could be titrated in 1 day by one technician. There was little difference between automated and manual test reproducibility when measured at the twofold titer one-dilution difference level. However, the automated system titrated a higher number of sera at the same titer on repeat runs than either of the manual test procedures. The automated one-quartile difference reproducibility (each twofold dilution subdivided into 4 units-"quartiles") was equal to the manual test one-dilution difference reproducibility. The standard deviation of the per cent variation from the mean of paired serum titers for 40-sample-per-hr runs ranged from +/-3.49 to +/-5.36%. The manual and automated systems were of comparable sensitivity in their detection of negative sera.

  11. Autoantibodies Profile in the Sera of Patients with Sjogren]s Syndrome: The ANA Evaluation—A Homogeneous, Multiplexed System

    PubMed Central

    Gilburd, Boris; Abu-Shakra, Mahmoud; Giordano, Andrea; Bocci, Elena Bartoloni; delle Monache, Francesco; Gerli, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    Background: Flow-based, multiplex bead arrays (MBA) have been developed for a variety of applications including the detection of antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens (ENA). It offers a rapid and sensitive method to assess multiple analyses in a single tube/well. Purpose: To evaluate the Athena Multi-Lyte ANA Test System utilizes Luminex Corporation's MBA technology for the detection of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and ENA antibodies in the sera of patients with Sjogren's syndrome (SS). Methods: MBA assay was used to detect ANA and ENA antibodies in the sera of 37 patients with SS and 96 sera from healthy subjects. Results: All patients were women. Their mean age was 48.7 years and the mean disease duration was 7.27 years. ANA was found in 3 (3%) sera of healthy subjects by the AtheNA system and in 2 (2%) sera by the ELISA kit. A 99% concordance between the 2 assays was found. A 94.6% concordance between the 2 assays was found by testing the sera of patients with SS for ANA. By the AtheNA system, none of the sera of 37 patients with SS had autoantibodies reacting with Sm, Jo-1, dsDNA or histones. Anti-RNP antibody was found in 5.4% of the sera and 2.7% of the sera reacted with Scl-70 and histones. Anti-SS/A and anti-SS/B were identified in 84 and 76% of the sera, respectively. Conclusion: The AtheNa Multi-Lyte ANA Test System offers a sensitive and specific result for the detection of ANA and ENA antibodies in the sera of patients with SS. PMID:15154612

  12. Characterisation of novel fungal and bacterial protease preparations and evaluation of their ability to hydrolyse meat myofibrillar and connective tissue proteins.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Kate; Ha, Minh; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din; Carne, Alan

    2015-04-01

    The catalytic capability of four commercially available food-grade fungal and bacterial protease preparations (AFP, FPII, F60K and HT) was evaluated over a range of pH, temperature and substrate conditions using esterase and caseinolytic activity assays and time course hydrolysis over 120 and 60 min of myofibrillar and connective tissue proteins, respectively. The protease preparations displayed similar casein hydrolysis kinetics and were active in hydrolysing BODIPY-FL casein to varying extents at postmortem aging meat pH (5.0-6.0). All of the four proteases exhibited selective hydrolytic activity towards meat myofibrillar proteins including myosin and actin. Significant hydrolysis of two meat tenderisation protein markers troponin T and desmin by the four proteases was detected by western blot. The results obtained indicate that the new fungal protease preparations AFP and FPII, bacterial protease preparation HT and the new source of fungal protease preparation F60K have potential for use in meat tenderising applications. PMID:25442543

  13. Landing Hazard Avoidance Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernathy, Michael Franklin (Inventor); Hirsh, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Landing hazard avoidance displays can provide rapidly understood visual indications of where it is safe to land a vehicle and where it is unsafe to land a vehicle. Color coded maps can indicate zones in two dimensions relative to the vehicles position where it is safe to land. The map can be simply green (safe) and red (unsafe) areas with an indication of scale or can be a color coding of another map such as a surface map. The color coding can be determined in real time based on topological measurements and safety criteria to thereby adapt to dynamic, unknown, or partially known environments.

  14. Transient ECM protease activity promotes synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Magnowska, Marta; Gorkiewicz, Tomasz; Suska, Anna; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Rutkowska-Wlodarczyk, Izabela; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Wlodarczyk, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Activity-dependent proteolysis at a synapse has been recognized as a pivotal factor in controlling dynamic changes in dendritic spine shape and function; however, excessive proteolytic activity is detrimental to the cells. The exact mechanism of control of these seemingly contradictory outcomes of protease activity remains unknown. Here, we reveal that dendritic spine maturation is strictly controlled by the proteolytic activity, and its inhibition by the endogenous inhibitor (Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 – TIMP-1). Excessive proteolytic activity impairs long-term potentiation of the synaptic efficacy (LTP), and this impairment could be rescued by inhibition of protease activity. Moreover LTP is altered persistently when the ability of TIMP-1 to inhibit protease activity is abrogated, further demonstrating the role of such inhibition in the promotion of synaptic plasticity under well-defined conditions. We also show that dendritic spine maturation involves an intermediate formation of elongated spines, followed by their conversion into mushroom shape. The formation of mushroom-shaped spines is accompanied by increase in AMPA/NMDA ratio of glutamate receptors. Altogether, our results identify inhibition of protease activity as a critical regulatory mechanism for dendritic spines maturation. PMID:27282248

  15. Proteases and Peptidases of Castor Bean Endosperm

    PubMed Central

    Tully, Raymond E.; Beevers, Harry

    1978-01-01

    The endosperm of castor bean seeds (Ricinus communis L.) contains two —SH-dependent aminopeptidases, one hydrolyzing l-leucine-β-naphthylamide optimally at pH 7.0, and the other hydrolyzing l-proline-β-naphthylamide optimally at pH 7.5. After germination the endosperm contains in addition an —SH-dependent hemoglobin protease, a serine-dependent carboxypeptidase, and at least two —SH-dependent enzymes hydrolyzing the model substrate α-N-benzoyl-dl-arginine-β-naphthylamide (BANA). The carboxypeptidase is active on a variety of N-carbobenzoxy dipeptides, especially N-carbobenzoxy-L-phenylalanine-l-alanine and N-carbobenzoxy-l-tyrosine-l-leucine. The pH optima for the protease, carboxypeptidase, and BANAase acivities are 3.5 to 4.0, 5.0 to 5.5, and 6 to 8, respectively. The two aminopeptidases increased about 4-fold in activity during the first 4 days of growth, concurrent with the period of rapid depletion of storage protein. Activities then declined as the endosperm senesced, but were still evident after 6 days. Senescence was complete by day 7 to 8. Hemoglobin protease, carboxypeptidase, and BANAase activities appeared in the endosperm at day 2 to 3, and reached peak activity at day 5 to 6. The data indicate that the aminopeptidases are involved in the early mobilization of endosperm storage protein, whereas protease, carboxypeptidase, and BANAase may take part in later turnover and/or senescence. PMID:16660598

  16. Sperm apoptosis in nonpregnant luteal phase sera after in vitro fertilization as assessed by comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Bouma, C L; Patton, W C; Jacobson, J D; King, A; Chan, P J

    2004-01-01

    Toxicity in serum has been reported in cases of recurrent spontaneous abortions and endometriosis. The null hypothesis was that serum toxicity was not involved in failed pregnancies after in vitro fertilization procedures. The objective was to expose donor sperm to pregnant versus nonpregnant patient sera and analyze for sperm DNA damaging effects using a novel comparative genomic hybridization method. Luteal phase sera (N = 21 cases) were drawn one week after embryo transfer. Colloid-washed donor sperm were incubated (48 h, 37 degrees C, 5% CO2 in air) in 0% or 50% sera. Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) of control sperm were stained in Hoechst 33342 and hybridized to Sybr Gold-stained ssDNA of sera-treated sperm. Image analyses were performed and fluorescent intensities analyzed. Nonpregnant patient sera (57% of cases) were associated with DNA fragmentation (64.4 +/- 8.8 pixels; mean +/- S.E.M.) when compared with pregnant patient sera (106.3 +/- 8.4 pixels). There were no differences in the sera of biochemical (108.2 +/- 15.3) versus clinical pregnancy cases (105.3 +/- 11.4). The results suggest that nonpregnant patient sera contained factor(s) that cause DNA fragmentation leading to pregnancy losses.

  17. Molecular characterization of protease activity in Serratia sp. strain SCBI and its importance in cytotoxicity and virulence.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Lauren M; Tisa, Louis S

    2014-11-01

    A newly recognized Serratia species, termed South African Caenorhabditis briggsae isolate (SCBI), is both a mutualist of the nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae KT0001 and a pathogen of lepidopteran insects. Serratia sp. strain SCBI displays high proteolytic activity, and because secreted proteases are known virulence factors for many pathogens, the purpose of this study was to identify genes essential for extracellular protease activity in Serratia sp. strain SCBI and to determine what role proteases play in insect pathogenesis and cytotoxicity. A bank of 2,100 transposon mutants was generated, and six SCBI mutants with defective proteolytic activity were identified. These mutants were also defective in cytotoxicity. The mutants were found defective in genes encoding the following proteins: alkaline metalloprotease secretion protein AprE, a BglB family transcriptional antiterminator, an inosine/xanthosine triphosphatase, GidA, a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein, and a PIN domain protein. Gene expression analysis on these six mutants showed significant downregulation in mRNA levels of several different types of predicted protease genes. In addition, transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis provided insight into how inactivation of AprE, GidA, and a PIN domain protein influences motility and virulence, as well as protease activity. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) to further characterize expression of predicted protease genes in wild-type Serratia sp. SCBI, the highest mRNA levels for the alkaline metalloprotease genes (termed prtA1 to prtA4) occurred following the death of an insect host, while two serine protease and two metalloprotease genes had their highest mRNA levels during active infection. Overall, these results indicate that proteolytic activity is essential for cytotoxicity in Serratia sp. SCBI and that its regulation appears to be highly complex.

  18. Molecular Characterization of Protease Activity in Serratia sp. Strain SCBI and Its Importance in Cytotoxicity and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Lauren M.

    2014-01-01

    A newly recognized Serratia species, termed South African Caenorhabditis briggsae isolate (SCBI), is both a mutualist of the nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae KT0001 and a pathogen of lepidopteran insects. Serratia sp. strain SCBI displays high proteolytic activity, and because secreted proteases are known virulence factors for many pathogens, the purpose of this study was to identify genes essential for extracellular protease activity in Serratia sp. strain SCBI and to determine what role proteases play in insect pathogenesis and cytotoxicity. A bank of 2,100 transposon mutants was generated, and six SCBI mutants with defective proteolytic activity were identified. These mutants were also defective in cytotoxicity. The mutants were found defective in genes encoding the following proteins: alkaline metalloprotease secretion protein AprE, a BglB family transcriptional antiterminator, an inosine/xanthosine triphosphatase, GidA, a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein, and a PIN domain protein. Gene expression analysis on these six mutants showed significant downregulation in mRNA levels of several different types of predicted protease genes. In addition, transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis provided insight into how inactivation of AprE, GidA, and a PIN domain protein influences motility and virulence, as well as protease activity. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) to further characterize expression of predicted protease genes in wild-type Serratia sp. SCBI, the highest mRNA levels for the alkaline metalloprotease genes (termed prtA1 to prtA4) occurred following the death of an insect host, while two serine protease and two metalloprotease genes had their highest mRNA levels during active infection. Overall, these results indicate that proteolytic activity is essential for cytotoxicity in Serratia sp. SCBI and that its regulation appears to be highly complex. PMID:25182493

  19. Proteases and Protease Inhibitors of Urinary Extracellular Vesicles in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tataruch, Dorota; Gu, Dongfeng; Liu, Xinyu; Forsblom, Carol; Groop, Per-Henrik; Holthofer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus (DM), leads to chronic kidney disease (CKD), and, ultimately, is the main cause for end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Beyond urinary albumin, no reliable biomarkers are available for accurate early diagnostics. Urinary extracellular vesicles (UEVs) have recently emerged as an interesting source of diagnostic and prognostic disease biomarkers. Here we used a protease and respective protease inhibitor array to profile urines of type 1 diabetes patients at different stages of kidney involvement. Urine samples were divided into groups based on the level of albuminuria and UEVs isolated by hydrostatic dialysis and screened for relative changes of 34 different proteases and 32 protease inhibitors, respectively. Interestingly, myeloblastin and its natural inhibitor elafin showed an increase in the normo- and microalbuminuric groups. Similarly, a characteristic pattern was observed in the array of protease inhibitors, with a marked increase of cystatin B, natural inhibitor of cathepsins L, H, and B as well as of neutrophil gelatinase-associated Lipocalin (NGAL) in the normoalbuminuric group. This study shows for the first time the distinctive alterations in comprehensive protease profiles of UEVs in diabetic nephropathy and uncovers intriguing mechanistic, prognostic, and diagnostic features of kidney damage in diabetes. PMID:25874235

  20. Protease IV, a quorum sensing-dependent protease of Pseudomonas aeruginosa modulates insect innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Park, Su-Jin; Kim, Soo-Kyoung; So, Yong-In; Park, Ha-Young; Li, Xi-Hui; Yeom, Doo Hwan; Lee, Mi-Nan; Lee, Bok-Luel; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2014-12-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, quorum sensing (QS) plays an essential role in pathogenesis and the QS response controls many virulence factors. Using a mealworm, Tenebrio molitor as a host model, we found that Protease IV, a QS-regulated exoprotease of P. aeruginosa functions as a key virulence effector causing the melanization and death of T. molitor larvae. Protease IV was able to degrade zymogens of spätzle processing enzyme (SPE) and SPE-activating enzyme (SAE) without the activation of the antimicrobial peptide (AMP) production. Since SPE and SAE function to activate spätzle, a ligand of Toll receptor in the innate immune system of T. molitor, we suggest that Protease IV may interfere with the activation of the Toll signaling. Independently of the Toll pathway, the melanization response, another innate immunity was still generated, since Protease IV directly converted Tenebrio prophenoloxidase into active phenoloxidase. Protease IV also worked as an important factor in the virulence to brine shrimp and nematode. These results suggest that Protease IV provides P. aeruginosa with a sophisticated way to escape the immune attack of host by interfering with the production of AMPs. PMID:25315216

  1. A novel protease activity assay using a protease-responsive chaperone protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sao, Kentaro; Murata, Masaharu; Fujisaki, Yuri; Umezaki, Kaori; Mori, Takeshi; Niidome, Takuro; Katayama, Yoshiki; Hashizume, Makoto

    2009-06-05

    Protease activity assays are important for elucidating protease function and for developing new therapeutic agents. In this study, a novel turbidimetric method for determining the protease activity using a protease-responsive chaperone protein is described. For this purpose, a recombinant small heat-shock protein (sHSP) with an introduced Factor Xa protease recognition site was synthesized in bacteria. This recombinant mutant, FXa-HSP, exhibited chaperone-like activity at high temperatures in cell lysates. However, the chaperone-like activity of FXa-HSP decreased dramatically following treatment with Factor Xa. Protein precipitation was subsequently observed in the cell lysates. The reaction was Factor Xa concentration-dependent and was quantitatively suppressed by a specific inhibitor for Factor Xa. Protein aggregation was detected by a simple method based on turbidimetry. The results clearly demonstrate that this assay is an effective, easy-to-use method for determining protease activities without the requirement of labeling procedures and the use of radioisotopes.

  2. Natural cysteine protease inhibitors in protozoa: Fifteen years of the chagasin family.

    PubMed

    Costa, Tatiana F R; Lima, Ana Paula C A

    2016-03-01

    Chagasin-type inhibitors comprise natural inhibitors of papain-like cysteine proteases that are distributed among Protist, Bacteria and Archaea. Chagasin was identified in the pathogenic protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi as an approximately 11 kDa protein that is a tight-binding and highly thermostable inhibitor of papain, cysteine cathepsins and endogenous parasite cysteine proteases. It displays an Imunoglobulin-like fold with three exposed loops to one side of the molecule, where amino acid residues present in conserved motifs at the tips of each loop contact target proteases. Differently from cystatins, the loop 2 of chagasin enters the active-site cleft, making direct contact with the catalytic residues, while loops 4 and 6 embrace the enzyme from the sides. Orthologues of chagasin are named Inhibitors of Cysteine Peptidases (ICP), and share conserved overall tri-dimensional structure and mode of binding to proteases. ICPs are tentatively distributed in three families: in family I42 are grouped chagasin-type inhibitors that share conserved residues at the exposed loops; family I71 contains Plasmodium ICPs, which are large proteins having a chagasin-like domain at the C-terminus, with lower similarity to chagasin in the conserved motif at loop 2; family I81 contains Toxoplasma ICP. Recombinant ICPs tested so far can inactivate protozoa cathepsin-like proteases and their mammalian counterparts. Studies on their biological roles were carried out in a few species, mainly using transgenic protozoa, and the conclusions vary. However, in all cases, alterations in the levels of expression of chagasin/ICPs led to substantial changes in one or more steps of parasite biology, with higher incidence in influencing their interaction with the hosts. We will cover most of the findings on chagasin/ICP structural and functional properties and overview the current knowledge on their roles in protozoa.

  3. Coagulation factor XII protease domain crystal structure

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, M; Wilmann, P; Awford, J; Li, C; Hamad, BK; Fischer, PM; Dreveny, I; Dekker, LV; Emsley, J

    2015-01-01

    Background Coagulation factor XII is a serine protease that is important for kinin generation and blood coagulation, cleaving the substrates plasma kallikrein and FXI. Objective To investigate FXII zymogen activation and substrate recognition by determining the crystal structure of the FXII protease domain. Methods and results A series of recombinant FXII protease constructs were characterized by measurement of cleavage of chromogenic peptide and plasma kallikrein protein substrates. This revealed that the FXII protease construct spanning the light chain has unexpectedly weak proteolytic activity compared to β-FXIIa, which has an additional nine amino acid remnant of the heavy chain present. Consistent with these data, the crystal structure of the light chain protease reveals a zymogen conformation for active site residues Gly193 and Ser195, where the oxyanion hole is absent. The Asp194 side chain salt bridge to Arg73 constitutes an atypical conformation of the 70-loop. In one crystal form, the S1 pocket loops are partially flexible, which is typical of a zymogen. In a second crystal form of the deglycosylated light chain, the S1 pocket loops are ordered, and a short α-helix in the 180-loop of the structure results in an enlarged and distorted S1 pocket with a buried conformation of Asp189, which is critical for P1 Arg substrate recognition. The FXII structures define patches of negative charge surrounding the active site cleft that may be critical for interactions with inhibitors and substrates. Conclusions These data provide the first structural basis for understanding FXII substrate recognition and zymogen activation. PMID:25604127

  4. Immunodiagnosis of human neurocysticercosis using a synthetic peptide selected by phage-display.

    PubMed

    Hell, R C R; Amim, P; de Andrade, H M; de Avila, R A M; Felicori, L; Oliveira, A G; Oliveira, C A; Nascimento, E; Tavares, C A P; Granier, C; Chávez-Olórtegui, C

    2009-04-01

    The usefulness of a synthetic peptide in the serodiagnosis of Taenia solium human neurocysticercosis (NC) has been evaluated. Phage-displayed peptides were screened with human antibodies to scolex protein antigen from cysticercus cellulosae (SPACc). One clone was found to interact specifically with anti-SPACc IgGs. The corresponding synthetic peptide was found to be recognized in ELISA by NC patient's sera. The study was carried out with sera from 28 confirmed NC patients, 13 control sera and 73 sera from patients suffering from other infectious diseases. A 93% sensibility and a 94.3% specificity was achieved. Figures of 89% and 31.4% of sensibility and specificity were obtained in a SPACc-based ELISA. Immunoblotting of SPACc with anti-peptide antibodies revealed a single band of approximately 45 kDa in 1D and four 45 kDa isoforms in 2D-gel electrophoresis. A strong and specific immunostaining in the fibers beneath the suckers, at the base of the rostellum, and in the tissue surrounding the scolex of cysticerci was observed by immunomicroscopy. Our results show that a peptide-based immunodiagnostic of neurocisticercosis can be envisioned.

  5. Serine Protease Autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs): Biogenesis and Function

    PubMed Central

    Dautin, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Serine Protease Autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) constitute a large family of proteases secreted by Escherichia coli and Shigella. SPATEs exhibit two distinct proteolytic activities. First, a C-terminal catalytic site triggers an intra-molecular cleavage that releases the N-terminal portion of these proteins in the extracellular medium. Second, the secreted N-terminal domains of SPATEs are themselves proteases; each contains a canonical serine-protease catalytic site. Some of these secreted proteases are toxins, eliciting various effects on mammalian cells. Here, we discuss the biogenesis of SPATEs and their function as toxins. PMID:22069633

  6. Latest development of display technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hong-Yue; Yao, Qiu-Xiang; Liu, Pan; Zheng, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Ji-Cheng; Zheng, Hua-Dong; Zeng, Chao; Yu, Ying-Jie; Sun, Tao; Zeng, Zhen-Xiang

    2016-09-01

    In this review we will focus on recent progress in the field of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) display technologies. We present the current display materials and their applications, including organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), flexible OLEDs quantum dot light emitting diodes (QLEDs), active-matrix organic light emitting diodes (AMOLEDs), electronic paper (E-paper), curved displays, stereoscopic 3D displays, volumetric 3D displays, light field 3D displays, and holographic 3D displays. Conventional 2D display devices, such as liquid crystal devices (LCDs) often result in ambiguity in high-dimensional data images because of lacking true depth information. This review thus provides a detailed description of 3D display technologies.

  7. The utility of an international sera bank for use in evaluating the potential human allergenicity of novel proteins.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Karluss; Bannon, Gary; Herouet-Guicheney, Corinne; Ladics, Gregory; Lee, Laurie; Lee, Sang-Il; Privalle, Laura; Ballmer-Weber, Barbara; Vieths, Stefan

    2007-05-01

    In the safety assessment of novel foods produced through biotechnology, careful consideration is given to determining the allergenic potential of newly introduced proteins. IgE serum screening is one tool for evaluating whether the protein in question has sequence identity to a known allergen or if the source of the gene encoding the protein is a known allergenic food. A "specific" serum screen involves testing a gene product with sera from patients with documented clinical allergy to a specific allergen to confirm that the gene product of interest is not the same protein to which the patient produces IgE antibodies. A "targeted" serum screen involves testing the gene product of interest with sera from patients sensitive to food or aeroallergens from the same broad group. The concept of a global sera bank with accessible, well-characterized sera for use in such assays is an appealing option. This paper summarizes the consensus elements from a workshop to evaluate the potential utility of an international sera bank for evaluating the allergenicity of novel proteins. Areas of agreement following the workshop included the following: (1) specific sera screens are appropriate for exploring potentially cross-reactive proteins that have been identified through bioinformatics analyses; however, additional validation is needed, particularly for targeted sera screens, (2) practical and ethical considerations may preclude the formation of a global sera bank, and therefore, (3) a regional network of clinicians who could serve as sources of patient sera or be approached to conduct sera studies would be the most practical alternative.

  8. A study on trypsin, Aspergillus flavus and Bacillus sp. protease inhibitory activity in Cassia tora (L.) syn Senna tora (L.) Roxb. seed extract

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Proteases play an important role in virulence of many human, plant and insect pathogens. The proteinaceous protease inhibitors of plant origin have been reported widely from many plant species. The inhibitors may potentially be used for multiple therapeutic applications in viral, bacterial, fungal diseases and physiological disorders. In traditional Indian medicine system, Cassia tora (Senna tora) is reportedly effective in treatment of skin and gastrointestinal disorders. The present study explores the protease inhibitory activity of the above plant seeds against trypsin, Aspergillus flavus and Bacillus sp. proteases. Methods The crushed seeds of Cassia tora were washed thoroughly with acetone and hexane for depigmentation and defatting. The proteins were fractionated by ammonium sulphate (0-30, 30-60, 60-90%) followed by dialysis and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The inhibitory potential of crude seed extract and most active dialyzed fraction against trypsin and proteases was established by spot test using unprocessed x-ray film and casein digestion methods, respectively. Electrophoretic analysis of most active fraction (30-60%) and SEC elutes were carried employing Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Gelatin SDS-PAGE. Inhibition of fungal spore germination was studied in the presence of dialyzed active inhibitor fraction. Standard deviation (SD) and ANOVA were employed as statistical tools. Results The crude seeds' extract displayed strong antitryptic, bacterial and fungal protease inhibitory activity on x-ray film. The seed protein fraction 30-60% was found most active for trypsin inhibition in caseinolytic assay (P < 0.001). The inhibition of caseinolytic activity of the proteases increased with increasing ratio of seed extract. The residual activity of trypsin, Aspergillus flavus and Bacillus sp. proteases remained only 4, 7 and 3.1%, respectively when proteases were incubated with 3 mg ml-1 seed protein

  9. New directions for protease inhibitors directed drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yoshio; Kiso, Yoshiaki

    2016-11-01

    Proteases play crucial roles in various biological processes, and their activities are essential for all living organisms-from viruses to humans. Since their functions are closely associated with many pathogenic mechanisms, their inhibitors or activators are important molecular targets for developing treatments for various diseases. Here, we describe drugs/drug candidates that target proteases, such as malarial plasmepsins, β-secretase, virus proteases, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4. Previously, we reported inhibitors of aspartic proteases, such as renin, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease, human T-lymphotropic virus type I protease, plasmepsins, and β-secretase, as drug candidates for hypertension, adult T-cell leukaemia, human T-lymphotropic virus type I-associated myelopathy, malaria, and Alzheimer's disease. Our inhibitors are also described in this review article as examples of drugs that target proteases. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 563-579, 2016. PMID:26584340

  10. Black optic display

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    1997-01-01

    An optical display includes a plurality of stacked optical waveguides having first and second opposite ends collectively defining an image input face and an image screen, respectively, with the screen being oblique to the input face. Each of the waveguides includes a transparent core bound by a cladding layer having a lower index of refraction for effecting internal reflection of image light transmitted into the input face to project an image on the screen, with each of the cladding layers including a cladding cap integrally joined thereto at the waveguide second ends. Each of the cores is beveled at the waveguide second end so that the cladding cap is viewable through the transparent core. Each of the cladding caps is black for absorbing external ambient light incident upon the screen for improving contrast of the image projected internally on the screen.

  11. Peptide inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin by mRNA display

    SciTech Connect

    Yiadom, Kwabena P.A.B.; Muhie, Seid; Yang, David C.H. . E-mail: yangdc@georgetown.edu

    2005-10-07

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are extremely toxic. The metalloproteases associated with the toxins cleave proteins essential for neurotransmitter secretion. Inhibitors of the metalloprotease are currently sought to control the toxicity of BoNTs. Toward that goal, we produced a synthetic cDNA for the expression and purification of the metalloprotease of BoNT/A in Escherichia coli as a biotin-ubiquitin fusion protein, and constructed a combinatorial peptide library to screen for BoNT/A light chain inhibitors using mRNA display. A protease assay was developed using immobilized intact SNAP-25 as the substrate. The new peptide inhibitors showed a 10-fold increase in affinity to BoNT/A light chain than the parent peptide. Interestingly, the sequences of the new peptide inhibitors showed abundant hydrophobic residues but few hydrophilic residues. The results suggest that mRNA display may provide a general approach in developing peptide inhibitors of BoNTs.

  12. Arabidopsis AtSerpin1, Crystal Structure and in Vivo Interaction with Its Target Protease RESPONSIVE TO DESICCATION-21 (RD21)

    SciTech Connect

    Lampl, Nardy; Budai-Hadrian, Ofra; Davydov, Olga; Joss, Tom V.; Harrop, Stephen J.; Curmi, Paul M.G.; Roberts, Thomas H.; Fluhr, Robert

    2010-05-25

    In animals, protease inhibitors of the serpin family are associated with many physiological processes, including blood coagulation and innate immunity. Serpins feature a reactive center loop (RCL), which displays a protease target sequence as a bait. RCL cleavage results in an irreversible, covalent serpin-protease complex. AtSerpin1 is an Arabidopsis protease inhibitor that is expressed ubiquitously throughout the plant. The x-ray crystal structure of recombinant AtSerpin1 in its native stressed conformation was determined at 2.2 {angstrom}. The electrostatic surface potential below the RCL was found to be highly positive, whereas the breach region critical for RCL insertion is an unusually open structure. AtSerpin1 accumulates in plants as a full-length and a cleaved form. Fractionation of seedling extracts by nonreducing SDS-PAGE revealed the presence of an additional slower migrating complex that was absent when leaves were treated with the specific cysteine protease inhibitor l-trans-epoxysuccinyl-l-leucylamido (4-guanidino)butane. Significantly, RESPONSIVE TO DESICCATION-21 (RD21) was the major protease labeled with the l-trans-epoxysuccinyl-l-leucylamido (4-guanidino)butane derivative DCG-04 in wild type extracts but not in extracts of mutant plants constitutively overexpressing AtSerpin1, indicating competition. Fractionation by nonreducing SDS-PAGE followed by immunoblotting with RD21-specific antibody revealed that the protease accumulated both as a free enzyme and in a complex with AtSerpin1. Importantly, both RD21 and AtSerpin1 knock-out mutants lacked the serpin-protease complex. The results establish that the major Arabidopsis plant serpin interacts with RD21. This is the first report of the structure and in vivo interaction of a plant serpin with its target protease.

  13. Hepatitis C virus NS3 protease is activated by low concentrations of protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Göran; Arenas, Omar Gutiérrez; Danielson, U Helena

    2009-12-01

    The nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a bifunctional enzyme with a protease and a helicase functionality located in each of the two domains of the single peptide chain. There is little experimental evidence for a functional role of this unexpected arrangement since artificial single domain forms of both enzymes are catalytically competent. We have observed that low concentrations of certain protease inhibitors activate the protease of full-length NS3 from HCV genotype 1a with up to 100%, depending on the preincubation time and the inhibitor used. The activation was reduced, but not eliminated, by increased ionic strength, lowered glycerol concentration, or lowered pH. In all cases, it was at the expense of a significant loss of activity. Activation was not seen with the artificial protease domain of genotype 1b NS3 fused with a fragment of the NS4A cofactor. This truncated and covalently modified enzyme form was much less active and exhibited fundamentally different catalytic properties to the full-length NS3 protease without the fused cofactor. The most plausible explanation for the activation was found to involve a slow transition between two enzyme conformations, which differed in their catalytic ability and affinity for inhibitors. Equations derived based on this assumption resulted in better fits to the experimental data than the equation for simple competitive inhibition. The mechanism may involve an inhibitor-induced stabilization of the helicase domain in a conformation that enhances the protease activity, or an improved alignment of the catalytic triad in the protease. The proposed mnemonic mechanism and derived equations are viable for both these explanations and can serve as a basic framework for future studies of enzymes activated by inhibitors or other ligands.

  14. Three monoclonal antibodies against the serpin protease nexin-1 prevent protease translocation.

    PubMed

    Kousted, Tina M; Skjoedt, Karsten; Petersen, Steen V; Koch, Claus; Vitved, Lars; Sochalska, Maja; Lacroix, Céline; Andersen, Lisbeth M; Wind, Troels; Andreasen, Peter A; Jensen, Jan K

    2014-01-01

    Protease nexin-1 (PN-1) belongs to the serpin family and is an inhibitor of thrombin, plasmin, urokinase-type plasminogen activator, and matriptase. Recent studies have suggested PN-1 to play important roles in vascular-, neuro-, and tumour-biology. The serpin inhibitory mechanism consists of the serpin presenting its so-called reactive centre loop as a substrate to its target protease, resulting in a covalent complex with the inactivated enzyme. Previously, three mechanisms have been proposed for the inactivation of serpins by monoclonal antibodies: steric blockage of protease recognition, conversion to an inactive conformation or induction of serpin substrate behaviour. Until now, no inhibitory antibodies against PN-1 have been thoroughly characterised. Here we report the development of three monoclonal antibodies binding specifically and with high affinity to human PN-1. The antibodies all abolish the protease inhibitory activity of PN-1. In the presence of the antibodies, PN-1 does not form a complex with its target proteases, but is recovered in a reactive centre cleaved form. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we mapped the three overlapping epitopes to an area spanning the gap between the loop connecting α-helix F with β-strand 3A and the loop connecting α-helix A with β-strand 1B. We conclude that antibody binding causes a direct blockage of the final critical step of protease translocation, resulting in abortive inhibition and premature release of reactive centre cleaved PN-1. These new antibodies will provide a powerful tool to study the in vivo role of PN-1's protease inhibitory activity.

  15. Simultaneous EKG and ultrasonoscope display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    Display of two dimensional image of heart and EKG waveform concurrently on same cathode-ray, is achieved by device. Concurrent display allows continuous comparision of dimensional changes in heart and periodicity of EKG waveform.

  16. Human factors of visual displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, H. L.

    1984-01-01

    Several human factors issues in visual displays are addressed in this report. They are as follows: (1) the importance of luminance range and contrast; (2) uniformity of visual displays; (3) image quality; (4) color contrast; and (5) dot matrix fonts.

  17. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment.

    PubMed

    Fyfe, Cameron D; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W; Cogdell, Richard J; Wall, Daniel M; Burchmore, Richard J S; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  18. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macro­globulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group. PMID:26143919

  19. Zoster in children with cancer: radioimmune precipitation profiles of sera before and after illness.

    PubMed

    Grose, C

    1983-01-01

    Sera collected from children with cancer before and for extended periods after the onset of zoster were analyzed by radioimmune precipitation techniques. The percent recovery of both [3H]fucose- and [35S]methionine-labeled varicella-zoster virus (VZV)-specific antigens increased severalfold immediately after zoster and declined slowly during convalescence; however, within two years serum panels from two patients exhibited serologic evidence of subclinical reactivation of VZV. After electrophoretic fractionation of the immunoprecipitates, the polypeptide profile after zoster closely resembled that described for high titer xenoantisera to VZV and contained at least 16 constituents ranging in molecular weight from 32 to 174,000. In contrast, sera obtained before zoster were easily distinguished because they precipitated poorly, if at all, two major VZV glycoproteins (gp62 and gp98) and several nonglycosylated polypeptides. The emergence of zoster, therefore, was associated with the appearance of previously undetectable antibodies to VZV-specific proteins. PMID:6296242

  20. Biomarker Quantification in Unprocessed Human Sera by Using A New Nanomagnetic Protein Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanpeng; Jing, Ying; Srinivasan, Balasubramanian; Yao, Xiaofeng; Hugger, Marie A.; Xing, Chengguo; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2010-12-01

    Early recognition and prevention of chronic disease, such as lung cancer, require a fast, accurate detection and longitudinal monitoring on potential biomarkers, which could identify the molecule change in the initial stage of the chronic disease. Here we report the realization of specific and accurate quantification of a low-abundance serum protein in unprocessed human sera, using our novel giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensing system with uniform high-magnetic-moment nanoparticles and a competition based detection scheme. Only one antibody is needed for such detection scheme. The quantification of interleukin-6 (IL-6, a low-abundance protein and a potential cancer biomarker), as low as 125 fM IL-6 proteins, directly in 4 μL of unprocessed human sera was demonstrated within 5 minutes by such system. The results nicely differentiate normal individuals and lung cancer patients. This platform has great potential to facilitate the identification and validation of disease biomarkers.

