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Sample records for sera proteases display

  1. The Plasmodium serine-type SERA proteases display distinct expression patterns and non-essential in vivo roles during life cycle progression of the malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Putrianti, Elyzana D; Schmidt-Christensen, Anja; Arnold, Iris; Heussler, Volker T; Matuschewski, Kai; Silvie, Olivier

    2010-06-01

    Parasite proteases play key roles in several fundamental steps of the Plasmodium life cycle, including haemoglobin degradation, host cell invasion and parasite egress. Plasmodium exit from infected host cells appears to be mediated by a class of papain-like cysteine proteases called 'serine repeat antigens' (SERAs). A SERA subfamily, represented by Plasmodium falciparum SERA5, contains an atypical active site serine residue instead of a catalytic cysteine. Members of this SERAser subfamily are abundantly expressed in asexual blood stages, rendering them attractive drug and vaccine targets. In this study, we show by antibody localization and in vivo fluorescent tagging with the red fluorescent protein mCherry that the two P. berghei serine-type family members, PbSERA1 and PbSERA2, display differential expression towards the final stages of merozoite formation. Via targeted gene replacement, we generated single and double gene knockouts of the P. berghei SERAser genes. These loss-of-function lines progressed normally through the parasite life cycle, suggesting a specialized, non-vital role for serine-type SERAs in vivo. Parasites lacking PbSERAser showed increased expression of the cysteine-type PbSERA3. Compensatory mechanisms between distinct SERA subfamilies may thus explain the absence of phenotypical defect in SERAser disruptants, and challenge the suitability to develop potent antimalarial drugs based on specific inhibitors of Plasmodium serine-type SERAs.

  2. Enzymic, phylogenetic, and structural characterization of the unusual papain-like protease domain of Plasmodium falciparum SERA5.

    PubMed

    Hodder, Anthony N; Drew, Damien R; Epa, V Chandana; Delorenzi, Mauro; Bourgon, Richard; Miller, Susanne K; Moritz, Robert L; Frecklington, David F; Simpson, Richard J; Speed, Terence P; Pike, Robert N; Crabb, Brendan S

    2003-11-28

    Serine repeat antigen 5 (SERA5) is an abundant antigen of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and is the most strongly expressed member of the nine-gene SERA family. It appears to be essential for the maintenance of the erythrocytic cycle, unlike a number of other members of this family, and has been implicated in parasite egress and/or erythrocyte invasion. All SERA proteins possess a central domain that has homology to papain except in the case of SERA5 (and some other SERAs), where the active site cysteine has been replaced with a serine. To investigate if this domain retains catalytic activity, we expressed, purified, and refolded a recombinant form of the SERA5 enzyme domain. This protein possessed chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity as it processed substrates downstream of aromatic residues, and its activity was reversed by the serine protease inhibitor 3,4-diisocoumarin. Although all Plasmodium SERA enzyme domain sequences share considerable homology, phylogenetic studies revealed two distinct clusters across the genus, separated according to whether they possess an active site serine or cysteine. All Plasmodia appear to have at least one member of each group. Consistent with separate biological roles for members of these two clusters, molecular modeling studies revealed that SERA5 and SERA6 enzyme domains have dramatically different surface properties, although both have a characteristic papain-like fold, catalytic cleft, and an appropriately positioned catalytic triad. This study provides impetus for the examination of SERA5 as a target for antimalarial drug design.

  3. Structural Insights into the Protease-like Antigen Plasmodium falciparum SERA5 and Its Noncanonical Active-Site Serine

    SciTech Connect

    Hodder, Anthony N.; Malby, Robyn L.; Clarke, Oliver B.; Fairlie, W. Douglas; Colman, Peter M.; Crabb, Brendan S.; Smith, Brian J.

    2009-08-28

    The sera genes of the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium encode a family of unique proteins that are maximally expressed at the time of egress of parasites from infected red blood cells. These multi-domain proteins are unique, containing a central papain-like cysteine-protease fragment enclosed between the disulfide-linked N- and C-terminal domains. However, the central fragment of several members of this family, including serine repeat antigen 5 (SERA5), contains a serine (S596) in place of the active-site cysteine. Here we report the crystal structure of the central protease-like domain of Plasmodium falciparum SERA5, revealing a number of anomalies in addition to the putative nucleophilic serine: (1) the structure of the putative active site is not conducive to binding substrate in the canonical cysteine-protease manner; (2) the side chain of D594 restricts access of substrate to the putative active site; and (3) the S{sub 2} specificity pocket is occupied by the side chain of Y735, reducing this site to a small depression on the protein surface. Attempts to determine the structure in complex with known inhibitors were not successful. Thus, despite having revealed its structure, the function of the catalytic domain of SERA5 remains an enigma.

  4. High-throughput screening of improved protease inhibitors using a yeast cell surface display system and a yeast cell chip.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Wataru; Yoshino, Yuichi; Morisaka, Hironobu; Tsunetomo, Keiji; Koyo, Hirotaka; Kamiya, Shinji; Kawata, Noriyuki; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Protease-targeted inhibitors have been promising pharmaceuticals. Here, we combined a yeast cell surface display system with a yeast cell chip for the high-throughput screening of protease inhibitors, and succeeded in improving the activity of a protease inhibitor.

  5. Development of a glutathione production process from proteinaceous biomass resources using protease-displaying Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Kim, Songhee; Yoshida, Hideyo; Kiriyama, Kentaro; Kondo, Takashi; Okai, Naoko; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2012-02-01

    Glutathione is a valuable tri-peptide that is widely used in the pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic industries. Glutathione is produced industrially by fermentation using Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and supplementation of fermentation with several amino acids can increase intracellular GSH content. More recently, however, focus has been given to protein as a resource for biofuel and fine chemical production. We demonstrate that expression of a protease on the cell surface of S. cerevisiae enables the direct use of keratin and soy protein as a source of amino acids and that these substrates enhanced intracellular GSH content. Furthermore, fermentation using soy protein also enhanced cell concentration. GSH fermentation from keratin and to a greater extent from soy protein using protease-displaying yeast yielded greater GSH productivity compared to GSH fermentation with amino acid supplementation. This protease-displaying yeast is potentially applicable to a variety of processes for the bio-production of value-added chemicals from proteinaceous biomass resources.

  6. A putative serine protease, SpSsp1, from Saprolegnia parasitica is recognised by sera of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    PubMed Central

    Minor, Kirsty L.; Anderson, Victoria L.; Davis, Katie S.; Van Den Berg, Albert H.; Christie, James S.; Löbach, Lars; Faruk, Ali Reza; Wawra, Stephan; Secombes, Chris J.; Van West, Pieter

    2014-01-01

    Saprolegniosis, the disease caused by Saprolegnia sp., results in considerable economic losses in aquaculture. Current control methods are inadequate, as they are either largely ineffective or present environmental and fish health concerns. Vaccination of fish presents an attractive alternative to these control methods. Therefore we set out to identify suitable antigens that could help generate a fish vaccine against Saprolegnia parasitica. Unexpectedly, antibodies against S. parasitica were found in serum from healthy rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. The antibodies detected a single band in secreted proteins that were run on a one-dimensional SDS-polyacrylamide gel, which corresponded to two protein spots on a two-dimensional gel. The proteins were analysed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Mascot and bioinformatic analysis resulted in the identification of a single secreted protein, SpSsp1, of 481 amino acid residues, containing a subtilisin domain. Expression analysis demonstrated that SpSsp1 is highly expressed in all tested mycelial stages of S. parasitica. Investigation of other non-infected trout from several fish farms in the United Kingdom showed similar activity in their sera towards SpSsp1. Several fish that had no visible saprolegniosis showed an antibody response towards SpSsp1 suggesting that SpSsp1 might be a useful candidate for future vaccination trial experiments. PMID:25088077

  7. A putative serine protease, SpSsp1, from Saprolegnia parasitica is recognised by sera of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Minor, Kirsty L; Anderson, Victoria L; Davis, Katie S; Van Den Berg, Albert H; Christie, James S; Löbach, Lars; Faruk, Ali Reza; Wawra, Stephan; Secombes, Chris J; Van West, Pieter

    2014-07-01

    Saprolegniosis, the disease caused by Saprolegnia sp., results in considerable economic losses in aquaculture. Current control methods are inadequate, as they are either largely ineffective or present environmental and fish health concerns. Vaccination of fish presents an attractive alternative to these control methods. Therefore we set out to identify suitable antigens that could help generate a fish vaccine against Saprolegnia parasitica. Unexpectedly, antibodies against S. parasitica were found in serum from healthy rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. The antibodies detected a single band in secreted proteins that were run on a one-dimensional SDS-polyacrylamide gel, which corresponded to two protein spots on a two-dimensional gel. The proteins were analysed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Mascot and bioinformatic analysis resulted in the identification of a single secreted protein, SpSsp1, of 481 amino acid residues, containing a subtilisin domain. Expression analysis demonstrated that SpSsp1 is highly expressed in all tested mycelial stages of S. parasitica. Investigation of other non-infected trout from several fish farms in the United Kingdom showed similar activity in their sera towards SpSsp1. Several fish that had no visible saprolegniosis showed an antibody response towards SpSsp1 suggesting that SpSsp1 might be a useful candidate for future vaccination trial experiments.

  8. Proteases.

    PubMed

    Barrett, A J

    2001-05-01

    The processes of growth and remodeling of cells and tissues in multicellular organisms require the breakdown of old protein molecules, in concert with the synthesis of new ones. For example, many newly-synthesized molecules require proteolytic processing to convert them to biologically active forms. Proteolysis can terminate the activity of a protein--e.g., capsases mediate apoptosis, which is a vital step in the life cycle of the cell. Proteolysis contributes to defense systems too, as the recognition of peptide fragments of foreign proteins triggers the immune response. Proteases are the class of enzymes involved in these important reactions. This unit discusses the general categories of proteases, and sets the stage for addition of overview units on cysteine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases, as well as protocol units featuring techniques for analyzing mammalian and yeast proteasomes and protease inhibitors, among other topics.

  9. Peptide mimics selected from immune sera using phage display technology can replace native antigens in the diagnosis of Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Casey, J L; Coley, A M; Parisi, K; Foley, M

    2009-02-01

    There is an expanding area of small molecule discovery, especially in the area of peptide mimetics. Peptide sequences can be used to substitute for the entire native antigen for use in diagnostic assays. Our approach is to select peptides that mimic epitopes of the natural immune response to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) that may be recognised by antibodies typically produced after infection with EBV. We screened a random peptide library on sera from rabbits immunised with a crude preparation of EBV and serum antibodies from a patient with a high titer of EBV antibodies. We selected four peptides (Eb1-4) with the highest relative binding affinity with immune rabbit sera and a single peptide with high affinity to human serum antibodies. The peptides were coupled to the carrier molecule BSA and the recognition of the peptides by IgM antibodies in clinical samples after infection with EBV was measured. The sensitivities were Eb1 94%, Eb2, 3, 4 88%, H1 81% and all had 100% specificity. This study illustrates that the phage display approach to select epitope mimics can be applied to polyclonal antibodies and peptides that represent several diagnostically important epitopes can be selected simultaneously. This panel of EBV peptides representing a wide coverage of immunodominant epitopes could replace crude antigen preparations currently used for capture in commercial diagnostic tests for EBV.

  10. Peptide mimics selected from immune sera using phage display technology can replace native antigens in the diagnosis of Epstein–Barr virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Casey, J.L.; Coley, A.M.; Parisi, K.; Foley, M.

    2009-01-01

    There is an expanding area of small molecule discovery, especially in the area of peptide mimetics. Peptide sequences can be used to substitute for the entire native antigen for use in diagnostic assays. Our approach is to select peptides that mimic epitopes of the natural immune response to Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) that may be recognised by antibodies typically produced after infection with EBV. We screened a random peptide library on sera from rabbits immunised with a crude preparation of EBV and serum antibodies from a patient with a high titer of EBV antibodies. We selected four peptides (Eb1–4) with the highest relative binding affinity with immune rabbit sera and a single peptide with high affinity to human serum antibodies. The peptides were coupled to the carrier molecule BSA and the recognition of the peptides by IgM antibodies in clinical samples after infection with EBV was measured. The sensitivities were Eb1 94%, Eb2, 3, 4 88%, H1 81% and all had 100% specificity. This study illustrates that the phage display approach to select epitope mimics can be applied to polyclonal antibodies and peptides that represent several diagnostically important epitopes can be selected simultaneously. This panel of EBV peptides representing a wide coverage of immunodominant epitopes could replace crude antigen preparations currently used for capture in commercial diagnostic tests for EBV. PMID:19073711

  11. Peptide sequences identified by phage display are immunodominant functional motifs of Pet and Pic serine proteases secreted by Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri.

    PubMed

    Ulises, Hernández-Chiñas; Tatiana, Gazarian; Karlen, Gazarian; Guillermo, Mendoza-Hernández; Juan, Xicohtencatl-Cortes; Carlos, Eslava

    2009-12-01

    Plasmid-encoded toxin (Pet) and protein involved in colonization (Pic), are serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) secreted by enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), which display the GDSGSG sequence or the serine motif. Our research was directed to localize functional sites in both proteins using the phage display method. From a 12mer linear and a 7mer cysteine-constrained (C7C) libraries displayed on the M13 phage pIII protein we selected different mimotopes using IgG purified from sera of children naturally infected with EAEC producing Pet and Pic proteins, and anti-Pet and anti-Pic IgG purified from rabbits immunized with each one of these proteins. Children IgG selected a homologous group of sequences forming the consensus sequence, motif, PQPxK, and the motifs PGxI/LN and CxPDDSSxC were selected by the rabbit anti-Pet and anti-Pic IgGs, respectively. Analysis of the amino terminal region of a panel of SPATEs showed the presence in all of them of sequences matching the PGxI/LN or CxPDDSSxC motifs, and in a three-dimensional model (Modeller 9v2) designed for Pet, both these motifs were found in the globular portion of the protein, close to the protease active site GDSGSG. Antibodies induced in mice by mimotopes carrying the three aforementioned motifs were reactive with Pet, Pic, and with synthetic peptides carrying the immunogenic mimotope sequences TYPGYINHSKA and LLPQPPKLLLP, thus confirming that the peptide moiety of the selected phages induced the antibodies specific for the toxins. The antibodies induced in mice to the PGxI/LN and CxPDDSSxC mimotopes inhibited fodrin proteolysis and macrophage chemotaxis biological activities of Pet. Our results showed that we were able to generate, by a phage display procedure, mimotopes with sequence motifs PGxI/LN and CxPDDSSxC, and to identify them as functional motifs of the Pet, Pic and other SPATEs involved in their biological activities.

  12. Protease substrate profiling using bacterial display of self-blocking affinity proteins and flow-cytometric sorting.

    PubMed

    Sandersjöö, Lisa; Jonsson, Andreas; Löfblom, John

    2017-01-01

    Proteases are involved in fundamental biological processes and are important tools in both biotechnological and biomedical research. An important property of proteases is to discriminate among potential substrates. Here, a new method for substrate profiling of proteases is presented. The substrates are displayed between two anti-idiotypic affinity domains on the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus carnosus. The first domain functions as a reporter tag and has affinity for a labeled reporter protein, whereas the second domain blocks the reporter tag from interacting with the reporter protein. Site-specific proteolysis of the substrate results in release of the blocking domain, enabling the reporter tag to bind the labeled reporter protein. Proteolysis is therefore reflected in reporter binding, which is quantified by flow cytometry. First, the method with tobacco etch virus protease (TEVp) is evaluated and then the substrate preference of matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1) is determined using two libraries of around three million substrates each. Identified substrate peptides contained the previously reported motif (PXXXHy ) and on-cell determination of apparent kcat /KM revealed that the enriched substrate peptides are hydrolyzed six to eight-fold more efficiently than a previously reported substrate peptide. The method thus works as intended and the authors believe it has potential as an efficient tool for substrate profiling.

  13. Highly Constrained Bicyclic Scaffolds for the Discovery of Protease-Stable Peptides via mRNA Display.

    PubMed

    Hacker, David E; Hoinka, Jan; Iqbal, Emil S; Przytycka, Teresa M; Hartman, Matthew C T

    2017-03-17

    Highly constrained peptides such as the knotted peptide natural products are promising medicinal agents because of their impressive biostability and potent activity. Yet, libraries of highly constrained peptides are challenging to prepare. Here, we present a method which utilizes two robust, orthogonal chemical steps to create highly constrained bicyclic peptide libraries. This technology was optimized to be compatible with in vitro selections by mRNA display. We performed side-by-side monocyclic and bicyclic selections against a model protein (streptavidin). Both selections resulted in peptides with mid-nanomolar affinity, and the bicyclic selection yielded a peptide with remarkable protease resistance.

  14. The Lon protease from the haloalkaliphilic archaeon Natrialba magadii is transcriptionally linked to a cluster of putative membrane proteases and displays DNA-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Sastre, Diego E; Paggi, Roberto A; De Castro, Rosana E

    2011-05-20

    The ATP-dependent Lon protease is universally distributed in bacteria, eukaryotic organelles and archaea. In comparison with bacterial and eukaryal Lon proteases, the biology of the archaeal Lon has been studied to a limited extent. In this study, the gene encoding the Lon protease of the alkaliphilic haloarchaeon Natrialba magadii (Nmlon) was cloned and sequenced, and the genetic organization of Nmlon was examined at the transcriptional level. Nmlon encodes a 84 kDa polypeptide with a pI of 4.42 which contains the ATPase, protease and membrane targeting domains of the archaeal-type LonB proteases. Nmlon is part of an operon that encodes membrane proteases and it is transcribed as a polycistronic mRNA in N. magadii cells at different growth stages. Accordingly, NmLon was detected in cell membranes of N. magadii throughout growth by Western blot analysis using specific anti-NmLon antibodies. Interestingly, in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, purified NmLon bound double stranded as well as single stranded DNA in the presence of elevated salt concentrations. This finding shows that DNA-binding is conserved in the LonA and LonB subfamilies and suggests that Lon-DNA interaction may be relevant for its function in haloarchaea.

  15. Peanut Seed Cultivars with Contrasting Resistance to Aspergillus parasiticus Colonization Display Differential Temporal Response of Protease Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Müller, Virginia; Bonacci, Gustavo; Batthyany, Carlos; Amé, María V; Carrari, Fernando; Gieco, Jorge; Asis, Ramón

    2017-02-08

    Significant efforts are being made to minimize aflatoxin contamination in peanut seeds and one possible strategy is to understand and exploit the mechanisms of plant defense against fungal infection. In this study we have identified and characterized, at biochemical and molecular levels, plant protease inhibitors (PPIs) produced in peanut seeds of the resistant PI 337394 and the susceptible Forman cultivar during Aspergillus parasiticus colonization. With chromatographic methods and 2D-electrophoresis-mass spectrometry we have isolated and identified four variants of Bowman-Birk trypsin inhibitor (BBTI) and a novel Kunitz-type protease inhibitor (KPI) produced in response to A. parasiticus colonization. KPI was detected only in the resistant cultivar, while BBTI was produced in the resistant cultivar in a higher concentration than susceptible cultivar and with different isoforms. The kinetic expression of KPI and BBTI genes along with trypsin inhibitory activity was analyzed in both cultivars during infection. In the susceptible cultivar an early PPI activity response was associated with BBTI occurrence. Meanwhile, in the resistant cultivar a later response with a larger increase in PPI activity was associated with BBTI and KPI occurrence. The biological significance of PPI in seed defense against fungal infection was analyzed and linked to inhibitory properties on enzymes released by the fungus during infection, and to the antifungal effect of KPI.

  16. Geranylated flavonoids displaying SARS-CoV papain-like protease inhibition from the fruits of Paulownia tomentosa.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung Keun; Curtis-Long, Marcus J; Lee, Kon Ho; Kim, Dae Wook; Ryu, Hyung Won; Yuk, Heung Joo; Park, Ki Hun

    2013-06-01

    SARS-CoV papain-like protease (PLpro) is an important antiviral target due to its key roles in SARS virus replication. The MeOH extracts of the fruits of the Paulownia tree yielded many small molecules capable of targeting PLpro. Five of these compounds were new geranylated flavonoids, tomentin A, tomentin B, tomentin C, tomentin D, tomentin E (1-5). Structure analysis of new compounds (1-5) by NMR showed that they all contain a 3,4-dihydro-2H-pyran moiety. This chemotype is very rare and is derived from cyclization of a geranyl group with a phenol functionality. Most compounds (1-12) inhibited PLpro in a dose dependent manner with IC50's raging between 5.0 and 14.4 μM. All new compounds having the dihydro-2H-pyran group showed better inhibition than their parent compounds (1 vs 11, 2 vs 9, 4 vs 12, 5 vs 6). In kinetic studies, 1-12 emerged to be reversible, mixed inhibitors.

  17. Identification of a human immunodominant B-cell epitope within the immunoglobulin A1 protease of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    De Paolis, Francesca; Beghetto, Elisa; Spadoni, Andrea; Montagnani, Francesca; Felici, Franco; Oggioni, Marco R; Gargano, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    Background The IgA1 protease of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a proteolytic enzyme that specifically cleaves the hinge regions of human IgA1, which dominates most mucosal surfaces and is the major IgA isotype in serum. This protease is expressed in all of the known pneumococcal strains and plays a major role in pathogen's resistance to the host immune response. The present work was focused at identifying the immunodominant regions of pneumococcal IgA1 protease recognized by the human antibody response. Results An antigenic sequence corresponding to amino acids 420–457 (epiA) of the iga gene product was identified by screening a pneumococcal phage display library with patients' sera. The epiA peptide is conserved in all pneumococci and in two out of three S. mitis strains, while it is not present in other oral streptococci so far sequenced. This epitope was specifically recognized by antibodies present in sera from 90% of healthy adults, thus representing an important target of the humoral response to S. pneumoniae and S. mitis infection. Moreover, sera from 68% of children less than 4 years old reacted with the epiA peptide, indicating that the human immune response against streptococcal antigens occurs during childhood. Conclusion The broad and specific recognition of the epiA polypeptide by human sera demonstrate that the pneumococcal IgA1 protease contains an immunodominant B-cell epitope. The use of phage display libraries to identify microbe or disease-specific antigens recognized by human sera is a valuable approach to epitope discovery. PMID:18088426

  18. Supermarket Proteases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagar, William G.; Bullerwell, Lornie D.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory activity on enzymes. Uses common items found in the supermarket that contain protease enzymes, such as contact lens cleaner and meat tenderizer. Demonstrates the digestion of gelatin proteins as part of enzymatic reactions. (Author/SOE)

  19. Antibodies from the sera of HIV-infected patients efficiently hydrolyze all human histones.

    PubMed

    Baranova, Svetlana V; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2016-08-01

    Histones and their post-translational modifications have key roles in chromatin remodeling and gene transcription. Besides intranuclear functions, histones act as damage-associated molecular pattern molecules when they are released into the extracellular space. Administration of exogenous histones to animals leads to systemic inflammatory and toxic responses through activating Toll-like receptors and inflammasome pathways. Here, using ELISA it was shown that sera of HIV-infected patients and healthy donors contain autoantibodies against histones. Autoantibodies with enzymic activities (abzymes) are a distinctive feature of autoimmune diseases. It was interesting whether antibodies from sera of HIV-infected patients can hydrolyze human histones. Electrophoretically and immunologically homogeneous IgGs were isolated from sera of HIV-infected patients by chromatography on several affinity sorbents. We present first evidence showing that 100% of IgGs purified from the sera of 32 HIV-infected patients efficiently hydrolyze from one to five human histones. Several rigid criteria have been applied to show that the histone-hydrolyzing activity is an intrinsic property of IgGs of HIV-infected patients. The relative efficiency of hydrolysis of histones (H1, H2a, H2b, H3, and H4) significantly varied for IgGs of different patients. IgGs from the sera of 40% of healthy donors also hydrolyze histones but with an average efficiency approximately 16-fold lower than that of HIV-infected patients. Similar to proteolytic abzymes from the sera of patients with several autoimmune diseases, histone-hydrolyzing IgGs from HIV-infected patients were inhibited by specific inhibitors of serine and of metal-dependent proteases, but an unexpected significant inhibition of the activity by specific inhibitor of thiol-like proteases was also observed. Because IgGs can efficiently hydrolyze histones, a negative role of abzymes in development of acquired immune deficiency syndrome cannot be

  20. Proteases as Insecticidal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Robert L.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2010-01-01

    Proteases from a variety of sources (viruses, bacteria, fungi, plants, and insects) have toxicity towards insects. Some of these insecticidal proteases evolved as venom components, herbivore resistance factors, or microbial pathogenicity factors, while other proteases play roles in insect development or digestion, but exert an insecticidal effect when over-expressed from genetically engineered plants or microbial pathogens. Many of these proteases are cysteine proteases, although insect-toxic metalloproteases and serine proteases have also been examined. The sites of protease toxic activity range from the insect midgut to the hemocoel (body cavity) to the cuticle. This review discusses these insecticidal proteases along with their evaluation and use as potential pesticides. PMID:22069618

  1. Yeast extracellular proteases.

    PubMed

    Ogrydziak, D M

    1993-01-01

    Many species of yeast secrete significant amounts of protease(s). In this article, results of numerous surveys of yeast extracellular protease production have been compiled and inconsistencies in the data and limitations of the methodology have been examined. Regulation, purification, characterization, and processing of yeast extracellular proteases are reviewed. Results obtained from the sequences of cloned genes, especially the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bar protease, the Candida albicans acid protease, and the Yarrowia lipolytica alkaline protease, have been emphasized. Biotechnological applications and the medical relevance of yeast extracellular proteases are covered. Yeast extracellular proteases have potential in beer and wine stabilization, and they probably contribute to pathogenicity of Candida spp. Yeast extracellular protease genes also provide secretion and processing signals for yeast expression systems designed for secretion of heterologous proteins. Coverage of the secretion of foreign proteases such as prochymosin, urokinase, and tissue plasminogen activator by yeast in included.