  1. Survey on vertical infection of bovine viral diarrhea virus from fetal bovine sera in the field.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Kumiko; Oguma, Keisuke; Sentsui, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) isolation and antibody survey were performed using 2,758 fetal bovine sera (FBS) collected from slaughterhouses in New Zealand, Australia and the Dominican Republic, and then sent to Japan to manufacture commercial serum for cell culture use. FBS in the Dominican Republic were pooled for each several individuals, and those collected in other countries were separated according to each individual and subjected to the tests. BVDV was isolated from 25 (0.91%) FBS, and the BVDV antibody was detected in 44 (1.60%) FBS. The survey on 139 sets of paired sera of a dam and her fetus revealed that neither the BVDV antibody nor BVDV was detected in all FBS from BVDV antibody-positive dams.

  2. A "dipstick" enzyme immunoassay for detection of antibody to Brucella abortus in cattle sera.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, K; Ballinger, R; Stiller, J; Rosenbaum, B

    1985-07-01

    An enzyme immunoassay that utilizes antigen bound to a matrix which can be removed from the substrate to stop development is described. The assay which is performed in glass or plastic disposable tubes uses Gel-Bond film strips for attachment of antigen. The only equipment requirements are a rotary shaker and a spectrophotometer (optional). The antigen coated strips are passed through a series of tubes containing test serum, wash solution, antibody-enzyme conjugate, wash solution and substrate-chromogen taking about 45 minutes to perform. In testing sera with or without antibody to Brucella abortus a very high correlation existed between same day tests and tests performed over several days as well as with data on the same sera obtained by an enzyme immunoassay in a microtiter format.

  3. Reactivity of human Lyme borreliosis sera with a 39-kilodalton antigen specific to Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, W J; Schrumpf, M E; Schwan, T G

    1990-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is the causative agent of Lyme borreliosis, a spirochetal illness with a variety of acute clinical manifestations that may lead to debilitating neurological and arthritic complications. Diagnosis is difficult because symptoms mimic a variety of unrelated clinical conditions, spirochetes cannot always be isolated from infected patients, and current serological tests are frequently inconclusive because of the presence of cross-reacting non-B. burgdorferi antibodies. To identify antigens specific to B. burgdorferi that could be used in the serodiagnosis of Lyme borreliosis, we screened a Borrelia DNA expression library in Escherichia coli for antigens reactive with human Lyme borreliosis sera. One clone carried a 6.3-kilobase EcoRI chromosomal fragment (pSPR33), which encoded two species-specific antigens with molecular masses of 28 (P28) and 39 (P39) kilodaltons (kDa). These two antigens were immunologically distinct from OspA, OspB, and the 41-kDa flagellin. Ninety-four serum specimens from patients having Lyme borreliosis were tested for reactivity with P39. All of 33 the serum specimens with immunofluorescence assay titers of greater than or equal to 1:256, 13 of 17 serum specimens with titers of 1:128, and 14 of 44 serum specimens with titers of less than or equal to 1:64 reacted with P39. Notably, many sera reactive to P39 did not appear to react with the 41-kDa flagellin. Therefore, antibody to P39 could be mistaken for antibody to the 41-kDa flagellin in tests of human sera by Western blot (immunoblot). Twenty-five control serum specimens, which included sera from syphilitic, relapsing fever, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients as well as from 10 normal individuals, did not react to P39. Our data suggest that P39 may be a useful antigen for the serological confirmation of Lyme borreliosis. Images PMID:2380361

  4. [Inhibition of EA and EAC rosette formation by sera of patients with vesical schistosomiasis].

    PubMed

    De Simone, C; Rebuzzi, E; Marianella, R M; Carini, L; Elmi, A S; Nuti, M

    1978-12-01

    Circulating immune complexes were investigated by the E.A. and E.A.C. rosette inhibition test in sera samples from patients infested by Schistosoma haematobium. About 60% of the patients demonstrated significantly higher inhibition values than controls. The material inhibiting E.A.C. rosette formation was precipitated by 3.5% polyethilene glycol, thus excluding the role of C3 fragments and suggesting that inhibition was due to immune complexes.

  5. Plaque assay of neonatal calf diarrhea virus and the neutralizing antibody in human sera.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, S; Inouye, S; Kono, R

    1977-01-01

    Neonatal calf diarrhea virus (a bovine rotavirus) formed distinct plaques in monolayers of MA-104 cells, an established macacus rhesus monkey kidney cell line, when diethylaminoethyl dextran and trypsin were included in the overlay medium. By using this plaque assay method, titration of neutralizing antibody to neonatal calf diarrhea virus was made feasible. It was demonstrated that some human sera contained neutralizing antibody to this agent.

  6. [Use of cross-absorbed sera in neutralization tests with viral titration by the cytopathogenic effect].

    PubMed

    Pervikov, Iu V; Chumakov, M P; Voroshilova, M K; Rubin, S G

    1975-01-01

    A new method for intratypic antigenic differentiation of poliovirus strains has been developed. The method is based on the use of cross-absorbed sera in neutralization tests where virus is titrated by the cytopathic effect. Qualitative differences between the antigenic structure of vaccine and "wild" strains as well as between some "wild" strains of the same serologic type have been found. The method may be used in practical laboratories.

  7. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for quantification of rabies antibodies in human sera.

    PubMed

    Kavaklova, L; Eskenazy, M; Gancheva, T; Vacheva, V

    1984-09-01

    A double antibody enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was elaborated for detection of rabies antibodies in human sera. The procedure consisted of coating polyvinylchloride plates with rabbit antirabies serum followed by attachment of partially purified fixed virus and human rabies antibodies. The rabies-specific antibodies in human antisera were quantified by means of antihuman peroxidase conjugate. Titration of antisera from human volunteers immunized with the "Fermi" vaccine revealed excellent correlation of the virus neutralization test and ELISA.

  8. Blood Levels of Zinc in Creole Horses Used in Sera Production

    SciTech Connect

    Baptista, Tatyana S.; Zamboni, Cibele B.; Kovacs, Luciana; Freitas, M. G.; Marcelino, Jose R.

    2010-08-04

    Using Neutron Activation Analysis Zn concentrations were determined in blood of horses (Creole breed). No significant difference was observed between male (0.0029{+-}.0007 gL{sup -1}) and female (0.0031{+-}.0011 gL{sup -1}) animals. These data are an important support to understand the physiological functions of Zn in blood during the process of sera production at Butantan Institute (Sao Paulo, Brazil) using horses.

  9. NMO sera down-regulate AQP4 in human astrocyte and induce cytotoxicity independent of complement.

    PubMed

    Haruki, Hiroyo; Sano, Yasuteru; Shimizu, Fumitaka; Omoto, Masatoshi; Tasaki, Ayako; Oishi, Mariko; Koga, Michiaki; Saito, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Nakada, Tsutomu; Kanda, Takashi

    2013-08-15

    Autoantibodies against astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) are highly specific for neuromyelitis optica (NMO). However, the molecular mechanism of NMO still remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to identify the possible humoral mechanisms responsible for the occurrence of astrocytic damage. Human primary astrocytes (AST) were immortalized by retroviral vectors harboring temperature-sensitive SV40 T antigen gene and AQP4 cDNA (M23), designated as hAST-AQP4. The effects of NMO sera on the content and localization of AQP4, including cytotoxicity and astrocytic morphology, were evaluated. In addition, this study examined whether the amount and localization of AQP4 protein in astrocytes were influenced by direct contact with the immortalized human brain microvascular endothelial cell line, TY09. NMO sera alone induced cytotoxicity and addition of complement had a more harmful effect on hAST-AQP4. NMO sera also decreased AQP4 mRNA and protein. NMO sera alone up-regulated TNFα and IL-6 in astrocytes and co-incubation with anti-TNFα and anti-IL-6 neutralizing antibodies blocked both the cytotoxicity and reduction of AQP4 in astrocytes. In the experiment using the in vitro BBB models, AQP4 protein mainly localized at the astrocytic membrane after co-culture with TY09, in contact with TY09. The future elucidation of factors that up-regulate AQP4 in astrocytes presumably released by blood brain barrier forming endothelial cells and that block the production of inflammatory cytokines may therefore lead to the development of a novel therapeutic strategy.

  10. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) analysis of sera from visceral leishmaniasis patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Visceral leishmaniasis is a parasitic infection caused by Lesihmania donovani complex and transmitted by the bite of the phlebotomine sand fly. It is an endemic disease in many developing countries with more than 90% of the cases occurring in Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Sudan, Ethiopia and Brazil. The disease is fatal if untreated. The disease is conventionally diagnosed by demonstrating the intracellular parasite in bone marrow or splenic aspirates. This study was carried out to discover differentially expressed proteins which could be potential biomarkers. Methods Sera from six visceral leishmaniasis patients and six healthy controls were depleted of high abundant proteins by immunodepletion. The depleted sera were compared by 2-D Difference in gel electrophoresis (DIGE). Differentially expressed proteins were identified the by tandem mass spectrometry. Three of the identified proteins were further validated by western blotting. Results This is the first report of serum proteomics study using quantitative Difference in gel electrophoresis (DIGE) in visceral leishmaniasis. We identified alpha-1-acidglycoprotein and C1 inhibitor as up regulated and transthyretin, retinol binding protein and apolipoprotein A-I as down regulated proteins in visceral leishmaniasis sera in comparison with healthy controls. Western blot validation of C1 inhibitor, transthyretin and apolipoprotein A-I in a larger cohort (n = 29) confirmed significant difference in the expression levels (p < 0.05). Conclusions In conclusion, DIGE based proteomic analysis showed that several proteins are differentially expressed in the sera of visceral leishmaniasis. The five proteins identified here have potential, either independently or in combination, as prognostic biomarkers. PMID:21906353

  11. Depletion of reactive advanced glycation endproducts from diabetic uremic sera using a lysozyme-linked matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuhashi, T; Li, Y M; Fishbane, S; Vlassara, H

    1997-01-01

    Diabetic uremic sera contain excessive amounts of reactive advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), which accelerate the vasculopathy of diabetes and end-stage renal disease. To capture in vivo-derived toxic AGEs, high affinity AGE-binding protein lysozyme (LZ) was linked to a Sepharose 4B matrix. Initial studies showed that > 80% of 125I-AGE-BSA was retained by the LZ matrix, compared with < 10% retained by a control matrix. More than 60% of AGE-lysine was captured by the LZ matrix, and the LZ-bound fraction retained immunoreactivity and cross-linking activity, but had little intrinsic fluorescence (370/440 nm). After passage through the LZ matrix, AGE levels in diabetic sera (0.37+/-0.04 U/mg) were significantly reduced to a level (0.09+/-0.01 U/mg; n = 10; P < 0. 0001) comparable with the level of normal human serum, whereas total protein absorption was < 3%. The AGE-enriched serum fraction exhibited cross-linking activity, which was completely prevented by aminoguanidine. Among numerous LZ-bound proteins in diabetic uremic sera, three major proteins "susceptible" to AGE modification were identified: the immunoglobulin G light chain, apolipoprotein J (clusterin/SP-40,40), and the complement 3b beta chain. These findings indicate that the LZ-linked AGE affinity column may serve as an efficient method for the depletion of toxic AGEs from sera, including specific AGE-modified proteins that may be linked to altered immunity, lipoprotein metabolism, and accelerated vasculopathy in renal failure patients with or without diabetes. PMID:9259584

  12. Protective effect of snake venom antibodies in sera of previous snake bite victims.

    PubMed

    Theakston, R D; Reid, H A; Iddon, D; Larrick, J W

    1983-06-01

    Three out of seven serum samples from Ecuadorian Indians had very high antibody levels against Bothrops nasutus venom, and IgG concentrates of these sera effectively neutralized this venom when subsequently injected into mice. It is concluded that the high mortality rate among these Indians would be even higher if there were not such natural protection. Further research into active immunization of humans should be encouraged. PMID:6625731

  13. Developing Intepretive Soil Education Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansmeyer, T. L.; Cooper, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    Describes several soil educational displays developed for park and nature center trails. Displays include full-scale soil monoliths displayed along the trails with explanations on why and how the soils are different, and micro-monoliths exhibiting the different soil types. (MDH)

  14. [Competitive effect of PSK against the immunosuppressive effect induced in the sera of mice bearing syngeneic tumors].

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, K; Morita, I; Oguchi, Y; Fujii, T; Yoshikumi, C; Nomoto, K

    1986-12-01

    PSK is a protein-bound polysaccharide prepared from cultured mycelium of Coriolus versicolor. The appearance of an immunosuppressive effect in sera of tumor-bearing mice and its elimination by oral administration of PSK were investigated using an in vitro assay of blastoid transformation of normal spleen cells in response to PHA. (1) An inhibitory effect appeared in sera of X5563 plasmacytoma-bearing mice, while a facilitating effect was noted in sera of MH134 hepatoma- and MM 102 mammary tumor-bearing mice. (2) The presence of both an inhibitory and a facilitating factor was shown by Sephacryl gel fractionation. (3) Oral administration of PSK resulted in the elimination of the inhibitory effect from sera of X5563-bearing mice. The facilitating effect of sera from MH134-bearing mice was augmented by PSK administration, but that in sera from MM102-bearing mice was not influenced by such treatment. The summarized effects of these factors may be expressed as various types of effects in serum and PSK may be effective in the elimination of a suppressive factor from such sera.

  15. Excretory-secretory antigenic components of Paragonimus heterotremus recognized by infected human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Maleewong, W; Wongkham, C; Intapan, P; Pariyanonda, S; Morakote, N

    1992-01-01

    Antigenic components of Paragonimus heterotremus metabolic products were revealed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblot analysis of sera from patients with P. heterotremus infection, from patients with other illnesses, and from healthy adults. By SDS-PAGE, it was found that the metabolic products comprised more than eight major polypeptides. Immunoblot analysis revealed 11 components which were strongly recognized by paragonimiasis antisera. These antigenic components had molecular masses ranging from less than 12.3 kDa to 144 kDa. One antigenic band of 31.5 kDa was found to give a consistent reaction with paragonimiasis antisera (97% sensitivity). Of the other patient sera, only sera from patients with Fasciola sp. infection reacted with antigenic bands of 56, 38, and 18.5 kDa. The present findings suggest that the 31.5-kDa component is sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of human P. heterotremus paragonimiasis. Images PMID:1500515

  16. Nucleotide-hydrolyzing antibodies from the sera of autoimmune-prone MRL-lpr/lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Andryushkova, Alexandra A; Kuznetsova, Irina A; Orlovskaya, Irina A; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2009-08-01

    Abzymes (Abzs) with different enzymic activities have been detected in the sera of patients with various autoimmune (AI) diseases and in AI mice. In this work, electrophoretically homogeneous IgGs were isolated from the sera of MRL-lpr/lpr mice spontaneously developing lupus-like AI pathology. It was shown for the first time that polyclonal IgGs (pIgGs) and their isolated heavy and light chains hydrolyze different nucleoside-5'-triphosphate (NTPs), nucleoside-5'-diphosphate (NDPs), adenosine monophosphate and deoxiadenosine-5'-monophosphate (dAMP), whereas antibodies from the sera of control healthy mice were catalytically inactive. Monoclonal mouse IgGs also effectively hydrolyze nucleotides. The data demonstrate that nucleotide-hydrolyzing activity is an intrinsic property of isolated mouse pIgG and monoclonal IgG. It was shown that various markers of AI pathologies (proteinuria and antibody titers to native and denatured DNA) demonstrating spontaneous development of AI reactions increased in animals with aging and correlated with an increase in Abz relative activity in hydrolysis of nucleotides. The highest increase in AI reaction markers and in Abz enzymic activity was found in mice immunized with a DNA-protein complex.

  17. Detection of Babesia divergens in southern Norway by using an immunofluorescence antibody test in cow sera

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The incidence of bovine babesiosis, caused by Babesia divergens (Apicomplexa: Piroplasmida) has decreased markedly since the 1930 s, but may re-emerge as a consequence of climate change and changes in legislation and pasturing practices. This is a potentially serious disease, with both economical and animal welfare consequences. Therefore, there is a need to survey the distribution of B. divergens. Methods We tested sera from 306 healthy pastured cows from 24 farms along the southern Norwegian coast by using an indirect immunofluorescence IgG antibody test (IFAT). Fractions of seropositive cows were compared by calculating 95% CI. Results The results of this test showed that 27% of the sera were positive for B. divergens antibodies. The fraction of antibody-positive sera that we detected showed a two-humped distribution, with a high fraction of positives being found in municipalities in the western and eastern parts of the study area, while the municipalities between these areas had few or no positive serum samples. Conclusions Neither the farmers' observations nor the Norwegian Dairy Herd Recording System give an adequate picture of the distribution of bovine babesiosis. Serological testing of cows by using IFAT is a convenient way of screening for the presence of B. divergens in an area. PMID:20925923

  18. Disease pattern recognition in FT-IR spectra of human sera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrich, Wolfgang H.; Dolenko, Brion; Fink, Daniel J.; Frueh, Johanna; Greger, Helmut; Jacob, Stephan; Keller, Franz; Nikulin, Alexander; Otto, Matthias; Pessin-Minsley, Melissa S.; Quarder, Ortrud; Somorjai, Raymond L.; Staib, Arnulf; Thienel, Ulrich; Werner, Gerhard H.; Wielinger, Hans

    2001-06-01

    We observed differences between the mid-infrared spectra of sera originating from healthy volunteers and from patients with diabetes mellitus or rheumatoid arthritis. These differences were found to be significant in terms of the Fisher criterion, the t-test, and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. The significance allows for a classification of the spectra and a probability (`DPR-score') of belonging to the class `healthy' can be computed. In comparing the samples from 80 diabetes patients with samples from 40 healthy volunteers we are able to achieve a sensitivity and a specificity of 80% and above. The DPR-score correlates better with the actual status of health than the glucose concentration alone. In a study on rheumatoid arthritis we compared the spectral signatures of sera taken from 188 rheumatoid arthritis patients and sera from 196 healthy volunteers. By applying linear discriminant analysis to 2/3 of the samples we are able to classify the remaining third of the samples (independent validation) with a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 88%.

  19. Sera from cancer patients contain two oscillating ECTO-NOX activities with different period lengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Sui; Morre, Dorothy M.; Morre, D. James

    2003-01-01

    ECTO-NOX protein's are cell surface-associated and growth-related hydroquinone oxidases with both protein disulfide-thiol interchange activity and the capacity to oxidize NAD(P)H. The activities of these ECTO-NOX proteins are not steady state but fluctuate to create a repeating pattern of oscillations. Two forms of ECTO-NOX activities have been distinguished. The constitutive ECTO-NOX (CNOX), is hormone responsive and refractory to quinone-site inhibitors. A tumor-associated NOX (tNOX) is unregulated, refractory to hormones and growth factors and responds to quinone-site inhibitors. CNOX proteins are widely distributed and exhibit oscillations in enzymatic activity with a period length of 24 min. tNOX proteins are cancer specific and exhibit oscillations with a period length of about 22 min. Our findings now demonstrate the presence of the novel oscillating tNOX activity in sera of patients with cancer whereas the constitutive NOX of non-cancer cells is present in sera of both cancer patients and healthy volunteers. We conclude that ECTO-NOX proteins in sera exhibit oscillatory characteristics similar to those of ECTO-NOX forms of the cell surface.

  20. Bacterial cell surface display for epitope mapping of hepatitis C virus core antigen.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Min; Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Eui-Joong; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Oh, Jong-Won

    2003-09-26

    Cell surface expression of protein has been widely used to display enzymes and antigens. Here we show that Pseudomonas syringae ice nucleation protein with a deletion of internal repeating domain (INC) can be used in Escherichia coli to display peptide in a conformationally active form on the outside of the folded protein by fusing to the C-terminus of INC. Diagnostic potential of this technology was demonstrated by effective mapping of antigenic epitopes derived from hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. Amino acids 1-38 and 26-53 of HCV core protein were found to react more sensitively in a native conformation with the HCV patient sera than commercial diagnostic antigen, c22p (amino acids 10-53) by display-ELISA. These results demonstrate that the bacterial cell surface display using INC is useful for peptide presentation and thus epitope mapping of antigen. PMID:14553932

  1. Allosteric Partial Inhibition of Monomeric Proteases. Sulfated Coumarins Induce Regulation, not just Inhibition, of Thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Verespy III, Stephen; Mehta, Akul Y.; Afosah, Daniel; Al-Horani, Rami A.; Desai, Umesh R.

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteases can offer major regulatory advantages, but remains a concept on paper to date; although it has been routinely documented for receptors and oligomeric proteins. Thrombin, a key protease of the coagulation cascade, displays significant conformational plasticity, which presents an attractive opportunity to discover small molecule probes that induce sub-maximal allosteric inhibition. We synthesized a focused library of some 36 sulfated coumarins to discover two agents that display sub-maximal efficacy (~50%), high potency (<500 nM) and high selectivity for thrombin (>150-fold). Michaelis-Menten, competitive inhibition, and site-directed mutagenesis studies identified exosite 2 as the site of binding for the most potent sulfated coumarin. Stern-Volmer quenching of active site-labeled fluorophore suggested that the allosteric regulators induce intermediate structural changes in the active site as compared to those that display ~80–100% efficacy. Antithrombin inactivation of thrombin was impaired in the presence of the sulfated coumarins suggesting that allosteric partial inhibition arises from catalytic dysfunction of the active site. Overall, sulfated coumarins represent first-in-class, sub-maximal inhibitors of thrombin. The probes establish the concept of allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteins. This concept may lead to a new class of anticoagulants that are completely devoid of bleeding. PMID:27053426

  2. Dysregulation of protease and protease inhibitors in a mouse model of human pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Budatha, Madhusudhan; Silva, Simone; Montoya, Teodoro Ignacio; Suzuki, Ayako; Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Wieslander, Cecilia Karin; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Word, Ruth Ann; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    Mice deficient for the fibulin-5 gene (Fbln5(-/-)) develop pelvic organ prolapse (POP) due to compromised elastic fibers and upregulation of matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9. Here, we used casein zymography, inhibitor profiling, affinity pull-down, and mass spectrometry to discover additional protease upregulated in the vaginal wall of Fbln5(-/-) mice, herein named V1 (25 kDa). V1 was a serine protease with trypsin-like activity similar to protease, serine (PRSS) 3, a major extrapancreatic trypsinogen, was optimum at pH 8.0, and predominantly detected in estrogenized vaginal epithelium of Fbln5(-/-) mice. PRSS3 was (a) localized in epithelial secretions, (b) detected in media of vaginal organ culture from both Fbln5(-/-) and wild type mice, and (c) cleaved fibulin-5 in vitro. Expression of two serine protease inhibitors [Serpina1a (α1-antitrypsin) and Elafin] was dysregulated in Fbln5(-/-) epithelium. Finally, we confirmed that PRSS3 was expressed in human vaginal epithelium and that SERPINA1 and Elafin were downregulated in vaginal tissues from women with POP. These data collectively suggest that the balance between proteases and their inhibitors contributes to support of the pelvic organs in humans and mice. PMID:23437119

  3. Monoclonal antibody to a cancer-specific and drug-responsive hydroquinone (NADH) oxidase from the sera of cancer patients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, NaMi; Chueh, Pin-Ju; Kim, Chinpal; Caldwell, Sara; Morre, Dorothy M.; Morre, D. James

    2002-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were generated in mice to a 34-kDa circulating form of a drug-responsive hydroquinone (NADH) oxidase with a protein disulfide-thiol interchange activity specific to the surface of cancer cells and the sera of cancer patients. Screening used Western blots with purified 34-kDa tNOX from HeLa cells and the sera of cancer patients. Epitopes were sought that inhibited the drug-responsive oxidation of NADH with the sera of cancer patients, but which had no effect on NADH oxidation with the sera of healthy volunteers. Two such antisera were generated. One, designated monoclonal antibody (mAb) 12.1, was characterized extensively. The NADH oxidase activity inhibited by mAb 12.1 also was inhibited by the quinone site inhibitor capsaicin (8-methyl- N-vanillyl-6-noneamide). The inhibition was competitive for the drug-responsive protein disulfide-thiol interchange activity assayed either by restoration of activity to scrambled RNase or by cleavage of a dithiodipyridine substrate, and was uncompetitive for NADH oxidation. Both the mAb 12.1 and the postimmune antisera immunoprecipitated drug-responsive NOX activity and identified the same 34-kDa tNOX protein in the sera of cancer patients that was absent from sera of healthy volunteers, and was utilized as immunogen. Preimmune sera from the same mouse as the postimmune antisera was without effect. Both mouse ascites containing mAb 12.1 and postimmune sera (but not preimmune sera) slowed the growth of human cancer cell lines in culture, but did not affect the growth of non-cancerous cell lines. Immunocytochemical and histochemical findings showed that mAb 12.1 reacted with the surface membranes of human carcinoma cells and tissues.

  4. Enhanced Activity of Meprin-α, a Pro-Migratory and Pro-Angiogenic Protease, in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Noël, Agnès; Blacher, Silvia; Huguenin, Maya; Nievergelt, Alexandra; Niggli, Verena; Kern, Alexander; Müller, Stefan; Seibold, Frank; Friess, Helmut; Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Stöcker, Walter; Sterchi, Erwin E.

    2011-01-01

    Meprin-α is a metalloprotease overexpressed in cancer cells, leading to the accumulation of this protease in a subset of colorectal tumors. The impact of increased meprin-α levels on tumor progression is not known. We investigated the effect of this protease on cell migration and angiogenesis in vitro and studied the expression of meprin-α mRNA, protein and proteolytic activity in primary tumors at progressive stages and in liver metastases of patients with colorectal cancer, as well as inhibitory activity towards meprin-α in sera of cancer patient as compared to healthy controls. We found that the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)- induced migratory response of meprin-transfected epithelial cells was increased compared to wild-type cells in the presence of plasminogen, and that the angiogenic response in organ-cultured rat aortic explants was enhanced in the presence of exogenous human meprin-α. In patients, meprin-α mRNA was expressed in colonic adenomas, primary tumors UICC (International Union Against Cancer) stage I, II, III and IV, as well as in liver metastases. In contrast, the corresponding protein accumulated only in primary tumors and liver metastases, but not in adenomas. However, liver metastases lacked meprin-α activity despite increased expression of the corresponding protein, which correlated with inefficient zymogen activation. Sera from cancer patients exhibited reduced meprin-α inhibition compared to healthy controls. In conclusion, meprin-α activity is regulated differently in primary tumors and metastases, leading to high proteolytic activity in primary tumors and low activity in liver metastases. By virtue of its pro-migratory and pro-angiogenic activity, meprin-α may promote tumor progression in colorectal cancer. PMID:22096485

  5. Structural determinants of tobacco vein mottling virus protease substrate specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ping; Austin, Brian P.; Tozer, Jozsef; Waugh, David

    2010-10-28

    Tobacco vein mottling virus (TVMV) is a member of the Potyviridae, one of the largest families of plant viruses. The TVMV genome is translated into a single large polyprotein that is subsequently processed by three virally encoded proteases. Seven of the nine cleavage events are carried out by the NIa protease. Its homolog from the tobacco etch virus (TEV) is a widely used reagent for the removal of affinity tags from recombinant proteins. Although TVMV protease is a close relative of TEV protease, they exhibit distinct sequence specificities. We report here the crystal structure of a catalytically inactive mutant TVMV protease (K65A/K67A/C151A) in complex with a canonical peptide substrate (Ac-RETVRFQSD) at 1.7-{angstrom} resolution. As observed in several crystal structures of TEV protease, the C-terminus ({approx}20 residues) of TVMV protease is disordered. Unexpectedly, although deleting the disordered residues from TEV protease reduces its catalytic activity by {approx}10-fold, an analogous truncation mutant of TVMV protease is significantly more active. Comparison of the structures of TEV and TVMV protease in complex with their respective canonical substrate peptides reveals that the S3 and S4 pockets are mainly responsible for the differing substrate specificities. The structure of TVMV protease suggests that it is less tolerant of variation at the P1{prime} position than TEV protease. This conjecture was confirmed experimentally by determining kinetic parameters k{sub cat} and K{sub m} for a series of oligopeptide substrates. Also, as predicted by the cocrystal structure, we confirm that substitutions in the P6 position are more readily tolerated by TVMV than TEV protease.

  6. Mitochondrial Proteases as Emerging Pharmacological Targets.

    PubMed

    Gibellini, Lara; De Biasi, Sara; Nasi, Milena; Iannone, Anna; Cossarizza, Andrea; Pinti, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    The preservation of mitochondrial function and integrity is critical for cell viability. Under stress conditions, unfolded, misfolded or damaged proteins accumulate in a certain compartment of the organelle, interfering with oxidative phosphorylation and normal mitochondrial functions. In stress conditions, several mechanisms, including mitochondrial unfolded protease response (UPRmt), fusion and fission, and mitophagy are engaged to restore normal proteostasis of the organelle. Mitochondrial proteases are a family of more than 20 enzymes that not only are involved in the UPRmt, but actively participate at multiple levels in the stress-response system. Alterations in their expression levels, or mutations that determine loss or gain of function of these proteases deeply impair mitochondrial functionality and can be associated with the onset of inherited diseases, with the development of neurodegenerative disorders and with the process of carcinogenesis. In this review, we focus our attention on six of them, namely CLPP, HTRA2 and LONP1, by analysing the current knowledge about their functions, their involvement in the pathogenesis of human diseases, and the compounds currently available for inhibiting their functions. PMID:26831646

  7. Proteases of human rhinovirus: role in infection.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Lora M; Walker, Erin J; Jans, David A; Ghildyal, Reena

    2015-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRV) are the major etiological agents of the common cold and asthma exacerbations, with significant worldwide health and economic impact. Although large-scale population vaccination has proved successful in limiting or even eradicating many viruses, the more than 100 distinct serotypes mean that conventional vaccination is not a feasible strategy to combat HRV. An alternative strategy is to target conserved viral proteins such as the HRV proteases, 2A(pro) and 3C(pro), the focus of this review. Necessary for host cell shutoff, virus replication, and pathogenesis, 2A(pro) and 3C(pro) are clearly viable drug targets, and indeed, 3C(pro) has been successfully targeted for treating the common cold in experimental infection. 2A(pro) and 3C(pro) are crucial for virus replication due to their role in polyprotein processing as well as cleavage of key cellular proteins to inhibit cellular transcription and translation. Intriguingly, the action of the HRV proteases also disrupts nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, contributing to HRV cytopathic effects. Improved understanding of the protease-cell interactions should enable new therapeutic approaches to be identified for drug development. PMID:25261311

  8. Oligomeric state study of prokaryotic rhomboid proteases.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Padmapriya; Mak, Michelle W; Fischer-Witholt, Sarah J; Guigard, Emmanuel; Kay, Cyril M; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2012-12-01

    Rhomboid peptidases (proteases) play key roles in signaling events at the membrane bilayer. Understanding the regulation of rhomboid function is crucial for insight into its mechanism of action. Here we examine the oligomeric state of three different rhomboid proteases. We subjected Haemophilus influenzae, (hiGlpG), Escherichia coli GlpG (ecGlpG) and Bacillus subtilis (YqgP) to sedimentation equilibrium analysis in detergent-solubilized dodecylmaltoside (DDM) solution. For hiGlpG and ecGlpG, rhomboids consisting of the core 6 transmembrane domains without and with soluble domains respectively, and YqgP, predicted to have 7 transmembrane domains with larger soluble domains at the termini, the predominant species was dimeric with low amounts of monomer and tetramers observed. To examine the effect of the membrane domain alone on oligomeric state of rhomboid, hiGlpG, the simplest form from the rhomboid class of intramembrane proteases representing the canonical rhomboid core of six transmembrane domains, was studied further. Using gel filtration and crosslinking we demonstrate that hiGlpG is dimeric and functional in DDM detergent solution. More importantly co-immunoprecipitation studies demonstrate that the dimer is present in the lipid bilayer suggesting a physiological dimer. Overall these results indicate that rhomboids form oligomers which are facilitated by the membrane domain. For hiGlpG we have shown that these oligomers exist in the lipid bilayer. This is the first detailed oligomeric state characterization of the rhomboid family of peptidases. PMID:22921757

  9. Proteases of human rhinovirus: role in infection.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Lora M; Walker, Erin J; Jans, David A; Ghildyal, Reena

    2015-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRV) are the major etiological agents of the common cold and asthma exacerbations, with significant worldwide health and economic impact. Although large-scale population vaccination has proved successful in limiting or even eradicating many viruses, the more than 100 distinct serotypes mean that conventional vaccination is not a feasible strategy to combat HRV. An alternative strategy is to target conserved viral proteins such as the HRV proteases, 2A(pro) and 3C(pro), the focus of this review. Necessary for host cell shutoff, virus replication, and pathogenesis, 2A(pro) and 3C(pro) are clearly viable drug targets, and indeed, 3C(pro) has been successfully targeted for treating the common cold in experimental infection. 2A(pro) and 3C(pro) are crucial for virus replication due to their role in polyprotein processing as well as cleavage of key cellular proteins to inhibit cellular transcription and translation. Intriguingly, the action of the HRV proteases also disrupts nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, contributing to HRV cytopathic effects. Improved understanding of the protease-cell interactions should enable new therapeutic approaches to be identified for drug development.

  10. Corruption of innate immunity by bacterial proteases.

    PubMed

    Potempa, Jan; Pike, Robert N

    2009-01-01

    The innate immune system of the human body has developed numerous mechanisms to control endogenous and exogenous bacteria and thus prevent infections by these microorganisms. These mechanisms range from physical barriers such as the skin or mucosal epithelium to a sophisticated array of molecules and cells that function to suppress or prevent bacterial infection. Many bacteria express a variety of proteases, ranging from non-specific and powerful enzymes that degrade many proteins involved in innate immunity to proteases that are extremely precise and specific in their mode of action. Here we have assembled a comprehensive picture of how bacterial proteases affect the host's innate immune system to gain advantage and cause infection. This picture is far from being complete since the numbers of mechanisms utilized are as astonishing as they are diverse, ranging from degradation of molecules vital to innate immune mechanisms to subversion of the mechanisms to allow the bacterium to hide from the system or take advantage of it. It is vital that such mechanisms are elucidated to allow strategies to be developed to aid the innate immune system in controlling bacterial infections.

  11. The need for a sufficient number of low level sera in comparisons of different serum vitamin B12 assays.

    PubMed

    Gijzen, A H; de Kock, H W; Meulendijk, P N; Schmidt, N A; Schopman, W; Tertoolen, J F; Voogd, C E

    1983-01-24

    Eight radiochemical methods for the assay of vitamin B12 in serum were compared with the microbiological assay with Lactobacillus leichmannii ATCC 7830 using 198 individual sera of patients. There was a good agreement between the results of most samples with some kits and the microbiological assay. However, especially in the sera of vitamin B12-deficient patients large discrepancies between the results could occur. These variations were due to both the kits used and the performance of the assays in different laboratories. A sufficient number of non-pooled sera of vitamin B12-deficient patients should be included in investigations to validate radiochemical methods. PMID:6825315

  12. Similarities between Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Hepatitis C Virus Genetic and Phenotypic Protease Quasispecies Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Nevot, Maria; Jordan-Paiz, Ana; Franco, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are two highly variable RNA viruses that cause chronic infections in humans. Although HCV likely preceded the AIDS epidemic by some decades, the global spread of both viruses is a relatively recent event. Nevertheless, HCV global diversity is higher than that of HIV-1. To identify differences in mutant diversity, we compared the HIV-1 protease and HCV NS3 protease quasispecies. Three protease gene quasispecies samples per virus, isolated from a total of six infected patients, were genetically and phenotypically analyzed at high resolution (HIV-1, 308 individual clones; HCV, 299 clones). Single-nucleotide variant frequency did not differ between quasispecies from the two viruses (HIV-1, 2.4 × 10−3 ± 0.4 × 10−3; HCV, 2.1 × 10−3 ± 0.5 × 10−3) (P = 0.1680). The proportion of synonymous substitutions to potential synonymous sites was similar (3.667 ± 0.6667 and 2.183 ± 0.9048, respectively) (P = 0.2573), and Shannon's entropy values did not differ between HIV-1 and HCV (0.84 ± 0.02 and 0.83 ± 0.12, respectively) (P = 0.9408). Of note, 65% (HIV-1) and 67% (HCV) of the analyzed enzymes displayed detectable protease activity, suggesting that both proteases have a similar mutational robustness. In both viruses, there was a rugged protease enzymatic activity landscape characterized by a sharp peak, representing the master sequence, surrounded by a collection of diverse variants present at lower frequencies. These results indicate that nucleotide quasispecies diversification during chronic infection is not responsible for the higher worldwide genetic diversity observed in HCV. IMPORTANCE HCV global diversity is higher than that of HIV-1. We asked whether HCV genetic diversification during infection is responsible for the higher worldwide genetic diversity observed in HCV. To this end, we analyzed and compared the genotype and enzymatic activities of HIV-1 and HCV protease

  13. LED instrument approach instruction display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meredith, B. D.; Kelly, W. L., IV; Crouch, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    A display employing light emitting diodes (LED's) was developed to demonstrate the feasibility of such displays for presenting landing and navigation information to reduce the workload of general aviation pilots during IFR flight. The display consists of a paper tape reader, digital memory, control electronics, digital latches, and LED alphanumeric displays. A presentable digital countdown clock-timer is included as part of the system to provide a convenient means of monitoring time intervals for precise flight navigation. The system is a limited capability prototype assembled to test pilot reaction to such a device under simulated IFR operation. Pilot opinion indicates that the display is helpful in reducing the IFR pilots workload when used with a runway approach plate. However, the development of a compact, low power second generation display was recommended which could present several instructions simultaneously and provide information update capability. A microprocessor-based display could fulfill these requirements.

  14. Unique interactive projection display screen

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1997-11-01

    Projection systems continue to be the best method to produce large (1 meter and larger) displays. However, in order to produce a large display, considerable volume is typically required. The Polyplanar Optic Display (POD) is a novel type of projection display screen, which for the first time, makes it possible to produce a large projection system that is self-contained and only inches thick. In addition, this display screen is matte black in appearance allowing it to be used in high ambient light conditions. This screen is also interactive and can be remotely controlled via an infrared optical pointer resulting in mouse-like control of the display. Furthermore, this display need not be flat since it can be made curved to wrap around a viewer as well as being flexible.

  15. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    1986-06-01

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time- and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG - a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible andmore » are indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time- and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments,commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a repeat sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.« less

  16. Four Amino Acid Changes in HIV-2 Protease Confer Class-Wide Sensitivity to Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Robert A.; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Protease is essential for retroviral replication, and protease inhibitors (PI) are important for treating HIV infection. HIV-2 exhibits intrinsic resistance to most FDA-approved HIV-1 PI, retaining clinically useful susceptibility only to lopinavir, darunavir, and saquinavir. The mechanisms for this resistance are unclear; although HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases share just 38 to 49% sequence identity, all critical structural features of proteases are conserved. Structural studies have implicated four amino acids in the ligand-binding pocket (positions 32, 47, 76, and 82). We constructed HIV-2ROD9 molecular clones encoding the corresponding wild-type HIV-1 amino acids (I32V, V47I, M76L, and I82V) either individually or together (clone PRΔ4) and compared the phenotypic sensitivities (50% effective concentration [EC50]) of mutant and wild-type viruses to nine FDA-approved PI. Single amino acid replacements I32V, V47I, and M76L increased the susceptibility of HIV-2 to multiple PI, but no single change conferred class-wide sensitivity. In contrast, clone PRΔ4 showed PI susceptibility equivalent to or greater than that of HIV-1 for all PI. We also compared crystallographic structures of wild-type HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases complexed with amprenavir and darunavir to models of the PRΔ4 enzyme. These models suggest that the amprenavir sensitivity of PRΔ4 is attributable to stabilizing enzyme-inhibitor interactions in the P2 and P2′ pockets of the protease dimer. Together, our results show that the combination of four amino acid changes in HIV-2 protease confer a pattern of PI susceptibility comparable to that of HIV-1, providing a structural rationale for intrinsic HIV-2 PI resistance and resolving long-standing questions regarding the determinants of differential PI susceptibility in HIV-1 and HIV-2. IMPORTANCE Proteases are essential for retroviral replication, and HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases share a great deal of structural similarity. However, only three of nine

  17. Characterization of the 41kDa allergen Asp v 13, a subtilisin-like serine protease from Aspergillus versicolor.

    PubMed

    Shi, C; Miller, J D

    2011-09-01

    Aspergillus versicolor is common on moldy building materials. Asp v 13, the principal allergen is produced by strains collected from across Canada. In this paper, we report a 1833bp Asp v 13 open reading frame predicted to encode a protein of 403 amino acids in length with three introns. A BLAST search of Asp v 13, a phylogenic tree calculation and alignment with its homologous proteins from other species indicated that Asp v 13 is a secretory, subtilisin-like serine protease widely distributed in Aspergillus species. His-tagged Asp v 13 was over-expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using Ni-NTA columns with a yield of 1mg/L. Based on immuno binding assay of recombinant protein both antibodies developed against the natural protein, and human sera IgE, the recombinant protein was similar to the natural form. Six IgE- and seven IgG-binding epitopes were also identified with selected human sera along the entire amino acid sequence of Asp v 13. Most residues binding these epitopes are exposed on the surface and correspond to charged regions of the molecule.

  18. A comparative biochemical analysis of the NS2B(H)-NS3pro protease complex from four dengue virus serotypes.

    PubMed

    Iempridee, Tawin; Thongphung, Ratchanu; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan; Katzenmeier, Gerd

    2008-01-01

    The two-component protease NS2B-NS3 of dengue virus mediates proteolytic processing of the polyprotein precursor and therefore represents a target for the development of antiviral drugs. The amino acid sequences of the NS3 serine protease and the NS2B cofactor exhibit relatively low degrees of conservation among the 4 serotypes thus suggesting that differences in enzyme activity exist which could modulate their susceptibility to future protease inhibitors. In this study we have addressed the question of functional similarity among the NS2B(H)-NS3pro proteases from 4 dengue virus serotypes by employing a uniform approach to clone, purify and assay proteolytic activity of these enzymes. Significant differences were observed for patterns of protein formation and expression levels in the E. coli host. Renaturation of the NS2B(H)-NS3pro precursors from dengue virus serotypes 2, 3 and 4 mediated by artificial chaperone-assisted refolding yielded enzymatically active proteases, whereas the enzyme from serotype 1 was obtained as soluble protein. Kinetic experiments using the GRR-amc substrate revealed comparable K(m) values while k(cat) values as obtained by active-site titration experiments displayed minor variations. Denaturation experiments demonstrated significant differences in half-life of the NS3 proteases from serotypes 2, 3 and 4 at 50 degrees C, whereas pH optima for all 4 enzymes were comparable.

  19. Diversity of Both the Cultivable Protease-Producing Bacteria and Bacterial Extracellular Proteases in the Coastal Sediments of King George Island, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ming-Yang; Wang, Guang-Long; Li, Dan; Zhao, Dian-Li; Qin, Qi-Long; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Chen, Bo; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Protease-producing bacteria play a vital role in degrading sedimentary organic nitrogen. However, the diversity of these bacteria and their extracellular proteases in most regions remain unknown. In this paper, the diversity of the cultivable protease-producing bacteria and of bacterial extracellular proteases in the sediments of Maxwell Bay, King George Island, Antarctica was investigated. The cultivable protease-producing bacteria reached 105 cells/g in all 8 sediment samples. The cultivated protease-producing bacteria were mainly affiliated with the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria, and the predominant genera were Bacillus (22.9%), Flavobacterium (21.0%) and Lacinutrix (16.2%). Among these strains, Pseudoalteromonas and Flavobacteria showed relatively high protease production. Inhibitor analysis showed that nearly all the extracellular proteases from the bacteria were serine proteases or metalloproteases. These results begin to address the diversity of protease-producing bacteria and bacterial extracellular proteases in the sediments of the Antarctic Sea. PMID:24223990

  20. Augmenting digital displays with computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing

    As we inevitably step deeper and deeper into a world connected via the Internet, more and more information will be exchanged digitally. Displays are the interface between digital information and each individual. Naturally, one fundamental goal of displays is to reproduce information as realistically as possible since humans still care a lot about what happens in the real world. Human eyes are the receiving end of such information exchange; therefore it is impossible to study displays without studying the human visual system. In fact, the design of displays is rather closely coupled with what human eyes are capable of perceiving. For example, we are less interested in building displays that emit light in the invisible spectrum. This dissertation explores how we can augment displays with computation, which takes both display hardware and the human visual system into consideration. Four novel projects on display technologies are included in this dissertation: First, we propose a software-based approach to driving multiview autostereoscopic displays. Our display algorithm can dynamically assign views to hardware display zones based on multiple observers' current head positions, substantially reducing crosstalk and stereo inversion. Second, we present a dense projector array that creates a seamless 3D viewing experience for multiple viewers. We smoothly interpolate the set of viewer heights and distances on a per-vertex basis across the arrays field of view, reducing image distortion, crosstalk, and artifacts from tracking errors. Third, we propose a method for high dynamic range display calibration that takes into account the variation of the chrominance error over luminance. We propose a data structure for enabling efficient representation and querying of the calibration function, which also allows user-guided balancing between memory consumption and the amount of computation. Fourth, we present user studies that demonstrate that the ˜ 60 Hz critical flicker fusion

  1. Novel proteases from the genome of the carnivorous plant Drosera capensis: Structural prediction and comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Butts, Carter T; Bierma, Jan C; Martin, Rachel W

    2016-10-01

    In his 1875 monograph on insectivorous plants, Darwin described the feeding reactions of Drosera flypaper traps and predicted that their secretions contained a "ferment" similar to mammalian pepsin, an aspartic protease. Here we report a high-quality draft genome sequence for the cape sundew, Drosera capensis, the first genome of a carnivorous plant from order Caryophyllales, which also includes the Venus flytrap (Dionaea) and the tropical pitcher plants (Nepenthes). This species was selected in part for its hardiness and ease of cultivation, making it an excellent model organism for further investigations of plant carnivory. Analysis of predicted protein sequences yields genes encoding proteases homologous to those found in other plants, some of which display sequence and structural features that suggest novel functionalities. Because the sequence similarity to proteins of known structure is in most cases too low for traditional homology modeling, 3D structures of representative proteases are predicted using comparative modeling with all-atom refinement. Although the overall folds and active residues for these proteins are conserved, we find structural and sequence differences consistent with a diversity of substrate recognition patterns. Finally, we predict differences in substrate specificities using in silico experiments, providing targets for structure/function studies of novel enzymes with biological and technological significance. Proteins 2016; 84:1517-1533. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Loss of the SUMO protease Ulp2 triggers a specific multichromosome aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hong-Yeoul; Wilson, Nicole R; Mehta, Sameet; Hwang, Soo Seok; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2016-08-15

    Post-translational protein modification by the small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) regulates numerous cellular pathways, including transcription, cell division, and genome maintenance. The SUMO protease Ulp2 modulates many of these SUMO-dependent processes in budding yeast. From whole-genome RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), we unexpectedly discovered that cells lacking Ulp2 display a twofold increase in transcript levels across two particular chromosomes: chromosome I (ChrI) and ChrXII. This is due to the two chromosomes being present at twice their normal copy number. An abnormal number of chromosomes, termed aneuploidy, is usually deleterious. However, development of specific aneuploidies allows rapid adaptation to cellular stresses, and aneuploidy characterizes most human tumors. Extra copies of ChrI and ChrXII appear quickly following loss of active Ulp2 and can be eliminated following reintroduction of ULP2, suggesting that aneuploidy is a reversible adaptive mechanism to counteract loss of the SUMO protease. Importantly, increased dosage of two genes on ChrI-CLN3 and CCR4, encoding a G1-phase cyclin and a subunit of the Ccr4-Not deadenylase complex, respectively-suppresses ulp2Δ aneuploidy, suggesting that increased levels of these genes underlie the aneuploidy induced by Ulp2 loss. Our results reveal a complex aneuploidy mechanism that adapts cells to loss of the SUMO protease Ulp2. PMID:27585592

  3. Novel proteases from the genome of the carnivorous plant Drosera capensis: Structural prediction and comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Butts, Carter T; Bierma, Jan C; Martin, Rachel W

    2016-10-01

    In his 1875 monograph on insectivorous plants, Darwin described the feeding reactions of Drosera flypaper traps and predicted that their secretions contained a "ferment" similar to mammalian pepsin, an aspartic protease. Here we report a high-quality draft genome sequence for the cape sundew, Drosera capensis, the first genome of a carnivorous plant from order Caryophyllales, which also includes the Venus flytrap (Dionaea) and the tropical pitcher plants (Nepenthes). This species was selected in part for its hardiness and ease of cultivation, making it an excellent model organism for further investigations of plant carnivory. Analysis of predicted protein sequences yields genes encoding proteases homologous to those found in other plants, some of which display sequence and structural features that suggest novel functionalities. Because the sequence similarity to proteins of known structure is in most cases too low for traditional homology modeling, 3D structures of representative proteases are predicted using comparative modeling with all-atom refinement. Although the overall folds and active residues for these proteins are conserved, we find structural and sequence differences consistent with a diversity of substrate recognition patterns. Finally, we predict differences in substrate specificities using in silico experiments, providing targets for structure/function studies of novel enzymes with biological and technological significance. Proteins 2016; 84:1517-1533. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27353064

  4. Advanced poly-LED displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, Mark; Nisato, Giovanni; Fish, D.; Giraldo, Andrea; Jenkins, A. J.; Johnson, Mark T.

    2003-05-01

    Philips have been actively developing polymer OLED (poly-LED) displays as a future display technology. Their emissive nature leads to a very attractive visual appearance, with wide viewing angle, high brightness and fast response speed. Whilst the first generation of poly-LED displays are likely to be passive-matrix driven, power reduction and resolution increase will lead to the use of active-matrix poly-LED displays. Philips Research have designed, fabricated and characterized five different designs of active-matrix polymer-LED display. Each of the five displays makes use of a distinct pixel programming- or pixel drive-technique, including current programming, threshold voltage measurement and photodiode feedback. It will be shown that hte simplest voltage-programmed current-source pixel suffers from potentially unacceptable brightness non-uniformity, and that advanced pixel circuits can provide a solution to this. Optical-feedback pixel circuits will be discussed, showing that they can be used to improve uniformity and compensate for image burn-in due to polymer-LED material degradation, improving display lifetime. Philips research has also been active in developing technologies required to implement poly-LED displays on flexible substrates, including materials, processing and testing methods. The fabrication of flexible passive-matrix poly-LED displays will be presented, as well as the ongoing work to assess the suitability of processing flexible next-generation poly-LED displays.

  5. Rapid display of radiographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Jerome R., Jr.; Moore, Stephen M.; Whitman, Robert A.; Blaine, G. James; Jost, R. Gilbert; Karlsson, L. M.; Monsees, Thomas L.; Hassen, Gregory L.; David, Timothy C.

    1991-07-01

    The requirements for the rapid display of radiographic images exceed the capabilities of widely available display, computer, and communications technologies. Computed radiography captures data with a resolution of about four megapixels. Large-format displays are available that can present over four megapixels. One megapixel displays are practical for use in combination with large-format displays and in areas where the viewing task does not require primary diagnosis. This paper describes an electronic radiology system that approximates the highest quality systems, but through the use of several interesting techniques allows the possibility of its widespread installation throughout hospitals. The techniques used can be grouped under three major system concepts: a local, high-speed image server, one or more physician's workstations each with one or more high-performance auxiliary displays specialized to the radiology viewing task, and dedicated, high-speed communication links between the server and the displays. This approach is enhanced by the use of a progressive transmission scheme to decrease the latency for viewing four megapixel images. The system includes an image server with storage for over 600 4-megapixel images and a high-speed link. A subsampled megapixel image is fetched from disk and transmitted to the display in about one second followed by the full resolution 4-megapixel image in about 2.5 seconds. Other system components include a megapixel display with a 6-megapixel display memory space and frame-rate update of image roam, zoom, and contrast. Plans for clinical use are presented.

  6. Characterization of a papain-like cysteine protease essential for the survival of Babesia ovis merozoites.

    PubMed

    Carletti, Tamara; Barreto, Carmo; Mesplet, Maria; Mira, Anabela; Weir, William; Shiels, Brian; Oliva, Abel Gonzalez; Schnittger, Leonhard; Florin-Christensen, Monica

    2016-02-01

    Babesia ovis, a tick-transmitted intraerythrocytic protozoan parasite, causes severe infections in small ruminants from Southern Europe, Middle East, and Northern Africa. With the aim of finding potential targets for the development of control methods against this parasite, sequence analysis of its genome led to the identification of four putative cysteine proteases of the C1A family. Orthology between B. ovis, B. bovis, T. annulata, and T. parva sequences showed that each B. ovis C1A peptidase sequence clustered within one of the four ortholog groups previously reported for these piroplasmids. The ortholog of bovipain-2 of B. bovis and falcipain-2 of Plasmodium falciparum, respectively, was designated "ovipain-2" and further characterized. In silico analysis showed that ovipain-2 has the typical topology of papain-like cysteine peptidases and a highly similar predicted three dimensional structure to bovipain-2 and falcipain-2, suggesting susceptibility to similar inhibitors. Immunoblotting using antibodies raised against a recombinant form of ovipain-2 (r-ovipain-2) demonstrated expression of ovipain-2 in in vitro cultured B. ovis merozoites. By immunofluorescence, these antibodies reacted with merozoites and stained the cytoplasm of infected erythrocytes. This suggests that ovipain-2 is secreted by the parasite and could be involved in intra- and extracellular digestion of hemoglobin and/or cleavage of erythrocyte proteins facilitating parasite egress. A significant reduction in the percentage of parasitized erythrocytes was obtained upon incubation of B. ovis in vitro cultures with anti-r-ovipain-2 antibodies, indicating an important functional role for ovipain-2 in the intra erythrocytic development cycle of this parasite. Finally, studies of the reactivity of sera from B. ovis-positive and negative sheep against r-ovipain-2 showed that this protease is expressed in vivo, and can be recognized by host antibodies. The results of this study suggest that ovipain-2

  7. Immunoreactive Proteins of Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum CCM 7952 and Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum CCDM 372 Identified by Gnotobiotic Mono-Colonized Mice Sera, Immune Rabbit Sera and Non-immune Human Sera

    PubMed Central

    Górska, Sabina; Dylus, Ewa; Rudawska, Angelika; Brzozowska, Ewa; Srutkova, Dagmar; Schwarzer, Martin; Razim, Agnieszka; Kozakova, Hana; Gamian, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The Bifidobacteria show great diversity in the cell surface architecture which may influence the physicochemical properties of the bacterial cell and strain specific properties. The immunomodulatory role of bifidobacteria has been extensively studied, however studies on the immunoreactivity of their protein molecules are very limited. Here, we compared six different methods of protein isolation and purification and we report identification of immunogenic and immunoreactive protein of two human Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum strains. We evaluated potential immunoreactive properties of proteins employing polyclonal sera obtained from germ free mouse, rabbit and human. The protein yield was isolation method-dependent and the reactivity of proteins detected by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting was heterogeneous and varied between different serum samples. The proteins with the highest immunoreactivity were isolated, purified and have them sequenced. Among the immunoreactive proteins we identified enolase, aspartokinase, pyruvate kinase, DnaK (B. longum ssp. longum CCM 7952) and sugar ABC transporter ATP-binding protein, phosphoglycerate kinase, peptidoglycan synthethase penicillin-binding protein 3, transaldolase, ribosomal proteins and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (B. longum ssp. longum CCDM 372). PMID:27746766

  8. Salmonella typhi O:9,12 polysaccharide-protein conjugates: characterization and immunoreactivity with pooled and individual normal human sera, sera from patients with paratyphoid A and B and typhoid fever, and animal sera.

    PubMed

    Aron, L; Di Fabio, J; Cabello, F C

    1993-04-01

    Polysaccharide of O:9,12 specificity purified from Salmonella typhi was conjugated to tetanus toxoid or bovine serum albumin in order to obtain defined antigenic material that would contain O chain free of other S. typhi antigens and that would be suitable for characterizing host humoral response to only S. typhi O-chain antigens. These artificial conjugates were strongly reactive in immunodots with 18 pooled and 3 individual serum samples from patients with typhoid fever and with rabbit anti-Salmonella O antiserum (group D, factors 1, 9, and 12). They reacted weakly with one serum sample from one human with paratyphoid A. These results suggest that the periodate oxidation and the reductive amination used in the conjugation conserved the immunogenicity of the O chain and allowed its absorption to nitrocellulose. They also suggest that the bovine serum albumin conjugate could be used in the diagnosis of S. typhi infections as normal sera may react with the protein molecule of the tetanus toxoid conjugate.

  9. Economic Methods of Ginger Protease'sextraction and Purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yuanyuan; Tong, Junfeng; Wei, Siqing; Du, Xinyong; Tang, Xiaozhen

    This article reports the ginger protease extraction and purification methods from fresh ginger rhizome. As to ginger protease extraction, we adapt the steps of organic solvent dissolving, ammonium sulfate depositing and freeze-drying, and this method can attain crude enzyme powder 0.6% weight of fresh ginger rhizome. The purification part in this study includes two steps: cellulose ion exchange (DEAE-52) and SP-Sephadex 50 chromatography, which can purify crude ginger protease through ion and molecular weight differences respectively.

  10. A preliminary neutron diffraction analysis of Achromobacter protease I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Yuki; Masaki, Takeharu; Yamada, Taro; Kurihara, Kazuo; Tanaka, Ichiro; Niimura, Nobuo

    2010-11-01

    Achromobacter protease I (API, E.C. 3.4.21.50) is one of the serine proteases produced by Achromobacter lyticus M497-1. API is distinct from the other tripsin type protease in its lysine specificity. The neutron structure analysis of catalytic triad with Trp169 and His210 was presented. His57 was double protonated and formed hydrogen bonds to Ser194Oγ and Asp113Oδ1, Oδ2.

  11. Specificity of anti-lymphocyte antibodies in sera from patients with AIDS-related complex (ARC) and healthy homosexuals.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, R Q; Johnson, E A; Donnelly, R P; Lavia, M F; Tsang, K Y

    1988-01-01

    The presence and specificity of anti-lymphocyte antibodies (ALA) was investigated in sera from male homosexuals with AIDS-Related Complex (ARC) as well as healthy homosexuals. Individuals in the healthy homosexual group had no detectable antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Antibodies reactive with normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells were detected by Western blot analysis in sera from both groups of homosexuals. Of those individuals whose sera contained ALA, 71% of ARC patients and 83% of healthy homosexuals had antibodies recognizing a 73 kilodalton (kD) molecule. ALA present in ARC sera reacted with CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes while little reactivity with B cells was observed. Our results indicate that ALA appear in homosexuals prior to HIV infection and are reactive primarily with T lymphocytes. A 73 kD structure associated with the T cell membrane is frequently the target for these antibodies. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3052941

  12. An acousto-optical method for registration of erythrocytes' agglutination reaction—sera color influence on the resolving power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubrovski, V. A.; Medvedeva, M. F.; Torbin, S. O.

    2016-01-01

    The absorption spectra of agglutinating sera were used to determine blood groups. It was shown experimentally that the sera color significantly affects the resolving power of the acousto-optical method of blood typing. In order to increase the resolving power of the method and produce an invariance of the method for sera color, we suggested introducing a probing light beam individually for different sera. The proposed technique not only improves the resolving power of the method, but also reduces the risk of false interpretation of the experimental results and, hence, error in determining the blood group of the sample. The latter is especially important for the typing of blood samples with weak agglutination of erythrocytes. This study can be used in the development of an instrument for instrumental human blood group typing based on the acousto-optical method.

  13. X-1 on display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1949-01-01

    A Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1 series aircraft on display at an Open House at NACA Muroc Flight Test Unit or High-Speed Flight Research Station hangar on South Base of Edwards Air Force Base, California. (The precise date of the photo is uncertain, but it is probably before 1948.) The instrumentation that was carried aboard the aircraft to gather data is on display. The aircraft data was recorded on oscillograph film that was read, calibrated, and converted into meaningful parameters for the engineers to evaluate from each research flight. In the background of the photo are several early U.S. jets. These include several Lockheed P-80 Shooting Stars, which were used as chase planes on X-1 flights; two Bell P-59 Airacomets, the first U.S. jet pursuit aircraft (fighter in later parlance); and a prototype Republic XP-84 Thunderjet. There were five versions of the Bell X-1 rocket-powered research aircraft that flew at the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station, Edwards, California. The bullet-shaped X-1 aircraft were built by Bell Aircraft Corporation, Buffalo, N.Y. for the U.S. Army Air Forces (after 1947, U.S. Air Force) and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The X-1 Program was originally designated the XS-1 for eXperimental Sonic. The X-1's mission was to investigate the transonic speed range (speeds from just below to just above the speed of sound) and, if possible, to break the 'sound barrier.' Three different X-1s were built and designated: X-1-1, X-1-2 (later modified to become the X-1E), and X-1-3. The basic X-1 aircraft were flown by a large number of different pilots from 1946 to 1951. The X-1 Program not only proved that humans could go beyond the speed of sound, it reinforced the understanding that technological barriers could be overcome. The X-1s pioneered many structural and aerodynamic advances including extremely thin, yet extremely strong wing sections; supersonic fuselage configurations; control system requirements; powerplant

  14. Autotransporter-Based Antigen Display in Bacterial Ghosts

    PubMed Central

    Hjelm, Anna; Söderström, Bill; Vikström, David; Jong, Wouter S. P.; Luirink, Joen

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial ghosts are empty cell envelopes of Gram-negative bacteria that can be used as vehicles for antigen delivery. Ghosts are generated by releasing the bacterial cytoplasmic contents through a channel in the cell envelope that is created by the controlled production of the bacteriophage ϕX174 lysis protein E. While ghosts possess all the immunostimulatory surface properties of the original host strain, they do not pose any of the infectious threats associated with live vaccines. Recently, we have engineered the Escherichia coli autotransporter hemoglobin protease (Hbp) into a platform for the efficient surface display of heterologous proteins in Gram-negative bacteria, HbpD. Using the Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccine target ESAT6 (early secreted antigenic target of 6 kDa), we have explored the application of HbpD to decorate E. coli and Salmonella ghosts with antigens. The use of different promoter systems enabled the concerted production of HbpD-ESAT6 and lysis protein E. Ghost formation was monitored by determining lysis efficiency based on CFU, the localization of a set of cellular markers, fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and electron microscopy. Hbp-mediated surface display of ESAT6 was monitored using a combination of a protease accessibility assay, fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and (immuno-)electron microscopy. Here, we show that the concerted production of HbpD and lysis protein E in E. coli and Salmonella can be used to produce ghosts that efficiently display antigens on their surface. This system holds promise for the development of safe and cost-effective vaccines with optimal intrinsic adjuvant activity and exposure of heterologous antigens to the immune system. PMID:25398861

  15. Laser illuminated flat panel display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    A 10 inch laser illuminated flat panel Planar Optic Display (POD) screen has been constructed and tested. This POD screen technology is an entirely new concept in display technology. Although the initial display is flat and made of glass, this technology lends itself to applications where a plastic display might be wrapped around the viewer. The display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optical waveguides where each glass waveguide represents a vertical line of resolution. A black cladding layer, having a lower index of refraction, is placed between each waveguide layer. Since the cladding makes the screen surface black, the contrast is high. The prototype display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately I inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  16. Role of Protease-Inhibitors in Ocular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Pescosolido, Nicola; Barbato, Andrea; Pascarella, Antonia; Giannotti, Rossella; Genzano, Martina; Nebbioso, Marcella

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the balance between proteases and protease-inhibitors system plays a key role in maintaining cellular and tissue homeostasis. Indeed, its alteration has been involved in many ocular and systemic diseases. In particular, research has focused on keratoconus, corneal wounds and ulcers, keratitis, endophthalmitis, age-related macular degeneration, Sorsby fundus dystrophy, loss of nerve cells and photoreceptors during optic neuritis both in vivo and in vitro models. Protease-inhibitors have been extensively studied, rather than proteases, because they may represent a therapeutic approach for some ocular diseases. The protease-inhibitors mainly involved in the onset of the above-mentioned ocular pathologies are: α2-macroglobulin, α1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI), metalloproteinase inhibitor (TIMP), maspin, SERPINA3K, SERPINB13, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), and calpeptin. This review is focused on the several characteristics of dysregulation of this system and, particularly, on a possible role of proteases and protease-inhibitors in molecular remodeling that may lead to some ocular diseases. Recently, researchers have even hypothesized a possible therapeutic effect of the protease-inhibitors in the treatment of injured eye in animal models. PMID:25493637

  17. Extracellular Bacterial Proteases in Chronic Wounds: A Potential Therapeutic Target?

    PubMed Central

    Suleman, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Bacterial biofilms are considered to be responsible for over 80% of persistent infections, including chronic lung infections, osteomyelitis, periodontitis, endocarditis, and chronic wounds. Over 60% of chronic wounds are colonized with bacteria that reside within a biofilm. The exaggerated proteolytic environment of chronic wounds, more specifically elevated matrix metalloproteinases, is thought to be one of the possible reasons as to why chronic wounds fail to heal. However, the role of bacterial proteases within chronic wounds is not fully understood. Recent Advances: Recent research has shown that bacterial proteases can enable colonization and facilitate bacterial immune evasion. The inhibition of bacterial proteases such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase B (LasB) has resulted in the disruption of the bacterial biofilm in vitro. P. aeruginosa is thought to be a key pathogen in chronic wound infection, and therefore, the disruption of these biofilms, potentially through the targeting of P. aeruginosa bacterial proteases, is an attractive therapeutic endeavor. Critical Issues: Disrupting biofilm formation through the inhibition of bacterial proteases may lead to the dissemination of bacteria from the biofilm, allowing planktonic cells to colonize new sites within the wound. Future Directions: Despite a plethora of evidence supporting the role of bacterial proteases as virulence factors in infection, there remains a distinct lack of research into the effect of bacterial proteases in chronic wounds. To assess the viability of targeting bacterial proteases, future research should aim to understand the role of these proteases in a variety of chronic wound subtypes. PMID:27785379

  18. Role of Protease-Inhibitors in Ocular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Pescosolido, Nicola; Barbato, Andrea; Pascarella, Antonia; Giannotti, Rossella; Genzano, Martina; Nebbioso, Marcella

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the balance between proteases and protease-inhibitors system plays a key role in maintaining cellular and tissue homeostasis. Indeed, its alteration has been involved in many ocular and systemic diseases. In particular, research has focused on keratoconus, corneal wounds and ulcers, keratitis, endophthalmitis, age-related macular degeneration, Sorsby fundus dystrophy, loss of nerve cells and photoreceptors during optic neuritis both in vivo and in vitro models. Protease-inhibitors have been extensively studied, rather than proteases, because they may represent a therapeutic approach for some ocular diseases. The protease-inhibitors mainly involved in the onset of the above-mentioned ocular pathologies are: α2-macroglobulin, α1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI), metalloproteinase inhibitor (TIMP), maspin, SERPINA3K, SERPINB13, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), and calpeptin. This review is focused on the several characteristics of dysregulation of this system and, particularly, on a possible role of proteases and protease-inhibitors in molecular remodeling that may lead to some ocular diseases. Recently, researchers have even hypothesized a possible therapeutic effect of the protease-inhibitors in the treatment of injured eye in animal models.

  19. Detergent alkaline proteases: enzymatic properties, genes, and crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Katsuhisa; Ozaki, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Tohru; Ito, Susumu

    2007-06-01

    Subtilisin-like serine proteases from bacilli have been used in various industrial fields worldwide, particularly in the production of laundry and automatic dishwashing detergents. They belong to family A of the subtilase superfamily, which is composed of three clans, namely, true subtilisins, high-alkaline proteases, and intracellular proteases. We succeeded in the large-scale production of a high-alkaline protease (M-protease) from alkaliphilic Bacillus clausii KSM-K16, and the enzyme has been introduced into compact heavy-duty laundry detergents. We have also succeeded in the industrial-scale production of a new alkaline protease, KP-43, which was originally resistant to chemical oxidants and to surfactants, produced by alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. strain KSM-KP43 and have incorporated it into laundry detergents. KP-43 and related proteases form a new clan, oxidatively stable proteases, in subtilase family A. In this review, we describe the enzymatic properties, gene sequences, and crystal structures of M-protease, KP-43, and related enzymes. PMID:17630120

  20. Titration of herpes simplex virus antibodies in human sera by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, B F; Grauballe, P C; Spanggaard, H

    1977-12-01

    100 sera from healthy adults were titrated simultaneously for herpes simplex virus (HSV) antibodies by ELISA and neutralization. The ELISA was performed on microtitre plates where approximately 100 ng of detergent solubilized and chromatographically purified HSV glycoproteins was bound covalently to the plastic bottom of each well. The optical density (OD) values obtained by the use of the peroxidase-1.2phenylendiamindihydrochloride system showed good correlation with the neuratlizing antibody titres. Sera with very low neutralizing titres were clearly positive in ELISA.