  2. Investigations with Protease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Din Yan

    1997-01-01

    Presents two simple and reliable ways for measuring protease activity that can be used for a variety of investigations in a range of biology class levels. The investigations use protease from a variety of sources. (DDR)

  3. Commercially Available Complement Component-Depleted Sera Are Unexpectedly Codepleted of Ficolin-2

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Allison M.; Geno, K. Aaron; Dalecki, Alex G.; Cheng, Xiaogang

    2014-01-01

    The ficolins are a family of innate pattern recognition molecules that are known to bind acetylated compounds and activate complement through the association of mannose binding lectin (MBL)/ficolin-associated serine proteases (MASPs). Their importance has more recently become appreciated, as they have been shown to play a role in a variety of disease processes from infection to autoimmunity. While studying ficolin-2-mediated complement deposition on Streptococcus pneumoniae, we found that sera depleted of C1q or other complement components were also codepleted of ficolin-2 but not ficolin-1, ficolin-3, or MBL. MBL present in C1q-depleted sera was able to mediate complement deposition on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting the presence of MASPs. We found that complement was activated on pneumococci in C1q-depleted serum only after opsonization with exogenous recombinant ficolin-2 (rFicolin-2). Also, no complement deposition was observed in C1q-depleted serum when pneumococci were opsonized with rFicolin-2 mutated at its lysine-57 residue, where MASPs are known to associate. Thus, these depleted sera are a unique tool to study ficolin-2-mediated complement pathways; however, one should be aware that ficolin-2 is absent from complement component-depleted sera. PMID:25030054

  4. Proteases as therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Craik, Charles S.; Page, Michael J.; Madison, Edwin L.

    2015-01-01

    Proteases are an expanding class of drugs that hold great promise. The U.S. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) has approved 12 protease therapies, and a number of next generation or completely new proteases are in clinical development. Although they are a well-recognized class of targets for inhibitors, proteases themselves have not typically been considered as a drug class despite their application in the clinic over the last several decades; initially as plasma fractions and later as purified products. Although the predominant use of proteases has been in treating cardiovascular disease, they are also emerging as useful agents in the treatment of sepsis, digestive disorders, inflammation, cystic fibrosis, retinal disorders, psoriasis and other diseases. In the present review, we outline the history of proteases as therapeutics, provide an overview of their current clinical application, and describe several approaches to improve and expand their clinical application. Undoubtedly, our ability to harness proteolysis for disease treatment will increase with our understanding of protease biology and the molecular mechanisms responsible. New technologies for rationally engineering proteases, as well as improved delivery options, will expand greatly the potential applications of these enzymes. The recognition that proteases are, in fact, an established class of safe and efficacious drugs will stimulate investigation of additional therapeutic applications for these enzymes. Proteases therefore have a bright future as a distinct therapeutic class with diverse clinical applications. PMID:21406063

  5. 21 CFR 864.2800 - Animal and human sera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Animal and human sera. 864.2800 Section 864.2800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... human sera. (a) Identification. Animal and human sera are biological products, obtained from the...

  6. 21 CFR 864.2800 - Animal and human sera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Animal and human sera. 864.2800 Section 864.2800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... human sera. (a) Identification. Animal and human sera are biological products, obtained from the...

  7. Serine proteases inhibiting cyanopeptides.

    PubMed

    Radau, G

    2000-08-01

    There are many compounds inhibiting serine proteases which play an important role in the human organism. This article reviews publications on the low-molecular weight, serine protease inhibitory cyanopeptides and reports on new developments in establishing structure-activity relationships.

  8. Fibrin(ogen)olytic activity of bumblebee venom serine protease

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Yuling; Choo, Young Moo; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Jia Jingming; Cui Zheng; Wang Dong; Kim, Doh Hoon; Sohn, Hung Dae; Jin, Byung Rae

    2011-09-01

    Bee venom is a rich source of pharmacologically active components; it has been used as an immunotherapy to treat bee venom hypersensitivity, and venom therapy has been applied as an alternative medicine. Here, we present evidence that the serine protease found in bumblebee venom exhibits fibrin(ogen)olytic activity. Compared to honeybee venom, bumblebee venom contains a higher content of serine protease, which is one of its major components. Venom serine proteases from bumblebees did not cross-react with antibodies against the honeybee venom serine protease. We provide functional evidence indicating that bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) acts as a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. Bt-VSP activates prothrombin and directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. However, Bt-VSP is not a plasminogen activator, and its fibrinolytic activity is less than that of plasmin. Taken together, our results define roles for Bt-VSP as a prothrombin activator, a thrombin-like protease, and a plasmin-like protease. These findings offer significant insight into the allergic reaction sequence that is initiated by bee venom serine protease and its potential usefulness as a clinical agent in the field of hemostasis and thrombosis. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > Bumblebee venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) is a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. > Bt-VSP activates prothrombin. > Bt-VSP directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. > Bt-VSP is a hemostatically active protein that is a potent clinical agent.

  9. Bacterial proteases and virulence.

    PubMed

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing tolerance to adverse conditions such as those experienced in the host. In the membrane, HtrA performs similar functions whereas the extracellular proteases, in close contact with host components, pave the way for spreading infections by degrading host matrix components or interfering with host cell signalling to short-circuit host cell processes. Common to both intra- and extracellular proteases is the tight control of their proteolytic activities. In general, substrate recognition by the intracellular proteases is highly selective which is, in part, attributed to the chaperone activity associated with the proteases either encoded within the same polypeptide or on separate subunits. In contrast, substrate recognition by extracellular proteases is less selective and therefore these enzymes are generally expressed as zymogens to prevent premature proteolytic activity that would be detrimental to the cell. These extracellular proteases are activated in complex cascades involving auto-processing and proteolytic maturation. Thus, proteolysis has been adopted by bacterial pathogens at multiple levels to ensure the success of the pathogen in contact with the human host.

  10. Sera with high levels of anti-smooth muscle and anti-mitochondrial antibodies frequently bind to cytoskeleton proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Dighiero, G; Lymberi, P; Monot, C; Abuaf, N

    1990-01-01

    Using ELISA methods, 54 sera from chronic active hepatitis (CAH) patients displaying high levels of anti-smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) and 18 sera from primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) patients with high levels of anti-M2 antibodies were examined for the presence of high antibody levels against actin, tubulin, myosin, tropomyosin, troponin, vimentin and desmin. Our results showed that: (i) in CAH with high SMA activity, increased antibody levels were found in 51.9% of sera for actin, 31.5% for myosin, 35.2% for tubulin, 34.0% for tropomyosin, 11.3% for troponin, 22.6% for vimentin and 43.4% for desmin, compared with natural antibody levels in 21 normal sera; (ii) Similar high levels of these antibodies were found in the case of PBC; (iii) in most cases, sera simultaneously bound to several antigens of the panel; and (iv) approximately 26% of the CAH sera were found to be negative with the seven antigens examined while 22% were reacted with a cytoskeleton protein (CP) other than actin. These results indicate that current opinion associating SMA with anti-actin activity in CAH is confirmed for only 50% of cases and that although a good correlation between SMA and anti-CP antibodies can be obtained, there is still a significant percentage of SMA for which the putative antigen recognized needs to be determined. PMID:2208796

  11. Serine protease activities in Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi promastigotes.

    PubMed

    da Silva-López, Raquel Elisa; dos Santos, Tatiana Resende; Morgado-Díaz, José Andrés; Tanaka, Marcelo Neves; de Simone, Salvatore Giovanni

    2010-10-01

    The present work reports the isolation, biochemical characterization, and subcellular location of serine proteases from aqueous, detergent soluble, and culture supernatant of Leishmania chagasi promastigote extracts, respectively, LCSII, LCSI, and LCSIII. The active enzyme molecular masses of LCSII were about 105, 66, and 60 kDa; of LCSI, 60 and 58 kDa; and of LCSIII, approximately 76 and 68 kDa. Optimal pH for the enzymes was 7.0 for LCSI and LCSIII and 8.5 for LCSII, and the optimal temperature for all enzymes was 37°C, using α-N-ρ-tosyl-L: -arginine methyl ester as substrate. Assay of thermal stability indicated that LCSIII is the more stable enzyme. Hemoglobin, bovine serum albumin, and ovalbumin were hydrolyzed by LCSII and LCSI but not by LCSIII. Inhibition studies suggested that enzymes belong to the serine protease class modulated by divalent cations. Rabbit antiserum against 56-kDa serine protease of Leishmania amazonensis identified proteins in all extracts of L. chagasi. Furthermore, immunocytochemistry demonstrated that serine proteases are located in flagellar pocket region and cytoplasmic vesicles of L. chagasi promastigotes. These findings indicate that L. chagasi serine proteases differ from L. amazonensis proteases and all known flagellate proteases, but display some similarities with serine proteases from other Leishmania species, suggesting a conservation of this enzymatic activity in the genus.

  12. Phage neutralization by sera of patients receiving phage therapy.

    PubMed

    Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzanna; Zaczek, Maciej; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Kłak, Marlena; Fortuna, Wojciech; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Rogóż, Paweł; Szufnarowski, Krzysztof; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Owczarek, Barbara; Górski, Andrzej

    2014-08-01

    The aim of our investigation was to verify whether phage therapy (PT) can induce antiphage antibodies. The antiphage activity was determined in sera from 122 patients from the Phage Therapy Unit in Wrocław with bacterial infections before and during PT, and in sera from 30 healthy volunteers using a neutralization test. Furthermore, levels of antiphage antibodies were investigated in sera of 19 patients receiving staphylococcal phages and sera of 20 healthy volunteers using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The phages were administered orally, locally, orally/locally, intrarectally, or orally/intrarectally. The rate of phage inactivation (K) estimated the level of phages' neutralization by human sera. Low K rates were found in sera of healthy volunteers (K ≤ 1.73). Low K rates were detected before PT (K ≤ 1.64). High antiphage activity of sera K > 18 was observed in 12.3% of examined patients (n = 15) treated with phages locally (n = 13) or locally/orally (n = 2) from 15 to 60 days of PT. High K rates were found in patients treated with some Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterococcus faecalis phages. Low K rates were observed during PT in sera of patients using phages orally (K ≤ 1.04). Increased inactivation of phages by sera of patients receiving PT decreased after therapy. These results suggest that the antiphage activity in patients' sera depends on the route of phage administration and phage type. The induction of antiphage activity of sera during or after PT does not exclude a favorable result of PT.

  13. Phage Neutralization by Sera of Patients Receiving Phage Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Żaczek, Maciej; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Kłak, Marlena; Fortuna, Wojciech; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Rogóż, Paweł; Szufnarowski, Krzysztof; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Owczarek, Barbara; Górski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of our investigation was to verify whether phage therapy (PT) can induce antiphage antibodies. The antiphage activity was determined in sera from 122 patients from the Phage Therapy Unit in Wrocław with bacterial infections before and during PT, and in sera from 30 healthy volunteers using a neutralization test. Furthermore, levels of antiphage antibodies were investigated in sera of 19 patients receiving staphylococcal phages and sera of 20 healthy volunteers using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The phages were administered orally, locally, orally/locally, intrarectally, or orally/intrarectally. The rate of phage inactivation (K) estimated the level of phages' neutralization by human sera. Low K rates were found in sera of healthy volunteers (K≤1.73). Low K rates were detected before PT (K≤1.64). High antiphage activity of sera K>18 was observed in 12.3% of examined patients (n=15) treated with phages locally (n=13) or locally/orally (n=2) from 15 to 60 days of PT. High K rates were found in patients treated with some Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterococcus faecalis phages. Low K rates were observed during PT in sera of patients using phages orally (K≤1.04). Increased inactivation of phages by sera of patients receiving PT decreased after therapy. These results suggest that the antiphage activity in patients' sera depends on the route of phage administration and phage type. The induction of antiphage activity of sera during or after PT does not exclude a favorable result of PT. PMID:24893003

  14. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense adaptation to different mammalian sera is associated with VSG expression site plasticity.

    PubMed

    Cordon-Obras, Carlos; Cano, Jorge; González-Pacanowska, Dolores; Benito, Agustin; Navarro, Miguel; Bart, Jean-Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infection is widely considered an anthroponosis, although it has also been found in wild and domestic animals. Thus, fauna could act as reservoir, constraining the elimination of the parasite in hypo-endemic foci. To better understand the possible maintenance of T. b. gambiense in local fauna and investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptation, we generated adapted cells lines (ACLs) by in vitro culture of the parasites in different mammalian sera. Using specific antibodies against the Variant Surface Glycoproteins (VSGs) we found that serum ACLs exhibited different VSG variants when maintained in pig, goat or human sera. Although newly detected VSGs were independent of the sera used, the consistent appearance of different VSGs suggested remodelling of the co-transcribed genes at the telomeric Expression Site (VSG-ES). Thus, Expression Site Associated Genes (ESAGs) sequences were analysed to investigate possible polymorphism selection. ESAGs 6 and 7 genotypes, encoding the transferrin receptor (TfR), expressed in different ACLs were characterised. In addition, we quantified the ESAG6/7 mRNA levels and analysed transferrin (Tf) uptake. Interestingly, the best growth occurred in pig and human serum ACLs, which consistently exhibited a predominant ESAG7 genotype and higher Tf uptake than those obtained in calf and goat sera. We also detected an apparent selection of specific ESAG3 genotypes in the pig and human serum ACLs, suggesting that other ESAGs could be involved in the host adaptation processes. Altogether, these results suggest a model whereby VSG-ES remodelling allows the parasite to express a specific set of ESAGs to provide selective advantages in different hosts. Finally, pig serum ACLs display phenotypic adaptation parameters closely related to human serum ACLs but distinct to parasites grown in calf and goat sera. These results suggest a better suitability of swine to maintain T. b. gambiense infection supporting

  15. [Chloroplast Deg proteases].

    PubMed

    Grabsztunowicz, Magda; Luciński, Robert; Baranek, Małgorzata; Sikora, Bogna; Jackowski, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    For some chloroplast proteases ATP binding and hydrolysis is not necessary for their catalytic activity, most probably because even strongly unfolded substrates may penetrate their catalytic chamber. Deg1, 2, 5 and 8 are the best known of Arabidopsis thaliana ATP- independent chloroplast proteases, encoded by orthologues of genes coding for DegP, DegQ and DegS proteases of Escherichia coli. Current awareness in the area of structure and functions of chloroplast Degs is much more limited vs the one about their bacterial counterparts. Deg5 and Deg8 form a catalytic heterododecamer which is loosely attached to luminal side of thylakoid membrane. The complex catalyses--supported by Deg1 and one of FtsH proteases--the degradation of PsbA damaged due to plant exposition to elevated irradiance and thus these protease are of key importance for the plants' sensitivity to photoinhibition. Deg2 role in the disposal of damaged PsbA has not been elucidated. Recombinant Deg1 may degrade PsbO and plastocyanin in vitro but it is not clear whether this reaction is performed in vivo as well.

  16. Recombinant proteinase 3 (Wegener's antigen) expressed in Pichia pastoris is functionally active and is recognized by patient sera.

    PubMed

    Harmsen, M C; Heeringa, P; van der Geld, Y M; Huitema, M G; Klimp, A; Tiran, A; Kallenberg, C G

    1997-11-01

    The open reading frame of human proteinase 3 (PR3) without the prepro-peptide was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli (rcPR3) and in Pichia pastoris (rpPR3). The 6-histidine tagged rpPR3 was efficiently secreted into culture supernatant from which it could be purified by immobilized metal chelate chromatography. Purified rpPR3 migrated as a single 32-kD band on SDS-PAGE and harboured protease activity that could be inhibited with inhibitors specific for serine-proteases. By indirect antigen-capture ELISA using rpPR3, 60% of sera from patients with Wegener's granulomatosis bound to the recombinant product, although it was not recognized in ELISA with directly coated rpPR3.

  17. TACOM LCMC Sustainment Engineering Risk Assessment (SERA) Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-26

    Record ( PMR ) which represents the current support strategy of the equipment. The PMR is the initial input for a SERA. By conducting a SERA, a...Record ( PMR ) Ovhl-Qty – Overhaul Quantity Unit of Measure CAGE Code – Commercial or Government Entity RNCC - Reference Number Category Code RNVC

  18. Prevalence of genes encoding extracellular proteases in Staphylococcus aureus - important targets triggering immune response in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zdzalik, Michal; Karim, Abdulkarim Y; Wolski, Krzysztof; Buda, Pawel; Wojcik, Kinga; Brueggemann, Sarah; Wojciechowski, Piotr; Eick, Sigrun; Calander, Ann-Marie; Jonsson, Ing-Marie; Kubica, Malgorzata; Polakowska, Klaudia; Miedzobrodzki, Jacek; Wladyka, Benedykt; Potempa, Jan; Dubin, Grzegorz

    2012-11-01

    Proteases of Staphylococcus aureus have long been considered to function as important virulence factors, although direct evidence of the role of particular enzymes remains incomplete and elusive. Here, we sought to provide a collective view of the prevalence of extracellular protease genes in genomes of commensal and pathogenic strains of S. aureus and their expression in the course of human and mouse infection. Data on V8 protease, staphopains A and B, aureolysin, and the recently described and poorly characterized group of six Spl proteases are provided. A phylogenetically diverse collection of 167 clinical isolates was analyzed, resulting in the comprehensive genetic survey of the prevalence of protease-encoding genes. No correlation between identified gene patterns with specific infections was established. Humoral response against the proteases of interest was examined in the sera derived from human patients and from a model mouse infection. The analysis suggests that at least some, if not all, tested proteases are expressed and secreted during the course of infection. Overall, the results presented in this study support the hypothesis that the secretory proteases as a group may contribute to the virulence of S. aureus.

  19. The site-2 protease.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Robert B

    2013-12-01

    The site-2 protease (S2P) is an unusually-hydrophobic integral membrane protease. It cleaves its substrates, which are membrane-bound transcription factors, within membrane-spanning helices. Although structural information for S2P from animals is lacking, the available data suggest that cleavage may occur at or within the lipid bilayer. In mammalian cells, S2P is essential owing to its activation of the sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs); in the absence of exogenous lipid, cells lacking S2P cannot survive. S2P is also important in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, activating several different membrane-bound transcription factors. Human patients harboring reduction-of-function mutations in S2P exhibit an array of pathologies ranging from skin defects to neurological abnormalities. Surprisingly, Drosophila melanogaster lacking S2P are viable and fertile. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Intramembrane Proteases.

  20. Molecular markers of serine protease evolution

    PubMed Central

    Krem, Maxwell M.; Di Cera, Enrico

    2001-01-01

    The evolutionary history of serine proteases can be accounted for by highly conserved amino acids that form crucial structural and chemical elements of the catalytic apparatus. These residues display non- random dichotomies in either amino acid choice or serine codon usage and serve as discrete markers for tracking changes in the active site environment and supporting structures. These markers categorize serine proteases of the chymotrypsin-like, subtilisin-like and α/β-hydrolase fold clans according to phylogenetic lineages, and indicate the relative ages and order of appearance of those lineages. A common theme among these three unrelated clans of serine proteases is the development or maintenance of a catalytic tetrad, the fourth member of which is a Ser or Cys whose side chain helps stabilize other residues of the standard catalytic triad. A genetic mechanism for mutation of conserved markers, domain duplication followed by gene splitting, is suggested by analysis of evolutionary markers from newly sequenced genes with multiple protease domains. PMID:11406580

  1. A Genomic Analysis of Rat Proteases and Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Puente, Xose S.; López-Otín, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    Proteases perform important roles in multiple biological and pathological processes. The availability of the rat genome sequence has facilitated the analysis of the complete protease repertoire or degradome of this model organism. The rat degradome consists of at least 626 proteases and homologs, which are distributed into 24 aspartic, 160 cysteine, 192 metallo, 221 serine, and 29 threonine proteases. This distribution is similar to that of the mouse degradome but is more complex than that of the human degradome composed of 561 proteases and homologs. This increased complexity of rat proteases mainly derives from the expansion of several families, including placental cathepsins, testases, kallikreins, and hematopoietic serine proteases, involved in reproductive or immunological functions. These protease families have also evolved differently in rat and mouse and may contribute to explain some functional differences between these closely related species. Likewise, genomic analysis of rat protease inhibitors has shown some differences with mouse protease inhibitors and the expansion of families of cysteine and serine protease inhibitors in rodents with respect to human. These comparative analyses may provide new views on the functional diversity of proteases and inhibitors and contribute to the development of innovative strategies for treating proteolysis diseases. PMID:15060002

  2. Rock squirrel (Spermophilus variegatus) blood sera affects proteolytic and hemolytic activities of rattlesnake venoms.

    PubMed

    Biardi, James E; Coss, Richard G

    2011-02-01

    Rock squirrels (Spermophilus variegatus) from two sites in south central New Mexico, where prairie (Crotalus viridis viridis) and western diamondback (Crotalus atrox) rattlesnakes are common predators, were assayed for inhibition of rattlesnake venom digestive and hemostatic activities. At statistically significant levels rock squirrel blood sera reduced the metalloprotease and hemolytic activity of venoms from C. v. viridis and C. atrox more than venom from an allopatric snake species, the northern Pacific rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus). In contrast, general proteolytic activity of venom from C. oreganus was inhibited more by S. variegatus serum defenses than activity of venom from sympatric snakes. For all three venoms, incubation with squirrel sera increased the level of fibrinolysis over venom-only treatments. These results suggest that rock squirrels (S. variegatus) can defend against metalloproteases and other proteases after envenomation from at least two of five rattlesnake predators they might encounter. However, there were statistically significant differences between general proteolytic activity and fibrinolytic activity of C. v. viridis and C. atrox venom, suggesting that rock squirrels might be differentially vulnerable to these two predators. The hypothesis that prey resistance influences snake venom evolution in a predator-prey arms race is given further support by the previously cryptic variation in venoms detected when assayed against prey defenses.

  3. Display Tactics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetlow, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Display took a wide variety of forms ranging from students presenting their initial planning and thought processes, to displays of their finished work, and their suggestions for extending the task should they, or others, have time to return to it in the future. A variety of different media were used from traditional posters in many shapes and…

  4. Screening and characterization of protease producing actinomycetes from marine saltern.

    PubMed

    Suthindhiran, Krish; Jayasri, Mangalam Achuthananda; Dipali, Dipa; Prasar, Apurva

    2014-10-01

    In the course of systematic screening program for bioactive actinomycetes, an alkaline protease producing halophilic strain Actinopolyspora sp. VITSDK2 was isolated from marine saltern, Southern India. The strain was identified as Actinopolyspora based on its phenotypic and phylogenetic characters. The protease was partially purified using ammonium sulfate precipitation and subsequently by DEAE cellulose column chromatography. The enzyme was further purified using HPLC and the molecular weight was found to be 22 kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE analysis. The purified protease exhibited pH stability in a wide range of 4-12 with optimum at 10.0. The enzyme was found to be stable between 25 and 80 °C and displayed a maximum activity at 60 °C. The enzyme activity was increased marginally in presence of Mn(2+) , Mg(2+) , and Ca(2+) and decreased in presence of Cu(2+) . PMSF and DFP completely inhibited the activity suggesting it belongs to serine protease. Further, the proteolytic activity was abolished in presence of N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone suggesting this might be chymotrypsin-like serine protease. The protease was 96% active when kept for 10 days at room temperature. The results indicate that the enzyme belong to chymotrypsin-like serine protease exhibiting both pH and thermostability, which can be used for various applications in industries.

  5. Proteases in bacterial pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ingmer, Hanne; Brøndsted, Lone

    2009-11-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for protein quality control under adverse conditions experienced in the host, as well as for the timely degradation of central virulence regulators. We have focused on the contribution of the conserved Lon, Clp, HtrA and FtsH proteases to pathogenesis and have highlighted common biological processes for which their activities are important for virulence.

  6. The quantitation of C6 in rabbit and human sera

    PubMed Central

    Tedesco, F.; Lachmann, P. J.

    1971-01-01

    C6 quantitation was carried out in rabbit and human sera by the single radial immunodiffusion technique. The C6 content of the rabbit and human sera used as standards was estimated by precipitin analysis, using an anti-C6 antiserum labelled with 125I. The mean C6 level in normal human serum was 11 μg/ml, whereas in normal rabbit serum it was 35 μg/ml. Sera from forty rabbits heterozygous for C6 deficiency were found to have a mean concentration of C6 of 14 μg/ml. The C6 level was estimated in sera from patients with various immunological disorders and found to be significantly higher in the sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and normal in the sera from patients with SLE, glomerulonephritis, nephrotic syndrome and myeloma. C6 haemolytic assays were found to correlate well with the antigenic assays only in fresh sera. In various circumstances this correlation breaks down, presumably because of C6 inactivator. This inactivator, in contrast to C3-inactivator, appears to be bound to antigen–antibody complement complexes. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:4998970

  7. Effects of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis sera on cultured cholinergic neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Touzeau, G.; Kato, A.C.

    1983-03-01

    Dissociated monolayer cultures of chick ciliary ganglion neurons have been used to study the effects of control and ALS sera. The cultured neurons survive and extend neurites for a minimum of 2 weeks in a standard tissue culture medium that contains 10% heat-inactivated human serum. Three parameters of the neurons have been examined when cultured in control and ALS sera for 8 to 12 days: (1) neuronal survival, (2) activity of the enzyme choline acetyltransferase, and (3) synthesis of /sup 3/H-acetylcholine using /sup 3/H-choline as precursor. ALS sera cause a small decrease in these three parameters, but this difference is not significant.

  8. AN ELECTROPHORETIC STUDY OF NEPHROTIC SERA AND URINE

    PubMed Central

    Longsworth, L. G.; MacInnes, D. A.