  1. Intracellular alkaline proteases produced by thermoacidophiles: detection of protease heterogeneity by gelatin zymography and polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Kocabiyik, Semra; Erdem, Bilge

    2002-08-01

    In this study 24 thermoacidophilic archeal and bacterial strains isolated from hot-springs and hot-soils were screened for their ability to produce intracellular alkaline proteases. The protease activities of the strains, based on azocasein hydrolysis, showed a variation from 0.6 to 5.1 U. The cell extracts of three most potent producers were further examined and it was found that their proteases exhibited maximum activity at 60-70 degrees C and showed a pH optimum over a range of pH 7.0-8.5. Gelatin zymography revealed that two of the selected archeal strains produced multiple active SDS-resistant proteases. On the other hand, PCR amplification of alkaline serine protease gene sequences of total DNA from all isolates yielded four distinct amplification fragments of 650, 450, 400 and 300 bp, which might have been derived from different serine protease genes.

  2. Flat panel planar optic display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1994-11-01

    A prototype 10 inch flat panel Planar Optic Display, (POD), screen has been constructed and tested. This display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optic class sheets bonded together with a cladding layer between each sheet where each glass sheet represents a vertical line of resolution. The display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately 1 inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  3. Peripheral vision displays: The future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assenhein, H. M.

    1984-01-01

    Several areas of research relating to peripheral vision displays used by aircraft pilots are outlined: fiber optics, display color, and holography. Various capacities and specifications of gas and solid state lasers are enumerated. These lasers are potential sources of green light for the peripheral vision displays. The relative radiance required for rod and cone vision at different wavelengths is presented graphically. Calculated and measured retinal sensitivities (foveal and peripheral) are given for wavelength produced by various lasers.

  4. Assessment of IgE and IgG4 Binding Capacities of Cow's Milk Proteins Selectively Altered by Proteases.

    PubMed

    Charcosset, Alexandre; Adel-Patient, Karine; Dupont, Christophe; Bernard, Hervé

    2016-05-01

    Specific IgE and IgG4 have been reported to play key roles in the context of IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy (CMA), but the persistence of their epitopes in milk hydrolysates has not been evaluated. Using sera from 32 CMA patients, 6 CMA patients treated by epicutaneous therapy (CM-treated), and 4 CM-tolerant peanut allergic patients, we analyzed the IgE and IgG4 binding capacities related to major milk allergens in processed milk. Different proteases (plasmin, chymosin, α-chymotrypsin, or pepsin) were used progressively and selectively to hydrolyze β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) and casein (CN) in milk. We then showed that proteases differentially affect IgE or IgG4 immunoreactivities of CN and β-LG and also that we could not relate IgE and/or IgG4 levels or specificities to milk hydrolysates to the clinical status of the patients. PMID:27015440

  5. The display of tactile information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrick, Carl E.

    1991-01-01

    There are a number of examples of natural tactile displays that can five us some insights about the solid geometry of touch, and recent experimental work on the subject has extended our thinking considerably. The concern of here is, however, more with synthetic or artificial displays for the production of a virtual environment. Features of synthetic displays that have enjoyed some success in one of the following two enterprises are discussed: the study of the spatio-temporal dimensions of stimuli that afford accurate and rapid processing of environmental information, or the use of displays in the design of sensory aids for disabled persons.

  6. Colorimetric evaluation of display performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmowski, Bogdan B.

    2001-08-01

    The development of information techniques, using new technologies, physical phenomena and coding schemes, enables new application areas to be benefited form the introduction of displays. The full utilization of the visual perception of a human operator, requires the color coding process to be implemented. The evolution of displays, from achromatic (B&W) and monochromatic, to multicolor and full-color, enhances the possibilities of information coding, creating however a need for the quantitative methods of display parameter assessment. Quantitative assessment of color displays, restricted to photometric measurements of their parameters, is an estimate leading to considerable errors. Therefore, the measurements of a display's color properties have to be based on spectral measurements of the display and its elements. The quantitative assessment of the display system parameters should be made using colorimetric systems like CIE1931, CIE1976 LAB or LUV. In the paper, the constraints on the measurement method selection for the color display evaluation are discussed and the relations between their qualitative assessment and the ergonomic conditions of their application are also presented. The paper presents the examples of using LUV colorimetric system and color difference (Delta) E in the optimization of color liquid crystal displays.

  7. Liquid crystal Fresnel lens display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Qian; Abhishek Kumar, Srivastava; Alwin Tam, Ming-Wai; Zheng, Zhi-Gang; Shen, Dong; Vladimir, Chigrinov G.; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2016-09-01

    A novel see-through display with a liquid crystal lens array was proposed. A liquid crystal Fresnel lens display (LCFLD) with a holographic screen was demonstrated. The proposed display system has high efficiency, simple fabrication, and low manufacturing cost due to the absence of a polarizer and color filter. Project supported by Partner State Key Laboratory on Advanced Displays and Optoelectronics Technologies HKUST, China, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61435008 and 61575063), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. WM1514036).

  8. Liquid crystal Fresnel lens display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Qian; Abhishek Kumar, Srivastava; Alwin Tam, Ming-Wai; Zheng, Zhi-Gang; Shen, Dong; Vladimir, Chigrinov G.; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2016-09-01

    A novel see-through display with a liquid crystal lens array was proposed. A liquid crystal Fresnel lens display (LCFLD) with a holographic screen was demonstrated. The proposed display system has high efficiency, simple fabrication, and low manufacturing cost due to the absence of a polarizer and color filter. Project supported by Partner State Key Laboratory on Advanced Displays and Optoelectronics Technologies HKUST, China, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61435008 and 61575063), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. WM1514036).

  9. Determinants of Affinity and Proteolytic Stability in Interactions of Kunitz Family Protease Inhibitors with Mesotrypsin

    SciTech Connect

    Salameh, M.A.; Soares, A.; Navaneetham, D.; Sinha, D.; Walsh, P. N.; Radisky, E. S.

    2010-11-19

    An important functional property of protein protease inhibitors is their stability to proteolysis. Mesotrypsin is a human trypsin that has been implicated in the proteolytic inactivation of several protein protease inhibitors. We have found that bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), a Kunitz protease inhibitor, inhibits mesotrypsin very weakly and is slowly proteolyzed, whereas, despite close sequence and structural homology, the Kunitz protease inhibitor domain of the amyloid precursor protein (APPI) binds to mesotrypsin 100 times more tightly and is cleaved 300 times more rapidly. To define features responsible for these differences, we have assessed the binding and cleavage by mesotrypsin of APPI and BPTI reciprocally mutated at two nonidentical residues that make direct contact with the enzyme. We find that Arg at P{sub 1} (versus Lys) favors both tighter binding and more rapid cleavage, whereas Met (versus Arg) at P'{sub 2} favors tighter binding but has minimal effect on cleavage. Surprisingly, we find that the APPI scaffold greatly enhances proteolytic cleavage rates, independently of the binding loop. We draw thermodynamic additivity cycles analyzing the interdependence of P1 and P'{sub 2} substitutions and scaffold differences, finding multiple instances in which the contributions of these features are nonadditive. We also report the crystal structure of the mesotrypsin {center_dot} APPI complex, in which we find that the binding loop of APPI displays evidence of increased mobility compared with BPTI. Our data suggest that the enhanced vulnerability of APPI to mesotrypsin cleavage may derive from sequence differences in the scaffold that propagate increased flexibility and mobility to the binding loop.

  10. Determinants of Affinity and Proteolytic Stability in Interactions of Kunitz Family Protease Inhibitors with Mesotrypsin

    SciTech Connect

    M Salameh; A Soares; D Navaneetham; D Sinha; P Walsh; E Radisky

    2011-12-31

    An important functional property of protein protease inhibitors is their stability to proteolysis. Mesotrypsin is a human trypsin that has been implicated in the proteolytic inactivation of several protein protease inhibitors. We have found that bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), a Kunitz protease inhibitor, inhibits mesotrypsin very weakly and is slowly proteolyzed, whereas, despite close sequence and structural homology, the Kunitz protease inhibitor domain of the amyloid precursor protein (APPI) binds to mesotrypsin 100 times more tightly and is cleaved 300 times more rapidly. To define features responsible for these differences, we have assessed the binding and cleavage by mesotrypsin of APPI and BPTI reciprocally mutated at two nonidentical residues that make direct contact with the enzyme. We find that Arg at P{sub 1} (versus Lys) favors both tighter binding and more rapid cleavage, whereas Met (versus Arg) at P'{sub 2} favors tighter binding but has minimal effect on cleavage. Surprisingly, we find that the APPI scaffold greatly enhances proteolytic cleavage rates, independently of the binding loop. We draw thermodynamic additivity cycles analyzing the interdependence of P{sub 1} and P'{sub 2} substitutions and scaffold differences, finding multiple instances in which the contributions of these features are nonadditive. We also report the crystal structure of the mesotrypsin-APPI complex, in which we find that the binding loop of APPI displays evidence of increased mobility compared with BPTI. Our data suggest that the enhanced vulnerability of APPI to mesotrypsin cleavage may derive from sequence differences in the scaffold that propagate increased flexibility and mobility to the binding loop.

  11. Preclinical Profile and Characterization of the Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Protease Inhibitor Asunaprevir (BMS-650032)

    PubMed Central

    Sheaffer, Amy K.; Friborg, Jacques; Hernandez, Dennis; Falk, Paul; Zhai, Guangzhi; Levine, Steven; Chaniewski, Susan; Yu, Fei; Barry, Diana; Chen, Chaoqun; Lee, Min S.; Mosure, Kathy; Sun, Li-Qiang; Sinz, Michael; Meanwell, Nicholas A.; Colonno, Richard J.; Knipe, Jay; Scola, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Asunaprevir (ASV; BMS-650032) is a hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease inhibitor that has demonstrated efficacy in patients chronically infected with HCV genotype 1 when combined with alfa interferon and/or the NS5A replication complex inhibitor daclatasvir. ASV competitively binds to the NS3/4A protease complex, with Ki values of 0.4 and 0.24 nM against recombinant enzymes representing genotypes 1a (H77) and 1b (J4L6S), respectively. Selectivity was demonstrated by the absence of any significant activity against the closely related GB virus-B NS3 protease and a panel of human serine or cysteine proteases. In cell culture, ASV inhibited replication of HCV replicons representing genotypes 1 and 4, with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) ranging from 1 to 4 nM, and had weaker activity against genotypes 2 and 3 (EC50, 67 to 1,162 nM). Selectivity was again demonstrated by the absence of activity (EC50, >12 μM) against a panel of other RNA viruses. ASV exhibited additive or synergistic activity in combination studies with alfa interferon, ribavirin, and/or inhibitors specifically targeting NS5A or NS5B. Plasma and tissue exposures in vivo in several animal species indicated that ASV displayed a hepatotropic disposition (liver-to-plasma ratios ranging from 40- to 359-fold across species). Twenty-four hours postdose, liver exposures across all species tested were ≥110-fold above the inhibitor EC50s observed with HCV genotype-1 replicons. Based on these virologic and exposure properties, ASV holds promise for future utility in a combination with other anti-HCV agents in the treatment of HCV-infected patients. PMID:22869577

  12. Maintenance Procedure Display: Head Mounted Display (HMD) Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Milrian; Litaker, Harry L., Jr.; Solem, Jody A.; Holden, Kritina L.; Hoffman, Ronald R.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing maintenance procedures for head mounted displays is shown. The topics include: 1) Study Goals; 2) Near Eye Displays (HMDs); 3) Design; 4) Phase I-Evaluation Methods; 5) Phase 1 Results; 6) Improved HMD Mounting; 7) Phase 2 -Evaluation Methods; 8) Phase 2 Preliminary Results; and 9) Next Steps.

  13. Flow cytometry crossmatching and primary cadaver kidney graft outcome: relevance of T and B cell targets, historic sera and autologous controls.

    PubMed

    LeFor, W M; Ackermann, J R; Alveranga, D Y; Bowers, V D; Heinrichs, D F; Kahana, L; Shires, D L; Weinstein, S S; Wright, C E

    1996-12-01

    cells (n = 7) had a poor 29% GS, while those historically positive only vs. B cells (n = 7) had 100% GS. On the other hand, patients positive only with the current serum (n = 16) had 2-yr GS of 100% (false positive test?), while patients whose current and historic sera reactions were positive (n = 21) had a 25-50% GS (true positive test?). About 1 in 15 patients (19%) displayed positive autologous FCXM reactions. Subtraction of autologous MCF shift values from those vs. the donor converted 17 patients to the T neg - B neg or T pos - B neg group whose 2-yr actual GS was not significantly different (p > 0.8) from those initially testing T neg B neg vs. their donors.

  14. Prefusion F-specific antibodies determine the magnitude of RSV neutralizing activity in human sera.

    PubMed

    Ngwuta, Joan O; Chen, Man; Modjarrad, Kayvon; Joyce, M Gordon; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Kumar, Azad; Yassine, Hadi M; Moin, Syed M; Killikelly, April M; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Rundlet, Emily J; Sastry, Mallika; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B E; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Nason, Martha C; Capella, Cristina; Peeples, Mark E; Ledgerwood, Julie E; McLellan, Jason S; Kwong, Peter D; Graham, Barney S

    2015-10-14

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is estimated to claim more lives among infants <1 year old than any other single pathogen, except malaria, and poses a substantial global health burden. Viral entry is mediated by a type I fusion glycoprotein (F) that transitions from a metastable prefusion (pre-F) to a stable postfusion (post-F) trimer. A highly neutralization-sensitive epitope, antigenic site Ø, is found only on pre-F. We determined what fraction of neutralizing (NT) activity in human sera is dependent on antibodies specific for antigenic site Ø or other antigenic sites on F in healthy subjects from ages 7 to 93 years. Adsorption of individual sera with stabilized pre-F protein removed >90% of NT activity and depleted binding antibodies to both F conformations. In contrast, adsorption with post-F removed ~30% of NT activity, and binding antibodies to pre-F were retained. These findings were consistent across all age groups. Protein competition neutralization assays with pre-F mutants in which sites Ø or II were altered to knock out binding of antibodies to the corresponding sites showed that these sites accounted for ~35 and <10% of NT activity, respectively. Binding competition assays with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) indicated that the amount of site Ø-specific antibodies correlated with NT activity, whereas the magnitude of binding competed by site II mAbs did not correlate with neutralization. Our results indicate that RSV NT activity in human sera is primarily derived from pre-F-specific antibodies, and therefore, inducing or boosting NT activity by vaccination will be facilitated by using pre-F antigens that preserve site Ø.

  15. Prefusion F–specific antibodies determine the magnitude of RSV neutralizing activity in human sera

    PubMed Central

    Ngwuta, Joan O.; Chen, Man; Modjarrad, Kayvon; Joyce, M. Gordon; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Kumar, Azad; Yassine, Hadi M.; Moin, Syed M.; Killikelly, April M.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Rundlet, Emily J.; Sastry, Mallika; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B. E.; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Nason, Martha C.; Capella, Cristina; Peeples, Mark E.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.; McLellan, Jason S.; Kwong, Peter D.; Graham, Barney S.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is estimated to claim more lives among infants <1 year old than any other single pathogen, except malaria, and poses a substantial global health burden. Viral entry is mediated by a type I fusion glycoprotein (F) that transitions from a metastable prefusion (pre-F) to a stable postfusion (post-F) trimer. A highly neutralization-sensitive epitope, antigenic site Ø, is found only on pre-F. We determined what fraction of neutralizing (NT) activity in human sera is dependent on antibodies specific for antigenic site Ø or other antigenic sites on F in healthy subjects from ages 7 to 93 years. Adsorption of individual sera with stabilized pre-F protein removed >90% of NT activity and depleted binding antibodies to both F conformations. In contrast, adsorption with post-F removed ~30% of NT activity, and binding antibodies to pre-F were retained. These findings were consistent across all age groups. Protein competition neutralization assays with pre-F mutants in which sites Ø or II were altered to knock out binding of antibodies to the corresponding sites showed that these sites accounted for ~35 and <10% of NT activity, respectively. Binding competition assays with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) indicated that the amount of site Ø–specific antibodies correlated with NT activity, whereas the magnitude of binding competed by site II mAbs did not correlate with neutralization. Our results indicate that RSV NT activity in human sera is primarily derived from pre-F–specific antibodies, and therefore, inducing or boosting NT activity by vaccination will be facilitated by using pre-F antigens that preserve site Ø. PMID:26468324

  16. Origin and Diversification of Meprin Proteases.

    PubMed

    Marín, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Meprins are astacin metalloproteases with a characteristic, easily recognizable structure, given that they are the only proteases with both MAM and MATH domains plus a transmembrane region. So far assumed to be vertebrate-specific, it is shown here, using a combination of evolutionary and genomic analyses, that meprins originated before the urochordates/vertebrates split. In particular, three genes encoding structurally typical meprin proteins are arranged in tandem in the genome of the urochordate Ciona intestinalis. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the protease and MATH domains present in the meprin-like proteins encoded by the Ciona genes are very similar in sequence to the domains found in vertebrate meprins, which supports them having a common origin. While many vertebrates have the two canonical meprin-encoding genes orthologous to human MEP1A and MEP1B (which respectively encode for the proteins known as meprin α and meprin β), a single gene has been found so far in the genome of the chondrichthyan fish Callorhinchus milii, and additional meprin-encoding genes are present in some species. Particularly, a group of bony fish species have genes encoding highly divergent meprins, here named meprin-F. Genes encoding meprin-F proteins, derived from MEP1B genes, are abundant in some species, as the Amazon molly, Poecilia formosa, which has 7 of them. Finally, it is confirmed that the MATH domains of meprins are very similar to the ones in TRAF ubiquitin ligases, which suggests that meprins originated when protease and TRAF E3-encoding sequences were combined. PMID:26288188

  17. Purification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteases and microscopic characterization of pseudomonal protease-induced rabbit corneal damage.

    PubMed Central

    Kreger, A S; Gray, L D

    1978-01-01

    Extracellular proteases of three cornea-virulent strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated by sequential ammonium sulfate precipitation, Ultrogel AcA 54 gel filtration, and flat-bed isoelectric focusing. The purity of the preparations was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis , thin-layer isoelectric focusing in polyacrylamide gel, immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoretic procedures, and tests for the presence of other known pseudomonal products. Light and electron microscopic examination of rabbit corneal lesions observed 4 to 6 h after the intracorneal injection of submicrogram amounts of the proteases revealed: (i) degeneration and necrosis of epithelium, endothelium, and keratocytes, (ii) infiltration, degeneration, and necrosis of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, (iii) loss of the characteristic weblike pattern, colloidal iron staining, and ruthenium red staining of the stromal proteoglycan ground substance, (iv) dispersal of strucutrally normal appearing collagen fibrils, ground substance, (iv) dispersal of structurally normal appearing collagen fibrils, and (v) accumulation of plasma proteins and fibrin in the necrotic corneas. These structural alterations are very similar to those observed previously during experimental P. aeruginosa keratitis, and this similarity supports the idea that pseudomonal proteases are responsible, at least in part, for the rapid and extensive liquefaction necrosis characteristic of pseudomonal-induced keratitis. In addition, the results support the idea that pseudomonal proteases elicit severe corneal damage by causing the loss of the corneal proteoglycan ground substance, thus resulting in dispersal of undamaged collagen fibrils, weakening of the corneal stroma, and subsequent descemetocele formation and corneal perforation by the anterior chamber pressure. Images PMID:415981

  18. A bumblebee (Bombus ignitus) venom serine protease inhibitor that acts as a microbial serine protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hu; Kim, Bo Yeon; Lee, Kwang Sik; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Lee, Kyung Yong; Jin, Byung Rae

    2014-01-01

    Serine protease inhibitors from bumblebee venom have been shown to block plasmin activity. In this study, we identified the protein BiVSPI from the venom of Bombus ignitus to be a serine protease inhibitor and an antimicrobial factor. BiVSPI is a 55-amino acid mature peptide with ten conserved cysteine residues and a P1 methionine residue. BiVSPI is expressed in the venom gland and also found in the venom as an 8-kDa peptide. Recombinant BiVSPI that was expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells exhibited inhibitory activity against chymotrypsin but not trypsin. BiVSPI also inhibited microbial serine proteases, such as subtilisin A (Ki=6.57nM) and proteinase K (Ki=7.11nM). In addition, BiVSPI was shown to bind directly to Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Beauveria bassiana but not to Escherichia coli. Consistent with these results, BiVSPI exhibited antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi. These findings provide evidence for a novel serine protease inhibitor in bumblebee venom that has antimicrobial functions.

  19. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    SciTech Connect

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-06-30

    The X-ray structure of protease-cleaved E. coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  20. Identification of Borrelia burgdorferi Ribosomal Protein L25 by the Phage Surface Display Method and Evaluation of the Protein's Value for Serodiagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Markus; Bunk, Sebastian; Diterich, Isabel; Weichel, Michael; Rauter, Carolin; Hassler, Dieter; Hermann, Corinna; Crameri, Reto; Hartung, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The phage surface display technique was used to identify Borrelia burgdorferi antigens. By affinity selection with immunoglobulin G from pooled sera of six Lyme borreliosis (LB) patients, the ribosomal protein L25 was identified. The diagnostic value of L25 was investigated by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, using sera from 80 LB patients and 75 controls, and the use of the protein resulted in a specificity of 99% and a 23% sensitivity, which qualify L25 as a useful antigen when combined with others. PMID:17021109

  1. Validation of ELISA for the determination of anti-ricin immunoglobulin G concentration in mouse sera.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Changhong Y; Pace-Templeton, Judith G; Millard, Charles B; Wannemacher, Robert W; Hewetson, John F

    2006-03-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the determination of anti-ricin immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentration in mouse sera was systematically validated. The results obtained throughout the validation process strongly demonstrated that the ELISA was reliable, reproducible, and suitable for its intended use. The assay had a high level of precision within and between runs, was specific for the anti-ricin IgG, and showed no interference with a number of different serum matrices. The assay exhibited excellent accuracy, linearity, and stability. The mean recovery of four test samples with different known concentrations was 100.9+/-11.3%, 102.7+/-10.8%, 99.0+/-7.2%, and 95.9+/-11.3%, respectively (n=10). The mean recovery of the observed anti-ricin IgG concentration of three quality control samples run on 73 plates to their nominal concentrations was 100.1+/-7.3%, 100.2+/-5.8%, and 103.7+/-8.1%; and the coefficient of variation (CV) was 7.3%, 5.8%, and 7.8%, respectively. The back-calculated anti-ricin IgG concentration, %CV, and relative error of seven standards from the calibration curves run in the entire validation study were analyzed (n=7 x 73). The results indicated that the four-parameter logistic (4PL) equation, y=(a-d)/(1+(x/c)b)+d, provided an accurate representation of a sigmoidal relationship between the measured response and the logarithm of observed concentration of anti-ricin IgG in mouse sera for this ELISA. The lower limit of quantification and upper limit of quantification of the calibration curve were 3.3 ng/ml and 82.8 ng/ml, respectively. The measurable range of the assay would cover all possible anti-ricin IgG concentrations in mouse sera stimulated with a ricin vaccine candidate, when the test sera are measured at a 1:800 starting dilution followed by four additional fourfold serial dilutions.

  2. Nanomagnetic competition assay for low-abundance protein biomarker quantification in unprocessed human sera.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanpeng; Srinivasan, Balasubramanian; Jing, Ying; Yao, Xiaofeng; Hugger, Marie A; Wang, Jian-Ping; Xing, Chengguo

    2010-03-31

    A novel giant magnetoresistive sensor and uniform high-magnetic-moment FeCo nanoparticles (12.8 nm)-based detecting platform with minimized detecting distance was developed for rapid biomolecule quantification from body fluids. Such a system demonstrates specific, accurate, and quick detection and quantification of interleukin-6, a low-abundance protein and a potential cancer biomarker, directly in 4 muL of unprocessed human sera. This platform is expected to facilitate the identification and validation of disease biomarkers. It may eventually lead to a low-cost personal medical device for chronic disease early detection, diagnosis, and prognosis.

  3. Food allergy: a clinician's criteria for including sera in a serum bank.

    PubMed

    Ballmer-Weber, B K; Fernández-Rivas, M

    2008-10-01

    Safety assessment for genetically-engineered crop plants includes assessment for allergic responses. To facilitate this assessment, serum banks should contain well-characterised sera from patients with confirmed food allergies. A serum is defined as well-characterised if it is taken from a patient who has a convincing history of allergic responses to a known allergen or an allergen-containing food, a positive skin prick test (or elevated IgE response), and a positive response in a clinical food challenge.

  4. Rigidity analysis of HIV-1 protease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heal, J. W.; Wells, S. A.; Jimenez-Roldan, E.; Freedman, R. F.; Römer, R. A.

    2011-03-01

    We present a rigidity analysis on a large number of X-ray crystal structures of the enzyme HIV-1 protease using the 'pebble game' algorithm of the software FIRST. We find that although the rigidity profile remains similar across a comprehensive set of high resolution structures, the profile changes significantly in the presence of an inhibitor. Our study shows that the action of the inhibitors is to restrict the flexibility of the β-hairpin flaps which allow access to the active site. The results are discussed in the context of full molecular dynamics simulations as well as data from NMR experiments.

  5. Endogenous Protease Activation of ENaC

    PubMed Central

    Adebamiro, Adedotun; Cheng, Yi; Johnson, John P.; Bridges, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Endogenous serine proteases have been reported to control the reabsorption of Na+ by kidney- and lung-derived epithelial cells via stimulation of electrogenic Na+ transport mediated by the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC). In this study we investigated the effects of aprotinin on ENaC single channel properties using transepithelial fluctuation analysis in the amphibian kidney epithelium, A6. Aprotinin caused a time- and concentration-dependent inhibition (84 ± 10.5%) in the amiloride-sensitive sodium transport (INa) with a time constant of 18 min and half maximal inhibition constant of 1 μM. Analysis of amiloride analogue blocker–induced fluctuations in INa showed linear rate–concentration plots with identical blocker on and off rates in control and aprotinin-inhibited conditions. Verification of open-block kinetics allowed for the use of a pulse protocol method (Helman, S.I., X. Liu, K. Baldwin, B.L. Blazer-Yost, and W.J. Els. 1998. Am. J. Physiol. 274:C947–C957) to study the same cells under different conditions as well as the reversibility of the aprotinin effect on single channel properties. Aprotinin caused reversible changes in all three single channel properties but only the change in the number of open channels was consistent with the inhibition of INa. A 50% decrease in INa was accompanied by 50% increases in the single channel current and open probability but an 80% decrease in the number of open channels. Washout of aprotinin led to a time-dependent restoration of INa as well as the single channel properties to the control, pre-aprotinin, values. We conclude that protease regulation of INa is mediated by changes in the number of open channels in the apical membrane. The increase in the single channel current caused by protease inhibition can be explained by a hyperpolarization of the apical membrane potential as active Na+ channels are retrieved. The paradoxical increase in channel open probability caused by protease inhibition will require further

  6. Updated defense display market assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    1999-08-01

    This paper addresses the number, function and size of principal military displays and establishes a basis to determine the opportunities for technology insertion in the immediate future and into the next millennium. Principal military displays are defined as those occupying appreciable crewstation real-estate and/or those without which the platform could not carry out its intended mission. DoD 'office' applications are excluded from this study. The military displays market is specified by such parameters as active area and footprint size, and other characteristics such as luminance, gray scale, resolution, angle, color, video capability, and night vision imaging system compatibility. Funded, future acquisitions, planned and predicted crewstation modification kits, and form-fit upgrades are taken into account. This paper provides an overview of the DoD niche market, allowing both government and industry a necessary reference by which to meet DoD requirements for military displays in a timely and cost-effective manner. The aggregate DoD installed base for direct-view and large-area military displays is presently estimated to be in excess of 313,000. Miniature displays are those which must be magnified to be viewed, involve a significantly different manufacturing paradigm and are used in helmet mounted displays and thermal weapon sight applications. Some 114,000 miniature displays are presently included within future weapon system acquisition plans. For vendor production planning purposes it is noted that foreign military sales could substantially increase these quantities. The vanishing vendor syndrome (VVS) for older display technologies continues to be a growing, pervasive problem throughout DoD, which consequently must leverage the more modern, especially flat panel, display technologies being developed to replace older, especially cathode ray tube, technology for civil-commercial markets. Total DoD display needs (FPD, HMD) are some 427,000.

  7. Construction of dengue virus protease expression plasmid and in vitro protease assay for screening antiviral inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lai, Huiguo; Teramoto, Tadahisa; Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus serotypes 1-4 (DENV1-4) are mosquito-borne human pathogens of global significance causing ~390 million cases annually worldwide. The virus infections cause in general a self-limiting disease, known as dengue fever, but occasionally also more severe forms, especially during secondary infections, dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome causing ~25,000 deaths annually. The DENV genome contains a single-strand positive sense RNA, approximately 11 kb in length. The 5'-end has a type I cap structure. The 3'-end has no poly(A) tail. The viral RNA has a single long open reading frame that is translated by the host translational machinery to yield a polyprotein precursor. Processing of the polyprotein precursor occurs co-translationally by cellular proteases and posttranslationally by the viral serine protease in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to yield three structural proteins (capsid (C), precursor membrane (prM), and envelope (E) and seven nonstructural (NS) proteins (NS1, NS2A, NS2B, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, and NS5). The active viral protease consists of both NS2B, an integral membrane protein in the ER, and the N-terminal part of NS3 (180 amino acid residues) that contains the trypsin-like serine protease domain having a catalytic triad of H51, D75, and S135. The C-terminal part of NS3, ~170-618 amino acid residues, encodes an NTPase/RNA helicase and 5'-RNA triphosphatase activities; the latter enzyme is required for the first step in 5'-capping. The cleavage sites of the polyprotein by the viral protease consist of two basic amino acid residues such as KR, RR, or QR, followed by short chain amino acid residues, G, S, or T. Since the cleavage of the polyprotein by the viral protease is absolutely required for assembly of the viral replicase, blockage of NS2B/NS3pro activity provides an effective means for designing dengue virus (DENV) small-molecule therapeutics. Here we describe the screening of small-molecule inhibitors against DENV2 protease. PMID

  8. Structural and Immunological Characteristics of a 28-Kilodalton Cruzipain-Like Cysteine Protease of Paragonimus westermani Expressed in the Definitive Host Stage

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Doo-Hee; Chung, Joon-Yong; Chung, Young-Bae; Bahk, Young-Yil; Kang, Shin-Yong; Kong, Yoon; Cho, Seung-Yull

    2000-01-01

    A complete cDNA sequence encoding a 28-kDa cruzipain-like cysteine protease of adult Paragonimus westermani, termed Pw28CCP, was isolated from an adult cDNA library. The cDNA contained a single open reading frame of 975 bp encoding 325 amino acids, which exhibited the structural motif and domain organization characteristic of cysteine proteases of non-cathepsin Bs including a hydrophobic signal sequence, an ERFNIN motif, and essential cysteine residues as well as active sites in the mature catalytic region. Analysis of its phylogenetic position revealed that this novel enzyme belonged to the cruzipain-like cysteine proteases. The sequence of the first 13 amino acids predicted from the mature domain of Pw28CCP was in accord with that determined from the native 28-kDa enzyme purified from the adult worm. Expression of Pw28CCP was observed specifically in juvenile and adult worms, with a location in the intestinal epithelium, suggesting that this enzyme could be secreted and involved in nutrient uptake and immune modulation. The recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli was used to assess antigenicity by immunoblotting with sera from patients with active paragonimiasis and from those with other parasitic infections. The resulting sensitivity of 86.2% (56 of 65 samples) and specificity of 98% (147 of 150 samples) suggest its potential as an antigen for use in immunodiagnosis. PMID:11063501

  9. Autotransported Serine Protease A of Neisseria meningitidis: an Immunogenic, Surface-Exposed Outer Membrane, and Secreted Protein

    PubMed Central

    Turner, David P. J.; Wooldridge, Karl G.; Ala'Aldeen, Dlawer A. A.

    2002-01-01

    Several autotransporter proteins have previously been identified in Neisseria meningitidis. Using molecular features common to most members of the autotransporter family of proteins, we have identified an additional novel ca. 112-kDa autotransporter protein in the meningococcal genomic sequence data. This protein, designated autotransported serine protease A (AspA), has significant N-terminal homology to the secreted serine proteases (subtilases) from several organisms and contains a serine protease catalytic triad. The amino acid sequence of AspA is well-conserved in serogroup A, B, and C meningococci. In Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the AspA homologue appears to be a pseudogene. The gene encoding AspA was cloned and expressed from meningococcal strain MC58 (B15:P1.16b). Anti-AspA antibodies were detected in patients' convalescent-phase sera, suggesting that AspA is expressed in vivo during infection and is immunogenic and cross-reactive. Rabbit polyclonal monospecific anti-AspA serum was used to probe whole-cell proteins from a panel of wild-type meningococcal strains and two AspA mutant strains. Expression of the ca. 112-kDa precursor polypeptide was detected in 12 of 20 wild-type meningococcal strains examined, suggesting that AspA expression is phase variable. Immunogold electron microscopy and cellular fractionation studies showed that the AspA precursor is transported to the outer membrane and remains surface exposed. Western blot experiments confirmed that smaller, ca. 68- or 70-kDa components of AspA (AspA68 and AspA70, respectively) are then secreted into the meningococcal culture supernatant. Site-directed mutagenesis of S426 abolished secretion of both rAspA68 and rAspA70 in Escherichia coli, confirming that AspA is an autocleaved autotransporter protein. In conclusion, we characterized a novel, surface-exposed and secreted, immunogenic, meningococcal autotransporter protein. PMID:12117956

  10. Secretory expression, functional characterization, and molecular genetic analysis of novel halo-solvent-tolerant protease from Bacillus gibsonii.

    PubMed

    Deng, Aihua; Zhang, Guoqiang; Shi, Nana; Wu, Jie; Lu, Fuping; Wen, Tingyi

    2014-02-28

    A novel protease gene from Bacillus gibsonii, aprBG, was cloned, expressed in B. subtilis, and characterized. High-level expression of aprBG was achieved in the recombinant strain when a junction was present between the promoter and the target gene. The purified recombinant enzyme exhibited similar N-terminal sequences and catalytic properties to the native enzyme, including high affinity and hydrolytic efficiency toward various substrates and a superior performance when exposed to various metal ions, surfactants, oxidants, and commercial detergents. AprBG was remarkably stable in 50% organic solvents and retained 100% activity and stability in 0-4 M NaCl, which is better than the characteristics of previously reported proteases. AprBG was most closely related to the high-alkaline proteases of the subtilisin family with a 57-68% identity. The secretion and maturation mechanism of AprBG was dependent on the enzyme activity, as analyzed by site-directed mutagenesis. Thus, when taken together, the results revealed that the halo-solvent-tolerant protease AprBG displays significant activity and stability under various extreme conditions, indicating its potential for use in many biotechnology applications. PMID:24150493

  11. Location of caspase 3-like protease in the development of sieve element and tracheary element of stem in Cucurbita moschata.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xia; Qian, Jie; Xu, Shan; Song, Xin; Zhu, Jian

    2008-12-01

    The casepase is considered to regulate the process of programmed cell death in the development of organisms. In this study, caspase 3-like protease was detected by immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy during the development of sieve element and tracheary element of stem in Cucurbita moschata Duch. Antibody with brown color (under light microscopy) and gold particles (under transmission electron microscopy) for detecting caspase 3-like protease was mainly displayed in inner phloem, external phloem and xylem in the region close to procambium. From the results it was considered that caspase 3-like protease did exist in vascular elements and played different roles during the development of sieve and tracheary elements, and different types of programmed cell death might be carried out. The caspase 3-like protease mainly participated in making cytoplasmic streaming cease and in degrading P-protein bodies; however, it rarely participated in the function for signal transferring in the developmental sieve element. However, it might induce calcium accumulation for rupturing the tonoplast in the signal of PCD in the developmental tracheary element.

  12. Partial purification and characterization of extracellular protease from a halophilic and thermotolerant strain Streptomyces pseudogrisiolus NRC-15.

    PubMed

    Awad, Hassan M; Mostafa, El-Sayed E; Saad, Moataza M; Selim, Mohsen H; Hassan, Helmy M

    2013-08-01

    An alkaline protease was purified from a halophilic and thermotolerant potent alkaline protease-producing strain Streptomyces pseudogrisiolus NRC-15 using ammonium sulphate precipitation and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography. The enzyme was purified to 77.24-folds with a yield of 91.8% and the specific activity was 112 U/mg of protein. The protease showed a single band on SDS-PAGE with its molecular mass at 20 kDa and exhibited a maximum relative activity of 100% using casein as a substrate and. The enzyme had an optimum pH of 9.5 and displayed optimum activity at 50 degrees C. The enzyme activity was completely inhibited by the serine protease inhibitor PMSF, suggesting the presence of serine residue in the active site. The enzyme activity was increased by the metal ions Ca2+, Co2+, K+ and Mg2+. The enzyme significantly enhanced the removal of stains when used with wheel detergent, indicating the potential of the enzyme for using as a laundry detergent additive to improve the performance of heavy-duty laundry detergent.

  13. Flexible Bistable Cholesteric Reflective Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Deng-Ke

    2006-03-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystals (ChLCs) exhibit two stable states at zero field condition-the reflecting planar state and the nonreflecting focal conic state. ChLCs are an excellent candidate for inexpensive and rugged electronic books and papers. This paper will review the display cell structure,materials and drive schemes for flexible bistable cholesteric (Ch) reflective displays.

  14. Displays: Entering a New Dimension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkman, Neal

    2007-01-01

    As display technologies prepare to welcome 3-D, the 21st-century classroom will soon bear little resemblance to anything students and teachers have ever seen. In this article, the author presents the latest innovations in the world of digital display technology. These include: (1) Touchlight, an interactive touch screen program that takes a normal…

  15. Biochemical and molecular characterization of a detergent-stable serine alkaline protease from Bacillus pumilus CBS with high catalytic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Jaouadi, Bassem; Ellouz-Chaabouni, Semia; Rhimi, Moez; Bejar, Samir

    2008-09-01

    an ORF of 1149bp encoding a protein of 383 aa organized into a signal peptide (29 aa), a pro-protein (79 aa) and a mature enzyme (275 aa). The deduced amino acid sequence inspection displays an important homology with other bacterial proteases. The highest homology of 98.1% was found with BPP-A protease from Bacillus pumilus MS-1, with only 8 aa of difference.

  16. Drugs derived from phage display

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Andrew E; Sexton, Daniel J; Ladner, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    Phage display, one of today’s fundamental drug discovery technologies, allows identification of a broad range of biological drugs, including peptides, antibodies and other proteins, with the ability to tailor critical characteristics such as potency, specificity and cross-species binding. Further, unlike in vivo technologies, generating phage display-derived antibodies is not restricted by immunological tolerance. Although more than 20 phage display-derived antibody and peptides are currently in late-stage clinical trials or approved, there is little literature addressing the specific challenges and successes in the clinical development of phage-derived drugs. This review uses case studies, from candidate identification through clinical development, to illustrate the utility of phage display as a drug discovery tool, and offers a perspective for future developments of phage display technology. PMID:24262785

  17. INFORMATION DISPLAY: CONSIDERATIONS FOR DESIGNING COMPUTER-BASED DISPLAY SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    O'HARA,J.M.; PIRUS,D.; BELTRATCCHI,L.

    2004-09-19

    This paper discussed the presentation of information in computer-based control rooms. Issues associated with the typical displays currently in use are discussed. It is concluded that these displays should be augmented with new displays designed to better meet the information needs of plant personnel and to minimize the need for interface management tasks (the activities personnel have to do to access and organize the information they need). Several approaches to information design are discussed, specifically addressing: (1) monitoring, detection, and situation assessment; (2) routine task performance; and (3) teamwork, crew coordination, collaborative work.

  18. Functional properties of DENV EDIII‑reactive antibodies in human DENV‑1‑infected sera and rabbit antiserum to EDIII.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Wen, Kun; Li, Xiao-Quan; Yi, Hai-Su; Ding, Xi-Xia; Huang, Yan-Fen; Pan, Yu-Xian; Hu, Dong-Mei; Di, Biao; Che, Xiao-Yan; Fu, Ning

    2016-08-01

    The envelope domain III (EDIII) of the dengue virus (DENV) has been confirmed to be involved in receptor binding. It is the target of specific neutralizing antibodies, and is considered to be a promising subunit dengue vaccine candidate. However, several recent studies have shown that anti‑EDIII antibodies contribute little to the neutralizing or enhancing ability of human DENV‑infected serum. The present study involved an analysis of the neutralization and antibody‑dependent enhancement (ADE) activities of EDIII‑reactive antibodies in human convalescent sera from patients with primary DENV‑1 infection and rabbit antiserum immunized with recombinant DENV‑1 EDIII protein. The results indicated that serum neutralization was not associated with titres of EDIII‑binding antibodies in the human DENV‑1‑infected sera. The depletion of anti‑EDIII antibodies from these serum samples revealed that the anti‑EDIII antibodies of the patients contributed little to neutralization and ADE. However, the EDIII‑reactive antibodies from the rabbit antiserum exhibited protective abilities of neutralization at a high dilution (~1:50,000) and ADE at a low dilution (~1:5,000) for the homotypic DENV infection. Notably, the rabbit antiserum displayed ADE activity only at a dilution of 1:40 for the heterotypic virus infection, which suggests that EDIII‑reactive antibodies may be safe in secondary infection with heterotypic viruses. These results suggest that DENV EDIII is not the predominant antigen of the DENV infection process; however, purified or recombinant DENV EDIII may be used as a subunit vaccine to provoke an effective and safe antibody response. PMID:27357403

  19. Viral proteases as targets for drug design.

    PubMed

    Skoreński, Marcin; Sieńczyk, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    In order to productively infect a host, viruses must enter the cell and force host cell replication mechanisms to produce new infectious virus particles. The success of this process unfortunately results in disease progression and, in the case of infection with many viral species, may cause mortality. The discoveries of Louis Pasteur and Edward Jenner led to one of the greatest advances in modern medicine - the development of vaccines that generate long-lasting memory immune responses to combat viral infection. Widespread use of vaccines has reduced mortality and morbidity associated with viral infection and, in some cases, has completely eradicated virus from the human population. Unfortunately, several viral species maintain a significant ability to mutate and "escape" vaccine-induced immune responses. Thus, novel anti-viral agents are required for treatment and prevention of viral disease. Targeting proteases that are crucial in the viral life cycle has proven to be an effective method to control viral infection, and this avenue of investigation continues to generate anti-viral treatments. Herein, we provide the reader with a brief history as well as a comprehensive review of the most recent advances in the design and synthesis of viral protease inhibitors. PMID:23016690

  20. Use of bacteriophage particles displaying influenza virus hemagglutinin for the detection of hemagglutination-inhibition antibodies.

    PubMed

    Domm, William; Brewer, Matthew; Baker, Steven F; Feng, Changyong; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Treanor, John; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Bacteriophage lambda capsids provide a flexible molecular scaffold that can be engineered to display a wide range of exogenous proteins, including full-length viral glycoproteins produced in eukaryotic cells. One application for such particles lies in the detection of virus-specific antibodies, since they may obviate the need to work with infectious stocks of highly pathogenic or emerging viruses that can pose significant biosafety and biocontainment challenges. Bacteriophage lambda capsids were produced that displayed an insect-cell derived, recombinant H5 influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) on their surface. The particles agglutinated red blood cells efficiently, in a manner that could be blocked using H5 HA-specific monoclonal antibodies. The particles were then used to develop a modified hemagglutinination-inhibition (HAI) assay, which successfully identified human sera with H5 HA-specific HAI activity. These results demonstrate the utility of HA-displaying bacteriophage capsids for the detection of influenza virus-specific HAI antibodies.

  1. Broad-Spectrum Allosteric Inhibition of Herpesvirus Proteases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses rely on a homodimeric protease for viral capsid maturation. A small molecule, DD2, previously shown to disrupt dimerization of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus protease (KSHV Pr) by trapping an inactive monomeric conformation and two analogues generated through carboxylate bioisosteric replacement (compounds 2 and 3) were shown to inhibit the associated proteases of all three human herpesvirus (HHV) subfamilies (α, β, and γ). Inhibition data reveal that compound 2 has potency comparable to or better than that of DD2 against the tested proteases. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and a new application of the kinetic analysis developed by Zhang and Poorman [Zhang, Z. Y., Poorman, R. A., et al. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 15591–15594] show DD2, compound 2, and compound 3 inhibit HHV proteases by dimer disruption. All three compounds bind the dimer interface of other HHV proteases in a manner analogous to binding of DD2 to KSHV protease. The determination and analysis of cocrystal structures of both analogues with the KSHV Pr monomer verify and elaborate on the mode of binding for this chemical scaffold, explaining a newly observed critical structure–activity relationship. These results reveal a prototypical chemical scaffold for broad-spectrum allosteric inhibition of human herpesvirus proteases and an approach for the identification of small molecules that allosterically regulate protein activity by targeting protein–protein interactions. PMID:24977643

  2. Effect of proteases on the. beta. -thromboglobulin radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Donlon, J.A.; Helgeson, E.A.; Donlon, M.A.

    1985-02-11

    Rat peritoneal mast cells and mast cell granules were evaluated by radioimmunoassay for the presence of ..beta..-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4. The initial assays indicated that a ..beta..-thromboglobulin cross reacting material was released from mast cells by compound 48/80 in a similar dose-dependent manner as histamine release. The material was also found to be associated with purified granules. However, the use of protease inhibitors in the buffers completely abolished the positive assays. Further evaluation of the effects of various proteases on the ..beta..-thromboglobulin assay indicated that elastase would also generate a false positive assay which could then be neutralized by the use of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin as a protease inhibitor. There was no protease effect on the platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay which always showed no detectable amounts with mast cells, granules or proteases. These results clearly indicate the artifactual positive assays which can arise when using certain radioimmunoassay tests in the presence of cell proteases. The use of protease inhibitors is a necessary control when applying a radioimmunoassay to a system with potentially active proteases. 24 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  3. Expression and characterization of Coprothermobacter proteolyticus alkaline serine protease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    TECHNICAL ABSTRACT A putative protease gene (aprE) from the thermophilic bacterium Coprothermobacter proteolyticus was cloned and expressed in Bacillus subtilis. The enzyme was determined to be a serine protease based on inhibition by PMSF. Biochemical characterization demonstrated the enzyme had...

  4. Comparison of RFFIT tests with different standard sera and testing procedures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peng-cheng; Noguchi, Akira; Inoue, Satoshi; Tang, Qing; Rayner, Simon; Liang, Guo-dong

    2012-06-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) standard assay for determining antibody level is the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT) and is used to determine the degree of immunity after vaccination against rabies. To compare the difference in RFFIT results between the laboratories of The National Institute of Infectious Disease in Japan (NIID) and the Chinese Centre for Disease Control (CCDC) as well the influence of the choice of standard serum (STD) for the detection, the two laboratories detection methods were simultaneously manipulated by RFFIT. The reference serums used in NIID and the WHO standard serum used in CCDC were compared in the same RFFIT detection to determine the titer of four sera samples C1, S1, S2 and S4 in parallel, and the titers of the detected sera samples were calculated using the standard formula for neutralizing antibody titer. No significant difference was found in RFFIT methods from the two laboratories and the RFFIT testing procedures of the two laboratories have good consistency. However, different titers were obtained with the tentative internal standard serum (TI-STD) produced by adjusting to 2.0 IU of WHO standard serum in NIID and the WHO STD. The titer determined with the TI-STD was higher than that determined with WHO STD, This difference appears to be significant and requires further investigation.

  5. The occurrence and properties of E rosette inhibitory substance in the sera of malnourished children.

    PubMed Central

    Salimonu, L S; Johnson, A O; Williams, A I; Adeleye, G I; Osunkoya, B O

    1982-01-01

    In vitro sheep erythrocyte (E) rosette inhibitory activity was observed in the sera of nine out of 22 (41%) children with kwashiorkor, three of 15 (20%) marasmic children, neither of the two children with marasmic-kwashiorkor and in one of 42 (2%) well nourished control children. Sera of children with kwashiorkor containing the E rosette inhibitory substance did not inhibit in vitro rosette formations by autologous lymphocytes whereas rosette formations by homologous lymphocytes were inhibited. Inhibition of E rosette formation occurred when lymphocytes were pretreated with serum having the inhibitory substance before incubation with sheep red cells, but there was no such inhibition when sheep red cells were pretreated with the same serum before incubation with lymphocytes. The inhibitory substance was observed to be stable at 4 degrees C up to about 1 week and migrated electrophoretically with the alpha-2 globulins. It was digested by papain. It is probable that the E rosette inhibitory substance demonstrated in the present study is attached to markers on T lymphocyte surfaces in some malnourished children thereby making the lymphocytes unreactive in vitro and presumably in vivo as well. PMID:6805988

  6. Functional Proteomic Profiling of Phosphodiesterases Using SeraFILE Separations Platform

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Amita R.; Kuruc, Matthew P.; Gujarathi, Ketan M.; Roy, Swapan

    2012-01-01

    Functional proteomic profiling can help identify targets for disease diagnosis and therapy. Available methods are limited by the inability to profile many functional properties measured by enzymes kinetics. The functional proteomic profiling approach proposed here seeks to overcome such limitations. It begins with surface-based proteome separations of tissue/cell-line extracts, using SeraFILE, a proprietary protein separations platform. Enzyme kinetic properties of resulting subproteomes are then characterized, and the data integrated into proteomic profiles. As a model, SeraFILE-derived subproteomes of cyclic nucleotide-hydrolyzing phosphodiesterases (PDEs) from bovine brain homogenate (BBH) and rat brain homogenate (RBH) were characterized for cAMP hydrolysis activity in the presence (challenge condition) and absence of cGMP. Functional profiles of RBH and BBH were compiled from the enzyme activity response to the challenge condition in each of the respective subproteomes. Intersample analysis showed that comparable profiles differed in only a few data points, and that distinctive subproteomes can be generated from comparable tissue samples from different animals. These results demonstrate that the proposed methods provide a means to simplify intersample differences, and to localize proteins attributable to sample-specific responses. It can be potentially applied for disease and nondisease sample comparison in biomarker discovery and drug discovery profiling. PMID:23227336

  7. Sera of overweight people promote in vitro adipocyte differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Overweight status should not be considered merely an aesthetic concern; rather, it can incur health risks since it may trigger a cascade of events that produce further fat tissue through altered levels of circulating signaling molecules. There have been few studies addressing the effect of overweight status on the physiological functions of stem cells, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which are the progenitors of adipocytes and osteocytes and are a subset of the bone marrow stromal cell population. Methods We decided to investigate the influence of overweight individuals’ sera on in vitro MSC proliferation and differentiation. Results We observed that in vitro incubation of bone marrow stromal cells with the sera of overweight individuals promotes the adipogenic differentiation of MSCs while partially impairing proper osteogenesis. Conclusions These results, which represent a pilot study, might suggest that becoming overweight triggers further weight gains by promoting a bias in the differentiation potential of MSCs toward adipogenesis. The circulating factors involved in this phenomenon remain to be determined, since the great majority of the well known pro-inflammatory cytokines and adipocyte-secreted factors we investigated did not show relevant modifications in overweight serum samples compared with controls. PMID:24405848

  8. Characterization of two different agglutinators in the latex fixation test, occurring in normal human sera

    PubMed Central

    Klein, F.; Valkenburg, H. A.; Van Zwet, Theda L.; Lafeber, Geertruida J. M.

    1966-01-01

    Using a sensitive modification of the latex fixation test it is possible to detect a small agglutinating effect in about 60 per cent of normal human sera, after these have been heated for 30 minutes at 56°. This was shown to be caused by an IgM globulin with the properties of a rheumatoid factor. The factor is able to react with human IgG globulin and may represent an antibody to the IgG part of circulating antigen—antibody complexes. The heat treatment probably inactivates an inhibitor of the latex fixation reaction. In addition all normal human sera give an agglutination reaction with IgG coated latex at incubation temperatures of 37° or lower. It was shown that these reactions are caused by a thermolabile, non-reducible component with a sedimentation constant of about 10. This component is probably identical with the complement component C'1q. The agglutinating activity was found in the α2—β1 region after electrophoresis of untreated serum, but in the slow γ region after treatment of the serum with EDTA. This kind of agglutination may cause false positive reactions in latex tests which are carried out at 37° or less. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 3 PMID:4160336

  9. Comparison of RFFIT tests with different standard sera and testing procedures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peng-cheng; Noguchi, Akira; Inoue, Satoshi; Tang, Qing; Rayner, Simon; Liang, Guo-dong

    2012-06-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) standard assay for determining antibody level is the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT) and is used to determine the degree of immunity after vaccination against rabies. To compare the difference in RFFIT results between the laboratories of The National Institute of Infectious Disease in Japan (NIID) and the Chinese Centre for Disease Control (CCDC) as well the influence of the choice of standard serum (STD) for the detection, the two laboratories detection methods were simultaneously manipulated by RFFIT. The reference serums used in NIID and the WHO standard serum used in CCDC were compared in the same RFFIT detection to determine the titer of four sera samples C1, S1, S2 and S4 in parallel, and the titers of the detected sera samples were calculated using the standard formula for neutralizing antibody titer. No significant difference was found in RFFIT methods from the two laboratories and the RFFIT testing procedures of the two laboratories have good consistency. However, different titers were obtained with the tentative internal standard serum (TI-STD) produced by adjusting to 2.0 IU of WHO standard serum in NIID and the WHO STD. The titer determined with the TI-STD was higher than that determined with WHO STD, This difference appears to be significant and requires further investigation. PMID:22684473

  10. Detection of IgM antibodies from cerebrospinal fluid and sera of dengue fever patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, W J; Hwang, K P; Fang, A H

    1991-12-01

    During the dengue epidemic from late 1987 to 1989, 6 specimens of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and sera for IgM detection were collected from 4 cases virologically confirmed dengue patients who had neural symptoms. Another 20 serum specimens, which had been diagnosed as dengue infection either virologically or serologically, were sent to the laboratory from Kaohsiung Medical College Hospital. All these specimens were also taken to detect the existence of IgM. The results showed that IgM could be detected from 14 out of 20 serum specimens. One of the positive specimens showed IgM can last up to 252 days after onset of illness. In addition, IgM was detected from both CSF and sera of all four dengue patients with neural symptoms. The IgM titer in CSF (less than or equal to 1:20) was always lower than that in serum (greater than or equal to 1:80). Two cases with sequentially collected specimens showed the fading of IgM titer in CSF. As a matter of fact, it became undetectable about a month after onset of illness, which is apparently different from the situation in serum.

  11. Sialoglycoprotease of Pasteurella haemolytica A1: detection of antisialoglycoprotease antibodies in sera of calves.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C W; Shewen, P E; Cladman, W M; Conlon, J A; Mellors, A; Lo, R Y

    1994-01-01

    Log phase culture supernate from Pasteurella haemolytica biotype A, serotype 1 contains a proteolytic enzyme specific for O-sialoglycoproteins. Using two methods, Western immunoblotting and enzyme neutralization assay, it was demonstrated that certain bovine sera from two previous P. haemolytica A1 vaccination and challenge trials contained antibodies (Ab) (isotypes IgG1 and IgG2 on Western immunoblot) to the sialoglycoprotease (Gcp). In these trials, selected calves were vaccinated twice with either the commercial culture supernate vaccine Presponse or given phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). One trial was conducted during spring, P. haem XIX, and the other during the winter, P. haem XXI. Although there was no clear evidence for induction of anti-Gcp in response to vaccination, several calves seroconverted following intrapulmonary challenge with live P. haemolytica A1. This is the first report of anti-Gcp Ab in bovine sera. The results indicated that the Gcp is immunogenic and that the bacterium produces the enzyme in vivo. Further, animals with an anti-Gcp response had less pneumonia at necropsy, suggesting the Gcp may induce protective immunity. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:8004547

  12. Purification and inhibitory profile of phospholipase A2 inhibitors from Australian elapid sera.

    PubMed

    Hains, P G; Broady, K W

    2000-02-15

    Although the resistance of snakes to their own venom is well known, until now no investigators have examined the serum of Australian snakes. Here we describe the identification and purification of a range of phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) inhibitors from the serum of Australian elapids. All PLA(2) inhibitors were composed of two protein chains, an alpha-chain and a beta-chain. The alpha-chains were approx. 22.5 kDa in size and variably glycosylated, whereas the beta-chains were approx. 19.8 kDa in size and not glycosylated. Identification of isoforms of the two subunit chains was significant because three of the six sera examined were from single snake specimens. In addition, the glycosylation patterns of the alpha-chains were thoroughly investigated in these unpooled sera. The functional and structural properties of the purified inhibitors were studied. Uniquely, a snake PLA(2) inhibitor was found to inhibit human type II PLA(2) enzyme, which has implications for the treatment of the many diseases in which PLA(2) enzymes have been implicated. Further, we demonstrate that the inhibitor forms a non-covalent association with a purified PLA(2) enzyme. Finally, the purified PLA(2) inhibitor was shown to protect in vivo against the lethal affects of a homologous PLA(2) enzyme, suggesting a role for PLA(2) inhibitors in the treatment of snake bite victims. PMID:10657250

  13. Estimation of Group B Streptococcus Type III Polysaccharide-Specific Antibody Concentrations in Human Sera Is Antigen Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, Reva; Anthony, Bascom F.; Frasch, Carl E.

    1998-01-01

    The presence of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against group B streptococcus (GBS) type III polysaccharide (PS) has been correlated with protection against GBS disease. The GBS type III PS is structurally similar to the pneumococcal type 14 PS, differing only in the presence of sialic acid residues. Four different preparations of GBS type III PS were evaluated for their specificity in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA): free PS, free PS mixed with methylated human serum albumin (mHSA), PS conjugated to biotin and PS conjugated to human serum albumin. Three groups of human sera were used to evaluate these PS preparations: sera from recipients of a GBS PS vaccine, sera from women receiving a GBS type III PS-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine, and sera from nonimmunized healthy women of childbearing age. Estimated antibody concentrations were different depending on the PS preparation used. Using any of the four preparations, we were able to measure ≤0.05 μg of IgG antibody to the GBS type III PS per ml. The specificity of the assay was determined by competitive inhibition with homologous and heterologous PS. The pneumococcal type 14 PS did not inhibit binding of antibody to the native GBS type III PS in sera from adults receiving the GBS PS vaccine or in sera from nonimmunized adults (except serum G9). The pneumococcal type 14 PS inhibited 50% in sera from recipients of GBS type III conjugate vaccine and in serum G9 when GBS type III PS conjugated to biotin or to HSA was used as antigen in ELISA. These data show that free GBS type III PS or PS mixed with mHSA is a sensitive and specific antigen for ELISA and that conjugation can alter the antigenic specificity of a PS. PMID:9826364

  14. Recognition of Vipera ammodytes meridionalis neurotoxin vipoxin and its components using phage-displayed scFv and polyclonal antivenom sera.

    PubMed

    Stoyanova, Vishnya; Aleksandrov, Radoslav; Lukarska, Maria; Duhalov, Deyan; Atanasov, Vasil; Petrova, Svetla

    2012-10-01

    Vipoxin is a potent postsynaptic heterodimeric neurotoxin isolated from the venom of the Bulgarian snake Vipera ammodytes meridionalis, whose snakebites cause different and strongly manifested pathophysiological effects (neurotoxic, hemolytic, anticoagulant, convulsant, hypotensive, hyperglycemic etc.). The neutralization of snake toxins calls for extensive research through the application of different approaches: antibodies, non-immunologic inhibitors, natural products derived from plants and animals, as well as synthetic drugs. In this study, we applied naive Tomlinson I + J (Cambridge, UK) libraries to obtain recombinant human scFv antibodies against the vipoxin's two subunits--basic and toxic phospholipase A₂ (PLA₂) and acidic, non-toxic component. We found that 33 of more than hundred tested clones were positive and recognized vipoxin and its subunits. Enriched scFv-phage samples (1.2 × 10⁹ pfu/ml) were analyzed for their binding (ELISA) and enzyme-inhibiting abilities. Single chain Fv-phage clones--D₁₂, E₃, F₆, D₁₀ and G₅ exhihest binding affinity for the toxic component. Clones A₁, D₁₂ and C₁₂ recognized preferentially vipoxin's acidic component. Clones E₃, G₅ and H₄ inhibited the enzymatic activity of both vipoxin and its purified and separated toxic subunit to the highest extent. Six of the selected clones (E₃, G₅, H₄, C₁₂, D₁₀ and A₁₁) inhibited direct hemolytic activity of vipoxin and its pure PLA₂ subunit. The obtained specific scFv antibodies will be used for epitope mapping studies required to shed light on the role of the phospholipase A₂ activity for the vipoxin toxicity and its effective neutralization.

  15. Alkaline protease production by a strain of marine yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Wang; Zhenming, Chi; Chunling, Ma

    2006-07-01

    Yeast strain 10 with high yield of protease was isolated from sediments of saltern near Qingdao, China. The protease had the highest activity at pH 9.0 and 45°C. The optimal medium for the maximum alkaline protease production of strain 10 was 2.5g soluble starch and 2.0g NaNO3 in 100mL seawater with initial pH 6.0. The optimal cultivation conditions for the maximum protease production were temperature 24.5°C, aeration rate 8.0L min-1 and agitation speed 150r min-1 Under the optimal conditions, 623.1 U mg-1 protein of alkaline protease was reached in the culture within 30h of fermentation.

  16. Purification and characterization of an alkaline protease from Acetes chinensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiachao; Liu, Xin; Li, Zhaojie; Xu, Jie; Xue, Changhu; Gao, Xin

    2005-07-01

    An alkaline protease from Acetes chinensis was purified and characterized in this study. The steps of purification include ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography with Q-sepharose Fast Flow, gel filtration chromatography with S300 and the second ion-exchange chromatography with Q-sepharose Fast Flow. The protease was isolated and purified, which was present and active on protein substrates (azocasein and casein). The specific protease activity was 17.15 folds and the recovery was 4.67. The molecular weight of the protease was estimated at 23.2 kD by SDS-PAGE. With azocasein as the susbstrate, the optimal temperature was 55°C and the optimal pH value was 5.5. Ion Ca2+ could enhance the proteolytic activity of the protease, while Cu2+, EDTA and PMSF could inhibit its activity.

  17. The maize cystatin CC9 interacts with apoplastic cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    van der Linde, Karina; Mueller, André N; Hemetsberger, Christoph; Kashani, Farnusch; van der Hoorn, Renier A L; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2012-11-01

    In a recent study we identified corn cystain9 (CC9) as a novel compatibility factor for the interaction of the biotrophic smut fungus Ustilago maydis with its host plant maize. CC9 is transcriptionally induced during the compatible interaction with U. maydis and localizes in the maize apoplast where it inhibits apoplastic papain-like cysteine proteases. The proteases are activated during incompatible interaction and salicylic acid (SA) treatment and, in turn, are sufficient to induce SA signaling including PR-gene expression. Therefore the inhibition of apoplastic papain-like cysteine proteases by CC9 is essential to suppress host immunity during U. maydis infection. Here were present new experimental data on the cysteine protease-cystatin interaction and provide an in silco analysis of plant cystatins and the identified apoplastic cysteine proteases.

  18. Poliovirus protease 3C(pro) kills cells by apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Barco, A; Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    2000-01-20

    The tetracycline-based Tet-Off expression system has been used to analyze the effects of poliovirus protease 3C(pro) on human cells. Stable HeLa cell clones that express this poliovirus protease under the control of an inducible, tightly regulated promoter were obtained. Tetracycline removal induces synthesis of 3C protease, followed by drastic morphological alterations and cellular death. Degradation of cellular DNA in nucleosomes and generation of apoptotic bodies are observed from the second day after 3C(pro) induction. The cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, an enzyme involved in DNA repair, occurs after induction of 3C(pro), indicating caspase activation by this poliovirus protease. The 3C(pro)-induced apoptosis is blocked by the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Our findings suggest that the protease 3C is responsible for triggering apoptosis in poliovirus-infected cells by a mechanism that involves caspase activation.

  19. Cockpit display requirements and specifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, Darrel G.

    1993-12-01

    Flight instrument design has begun to include a new electronic technology for the display head: active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD). This is a significant design transition and applies across the board to complete cockpit modernization programs, individual instrument replacement projects, and new systems. AMLCD-based instruments are expected to have a substantially higher mean time between failure compared to both electromechanical and CRT- based instruments. Thus, the new technology will pay for itself. Furthermore, AMLCDs are truly sunlight-readable whereas CRT displays are not; it is mission critical that a pilot be able to see an instrument with the sun shining directly in the eye or onto the display. AMLCDs can also provide larger display areas enabling formats which increase situational awareness. As this is a new technology for the military, an industrial base for militarized AMLCDs must be created based on present research capabilities. The requirements for AMLCDs in DOD programs have been analyzed. Projects to build infrastructure and capacity are described. Applications include not only cockpits, but also digital map/GPS integrated displays for tank commanders and field laptop computers. We have the opportunity with this new technology to establish a common critical item product function specification for sunlight-readable, color and grayscale capable, flat panel displays for military applications. the Wright Laboratory is leading the development of such functional specification for U.S. military aircraft.

  20. Lizard threat display handicaps endurance.

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Y

    2003-01-01

    Honest-signalling theory asserts that threat displays reliably advertise attributes that influence fighting success. Endurance, as measured by treadmill performance, predicts the outcome of agonistic interactions among lizards. If threat displays in lizards function to advertise endurance capacity then variation in threat displays should correlate with endurance. I tested this prediction for the duration of threat posturing in male side-blotched lizards (Uta stansburiana) and examined whether threat displays act as quality handicaps, reliable signals that expend the attribute that is advertised. Individual variation in the duration of threat posturing correlated with endurance, while an experimental reduction of endurance diminished the duration of threat posturing. As expected of a quality handicap, endurance fell below baseline after display production. A restriction of aerobic metabolism can account for this effect. In threat posturing, lateral compression of the thorax may interfere with respiration or with circulation, limiting aerobic metabolism and causing a compensatory increase in anaerobic metabolism, thereby generating lactate and diminishing locomotor capacity. Concentrations of lactate measured after display production were higher than baseline, consistent with the proposed mechanism. By restricting aerobic metabolism, the threat posture can act as a quality handicap, simultaneously advertising and expending the endurance capacity of displaying lizards. PMID:12803896

  1. Why do animals repeat displays?

    PubMed

    Payne; Pagel

    1997-07-01

    Both agonistic and sexual animal displays often involve more than one performance of some specific display action. Since repetition is energetically costly there must be good reasons why a signaller should carry out such repetitive actions, rather than simply displaying once. We briefly review three different 'reasons' which arise from three different receiver assessment rules: when assessment is based on the average magnitude of all display actions so far, the reason for the repetition is to improve the accuracy of the estimate (model A); when the assessment is based solely on the action of greatest magnitude so far, the repetition is to replace the signal with one of greater magnitude (model B); when the assessment is based on the cumulative sum of all display actions so far, the repetition is to augment that sum (model C). We discuss how to characterize each case from an understanding of its expected optimal behaviour as predicted by formal models. For model A the mean magnitude of display actions should stay constant and the contest duration should depend on relative qualities. In models B and C the encounter duration depends only on the weaker participant. In model B each display action is greater than the previous, but only a small number of steps are expected. In model C the magnitude of display actions can either escalate, stay constant, or even decrease. The displays of cichlid fish, the roaring contests of red deer, Cervus elaphusthe calling of Blanchard's cricket frogs, Acris crepitans blanchardiand the pheromonal exchanges of yeast gametes are used as illustrative examples.