    1940-01-01

    The electrophoretic patterns of the sera and urine of two cases of lipoid nephrosis have been obtained and have been compared with a typical pattern of normal serum. The patterns of the pathological sera deviated widely from the normal, indicating relatively low albumin and high globulin content. The comparison of the patterns of nephrotic sera cleared by centrifugation and by ether extraction shows that a large portion of the β globulin consisted of a labile lipo-protein. The pattern of the nephrotic urine proteins resembled that of normal serum, with, however, significant differences. PMID:19870946

  9. Electrophoretic abnormalities in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and cancer sera.

    PubMed

    Werthamer, S; Amaral, L

    1976-01-01

    It was previously shown (Am J Clin Pathol 55: 65-67, 1971) that sera from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) produce a characteristic pattern on disk-acrylamide gels. Other observations indicating the presence of immunosuppressive proteins in the sera of patients with cancer suggested the search for characteristic protein patterns employing the same technic. Utilizing sera from patients with various types of malignancies and appropriate controls, the results appear to indicate that there is a consistent and distinctive pattern to the gels. The nature of the (different) protein(s) remains to be elucidated.

  10. Laundry performance of subtilisin proteases.

    PubMed

    Wolff, A M; Showell, M S; Venegas, M G; Barnett, B L; Wertz, W C

    1996-01-01

    Effective laundry protease performance against susceptible stains depends upon both the enzyme itself and the environment in which it must work. In order to technically design superior laundry proteases, a model for protease's mechanism of action in detergents was developed which has been substantiated through-the-wash. While evaluation of this model and/or a given protease's effectiveness could be judged by a variety of methods, the utility of using visual wash performance comparisons, analytical, and stain characterization studies is described. Finally, data comparing the performance of wild type Subtilisin proteases with mutants designed via the projected model are given, demonstrating possible utility of the system.

  11. SERA: Simulation Environment for Radiotherapy Applications - Users Manual Version 1CO

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, James Robert; Wessol, Daniel Edward; Wemple, Charles Alan; Wheeler, Floyd J; Harkin, G. J.; Frandsen, M. W.; Albright, C. L.; Cohen, M.T.; Rossmeier, M.; Cogliati, J.J.

    2002-06-01

    This document is the user manual for the Simulation Environment for Radiotherapy Applications (SERA) software program developed for boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) patient treatment planning by researchers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and students and faculty at Montana State University (MSU) Computer Science Department. This manual corresponds to the final release of the program, Version 1C0, developed to run under the RedHat Linux Operating System (version 7.2 or newer) or the Solaris™ Operating System (version 2.6 or newer). SERA is a suite of command line or interactively launched software modules, including graphical, geometric reconstruction, and execution interface modules for developing BNCT treatment plans. The program allows the user to develop geometric models of the patient as derived from Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) images, perform dose computation for these geometric models, and display the computed doses on overlays of the original images as three dimensional representations. This manual provides a guide to the practical use of SERA, but is not an exhaustive treatment of each feature of the code.

  12. Neutralizing Antibodies Against AAV Serotypes 1, 2, 6, and 9 in Sera of Commonly Used Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Rapti, Kleopatra; Louis-Jeune, Vedell; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Ladage, Dennis; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Hajjar, Roger J; Weber, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are promising gene delivery vehicles for human gene transfer. One significant obstacle to AAV-based gene therapy is the high prevalence of neutralizing antibodies in humans. Until now, it was thought that, except for nonhuman primates, pre-existing neutralizing antibodies are not a problem in small or large animal models for gene therapy. Here, we demonstrate that sera of several animal models of cardiovascular diseases harbor pre-existing antibodies against the cardiotropic AAV serotypes AAV1, AAV6, and AAV9 and against AAV2. The neutralizing antibody titers vary widely both between species and between serotypes. Of all species tested, rats displayed the lowest levels of neutralizing antibodies. Surprisingly, naive mice obtained directly from commercial vendors harbored neutralizing antibodies. Of the large animal models tested, the neutralization of AAV6 transduction by dog sera was especially pronounced. Sera of sheep and rabbits showed modest neutralization of AAV transduction whereas porcine sera strongly inhibited transduction by all AAV serotypes and displayed the largest variation between individual animals. Importantly, neutralizing antibody titers as low as 1/4 completely prevented in vivo transduction by AAV9 in rats. Our results suggest that prescreening of animals for neutralizing antibodies will be important for future gene transfer experiments in these animal models. PMID:21915102

  13. Preferential use of dilutions of single sera than mixture of sera to standardize the quantitation of anticardiolipin antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rupin, A; Reber, G; Bardos, P; de Moerloose, P

    1994-08-15

    The aim of this study was to compare four house standards coming from two University Hospital laboratories with the standards provided by the Antiphospholipid Standardization Laboratory (ASL) in order to quantify anticardiolipin antibodies. Using two different plates and two different buffered protein solutions, slopes from the serial dilutions of each of the four house standards were found comparable. In contrast different slopes were obtained when using the ASL standards which consist of a mixture of sera. Our results indicate that dilutions of single sera are more suitable than mixture of sera when quantification of anticardiolipin antibodies is required.

  14. Inconclusive Hepatitis C Virus Antibody Results in African Sera

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Include Security Classification) Inconclusive hepatitis C virus antibody results in African sera 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Hyams KC, Okoth FA, Tukei PM...exhausted. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS P All other editions are obsolete. UNCLASS I F I ED 254 CORRESPONDENCE 93-13564 Inconclusive Hepatitis C Virus ...outpatients living on the eastern coast of Kenya were evaluated. Colleagues-in Africa, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus anti- Sera and epidemiologic data

  15. Comparison of animal sera for suitability in coagulase testing.

    PubMed

    Orth, D S; Chugg, L R; Anderson, A W

    1971-03-01

    The sera of several animals were examined for suitability in coagulase testing. The assay for coagulase-reacting factor (CRF) activities of the whole sera indicated the following relative concentrations of CRF: human > pig > rabbit > horse > bovine, chicken, and lamb. Human, pig, and rabbit sera had adequate amounts of CRF for coagulase testing. The plasmin activities of the different sera, arranged from the strongest to the weakest, were as follows: rabbit > human > lamb > horse > bovine, chicken, and pig. Fibrinolysis was observed when rabbit, human, lamb, or horse sera were incorporated into coagulase test agars. Pig serum was superior to the other sera for use in the plate test for coagulase since it had adequate amounts of CRF and the plasminogen-plasmin system was not activated by staphylokinase or staphylococcal Müller factor. Heparinized pig plasma was more suitable than citrated pig plasma since citrate interfered with the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, and the use of heparinized plasma prevented false-positive coagulase reactions due to citrate utilization.

  16. From proteases to proteomics.

    PubMed

    Neurath, H

    2001-04-01

    This personal and professional autobiography covers the 50-yr period of 1950-2000 and includes the following topics: History of the University of Washington School of Medicine and its Department of Biochemistry (Mount Rainier and the University of Washington, recruiting faculty, biology, research programs); scientific editing (publication, Biochemistry, Protein Science, electronic publication); Europe revisited (Heidelberg, approaching retirement, the German Research Center, reunion in Vienna); and 50 yr of research on proteolytic enzymes (trypsin, carboxypeptidases, mast cell proteases, future developments).

  17. From proteases to proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Neurath, Hans

    2001-01-01

    This personal and professional autobiography covers the 50-yr period of 1950–2000 and includes the following topics: History of the University of Washington School of Medicine and its Department of Biochemistry (Mount Rainier and the University of Washington, recruiting faculty, biology, research programs); scientific editing (publication, Biochemistry, Protein Science, electronic publication); Europe revisited (Heidelberg, approaching retirement, the German Research Center, reunion in Vienna); and 50 yr of research on proteolytic enzymes (trypsin, carboxypeptidases, mast cell proteases, future developments). PMID:11274481

  18. Proteases in blood clotting.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Peter N; Ahmad, Syed S

    2002-01-01

    The serine proteases, cofactors and cell-receptor molecules that comprise the haemostatic mechanism are highly conserved modular proteins that have evolved to participate in biochemical reactions in blood coagulation, anticoagulation and fibrinolysis. Blood coagulation is initiated by exposure of tissue factor, which forms a complex with factor VIIa and factor X, which results in the generation of small quantities of thrombin and is rapidly shutdown by the tissue factor pathway inhibitor. The generation of these small quantities of thrombin then activates factor XI, resulting in a sequence of events that lead to the activation of factor IX, factor X and prothrombin. Sufficient thrombin is generated to effect normal haemostasis by converting fibrinogen into fibrin. The anticoagulant pathways that regulate blood coagulation include the protein C anticoagulant mechanism, the serine protease inhibitors in plasma, and the Kunitz-like inhibitors, tissue factor pathway inhibitor and protease nexin 2. Finally, the fibrinolytic mechanism that comprises the activation of plasminogen into plasmin prevents excessive fibrin accumulation by promoting local dissolution of thrombi and promoting wound healing by reestablishment of blood flow.

  19. Plasma displays

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel, A.

    1991-12-01

    Plasma displays make use of lightly ionized glow discharges to produce light, perform switching and selection functions, or both. Both the negative glow and the positive column are used. Color can be attained by using UV from the discharge to stimulate phosphors. The adroit use of priming can reduce the number of drive circuits required - an advantage unique in the display art to plasma devices. Short voltage pulses can improve the efficacy of positive-column devices. Short voltage pulses can improve the efficacy of positive-column devices. The gas discharge can be used as a source of electrons, which can then excite cathodoluminescent phosphors in a variety of colors. It can also be used as a selection means for liquid-crystal displays. In this paper a wide variety of device configurations, using both unidirectional and bidirectional pulse excitations, is described.

  20. Serine protease inhibitors suppress pancreatic endogenous proteases and modulate bacterial neutral proteases.

    PubMed

    Nduaguibe, Chikodili C; Bentsi-Barnes, Kwamina; Mullen, Yoko; Kandeel, Fouad; Al-Abdullah, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Pefabloc, Trasylol and Urinary Trypsin Inhibitor (UTI) have been reported to be effective serine protease inhibitors that impair pancreatic endogenous proteases resulting in improved islet yield. Here we evaluated the effect of these inhibitors on endogenous proteases (trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase), bacterial neutral proteases (thermolysin and neutral protease) and islet isolation digestion samples. Protease activity was measured using a fluorimetric assay and islet function was assessed by dynamic perifusion. Trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase were significantly inhibited by Pefabloc and UTI. Trasylol showed strong inhibitory effects on trypsin and chymotrypsin but also decreased thermolysin activity. UTI was found to inhibit the activity of endogenous proteases and increase the activity of bacterial neutral proteases. Human islets exposed to Pefabloc had reduced insulin response, unlike Trasylol or UTI, which had no detrimental effect on insulin secretion. Although Trasylol was an effective inhibitor of endogenous proteases, FDA regulatory issues preclude its use in clinical application and thus in the isolation process. UTI has the greatest potential because it impairs endogenous pancreatic proteases and enhances digestion enzymes.

  1. Protease-mediated drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Eva F.; Goyan, Rebecca L.; Kennedy, James C.; Mackay, M.; Mendes, M. A. K.; Pottier, Roy H.

    2003-12-01

    Drugs used in disease treatment can cause damage to both malignant and normal tissue. This toxicity limits the maximum therapeutic dose. Drug targeting is of high interest to increase the therapeutic efficacy of the drug without increasing systemic toxicity. Certain tissue abnormalities, disease processes, cancers, and infections are characterized by high levels of activity of specific extracellular and/or intracellular proteases. Abnormally high activity levels of specific proteases are present at sites of physical or chemical trauma, blood clots, malignant tumors, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, gingival disease, glomerulonerphritis, and acute pancreatitis. Abnormal protease activity is suspected in development of liver thrombosis, pulmonary emphysema, atherosclerosis, and muscular dystrophy. Inactiviating disease-associated proteases by the administration of appropriate protease inhibitors has had limited success. Instead, one could use such proteases to target drugs to treat the condition. Protease mediated drug delivery offers such a possibility. Solubilizing groups are attached to insoluble drugs via a polypeptide chain which is specifically cleavable by certian proteases. When the solubilized drug enounters the protease, the solubilizing moieties are cleaved, and the drug precipitates at the disease location. Thus, a smaller systemic dosage could result in a therapeutic drug concentration at the treatment site with less systemic toxicity.

  2. Soluble chemokine receptor CXCR4 is present in human sera.

    PubMed

    Malvoisin, Etienne; Livrozet, Jean-Michel; Makloufi, Djamila; Vincent, Nadine

    2011-07-15

    A soluble form of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 was detected in human sera by isoelectric focusing and Western blotting. Sera of patients and normal subjects were analyzed using a panel of specific antibodies. Compared with controls, high levels of serum CXCR4 were found in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. Serum CXCR4 levels in the majority of HIV patients were similar to those in healthy controls. A sensitive polyclonal antibody was developed in rabbit immunized with a maltose binding protein (MBP) construct expressing the full-length CXCR4. Using anti-MBPCXCR4 antibody, the level of CXCR4 in sera of a majority of patients with fibrosis was very low. The potential of serum CXCR4 as a new diagnostic biomarker warrants further investigation.

  3. Antinuclear antibodies in the sera of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Takimoto, T.; Ishikawa, S.; Masuda, K.; Tanaka, S.; Yoshizaki, T.; Umeda, R. )

    1989-11-01

    We studied the production of heterophile antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) in the sera of 50 patients, 20 with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and 30 with other head and neck cancers (laryngeal cancer and maxillary cancer), before and after radiation therapy. A higher incidence of ANAs was found in the sera of patients with NPC and ANA production in these patients was higher after radiation therapy. We therefore performed in vitro experiments to explore the mechanisms of ANA production in the serum of postirradiated NPC patients. X-ray-irradiated NPC-derived cells (NPC-KT) produced a large amount of Epstein-Barr virus (NPC EBV) compared with non-irradiated NPC-KT cells. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma EBV-infected lymphocytes produced high levels of ANAs. These data suggest that lymphocytes infected by EBV from NPC cells may produce ANAs in the sera of NPC patients.

  4. Analysis of Cl and Na in Hyperimmune Sera by NAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, T. S.; Zamboni, C. B.; Marcelino, J. R.

    2011-08-01

    The Cl and Na concentration values in four types of hyperimmune sera (anti-Bothrops, anti-Diphtheria, anti-Rabies and anti-Tetanus) used for immunological therapy were determined using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). These data were compatible with the specifications established by the Word Health Organization (WHO-OMS) and with the Brazilian Official Pharmacopea (Pharmaceutical Code Official of the Country). These data are an important support for quality control of hyperimmune sera production at Butantan Institute (São Paulo city, Brazil), responsible for supplying the Brazilian market.

  5. Complement fixation and neutralization RS antibodies in maternal and neonatal sera.

    PubMed Central

    Heijtink, R. A.; Backx, G.; Van Der Horst, J. M.; Masurel, N.

    1977-01-01

    RSV complement fixation antibodies were established in 200 paired maternal and cord blood sera. Geometric mean titres in cord sera were significantly higher than in matermal sera. The differences did not depend on the virus strain used. Half of the paired sera (taken at random) were also submitted to microneutralization tests. No differences were found between geometric mean titres in maternal and cord sera. PMID:266541

  6. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  7. MALT1 Protease Activity Is Required for Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jong W; Hoffman, Sandy; Beal, Allison M; Dykon, Angela; Ringenberg, Michael A; Hughes, Anna C; Dare, Lauren; Anderson, Amber D; Finger, Joshua; Kasparcova, Viera; Rickard, David; Berger, Scott B; Ramanjulu, Joshi; Emery, John G; Gough, Peter J; Bertin, John; Foley, Kevin P

    2015-01-01

    CARMA-BCL10-MALT1 signalosomes play important roles in antigen receptor signaling and other pathways. Previous studies have suggested that as part of this complex, MALT1 functions as both a scaffolding protein to activate NF-κB through recruitment of ubiquitin ligases, and as a protease to cleave and inactivate downstream inhibitory signaling proteins. However, our understanding of the relative importance of these two distinct MALT1 activities has been hampered by a lack of selective MALT1 protease inhibitors with suitable pharmacologic properties. To fully investigate the role of MALT1 protease activity, we generated mice homozygous for a protease-dead mutation in MALT1. We found that some, but not all, MALT1 functions in immune cells were dependent upon its protease activity. Protease-dead mice had defects in the generation of splenic marginal zone and peritoneal B1 B cells. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells displayed decreased T cell receptor-stimulated proliferation and IL-2 production while B cell receptor-stimulated proliferation was partially dependent on protease activity. In dendritic cells, stimulation of cytokine production through the Dectin-1, Dectin-2, and Mincle C-type lectin receptors was also found to be partially dependent upon protease activity. In vivo, protease-dead mice had reduced basal immunoglobulin levels, and showed defective responses to immunization with T-dependent and T-independent antigens. Surprisingly, despite these decreased responses, MALT1 protease-dead mice, but not MALT1 null mice, developed mixed inflammatory cell infiltrates in multiple organs, suggesting MALT1 protease activity plays a role in immune homeostasis. These findings highlight the importance of MALT1 protease activity in multiple immune cell types, and in integrating immune responses in vivo.

  8. Proteases from psychrotrophs: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kasana, Ramesh Chand

    2010-05-01

    Proteases are hydrolytic enzymes which catalyze the total hydrolysis of proteins in to amino acids. Although proteolytic enzymes can be obtained from animals and plants but microorganisms are the preferred source for industrial applications in view of scientific and economical advantage. Among various groups of microbes, psychrotrophs are ideal candidates for enzymes production keeping in mind that enzymes active at low temperature and stable under alkaline condition, in presence of oxidants and detergents are in large demand as laundry additive. The proteases from psychrotrophs also find application in environmental bioremediation, food and molecular biology. During the previous two decades, proteases from psychrotrophs have received increased attention because of their wide range of applications, but the full potential of psychrotrophic proteases has not been exploited. This review focuses attention on the present status of knowledge on the production, optimization, molecular characteristics, applications, substrate specificity, and crystal structure of psychrotrophic proteases. The review will help in making strategies for exploitation of psychrotrophic protease resources and improvement of enzymes to obtain more robust proteases of industrial and biotechnological significance.

  9. Cathepsin proteases in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Zhicheng; Carruthers, Vern B.

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine proteases are important for the growth and survival of apicomplexan parasites that infect humans. The apicomplexan Toxoplasma gondii expresses five members of the C1 family of cysteine proteases, including one cathepsin L-like (TgCPL), one cathepsin B-like (TgCPB), and three cathepsin C-like (TgCPC1, 2 and 3) proteases. Recent genetic, biochemical and structural studies reveal that cathepsins function in microneme and rhoptry protein maturation, host cell invasion, replication, and nutrient acquisition.. Here, we review the key features and roles of T. gondii cathepsins and discuss the therapeutic potential for specific inhibitor development. PMID:21660658

  10. Proteomic analysis of Trichinella spiralis adult worm excretory-secretory proteins recognized by early infection sera.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruo Dan; Qi, Xin; Sun, Ge Ge; Jiang, Peng; Zhang, Xi; Wang, Li Ang; Liu, Xiao Lin; Wang, Zhong Quan; Cui, Jing

    2016-11-15

    At the intestinal stage of a Trichinella spiralis (T. spiralis) infection, the excretory-secretory (ES) antigens produced by adult worms (AWs) result in an early exposure to the host's immune system and elicit the production of specific antibodies; the AW ES proteins might provide early diagnostic markers of trichinellosis. The aim of this study was to identify early serodiagnostic markers from T. spiralis AW ES antigens. T. spiralis AWs were collected at 72h post infection, and their ES antigens were analysed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Then, the immunoreactive bands were subjected to shotgun LC-MS/MS and bioinformatics analyses. Our results showed that only one protein band (33kDa) was recognized by the sera of mice infected with T. spiralis at 8 days after infection. The shotgun LC-MS/MS analysis identified 23 proteins that were then clustered into 10 types; these proteins had molecular weights of 28.13-71.62kDa and pI 5.05-9.20. Certain enzymes (e.g., serine protease, adult-specific deoxyribonuclease [DNase] II, peptidase S1A subfamily, and multi cystatin-like domain protein) were found to be highly represented. The functions of the 10 proteins were further analysed: of the 6 annotated proteins, 3 had serine hydrolase activity and 2 had DNase II activity. These results provide a valuable basis for identifying early diagnostic antigens and vaccine candidates for trichinellosis.

  11. Serine Proteases of Parasitic Helminths

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Wen, Yun jun; Cai, Ya Nan; Vallée, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal; Liu, Ming Yuan; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2015-01-01

    Serine proteases form one of the most important families of enzymes and perform significant functions in a broad range of biological processes, such as intra- and extracellular protein metabolism, digestion, blood coagulation, regulation of development, and fertilization. A number of serine proteases have been identified in parasitic helminths that have putative roles in parasite development and nutrition, host tissues and cell invasion, anticoagulation, and immune evasion. In this review, we described the serine proteases that have been identified in parasitic helminths, including nematodes (Trichinella spiralis, T. pseudospiralis, Trichuris muris, Anisakis simplex, Ascaris suum, Onchocerca volvulus, O. lienalis, Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum, and Steinernema carpocapsae), cestodes (Spirometra mansoni, Echinococcus granulosus, and Schistocephalus solidus), and trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, and Schistosoma mansoni). Moreover, the possible biological functions of these serine proteases in the endogenous biological phenomena of these parasites and in the host-parasite interaction were also discussed. PMID:25748703

  12. Autoantibodies directed against the protease inhibitor calpastatin in psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Y; Shimada, Y; Kawara, S; Takehara, K; Sato, S

    2005-01-01

    Psoriasis is believed to be a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease, but also exhibits autoantibody production. Calpastatin is an endogenous inhibitor of calpain, a ubiquitous protease that regulates inflammatory processes. Anti-calpastatin autoantibody was first identified as an autoantibody specific to rheumatoid arthritis, but has been also detected in other autoimmune diseases. In this study, we examined the presence and levels of anti-calpastatin antibody in 77 psoriasis patients by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Compared with normal controls, psoriasis patients exhibited significantly elevated IgG anti-calpastatin antibody levels that were similar to those found in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Remarkably, IgG anti-calpastatin autoantibody in sera from psoriasis patients inhibited calpastatin activity. Calpain II expression was up-regulated in psoriasis skin lesions compared with normal skin while calpastatin expression was normal. The results of this study reveal the presence of anti-calpastatin autoantibody in psoriasis. PMID:15654835

  13. Application of Protease Technology in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, James Q.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews background on proteases and their functions, their physiological significance in skin, and the potential implications of incorporating specific proteases and protease blends into dermatological products, including skin care formulations. The history of protease blend formulations used in wound model studies and for other disorders is reviewed. In vitro data with use of a specific 3-protease blend with evaluation of the impact on various skin proteins and peptides is also discussed in this article. PMID:23882305

  14. Contribution of Gag and protease to variation in susceptibility to protease inhibitors between different strains of subtype B human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Katherine A; Mbisa, Jean L; Cane, Patricia A; Pillay, Deenan; Parry, Chris M

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag can directly affect susceptibility to protease inhibitors (PIs) in the absence of known resistance mutations in protease. Inclusion of co-evolved Gag alongside protease in phenotypic drug susceptibility assays can alter PI susceptibility in comparison with protease with a WT Gag. Using a single-replication-cycle assay encompassing full-length Gag together with protease we demonstrated significant variation in PI susceptibility between a number of PI-naïve subtype B viruses. Six publicly available subtype B molecular clones, namely HXB2, NL4-3, SF2, YU2, JRFL and 89.6, displayed up to nine-fold reduced PI susceptibility in comparison with the assay reference strain. For two molecular clones, YU2 and JRFL, Gag contributed solely to the observed reduction in susceptibility, with the N-terminal region of Gag contributing significantly. Gag and protease from treatment-naïve, patient-derived viruses also demonstrated significant variation in susceptibility, with up to a 17-fold reduction to atazanavir in comparison with the assay reference strain. In contrast to the molecular clones, protease was the main determinant of the reduced susceptibility. Common polymorphisms in protease, including I13V, L63P and A71T, were shown to contribute to this reduction in PI susceptibility, in the absence of major resistance mutations. This study demonstrated significant variation in PI susceptibility of treatment-naïve patient viruses, and provided further evidence of the independent role of Gag, the protease substrate and in particular the N-terminus of Gag in PI susceptibility. It also highlighted the importance of considering co-evolved Gag and protease when assessing PI susceptibility.

  15. Determination of immune complexes in sera from dogs with various diseases by mastocytoma cell assay.

    PubMed Central

    Targowski, S

    1982-01-01

    Canine immunoglobulin G complexed with particulate or soluble antigen can bind to the Fc receptors on the mastocytoma cells. Attachment of immune complexes composed of immunoglobulin G and soluble antigen (ovalbumin) to mastocytoma cells was detected by an inhibition of rosette formation with indicator cells (sensitized sheep erythrocytes). Therefore, canine circulating immune complexes may also attach to mastocytoma cells and inhibit rosette formation (mastocytoma cell assay). Sera from 326 dogs with various diseases and from 50 clinically normal dogs were assayed for immune complexes. The incidence of immune complexes in sera from normal dogs was 6% as compared with 25% in dogs with various diseases. The immune complexes were demonstrated in 37% of sera from dogs with various neoplastic diseases, 40% of sera from dogs with diabetes, 24% of sera from dogs with hypothyroidism, 50% of sera from dogs with mycotic disease, 75% of sera from dogs with arthritis, 38% of sera from dogs with kidney disorders, 40% of sera from dogs with neurological diseases, 45% of sera from dogs with various parasitic diseases, and 27% of sera from dogs with liver disorders. Only 19% of sera from dogs admitted to the hospital for various surgeries gave positive results. The incidence of the positive sera from dogs with various diseases is discussed in regard to their counterparts of human diseases. PMID:6226676

  16. [On the effect of immune and normal sera on catalase].