  2. Reversal of mitochondrial defects with CSB-dependent serine protease inhibitors in patient cells of the progeroid Cockayne syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chatre, Laurent; Biard, Denis S. F.; Sarasin, Alain; Ricchetti, Miria

    2015-01-01

    UV-sensitive syndrome (UVSS) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) are human disorders caused by CSA or CSB gene mutations; both conditions cause defective transcription-coupled repair and photosensitivity. Patients with CS also display neurological and developmental abnormalities and dramatic premature aging, and their cells are hypersensitive to oxidative stress. We report CSA/CSB-dependent depletion of the mitochondrial DNA polymerase-γ catalytic subunit (POLG1), due to HTRA3 serine protease accumulation in CS, but not in UVsS or control fibroblasts. Inhibition of serine proteases restored physiological POLG1 levels in either CS fibroblasts and in CSB-silenced cells. Moreover, patient-derived CS cells displayed greater nitroso-redox imbalance than UVSS cells. Scavengers of reactive oxygen species and peroxynitrite normalized HTRA3 and POLG1 levels in CS cells, and notably, increased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, which was altered in CS cells. These data reveal critical deregulation of proteases potentially linked to progeroid phenotypes in CS, and our results suggest rescue strategies as a therapeutic option. PMID:26038566

  3. SUMO proteases ULP1c and ULP1d are required for development and osmotic stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Castro, Pedro Humberto; Couto, Daniel; Freitas, Sara; Verde, Nuno; Macho, Alberto P; Huguet, Stéphanie; Botella, Miguel Angel; Ruiz-Albert, Javier; Tavares, Rui Manuel; Bejarano, Eduardo Rodríguez; Azevedo, Herlânder

    2016-09-01

    Sumoylation is an essential post-translational regulator of plant development and the response to environmental stimuli. SUMO conjugation occurs via an E1-E2-E3 cascade, and can be removed by SUMO proteases (ULPs). ULPs are numerous and likely to function as sources of specificity within the pathway, yet most ULPs remain functionally unresolved. In this report we used loss-of-function reverse genetics and transcriptomics to functionally characterize Arabidopsis thaliana ULP1c and ULP1d SUMO proteases. GUS reporter assays implicated ULP1c/d in various developmental stages, and subsequent defects in growth and germination were uncovered using loss-of-function mutants. Microarray analysis evidenced not only a deregulation of genes involved in development, but also in genes controlled by various drought-associated transcriptional regulators. We demonstrated that ulp1c ulp1d displayed diminished in vitro root growth under low water potential and higher stomatal aperture, yet leaf transpirational water loss and whole drought tolerance were not significantly altered. Generation of a triple siz1 ulp1c ulp1d mutant suggests that ULP1c/d and the SUMO E3 ligase SIZ1 may display separate functions in development yet operate epistatically in response to water deficit. We provide experimental evidence that Arabidopsis ULP1c and ULP1d proteases act redundantly as positive regulators of growth, and operate mainly as isopeptidases downstream of SIZ1 in the control of water deficit responses. PMID:27325215

  4. Positive selection of digestive Cys proteases in herbivorous Coleoptera.

    PubMed

    Vorster, Juan; Rasoolizadeh, Asieh; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Cloutier, Conrad; Sainsbury, Frank; Michaud, Dominique

    2015-10-01

    Positive selection is thought to contribute to the functional diversification of insect-inducible protease inhibitors in plants in response to selective pressures exerted by the digestive proteases of their herbivorous enemies. Here we assessed whether a reciprocal evolutionary process takes place on the insect side, and whether ingestion of a positively selected plant inhibitor may translate into a measurable rebalancing of midgut proteases in vivo. Midgut Cys proteases of herbivorous Coleoptera, including the major pest Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), were first compared using a codon-based evolutionary model to look for the occurrence of hypervariable, positively selected amino acid sites among the tested sequences. Hypervariable sites were found, distributed within -or close to- amino acid regions interacting with Cys-type inhibitors of the plant cystatin protein family. A close examination of L. decemlineata sequences indicated a link between their assignment to protease functional families and amino acid identity at positively selected sites. A function-diversifying role for positive selection was further suggested empirically by in vitro protease assays and a shotgun proteomic analysis of L. decemlineata Cys proteases showing a differential rebalancing of protease functional family complements in larvae fed single variants of a model cystatin mutated at positively selected amino acid sites. These data confirm overall the occurrence of hypervariable, positively selected amino acid sites in herbivorous Coleoptera digestive Cys proteases. They also support the idea of an adaptive role for positive selection, useful to generate functionally diverse proteases in insect herbivores ingesting functionally diverse, rapidly evolving dietary cystatins. PMID:26264818

  5. DARPA high resolution display technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slusarczuk, Marko

    1990-11-01

    Much of the information of interest to pilots in flight is display-limited, and is undergoing substantial expansion due to improved sensor output and signal processing; attention is accordingly given to digitally-based instrument display imaging in the present evaluation of high-resolution cockpit display technologies. Also noted are the advantages of digitally transmitted sensor data in cases where the airborne reconnaissance user may be able to analyze telemetered airborne data in real time and respond with requests to the pilot for more detailed information of specific battlefield sites.

  6. Texture-Based Correspondence Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerald-Yamasaki, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Texture-based correspondence display is a methodology to display corresponding data elements in visual representations of complex multidimensional, multivariate data. Texture is utilized as a persistent medium to contain a visual representation model and as a means to create multiple renditions of data where color is used to identify correspondence. Corresponding data elements are displayed over a variety of visual metaphors in a normal rendering process without adding extraneous linking metadata creation and maintenance. The effectiveness of visual representation for understanding data is extended to the expression of the visual representation model in texture.

  7. Design of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors with C3-Substituted Hexahydrocyclopentafuranyl Urethanes as P2-Ligands: Synthesis, Biological Evaluation, and Protein-Ligand X-ray Crystal Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K; Chapsal, Bruno D; Parham, Garth L; Steffey, Melinda; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Amano, Masayuki; Weber, Irene T; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2011-11-07

    We report the design, synthesis, biological evaluation, and the X-ray crystal structure of a novel inhibitor bound to the HIV-1 protease. Various C3-functionalized cyclopentanyltetrahydrofurans (Cp-THF) were designed to interact with the flap Gly48 carbonyl or amide NH in the S2-subsite of the HIV-1 protease. We investigated the potential of those functionalized ligands in combination with hydroxyethylsulfonamide isosteres. Inhibitor 26 containing a 3-(R)-hydroxyl group on the Cp-THF core displayed the most potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity. Our studies revealed a preference for the 3-(R)-configuration over the corresponding 3-(S)-derivative. Inhibitor 26 exhibited potent activity against a panel of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 variants. A high resolution X-ray structure of 26-bound HIV-1 protease revealed important molecular insight into the ligand-binding site interactions.

  8. Viral cysteine proteases are homologous to the trypsin-like family of serine proteases: structural and functional implications.

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, J F; Fletterick, R J

    1988-01-01

    Proteases that are encoded by animal picornaviruses and plant como- and potyviruses form a related group of cysteine-active-center enzymes that are essential for virus maturation. We show that these proteins are homologous to the family of trypsin-like serine proteases. In our model, the active-site nucleophile of the trypsin catalytic triad, Ser-195, is changed to a Cys residue in these viral proteases. The other two residues of the triad, His-57 and Asp-102, are otherwise absolutely conserved in all the viral protease sequences. Secondary structure analysis of aligned sequences suggests the location of the component strands of the twin beta-barrel trypsin fold in the viral proteases. Unexpectedly, the 2a and 3c subclasses of viral cysteine proteases are, respectively, homologous to the small and large structural subclasses of trypsin-like serine proteases. This classification allows the molecular mapping of residues from viral sequences onto related tertiary structures; we precisely identify amino acids that are strong determinants of specificity for both small and large viral cysteine proteases. Images PMID:3186696

  9. Expression and immunological characterization of cardamom mosaic virus coat protein displaying HIV gp41 epitopes.

    PubMed

    Damodharan, Subha; Gujar, Ravindra; Pattabiraman, Sathyamurthy; Nesakumar, Manohar; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth; Vadakkuppattu, Ramanathan D; Usha, Ramakrishnan

    2013-05-01

    The coat protein of cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV), a member of the genus Macluravirus, assembles into virus-like particles when expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system. The N and C-termini of the coat protein were engineered with the Kennedy peptide and the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes of gp41 of HIV. The chimeric proteins reacted with sera from HIV positive persons and also stimulated secretion of cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from these persons. Thus, a system based on the coat protein of CdMV can be used to display HIV-1 antigens. PMID:23668610

  10. Expression and immunological characterization of cardamom mosaic virus coat protein displaying HIV gp41 epitopes.

    PubMed

    Damodharan, Subha; Gujar, Ravindra; Pattabiraman, Sathyamurthy; Nesakumar, Manohar; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth; Vadakkuppattu, Ramanathan D; Usha, Ramakrishnan

    2013-05-01

    The coat protein of cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV), a member of the genus Macluravirus, assembles into virus-like particles when expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system. The N and C-termini of the coat protein were engineered with the Kennedy peptide and the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes of gp41 of HIV. The chimeric proteins reacted with sera from HIV positive persons and also stimulated secretion of cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from these persons. Thus, a system based on the coat protein of CdMV can be used to display HIV-1 antigens.

  11. Simultaneous detection of avian influenza virus NP and H5 antibodies in chicken sera using a fluorescence microsphere immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Lupiani, Blanca; Mozisek, Blayne; Mason, Peter W; Lamichhane, Chinta; Reddy, Sanjay M

    2010-03-01

    Avian influenza (AI) surveillance in commercial poultry is accomplished by detecting the presence of antibodies to two group-specific antigens, NP and M1, using the agar gel immunodiffusion test. In order to determine the viral subtype responsible for the infection, positive samples must be further subtyped using the hemagglutination inhibition and neuraminidase inhibition tests. These tests are labor intensive and may take up to 4 days, thus slowing down responses to outbreaks. To expedite the subtyping of chicken sera we have developed a multiplex fluorescence microsphere immunoassay (FMIA), which allows for the simultaneous detection and subtyping of chicken sera to H5 influenza viruses. The FMIA was developed using NP (full length) and H5 (HA1 region) proteins expressed in baby hamster kidney cells using a Venezuela equine encephalitis virus replicon system. Both proteins were tagged with 6xHis at the carboxy-end and purified using cobalt-coated agarose beads. Purified H5 protein showed minimal cross-reactivity with anti-H2 serum, while no cross-reactivity was observed with sera to other AI virus (AIV) subtypes and other important poultry viral pathogens. In addition, and as expected, all the AIV sera tested reacted strongly with purified NP protein. Our results indicate that FMIA can be used for rapid subtyping of chicken sera.

  12. Single-dilution indirect solid-phase radioimmunoassay for the detection of anti-pseudorabies immunoglobulin G in swine sera.

    PubMed

    Wang, F I; Hahn, E C

    1986-07-01

    A single-dilution indirect solid-phase radioimmunoassay (IRIA) was developed for the detection of low levels of anti-pseudorabies immunoglobulin G in swine sera. The assay derived increased sensitivity from the use of a second amplifying antibody. The IRIA was examined for its stoichiometry, amplification by secondary antibody, advantage of a single-dilution assay vs an end-point titration, sensitivity, and specificity. The assay had a near linear dose-response relationship with positive sera (serum-neutralization titer less than or equal to 1:16) and lacked a dose response with negative sera. With addition of the secondary antibody, the IRIA was enhanced 8.5-fold in net specific binding, and the end-point titer was amplified 32-fold. The single-dilution assay was proved to be a feasible test, compared with end-point titration. Anti-pseudorabies virus titers were at least 128-fold higher by IRIA than those by serum-neutralization test. Evidence indicated that there may be minimal or no cross-reactivity of IRIA antigen with anti-infectious bovine rhinotracheitis sera. The single-dilution IRIA was a rapid and sensitive test for anti-pseudorabies virus immunoglobulin G in swine sera.

  13. Reactivity of sera from sheep immunised with individual outer membrane proteins of Bacteroides nodosus against heterologous bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Emery, D L

    1984-09-01

    In order to identify those bacterial antigens which might be involved in immunity against ovine footrot, antisera were raised in sheep to 6 proteins in the outer membrane complex (OMC) of one strain of Bacteroides nodosus. Examination of the specificity of these antisera by Western blotting, crossed immunoelectrophoresis (XIEP) and IEP, revealed that they recognized the homologous OMC protein, but did not precipitate either undenatured pili or OMC, nor could they agglutinate the homologous bacteria. In contrast, anti-OMC and anti-pili sera could precipitate OMC or pili respectively, and agglutinate whole bacteria. Subsequent analysis of these sera against 5 strains of B. nodosus from different serogroups revealed that Proteins 1, 3 and 4 had a similar antigenic structure in all strains examined. The reactivity of anti-pili sera was restricted to homologous bacteria whereas anti-pilin sera (raised against denatured pili) also reacted with pilin from 2 of 3 heterologous strains. However, none of the patterns of staining or absorption of any of these sera matched the spectrum of cross-protection afforded by vaccination of sheep with B. nodosus strain 198 cells. The results question the role of individual OMC proteins in cross-protective immunity and may imply that interactions between several bacterial components are involved in the phenomenon. PMID:6208674

  14. Mapping of epitopes on U1 snRNP polypeptide A with synthetic peptides and autoimmune sera.

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, S; Briand, J P; Abuaf, N; van Regenmortel, M H; Muller, S

    1991-01-01

    The ability of synthetic peptides encompassing almost the entire sequence of snRNP U1A polypeptide to be recognized in ELISA by sera of autoimmune patients was investigated. Sera from 18 patients with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), 145 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and 120 with other rheumatic autoimmune diseases were tested with 13 overlapping peptides. Among them, peptide 257-282 and, to a lower extent, peptide 1-11 were recognized by MCTD, SLE and Sjögren's syndrome sera. In contrast, peptide 35-58 was recognized by 94% of MCTD and only 19% of SLE sera. It did not react with any of the other patient sera. The ELISA results were compared with the pattern of reactivity observed in immunoblotting. The results indicate that peptide 35-58 probably contains a major epitope recognized by MCTD autoantibodies. It is noteworthy that in snRNP particles, this region of U1A interacts with RNA and presents only limited homology with the corresponding sequence 32-50 of U2B''. Images Fig. 3 PMID:1717192

  15. Active Site Characterization of Proteases Sequences from Different Species of Aspergillus.

    PubMed

    Morya, V K; Yadav, Virendra K; Yadav, Sangeeta; Yadav, Dinesh

    2016-09-01

    A total of 129 proteases sequences comprising 43 serine proteases, 36 aspartic proteases, 24 cysteine protease, 21 metalloproteases, and 05 neutral proteases from different Aspergillus species were analyzed for the catalytically active site residues using MEROPS database and various bioinformatics tools. Different proteases have predominance of variable active site residues. In case of 24 cysteine proteases of Aspergilli, the predominant active site residues observed were Gln193, Cys199, His364, Asn384 while for 43 serine proteases, the active site residues namely Asp164, His193, Asn284, Ser349 and Asp325, His357, Asn454, Ser519 were frequently observed. The analysis of 21 metalloproteases of Aspergilli revealed Glu298 and Glu388, Tyr476 as predominant active site residues. In general, Aspergilli species-specific active site residues were observed for different types of protease sequences analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis of these 129 proteases sequences revealed 14 different clans representing different types of proteases with diverse active site residues.

  16. Color speckle in laser displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Kazuo

    2015-07-01

    At the beginning of this century, lighting technology has been shifted from discharge lamps, fluorescent lamps and electric bulbs to solid-state lighting. Current solid-state lighting is based on the light emitting diodes (LED) technology, but the laser lighting technology is developing rapidly, such as, laser cinema projectors, laser TVs, laser head-up displays, laser head mounted displays, and laser headlamps for motor vehicles. One of the main issues of laser displays is the reduction of speckle noise1). For the monochromatic laser light, speckle is random interference pattern on the image plane (retina for human observer). For laser displays, RGB (red-green-blue) lasers form speckle patterns independently, which results in random distribution of chromaticity, called color speckle2).

  17. Localization in virtual acoustic displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a particular spatial display medium, the virtual acoustic display. Although the technology can stand alone, it is envisioned ultimately to be a component of a larger multisensory environment and will no doubt find its greatest utility in that context. A general philosophy of the project has been that the development of advanced computer interfaces should be driven first by an understanding of human perceptual requirements, and secondarily by technological capabilities or constraints. In expanding on this view, the paper addresses why virtual acoustic displays are useful, characterizes the abilities of such displays, reviews some recent approaches to their implementation and application, describes the research project at NASA Ames in some detail, and finally outlines some critical research issues for the future.

  18. Multiplane binocular visual display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    Electro-optic system is interfaced with digital computer in flight simulator to generate simultaneous multiple-image planes in real time. System may have applications with other display and remote-control systems.

  19. Localization in virtual acoustic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.

    This paper discusses the development of a particular spatial display medium, the virtual acoustic display. Although the technology can stand alone, it is envisioned ultimately to be a component of a larger multisensory environment and will no doubt find its greatest utility in that context. A general philosophy of the project has been that the development of advanced computer interfaces should be driven first by an understanding of human perceptual requirements, and secondarily by technological capabilities or constraints. In expanding on this view, the paper addresses why virtual acoustic displays are useful, characterizes the abilities of such displays, reviews some recent approaches to their implementation and application, describes the research project at NASA Ames in some detail, and finally outlines some critical research issues for the future.

  20. 10-inch planar optic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiser, Leo; Veligdan, James T.

    1996-05-01

    A planar optic display (POD) is being built and tested for suitability as a high brightness replacement for the cathode ray tube, (CRT). The POD display technology utilizes a laminated optical waveguide structure which allows a projection type of display to be constructed in a thin (1 to 2 inch) housing. Inherent in the optical waveguide is a black cladding matrix which gives the display a black appearance leading to very high contrast. A digital micromirror device, (DMD) from Texas Instruments is used to create video images in conjunction with a 100 milliwatt green solid state laser. An anamorphic optical system is used to inject light into the POD to form a stigmatic image. In addition to the design of the POD screen, we discuss: image formation, image projection, and optical design constraints.

  1. Ten inch Planar Optic Display

    SciTech Connect

    Beiser, L.; Veligdan, J.

    1996-04-01

    A Planar Optic Display (POD) is being built and tested for suitability as a high brightness replacement for the cathode ray tube, (CRT). The POD display technology utilizes a laminated optical waveguide structure which allows a projection type of display to be constructed in a thin (I to 2 inch) housing. Inherent in the optical waveguide is a black cladding matrix which gives the display a black appearance leading to very high contrast. A Digital Micromirror Device, (DMD) from Texas Instruments is used to create video images in conjunction with a 100 milliwatt green solid state laser. An anamorphic optical system is used to inject light into the POD to form a stigmatic image. In addition to the design of the POD screen, we discuss: image formation, image projection, and optical design constraints.

  2. Effective color design for displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Lindsay W.

    2002-06-01

    Visual communication is a key aspect of human-computer interaction, which contributes to the satisfaction of user and application needs. For effective design of presentations on computer displays, color should be used in conjunction with the other visual variables. The general needs of graphic user interfaces are discussed, followed by five specific tasks with differing criteria for display color specification - advertising, text, information, visualization and imaging.

  3. Alternative display and interaction devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolas, M. T.; McDowall, I. E.; Mead, R. X.; Lorimer, E. R.; Hackbush, J. E.; Greuel, C.

    1995-01-01

    While virtual environment systems are typically thought to consist of a head mounted display and a flex-sensing glove, alternative peripheral devices are beginning to be developed in response to application requirements. Three such alternatives are discussed: fingertip sensing gloves, fixed stereoscopic viewers, and counterbalanced head mounted displays. A subset of commercial examples that highlight each alternative is presented as well as a brief discussion of interesting engineering and implementation issues.

  4. Unexpected Activity of a Novel Kunitz-type Inhibitor: INHIBITION OF CYSTEINE PROTEASES BUT NOT SERINE PROTEASES.

    PubMed

    Smith, David; Tikhonova, Irina G; Jewhurst, Heather L; Drysdale, Orla C; Dvořák, Jan; Robinson, Mark W; Cwiklinski, Krystyna; Dalton, John P

    2016-09-01

    Kunitz-type (KT) protease inhibitors are low molecular weight proteins classically defined as serine protease inhibitors. We identified a novel secreted KT inhibitor associated with the gut and parenchymal tissues of the infective juvenile stage of Fasciola hepatica, a helminth parasite of medical and veterinary importance. Unexpectedly, recombinant KT inhibitor (rFhKT1) exhibited no inhibitory activity toward serine proteases but was a potent inhibitor of the major secreted cathepsin L cysteine proteases of F. hepatica, FhCL1 and FhCL2, and of human cathepsins L and K (Ki = 0.4-27 nm). FhKT1 prevented the auto-catalytic activation of FhCL1 and FhCL2 and formed stable complexes with the mature enzymes. Pulldown experiments from adult parasite culture medium showed that rFhKT1 interacts specifically with native secreted FhCL1, FhCL2, and FhCL5. Substitution of the unusual P1 Leu(15) within the exposed reactive loop of FhKT1 for the more commonly found Arg (FhKT1Leu(15)/Arg(15)) had modest adverse effects on the cysteine protease inhibition but conferred potent activity against the serine protease trypsin (Ki = 1.5 nm). Computational docking and sequence analysis provided hypotheses for the exclusive binding of FhKT1 to cysteine proteases, the importance of the Leu(15) in anchoring the inhibitor into the S2 active site pocket, and the inhibitor's selectivity toward FhCL1, FhCL2, and human cathepsins L and K. FhKT1 represents a novel evolutionary adaptation of KT protease inhibitors by F. hepatica, with its prime purpose likely in the regulation of the major parasite-secreted proteases and/or cathepsin L-like proteases of its host.

  5. Enzyme specificity and effects of gyroxin, a serine protease from the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus, on protease-activated receptors.

    PubMed

    Yonamine, Camila M; Kondo, Marcia Y; Nering, Marcela B; Gouvêa, Iuri E; Okamoto, Débora; Andrade, Douglas; da Silva, José Alberto A; Prieto da Silva, Alvaro R B; Yamane, Tetsuo; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz; Lapa, Antônio J; Hayashi, Mirian A F; Lima-Landman, Maria Teresa R

    2014-03-01

    Gyroxin is a serine protease displaying a thrombin-like activity found in the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus. Typically, intravenous injection of purified gyroxin induces a barrel rotation syndrome in mice. The serine protease thrombin activates platelets aggregation by cleaving and releasing a tethered N-terminus peptide from the G-protein-coupled receptors, known as protease-activated receptors (PARs). Gyroxin also presents pro-coagulant activity suggested to be dependent of PARs activation. In the present work, the effects of these serine proteases, namely gyroxin and thrombin, on PARs were comparatively studied by characterizing the hydrolytic specificity and kinetics using PARs-mimetic FRET peptides. We show for the first time that the short (sh) and long (lg) peptides mimetizing the PAR-1, -2, -3, and -4 activation sites are all hydrolyzed by gyroxin exclusively after the Arg residues. Thrombin also hydrolyzes PAR-1 and -4 after the Arg residue, but hydrolyzes sh and lg PAR-3 after the Lys residue. The kcat/KM values determined for gyroxin using sh and lg PAR-4 mimetic peptides were at least 2150 and 400 times smaller than those determined for thrombin, respectively. For the sh and lg PAR-2 mimetic peptides the kcat/KM values determined for gyroxin were at least 6500 and 2919 times smaller than those determined for trypsin, respectively. The kcat/KM values for gyroxin using the PAR-1 and -3 mimetic peptides could not be determined due to the extreme low hydrolysis velocity. Moreover, the functional studies of the effects of gyroxin on PARs were conducted in living cells using cultured astrocytes, which express all PARs. Despite the ability to cleavage the PAR-1, -2, -3, and -4 peptides, gyroxin was unable to activate the PARs expressed in astrocytes as determined by evaluating the cytosolic calcium mobilization. On the other hand, we also showed that gyroxin is able to interfere with the activation of PAR-1 by thrombin or

  6. PEGylated substrates of NSP4 protease: A tool to study protease specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocka, Magdalena; Gruba, Natalia; Grzywa, Renata; Giełdoń, Artur; Bąchor, Remigiusz; Brzozowski, Krzysztof; Sieńczyk, Marcin; Dieter, Jenne; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Rolka, Krzysztof; Lesner, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Herein we present the synthesis of a novel type of peptidomimetics composed of repeating diaminopropionic acid residues modified with structurally diverse heterobifunctional polyethylene glycol chains (abbreviated as DAPEG). Based on the developed compounds, a library of fluorogenic substrates was synthesized. Further library deconvolution towards human neutrophil serine protease 4 (NSP4) yielded highly sensitive and selective internally quenched peptidomimetic substrates. In silico analysis of the obtained peptidomimetics revealed the presence of an interaction network with distant subsites located on the enzyme surface.

  7. Identification, isolation, and molecular cloning of a hookworm protease: an approach towards a defined vaccine for ancylostomiasis

    SciTech Connect

    Hotez, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    The hookworm Ancylostoma caninum was shown to release in vitro a 37 kDa protease that catalyzed the hydrolysis of fibrinogen, plasminogen, and elastin. The enzyme was purified from parasite extracts by ion-exchange chromatography, followed by gel filtration and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. An amino-terminal sequence was determined. When assayed with radiolabeled fibrin as substrate, the enzyme displayed optimal activity at pH 9-11; it was inactivated by dialysis against ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid. Antiserum raised against the protease in rabbits cross-reacted on western blots with soluble antigen from the infective larval stage of the parasite. A cDNA library from hookworm mRNA was constructed in the expression vector bacteriophage lambdagtll. A positive clone was identified with the rabbit antiserum that was shown to contain an 800-bp insert. The insert was mapped, subcloned into M13, and sequenced, revealing an open reading frame of 789 nucleotides corresponding to 263 amino acids.

  8. Highly potent fibrinolytic serine protease from Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Uesugi, Yoshiko; Usuki, Hirokazu; Iwabuchi, Masaki; Hatanaka, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a highly potent fibrinolytic serine protease from Streptomyces omiyaensis (SOT), which belongs to the trypsin family. The fibrinolytic activity of SOT was examined using in vitro assays and was compared with those of known fibrinolytic enzymes such as plasmin, tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), urokinase, and nattokinase. Compared to other enzymes, SOT showed remarkably higher hydrolytic activity toward mimic peptides of fibrin and plasminogen. The fibrinolytic activity of SOT is about 18-fold higher than that of plasmin, and is comparable to that of t-PA by fibrin plate assays. Furthermore, SOT had some plasminogen activator-like activity. Results show that SOT and nattokinase have very different fibrinolytic and fibrinogenolytic modes, engendering significant synergetic effects of SOT and nattokinase on fibrinolysis. These results suggest that SOT presents important possibilities for application in the therapy of thrombosis.

  9. Inferring selection in the Anopheles gambiae species complex: an example from immune-related serine protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Obbard, Darren J; Welch, John J; Little, Tom J

    2009-01-01

    Background Mosquitoes of the Anopheles gambiae species complex are the primary vectors of human malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. Many host genes have been shown to affect Plasmodium development in the mosquito, and so are expected to engage in an evolutionary arms race with the pathogen. However, there is little conclusive evidence that any of these mosquito genes evolve rapidly, or show other signatures of adaptive evolution. Methods Three serine protease inhibitors have previously been identified as candidate immune system genes mediating mosquito-Plasmodium interaction, and serine protease inhibitors have been identified as hot-spots of adaptive evolution in other taxa. Population-genetic tests for selection, including a recent multi-gene extension of the McDonald-Kreitman test, were applied to 16 serine protease inhibitors and 16 other genes sampled from the An. gambiae species complex in both East and West Africa. Results Serine protease inhibitors were found to show a marginally significant trend towards higher levels of amino acid diversity than other genes, and display extensive genetic structuring associated with the 2La chromosomal inversion. However, although serpins are candidate targets for strong parasite-mediated selection, no evidence was found for rapid adaptive evolution in these genes. Conclusion It is well known that phylogenetic and population history in the An. gambiae complex can present special problems for the application of standard population-genetic tests for selection, and this may explain the failure of this study to detect selection acting on serine protease inhibitors. The pitfalls of uncritically applying these tests in this species complex are highlighted, and the future prospects for detecting selection acting on the An. gambiae genome are discussed. PMID:19497100

  10. Allostery Is an Intrinsic Property of the Protease Domain of DegS Implications for Enzyme Function and Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, Jungsan; Grant, Robert A.; Sauer, Robert T.

    2010-12-02

    DegS is a periplasmic Escherichia coli protease, which functions as a trimer to catalyze the initial rate-limiting step in a proteolytic cascade that ultimately activates transcription of stress response genes in the cytoplasm. Each DegS subunit consists of a protease domain and a PDZ domain. During protein folding stress, DegS is allosterically activated by peptides exposed in misfolded outer membrane porins, which bind to the PDZ domain and stabilize the active protease. It is not known whether allostery is conferred by the PDZ domains or is an intrinsic feature of the trimeric protease domain. Here, we demonstrate that free DegS{sup {Delta}PDZ} equilibrates between active and inactive trimers with the latter species predominating. Substrate binding stabilizes active DegS{sup {Delta}PDZ} in a positively cooperative fashion. Mutations can also stabilize active DegS{sup {Delta}PDZ} and produce an enzyme that displays hyperbolic kinetics and degrades substrate with a maximal velocity within error of that for fully activated, intact DegS. Crystal structures of multiple DegS{sup {Delta}PDZ} variants, in functional and non-functional conformations, support a two-state model in which allosteric switching is mediated by changes in specific elements of tertiary structure in the context of an invariant trimeric base. Overall, our results indicate that protein substrates must bind sufficiently tightly and specifically to the functional conformation of DegS{sup {Delta}PDZ} to assist their own degradation. Thus, substrate binding alone may have regulated the activities of ancestral DegS trimers with subsequent fusion of the protease domain to a PDZ domain, resulting in ligand-mediated regulation.

  11. The LonA Protease Regulates Biofilm Formation, Motility, Virulence, and the Type VI Secretion System in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Andrew; Townsley, Loni; Gallego-Hernandez, Ana L.; Beyhan, Sinem; Kwuan, Laura

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The presence of the Lon protease in all three domains of life hints at its biological importance. The prokaryotic Lon protease is responsible not only for degrading abnormal proteins but also for carrying out the proteolytic regulation of specific protein targets. Posttranslational regulation by Lon is known to affect a variety of physiological traits in many bacteria, including biofilm formation, motility, and virulence. Here, we identify the regulatory roles of LonA in the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae. We determined that the absence of LonA adversely affects biofilm formation, increases swimming motility, and influences intracellular levels of cyclic diguanylate. Whole-genome expression analysis revealed that the message abundance of genes involved in biofilm formation was decreased but that the message abundances of those involved in virulence and the type VI secretion system were increased in a lonA mutant compared to the wild type. We further demonstrated that a lonA mutant displays an increase in type VI secretion system activity and is markedly defective in colonization of the infant mouse. These findings suggest that LonA plays a critical role in the environmental survival and virulence of V. cholerae. IMPORTANCE Bacteria utilize intracellular proteases to degrade damaged proteins and adapt to changing environments. The Lon protease has been shown to be important for environmental adaptation and plays a crucial role in regulating the motility, biofilm formation, and virulence of numerous plant and animal pathogens. We find that LonA of the human pathogen V. cholerae is in line with this trend, as the deletion of LonA leads to hypermotility and defects in both biofilm formation and colonization of the infant mouse. In addition, we show that LonA regulates levels of cyclic diguanylate and the type VI secretion system. Our observations add to the known regulatory repertoire of the Lon protease and the current understanding of V. cholerae physiology

  12. A novel organic solvent- and detergent-stable serine alkaline protease from Trametes cingulata strain CTM10101.

    PubMed

    Omrane Benmrad, Maroua; Moujehed, Emna; Ben Elhoul, Mouna; Zaraî Jaouadi, Nadia; Mechri, Sondes; Rekik, Hatem; Kourdali, Sidali; El Hattab, Mohamed; Badis, Abdelmalek; Sayadi, Sami; Bejar, Samir; Jaouadi, Bassem

    2016-10-01

    A protease-producing fungus was isolated from an alkaline wastewater of chemical industries and identified as Trametes cingulata strain CTM10101 on the basis of the ITS rDNA gene-sequencing. It was observed that the fungus strongly produce extracellular protease grown at 30°C in potato-dextrose-broth (PDB) optimized media (13500U/ml). The pure serine protease isolated by Trametes cingulata (designated SPTC) was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation-dialysis followed by heat-treatment and UNO S-1 FPLC cation-exchange chromatography. The chemical characterization carried on include phisico-chemical determination and spectroscopie analysis. The MALDI-TOF/MS analysis revealed that the purified enzyme was a monomer with a molecular mass of 31405.16-Da. The enzyme had an NH2-terminal sequence of ALTTQTEAPWALGTVSHKGQAST, thus sharing high homology with those of fungal-proteases. The optimum pH and temperature values of its proteolytic activity were pH 9 and 60°C, respectively, and its half-life times at 60 and 70°C were 9 and 5-h, respectively. It was completely inhibited by PMSF and DFP, which strongly suggested its belonging to the serine protease family. Compared to Flavourzyme(®)500L from Aspergillus oryzae and Thermolysin typeX from Geobacillus stearothermophilus, SPTC displayed higher levels of hydrolysis, substrate specificity, and catalytic efficiency as well as elevated organic solvent tolerance and considerable detergent stability. Finally, SPTC could potentially be used in peptide synthesis and detergent formulations. PMID:27296442

  13. The role of factor XIa (FXIa) catalytic domain exosite residues in substrate catalysis and inhibition by the Kunitz protease inhibitor domain of protease nexin 2.

    PubMed

    Su, Ya-Chi; Miller, Tara N; Navaneetham, Duraiswamy; Schoonmaker, Robert T; Sinha, Dipali; Walsh, Peter N

    2011-09-01

    To select residues in coagulation factor XIa (FXIa) potentially important for substrate and inhibitor interactions, we examined the crystal structure of the complex between the catalytic domain of FXIa and the Kunitz protease inhibitor (KPI) domain of a physiologically relevant FXIa inhibitor, protease nexin 2 (PN2). Six FXIa catalytic domain residues (Glu(98), Tyr(143), Ile(151), Arg(3704), Lys(192), and Tyr(5901)) were subjected to mutational analysis to investigate the molecular interactions between FXIa and the small synthetic substrate (S-2366), the macromolecular substrate (factor IX (FIX)) and inhibitor PN2KPI. Analysis of all six Ala mutants demonstrated normal K(m) values for S-2366 hydrolysis, indicating normal substrate binding compared with plasma FXIa; however, all except E98A and K192A had impaired values of k(cat) for S-2366 hydrolysis. All six Ala mutants displayed deficient k(cat) values for FIX hydrolysis, and all were inhibited by PN2KPI with normal values of K(i) except for K192A, and Y5901A, which displayed increased values of K(i). The integrity of the S1 binding site residue, Asp(189), utilizing p-aminobenzamidine, was intact for all FXIa mutants. Thus, whereas all six residues are essential for catalysis of the macromolecular substrate (FIX), only four (Tyr(143), Ile(151), Arg(3704), and Tyr(5901)) are important for S-2366 hydrolysis; Glu(98) and Lys(192) are essential for FIX but not S-2366 hydrolysis; and Lys(192) and Tyr(5901) are required for both inhibitor and macromolecular substrate interactions. PMID:21778227

  14. Characterisation of a detergent-stable alkaline protease from a novel thermophilic strain Paenibacillus tezpurensis sp. nov. AS-S24-II.

    PubMed

    Rai, Sudhir K; Roy, Jetendra K; Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2010-02-01

    An alkaline-protease-producing bacterial strain (AS-S24-II) isolated from a soil sample in Assam is a Gram-stain-positive, catalase-positive, endospore-forming rod and grows at temperatures ranging from 30 degrees C to 60 degrees C and salinity ranging from 0% to 7% (w/v) NaCl. Phenotypic characterisation, chemotaxonomic properties, presence of Paenibacillus-specific signature sequences, and ribotyping data suggested that the strain AS-S24-II represents a novel species of the genus Paenibacillus, for which the name Paenibacillus tezpurensis sp. nov. (MTCC 8959) is proposed. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that P. lentimorbus strain DNG-14 and P. lentimorbus strain DNG-16 represent the closest phylogenetic neighbour of this novel strain. Alkaline protease production (598 x 10(3) U l(-1)) by P. tezpurensis sp. nov. in SmF was optimised by response surface method. A laundry-detergent-stable, Ca(2+)-independent, 43-kDa molecular weight alkaline serine protease from this strain was purified with a 1.7-fold increase in specific activity. The purified protease displayed optimum activity at pH 9.5 and 45-50 degrees C temperature range and exhibited a significant stability and compatibility with surfactants and most of the tested commercial laundry detergents at room temperature. Further, the protease improved the wash performance of detergents, thus demonstrating its feasibility for inclusion in laundry detergent formulations.

  15. Investigations on a hyper-proteolytic mutant of Beauveria bassiana: broad substrate specificity and high biotechnological potential of a serine protease.

    PubMed

    Borgi, Ines; Gargouri, Ali

    2014-02-01

    A new strain of Beauveria bassiana was identified on the basis of the 18S rRNA gene sequence homology. This strain, called P2, is a spontaneously arisen mutant that was isolated after successive sub-culturing the wild-type B. bassiana P1 strain. P2 showed hyper-production of extracellular protease(s) as much as ninefold more than P1. An extracellular protease (SBP) having a molecular weight of 32 kDa was purified from the P2 strain. SBP was completely inhibited by the phenyl methyl sulphonyl fluoride, which suggests that it belongs to the serine protease family. Based on the homology analysis of its N-terminal and the gene sequences, the enzyme was identified as subtilisin. The enzyme displays maximum activity at 60 °C and pH 8, and was stable at pH 6-12. The enzyme hydrolyses natural proteins such as keratin and is activated in presence of β-mercaptoethanol and Tween detergents. SBP was compatible with some laundry detergent formulations and showed high efficacy in the removal of blood stains from cotton fabric. Moreover, it was observed to degrade the melanised feathers and to hydrolyse the gelatine from X-ray films. All these results highlight the suitability of SBP protease as a very efficient microbial bio-resource.

  16. Design of translactam HCMV protease inhibitors as potent antivirals.

    PubMed

    Borthwick, Alan D

    2005-07-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an important pathogen for which there is a significant unmet medical need. New HCMV antivirals, active against novel molecular targets, are undoubtedly needed as the currently available drugs ganciclovir, cidofovir, and foscarnet, which are all viral DNA inhibitors, suffer from limited effectiveness, mainly due to the development of drug resistance, poor bioavailability, and toxicity. One of the newer molecular targets that has been exploited in the search for better drug candidates is HCMV protease. Our deltaAla HCMV protease (wild type variant with the internal cleavage site deleted) was cloned and expressed in E. coli. This viral enzyme was used to develop HCMV protease assays to evaluate potential inhibitors. The chirally pure (SRS)-alpha-methyl pyrrolidine-5,5-trans-lactam template was synthesized, which together with the natural substrate requirements of HCMV protease and detailed SAR, was used to design potent and selective mechanism based inhibitors of HCMV protease. The mechanism of action of these inhibitors of HCMV protease was investigated by ESI/MS, and the X-ray crystal structure of the HCMV protease was used to refine our selective viral enzyme inhibitors to obtain plasma stable antivirals. A novel ELISA antiviral assay was developed which, together with a cytotoxicity assay, enabled us to discover anti-HCMV drug candidates equivalent in potency to ganciclovir that had good pharmacokinetics in the dog and good brain and ocular penetration in the guinea pig.

  17. Cold-adapted proteases as an emerging class of therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Fornbacke, Marcus; Clarsund, Mats

    2013-06-01

    Proteases have been used in medicine for several decades and are an established and well tolerated class of therapeutic agent. These proteases were sourced from mammals or bacteria that exist or have adapted to moderate temperatures (mesophilic organisms); however, proteases derived from organisms from cold environments-cold-adapted or psychrophilic proteases-generally have high specific activity, low substrate affinity, and high catalytic rates at low and moderate temperatures. Made possible by greater flexibility, psychrophilic enzymes interact with and transform the substrate at lower energy costs. Cold-adapted proteases have been used in a wide range of applications, including industrial functions, textiles, cleaning/hygiene products, molecular biology, environmental bioremediations, consumer food products, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical production. In addition to these applications, they have also shown promise as therapeutic modalities for cosmeceutical applications (by reducing glabellar [frown] lines) and a number of disease conditions, including bacterial infections (by disrupting biofilms to prevent bacterial infection), topical wound management (when used as a debridement agent to remove necrotic tissue and fibrin clots), oral/dental health management (by removing plaque and preventing periodontal disease), and in viral infections (by reducing the infectivity of viruses, such as human rhinovirus 16 and herpes simplex virus). Psychrophilic proteases with greater activity and stability (than the original organism-derived variant) have been developed; this coupled with available manufacturing recombinant production techniques suggests that cold-adapted proteases have a promising future as a distinct therapeutic class with diverse clinical applications.

  18. Laundry detergent compatibility of the alkaline protease from Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Banik, Rathindra Mohan; Prakash, Monika

    2004-01-01

    The endogenous protease activity in various commercially available laundry detergents of international companies was studied. The maximum protease activity was found at 50 degrees C in pH range 10.5-11.0 in all the tested laundry detergents. The endogenous protease activity in the tested detergents retained up to 70% on incubation at 40 degrees C for 1 h, whereas less than 30% activity was only found on incubation at 50 degrees C for 1 h. The alkaline protease from an alkalophilic strain of Bacillus cereus was studied for its compatibility in commercial detergents. The cell free fermented broth from shake flask culture of the organism showed maximum activity at pH 10.5 and 50 degrees C. The protease from B. cereus showed much higher residual activity (more than 80%) on incubation with laundry detergents at 50 degrees C for 1 h or longer. The protease enzyme from B. cereus was found to be superior over the endogenous proteases present in the tested commercial laundry detergents in comparison to the enzyme stability during the washing at higher temperature, e.g., 40-50 degrees C.

  19. Pioneer oral streptococci produce immunoglobulin A1 protease.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, M F; Evans, M; Fitzsimmons, S; Johnson, J; Pearce, C; Sheridan, M J; Wientzen, R; Bowden, G

    1994-01-01

    As part of a longitudinal study of the relationship between bacterial colonization and the secretory immune response, 367 isolates of pioneer viridans streptococci collected from 40 breast- and bottle-fed neonates within the first month postpartum were tested for the production of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) protease and glycosidases. Fifty percent of the streptococci isolated produced IgA1 protease, including all isolates of Streptococcus oralis and S. sanguis, 60.7% of S. mitis biovar 1 isolates, and some isolates that could not be identified. Three cleavage patterns of alpha 1 heavy chains were observed. Six isolates of S. mitis biovar 1 that did not produce IgA1 protease attacked the alpha 1 chain. Incubation of IgA1 protease-negative S. mitis biovar 1 isolates with IgA1, either prior to or together with S. sanguis, rendered the IgA1 paraprotein resistant to cleavage by the IgA1 protease of S. sanguis. The ability of some pioneer streptococci in the human oral cavity to produce IgA1 protease and of others to modify the susceptibility of IgA1 to cleavage by IgA1 protease perhaps enhances their ability to survive in this habitat. Images PMID:8188337

  20. Salt stress represses production of extracellular proteases in Bacillus pumilus.

    PubMed

    Liu, R F; Huang, C L; Feng, H

    2015-05-11

    Bacillus pumilus is able to secrete subtilisin-like prote-ases, one of which has been purified and characterized biochemically, demonstrating great potential for use in industrial applications. In the current study, the biosynthesis and transcription of extracellular pro-teases in B. pumilus (BA06) under salt stress were investigated using various methods, including a proteolytic assay, zymogram analysis, and real-time PCR. Our results showed that total extracellular proteolytic activity, both in fermentation broth and on milk-containing agar plates, was considerably repressed by salt in a dosage-dependent manner. As Bacillus species usually secret multiple extracellular proteases, a vari-ety of individual extracellular protease encoding genes were selected for real-time PCR analysis. It was shown that proteases encoded by the aprE and aprX genes were the major proteases in the fermentation broth in terms of their transcripts in B. pumilus. Further, transcription of aprE, aprX, and epr genes was indeed repressed by salt stress. In con-trast, transcription of other genes (e.g., vpr and wprA) was not repressed or significantly affected by the salt. Conclusively, salt stress represses total extracellular proteolytic activity in B. pumilus, which can largely be ascribed to suppression of the major protease-encoding genes (aprE, aprX) at the transcriptional level. In contrast, transcription of other pro-tease-encoding genes (e.g., vpr, wprA) was not repressed by salt stress.

  1. Cold-adapted proteases as an emerging class of therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Fornbacke, Marcus; Clarsund, Mats

    2013-06-01

    Proteases have been used in medicine for several decades and are an established and well tolerated class of therapeutic agent. These proteases were sourced from mammals or bacteria that exist or have adapted to moderate temperatures (mesophilic organisms); however, proteases derived from organisms from cold environments-cold-adapted or psychrophilic proteases-generally have high specific activity, low substrate affinity, and high catalytic rates at low and moderate temperatures. Made possible by greater flexibility, psychrophilic enzymes interact with and transform the substrate at lower energy costs. Cold-adapted proteases have been used in a wide range of applications, including industrial functions, textiles, cleaning/hygiene products, molecular biology, environmental bioremediations, consumer food products, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical production. In addition to these applications, they have also shown promise as therapeutic modalities for cosmeceutical applications (by reducing glabellar [frown] lines) and a number of disease conditions, including bacterial infections (by disrupting biofilms to prevent bacterial infection), topical wound management (when used as a debridement agent to remove necrotic tissue and fibrin clots), oral/dental health management (by removing plaque and preventing periodontal disease), and in viral infections (by reducing the infectivity of viruses, such as human rhinovirus 16 and herpes simplex virus). Psychrophilic proteases with greater activity and stability (than the original organism-derived variant) have been developed; this coupled with available manufacturing recombinant production techniques suggests that cold-adapted proteases have a promising future as a distinct therapeutic class with diverse clinical applications. PMID:25135820

  2. Exploring a new serine protease from Cucumis sativus L.

    PubMed

    Nafeesa, Zohara; Shivalingu, B R; Vivek, H K; Priya, B S; Swamy, S Nanjunda

    2015-03-01

    Coagulation is an important physiological process in hemostasis which is activated by sequential action of proteases. This study aims to understand the involvement of aqueous fruit extract of Cucumis sativus L. (AqFEC) European burp less variety in blood coagulation cascade. AqFEC hydrolyzed casein in a dose-dependent manner. The presence of protease activity was further confirmed by casein zymography which revealed the possible presence of two high molecular weight protease(s). The proteolytic activity was inhibited only by phenyl methyl sulphonyl fluoride suggesting the presence of serine protease(s). In a dose-dependent manner, AqFEC also hydrolysed Aα and Bβ subunits of fibrinogen, whereas it failed to degrade the γ subunit of fibrinogen even at a concentration as high as 100 μg and incubation time up to 4 h. AqFEC reduced the clotting time of citrated plasma by 87.65%. The protease and fibrinogenolytic activity of AqFEC suggests its possible role in stopping the bleeding and ensuing wound healing process.

  3. Cysteine Protease Inhibitors as Chemotherapy: Lessons from a Parasite Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selzer, Paul M.; Pingel, Sabine; Hsieh, Ivy; Ugele, Bernhard; Chan, Victor J.; Engel, Juan C.; Bogyo, Matthew; Russell, David G.; Sakanari, Judy A.; McKerrow, James H.

    1999-09-01

    Papain family cysteine proteases are key factors in the pathogenesis of cancer invasion, arthritis, osteoporosis, and microbial infections. Targeting this enzyme family is therefore one strategy in the development of new chemotherapy for a number of diseases. Little is known, however, about the efficacy, selectivity, and safety of cysteine protease inhibitors in cell culture or in vivo. We now report that specific cysteine protease inhibitors kill Leishmania parasites in vitro, at concentrations that do not overtly affect mammalian host cells. Inhibition of Leishmania cysteine protease activity was accompanied by defects in the parasite's lysosome/endosome compartment resembling those seen in lysosomal storage diseases. Colocalization of anti-protease antibodies with biotinylated surface proteins and accumulation of undigested debris and protease in the flagellar pocket of treated parasites were consistent with a pathway of protease trafficking from flagellar pocket to the lysosome/endosome compartment. The inhibitors were sufficiently absorbed and stable in vivo to ameliorate the pathology associated with a mouse model of Leishmania infection.

  4. Staphylococcal proteases aid in evasion of the human complement system.

    PubMed

    Jusko, Monika; Potempa, Jan; Kantyka, Tomasz; Bielecka, Ewa; Miller, Halie K; Kalinska, Magdalena; Dubin, Grzegorz; Garred, Peter; Shaw, Lindsey N; Blom, Anna M

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that presents severe health care concerns due to the prevalence of multiple antibiotic-resistant strains. New treatment strategies are urgently needed, which requires an understanding of disease causation mechanisms. Complement is one of the first lines of defense against bacterial pathogens, and S. aureus expresses several specific complement inhibitors. The effect of extracellular proteases from this bacterium on complement, however, has been the subject of limited investigation, except for a recent report regarding cleavage of the C3 component by aureolysin (Aur). We demonstrate here that four major extracellular proteases of S. aureus are potent complement inhibitors. Incubation of human serum with the cysteine proteases staphopain A and staphopain B, the serine protease V8 and the metalloproteinase Aur resulted in a drastic decrease in the hemolytic activity of serum, whereas two staphylococcal serine proteases D and E, had no effect. These four proteases were found to inhibit all pathways of complement due to the efficient degradation of several crucial components. Furthermore, S. aureus mutants lacking proteolytic enzymes were found to be more efficiently killed in human blood. Taken together, the major proteases of S. aureus appear to be important for pathogen-mediated evasion of the human complement system.

  5. Extracellular proteases modify cell wall turnover in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Jolliffe, L K; Doyle, R J; Streips, U N

    1980-01-01

    The rate of turnover of peptidoglycan in exponentially growing cultures of Bacillus subtilis was observed to be sensitive to extracellular protease. In protease-deficient mutants the rates of cell wall turnover were greater than that of wild-type strain 168, whereas hyperprotease-producing strains exhibited decreased rates of peptidoglycan turnover. The rate of peptidogylcan turnover in a protease-deficient strain was decreased when the mutant was grown in the presence of a hyperprotease-producing strain. The addition of phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, a serine protease inhibitor, to cultures of hyperprotease-producing strains increased their rates of cell wall turnover. Isolated cell walls of all protease mutants contained autolysin levels equal to or greater than that of wild-type strain 168. The presence of filaments, or cells with incomplete septa, was observed in hyperprotease-producing strains or when a protease-deficient strain was grown in the presence of subtilisin. The results suggest that the turnover of cell walls in B. subtilis may be regulated by extracellular proteases. Images PMID:6102558

  6. Membrane Proteases and Aminoglycoside Antibiotic Resistance ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Aaron; Lee, Samuel; Jacoby, Kyle; Manoil, Colin

    2011-01-01

    We present genetic studies that help define the functional network underlying intrinsic aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our analysis shows that proteolysis, particularly that controlled by the membrane protease FtsH, is a major determinant of resistance. First, we examined the consequences of inactivating genes controlled by AmgRS, a two-component regulator required for intrinsic tobramycin resistance. Three of the gene products account for resistance: a modulator of FtsH protease (YccA), a membrane protease (HtpX), and a membrane protein of unknown function (PA5528). Second, we screened mutations inactivating 66 predicted proteases and related functions. Insertions inactivating two FtsH protease accessory factors (HflK and HflC) and a cytoplasmic protease (HslUV) increased tobramycin sensitivity. Finally, we generated an ftsH deletion mutation. The mutation dramatically increased aminoglycoside sensitivity. Many of the functions whose inactivation increased sensitivity appeared to act independently, since multiple mutations led to additive or synergistic effects. Up to 500-fold increases in tobramycin sensitivity were observed. Most of the mutations also were highly pleiotropic, increasing sensitivity to a membrane protein hybrid, several classes of antibiotics, alkaline pH, NaCl, and other compounds. We propose that the network of proteases provides robust protection from aminoglycosides and other substances through the elimination of membrane-disruptive mistranslation products. PMID:21764915

  7. Fluorometric CCHFV OTU protease assay with potent inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kocabas, Fatih; Aslan, Galip S

    2015-10-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a deadly virus that has been listed in the Category C as a potential bioterror agent. There are no specific therapies against CCHFV, which urges identification of potential therapeutic targets and development of CCHFV therapies. CCHFV OTU protease takes an important role in viral invasion through antagonizing NF-κB signaling. Inhibition of CCHFV OTU protease by small molecules warrants an exciting potential as antiviral therapeutics. Here we report the expression and purification of a C-His-tagged recombinant CCHFV OTU protease in E. coli BL21 (DE3) host strain. Activity of the refolded purified recombinant viral OTU protease has been validated with a UB-AMC fluorescent assay. In addition, we show a dose-dependent inhibition of the viral OTU protease by two small molecules. This study provides a reliable approach for recombinant expression and purification of CCHFV OTU protease, and demonstrates validation of OTU protease activity and its inhibition based on a UB-AMC florescent assay.

  8. Prevalence of anti-beta-2 microglobulin autoantibodies in sera of rheumatoid arthritis patients with extra-articular manifestations.

    PubMed Central

    Falus, A; Merétey, K; Bozsóky, S

    1981-01-01

    The frequency and concentration of specific factors binding beta 2 microglobulin were investigated in sera and synovial fluids of patients and in sera of normal controls. High anti-beta 2 m activity was detected in the sera of adult RA patients, particularly in those of with extra-articular disease. Similarly, anti-beta 2 m was present in the synovial fluids of RA but not of osteoarthrosis patients. Both the binding of anti-beta 2 m activity to the Sepharose staphylococcal protein A and its elution position in the second 'IgG' peak after Sephadex G-200 gel filtration suggest the antibody nature of the activity. The possibility of differences not only in titre but also in the specificity of heterologous and homologous anti-beta 2 m antibodies are discussed. PMID:6167213

  9. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for measurement of antibodies against equine herpesvirus 2 in equine sera.

    PubMed

    Fu, Z F; Denby, L; Lien, D H; Robinson, A J

    1987-11-01

    An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for the detection of antibodies against equine herpesvirus type 2 (EHV-2) in equine sera. The optimal conditions of antigen concentration, and serum and conjugate dilutions were established by chequerboard titrations. When the standard ELISA test was used for titration of test sera, it was found to give titres approximately 1500 times higher than those obtained in the virus neutralization (VN) test, and a correlation coefficient of 0.815 was obtained between these two tests on 42 equine sera. All the positive serum samples by the VN were also positive by the ELISA, and one negative serum in the former test was found to be positive in the latter. Under field conditions, the test also detected increases in antibody titres against EHV-2 in 13 out of 14 foals soon after these animals excreted the virus.

  10. Monitoring of aflatoxins and ochratoxin A in Czechoslovak human sera by immunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Fukal, L. ); Reisnerova, H. )

    1990-03-01

    Since a level of food contamination with aflatoxins and ochratoxin A has been found low in Czechoslovakia, human exposure to these mycotoxins may not be negligible. However, analysis of food samples provides only indirect evidence of mycotoxin ingestion and no evidence about mycotoxin absorption. Direct evidence can only be obtained by analysis of human body fluids. Therefore, the authors decided to carry out a monitoring of aflatoxin and ochratoxin A level in human sera. In general, TLC and HPLC are most commonly used to analyze mycotoxins and its metabolites. The recent development of immunochemical techniques opens the possibility of determining individual exposure in a relatively large human population. These assays have the advantage of high specificity and sensitivity. Sample through-put is high, and the methods are technically simple and can be performed at low cost.

  11. Natural occurrence of Nuc in the sera of autoimmune-prone MRL/lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Y; Miura, K; Uehara, T; Amagai, M; Takeda, O; Tanuma, S; Kurosawa, Y

    1993-10-29

    We previously established a clone of cells termed KML1-7 which produces a soluble factor that boosts anti-DNA antibody production both in vitro and in vivo across the H-2 barrier. By using the purified protein, termed nucleobindin (Nuc), we cloned cDNA and produced recombinant(r) Nuc in E.coli. Although the purified rNuc showed biological activities such as anti-DNA antibody boosting and DNA binding, there was no evidence that Nuc is really associated with autoimmune status in lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice. Here we report that identification of Nuc was successful from the sera of MRL/lpr mice, but not from those of the substrain MRL/n mice, which show no apparent autoimmune syndrome at the same age of MRL/lpr mice, by means of immunochemical as well as N-terminal amino-acid sequencing methods.

  12. Detection of specific Mycoplasma conjunctivae antibodies in the sera of sheep with infectious keratoconjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Belloy, L; Giacometti, M; Abdo, E M; Nicolet, J; Krawinkler, M; Janovsky, M; Bruderer, U; Frey, J

    2001-01-01

    The serological cross reactions between Mycoplasma conjunctivae, the etiological agent of infectious keratoconjunctivitis (IKC), and the antigenetically and phylogenetically closely related Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae, which is often found in sheep, were analysed. Cross reacting antigens were identified using sera from sheep with IKC and from sheep of herds known to be free of IKC, as well as rabbit hyperimmune serum specific to the two Mycoplasma species. Cross reactions were predominantly due to the strongly antigenic proteins of 42 kDa and 83 kDa. Serospecific antigens of M. conjunctivae could be separated from cross-reacting antigens by the extraction of Tween 20-soluble membrane proteins. The Tween 20-extracted proteins of the M. conjunctivae strain HRC/581T were used for the development of an indirect ELISA test. This ELISA test was shown to be a useful serological method for the diagnosis of M. conjunctivae infections and to identify infected sheep herds.

  13. Immunoreactive insulin in diabetes mellitus patient sera detected by ultrasensitive ELISA with thio-NAD cycling.

    PubMed

    Ito, Etsuro; Kaneda, Mugiho; Kodama, Hiromi; Morikawa, Mika; Tai, Momoko; Aoki, Kana; Watabe, Satoshi; Nakaishi, Kazunari; Hashida, Seiichi; Tada, Satoshi; Kuroda, Noriyuki; Imachi, Hitomi; Murao, Koji; Yamashita, Masakane; Yoshimura, Teruki; Miura, Toshiaki

    2015-12-01

    To minimize patient suffering, the smallest possible volume of blood should be collected for diagnosis and disease monitoring. When estimating insulin secretion capacity and resistance to insulin in diabetes mellitus (DM), increasing insulin assay immunosensitivity would reduce the blood sample volume required for testing. Here we present an ultrasensitive ELISA coupled with thio-NAD cycling to measure immunoreactive insulin in blood serum. Only 5 μL of serum was required for testing, with a limit of detection (LOD) for the assay of 10(-16) moles/assay. Additional recovery tests confirmed this method can detect insulin in sera. Comparisons between a commercially available immunoreactive insulin kit and our ultrasensitive ELISA using the same commercially available reference demonstrated good data correlation, providing further evidence of assay accuracy. Together, these results demonstrate our ultrasensitive ELISA could be a powerful tool in the diagnosis and treatment of not only DM but also many other diseases in the future.

  14. Purification and biochemical characterization of two detergent-stable serine alkaline proteases from Streptomyces sp. strain AH4.

    PubMed

    Touioui, Souraya Boulkour; Jaouadi, Nadia Zaraî; Boudjella, Hadjira; Ferradji, Fatma Zohra; Belhoul, Mouna; Rekik, Hatem; Badis, Abdelmalek; Bejar, Samir; Jaouadi, Bassem

    2015-07-01

    Streptomyces sp. strain AH4 exhibited a high ability to produce two extracellular proteases when cultured on a yeast malt-extract (ISP2)-casein-based medium. Pure proteins were obtained after heat treatment (30 min at 70 °C) and ammonium sulphate fractionation (30-60 %), followed by size exclusion HPLC column. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the purified enzymes (named SAPS-P1 and SAPS-P2) were monomers with molecular masses of 36,417.13 and 21,099.10 Da, respectively. Their identified N-terminal amino acid displayed high homologies with those of Streptomyces proteases. While SAPS-P1 was optimally active at pH 12.0 and 70 °C, SAPS-P2 showed optimum activity at pH 10.0 and 60 °C. Both enzymes were completely stable within a wide range of temperature (45-75 °C) and pH (8.0-11.5). They were noted to be completely inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride and diisopropyl fluorophosphates, which confirmed their belonging to the serine proteases family. Compared to SAPS-P2, SAPS-P1 showed high thermostability and excellent stability towards bleaching, denaturing, and oxidizing agents. Both enzymes displayed marked stability and compatibility with a wide range of commercial laundry detergents and significant catalytic efficiencies compared to Subtilisin Carlsberg and Protease SG-XIV. Overall, the results indicated that SAPS-P1 and SAPS-P2 can be considered as potential promising candidates for future application as bioadditives in detergent formulations.

  15. Microarray screening of Guillain-Barré syndrome sera for antibodies to glycolipid complexes

    PubMed Central

    Halstead, Susan K.; Kalna, Gabriela; Islam, Mohammad B.; Jahan, Israt; Mohammad, Quazi D.; Jacobs, Bart C.; Endtz, Hubert P.; Islam, Zhahirul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the patterns of autoantibodies to glycolipid complexes in a large cohort of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and control samples collected in Bangladesh using a newly developed microarray technique. Methods: Twelve commonly studied glycolipids and lipids, plus their 66 possible heteromeric complexes, totaling 78 antigens, were applied to polyvinylidene fluoride–coated slides using a microarray printer. Arrays were probed with 266 GBS and 579 control sera (2 μL per serum, diluted 1/50) and bound immunoglobulin G detected with secondary antibody. Scanned arrays were subjected to statistical analyses. Results: Measuring antibodies to single targets was 9% less sensitive than to heteromeric complex targets (49.2% vs 58.3%) without significantly affecting specificity (83.9%–85.0%). The optimal screening protocol for GBS sera comprised a panel of 10 glycolipids (4 single glycolipids GM1, GA1, GD1a, GQ1b, and their 6 heteromeric complexes), resulting in an overall assay sensitivity of 64.3% and specificity of 77.1%. Notable heteromeric targets were GM1:GD1a, GM1:GQ1b, and GA1:GD1a, in which exclusive binding to the complex was observed. Conclusions: Rationalizing the screening protocol to capture the enormous diversity of glycolipid complexes can be achieved by miniaturizing the screening platform to a microarray platform, and applying simple bioinformatics to determine optimal sensitivity and specificity of the targets. Glycolipid complexes are an important category of glycolipid antigens in autoimmune neuropathy cases that require specific analytical and bioinformatics methods for optimal detection. PMID:27790627

  16. A macroecological analysis of SERA derived forest heights and implications for forest volume remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Brolly, Matthew; Woodhouse, Iain H; Niklas, Karl J; Hammond, Sean T

    2012-01-01

    Individual trees have been shown to exhibit strong relationships between DBH, height and volume. Often such studies are cited as justification for forest volume or standing biomass estimation through remote sensing. With resolution of common satellite remote sensing systems generally too low to resolve individuals, and a need for larger coverage, these systems rely on descriptive heights, which account for tree collections in forests. For remote sensing and allometric applications, this height is not entirely understood in terms of its location. Here, a forest growth model (SERA) analyzes forest canopy height relationships with forest wood volume. Maximum height, mean, H₁₀₀, and Lorey's height are examined for variability under plant number density, resource and species. Our findings, shown to be allometrically consistent with empirical measurements for forested communities world-wide, are analyzed for implications to forest remote sensing techniques such as LiDAR and RADAR. Traditional forestry measures of maximum height, and to a lesser extent H₁₀₀ and Lorey's, exhibit little consistent correlation with forest volume across modeled conditions. The implication is that using forest height to infer volume or biomass from remote sensing requires species and community behavioral information to infer accurate estimates using height alone. SERA predicts mean height to provide the most consistent relationship with volume of the height classifications studied and overall across forest variations. This prediction agrees with empirical data collected from conifer and angiosperm forests with plant densities ranging between 10²-10⁶ plants/hectare and heights 6-49 m. Height classifications investigated are potentially linked to radar scattering centers with implications for allometry. These findings may be used to advance forest biomass estimation accuracy through remote sensing. Furthermore, Lorey's height with its specific relationship to remote sensing

  17. Standardized Method of Measuring Acanthamoeba Antibodies in Sera from Healthy Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Cynthia L.; Wright, John A.; Coletta, Michael; Newsome, Anthony L.

    2001-01-01

    Acanthamoeba species can cause serious, debilitating, and sometimes life-threatening infections. Three groups have been identified using morphological and immunological comparisons. Previous serological studies have utilized a variety of antigen preparations and assay methods and reported disparate (3 to 100%) results. This study was designed to (i) optimize an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detecting serum antibodies to each of the Acanthamoeba serogroups and (ii) test 55 healthy individuals for specific immunoglobulin G reactivity. The highest signal-to-background ratio was found when 3,000 fixed, intact trophozoites per well were used with a 1:10 serum dilution. Sera yielding optical densities of <0.25 against all three Acanthamoeba serogroups were used to define the cutoff for positive results. The highest background reactivity with these sera was seen with Acanthamoeba polyphaga (serogroup 2), followed by Acanthamoeba culbertsoni (serogroup 3) and Acanthamoeba astronyxis (serogroup 1). Of 55 subjects tested, the highest number of positive results was seen with A. polyphaga (81.8%), followed by A. astronyxis (52.8%) and A. culbertsoni (40%). Seven serum samples (12.7%) were negative for all three Acanthamoeba serogroups, 16 (29.1%) were positive for one serogroup only, 16 were positive for two serogroups, and 16 reacted to all three serogroups. Further analysis showed no significant associations between serogroup reactivity and age or gender. However, some ethnic differences were noted, especially with A. polyphaga antigens. In that case, serum samples from Hispanic subjects were 14.5 times less likely to be positive (P = 0.0025) and had lower mean absorbance values (P = 0.047) than those from Caucasian subjects. Overall, these data suggest that Acanthamoeba colonization or infection is more common than previously thought. Mild or asymptomatic infections may contribute to the observed serum reactivities. PMID:11427418

  18. Endothelin-1 release from cultured endothelial cells induced by sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshio, T; Masuyama, J; Mimori, A; Takeda, A; Minota, S; Kano, S

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To clarify the pathophysiological role of endothelin-1 (ET-1) in the vascular injury associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) by investigating the effect of sera from patients with SLE on ET-1 release from cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. METHODS--Confluent monolayers of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with serum samples (diluted 1:10) from 25 patients with SLE and 16 normal controls for two hours at 37 degrees C and ET-1 concentration in the culture supernatant was measured by enzyme immunoassay. RESULTS--The mean release of ET-1 from endothelial cells in the presence of serum from SLE patients was greater than in the presence of serum from normal controls (p < 0.005). ET-1 release from endothelial cells significantly correlated with the titre of IgM anti-endothelial cell antibodies (IgM-AECA) and immune complex concentration in sera from SLE patients (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). After gel chromatography of the serum from an SLE patient, those fractions containing IgM-AECA or immune complex were shown to stimulate ET-1 release from endothelial cells. Heat aggregated IgG also stimulated ET-1 release from endothelial cells in a concentration dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS--IgM-AECA and immune complexes may stimulate ET-1 release from endothelial cells and ET-1 may play an important role in the initiation and development of vascular injury, such as pulmonary hypertension and lupus nephritis, in SLE. PMID:7794041

  19. A Macroecological Analysis of SERA Derived Forest Heights and Implications for Forest Volume Remote Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Brolly, Matthew; Woodhouse, Iain H.; Niklas, Karl J.; Hammond, Sean T.

    2012-01-01

    Individual trees have been shown to exhibit strong relationships between DBH, height and volume. Often such studies are cited as justification for forest volume or standing biomass estimation through remote sensing. With resolution of common satellite remote sensing systems generally too low to resolve individuals, and a need for larger coverage, these systems rely on descriptive heights, which account for tree collections in forests. For remote sensing and allometric applications, this height is not entirely understood in terms of its location. Here, a forest growth model (SERA) analyzes forest canopy height relationships with forest wood volume. Maximum height, mean, H100, and Lorey's height are examined for variability under plant number density, resource and species. Our findings, shown to be allometrically consistent with empirical measurements for forested communities world-wide, are analyzed for implications to forest remote sensing techniques such as LiDAR and RADAR. Traditional forestry measures of maximum height, and to a lesser extent H100 and Lorey's, exhibit little consistent correlation with forest volume across modeled conditions. The implication is that using forest height to infer volume or biomass from remote sensing requires species and community behavioral information to infer accurate estimates using height alone. SERA predicts mean height to provide the most consistent relationship with volume of the height classifications studied and overall across forest variations. This prediction agrees with empirical data collected from conifer and angiosperm forests with plant densities ranging between 102–106 plants/hectare and heights 6–49 m. Height classifications investigated are potentially linked to radar scattering centers with implications for allometry. These findings may be used to advance forest biomass estimation accuracy through remote sensing. Furthermore, Lorey's height with its specific relationship to remote sensing physics is

  20. [Demonstration of antibodies to salmonella-R-antigens in sera of patients suffering from salmonelloses (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schlecht, S; Böhlck, I; Kuhn, M

    1976-10-01

    The extent of hemagglutinating antibody titers against Salmonella R-lipopolysaccharides in 189 sera of 119 human beings suffering from various salmonelloses was estimated. When compared to serum specimens of 137 healthy persons a significant rise in the number of Ra- and Rb2-titer containing sera was observed. It was further found that titers directed against chemotypes Ra, Rb2 and Rc were significantly enhanced in height when compared to the control group. Sera of healthy persons and patients did not show significant differences in Rd1-, Rd2- and Re-titers, respecively. The results indicate that the innermost part of the LPS core in Salmonella S-forms is considerably less (or even none) immunogenic in respect to antibody formation. R-titers in sera from patients suffering from salmonelloses as well as from healthy persons were predominantly directed against Ra-, Rb2- or Rc-LPS structures; the Ra-titer being the most frequent one in both groups. More detailed analyses on sera from patients suffering from salmonelloses revealed a somewhat lower content of R-titers in the early stage of infection. Furthermore in typhoid fever changes in the height of Ra-titers paralled the usual course of O-titers and in gastroenteritic infections the course of illness, respectively. The immunogenicity of the LPS core, however, was less expressed than that of the O-polysaccharides as revealed from a comparison in extent and height of R- and O-titers. Frequently the salmonelloses sera showed titers against several R-antigens. In such cases Ra-titers mostly occurred either together with Rb2-titers alone or concomitantly with both Rb2- and Rc-titers. In absorption experiments it could be demonstrated that two types of antibodies had been formed, those directed against terminal sugar residues in R-lipopolysaccharides and others with specificties against internal partial structures of the core.