    PubMed

    Shataeva, L K; Zaikina, N A

    1975-01-01

    Effect of specific immune and normal sera on catalase was studied. The sera activated the enzyme, partially protected catalase against UV-irradiation and heating and also against the effect of inhibitors. Antibodies against catalase were observed in the fraction of 7 S gamma-globulins of immune serum. In studies of heat denaturation of catalase the stabilizing effect of immune serum was more distinct than the influence of normal serum and its protein fractions. In presence of serum protein fractions there was a correlation between the enthalpy of heat denaturation of catalase and decrease in specificity of the protein, in respect to the enxyme, associated with it in a complex. Alterations in enthropy compensated completely the decrease in enthalpy.

  17. Botulinum neurotoxin A protease: discovery of natural product exosite inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Silhár, Peter; Capková, Katerina; Salzameda, Nicholas T; Barbieri, Joseph T; Hixon, Mark S; Janda, Kim D

    2010-03-10

    A new mechanistic class of BoNT/A zinc metalloprotease inhibitors, from Echinacea, exemplified by the natural product d-chicoric acid (I1) is disclosed. A detailed evaluation of chicoric acid's mechanism of inhibition reveals that the inhibitor binds to an exosite, displays noncompetitive partial inhibition, and is synergistic with a competitive active site inhibitor when used in combination. Other components found in Echinacea, I3 and I4, were also inhibitors of the protease.

  18. Identification of antigenic variants of the porcine rubulavirus in sera of field swine and their seroprevalence.

    PubMed

    Escobar-López, A C; Rivera-Benitez, J F; Castillo-Juárez, H; Ramírez-Mendoza, H; Trujillo-Ortega, M E; Sánchez-Betancourt, J I

    2012-10-01

    We sampled sera from 1013 non-vaccinated swine from four states in Mexico, Guanajuato, Jalisco, Michoacán and the Estado de Mexico, to analyse anti-porcine rubulavirus antibody titres against three different porcine rubulavirus isolates (PAC-4/1993, PAC-6/2001, and PAC-9/2003) using a hemagglutination inhibition assay. The results revealed that there were antigenic differences among the isolates assessed. In particular, the estimated correlation between the PAC-4/1993 and PAC-6/2001 (0.50) isolates and between the PAC-4/1993 and PAC-9/2003 isolates (0.56) displayed a moderate positive correlation. In contrast, there was a strong positive correlation between the PAC-6/2001 and PAC-9/2003 isolates (0.73). We also found that in the state of Guanajuato, PAC-4/1993 was the isolate that was most frequently identified; in Jalisco, the isolate was PAC-6/2001; and in Michoacán, the isolate was PAC-9/2003. By contrast, in the Estado de Mexico, all three isolates appeared to circulate with a low seroprevalence. In general, the analysed sera from the four states displayed a porcine rubulavirus serological prevalence ranging from 9% to 23.7%. These data indicate that there is not complete antibody cross-antigenicity among the three isolates, and the antigenic variations in the antibody response found in this study implies that the use of a monovalent vaccine would not generate complete protection against the different antigenic subtypes.

  19. Serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, and protease-activated receptors: roles in synaptic function and behavior.

    PubMed

    Almonte, Antoine G; Sweatt, J David

    2011-08-17

    Serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, and protease-activated receptors have been intensively investigated in the periphery and their roles in a wide range of processes-coagulation, inflammation, and digestion, for example-have been well characterized (see Coughlin, 2000; Macfarlane et al., 2001; Molinari et al., 2003; Wang et al., 2008; Di Cera, 2009 for reviews). A growing number of studies demonstrate that these protein systems are widely expressed in many cell types and regions in mammalian brains. Accumulating lines of evidence suggest that the brain has co-opted the activities of these interesting proteins to regulate various processes underlying synaptic activity and behavior. In this review, we discuss emerging roles for serine proteases in the regulation of mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity and memory formation.

  20. Crystal Structure of a Novel Viral Protease with a Serine/Lysine Catalytic Dyad Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman,A.; Lee, J.; Delmas, B.; Paetzel, M.

    2006-01-01

    The blotched snakehead virus (BSNV), an aquatic birnavirus, encodes a polyprotein (NH2-pVP2-X-VP4-VP3-COOH) that is processed through the proteolytic activity of its own protease (VP4) to liberate itself and the viral proteins pVP2, X and VP3. The protein pVP2 is further processed by VP4 to give rise to the capsid protein VP2 and four structural peptides. We report here the crystal structure of a VP4 protease from BSNV, which displays a catalytic serine/lysine dyad in its active site. This is the first crystal structure of a birnavirus protease and the first crystal structure of a viral protease that utilizes a lysine general base in its catalytic mechanism. The topology of the VP4 substrate binding site is consistent with the enzymes substrate specificity and a nucleophilic attack from the si-face of the substrates scissile bond. Despite low levels of sequence identity, VP4 shows similarities in its active site to other characterized Ser/Lys proteases such as signal peptidase, LexA protease and Lon protease. Together, the structure of VP4 provides insights into the mechanism of a recently characterized clan of serine proteases that utilize a lysine general base and reveals the structure of potential targets for antiviral therapy, especially for other related and economically important viruses, such as infectious bursal disease virus in poultry and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus in aquaculture.

  1. Use of Sera from Humans and Dolphins with Lacaziosis and Sera from Experimentally Infected Mice for Western Blot Analyses of Lacazia loboi Antigens▿

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Leonel; Belone, Andréa F. F.; Vilela, Raquel; Rehtanz, Manuela; Bossart, Gregory D.; Reif, John S.; Fair, Patricia A.; Durden, Wendy N.; St. Leger, Judy; Travassos, Luiz R.; Rosa, Patricia S.

    2008-01-01

    Antibodies in the sera of patients with lacaziosis recognized an ∼193-kDa antigen and other Lacazia loboi antigens. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis gp43 antigen was detected by all evaluated sera, but they failed to detect a protein with the same molecular mass in L. loboi extracts. This study is the first to examine the humoral response to L. loboi antigens by using multiple host sera. PMID:17959822

  2. Mast Cell Proteases and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hongyan; Korthuis, Ronald J.

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells are best known for their role in allergic reactions but are also now recognized for their important contributions to a number of disparate inflammatory conditions through the release of inflammatory mediators, serglycin and other proteoglycans, and proteases. Because these tissue resident inflammatory cells express proteases in such great abundance and their enzymatic activity results in cleavage of a multitude of proteins and peptides, which in turn modify tissue function, their substrate specificity, tissue distribution, and mode of action have become the subjects of great interest. Although mast cell protease-dependent proteolysis is critical to host defense against invading pathogens, regulation of these hydrolytic enzymes is essential to limiting self-induced damage as well. Indeed, dysregulated release of mast cell proteases is now recognized to contribute to the pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory conditions including asthma, abdominal aortic aneurysm formation, vessel damage in atherosclerosis and hypertension, arthritis, and ischemia/reperfusion injury. Understanding how mast cell proteases contribute to inflammation will thus help unravel molecular mechanisms that underlie such immunologic disorders and will help identify new therapeutic targets for drug development. PMID:22125569

  3. Unveiling antimicrobial peptide-generating human proteases using PROTEASIX.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Paulo; Trindade, Fábio; Ferreira, Rita; Casteleiro, Mercedes Arguello; Stevens, Robert; Klein, Julie; Vitorino, Rui

    2017-02-27

    Extracting information from peptidomics data is a major current challenge, as endogenous peptides can result from the activity of multiple enzymes. Proteolytic enzymes can display overlapping or complementary specificity. The activity spectrum of human endogenous peptide-generating proteases is not fully known. Hence, the indirect study of proteolytic enzymes through the analysis of its substrates is largely hampered. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) represent a primordial set of immune defense molecules generated by proteolytic cleavage of precursor proteins. These peptides can be modulated by host and microorganismal stimuli, which both dictate proteolytic enzymes' expression and activity. Peptidomics is an attractive approach to identify peptides with a biological role and to assess proteolytic activity. However, bioinformatics tools to deal with peptidomics data are lacking. PROTEASIX is an excellent choice for the prediction of AMPs-generating proteases based on the reconstitution of a substrate's cleavage sites and the crossing of such information with known proteases' specificity retrieved by several publicly available databases. Therefore, the focus of the present tutorial is to explore the potential of PROTEASIX when gather information concerning proteases involved in the generation of human AMPs and to teach the user how to make the most out of peptidomics results using PROTEASIX.

  4. Characterisation of novel fungal and bacterial protease preparations and evaluation of their ability to hydrolyse meat myofibrillar and connective tissue proteins.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Kate; Ha, Minh; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din; Carne, Alan

    2015-04-01

    The catalytic capability of four commercially available food-grade fungal and bacterial protease preparations (AFP, FPII, F60K and HT) was evaluated over a range of pH, temperature and substrate conditions using esterase and caseinolytic activity assays and time course hydrolysis over 120 and 60 min of myofibrillar and connective tissue proteins, respectively. The protease preparations displayed similar casein hydrolysis kinetics and were active in hydrolysing BODIPY-FL casein to varying extents at postmortem aging meat pH (5.0-6.0). All of the four proteases exhibited selective hydrolytic activity towards meat myofibrillar proteins including myosin and actin. Significant hydrolysis of two meat tenderisation protein markers troponin T and desmin by the four proteases was detected by western blot. The results obtained indicate that the new fungal protease preparations AFP and FPII, bacterial protease preparation HT and the new source of fungal protease preparation F60K have potential for use in meat tenderising applications.

  5. Cytomegalovirus protease targeted prodrug development.

    PubMed

    Sabit, Hairat; Dahan, Arik; Sun, Jing; Provoda, Chester J; Lee, Kyung-Dall; Hilfinger, John H; Amidon, Gordon L

    2013-04-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a prevalent virus that infects up to 90% of the population. The goal of this research is to determine if small molecular prodrug substrates can be developed for a specific HCMV encoded protease and thus achieve site-specific activation. HCMV encodes a 256 amino acid serine protease that is responsible for capsid assembly, an essential process for herpes virus production. The esterase activity of the more stable HCMV A143T/A144T protease mutant was evaluated with model p-nitrophenol (ONp) esters, Boc-Xaa-ONp (Ala, Leu, Ile, Val, Gln, Phe at the Xaa position). We demonstrate that the A143T/A144T mutant has esterase activity toward specific small ester compounds, e.g., Boc-L-Ala-ONp. Mono amino acid and dipeptide prodrugs of ganciclovir (GCV) were also synthesized and evaluated for hydrolysis by the A143T/A144T protease mutant in solution. Hydrolysis of these prodrugs was also evaluated in Caco-2 cell homogenates, human liver microsomes (HLMs), and rat and human plasma. For the selectivity potential of the prodrugs, the hydrolysis ratio was evaluated as a percentage of prodrug hydrolyzed by the HCMV protease over the percentages of prodrug hydrolyses by Caco-2 cell homogenates, HLMs, and human/rat plasma. A dipeptide prodrug of ganciclovir, Ac-l-Gln-l-Ala-GCV, emerged as a potential selective prodrug candidate. The results of this research demonstrate that targeting prodrugs for activation by a specific protease encoded by the infectious HCMV pathogen may be achievable.

  6. [Identification of heterologous antitoxin in sera of patients with diphtheria].

    PubMed

    Gal'vidis, I A; Burkin, M A; Sviridov, V V

    2008-01-01

    Using immobilized diphtheria toxin and peroxidase conjugate of monoclonal antibodies to light chains of equine immunoglobulin a method of quantification of equine antibodies against diphtheria in sera of patients after serotherapy was developed. The sensitivity of indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was 0.0005 IU/ml, and coefficient of variation did not exceed 10%. It was shown that in patients with toxic diphtheria heterologous antitoxin is eliminated within 4-6 weeks. Level of anti-diphtheria immunoglobulin under the similar severity of disease and dosage of antitoxin can vary in wide ranges and depends from individual's characteristics.

  7. Naturally occurring anti-tissue antibodies in rat sera

    PubMed Central

    Weir, D. M.; Pinckard, R. N.; Elson, C. J.; Suckling, Deirdre E.

    1966-01-01

    Seventy per cent of normal rat sera have been shown to contain heat labile serum component(s) active against various rat organ homogenates as demonstrated by haemolytic complement fixation and passive haemagglutination tests. The main antigenic activity in rat liver has been found in the mitochondrial fractions. It was also demonstrated by the indirect fluorescent antibody technique that both guinea-pig complement and high molecular weight rat globulins were fixed to rat organ sections. Chemotactic activity has also been observed with rat serum and rat liver mitochondria and it is suggested that these naturally occurring antibodies may be implicated in the removal of tissue breakdown products. PMID:5338951

  8. Active protease mapping in 2DE gels.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenjun; Russell, Pamela J

    2009-01-01

    Proteases act as the molecular mediators of many vital biological processes. To understand the function of each protease, it needs to be separated from other proteins and characterized in its natural, biologically active form. In the method described in this chapter, proteases in a biological sample are separated under nonreducing conditions in 2DE gels. A specific small protease substrate, tagged with a fluorescent dye, is copolymerized into the SDS gel in the second dimension. After electrophoresis, the proteins are renatured by washing the gel with Triton X-100 solution or Milli Q water to remove SDS. The gel is then incubated in a protease assay buffer. The hydrolysis of the tagged specific substrate by the renatured protease releases the free fluorescent dye, which fluoresces in situ. The fluorescent spots indicate the location of the specific proteases in the gel and the specificity of the proteases.

  9. Synthesis of macrocyclic trypanosomal cysteine protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen Ting; Lira, Ricardo; Hansell, Elizabeth; McKerrow, James H; Roush, William R

    2008-11-15

    The importance of cysteine proteases in parasites, compounded with the lack of redundancy compared to their mammalian hosts makes proteases attractive targets for the development of new therapeutic agents. The binding mode of K11002 to cruzain, the major cysteine protease of Trypanosoma cruzi was used in the design of conformationally constrained inhibitors. Vinyl sulfone-containing macrocycles were synthesized via olefin ring-closing metathesis and evaluated against cruzain and the closely related cysteine protease, rhodesain.

  10. Plant cysteine proteases that evoke itch activate protease-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, V.B.; Lerner, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Bromelain, ficin and papain are cysteine proteases from plants that produce itch upon injection into skin. Their mechanism of action has not been considered previously. Objectives To determine the mechanism by which these proteases function. Methods The ability of these proteases to activate protease-activated receptors was determined by ratiometric calcium imaging. Results We show here that bromelain, ficin and papain activate protease-activated receptors 2 and 4. Conclusions Bromelain, ficin and papain function as signalling molecules and activate protease-activated receptors. Activation of these receptors is the likely mechanism by which these proteases evoke itch. PMID:20491769

  11. Differential reactivity of immune sera from human vaccinees with field strains of eastern equine encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Strizki, J M; Repik, P M

    1995-11-01

    Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that can produce a severe and often fatal acute encephalitis in humans, with significant neurologic sequelae in survivors. Due to the serious nature of the disease, an investigational inactivated EEE vaccine (PE-6) is available to individuals at risk for infection. Both serologic and recent molecular analyses of EEE viruses have demonstrated marked differences between the two antigenic varieties of EEE virus, designated North American (NA) and South American (SA). In view of these findings, we have examined the reactivity of sera from three individuals immunized with the EEE vaccine, derived from an NA isolate, with field strains of EEE virus. Anti-EEE serum antibodies from vaccinees reacted strongly in Western blot assays with both of the envelope (E1 and E2) glycoproteins of each NA strain examined, while reactivities with the glycoproteins of SA strains were substantially weaker and variable and dependent upon both the immune response of the vaccinee and the virus isolate assayed. Most striking was the modest to virtual lack of reactivity with the E2 protein of SA strains. Antigenic differences among the glycoproteins of EEE viruses were not as pronounced in immunoprecipitation analysis. Most significantly, although human immune sera displayed high neutralizing titers against each of the NA isolates examined, only negligible neutralizing titers were obtained against SA isolates. These data suggest that immunized individuals would mount an effective antibody response against infection with NA strains of EEE virus, but that further investigation is clearly warranted to fully assess the protective capability of the vaccine against infection with SA strains.

  12. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  13. Protective immunity induced in Aotus monkeys by a recombinant SERA protein of Plasmodium falciparum: further studies using SERA 1 and MF75.2 adjuvant.

    PubMed Central

    Inselburg, J; Bathurst, I C; Kansopon, J; Barr, P J; Rossan, R

    1993-01-01

    We describe the third of three vaccination trials of Panamanian Aotus monkeys with a recombinant blood-stage antigen derived from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Immunization was performed with an N-terminal region of the SERA antigen (serine repeat antigen protein), SERA 1, that contains a 262-amino-acid fragment including amino acids 24 to 285 of the 989-amino-acid SERA protein. Vaccinations were carried out with the recombinant protein mixed with either Freund's, MF75.2, or MF59.2 adjuvant. A control group that did not receive SERA 1 but only MF75.2 adjuvant was included. Monkeys vaccinated with the antigen MF59.2 mixture produced low anti-SERA 1 titers and were not protected. Monkeys vaccinated with antigen and Freund's adjuvant had, in general, a higher average anti-SERA 1 titer (107,278) than did monkeys immunized with SERA 1 and MF75.2 (40, 143), yet monkeys in both groups were well protected. Monkeys that received only MF75.2 developed neither detectable anti-SERA 1 nor anti-P. falciparum antibodies prior to or 10 days after parasite challenge, yet were apparently protected against infection. Monkeys vaccinated with either SERA 1 and Freund's, SERA 1 and MF75.2, or MF75.2 alone and that had been challenged but did not develop a countable parasitemia were treated with a curative dose of mefloquine 100 days after parasite challenge and then rechallenged 40 days later. None of the five rechallenged monkeys that had originally received SERA 1 and Freund's developed a countable parasitemia. Only one of five rechallenged monkeys that originally received SERA 1 and MF75.2 developed a high countable parasitemia, while two animals developed a barely countable parasitemia. Four of the rechallenged monkeys that had originally received only MF75.2 developed a moderate to high countable parasitemia. The results indicate that vaccination with SERA 1 and either Freund's or MF75.2 adjuvant provides protection and vaccination with MF75.2 alone can provide a

  14. Trace Elements Status in Sera of Patients with Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Nazila, Ariaee; Reza, Farid; Fahimeh, Shabestari; Mohamad, Shabestari; Farahzad, Jabbari Azad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Asthma is a multifactorial disease and its severity varies with the inflammatory grade. There are conflicting reports about the roles of trace elements in asthma. This study examined the effects of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), and selenium (Se) concentrations in sera of patients with allergic asthma attending Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad, Iran. Methods: Forty-nine patients, aged 10 to 50 years, with asthma in moderate or severe stages, and 24 healthy controls, were enrolled in this study. After demographic data collection and clinical evaluations, the subjects’ serum concentrations of Zn, Cu, and Se were measured via atomic absorbency. Results: Mean serum levels of Zn and Se in patients with allergic asthma were lower than in the healthy control group, but the Cu concentration in sera of patients with allergic asthma was slightly higher than healthy controls. Conclusion: Low levels of trace elements, specifically Zn, may have a role in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma; replacement of these elements may be an effective treatment. PMID:28070530

  15. Extracellular serine proteases from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: Screening, isolation and heterologous expression in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Ribitsch, D; Heumann, S; Karl, W; Gerlach, J; Leber, R; Birner-Gruenberger, R; Gruber, K; Eiteljoerg, I; Remler, P; Siegert, P; Lange, J; Maurer, K H; Berg, G; Guebitz, G M; Schwab, H

    2012-01-01

    A large strain collection comprising antagonistic bacteria was screened for novel detergent proteases. Several strains displayed protease activity on agar plates containing skim milk but were inactive in liquid media. Encapsulation of cells in alginate beads induced protease production. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia emerged as best performer under washing conditions. For identification of wash-active proteases, four extracellular serine proteases called StmPr1, StmPr2, StmPr3 and StmPr4 were cloned. StmPr2 and StmPr4 were sufficiently overexpressed in E. coli. Expression of StmPr1 and StmPr3 resulted in unprocessed, insoluble protein. Truncation of most of the C-terminal domain which has been identified by enzyme modeling succeeded in expression of soluble, active StmPr1 but failed in case of StmPr3. From laundry application tests StmPr2 turned out to be a highly wash-active protease at 45°C. Specific activity of StmPr2 determined with suc-L-Ala-L-Ala-L-Pro-l-Phe-p-nitroanilide as the substrate was 17±2U/mg. In addition we determined the kinetic parameters and cleavage preferences of protease StmPr2.

  16. Engineering of TEV protease variants by yeast ER sequestration screening (YESS) of combinatorial libraries

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Li; Gebhard, Mark C.; Li, Qing; Taft, Joseph M.; Georgiou, George; Iverson, Brent L.

    2013-01-01

    Myriad new applications of proteases would be enabled by an ability to fine-tune substrate specificity and activity. Herein we present a general strategy for engineering protease selectivity and activity by capitalizing on sequestration of the protease to be engineered within the yeast endoplasmic reticulum (ER). A substrate fusion protein composed of yeast adhesion receptor subunit Aga2, selection and counterselection substrate sequences, multiple intervening epitope tag sequences, and a C-terminal ER retention sequence is coexpressed with a protease library. Cleavage of the substrate fusion protein by the protease eliminates the ER retention sequence, facilitating transport to the yeast surface. Yeast cells that display Aga2 fusions in which only the selection substrate is cleaved are isolated by multicolor FACS with fluorescently labeled antiepitope tag antibodies. Using this system, the Tobacco Etch Virus protease (TEV-P), which strongly prefers Gln at P1 of its canonical ENLYFQ↓S substrate, was engineered to recognize selectively Glu or His at P1. Kinetic analysis indicated an overall 5,000-fold and 1,100-fold change in selectivity, respectively, for the Glu- and His-specific TEV variants, both of which retained high catalytic turnover. Human granzyme K and the hepatitis C virus protease were also shown to be amenable to this unique approach. Further, by adjusting the signaling strategy to identify phosphorylated as opposed to cleaved sequences, this unique system was shown to be compatible with the human Abelson tyrosine kinase. PMID:23589865

  17. Engineering of TEV protease variants by yeast ER sequestration screening (YESS) of combinatorial libraries.

    PubMed

    Yi, Li; Gebhard, Mark C; Li, Qing; Taft, Joseph M; Georgiou, George; Iverson, Brent L

    2013-04-30

    Myriad new applications of proteases would be enabled by an ability to fine-tune substrate specificity and activity. Herein we present a general strategy for engineering protease selectivity and activity by capitalizing on sequestration of the protease to be engineered within the yeast endoplasmic reticulum (ER). A substrate fusion protein composed of yeast adhesion receptor subunit Aga2, selection and counterselection substrate sequences, multiple intervening epitope tag sequences, and a C-terminal ER retention sequence is coexpressed with a protease library. Cleavage of the substrate fusion protein by the protease eliminates the ER retention sequence, facilitating transport to the yeast surface. Yeast cells that display Aga2 fusions in which only the selection substrate is cleaved are isolated by multicolor FACS with fluorescently labeled antiepitope tag antibodies. Using this system, the Tobacco Etch Virus protease (TEV-P), which strongly prefers Gln at P1 of its canonical ENLYFQ↓S substrate, was engineered to recognize selectively Glu or His at P1. Kinetic analysis indicated an overall 5,000-fold and 1,100-fold change in selectivity, respectively, for the Glu- and His-specific TEV variants, both of which retained high catalytic turnover. Human granzyme K and the hepatitis C virus protease were also shown to be amenable to this unique approach. Further, by adjusting the signaling strategy to identify phosphorylated as opposed to cleaved sequences, this unique system was shown to be compatible with the human Abelson tyrosine kinase.

  18. Proteases of Stored Product Insects and Their Inhibition by Specific Protease Inhibitors from Soybeans and Wheat Grain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-15

    PROTEASES; PROTEASE INHIBITORS; STORED-PRODUCT INISECTS; TRIBOLIUM CASIANEUH; MIDGUT PROTEASES; TENEBRIO MOLITOR MIDGUT-PROTEASES; LOCUST CAECAL...separation and identification of numerous midgut proteases in Tenebrio and Tribolium . The PAGE-gelatin matrix revealed the inhibitory effect of BBI...the proteinaceous trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitor from soybeans) on several Tribolium proteases - an effect which was not detectable in inhibition

  19. Changes in adipose tissue stromal-vascular cells in primary culture due to porcine sera

    SciTech Connect

    Jewell, D.E.; Hausman, G.J.

    1986-03-01

    This study was conducted to determine the response of rat stromal-vascular cells to pig sea. Sera were collected from unselected contemporary (lean) and high backfat thickness selected (obese) pigs. Sera from obese pigs were collected either by exsanguination or cannulation. sera from lean pigs during the growing phase (45 kg) and the fattening phase (100-110 kg) were collected. Stromal-vascular cells derived rom rat inguinal tissue were cultured on either 25 cm/sup 2/ flasks, collagen-coated coverslips or petri dishes. Cell proliferation was measured by (/sup 3/H)-thymidine incorporation during the fourth day of culture. Coverslip cultures were used for histochemical analysis. Petri dish cultures were used for analysis of Sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) activity. All cells were plated for 24 hours in media containing 10 fetal bovine sera. Test media contained 2.5, 5.0, 10.0% sera. Sera from obese pigs increased GPDH activity and fat cell production when compared to the lean controls. The increased concentration of sera increased esterase activity and lipid as measured with oil red O. The sera from obese pigs collected at slaughter stimulated more fat cell production than obese sera collected by cannulation. These studies show there are adipogenic factors in obese pigs sera which promote fat cell development in primary cell culture.

  20. Purification and characterization of a protease from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1, an antigen common to all the serotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Negrete-Abascal, E; Tenorio, V R; Guerrero, A L; García, R M; Reyes, M E; de la Garza, M

    1998-01-01

    A high molecular-mass proteolytic enzyme of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1, was purified from culture supernatants (CSN) by using DEAE-cellulose and sepharose-4B-gelatin chromatography. In 10% SDS-polyacrylamide gels copolymerized with porcine gelatin, the protease showed a single band of activity of > 200 kDa. However, minor molecular-mass proteolytic bands were observed when the protease was electrophoresed in the presence of either 5% beta-mercaptoethanol, 50 mM dithiothreitol, or 0.25 M urea. Furthermore, when the > 200-kDa purified protein was passed through a sucrose gradient, several bands with proteolytic activity were found: 62, 90, 190, and 540 kDa. The proteolytic activity was increased in the presence of calcium or zinc and was not affected after being heated at 90 degrees C for 5 min. Proteolytic activities were also observed in CSN from all A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes and biotypes. The purified protease hydrolyzed porcine IgA and IgG in vitro. In addition, by immunoblot the protease was recognized by serum of naturally infected pigs with serotypes 1 and 5, and by serum of pigs experimentally infected with serotypes 1, 2, 8, or 9. Serum of a pig vaccinated with CSN of a serotype 3 strain also recognized the protease, but not sera of pigs vaccinated with a bacterin (serotype 1). Proteins from CSN of all the serotypes, which were precipitated with 70% (NH4)2SO4, were recognized by a polyclonal antibody raised against the purified protease. Taken together these results indicate that an antigenic protease is produced in vivo by all the serotypes of A. pleuropneumoniae. The results indicate that proteases could have a role in the disease and in the immune response of pigs infected with A. pleuropneumoniae. Images Figure 2A. Figure 2B. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5A. Figure 5B. Figure 6A. Figure 6B. PMID:9684047

  1. Bacterial proteases in IBD and IBS.

    PubMed

    Steck, Natalie; Mueller, Kerstin; Schemann, Michael; Haller, Dirk

    2012-11-01

    Proteases play a decisive role in health and disease. They fulfil diverse functions and have been associated with the pathology of gastrointestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The current knowledge focuses on host-derived proteases including matrix metalloproteinases, various serine proteases and cathepsins. The possible contribution of bacterial proteases has been largely ignored in the pathogenesis of IBD and IBS, although there is increasing evidence, especially demonstrated for proteases from pathogenic bacteria. The underlying mechanisms extend to proteases from commensal bacteria which may be relevant for disease susceptibility. The intestinal microbiota and its proteolytic capacity exhibit the potential to contribute to the pathogenesis of IBD and IBS. This review highlights the relevance of host- and bacteria-derived proteases and their signalling mechanisms.

  2. Biotechnology of Cold-Active Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Swati; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2013-01-01

    The bulk of Earth’s biosphere is cold (<5 °C) and inhabited by psychrophiles. Biocatalysts from psychrophilic organisms (psychrozymes) have attracted attention because of their application in the ongoing efforts to decrease energy consumption. Proteinases as a class represent the largest category of industrial enzymes. There has been an emphasis on employing cold-active proteases in detergents because this allows laundry operations at ambient temperatures. Proteases have been used in environmental bioremediation, food industry and molecular biology. In view of the present limited understanding and availability of cold-active proteases with diverse characteristics, it is essential to explore Earth’s surface more in search of an ideal cold-active protease. The understanding of molecular and mechanistic details of these proteases will open up new avenues to tailor proteases with the desired properties. A detailed account of the developments in the production and applications of cold-active proteases is presented in this review. PMID:24832807

  3. Identification of Genotypic Changes in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease That Correlate with Reduced Susceptibility to the Protease Inhibitor Lopinavir among Viral Isolates from Protease Inhibitor-Experienced Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Dale J.; Isaacson, Jeffrey D.; King, Martin S.; Brun, Scott C.; Xu, Yi; Real, Kathryn; Bernstein, Barry M.; Japour, Anthony J.; Sun, Eugene; Rode, Richard A.

    2001-01-01

    The association of genotypic changes in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease with reduced in vitro susceptibility to the new protease inhibitor lopinavir (previously ABT-378) was explored using a panel of viral isolates from subjects failing therapy with other protease inhibitors. Two statistical tests showed that specific mutations at 11 amino acid positions in protease (L10F/I/R/V, K20M/R, L24I, M46I/L, F53L, I54L/T/V, L63P, A71I/L/T/V, V82A/F/T, I84V, and L90M) were associated with reduced susceptibility. Mutations at positions 82, 54, 10, 63, 71, and 84 were most closely associated with relatively modest (4- and 10-fold) changes in phenotype, while the K20M/R and F53L mutations, in conjunction with multiple other mutations, were associated with >20- and >40-fold-reduced susceptibility, respectively. The median 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of lopinavir against isolates with 0 to 3, 4 or 5, 6 or 7, and 8 to 10 of the above 11 mutations were 0.8-, 2.7-, 13.5-, and 44.0-fold higher, respectively, than the IC50 against wild-type HIV. On average, the IC50 of lopinavir increased by 1.74-fold per mutation in isolates containing three or more mutations. Each of the 16 viruses that displayed a >20-fold change in susceptibility contained mutations at residues 10, 54, 63, and 82 and/or 84, along with a median of three mutations at residues 20, 24, 46, 53, 71, and 90. The number of protease mutations from the 11 identified in these analyses (the lopinavir mutation score) may be useful for the interpretation of HIV genotypic resistance testing with respect to lopinavir-ritonavir (Kaletra) regimens and may provide insight into the genetic barrier to resistance to lopinavir-ritonavir in both antiretroviral therapy-naive and protease inhibitor-experienced patients. PMID:11462018

  4. Detection of autoantibodies against survivin in sera from cancer dogs.

    PubMed

    Tango, Yumiko; Kano, Rui; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Asano, Kazushi; Tanaka, Shigeo; Hasegawa, Astuhiko; Kamata, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    Survivin overexpression has been reported in relation to tumor malignancy, suggesting that it is an unfavorable prognostic marker, and antibody responses to this protein have been confirmed in human cancer patients. In this study, we investigated antibody responses to survivin in canine cancer cases, and examined the prevalence of such responses by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using recombinant canine survivin protein as the antigen. The cut-off value for positivity in the anti-survivin ELISA was 0.35, as determined using the mean absorbance +2 S.D. of samples from healthy dogs. Sera from 16 of 59 (27.1%) cancer and 3 of 25 (12%) non-cancer disease dogs were positive on ELISA. The highest positivity rates (>50%) among the cancer cases were seen in dogs with mammary tumor, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

  5. Stability of human sera collected for clinical chemistry determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, F. M.

    1969-01-01

    Problems in collecting and shipping human sera for clinical chemical analyses affect their stability and require proper preservation methods. It is shown that glutamic pyruvate transaminase is very unstable and serum cannot be shipped unless the shipping time is carefully controlled and is less than two days under refrigeration. A limit of four days handling time and avoidance of light exposure are required in bilirubin testing of specimens. Addition of 11 mg of a 10 to 1 mixture of finely powdered sodium fluoride and thymol per ml of blood to preserve specimen stability en route to a central laboratory prevents glycolysis. A citrate buffer at pH 6.2 in serum to be tested for alkaline phosphatase lessens decline at room temperature.

  6. Immunohistochemical studies using immunized Guinea pig sera with features of anti-human thyroid, eye and skeletal antibody and Graves' sera.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Ildikó; Szombathy, Zita; Kovács, Ilona; Szentmiklósi, A József

    2007-03-01

    Type 2 5' deiodinase enzyme was observed in both thyroid and eye muscle tissues, highlighting its possible role as a common antigen in thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy. Sera of 105 Graves' patients and 40 controls, and immunized guinea pig sera against TCSS peptide, showing homology to the amino acid sequence from 132 to 152 of type 2 5' deiodinase, were investigated to demonstrate the binding effects to human thyroid, eye and skeletal muscle tissues. Twenty-two Graves' patients were positive for anti-TCSS peptide antibodies, of whom 18 cases had ophthalmopathy. The levels of anti-TCSS peptide antibodies were higher not only in Graves' patients with (P<0.0001) and without (P<0.036) eye symptoms compared to controls but also the difference was significant between patients with and without ophthalmopathy (P<0.049). In Western blot, immunized sera showed binding reactions to the supernatant fractions of human thyroid, eye and skeletal muscle tissues at the range of 29 kDa. Patient sera with Graves' ophthalmopathy resulted in positive reactions directed to membrane areas in thyroid follicular cells, and to fibers in eye and skeletal muscles using immunohistochemical method, while no positive staining was present after adding control sera. The binding features of immunized guinea pig sera exhibited similar staining in all human tissues but could be blocked with Graves' sera. Our results suggest that type 2 5' deiodinase enzyme protein could play a role as an antigen in Graves' disease. Immunized guinea pig sera against TCSS peptide exhibited similar binding reactions and stainings to human thyroid, eye and skeletal muscle tissues as patient sera with Graves' ophthalmopathy.

  7. Characterization of human septic sera induced gene expression modulation in human myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Shaimaa; Michael, Paul; Brabant, Danielle; Omri, Abdelwahab; Narain, Ravin; Passi, Kalpdrum; Ramana, Chilakamarti V.; Parrillo, Joseph E.; Kumar, Anand; Parissenti, Amadeo; Kumar, Aseem

    2009-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the gene expression changes that occurs during sepsis, we have performed a cDNA microarray study utilizing a tissue culture model that mimics human sepsis. This study utilized an in vitro model of cultured human fetal cardiac myocytes treated with 10% sera from septic patients or 10% sera from healthy volunteers. A 1700 cDNA expression microarray was used to compare the transcription profile from human cardiac myocytes treated with septic sera vs normal sera. Septic sera treatment of myocytes resulted in the down-regulation of 178 genes and the up-regulation of 4 genes. Our data indicate that septic sera induced cell cycle, metabolic, transcription factor and apoptotic gene expression changes in human myocytes. Identification and characterization of gene expression changes that occur during sepsis may lead to the development of novel therapeutics and diagnostics. PMID:19684886

  8. Display formats manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runnels, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The standards and procedures for the generation of operational display formats to be used in the Mission Control Center (MCC) display control system are presented. The required effort, forms, and fundamentals for the design, specifications, and production of display formats are identified. The principles of display design and system constraints controlling the creation of optimum operational displays for mission control are explained. The basic two types of MCC display systems for presenting information are described.

  9. In Silico Screening on the Three-dimensional Model of the Plasmodium vivax SUB1 Protease Leads to the Validation of a Novel Anti-parasite Compound*

    PubMed Central

    Bouillon, Anthony; Giganti, David; Benedet, Christophe; Gorgette, Olivier; Pêtres, Stéphane; Crublet, Elodie; Girard-Blanc, Christine; Witkowski, Benoit; Ménard, Didier; Nilges, Michael; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Stoven, Véronique; Barale, Jean-Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Widespread drug resistance calls for the urgent development of new antimalarials that target novel steps in the life cycle of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. The essential subtilisin-like serine protease SUB1 of Plasmodium merozoites plays a dual role in egress from and invasion into host erythrocytes. It belongs to a new generation of attractive drug targets against which specific potent inhibitors are actively searched. We characterize here the P. vivax SUB1 enzyme and show that it displays a typical auto-processing pattern and apical localization in P. vivax merozoites. To search for small PvSUB1 inhibitors, we took advantage of the similarity of SUB1 with bacterial subtilisins and generated P. vivax SUB1 three-dimensional models. The structure-based virtual screening of a large commercial chemical compounds library identified 306 virtual best hits, of which 37 were experimentally confirmed inhibitors and 5 had Ki values of <50 μm for PvSUB1. Interestingly, they belong to different chemical families. The most promising competitive inhibitor of PvSUB1 (compound 2) was equally active on PfSUB1 and displayed anti-P. falciparum and Plasmodium berghei activity in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Compound 2 inhibited the endogenous PfSUB1 as illustrated by the inhibited maturation of its natural substrate PfSERA5 and inhibited parasite egress and subsequent erythrocyte invasion. These data indicate that the strategy of in silico screening of three-dimensional models to select for virtual inhibitors combined with stringent biological validation successfully identified several inhibitors of the PvSUB1 enzyme. The most promising hit proved to be a potent cross-inhibitor of PlasmodiumSUB1, laying the groundwork for the development of a globally active small compound antimalarial. PMID:23653352

  10. Nelfinavir: fourth protease inhibitor approved.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted accelerated approval to nelfinavir in both adult and pediatric formulations. Agouron, the manufacturer, used innovative computerized drug design techniques to discover, design, and refine the nelfinavir molecule. Nelfinavir is marketed under the trade name Viracept, and costs $5,000 per year. Early clinical trials find it to be as powerful as the other protease inhibitors, but with a different resistance profile. The drug has relatively few drug indications; however, several compounds have been contraindicated.

  11. Protease Profiling in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    acid synthase, which contains a serine hydrolase domain. We identified a lead inhibitor of this domain of fatty acid synthase, called Orlistat, which...SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Prostate cancer, tumor biology, protease, proteomics, transgenic, 20 animal model, fatty acid synthase, orlistat 16...the enzymes we identified is fatty acid synthase. Fatty acid synthase is the sole enzyme responsible for the cellular synthesis of fatty acids . This

  12. Characterization of Sera with Discordant Results from Reverse Sequence Screening for Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyunghoon; Park, Hyewon; Roh, Eun Youn; Shin, Sue; Park, Kyoung Un; Park, Myoung Hee; Song, Eun Young

    2013-01-01

    Reverse sequence screening for syphilis (RSSS) (screening with treponemal tests, followed by confirmation with nontreponemal tests) has been increasingly adopted. CDC recommends confirmation of discordant results (reactive EIA/CIA and nonreactive nontreponemal test) with Treponema pallidum particle agglutination assay (TP-PA). We characterized sera with discordant results from RSSS with Architect Syphilis TP CIA. Among 15,713 screening tests using Architect Syphilis TP at Seoul National University Gangnam Center between October 2010 and May 2011, 260 (1.7%) showed reactive results. Rapid plasma reagin (RPR) and TP-PA were performed on 153 available sera among them. On sera with discordant results between Architect Syphilis TP and TP-PA, INNO-LIA Syphilis Score and FTA-ABS were performed. Among 153 sera, RPR was nonreactive in 126 (82.4%). Among them, TP-PA was positive in 103 (81.7%), indeterminate (±) in 7 (5.6%), and negative in 16 (12.7%). Out of 16 CIA(+)/RPR(−)/TP-PA(−) sera, INNO-LIA Syphilis Score and/or FTA-ABS were negative on 14 sera. Out of 7 CIA(+)/RPR(−)/TP-PA(±) sera, INNO-LIA Syphilis Score and FTA-ABS were positive/reactive in 6 sera. RSSS with confirmation by TP-PA on sera with discordant results between Architect Syphilis TP and RPR effectively delineated those discordant results and could be successfully adopted for routine checkup for syphilis. PMID:23509699

  13. Lupus/Sjögren's autoantibody specificities in sera with paraproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sestak, A L; Harley, J B; Yoshida, S; Reichlin, M

    1987-01-01

    Antinuclear antibody and anti-RNA-protein autoantibodies were determined in 143 sera containing paraproteins and 39 control sera. Antinuclear antibodies were commonly present in the paraprotein sera by indirect immunofluorescence. 19 of 143 sera (13%) had elevated anti-Ro/SSA activity in a solid phase Ro/SSA binding assay, and 5 (3.5%) had Ro/SSA precipitating autoantibody. Eighteen sera had La/SSB binding autoantibodies (12%) but only one had an anti-La/SSB precipitin. Anti-nRNP(Sm) was not detected in any of these sera. The solid phase anti-RNA protein assays were repeated using anti-lambda and anti-kappa conjugates. Both lambda and kappa light chain autoantibodies were found in all positive sera consistent with polyclonal anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB responses. Paraprotein sera containing Ro/SSA precipitins were analyzed by isoelectric focusing followed by exposure to 125I-labeled Ro/SSA and autoradiography. All sera with anti-Ro/SSA binding paraproteins also contained polyclonal anti-Ro/SSA. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that anti-Ro/SSA paraproteins are common and arise from a previously present polyclonal anti-Ro/SSA response. Images PMID:3496360

  14. Molecular Imaging of Proteases in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunan; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2010-01-01

    Proteases play important roles during tumor angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Various molecular imaging techniques have been employed for protease imaging: optical (both fluorescence and bioluminescence), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET). In this review, we will summarize the current status of imaging proteases in cancer with these techniques. Optical imaging of proteases, in particular with fluorescence, is the most intensively validated and many of the imaging probes are already commercially available. It is generally agreed that the use of activatable probes is the most accurate and appropriate means for measuring protease activity. Molecular imaging of proteases with other techniques (i.e. MRI, SPECT, and PET) has not been well-documented in the literature which certainly deserves much future effort. Optical imaging and molecular MRI of protease activity has very limited potential for clinical investigation. PET/SPECT imaging is suitable for clinical investigation; however the optimal probes for PET/SPECT imaging of proteases in cancer have yet to be developed. Successful development of protease imaging probes with optimal in vivo stability, tumor targeting efficacy, and desirable pharmacokinetics for clinical translation will eventually improve cancer patient management. Not limited to cancer, these protease-targeted imaging probes will also have broad applications in other diseases such as arthritis, atherosclerosis, and myocardial infarction. PMID:20234801

  15. Comparative studies on neutralisation of primary HIV-1 isolates by human sera and rabbit anti-V3 peptide sera.

    PubMed

    Lawoko, A L; Johansson, B; Hjalmarsson, S; Christensson, B; Ljungberg, B; Al-Khalili, L; Sjölund, M; Pipkorn, R; Fenyö, E M; Blomberg, J

    1999-10-01

    IgG binding to V3 peptides and serum neutralising responses were studied in four HIV-1 infected individuals with progressive disease over a period of 31-70 months. The 18-20 mer peptides comprised residues 299-317 (numbering of HIV1 MN) in the N-terminal half of the V3 loop of the envelope glycoprotein gp120 and were derived from the sequences of autologous, as well as heterologous isolates. All four individuals studied lacked anti-V3 IgG binding to at least one autologous V3 sequence. V3 peptides to which autologous sera lacked binding IgG were all immunogenic in rabbits and induced antisera that were broadly cross-reactive by EIA and broadly cross-neutralising to primary HIV-1 isolates. This indicates that the peptides are immunogenic per se and that the respective human hosts have selective defects in recognising the corresponding V3 sequences. Despite the absence of antibody binding to autologous V3 peptides, the human sera had neutralising antibodies to autologous (three out of four cases), as well as heterologous isolates (all cases). Moreover, in vitro exposure of the patients' isolates to autologous neutralising serum or the homologous rabbit antiserum selected for variants with amino acid substitutions close to the crown of the V3 loop or in regions outside the sequence corresponding to peptides used for immunisation. The amino acid exchanges affected V3 positions known to be antigenic and which are also prone to change successively in infected persons. It is likely that neutralising antibodies recognise both linear and conformational epitopes in the V3 loop. Apparently, there are several, but restricted, numbers of ways for this structure to change its conformation and thereby give rise to neutralisation resistant viruses.

  16. Isolation and characterization of two serine proteases from metagenomic libraries of the Gobi and Death Valley deserts.

    PubMed

    Neveu, Julie; Regeard, Christophe; DuBow, Michael S

    2011-08-01

    The screening of environmental DNA metagenome libraries for functional activities can provide an important source of new molecules and enzymes. In this study, we identified 17 potential protease-producing clones from two metagenomic libraries derived from samples of surface sand from the Gobi and Death Valley deserts. Two of the proteases, DV1 and M30, were purified and biochemically examined. These two proteases displayed a molecular mass of 41.5 kDa and 45.7 kDa, respectively, on SDS polyacrylamide gels. Alignments with known protease sequences showed less than 55% amino acid sequence identity. These two serine proteases appear to belong to the subtilisin (S8A) family and displayed several unique biochemical properties. Protease DV1 had an optimum pH of 8 and an optimal activity at 55°C, while protease M30 had an optimum pH >11 and optimal activity at 40°C. The properties of these enzymes make them potentially useful for biotechnological applications and again demonstrate that metagenomic approaches can be useful, especially when coupled with the study of novel environments such as deserts.

  17. Intra-domain phage display (ID-PhD) of peptides and protein mini-domains censored from canonical pIII phage display.

    PubMed

    Tjhung, Katrina F; Deiss, Frédérique; Tran, Jessica; Chou, Ying; Derda, Ratmir

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe multivalent display of peptide and protein sequences typically censored from traditional N-terminal display on protein pIII of filamentous bacteriophage M13. Using site-directed mutagenesis of commercially available M13KE phage cloning vector, we introduced sites that permit efficient cloning using restriction enzymes between domains N1 and N2 of the pIII protein. As infectivity of phage is directly linked to the integrity of the connection between N1 and N2 domains, intra-domain phage display (ID-PhD) allows for simple quality control of the display and the natural variations in the displayed sequences. Additionally, direct linkage to phage propagation allows efficient monitoring of sequence cleavage, providing a convenient system for selection and evolution of protease-susceptible or protease-resistant sequences. As an example of the benefits of such an ID-PhD system, we displayed a negatively charged FLAG sequence, which is known to be post-translationally excised from pIII when displayed on the N-terminus, as well as positively charged sequences which suppress production of phage when displayed on the N-terminus. ID-PhD of FLAG exhibited sub-nanomolar apparent Kd suggesting multivalent nature of the display. A TEV-protease recognition sequence (TEVrs) co-expressed in tandem with FLAG, allowed us to demonstrate that 99.9997% of the phage displayed the FLAG-TEVrs tandem and can be recognized and cleaved by TEV-protease. The residual 0.0003% consisted of phage clones that have excised the insert from their genome. ID-PhD is also amenable to display of protein mini-domains, such as the 33-residue minimized Z-domain of protein A. We show that it is thus possible to use ID-PhD for multivalent display and selection of mini-domain proteins (Affibodies, scFv, etc.).

  18. Stereoscopic Flat Panel Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    the display of stereo imagery have been demonstrated. Stereoscopic displays typically require the user to wear special headgear. Autostereoscopic ...components and the resulting changes in the encoding algorithm. Keywords: Stereoscopic display, LCD, 3D , polarization encoding, flat panel 1...panel display when viewing non-stereoscopic imagery or data. Remotely operated vehicles do not represent the only potential application for 3D

  19. Electrochromic display device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, M. M.

    1984-07-01

    This invention relates to electrochromic devices. In one aspect it relates to electrically controllable display devices. In another aspect it relates to electrically tunable optical or light filters. In yet another aspect it relates to a chemical sensor device which employs a color changing film. There are many uses for electrically controllable display devices. A number of such devices have been in commercial use for some time. These display devices include liquid crystal displays, light emitting diode displays, plasma displays, and the like. Light emitting diode displays and plasma display panels both suffer from the fact that they are active. Light emissive devices which require substantial power for their operation, In addition, it is difficult to fabricate light emitting diode displays in a manner which renders them easily distinguishable under bright ambient illumination. Liquid crystal displays suffer from the disadvantage that they are operative only over a limited temperature range and have substantially no memory within the liquid crystal material.

  20. Detection of antibodies to proteases used in laundry detergents by the radioallergosorbent test.

    PubMed

    Dor, P J; Agarwal, M K; Gleich, M C; Welsh, P W; Dunnette, S L; Adolphson, C R; Gleich, G J

    1986-11-01

    Two proteases, Esperase and Alcalase, derived from Bacillus licheniformis and B. subtilis, respectively, are used in laundry products. In testing for the prevalence of IgE antibodies to these enzymes in sera among 300 laundry product workers, we experienced two problems in the establishment of a reliable RAST for these antigens. The first problem was the propensity of the allergen, Esperase, to undergo autolysis, suggesting that solid-phase Esperase might also lose reactivity through degradation. Treatment of Esperase with phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride stabilized the enzyme and permitted the synthesis of a stable solid-phase antigen. The second problem was the finding that sera reactive with Esperase in the RAST were also reactive with Savinase, an enzyme from B. licheniformis to which the workers were not exposed. Immunochemical analyses of the three enzymes with specific rabbit antisera by gel diffusion and by two-site immunoradiometric assay demonstrated that they were not cross contaminated to any appreciable extent. RAST inhibition demonstrated that solid-phase Esperase possessed unique allergenic determinants in that the reactivity of IgE antibodies was inhibited by low concentrations of Esperase and only by very high concentrations of Alcalase and Savinase. In contrast, the reactivity of solid-phase Alcalase was occasionally inhibited equally well by Esperase and Alcalase. Most strikingly, the reaction of IgE antibodies with solid-phase Savinase was always inhibited by comparable quantities of Esperase, Alcalase, and Savinase. Thus, the establishment of the RAST for these proteases appears to require the use of phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride to retard autolysis, and the results must be interpreted with caution because IgE antibodies in certain sera demonstrate cross-reactivity with Alcalase and Savinase.

  1. Biofluid proteases profiling in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Fábio; Ferreira, Rita; Amado, Francisco; Vitorino, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of protease relevance in biologic systems beyond catabolism of proteins and peptides to amino acids has stimulated interest as to their role in the pathogenesis of several disorders including diabetes mellitus (DM). Evaluation of proteases and the assessment of their activity in biofluids are fundamental to elucidate these proteolytic systems in DM and its related complications. In contrast to traditional immunoassay or substrate based approaches that targeted specific proteases and their inhibitors, the field of degradomics has provided a comprehensive approach to study these enzymes. Although the degradome contains over 500 proteases, very few have been associated with DM and its micro- and macrovascular complications. In this paper, we review these proteases and their respective inhibitors with emphasis on DM. It is likely that future research will expand these initial studies and look to develop high throughput automated technologies to identify and characterize biofluid proteases of diagnostic and prognostic value in other pathologies.