  1. Protease inhibition as new therapeutic strategy for GI diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vergnolle, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The GI tract is the most exposed organ to proteases, both in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. For digestive purposes, the lumen of the upper GI tract contains large amounts of pancreatic proteases, but studies have also demonstrated increased proteolytic activity into mucosal tissues (both in the upper and lower GI tract), associated with pathological conditions. This review aims at outlining the evidences for dysregulated proteolytic homeostasis in GI diseases and the pathogenic mechanisms of increased proteolytic activity. The therapeutic potential of protease inhibition in GI diseases is discussed, with a particular focus on IBDs, functional GI disorders and colorectal cancer. PMID:27196587

  2. In vitro digestion with proteases producing MHC class II ligands.

    PubMed

    Tohmé, Mira; Maschalidi, Sophia; Manoury, Bénédicte

    2013-01-01

    Proteases generate peptides that bind to MHC class II molecules to interact with a wide diversity of CD4(+) T cells. They are expressed in dedicated organelles: endosomes and lysosomes of professional antigen presenting cells (pAPCs) such as B cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells. The identification of endosomal proteases which produce antigenic peptides is important, for example, for better vaccination and to prevent autoimmune diseases. Here, we describe a panel of technics (in vitro digestion assays of protein with recombinant proteases or purified endosomes/lysosomes, T cell stimulation) to monitor the production of MHC class II ligands. PMID:23329510

  3. Future of autostereoscopic electronic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipton, Lenny

    1992-06-01

    Recently there has been significant activity in the attempt to develop autostereoscopic electronic displays. An interesting variation of the panoramagram, the moving slit technique, was described by Collender in the early seventies, and there have been various new types of volumetric display techniques, such as the Spacegraph acoustical mirror and the Texas Instruments laser scanned revolving surface. Lately liquid crystal technology has been employed by NTT and Dimension Technologies, offering the promise of a true three- dimensional display without the need for individual viewing devices. There are fundamental considerations with regard to presentation of visual information that provide constraints with regard to making such products competitive compared with current field-sequential electronic displays. These field-sequential displays have been successful in the marketplace and provide a standard against which the performance of new products must be measured. Products like CrystalEyesR allow any number of spectators to view the image, and have a high degree of compatibility with the present computer graphics and video infrastructures -- an important issue for manufacturers integrating such products into, for example, workstations, and for the user in terms of price and ease of use.

  4. Mask lithography for display manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, T.; Ekberg, P.

    2010-05-01

    The last ten years have seen flat displays conquer our briefcases, desktops, and living rooms. There has been an enormous development in production technology, not least in lithography and photomasks. Current masks for large displays are more than 2 m2 and make 4-6 1X prints on glass substrates that are 9 m2. One of the most challenging aspects of photomasks for displays is the so called mura, stripes or blemishes which cause visible defects in the finished display. For the future new and even tighter maskwriter specifications are driven by faster transistors and more complex pixel layouts made necessary by the market's wish for still better image quality, multi-touch panels, 3D TVs, and the next wave of e-book readers. Large OLED screens will pose new challenges. Many new types of displays will be lowcost and use simple lithography, but anything which can show video and high quality photographic images needs a transistor backplane and sophisticated masks for its production.

  5. Three-dimensional display technologies

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Jason

    2014-01-01

    The physical world around us is three-dimensional (3D), yet traditional display devices can show only two-dimensional (2D) flat images that lack depth (i.e., the third dimension) information. This fundamental restriction greatly limits our ability to perceive and to understand the complexity of real-world objects. Nearly 50% of the capability of the human brain is devoted to processing visual information [Human Anatomy & Physiology (Pearson, 2012)]. Flat images and 2D displays do not harness the brain’s power effectively. With rapid advances in the electronics, optics, laser, and photonics fields, true 3D display technologies are making their way into the marketplace. 3D movies, 3D TV, 3D mobile devices, and 3D games have increasingly demanded true 3D display with no eyeglasses (autostereoscopic). Therefore, it would be very beneficial to readers of this journal to have a systematic review of state-of-the-art 3D display technologies. PMID:25530827

  6. Phosphors for flat panel emissive displays

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.T.; Walko, R.J.; Phillips, M.L.F.

    1995-07-01

    An overview of emissive display technologies is presented. Display types briefly described include: cathode ray tubes (CRTs), field emission displays (FEDs), electroluminescent displays (ELDs), and plasma display panels (PDPs). The critical role of phosphors in further development of the latter three flat panel emissive display technologies is outlined. The need for stable, efficient red, green, and blue phosphors for RGB fall color displays is emphasized.

  7. 21 CFR 184.1027 - Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1027 Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product. (a) Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product is an enzyme preparation that includes carbohydrase and protease...

  8. Detection of Legume Protease Inhibitors by the Gel-X-ray Film Contact Print Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulimani, Veerappa H.; Sudheendra, Kulkarni; Giri, Ashok P.

    2002-01-01

    Redgram (Cajanus cajan L.) extracts have been analyzed for the protease inhibitors using a new, sensitive, simple, and rapid method for detection of electrophoretically separated protease inhibitors. The detection involves equilibrating the gel successively in the protease assay buffer and protease solution, rinsing the gel in assay buffer, and…

  9. Characterization of the protease activity of detergents: laboratory practicals for studying the protease profile and activity of various commercial detergents.

    PubMed

    Valls, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

    2011-07-01

    Detergent enzymes account for about 30% of the total worldwide production of enzymes and are one of the largest and most successful applications of modern industrial biotechnology. Proteases can improve the wash performance of household, industrial, and institutional laundry detergents used to remove protein-based stains such as blood, grass, body fluids, and food soils. This article describes two easy and cheap laboratory exercises to study the presence, profile, and basic enzymology of detergent proteases. These laboratory practicals are based on the determination of the detergent protease activity of various commercial detergents using the N-succinyl-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-prolyl-L-phenylalanine p-nitroanilide method and the bovine serum albumin degradation capacity. Students are also required to elucidate the enzymatic subtype of detergent proteases by studying the inhibitory potential of several types of protease inhibitors revealed by the same experimental methodology. Additionally, the results of the exercises can be used to provide additional insights on elementary enzymology by studying the influence of several important parameters on protease activity such as temperature (in this article) and the influence of pH and effects of surfactants and oxidizers (proposed). Students also develop laboratory skills, problem-solving capacities, and the ability to write a laboratory report. The exercises are mainly designed for an advanced undergraduate project in the biochemistry and biotechnology sciences. Globally, these laboratory practicals show students the biotechnological applications of proteases in the detergent industry and also reinforce important enzymology concepts.

  10. Putting it all together: improving display integration in ecological displays.

    PubMed

    Burns, C M

    2000-01-01

    Computer displays are being designed for increasingly larger industrial systems. As the application domain scales up, maintaining integration across different kinds of views becomes more challenging. This paper presents the results of a study of three different approaches to integration based on the spatial and temporal proximity of related information objects. The domain used for evaluation was a simulation of an industry-scale conventional power plant. All three displays were ecological displays developed using an abstraction hierarchy analysis. Views were integrated in a high-space/low-time, low-space/high-time, and high-space/high-time integration of means-end related objects. During a fault detection and diagnosis task, it was found that a low level of integration, high-space/ low-time, provided the fastest fault detection time. However, the most integrated condition, high-space/high-time, resulted in the fastest and most accurate fault diagnosis performance. Actual or potential applications of this research include computer displays for large-scale systems such as network management or process control, for which problem solving is critical and integration must be maintained. PMID:11022882

  11. IMDISP - INTERACTIVE IMAGE DISPLAY PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    The Interactive Image Display Program (IMDISP) is an interactive image display utility for the IBM Personal Computer (PC, XT and AT) and compatibles. Until recently, efforts to utilize small computer systems for display and analysis of scientific data have been hampered by the lack of sufficient data storage capacity to accomodate large image arrays. Most planetary images, for example, require nearly a megabyte of storage. The recent development of the "CDROM" (Compact Disk Read-Only Memory) storage technology makes possible the storage of up to 680 megabytes of data on a single 4.72-inch disk. IMDISP was developed for use with the CDROM storage system which is currently being evaluated by the Planetary Data System. The latest disks to be produced by the Planetary Data System are a set of three disks containing all of the images of Uranus acquired by the Voyager spacecraft. The images are in both compressed and uncompressed format. IMDISP can read the uncompressed images directly, but special software is provided to decompress the compressed images, which can not be processed directly. IMDISP can also display images stored on floppy or hard disks. A digital image is a picture converted to numerical form so that it can be stored and used in a computer. The image is divided into a matrix of small regions called picture elements, or pixels. The rows and columns of pixels are called "lines" and "samples", respectively. Each pixel has a numerical value, or DN (data number) value, quantifying the darkness or brightness of the image at that spot. In total, each pixel has an address (line number, sample number) and a DN value, which is all that the computer needs for processing. DISPLAY commands allow the IMDISP user to display all or part of an image at various positions on the display screen. The user may also zoom in and out from a point on the image defined by the cursor, and may pan around the image. To enable more or all of the original image to be displayed on the

  12. Multifunction display system, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design and construction of a multifunction display man/machine interface for use with a 4 pi IBM-360 System are described. The system is capable of displaying superimposed volatile alphanumeric and graphical data on a 512 x 512 element plasma panel, and holographically stored multicolor archival information. The volatile data may be entered from a keyboard or by means of an I/O interface to the 360 system. A 2-page memory local to the display is provided for storing the entered data. The archival data is stored as a phase hologram on a vinyl tape strip. This data is accessible by means of a rapid transport system which responds to inputs provided by the I/O channel on the keyboard. As many as 500 frames may be stored on a tape strip for access in under 6 seconds.

  13. A Clinical Information Display System

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Bruce J.; Lenhard, Raymond E.; Braine, Hayden; Kammer, Anne

    1977-01-01

    A clinical information display system has been implemented as part of a prototype Oncology Clinical Information System for the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center. The information system has been developed to support the management of patient therapy. Capabilities in the prototype include a patient data system, a patient abstract, a tumor registry, an appointment system, a census system, and a clinical information display system. This paper describes the clinical information display component of the prototype. It has the capability of supporting up to 10,000 patient records with online data entry and editing. At the present time, the system is being used only in the Oncology Center. There are plans, however, for trial use by other departments, and the system represents a tool with a potential for more general application.

  14. Engineering antibodies by yeast display.

    PubMed

    Boder, Eric T; Raeeszadeh-Sarmazdeh, Maryam; Price, J Vincent

    2012-10-15

    Since its first application to antibody engineering 15 years ago, yeast display technology has been developed into a highly potent tool for both affinity maturing lead molecules and isolating novel antibodies and antibody-like species. Robust approaches to the creation of diversity, construction of yeast libraries, and library screening or selection have been elaborated, improving the quality of engineered molecules and certainty of success in an antibody engineering campaign and positioning yeast display as one of the premier antibody engineering technologies currently in use. Here, we summarize the history of antibody engineering by yeast surface display, approaches used in its application, and a number of examples highlighting the utility of this method for antibody engineering.

  15. Developing tiled projection display systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hereld, M.; Judson, I. R.; Paris, J.; Stevens, R. L.

    2000-06-08

    Tiled displays are an emerging technology for constructing high-resolution semi-immersive visualization environments capable of presenting high-resolution images from scientific simulation [EVL, PowerWall]. In this way, they complement other technologies such as the CAVE [Cruz-Niera92] or ImmersaDesk, [Czernuszenko97], which by design give up pure resolution in favor of width of view and stereo. However, the largest impact may well be in using large-format tiled displays as one of possibly multiple displays in building ''information'' or ''active'' spaces that surround the user with diverse ways of interacting with data and multimedia information flows [IPSI, Childers00, Raskar98, ROME, Stanford, UNC]. These environments may prove to be the ultimate successor of the desktop metaphor for information technology work.

  16. Heat resistant proteases produced in milk by psychrotrophic bacteria of dairy origin.

    PubMed

    Adams, D M; Barach, J T; Speck, M L

    1975-06-01

    Production of heat resistant proteases by psychrotrophs growing in milk, resistance of such proteases to ultrahigh temperature treatments and action of these enzymes on milk were studied. All of the psychrotrophs obtained from raw milk produced proteases that survived 149 C for 10s. Seventy to ninety percent of the raw milk samples contained psychrotrophs capable of producing heat resistant proteases. The protease chosen as a model was resistant to heat treatments at 110 to 150 C, and the inactivation parameters suggested that thermal destruction of heat resistant proteases would damage the milk severely. The casein content and pH of normal milk were suitable for protease action, and the protease was quite active at normal and elevated room temperatures. The protease rapidly spoiled sterile milk with the development of bitter flavor, clearing, or coagulation; and the susceptibility of sterile milk to protease increased during storage of the milk.

  17. Drag and drop display & builder

    SciTech Connect

    Bolshakov, Timofei B.; Petrov, Andrey D.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    The Drag and Drop (DnD) Display & Builder is a component-oriented system that allows users to create visual representations of data received from data acquisition systems. It is an upgrade of a Synoptic Display mechanism used at Fermilab since 2002. Components can be graphically arranged and logically interconnected in the web-startable Project Builder. Projects can be either lightweight AJAX- and SVG-based web pages, or they can be started as Java applications. The new version was initiated as a response to discussions between the LHC Controls Group and Fermilab.

  18. Visual Attention to Radar Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moray, N.; Richards, M.; Brophy, C.

    1984-01-01

    A model is described which predicts the allocation of attention to the features of a radar display. It uses the growth of uncertainty and the probability of near collision to call the eye to a feature of the display. The main source of uncertainty is forgetting following a fixation, which is modelled as a two dimensional diffusion process. The model was used to predict information overload in intercept controllers, and preliminary validation obtained by recording eye movements of intercept controllers in simulated and live (practice) interception.

  19. Pyoverdine and Proteases Affect the Response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to Gallium in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Bonchi, Carlo; Frangipani, Emanuela; Imperi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Gallium is an iron mimetic which has recently been repurposed as an antibacterial agent due to its capability to disrupt bacterial iron metabolism. In this study, the antibacterial activity of gallium nitrate [Ga(NO3)3] was investigated in complement-free human serum (HS) on 55 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis patients. The susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to Ga(NO3)3 in HS was dependent on the bacterial ability to acquire iron from serum binding proteins (i.e., transferrin). The extent of serum protein degradation correlated well with P. aeruginosa growth in HS, while pyoverdine production did not. However, pyoverdine-deficient P. aeruginosa strains were unable to grow in HS and overcome iron restriction, albeit capable of releasing proteases. Predigestion of HS with proteinase K promoted the growth of all strains, irrespective of their ability to produce proteases and/or pyoverdine. The MICs of Ga(NO3)3 were higher in HS than in an iron-poor Casamino Acids medium, where proteolysis does not affect iron availability. Coherently, strains displaying high proteolytic activity were less susceptible to Ga(NO3)3 in HS. Our data support a model in which both pyoverdine and proteases affect the response of P. aeruginosa to Ga(NO3)3 in HS. The relatively high Ga(NO3)3 concentration required to inhibit the growth of highly proteolytic P. aeruginosa isolates in HS poses a limitation to the potential of Ga(NO3)3 in the treatment of P. aeruginosa bloodstream infections. PMID:26149986

  20. A Trichomonas vaginalis Rhomboid Protease and Its Substrate Modulate Parasite Attachment and Cytolysis of Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Riestra, Angelica M; Gandhi, Shiv; Sweredoski, Michael J; Moradian, Annie; Hess, Sonja; Urban, Sinisa; Johnson, Patricia J

    2015-12-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is an extracellular eukaryotic parasite that causes the most common, non-viral sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Although disease burden is high, molecular mechanisms underlying T. vaginalis pathogenesis are poorly understood. Here, we identify a family of putative T. vaginalis rhomboid proteases and demonstrate catalytic activity for two, TvROM1 and TvROM3, using a heterologous cell cleavage assay. The two T. vaginalis intramembrane serine proteases display different subcellular localization and substrate specificities. TvROM1 is a cell surface membrane protein and cleaves atypical model rhomboid protease substrates, whereas TvROM3 appears to localize to the Golgi apparatus and recognizes a typical model substrate. To identify TvROM substrates, we interrogated the T. vaginalis surface proteome using both quantitative proteomic and bioinformatic approaches. Of the nine candidates identified, TVAG_166850 and TVAG_280090 were shown to be cleaved by TvROM1. Comparison of amino acid residues surrounding the predicted cleavage sites of TvROM1 substrates revealed a preference for small amino acids in the predicted transmembrane domain. Over-expression of TvROM1 increased attachment to and cytolysis of host ectocervical cells. Similarly, mutations that block the cleavage of a TvROM1 substrate lead to its accumulation on the cell surface and increased parasite adherence to host cells. Together, these data indicate a role for TvROM1 and its substrate(s) in modulating attachment to and lysis of host cells, which are key processes in T. vaginalis pathogenesis.

  1. Pyoverdine and proteases affect the response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to gallium in human serum.

    PubMed

    Bonchi, Carlo; Frangipani, Emanuela; Imperi, Francesco; Visca, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Gallium is an iron mimetic which has recently been repurposed as an antibacterial agent due to its capability to disrupt bacterial iron metabolism. In this study, the antibacterial activity of gallium nitrate [Ga(NO3)3] was investigated in complement-free human serum (HS) on 55 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis patients. The susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to Ga(NO3)3 in HS was dependent on the bacterial ability to acquire iron from serum binding proteins (i.e., transferrin). The extent of serum protein degradation correlated well with P. aeruginosa growth in HS, while pyoverdine production did not. However, pyoverdine-deficient P. aeruginosa strains were unable to grow in HS and overcome iron restriction, albeit capable of releasing proteases. Predigestion of HS with proteinase K promoted the growth of all strains, irrespective of their ability to produce proteases and/or pyoverdine. The MICs of Ga(NO3)3 were higher in HS than in an iron-poor Casamino Acids medium, where proteolysis does not affect iron availability. Coherently, strains displaying high proteolytic activity were less susceptible to Ga(NO3)3 in HS. Our data support a model in which both pyoverdine and proteases affect the response of P. aeruginosa to Ga(NO3)3 in HS. The relatively high Ga(NO3)3 concentration required to inhibit the growth of highly proteolytic P. aeruginosa isolates in HS poses a limitation to the potential of Ga(NO3)3 in the treatment of P. aeruginosa bloodstream infections.

  2. Pyoverdine and proteases affect the response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to gallium in human serum.

    PubMed

    Bonchi, Carlo; Frangipani, Emanuela; Imperi, Francesco; Visca, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Gallium is an iron mimetic which has recently been repurposed as an antibacterial agent due to its capability to disrupt bacterial iron metabolism. In this study, the antibacterial activity of gallium nitrate [Ga(NO3)3] was investigated in complement-free human serum (HS) on 55 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis patients. The susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to Ga(NO3)3 in HS was dependent on the bacterial ability to acquire iron from serum binding proteins (i.e., transferrin). The extent of serum protein degradation correlated well with P. aeruginosa growth in HS, while pyoverdine production did not. However, pyoverdine-deficient P. aeruginosa strains were unable to grow in HS and overcome iron restriction, albeit capable of releasing proteases. Predigestion of HS with proteinase K promoted the growth of all strains, irrespective of their ability to produce proteases and/or pyoverdine. The MICs of Ga(NO3)3 were higher in HS than in an iron-poor Casamino Acids medium, where proteolysis does not affect iron availability. Coherently, strains displaying high proteolytic activity were less susceptible to Ga(NO3)3 in HS. Our data support a model in which both pyoverdine and proteases affect the response of P. aeruginosa to Ga(NO3)3 in HS. The relatively high Ga(NO3)3 concentration required to inhibit the growth of highly proteolytic P. aeruginosa isolates in HS poses a limitation to the potential of Ga(NO3)3 in the treatment of P. aeruginosa bloodstream infections. PMID:26149986

  3. REASSESSING THE ROLE OF THE SECRETED PROTEASE CPAF IN CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS INFECTION THROUGH GENETIC APPROACHES

    PubMed Central

    Snavely, Emily A.; Kokes, Marcela; Dunn, Joe D.; Saka, Hector A.; Nguyen, Bidong D.; Bastidas, Robert J.; McCafferty, Dewey G.; Valdivia, Raphael H.

    2014-01-01

    The secreted Chlamydia protease CPAF cleaves a defined set of mammalian and Chlamydia proteins in vitro. As a result, this protease has been proposed to modulate a range of bacterial and host cellular functions. However, it has recently come into question the extent to which many of its identified substrates constitute bona fide targets of proteolysis in infected host cell rather than artifacts of post lysis degradation. Here we clarify the role played by CPAF in cellular models of infection by analyzing Chlamydia trachomatis mutants deficient for CPAF activity. Using reverse genetic approaches, we identified two C. trachomatis strains possessing nonsense, loss-of-function mutations in cpa (CT858), and a third strain containing a mutation in Type II secretion (T2S) machinery that inhibited CPAF activity by blocking zymogen secretion and subsequent proteolytic maturation into the active hydrolase. HeLa cells infected with T2S− or CPAF− C. trachomatis mutants lacked detectable in vitro CPAF proteolytic activity, and were not defective for cellular traits that have been previously attributed to CPAF activity, including resistance to staurosporine-induced apoptosis, Golgi fragmentation, altered NFκB-dependent gene expression, and resistance to reinfection. However, CPAF-deficient mutants did display impaired generation of infectious elementary bodies (EBs), indicating an important role for this protease in the full replicative potential of C. trachomatis. In addition, we provide compelling evidence in live cells that CPAF-mediated protein processing of at least two host protein targets, vimentin filaments and the nuclear envelope protein Lamin-associated protein 1 (LAP1), occurs rapidly after the loss of the inclusion membrane integrity, but before loss of plasma membrane permeability and cell lysis. CPAF-dependent processing of host proteins correlates with a loss of inclusion membrane integrity, and so we propose that CPAF plays a role late in infection

  4. Characterisation of a secretory serine protease inhibitor (SjB6) from Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Proteins belonging to the serine protease inhibitor (serpin) superfamily play essential physiological roles in many organisms. In pathogens, serpins are thought to have evolved specifically to limit host immune responses by interfering with the host immune-stimulatory signals. Serpins are less well characterised in parasitic helminths, although some are thought to be involved in mechanisms associated with host immune modulation. In this study, we cloned and partially characterised a secretory serpin from Schistosoma japonicum termed SjB6, these findings provide the basis for possible functional roles. Methods SjB6 gene was identified through database mining of our previously published microarray data, cloned and detailed sequence and structural analysis and comparative modelling carried out using various bioinformatics and proteomics tools. Gene transcriptional profiling was determined by real-time PCR and the expression of native protein determined by immunoblotting. An immunological profile of the recombinant protein produced in insect cells was determined by ELISA. Results SjB6 contains an open reading frame of 1160 base pairs that encodes a protein of 387 amino acid residues. Detailed sequence analysis, comparative modelling and structural-based alignment revealed that SjB6 contains the essential structural motifs and consensus secondary structures typical of inhibitory serpins. The presence of an N-terminal signal sequence indicated that SjB6 is a secretory protein. Real-time data indicated that SjB6 is expressed exclusively in the intra-mammalian stage of the parasite life cycle with its highest expression levels in the egg stage (p < 0.0001). The native protein is approximately 60 kDa in size and recombinant SjB6 (rSjB6) was recognised strongly by sera from rats experimentally infected with S. japonicum. Conclusions The significantly high expression of SjB6 in schistosome eggs, when compared to other life cycle stages, suggests a possible

  5. Expression and secretion of heterologous proteases by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed Central

    Billman-Jacobe, H; Wang, L; Kortt, A; Stewart, D; Radford, A

    1995-01-01

    Genes encoding the basic protease of Dichelobacter nodosus (bprV) and the subtilisin of Bacillus subtilis (aprE) were cloned and expressed in Corynebacterium glutamicum. In each case, enzymatically active protein was detected in the supernatants of liquid cultures. While the secretion of subtilisin was directed by its own signal peptide, the natural signal peptide of the bprV basic protease did not facilitate secretion. A hybrid aprE-bprV gene in which the promoter and signal peptide coding sequences of subtilisin replaced those of bprV could be expressed, and basic protease was secreted by C. glutamicum. Expression of these proteases in C. glutamicum provides an opportunity to compare protein secretion from this gram-positive host with that from other gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. PMID:7747974

  6. Improving Viral Protease Inhibitors to Counter Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Kurt Yilmaz, Nese; Swanstrom, Ronald; Schiffer, Celia A

    2016-07-01

    Drug resistance is a major problem in health care, undermining therapy outcomes and necessitating novel approaches to drug design. Extensive studies on resistance to viral protease inhibitors, particularly those of HIV-1 and hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease, revealed a plethora of information on the structural and molecular mechanisms underlying resistance. These insights led to several strategies to improve viral protease inhibitors to counter resistance, such as exploiting the essential biological function and leveraging evolutionary constraints. Incorporation of these strategies into structure-based drug design can minimize vulnerability to resistance, not only for viral proteases but for other quickly evolving drug targets as well, toward designing inhibitors one step ahead of evolution to counter resistance with more intelligent and rational design. PMID:27090931

  7. Toxoplasma gondii aspartic protease 1 is not essential in tachyzoites.

    PubMed

    Polonais, Valerie; Shea, Michael; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2011-08-01

    Aspartic proteases are important virulence factors for pathogens and are recognized as attractive drug targets. Seven aspartic proteases (ASPs) have been identified in Toxoplasma gondii genome. Bioinformatics and phylogenetic analyses regroup them into five monophyletic groups. Among them, TgASP1, a coccidian specific aspartic protease related to the food vacuole plasmepsins, is associated with the secretory pathway in non-dividing cells and relocalizes in close proximity to the nascent inner membrane complex (IMC) of daughter cells during replication. Despite a potential role for TgASP1 in IMC formation, the generation of a conventional knockout of the TgASP1 gene revealed that this protease is not required for T. gondii tachyzoite survival or for proper IMC biogenesis.

  8. Display standards for commercial flight decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberth, Larry S.; Penn, Cecil W.

    1994-06-01

    SAE display standards are used as guidelines for certifying commercial airborne electronic displays. The SAE document generation structure and approval process is described. The SAE committees that generate display standards are described. Three SAE documents covering flat panel displays (AS-8034, ARP-4256, and ARP-4260) are discussed with their current status. Head-Up Display documents are also in work.

  9. Characterization of the immunoglobulin A protease of Ureaplasma urealyticum.

    PubMed Central

    Spooner, R K; Russell, W C; Thirkell, D

    1992-01-01

    Ureaplasma urealyticum strains of all serotypes express a specific human immunoglobulin A1 protease that cleaves immunoglobulin A1 to produce intact Fab and Fc fragments. The use of a variety of inhibitors suggests that the enzyme is a serine protease. N-terminal sequencing of the Fc digestion product showed that the enzyme cleaves between the proline and threonine residues 235 and 236 in the hinge region of the heavy chain of immunoglobulin A1. Images PMID:1587621

  10. Proteomic Substrate Identification for Membrane Proteases in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Stephan A.; Scilabra, Simone D.; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell communication in the brain is controlled by multiple mechanisms, including proteolysis. Membrane-bound proteases generate signaling molecules from membrane-bound precursor proteins and control the length and function of cell surface membrane proteins. These proteases belong to different families, including members of the “a disintegrin and metalloprotease” (ADAM), the beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzymes (BACE), membrane-type matrix metalloproteases (MT-MMP) and rhomboids. Some of these proteases, in particular ADAM10 and BACE1 have been shown to be essential not only for the correct development of the mammalian brain, but also for myelination and maintaining neuronal connections in the adult nervous system. Additionally, these proteases are considered as drug targets for brain diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), schizophrenia and cancer. Despite their biomedical relevance, the molecular functions of these proteases in the brain have not been explored in much detail, as little was known about their substrates. This has changed with the recent development of novel proteomic methods which allow to identify substrates of membrane-bound proteases from cultured cells, primary neurons and other primary brain cells and even in vivo from minute amounts of mouse cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This review summarizes the recent advances and highlights the strengths of the individual proteomic methods. Finally, using the example of the Alzheimer-related proteases BACE1, ADAM10 and γ-secretase, as well as ADAM17 and signal peptide peptidase like 3 (SPPL3), we illustrate how substrate identification with novel methods is instrumental in elucidating broad physiological functions of these proteases in the brain and other organs. PMID:27790089

  11. Amplified detection of protease activity using porous silicon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orosco, Manuel

    This dissertation will focus on harnessing the optical properties of porous silicon to sense protease activity. Electrochemical etching of polished silicon wafers produces porous silicon with unique optical properties such as Fabry-Perot fringes or a dielectric mirror reflecting specific wavelengths. Porous silicon optical transducers are coupled to a biochemical reaction (protease activity) and optically measured in a label-free manner. The first chapter is an introductory chapter discussing the current methods of detecting protease activity. Also discussed is the use of porous silicon for label-free sensing. The second chapter discusses the use of thin protein layers that are spin coated on the surface of a porous silicon film and excluded from the porous matrix based on size. When active proteases are introduced to the protein layer, small peptide fragments are generated, causing a change in refractive index from low to high. This can be used as a tool to monitor protease activity and amplify the signal to the naked eye. To extend on the second chapter, a double layered porous silicon film with the first layer have large pores and the second layer etched below having small pores was used for sensing protease activity. Proteases are adsorbed into the first layer and introduction of whole protein substrate produces small peptide fragments that can enter the second layer (changing the effective optical thickness). The fourth chapter describes a method of using luminescent transducers coupled to protein films. An "on-off" sensor using protein coated luminescent porous silicon was used to detect a decrease in the intensity of luminescence due to degradation of the protein film. An "off-on" sensor involved a fluorescent dye housed in the porous film and capped with a protein coating. The release of the dye is caused by the action of a protease causing an increase in fluorescent intensity from the dye.

  12. Photodeposition Recording And Display Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peled, A.

    1985-02-01

    The Photodeposition Effect (PDE) of Selenium hydrosols was investigated for transient photoactivation properties. It was found that the Volume Photoprecipitation (VP) has a faster response time as compared to Surface Photodeposition (SP). SP can be used for permanent recording of plane images. The faster VP process may be used in large volume display applications in near real time.

  13. Photodeposition Recording And Display Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peled, A.

    1985-08-01

    The photodeposition effect of selenium hydrosols was investigated for transient photoactivation properties. It was found that volume photoprecipitation (VP) has a faster response time compared to surface photodeposition (SP). SP can be used for permanent recording of plane images. The faster VP process may be used in large volume display applications in near real time.

  14. Interference Phenomenon with Mobile Displays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trantham, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    A simple experiment is presented in which the spacing and geometric pattern of pixels in mobile displays is measured. The technique is based on optical constructive interference. While the experiment is another opportunity to demonstrate wave interference from a grating-like structure, this can also be used to demonstrate concepts of solid state…

  15. Graphics Display of Foreign Scripts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abercrombie, John R.

    1987-01-01

    Describes Graphics Project for Foreign Language Learning at the University of Pennsylvania, which has developed ways of displaying foreign scripts on microcomputers. Character design on computer screens is explained; software for graphics, printing, and language instruction is discussed; and a text editor is described that corrects optically…

  16. Video Display Terminals: Radiation Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, William E.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses information gathered in past few years related to health effects of video display terminals (VDTs) with particular emphasis given to issues raised by VDT users. Topics covered include radiation emissions, health concerns, radiation surveys, occupational radiation exposure standards, and long-term risks. (17 references) (EJS)

  17. Real Time Sonic Boom Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haering, Ed

    2014-01-01

    This presentation will provide general information about sonic boom mitigation technology to the public in order to supply information to potential partners and licensees. The technology is a combination of flight data, atmospheric data and terrain information implemented into a control room real time display for flight planning. This research is currently being performed and as such, any results and conclusions are ongoing.

  18. Synthetic vision display evaluation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regal, David M.; Whittington, David H.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this research was to help us understand the display requirements for a synthetic vision system for the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Four experiments were conducted to examine the effects of different levels of perceptual cue complexity in displays used by pilots in a flare and landing task. Increased levels of texture mapping of terrain and runway produced mixed results, including harder but shorter landings and a lower flare initiation altitude. Under higher workload conditions, increased texture resulted in an improvement in performance. An increase in familiar size cues did not result in improved performance. Only a small difference was found between displays using two patterns of high resolution texture mapping. The effects of increased perceptual cue complexity on performance was not as strong as would be predicted from the pilot's subjective reports or from related literature. A description of the role of a synthetic vision system in the High Speed Civil Transport is provide along with a literature review covering applied research related to perceptual cue usage in aircraft displays.

  19. Animated Displays IV: Linear Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chagnon, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Describes several demonstrations that can be easily reproduced to help students understand optical polarization. Displays and supplement text include polarization by reflection; polarization by scattering; liquid crystals; optical activity; calcite; birefringent plastics; retardation plates; photoelasticity; and the "Optical Barber Pole." Contains…

  20. Vibratory tactile display for textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikei, Yasushi; Ikeno, Akihisa; Fukuda, Shuichi

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a tactile display that produces vibratory stimulus to a fingertip in contact with a vibrating tactor matrix. The display depicts tactile surface textures while the user is exploring a virtual object surface. A piezoelectric actuator drives the individual tactor in accordance with both the finger movement and the surface texture being traced. Spatiotemporal display control schemes were examined for presenting the fundamental surface texture elements. The temporal duration of vibratory stimulus was experimentally optimized to simulate the adaptation process of cutaneous sensation. The selected duration time for presenting a single line edge agreed with the time threshold of tactile sensation. Then spatial stimulus disposition schemes were discussed for representation of other edge shapes. As an alternative means not relying on amplitude control, a method of augmented duration at the edge was investigated. Spatial resolution of the display was measured for the lines presented both in perpendicular and parallel to a finger axis. Discrimination of texture density was also measured on random dot textures.