  2. Advances in protease engineering for laundry detergents.

    PubMed

    Vojcic, Ljubica; Pitzler, Christian; Körfer, Georgette; Jakob, Felix; Ronny Martinez; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2015-12-25

    Proteases are essential ingredients in modern laundry detergents. Over the past 30 years, subtilisin proteases employed in the laundry detergent industry have been engineered by directed evolution and rational design to tailor their properties towards industrial demands. This comprehensive review discusses recent success stories in subtilisin protease engineering. Advances in protease engineering for laundry detergents comprise simultaneous improvement of thermal resistance and activity at low temperatures, a rational strategy to modulate pH profiles, and a general hypothesis for how to increase promiscuous activity towards the production of peroxycarboxylic acids as mild bleaching agents. The three protease engineering campaigns presented provide in-depth analysis of protease properties and have identified principles that can be applied to improve or generate enzyme variants for industrial applications beyond laundry detergents.

  3. Structure and mechanism of rhomboid protease.

    PubMed

    Ha, Ya; Akiyama, Yoshinori; Xue, Yi

    2013-05-31

    Rhomboid protease was first discovered in Drosophila. Mutation of the fly gene interfered with growth factor signaling and produced a characteristic phenotype of a pointed head skeleton. The name rhomboid has since been widely used to describe a large family of related membrane proteins that have diverse biological functions but share a common catalytic core domain composed of six membrane-spanning segments. Most rhomboid proteases cleave membrane protein substrates near the N terminus of their transmembrane domains. How these proteases function within the confines of the membrane is not completely understood. Recent progress in crystallographic analysis of the Escherichia coli rhomboid protease GlpG in complex with inhibitors has provided new insights into the catalytic mechanism of the protease and its conformational change. Improved biochemical assays have also identified a substrate sequence motif that is specifically recognized by many rhomboid proteases.

  4. System status display information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, L. G.; Erickson, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    The system Status Display is an electronic display system which provides the flight crew with enhanced capabilities for monitoring and managing aircraft systems. Guidelines for the design of the electronic system displays were established. The technical approach involved the application of a system engineering approach to the design of candidate displays and the evaluation of a Hernative concepts by part-task simulation. The system engineering and selection of candidate displays are covered.

  5. Protease specificity determination by using cellular libraries of peptide substrates (CLiPS).

    PubMed

    Boulware, Kevin T; Daugherty, Patrick S

    2006-05-16

    We report a general combinatorial approach to identify optimal substrates of a given protease by using quantitative kinetic screening of cellular libraries of peptide substrates (CLiPS). A whole-cell protease activity assay was developed by displaying fluorescent reporter substrates on the surface of Escherichia coli as N-terminal fusions. This approach enabled generation of substrate libraries of arbitrary amino acid composition and length that are self-renewing. Substrate hydrolysis by a target protease was measured quantitatively via changes in whole-cell fluorescence by using FACS. FACS enabled efficient screening to identify optimal substrates for a given protease and characterize their cleavage kinetics. The utility of CLiPS was demonstrated by determining the substrate specificity of two unrelated proteases, caspase-3 and enteropeptidase (or enterokinase). CLiPS unambiguously identified the caspase-3 consensus cleavage sequence DXVDG. Enteropeptidase was unexpectedly promiscuous, but exhibited a preference for substrates with the motif (D/E)RM, which were cleaved substantially faster than the canonical DDDDK recognition sequence, widely used for protein purification. CLiPS provides a straightforward and versatile approach to determine protease specificity and discover optimal substrates on the basis of cleavage kinetics.

  6. Bacterial proteases: targets for diagnostics and therapy.

    PubMed

    Kaman, W E; Hays, J P; Endtz, H P; Bikker, F J

    2014-07-01

    Proteases are essential for the proliferation and growth of bacteria, and are also known to contribute to bacterial virulence. This makes them interesting candidates as diagnostic and therapeutic targets for infectious diseases. In this review, the authors discuss the most recent developments and potential applications for bacterial proteases in the diagnosis and treatment of bacterial infections. Current and future bacterial protease targets are described and their limitations outlined.

  7. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  8. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  9. Proteolytic crosstalk in multi-protease networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, Curtis T.; Mather, William H.

    2016-04-01

    Processive proteases, such as ClpXP in E. coli, are conserved enzyme assemblies that can recognize and rapidly degrade proteins. These proteases are used for a number of purposes, including degrading mistranslated proteins and controlling cellular stress response. However, proteolytic machinery within the cell is limited in capacity and can lead to a bottleneck in protein degradation, whereby many proteins compete (‘queue’) for proteolytic resources. Previous work has demonstrated that such queueing can lead to pronounced statistical relationships between different protein counts when proteins compete for a single common protease. However, real cells contain many different proteases, e.g. ClpXP, ClpAP, and Lon in E. coli, and it is not clear how competition between proteins for multiple classes of protease would influence the dynamics of cellular networks. In the present work, we theoretically demonstrate that a multi-protease proteolytic bottleneck can substantially couple the dynamics for both simple and complex (oscillatory) networks, even between substrates with substantially different affinities for protease. For these networks, queueing often leads to strong positive correlations between protein counts, and these correlations are strongest near the queueing theoretic point of balance. Furthermore, we find that the qualitative behavior of these networks depends on the relative size of the absolute affinity of substrate to protease compared to the cross affinity of substrate to protease, leading in certain regimes to priority queue statistics.

  10. Trace elements in sera from patients with renal disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Yoshinori; Nakai, Keiko; Sera, Kouichiro; Sato, Michirou

    1999-04-01

    In hemodialysis (HD) patients, an accumulation of trace elements such as aluminum, copper, silicon and vanadium has been reported. Aluminum-caused encephalopathy and aluminum-related bone diseases are important trace element-related complications. Using particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) we determined concentrations of aluminum, silicon, copper, zinc, selenium and bromine in sera of 29 patients with HD, 14 nondialysis patients with renal disease (RD) and 27 normal controls. The concentration of serum silicon of the patients with HD was 107.4 ± 61.3 μmol/l, which is markedly higher than that of normal controls (48.3 ± 25.8 μmol/l, p < 0.0001). The serum concentrations of zinc and bromine in patients with HD were 11.9 ± 1.7 and 21.3 ± 3.0 μmol/l, respectively. Both were markedly lower than those of normal controls (15.6 ± 2.6, 69.2 ± 8.3 μmol/l, p < 0.0001). The concentrations of aluminium and bromine in the serum of patients with RD were 171.9 ± 64.3 and 81.9 ± 11.6 μmol/l, which were markedly higher than those of normal controls ( p < 0.0001, p < 0.001). No significant differences were observed in the concentration of copper and selenium among three groups.

  11. Roe deer sera used for TBE surveillance in Austria.

    PubMed

    Duscher, Georg Gerhard; Wetscher, Monika; Baumgartner, Raphaela; Walder, Gernot

    2015-06-01

    A large majority of Austrian citizens are aware of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE), consequently reflected by a high vaccination rate of 85%. In return, risk assessment and disease mapping on human cases might be hampered due to high and inhomogeneous vaccination rates and travel habitats of humans. The roe deer was used to obtain a starting point for the integral view on the actual risk of TBE in Austria. The roe deer exhibits several attributes which makes it suitable as an indicator species: the roe deer has a restricted home range and it is known to be a heavy tick carrier. Furthermore it sero-converts after infection with TBE, but no outbreak occurs. Sera from 945 roe deer were obtained from all over Austria and screened with IFAT for the antibodies against TBE. Twenty-two positive samples, 2.4%, and 17 samples at the borderline titre of 1:16 were identified. The majority of the positive samples, 70.6%, were located in known TBE areas based on human cases. Further research is needed to confirm or reject new endemic foci of TBE transmission.

  12. Profiling antibodies to class II HLA in transplant patient sera.

    PubMed

    McMurtrey, Curtis; Lowe, Dave; Buchli, Rico; Daga, Sunil; Royer, Derek; Humphrey, Alisha; Cate, Steven; Osborn, Sean; Mojsilovic, Aleksandar; VanGundy, Rodney; Bardet, Wilfried; Duty, Andrew; Mojsilovic, Danijela; Jackson, Kenneth; Stastny, Peter; Briggs, David; Zehnder, Daniel; Higgins, Rob; Hildebrand, William

    2014-03-01

    Immunizing events including pregnancy, transfusions, and transplantation promote strong alloantibody responses to HLA. Such alloantibodies to HLA preclude organ transplantation, foster hyperacute rejection, and contribute to chronic transplant failure. Diagnostic antibody-screening assays detect alloreactive antibodies, yet key attributes including antibody concentration and isotype remain largely unexplored. The goal here was to provide a detailed profile of allogeneic antibodies to class II HLA. Methodologically, alloantibodies were purified from sensitized patient sera using an HLA-DR11 immunoaffinity column and subsequently categorized. Antibodies to DR11 were found to fix complement, exist at a median serum concentration of 2.3μg/mL, consist of all isotypes, and isotypes IgG2, IgM, and IgE were elevated. Because multimeric isotypes can confound diagnostic determinations of antibody concentration, IgM and IgA isotypes were removed and DR11-IgG tested alone. Despite removal of multimeric isotypes, patient-to-patient antibody concentrations did not correlate with MFI values. In conclusion, allogeneic antibody responses to DR11 are comprised of all antibody isotypes at differing proportions, these combined isotypes fix complement at nominal serum concentrations, and enhancements other than the removal of IgM and IgA multimeric isotypes may be required if MFI is to be used as a means of determining anti-HLA serum antibody concentrations in diagnostic clinical assays.

  13. Wheat gliadin fractions and other cereal antigens reactive with antibodies in the sera of coeliac patients.

    PubMed Central

    Kieffer, M; Frazier, P J; Daniels, N W; Coombs, R R

    1982-01-01

    The mixed reverse solid phase passive antiglobulin haemadsorption test (MRSPAH) and the enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) were found equally sensitive and fitted for the measurement of serum IgG antibodies against alcohol soluble gliadins. Using the ELISA method, three coeliac sera with elevated antibody titres against gliadins and two control sera with low titres were tested for IgG antibodies against the main groups of wheat proteins (acetic acid soluble glutenins, salt soluble albumins and globulins and alcohol soluble gliadins), eight fractions of gliadin and the alcohol soluble proteins of barley, rye, oat, maize and rice. As rice contained little alcohol soluble protein, a test against acid soluble rice proteins was included. In all three patient sera, titres higher than or equal to that for crude gliadin were found for wheat glutenin and for gliadin fractions seven and eight, both containing alpha gliadins. Similar high titres were found when these coeliac sera were tested against rye, barley and oat prolamines. Maize prolamines gave only low titres and no antibodies could be detected against rice proteins, in line with the tolerance of these latter two cereals by patients with coeliac disease. It would appear that sera from coeliac patients react with more than one antigenic fraction of protein in wheat and other cereals. Also sera from two normal persons appeared to have the same spectrum of reactivity against these cereal proteins as did the three sera from coeliac patients. The titres in normal sera were however much lower. PMID:7166001

  14. Thin optical display panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James Thomas

    1997-01-01

    An optical display includes a plurality of optical waveguides each including a cladding bound core for guiding internal display light between first and second opposite ends by total internal reflection. The waveguides are stacked together to define a collective display thickness. Each of the cores includes a heterogeneous portion defining a light scattering site disposed longitudinally between the first and second ends. Adjacent ones of the sites are longitudinally offset from each other for forming a longitudinal internal image display over the display thickness upon scattering of internal display light thereagainst for generating a display image. In a preferred embodiment, the waveguides and scattering sites are transparent for transmitting therethrough an external image in superposition with the display image formed by scattering the internal light off the scattering sites for defining a heads up display.

  15. Seamless tiled display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubin, Matthew B. (Inventor); Larson, Brent D. (Inventor); Kolosowsky, Aleksandra (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A modular and scalable seamless tiled display apparatus includes multiple display devices, a screen, and multiple lens assemblies. Each display device is subdivided into multiple sections, and each section is configured to display a sectional image. One of the lens assemblies is optically coupled to each of the sections of each of the display devices to project the sectional image displayed on that section onto the screen. The multiple lens assemblies are configured to merge the projected sectional images to form a single tiled image. The projected sectional images may be merged on the screen by magnifying and shifting the images in an appropriate manner. The magnification and shifting of these images eliminates any visual effect on the tiled display that may result from dead-band regions defined between each pair of adjacent sections on each display device, and due to gaps between multiple display devices.

  16. Th17-relevant cytokines vary with sera of different ANA staining patterns.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinhui; Meng, Wei; Zhang, Denghai; Qiu, Chaolin; Hua, Ling; Xie, Qiuhua; He, Xiaoxue; Ye, Hongxing

    2013-04-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) react with components located in the cell nucleus and cytoplasm. Differing ANA staining patterns may reflect the specificity of autoantibodies in sera and indicate some autoimmune diseases specifically, to some extent. Th17-relevant cytokines have been shown to be involved in a variety of autoimmune diseases, but not consistently. In this study, we investigated whether differences in Th17-relevant cytokines exist between different ANA pattern sera. Sera of 64 ANA-positive patients (12 homogeneous, 13 speckled particle, 11 nucleolar, 15 centromere, 6 peripheral nuclear) and 16 healthy donors were analyzed for IL-17, IL-6, IL-21, IL-22, IL-23 (p19), and TGF-β, and subsequently correlations between IL-17 and IL-6, IL-21, IL-22, IL-23, and TGF-β were analyzed. Results showed that these Th17-relevant cytokines varied with different ANA-positive sera compared with healthy donors, except TGF-β. Among them, IL-21 and IL-22 were higher with all ANA-positive sera and IL-17, IL-6, and IL-23 were higher with three or more ANA staining sera. No significant difference in these cytokines was seen between the different ANA staining sera except IL-17 levels in sera of peripheral nuclear staining positive subjects were higher than nucleolar. Additionally, in ANA-positive sera, IL-17 correlated with IL-6, IL-21, IL-22, and IL-23, but not with TGF-β. Thus, we demonstrated that Th17-relevant cytokines varied with different ANA staining pattern sera, suggesting that Th17-relevant cytokines play differing roles in autoimmune diseases.

  17. Scalability of Robotic Displays: Display Size Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    active matrix touch screen display (see figure 1). The screen is a super video graphics array 12.1 inches diagonal with 800x600-pixel resolution...ounces) super- video graphics display, high resolution (800x600) pictures with a 1.425-inch diagonal picture. The device used in this study was a...from a portable operator control unit that provides continuous data and video feedback for precise vehicle positioning. It was developed for the

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 drug susceptibility determination by using recombinant viruses generated from patient sera tested in a cell-killing assay.

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, C A; Keulen, W; van Bommel, T; Nijhuis, M; de Jong, D; de Jong, M D; Schipper, P; Back, N K

    1996-01-01

    A simple approach for the determination of drug susceptibilities by using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA from the sera of patients is described. HIV-1 RNA was extracted from patient sera, and the 5' part of the reverse transcriptase (RT) gene was transcribed into DNA and amplified in a nested PCR. The amplified fragment covers the 3' part of the protease gene and amino acids 1 to 304 of the RT gene. This fragment can be introduced through homologous recombination, as described previously, into a novel HIV-1 reference strain (pHXB2 delta 2-261RT) from which amino acids 2 to 261 of RT have been deleted. The resulting recombinant virus expresses all properties of the HXB2 reference strain except for those encoded by the introduced part of the patient RT gene. Recombinant viruses were subsequently tested for drug susceptibility in a microtiter format killing assay [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay] as well as in the standard HeLa CD4+ plaque reduction assay. Similar susceptibility profiles were obtained by each assay with recombinant viruses derived from patients receiving alternating nevirapine and zidovudine treatment or lamivudine-zidovudine combination therapy. In conclusion, this approach enables high-through-put determination of the drug susceptibilities of serum RNA-derived RT genes, independent of the patient's viral background, and generates the possibility of relating changes in susceptibility to changes in viral genotypes. PMID:8891152

  19. Bacterial proteases from the intracellular vacuole niche; protease conservation and adaptation for pathogenic advantage.

    PubMed

    Huston, Wilhelmina M

    2010-06-01

    Proteases with important roles for bacterial pathogens that specifically reside within intracellular vacuoles are frequently homologous to those that have important virulence functions for other bacteria. Research has identified that some of these conserved proteases have evolved specialized functions for intracellular vacuole-residing bacteria. Unique proteases with pathogenic functions have also been described from Chlamydia, Mycobacteria, and Legionella. These findings suggest that there are further novel functions for proteases from these bacteria that remain to be described. This review summarizes the recent findings of novel protease functions from the intracellular human pathogenic bacteria that reside exclusively in vacuoles.

  20. A General Method to Discover Epitopes from Sera

    PubMed Central

    Whittemore, Kurt; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Sykes, Kathryn; Shen, Luhui

    2016-01-01

    Antigen-antibody complexes are central players in an effective immune response. However, finding those interactions relevant to a particular disease state can be arduous. Nonetheless many paths to discovery have been explored since deciphering these interactions can greatly facilitate the development of new diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. In silico B cell epitope mapping approaches have been widely pursued, though success has not been consistent. Antibody mixtures in immune sera have been used as handles for biologically relevant antigens, but these and other experimental approaches have proven resource intensive and time consuming. In addition, these methods are often tailored to individual diseases or a specific proteome, rather than providing a universal platform. Most of these methods are not able to identify the specific antibody’s epitopes from unknown antigens, such as un-annotated neo antigens in cancer. Alternatively, a peptide library comprised of sequences unrestricted by naturally-found protein space provides for a universal search for mimotopes of an antibody’s epitope. Here we present the utility of such a non-natural random sequence library of 10,000 peptides physically addressed on a microarray for mimotope discovery without sequence information of the specific antigen. The peptide arrays were probed with serum from an antigen-immunized rabbit, or alternatively probed with serum pre-absorbed with the same immunizing antigen. With this positive and negative screening scheme, we identified the library-peptides as the mimotopes of the antigen. The unique library peptides were successfully used to isolate antigen-specific antibodies from complete immune serum. Sequence analysis of these peptides revealed the epitopes in the immunized antigen. We present this method as an inexpensive, efficient method for identifying mimotopes of any antibody’s targets. These mimotopes should be useful in defining both components of the antigen

  1. Beta-nerve growth factor levels in newborn cord sera.

    PubMed

    Haddad, J; Vilge, V; Juif, J G; Maitre, M; Donato, L; Messer, J; Mark, J

    1994-06-01

    This study was designed to examine beta-nerve growth factor (NGF) levels in human cord blood by a two-site enzyme immunoassay using MAb 27/21 to mouse NGF and to determine whether beta-NGF levels show developmental changes. Blood was collected at delivery from 61 newborns, 55 neonates appropriate for gestational age (46 term infants and 9 premature infants), 5 neonates small for gestational age, and 1 neonate with congenital hydrocephalus. In addition, samples were collected from 2 microcephalic children (microcephaly vera) aged 15 and 18 mo, 2 control children, and 4 healthy adults. Mean levels of NGF in preterm infants (n = 9; 13.7 +/- 8 pg/mL) were significantly lower than levels in term infants (n = 47; 21.2 +/- 8.8 pg/mL; p = 0.034 by Mann-Whitney U test). There was no correlation between birth weight, length, head circumference, and beta-NGF levels. In microcephalic children, NGF levels were low (8 pg/mL) compared with control infants' values (22 pg/mL). In adults, beta-NGF levels were higher and ranged between 238 and 292 pg/mL. Our study demonstrates that beta-NGF levels can be assessed in human newborn sera using a two-site enzyme immunoassay with MAb 27/21 to mouse beta-NGF, that beta-NGF levels are extremely low in newborns compared with adults, that beta-NGF levels seems to show developmental changes, and that beta-NGF levels may be used to assess NGF utilization under normal and pathologic conditions such as cerebral malformations.

  2. EMU helmet mounted display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marmolejo, Jose (Inventor); Smith, Stephen (Inventor); Plough, Alan (Inventor); Clarke, Robert (Inventor); Mclean, William (Inventor); Fournier, Joseph (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A helmet mounted display device is disclosed for projecting a display on a flat combiner surface located above the line of sight where the display is produced by two independent optical channels with independent LCD image generators. The display has a fully overlapped field of view on the combiner surface and the focus can be adjusted from a near field of four feet to infinity.

  3. Protease and lipase activities of fungal and bacterial strains derived from an artisanal raw ewe's milk cheese.

    PubMed

    Ozturkoglu-Budak, Sebnem; Wiebenga, Ad; Bron, Peter A; de Vries, Ronald P

    2016-11-21

    We previously identified the microbiota present during cheese ripening and observed high protease and lipase activity in Divle Cave cheese. To determine the contribution of individual isolates to enzyme activities, we investigated a range of species representing this microbiota for their proteolytic and lipolytic ability. In total, 17 fungal, 5 yeast and 18 bacterial strains, previously isolated from Divle Cave cheese, were assessed. Qualitative protease and lipase activities were performed on skim-milk agar and spirit-blue lipase agar, respectively, and resulted in a selection of strains for quantitative assays. For the quantitative assays, the strains were grown on minimal medium containing irradiated Divle Cave cheese, obtained from the first day of ripening. Out of 16 selected filamentous fungi, Penicillium brevicompactum, Penicillium cavernicola and Penicillium olsonii showed the highest protease activity, while Mucor racemosus was the best lipase producer. Yarrowia lipolytica was the best performing yeast with respect to protease and lipase activity. From the 18 bacterial strains, 14 and 11 strains, respectively showed protease and lipase activity in agar plates. Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus stratosphericus, Brevibacterium antiquum, Psychrobacter glacincola and Pseudomonas proteolytica displayed the highest protease and lipase activity. The proteases of yeast and filamentous fungi were identified as mainly aspartic protease by specific inhibition with Pepstatin A, whereas inhibition by PMSF (phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride) indicated that most bacterial enzymes belong to serine type protease. Our results demonstrate that aspartic proteases, which usually have high milk clotting activity, are predominantly derived from fungal strains, and therefore fungal enzymes appear to be more suitable for use in the cheese industry. Microbial enzymes studied in this research might be alternatives for rennin (chymosin) from animal source because of their low cost and stable

  4. Digital video display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zygielbaum, A. I.; Martin, W. L.; Engle, A.

    1973-01-01

    System displays image data in real time on 120,000-element raster scan with 2, 4, or 8 shades of grey. Designed for displaying planetary range Doppler data, system can be used for X-Y plotting, displaying alphanumerics, and providing image animation.

  5. XVD Image Display Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Andres, Paul M.; Mortensen, Helen B.; Parizher, Vadim; McAuley, Myche; Bartholomew, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The XVD [X-Windows VICAR (video image communication and retrieval) Display] computer program offers an interactive display of VICAR and PDS (planetary data systems) images. It is designed to efficiently display multiple-GB images and runs on Solaris, Linux, or Mac OS X systems using X-Windows.

  6. Screens and Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edstrom, Malin

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the characteristics of different computer screen technologies including the possible harmful effects on health of cathode ray tube (CRT) terminals. CRT's are compared to other technologies including liquid crystal displays, plasma displays, electroluminiscence displays, and light emitting diodes. A chart comparing the different…

  7. Protease-degradable electrospun fibrous hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Ryan J.; Bassin, Ethan J.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2015-03-01

    Electrospun nanofibres are promising in biomedical applications to replicate features of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). However, nearly all electrospun scaffolds are either non-degradable or degrade hydrolytically, whereas natural ECM degrades proteolytically, often through matrix metalloproteinases. Here we synthesize reactive macromers that contain protease-cleavable and fluorescent peptides and are able to form both isotropic hydrogels and electrospun fibrous hydrogels through a photoinitiated polymerization. These biomimetic scaffolds are susceptible to protease-mediated cleavage in vitro in a protease dose-dependent manner and in vivo in a subcutaneous mouse model using transdermal fluorescent imaging to monitor degradation. Importantly, materials containing an alternate and non-protease-cleavable peptide sequence are stable in both in vitro and in vivo settings. To illustrate the specificity in degradation, scaffolds with mixed fibre populations support selective fibre degradation based on individual fibre degradability. Overall, this represents a novel biomimetic approach to generate protease-sensitive fibrous scaffolds for biomedical applications.

  8. Increased levels of soluble CD226 in sera accompanied by decreased membrane CD226 expression on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhuwei; Zhang, Tao; Zhuang, Ran; Zhang, Yun; Jia, Wei; Song, Chaojun; Yang, Kun; Yang, Angang; Jin, Boquan

    2009-01-01

    Background As a cellular membrane triggering receptor, CD226 is involved in the NK cell- or CTL-mediated lysis of tumor cells of different origin, including freshly isolated tumor cells and tumor cell lines. Here, we evaluated soluble CD226 (sCD226) levels in sera, and membrane CD226 (mCD226) expression on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from cancer patients as well as normal subjects, and demonstrated the possible function and origin of the altered sCD226, which may provide useful information for understanding the mechanisms of tumor escape and for immunodiagnosis and immunotherapy. Results Soluble CD226 levels in serum samples from cancer patients were significantly higher than those in healthy individuals (P < 0.001), while cancer patients exhibited lower PBMC mCD226 expression than healthy individuals (P < 0.001). CD226-Fc fusion protein could significantly inhibit the cytotoxicity of NK cells against K562 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, three kinds of protease inhibitors could notably increase mCD226 expression on PMA-stimulated PBMCs and Jurkat cells with a decrease in the sCD226 level in the cell culture supernatant. Conclusion These findings suggest that sCD226 might be shed from cell membranes by certain proteases, and, further, sCD226 may be used as a predictor for monitoring cancer, and more important, a possible immunotherapy target, which may be useful in clinical application. PMID:19490613

  9. Suppression of T-lymphocyte responses to Entamoeba histolytica antigen by immune sera.

    PubMed Central

    Salata, R A; Martinez-Palomo, A; Canales, L; Murray, H W; Trevino, N; Ravdin, J I

    1990-01-01

    Lymphocytes from patients cured of amebic liver abscesses proliferate and produce gamma interferon upon incubation with soluble Entamoeba histolytica antigen: however, amebic liver abscesses exhibit a relentless progression without treatment. To determine whether suppressive factors are present in sera, we studied T-lymphocyte responses to total soluble E. histolytica antigen by using cells from five patients treated for amebic liver abscesses in the presence of 15 different immune sera and 10 control sera. In the presence of immune sera, E. histolytica antigen-induced lymphocyte proliferation decreased by 63% and production of gamma interferon was reduced by 93.2% (P less than 0.01). Immune sera had no effect on the mitogenic responses of patient lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin or on the proliferative responses of control lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin or tetanus toxoid. The suppressive activity of immune sera diminished as the time between therapy for amebic liver abscesses and serum collection increased (P less than 0.05). Suppressive activity did not correlate with the titers of serum anti-amebic antibody and was not affected when serum was absorbed with viable amebic trophozoites. In conclusion, soluble factors present in the sera of amebic liver abscess patients suppressed in vitro lymphocyte responses to E. histolytica antigen and may have contributed to the lack of development of effective in vivo cell-mediated immune responses following the onset of amebic liver abscesses. Images PMID:2123828

  10. The ELISA for the examination of hare sera for anti-Brucella antibodies.

    PubMed

    Szulowski, K; Iwaniak, W; Pilaszek, J; Truszczyński, M; Chrobocińska, M

    1999-01-01

    Hare brucellosis is caused primarily by Brucella suis biovar 2. Hares along with wild boars are the natural reservoir of this microorganism. In view of restriction of applicability of traditional serological methods the work aimed to develop the ELISA to examine hare sera for the presence of anti-Brucella antibodies. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigen obtained from the strain S19 of Brucella abortus and the conjugate of antibodies against rabbit immunoglobulin with horseradish peroxidase were used in the test. Hares' sera positive and negative in the CFT were used as controls of the ELISA. The sera collected from 9 hares suspected to be infected with Brucella organisms, positive in CFT (in this number 7 hares revealed clinical symptoms or anathomopathological lesions characteristic of brucellosis), 6 sera from hares showing no symptoms of the disease, negative in CFT and 520 sera from hares monitored for brucellosis were tested. All serum samples from hares suspected for Brucella infection were positive in ELISA and 2 of them were negative in RBPT. Additionally among the samples from hares monitored 12 sera were positive in ELISA and CFT, whereas 9 sera from 12 ones were also positive in the RBPT. The obtained results indicated that the ELISA developed in our laboratory proved to be equivalent in specificity to CFT. In addition, ELISA proved to be more sensitive than RBPT for the diagnosis of Brucella infection in hares.

  11. Sera from patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome inhibit production of interleukin-2 by normal lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, J P; Djeu, J Y; Stocks, N I; Masur, H; Gelmann, E P; Quinnan, G V

    1985-01-01

    We studied the effects of sera from patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) on interleukin-2 (IL-2) production to help elucidate the mechanism of immunodeficiency. Compared with sera from healthy controls, sera from AIDS patients suppressed phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced IL-2 production by normal blood mononuclear cells. Sera from homosexual contacts of AIDS patients and from adults with acute cytomegalovirus infection generally lacked this suppressive activity. The effect of the AIDS sera could not be attributed to absence of a stimulatory or nutritive factor, to inactivation of IL-2, to inhibition of the IL-2 assay, nor to increased turnover of IL-2. The suppressive effect of the sera was not mediated by radiosensitive or T8 antigen-bearing suppressor cells or by increased prostaglandin production or decreased interleukin-1 production. The sera acted directly on the groups of cells that produce IL-2, T cells and large granular lymphocytes; suppression occurred at an early, probably pretranslational, stage. When cells were incubated with AIDS sera and then washed, the suppressive effect persisted. The sera did not cause direct or complement-mediated cytotoxic effects on normal mononuclear cells nor did they suppress PHA-induced interferon production, nor proliferation of T lymphoblasts or lymphocyte lines. The suppressive effect was not mediated by interferon, cortisol, immunoglobulin G or M, or immune complexes. The activity was stable at pH 3, pH 10, and 60 degrees C; inactivated at 100 degrees C; and not ether extractable. Because IL-2 plays a central role in the development of many immune responses, the serum factor(s) that inhibits IL-2 production could contribute significantly to the immunodeficiency of AIDS. PMID:2989337

  12. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Rosenberg, A.H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest. 1 fig.

  13. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Rosenberg, Alan H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest.

  14. Recent patents and emerging therapeutics for HIV infections: a focus on protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mitesh; Mandava, Nanda K; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Mitra, Ashim K

    2013-07-01

    The inclusion of protease inhibitors (PIs) in highly active antiretroviral therapy has significantly improved clinical outcomes in HIV-1-infected patients. To date, PIs are considered to be the most important therapeutic agents for the treatment of HIV infections. Despite high anti-HIV-1 potency, poor oral bioavailability of PIs has been a major concern. For achieving therapeutic concentrations, large doses of PIs are administered, which results in unacceptable systemic toxicities. Such severe and long-term toxicities necessitate the development of safer and potentially promising PIs. Recently, considerable attention has been paid to the development of newer compounds capable of inhibiting wild-type and resistant HIV-1 protease. Some of these PIs have displayed potent HIV-1 protease inhibitory activity. In this review, we have made an attempt to provide an overview on clinically approved and newly developing PIs, and related recent patents in the development of novel PIs.

  15. Generation of bioactive peptide hydrolysates from cattle plasma using plant and fungal proteases.

    PubMed

    Bah, Clara S F; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A; McConnell, Michelle A; Carne, Alan

    2016-12-15

    Four protease preparations from plant and fungal sources (papain, bromelain, FP400 and FPII) were used to hydrolyse plasma which was separated from slaughterhouse cattle blood. The o-phthaldialdehyde assay was used to follow the release of TCA-soluble peptides over a 24h period. Hydrolysis profiles were displayed using SDS-PAGE. The in vitro antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the hydrolysates were determined. The results showed that hydrolysates of cattle plasma generated with fungal protease FPII had higher antioxidant activities. Overall than hydrolysates generated with papain, bromelain and FP400. None of the hydrolysates demonstrated antimicrobial activity. The FPII peptide hydrolysate was fractionated using gel permeation chromatography, OFFGEL isoelectric focusing and RP-HPLC. The RP-HPLC fraction with highest antioxidant activity contained 15 novel peptide sequences. The use of protease FPII to hydrolyse cattle plasma resulted in a hydrolysate with high antioxidant properties and unique peptide sequences.

  16. Resistance of extraocular motoneuron terminals to effects of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis sera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosier, D. R.; Siklos, L.; Appel, S. H.

    2000-01-01

    In sporadic ALS (s-ALS), axon terminals contain increased intracellular calcium. Passively transferred sera from patients with s-ALS increase intracellular calcium in spinal motoneuron terminals in vivo and enhance spontaneous transmitter release, a calcium-dependent process. In this study, passive transfer of s-ALS sera increased spontaneous release from spinal but not extraocular motoneuron terminals, suggesting that the resistance to physiologic abnormalities induced by s-ALS sera in mice parallels the resistance of extraocular motoneurons to dysfunction and degeneration in ALS.

  17. Immunoreactivity and bioactivity of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein in normal and heat-inactivated sera.

    PubMed Central

    Mészáros, K; Aberle, S; White, M; Parent, J B

    1995-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-potentiating effect of serum is due to LPS-binding protein (LBP), which facilitates the binding of LPS to CD14 receptors. We observed a remarkable heat sensitivity of recombinant LBP and various sera with respect to both immunoreactivity (measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and bioactivity (potentiation of LPS induction of tumor necrosis factor in monocytes). Human sera were more active and more heat sensitive than fetal bovine sera. The commonly practiced heat inactivation of human serum (56 degrees C, 30 min) resulted in a 70% loss of bioactivity, which caused an apparent decrease in the potency of LPS. PMID:7806380

  18. Purification and characterization of the subtilisin-like protease of Streptococcus suis that contributes to its virulence.

    PubMed

    Bonifait, Laetitia; Vaillancourt, Katy; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Frenette, Michel; Grenier, Daniel

    2011-03-24

    Streptococcus suis is a major swine pathogen that is responsible for severe infections such as meningitis, endocarditis, and septicemia. S. suis is also recognized as a zoonotic agent and expresses several virulence factors. The recently identified subtilisin-like protease (SspA) of S. suis plays an important role in the pathogenicity of this bacterium in animal models. The objective of the present study was to clone, purify, and characterize the SspA of serotype 2 S. suis P1/7. The SSU0757 gene encoding SspA was amplified and a 4798-bp DNA fragment was obtained. It was cloned into the expression plasmid pBAD/HisB and then inserted into Escherichia coli to overproduce the protein. The recombinant protease was purified by chromatography procedures and showed a molecular weight of 170 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Its activity was optimal at pH 7 and at temperatures ranging from 25°C to 37°C. It had a high specificity for the chromogenic substrate succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNa while specific inhibitors of serine proteases inhibited its activity. In addition to degrading gelatin, the protease hydrolyzed the Aα chain of fibrinogen, which prevented fibrin formation by thrombin. The recombinant subtilisin-like protease also showed toxicity towards brain microvascular endothelial cells. Lastly, sera from pigs infected with S. suis reacted with the recombinant SspA, indicating that it is produced during infections. In conclusion, the SspA of S. suis shared similarities with subtilisin-like proteases produced by other pathogenic streptococci and may contribute to the pathogenic process of S. suis infections.

  19. Protease and Protease-Activated Receptor-2 Signaling in the Pathogenesis of Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Eun; Jeong, Se Kyoo

    2010-01-01

    Proteases in the skin are essential to epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis. In addition to their direct proteolytic effects, certain proteases signal to cells by activating protease-activated receptors (PARs), the G-protein-coupled receptors. The expression of functional PAR-2 on human skin and its role in inflammation, pruritus, and skin barrier homeostasis have been demonstrated. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease characterized by genetic barrier defects and allergic inflammation, which is sustained by gene-environmental interactions. Recent studies have revealed aberrant expression and activation of serine proteases and PAR-2 in the lesional skin of AD patients. The imbalance between proteases and protease inhibitors associated with genetic defects in the protease/protease inhibitor encoding genes, increase in skin surface pH, and exposure to proteolytically active allergens contribute to this aberrant protease/PAR-2 signaling in AD. The increased protease activity in AD leads to abnormal desquamation, degradation of lipid-processing enzymes and antimicrobial peptides, and activation of primary cytokines, thereby leading to permeability barrier dysfunction, inflammation, and defects in the antimicrobial barrier. Moreover, up-regulated proteases stimulate PAR-2 in lesional skin of AD and lead to the production of cytokines and chemokines involved in inflammation and immune responses, itching sensation, and sustained epidermal barrier perturbation with easier allergen penetration. In addition, PAR-2 is an important sensor for exogenous danger molecules, such as exogenous proteases from various allergens, and plays an important role in AD pathogenesis. Together, these findings suggest that protease activity or PAR-2 may be a future target for therapeutic intervention for the treatment of AD. PMID:20879045

  20. Protease and protease-activated receptor-2 signaling in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Eun; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Lee, Seung Hun

    2010-11-01

    Proteases in the skin are essential to epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis. In addition to their direct proteolytic effects, certain proteases signal to cells by activating protease-activated receptors (PARs), the G-protein-coupled receptors. The expression of functional PAR-2 on human skin and its role in inflammation, pruritus, and skin barrier homeostasis have been demonstrated. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease characterized by genetic barrier defects and allergic inflammation, which is sustained by gene-environmental interactions. Recent studies have revealed aberrant expression and activation of serine proteases and PAR-2 in the lesional skin of AD patients. The imbalance between proteases and protease inhibitors associated with genetic defects in the protease/protease inhibitor encoding genes, increase in skin surface pH, and exposure to proteolytically active allergens contribute to this aberrant protease/ PAR-2 signaling in AD. The increased protease activity in AD leads to abnormal desquamation, degradation of lipid-processing enzymes and antimicrobial peptides, and activation of primary cytokines, thereby leading to permeability barrier dysfunction, inflammation, and defects in the antimicrobial barrier. Moreover, up-regulated proteases stimulate PAR-2 in lesional skin of AD and lead to the production of cytokines and chemokines involved in inflammation and immune responses, itching sensation, and sustained epidermal barrier perturbation with easier allergen penetration. In addition, PAR-2 is an important sensor for exogenous danger molecules, such as exogenous proteases from various allergens, and plays an important role in AD pathogenesis. Together, these findings suggest that protease activity or PAR-2 may be a future target for therapeutic intervention for the treatment of AD.

  1. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Paula Monteiro; Bittencourt, Mona Lisa de Assis; Caprara, Carolina Canielles; de Freitas, Marcela; de Almeida, Renata Paula Coppini; Silveira, Dâmaris; Fonseca, Yris Maria; Ferreira, Edivaldo Ximenes; Pessoa, Adalberto; Magalhães, Pérola Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy sauce production. Proteases can be produced in large quantities in a short time by established methods of fermentation. The parameters such as variation in C/N ratio, presence of some sugars, besides several other physical factors are important in the development of fermentation process. Proteases of fungal origin can be produced cost effectively, have an advantage faster production, the ease with which the enzymes can be modified and mycelium can be easily removed by filtration. The production of proteases has been carried out using submerged fermentation, but conditions in solid state fermentation lead to several potential advantages for the production of fungal enzymes. This review focuses on the production of fungal proteases, their distribution, structural-functional aspects, physical and chemical parameters, and the use of these enzymes in industrial applications. PMID:26273247

  2. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Paula Monteiro; Bittencourt, Mona Lisa de Assis; Caprara, Carolina Canielles; de Freitas, Marcela; de Almeida, Renata Paula Coppini; Silveira, Dâmaris; Fonseca, Yris Maria; Ferreira Filho, Edivaldo Ximenes; Pessoa Junior, Adalberto; Magalhães, Pérola Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy sauce production. Proteases can be produced in large quantities in a short time by established methods of fermentation. The parameters such as variation in C/N ratio, presence of some sugars, besides several other physical factors are important in the development of fermentation process. Proteases of fungal origin can be produced cost effectively, have an advantage faster production, the ease with which the enzymes can be modified and mycelium can be easily removed by filtration. The production of proteases has been carried out using submerged fermentation, but conditions in solid state fermentation lead to several potential advantages for the production of fungal enzymes. This review focuses on the production of fungal proteases, their distribution, structural-functional aspects, physical and chemical parameters, and the use of these enzymes in industrial applications.

  3. Regulation of protease production in Clostridium sporogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, C; Macfarlane, G T

    1990-01-01

    The physiological and nutritional factors that regulate protease synthesis in Clostridium sporogenes C25 were studied in batch and continuous cultures. Formation of extracellular proteases occurred at the end of active growth and during the stationary phase in batch cultures. Protease production was inversely related to growth rate in glucose-excess and glucose-limited chemostats over the range D = 0.05 to 0.70 h-1. In pulse experiments, glucose, ammonia, phosphate, and some amino acids (tryptophan, proline, tyrosine, and isoleucine) strongly repressed protease synthesis. This repression was not relieved by addition of 4 mM cyclic AMP, cyclic GMP, or dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Protease formation was markedly inhibited by 4 mM ATP and ADP, but GTP and GDP had little effect on the process. It is concluded that protease production by C. sporogenes is strongly influenced by the amount of energy available to the cells, with the highest levels of protease synthesis occurring under energy-limiting conditions. PMID:2268158

  4. Characterization and expression analysis of a trypsin-like serine protease from planarian Dugesia japonica.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Luming; Wu, Suge; Liu, Dianchen; Xu, Bo; Zhang, Xiufang; Zhao, Bosheng

    2012-06-01

    Trypsin-like serine proteases are involved in large number of processes, especially in digestive degradation and immune responses. Here, we identify the characterization of a trypsin-like serine protease in planarian, Djtry, which interestingly has the incompletely conserved catalytic triad (K, D, and S). Phylogenetic analysis suggests that Djtry is an ancient type of trypsin-like serine proteases. The spatial and temporal expression patterns of Djtry are shown during regenerating and embryonic development by whole-mount in situ hybridization. Djtry is found to display a tissue specific expression pattern, with a predominant expression detected in whole gut region of intact and regenerating planarian. While the tissue- and stage-specific expression patterns during the embryonic development imply the roles of Djtry involve in yolk degradation and gut formation. Quantitative real-time PCR was carried out to analyze the function of this protease in vivo after planarians were stimulated to a bacterial challenge and food. The results showed that Djtry increased after a bacterial challenge and was basically stable for food. Therefore, the trypsin-like serine protease might be involved in the innate defense reactions against bacterial infection.

  5. Detection of proteases from Sporosarcina aquimarina and Algoriphagus antarcticus isolated from Antarctic soil.

    PubMed

    Santos, Anderson F; Pires, Fabiano; Jesus, Hugo E; Santos, André L S; Peixoto, Raquel; Rosado, Alexandre S; D'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Branquinha, Marta H

    2015-03-01

    Two psychrophilic bacterial samples were isolated from King George Island soil, in Antarctica. The phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA (rrs) gene led to the correlation with the closest related isolates as Sporosarcina aquimarina (99%) and Algoriphagus antarcticus (99%), with query coverage of 99% and 98%, respectively. The spent culture media from both isolates displayed proteolytic activities detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis containing gelatin as protein substrate. Under the employed conditions, S. aquimarina showed a 55 kDa protease with the best activity detected at pH 7.0 and at 27°C. A. antarcticus also showed a single extracellular protease, however its molecular mass was around 90kDa and its best activity was detected at pH 9.0 and at 37°C. The proteases from both isolates were inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline and EDTA, two metalloprotease inhibitors. This is the first record of protease detection in both species, and our results may contribute to broaden the basic knowledge of proteases from the Antarctica environment and may help prospecting future biotechnological applications of these enzymes.

  6. Biochemical characterization of a detergent-stable serine alkaline protease from Caldicoprobacter guelmensis.

    PubMed

    Bouacem, Khelifa; Bouanane-Darenfed, Amel; Laribi-Habchi, Hassiba; Elhoul, Mouna Ben; Hmida-Sayari, Aïda; Hacene, Hocine; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Jaouadi, Bassem; Bejar, Samir

    2015-11-01

    Caldicoprobacter guelmensis isolated from the hydrothermal hot spring of Guelma (Algeria) produced high amounts of extracellular thermostable serine alkaline protease (called SAPCG) (23,000U/mL). The latter was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation, UNO Q-6 FPLC and Zorbex PSM 300 HPLC, and submitted to biochemical characterization assays. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) analysis revealed that the purified enzyme was a monomer, with a molecular mass of 55,824.19Da. The 19 N-terminal residue sequence of SAPCG showed high homology with those of microbial proteases. The enzyme was completely inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and diiodopropyl fluorophosphates (DFP), which suggested its belonging to the serine protease family. It showed optimum protease activity at pH 10 and 70°C with casein as a substrate. The thermoactivity and thermostability of SAPCG were enhanced in the presence of 2mM Ca(2+). Its half-life times at 80 and 90°C were 180 and 60min, respectively. Interestingly, the SAPCG protease exhibited significant compatibility with iSiS and Persil, and wash performance analysis revealed that it could remove blood-stains effectively. Overall, SAPCG displayed a number of attractive properties that make it a promising candidate for future applications as an additive in detergent formulations.

  7. Serine Protease Catalysis: A Computational Study of Tetrahedral Intermediates and Inhibitory Adducts.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Phong D; Mansoorabadi, Steven O; Frey, Perry A

    2016-08-04

    Peptide boronic acids and peptidyl trifluoromethyl ketones (TFKs) inhibit serine proteases by forming monoanionic, tetrahedral adducts to serine in the active sites. Investigators regard these adducts as analogs of monoanionic, tetrahedral intermediates. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations and fractional charge analysis show that tetrahedral adducts of model peptidyl TFKs are structurally and electrostatically very similar to corresponding tetrahedral intermediates. In contrast, the DFT calculations show the structures and electrostatic properties of analogous peptide boronate adducts to be significantly different. The peptide boronates display highly electrostatically positive boron, with correspondingly negative ligands in the tetrahedra. In addition, the computed boron-oxygen and boron-carbon bond lengths in peptide boronates (which are identical or very similar to the corresponding bonds in a peptide boronate adduct of α-lytic protease determined by X-ray crystallography at subangstrom resolution) are significantly longer than the corresponding bond lengths in model tetrahedral intermediates. Since protease-peptidyl TFKs incorporate low-barrier hydrogen bonds (LBHBs) between an active site histidine and aspartate, while the protease-peptide boronates do not, these data complement the spectroscopic and chemical evidence for the participation of LBHBs in catalysis by serine proteases. Moreover, while the potency of these classes of inhibitors can be correlated to the structures of the peptide moieties, the present results indicate that the strength of their bonds to serine contribute significantly to their inhibitory properties.

  8. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-01-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  9. Polyplanar optic display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.; Biscardi, C.; Brewster, C.; DeSanto, L.; Beiser, L.

    1997-07-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. This display screen is 2 inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. The new display uses a 100 milliwatt green solid state laser (532 nm) as its optical source. In order to produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP{trademark}) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments, Inc. A variable astigmatic focusing system is used to produce a stigmatic image on the viewing face of the POD. In addition to the optical design, the authors discuss the electronic interfacing to the DLP{trademark} chip, the opto-mechanical design and viewing angle characteristics.

  10. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-03-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  11. Multimission helicopter cockpit displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, William S.; Terry, Jody K.; Lovelace, Nancy D.

    1996-05-01

    A new operator display subsystem is being incorporated as part of the next generation United States Navy (USN) helicopter avionics system to be integrated into the multi-mission helicopter (MMH) that replaces both the SH-60B and the SH-60F in 2001. This subsystem exploits state-of-the-art technology for the display hardware, the display driver hardware, information presentation methodologies, and software architecture. Both of the existing SH-60 helicopter display systems are based on monochrome CRT technology; a key feature of the MMH cockpit is the integration of color AMLCD multifunction displays. The MMH program is one of the first military programs to use modified commercial AMLCD elements in a tactical aircraft. This paper presents the general configuration of the MMH cockpit and multifunction display subsystem and discusses the approach taken for presenting helicopter flight information to the pilots as well as presentation of mission sensor data for use by the copilot.

  12. Detection of anti-aquaporin-4 autoantibodies in the sera of Chinese neuromyelitis optica patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Miao; Su, Weiheng; Wang, Jie; Pisani, Francesco; Frigeri, Antonio; Ma, Tonghui

    2013-03-15

    In this study, we recruited 10 neuromyelitis optica patients, two multiple sclerosis patients and two myelitis patients. Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79) cells transfected with a human aquaporin-4-mCherry fusion protein gene were used to detect anti-aquaporin-4 antibody in neuromyelitis optica patient sera by immunofluorescence. Anti-aquaporin-4 autoantibody was stably detected by immunofluorescence in neuromyelitis optica patient sera exclusively. The sensitivity of the assay for neuromyelitis optica was 90% and the specificity for neuromyelitis optica was 100%. The anti-aquaporin-4 antibody titers in sera were tested with serial dilutions until the signal disappeared. A positive correlation was detected between Expanded Disability Status Scale scores and serum anti-aquaporin-4 antibody titers. The anti-aquaporin-4 antibody assay is highly sensitive and specific in the sera of Chinese neuromyelitis optica patients. Detection of aquaporin-4 autoantibody is important for the diagnosis and treatment of neuromyelitis optica.

  13. Detection of anti-aquaporin-4 autoantibodies in the sera of Chinese neuromyelitis optica patients★

    PubMed Central

    Li, Miao; Su, Weiheng; Wang, Jie; Pisani, Francesco; Frigeri, Antonio; Ma, Tonghui

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we recruited 10 neuromyelitis optica patients, two multiple sclerosis patients and two myelitis patients. Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79) cells transfected with a human aquaporin-4-mCherry fusion protein gene were used to detect anti-aquaporin-4 antibody in neuromyelitis optica patient sera by immunofluorescence. Anti-aquaporin-4 autoantibody was stably detected by immunofluorescence in neuromyelitis optica patient sera exclusively. The sensitivity of the assay for neuromyelitis optica was 90% and the specificity for neuromyelitis optica was 100%. The anti-aquaporin-4 antibody titers in sera were tested with serial dilutions until the signal disappeared. A positive correlation was detected between Expanded Disability Status Scale scores and serum anti-aquaporin-4 antibody titers. The anti-aquaporin-4 antibody assay is highly sensitive and specific in the sera of Chinese neuromyelitis optica patients. Detection of aquaporin-4 autoantibody is important for the diagnosis and treatment of neuromyelitis optica. PMID:25206717

  14. Paperlike thermochromic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Peng, Suili; Wen, Weijia; Sheng, Ping

    2007-05-01

    The authors report the design and implementation of a paperlike, thermally activated display fabricated from thermochromic composite and embedded conductive wiring patterns, shaped from mixture of metallic nanoparticles in polydimethylsioxane using soft lithography. The display exhibits good image quality and ease of control. Use of electric heating pulses is shown to reduce energy consumption while improving image quality control. The display has excellent mechanical bending flexibility.

  15. Display innovations through glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Lori L.

    2016-03-01

    Prevailing trends in thin, lightweight, high-resolution, and added functionality, such as touch sensing, continue to drive innovation in the display market. While display volumes grow, so do consumers’ need for portability, enhanced optical performance, and mechanical reliability. Technical advancements in glass design and process have enabled display innovations in these areas while supporting industry growth. Opportunities for further innovation remain open for glass manufacturers to drive new applications, enhanced functionality, and increased demand.

  16. Cysteine Proteases from Bloodfeeding Arthropod Ectoparasites

    PubMed Central

    Sojka, Daniel; Francischetti, Ivo M. B.; Calvo, Eric; Kotsyfakis, Michalis

    2012-01-01

    Cysteine proteases have been discovered in various bloodfeeding ectoparasites. Here, we assemble the available information about the function of these peptidases and reveal their role in hematophagy and parasite development. While most of the data shed light on key proteolytic events that play a role in arthropod physiology, we also report on the association of cysteine proteases with arthropod vectorial capacity. With emphasis on ticks, specifically Ixodes ricinus, we finally propose a model about the contribution of cysteine peptidases to blood digestion, and how their concerted action with other tick midgut proteases leads to the absorbance of nutrients by the midgut epithelial cells. PMID:21660665

  17. JAVA Stereo Display Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Karina

    2008-01-01

    This toolkit provides a common interface for displaying graphical user interface (GUI) components in stereo using either specialized stereo display hardware (e.g., liquid crystal shutter or polarized glasses) or anaglyph display (red/blue glasses) on standard workstation displays. An application using this toolkit will work without modification in either environment, allowing stereo software to reach a wider audience without sacrificing high-quality display on dedicated hardware. The toolkit is written in Java for use with the Swing GUI Toolkit and has cross-platform compatibility. It hooks into the graphics system, allowing any standard Swing component to be displayed in stereo. It uses the OpenGL graphics library to control the stereo hardware and to perform the rendering. It also supports anaglyph and special stereo hardware using the same API (application-program interface), and has the ability to simulate color stereo in anaglyph mode by combining the red band of the left image with the green/blue bands of the right image. This is a low-level toolkit that accomplishes simply the display of components (including the JadeDisplay image display component). It does not include higher-level functions such as disparity adjustment, 3D cursor, or overlays all of which can be built using this toolkit.

  18. Displaying Data As Movies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Judith G.

    1992-01-01

    NMSB Movie computer program displays large sets of data (more than million individual values). Presentation dynamic, rapidly displaying sequential image "frames" in main "movie" window. Any sequence of two-dimensional sets of data scaled between 0 and 255 (1-byte resolution) displayed as movie. Time- or slice-wise progression of data illustrated. Originally written to present data from three-dimensional ultrasonic scans of damaged aerospace composite materials, illustrates data acquired by thermal-analysis systems measuring rates of heating and cooling of various materials. Developed on Macintosh IIx computer with 8-bit color display adapter and 8 megabytes of memory using Symantec Corporation's Think C, version 4.0.

  19. [Sensitivity of different morphological variants of Leptospira to the leptospirocidal activity of normal animal sera].

    PubMed

    Anan'ina, Iu V; Chernukha, Iu G

    1984-10-01

    The leptospirocidal activity of normal animal sera with respect to 23 Leptospira strains was experimentally studied in vitro. 91.3% of the strains under study proved to be sensitive to the lytic action of cattle serum and 86.9%, to sheep serum. The uncinate variants of the pathogenic strains showed resistance to the action of the above sera, and their nonuncinate analogs were subject to agglutination with subsequent lysis, similarly to saprophytes.

  20. Two Membrane-Anchored Aspartic Proteases Contribute to Pollen and Ovule Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hui; Zhang, Yinghui; Wang, Wanlei; Zhao, Keke; Liu, Chunmei; Bai, Lin; Li, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Aspartic proteases are a class of proteolytic enzymes with conserved aspartate residues, which are implicated in protein processing, maturation, and degradation. Compared with yeast and animals, plants possess a larger aspartic protease family. However, little is known about most of these enzymes. Here, we characterized two Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored aspartic protease genes, A36 and A39, which are highly expressed in pollen and pollen tubes. a36 and a36 a39 mutants display significantly reduced pollen activity. Transmission electron microscopy and terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling assays further revealed that the unviable pollen in a36 a39 may undergo unanticipated apoptosis-like programmed cell death. The degeneration of female gametes also occurred in a36 a39. Aniline Blue staining, scanning electron microscopy, and semi in vitro guidance assays indicated that the micropylar guidance of pollen tubes is significantly compromised in a36 a39. A36 and A39 that were fused with green fluorescent protein are localized to the plasma membrane and display punctate cytosolic localization and colocalize with the GPI-anchored protein COBRA-LIKE10. Furthermore, in a36 a39, the abundance of highly methylesterified homogalacturonans and xyloglucans was increased significantly in the apical pollen tube wall. These results indicate that A36 and A39, two putative GPI-anchored aspartic proteases, play important roles in plant reproduction in Arabidopsis. PMID:27872247

  1. Effects of proposed adipogenic factors in fetal swine sera upon preadipocyte development

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, T.G.; Hausman, G.J.; Martin, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    Genetic obesity has been detected in fetal pigs which suggests primary factors that cause the obesity develop prenatally. Growth hormone and thyroid hormones have been implicated as regulatory factors in fetal serum for preadipocyte differentiation. This experiment examined effects of growth hormone (GH) and thyroxine (T4) addition upon preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation when supplemented to deficient fetal pig sea. Hormones were added to decapitated fetal pig (Decap) sera to concentrations present in intact littermate (Reference) sera. Primary stromal-vascular cell cultures were prepared from rat inguinal adipose tissue. Cells were incubated with 5% decap or reference sera and hormones in media 199 during: days 1 to 5 for a /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation assay; days 1 to 15 for assay of ..cap alpha..-glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase; days 5 to 14 for a complete differentiation assay. Decap sera promoted less proliferation and enzyme differentiation than reference sera with no effect of GH addition. GH reduced detection of lipid accumulating cells on percol density gradients by 81%. T4 addition stimulated preadipocyte multiplication and produced a 30% increase in completely differentiated preadipocytes. These results indicate thyroid hormones are important components of fetal sera for regulation of preadipocyte development, whereas GH may only affect cellular metabolism.

  2. Antibody recognition to secreted proteins of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in sera from infected ruminants.

    PubMed

    Pradenas, M; Jara, M C; Hernández, N; Zambrano, A; Collins, M T; Kruze, J

    2009-09-18

    Two liquid culture media to obtain secreted proteins of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis at different incubation periods were evaluated. Middlebrook 7H9-OADC (7H9) and Watson-Reid (WR) broths were inoculated with a field strain of M. paratuberculosis and growth curves determined using nonlinear regression analysis. Most culture filtrate (CF) proteins were of low molecular weight and reacted strongly against sera from cultured-positive cases of paratuberculosis. CF proteins obtained in WR yielded a higher number of bands and were detected earlier than those obtained from 7H9. A high degree of variability in CF protein immunoreactivity was seen among infected animals. Sera from cattle with clinical paratuberculosis or heavy fecal shedders of M. paratuberculosis reacted more intensively and to more CF proteins than did sera from other infected cattle. Immunoblots showed differences in antibody binding to CF proteins when sera were absorbed with M. avium but not with others environmental mycobacteria. Immunoblots with sera from infected goats and a sheep showed reactivity with proteins of 32, 33 and 46kDa both before and after the sera were absorbed with M. phlei. Antibodies found in serum of infected deer reacted with CF proteins in a similar way as did for cattle. These results suggest that a pool of CF proteins of M. paratuberculosis could be good candidates as antigens for serodiagnosis of paratuberculosis.

  3. Protease and protease inhibitory activity in pregnant and postpartum involuting uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Milwidsky, A.; Beller, U.; Palti, Z.; Mayer, M.

    1982-08-15

    The presence of two distinct proteolytic activities in the rat uterus was confirmed with /sup 14/C-labeled globin used as a sensitive protein substrate and following release of label into the trichloroacetic acid-soluble supernatant fraction. Protease I is a cytoplasmic acid protease while protease II is associated with the pellet fraction, can be extracted by 0.6 M sodium chloride, and is active at pH 7.0. Protease I activity is low during pregnancy and markedly increases at term achieving maximal activity at day 3 post partum with a subsequent decline to preterm activity values. Lactation did not affect the uterine protease I activity. Protease II activity is not significantly different during pregnancy, at term, and post partum. The presence of an inhibitor of protease I was suggested by a decrease in enzyme activity with an increased cytosolic protein concentration. The inhibitor also lessened bovine trypsin activity but had no effect on protease II. Although its inhibitory potency on trypsin fluctuated during the various uterine physiologic stages, these changes appeared to be statistically insignificant. Human uterine samples were also found to contain the two protease activities with similar changes in protease I post partum. It is suggested that, both in the rat and in man, uterine involution post partum is associated with a marked increase in activity of acid cytosolic protease, while a particulate neutral protease and a soluble inhibitor of trypsin, which are also present in uterine cells, do not appear to play a significant role in the dissolution of uterine tissues after parturition.

  4. Secreted fungal aspartic proteases: A review.

    PubMed

    Mandujano-González, Virginia; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Angel; Mercado-Flores, Yuridia

    2016-01-01

    The aspartic proteases, also called aspartyl and aspartate proteases or acid proteases (E.C.3.4.23), belong to the endopeptidase family and are characterized by the conserved sequence Asp-Gly-Thr at the active site. These enzymes are found in a wide variety of microorganisms in which they perform important functions related to nutrition and pathogenesis. In addition, their high activity and stability at acid pH make them attractive for industrial application in the food industry; specifically, they are used as milk-coagulating agents in cheese production or serve to improve the taste of some foods. This review presents an analysis of the characteristics and properties of secreted microbial aspartic proteases and their potential for commercial application.

  5. Role of cockroach proteases in allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Page, Kristen

    2012-10-01

    Allergic asthma is on the rise in developed countries, and cockroach exposure is a major risk factor for the development of asthma. In recent years, a number of studies have investigated the importance of allergen-associated proteases in modulating allergic airway inflammation. Many of the studies have suggested the importance of allergen-associated proteases as having a direct role on airway epithelial cells and dendritic cells. In most cases, activation of the protease activated receptor (PAR)-2 has been implicated as a mechanism behind the potent allergenicity associated with cockroaches. In this review, we focus on recent evidence linking cockroach proteases to activation of a variety of cells important in allergic airway inflammation and the role of PAR-2 in this process. We will highlight recent data exploring the potential mechanisms involved in the biological effects of the allergen.

  6. Split image optical display

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2005-05-31

    A video image is displayed from an optical panel by splitting the image into a plurality of image components, and then projecting the image components through corresponding portions of the panel to collectively form the image. Depth of the display is correspondingly reduced.

  7. Split image optical display

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2007-05-29

    A video image is displayed from an optical panel by splitting the image into a plurality of image components, and then projecting the image components through corresponding portions of the panel to collectively form the image. Depth of the display is correspondingly reduced.

  8. Effective Monitor Display Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, William

    1999-01-01

    Describes some of the factors that affect computer monitor display design and provides suggestions and insights into how screen displays can be designed more effectively. Topics include color, font choices, organizational structure of text, space outline, and general principles. (Author/LRW)

  9. Displays in space.

    PubMed

    Colford, Nicholas

    2002-04-01

    This chapter describes the human and environmental factors that dictate the way that displays must be designed for, and used in space. A brief history of the evolution of such display systems covers developments from the Mercury rockets to the International Space Station.

  10. Display and Presentation Boards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midgley, Thomas Keith

    The use of display and presentation boards as tools to help teachers/trainers convey messages more clearly is briefly discussed, and 24 different types of display and presentation boards are described and illustrated; i.e., chalk, paste-up, hook-n-loop, electric, flannel, scroll, communication planning, acetate pocket, slot, pin-tack, preview,…

  11. Polyplanar optical display electronics

    SciTech Connect

    DeSanto, L.; Biscardi, C.

    1997-07-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. The prototype ten inch display is two inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. In order to achieve a long lifetime, the new display uses a 100 milliwatt green solid-state laser (10,000 hr. life) at 532 nm as its light source. To produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP{trademark}) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments. In order to use the solid-state laser as the light source and also fit within the constraints of the B-52 display, the Digital Micromirror Device (DMD{trademark}) circuit board is removed from the Texas Instruments DLP light engine assembly. Due to the compact architecture of the projection system within the display chassis, the DMD{trademark} chip is operated remotely from the Texas Instruments circuit board. The authors discuss the operation of the DMD{trademark} divorced from the light engine and the interfacing of the DMD{trademark} board with various video formats (CVBS, Y/C or S-video and RGB) including the format specific to the B-52 aircraft. A brief discussion of the electronics required to drive the laser is also presented.

  12. 43-kilodalton glycoprotein from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis: immunochemical reactions with sera from patients with paracoccidioidomycosis, histoplasmosis, or Jorge Lobo's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Puccia, R; Travassos, L R

    1991-01-01

    Sera from patients with paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), histoplasmosis (HP), or Jorge Lobo's disease (JL) were titrated against purified gp43 from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis by using both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoprecipitation (IPP) reactions with 125I-labeled antigens. In IPP, PCM sera and other sera could be distinguished on the basis of serum titers, whereas in ELISA, 53% of the HP sera and 29% of the JL sera reacted similarly to the PCM sera. To investigate the possible role of the carbohydrate epitopes in these reactions, we compared the reactivities of sera from several patients with native and deglycosylated gp43. Competition experiments were carried out with monosaccharides as inhibitors. The results suggest that greater than 85% of the reactions of the PCM sera with gp43 involved peptide epitopes. Cross-reactions with HP and JL sera in ELISA were predominantly attributed to periodate-sensitive carbohydrate epitopes containing galactosyl residues. HP and JL sera which reacted strongly with gp43 in ELISA were only weakly reactive or did not react in IPP with labeled antigens in solution. Moreover, ELISA reactions could be significantly inhibited either by monosaccharides or by periodate treatment. Apparently, carbohydrate epitopes in gp43 are more accessible to the antibodies when the molecule is bound to a plastic substrate than when it is in solution. Structural changes in the gp43 antigen arising by N deglycosylation abolish reactivity with PCM sera and support the existence of conformational peptide epitopes. Images PMID:1722220

  13. System status display evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, Leland G.

    1988-01-01

    The System Status Display is an electronic display system which provides the crew with an enhanced capability for monitoring and managing the aircraft systems. A flight simulation in a fixed base cockpit simulator was used to evaluate alternative design concepts for this display system. The alternative concepts included pictorial versus alphanumeric text formats, multifunction versus dedicated controls, and integration of the procedures with the system status information versus paper checklists. Twelve pilots manually flew approach patterns with the different concepts. System malfunctions occurred which required the pilots to respond to the alert by reconfiguring the system. The pictorial display, the multifunction control interfaces collocated with the system display, and the procedures integrated with the status information all had shorter event processing times and lower subjective workloads.

  14. Protease Mediated Anti-Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    anticancer therapy and focal light illumination is expected to be an effective treatment with reduced phototoxicity given the quenched state of the...to months following photodynamic therapy (PDT). Herein, we report a novel design of protease-mediated photosensitization by which phototoxicity can...W81XWH-05-1-0515 TITLE: Protease Mediated Anti-Cancer Therapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ching-Hsuan Tung CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION

  15. Defense display market assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    1998-09-01

    This paper addresses the number, function and size of principal military displays and establishes a basis to determine the opportunities for technology insertion in the immediate future and into the next millennium. Principal military displays are defined as those occupying appreciable crewstation real-estate and/or those without which the platform could not carry out its intended mission. DoD 'office' applications are excluded from this study. The military displays market is specified by such parameters as active area and footprint size, and other characteristics such as luminance, gray scale, resolution, angle, color, video capability, and night vision imaging system (NVIS) compatibility. Funded, future acquisitions, planned and predicted crewstation modification kits, and form-fit upgrades are taken into account. This paper provides an overview of the DoD niche market, allowing both government and industry a necessary reference by which to meet DoD requirements for military displays in a timely and cost-effective manner. The aggregate DoD market for direct-view and large-area military displays is presently estimated to be in excess of 242,000. Miniature displays are those which must be magnified to be viewed, involve a significantly different manufacturing paradigm and are used in helmet mounted displays and thermal weapon sight applications. Some 114,000 miniature displays are presently included within Service weapon system acquisition plans. For vendor production planning purposes it is noted that foreign military sales could substantially increase these quantities. The vanishing vendor syndrome (VVS) for older display technologies continues to be a growing, pervasive problem throughout DoD, which consequently must leverage the more modern display technologies being developed for civil- commercial markets.

  16. Acid protease production in fungal root endophytes.

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, Michael S; Fraser, Erica; Kernaghan, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Fungal endophytes are ubiquitous in healthy root tissue, but little is known about their ecosystem functions, including their ability to utilize organic nutrient sources such as proteins. Root-associated fungi may secrete proteases to access the carbon and mineral nutrients within proteins in the soil or in the cells of their plant host. We compared the protein utilization patterns of multiple isolates of the root endophytes Phialocephala fortinii s.l., Meliniomyces variabilis and Umbelopsis isabellina with those of two ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi, Hebeloma incarnatulum and Laccaria bicolor, and the wood-decay fungus Irpex lacteus at pH values of 2-9 on liquid BSA media. We also assessed protease activity using a fluorescently labeled casein assay and gelatin zymography and characterized proteases using specific protease inhibitors. I. lacteus and U. isabellina utilized protein efficiently, while the ECM fungi exhibited poor protein utilization. ECM fungi secreted metallo-proteases and had pH optima above 4, while other fungi produced aspartic proteases with lower pH optima. The ascomycetous root endophytes M. variabilis and P. fortinii exhibited intermediate levels of protein utilization and M. variabilis exhibited a very low pH optimum. Comparing proteolytic profiles between fungal root endophytes and fungi with well defined ecological roles provides insight into the ecology of these cryptic root associates.

  17. Preclinical profile of VX-950, a potent, selective, and orally bioavailable inhibitor of hepatitis C virus NS3-4A serine protease.

    PubMed

    Perni, Robert B; Almquist, Susan J; Byrn, Randal A; Chandorkar, Gurudatt; Chaturvedi, Pravin R; Courtney, Lawrence F; Decker, Caroline J; Dinehart, Kirk; Gates, Cynthia A; Harbeson, Scott L; Heiser, Angela; Kalkeri, Gururaj; Kolaczkowski, Elaine; Lin, Kai; Luong, Yu-Ping; Rao, B Govinda; Taylor, William P; Thomson, John A; Tung, Roger D; Wei, Yunyi; Kwong, Ann D; Lin, Chao

    2006-03-01

    VX-950 is a potent, selective, peptidomimetic inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3-4A serine protease, and it demonstrated excellent antiviral activity both in genotype 1b HCV replicon cells (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 354 nM) and in human fetal hepatocytes infected with genotype 1a HCV-positive patient sera (IC50 = 280 nM). VX-950 forms a covalent but reversible complex with the genotype 1a HCV NS3-4A protease in a slow-on, slow-off process with a steady-state inhibition constant (K(i)*) of 7 nM. Dissociation of the covalent enzyme-inhibitor complex of VX-950 and genotype 1a HCV protease has a half-life of almost an hour. A >4-log10 reduction in the HCV RNA levels was observed after a 2-week incubation of replicon cells with VX-950, with no rebound of viral RNA observed after withdrawal of the inhibitor. In several animal species, VX-950 exhibits a favorable pharmacokinetic profile with high exposure in the liver. In a recently developed HCV protease mouse model, VX-950 showed excellent inhibition of HCV NS3-4A protease activity in the liver. Therefore, the overall preclinical profile of VX-950 supports its candidacy as a novel oral therapy against hepatitis C.

  18. Preclinical Profile of VX-950, a Potent, Selective, and Orally Bioavailable Inhibitor of Hepatitis C Virus NS3-4A Serine Protease

    PubMed Central

    Perni, Robert B.; Almquist, Susan J.; Byrn, Randal A.; Chandorkar, Gurudatt; Chaturvedi, Pravin R.; Courtney, Lawrence F.; Decker, Caroline J.; Dinehart, Kirk; Gates, Cynthia A.; Harbeson, Scott L.; Heiser, Angela; Kalkeri, Gururaj; Kolaczkowski, Elaine; Lin, Kai; Luong, Yu-Ping; Rao, B. Govinda; Taylor, William P.; Thomson, John A.; Tung, Roger D.; Wei, Yunyi; Kwong, Ann D.; Lin, Chao

    2006-01-01

    VX-950 is a potent, selective, peptidomimetic inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3-4A serine protease, and it demonstrated excellent antiviral activity both in genotype 1b HCV replicon cells (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 354 nM) and in human fetal hepatocytes infected with genotype 1a HCV-positive patient sera (IC50 = 280 nM). VX-950 forms a covalent but reversible complex with the genotype 1a HCV NS3-4A protease in a slow-on, slow-off process with a steady-state inhibition constant (Ki*) of 7 nM. Dissociation of the covalent enzyme-inhibitor complex of VX-950 and genotype 1a HCV protease has a half-life of almost an hour. A >4-log10 reduction in the HCV RNA levels was observed after a 2-week incubation of replicon cells with VX-950, with no rebound of viral RNA observed after withdrawal of the inhibitor. In several animal species, VX-950 exhibits a favorable pharmacokinetic profile with high exposure in the liver. In a recently developed HCV protease mouse model, VX-950 showed excellent inhibition of HCV NS3-4A protease activity in the liver. Therefore, the overall preclinical profile of VX-950 supports its candidacy as a novel oral therapy against hepatitis C. PMID:16495249

  19. PCSK9: an enigmatic protease.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Dayami

    2008-04-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) plays a critical role in cholesterol metabolism by controlling the levels of low density lipoprotein (LDL) particles that circulate in the bloodstream. Several gain-of-function and loss-of-function mutations in the PCSK9 gene, that occur naturally, have been identified and linked to hypercholesterolemia and hypocholesterolemia, respectively. PCSK9 expression has been shown to be regulated by sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) and statins similar to other genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis. The most critical finding concerning PCSK9 is that this protease is able to influence the number of LDL receptor molecules expressed on the cell surface. Studies have demonstrated that PCSK9 acts mainly by enhancing degradation of LDL receptor protein in the liver. Inactivation of PCSK9 in mice reduces plasma cholesterol levels primarily by increasing hepatic expression of LDL receptor protein and thereby accelerating clearance of circulating LDL cholesterol. The objective of this review is to summarize the current information related to the regulation and function of PCSK9 and to identify gaps in our present knowledge.

  20. Purification and characterization of serine proteases that exhibit caspase-like activity and are associated with programmed cell death in Avena sativa.

    PubMed

    Coffeen, Warren C; Wolpert, Thomas J

    2004-04-01

    Victoria blight of Avena sativa (oat) is caused by the fungus Cochliobolus victoriae, which is pathogenic because of the production of the toxin victorin. The victorin-induced response in sensitive A. sativa has been characterized as a form of programmed cell death (PCD) and displays morphological and biochemical features similar to apoptosis, including chromatin condensation, DNA laddering, cell shrinkage, altered mitochondrial function, and ordered, substrate-specific proteolytic events. Victorin-induced proteolysis of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is shown to be prevented by caspase-specific and general protease inhibitors. Evidence is presented for a signaling cascade leading to Rubisco proteolysis that involves multiple proteases. Furthermore, two proteases that are apparently involved in the Rubisco proteolytic cascade were purified and characterized. These proteases exhibit caspase specificity and display amino acid sequences homologous to plant subtilisin-like Ser proteases. The proteases are constitutively present in an active form and are relocalized to the extracellular fluid after induction of PCD by either victorin or heat shock. The role of the enzymes as processive proteases involved in a signal cascade during the PCD response is discussed.

  1. Carbohydrate protease conjugates: Stabilized proteases for peptide synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wartchow, C.A.; Wang, Peng; Bednarski, M.D.; Callstrom, M.R. |

    1995-12-31

    The synthesis of oligopeptides using stable carbohydrate protease conjugates (CPCs) was examined in acetonitrile solvent systems. CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin] was used for the preparation of peptides containing histidine, phenylalanine, tryptophan in the P{sub 1} position in 60-93% yield. The CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin]-catalyzed synthesis of octamer Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-OEt from Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-OMe was achieved in 71% yield demonstrating that synthesis peptides containing both hydrophylic and hydrophobic amino acids. The P{sub 2} specificity of papain for aromatic residues was utilized for the 2 + 3 coupling of Z-Tyr-Gly-OMe to H{sub 2}N-Gly-Phe-Leu-OH to generate the leucine enkephalin derivative in 79% yield. Although papain is nonspecific for the hydrolysis of N-benzyloxycarbonyl amino acid methyl esters in aqueous solution, the rates of synthesis for these derivitives with nucleophile leucine tert-butyl ester differed by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. CPC[thermolysin] was used to prepare the aspartame precursor Z-Asp-Phe-OMe in 90% yield. The increased stability of CPCs prepared from periodate-modified poly(2-methacryl- amido-2-deoxy-D-glucose), poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose), and poly(5-methacryl-amido-5-deoxy-D-ribose), carbohydrate materials designed to increase the aldehyde concentration in aqueous solution, suggests that the stability of CPCs is directly related to the aldehyde concentration of the carbohydrate material. Periodate oxidation of poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose) followed by covalent attachment to {alpha}-chymotrypsin gave a CPC with catalytic activity in potassium phosphate buffer at 90{degrees}C for 2 h. 1 fig., 1 tab., 40 refs.

  2. Protease Inhibitors Targeting Coronavirus and Filovirus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanchen; Vedantham, Punitha; Lu, Kai; Agudelo, Juliet; Carrion, Ricardo; Nunneley, Jerritt W.; Barnard, Dale; Pöhlmann, Stefan; McKerrow, James H.; Renslo, Adam R.; Simmons, Graham

    2016-01-01

    In order to gain entry into cells, diverse viruses, including Ebola virus, SARS-coronavirus and the emerging MERS-coronavirus, depend on activation of their envelope glycoproteins by host cell proteases. The respective enzymes are thus excellent targets for antiviral intervention. In cell culture, activation of Ebola virus, as well as SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can be accomplished by the endosomal cysteine proteases, cathepsin L (CTSL) and cathepsin B (CTSB). In addition, SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can use serine proteases localized at the cell surface, for their activation. However, it is currently unclear which protease(s) facilitate viral spread in the infected host. We report here that the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777, ((2S)-N-[(1E,3S)-1-(benzenesulfonyl)-5-phenylpent-1-en-3-yl]-2-{[(E)-4-methylpiperazine-1-carbonyl]amino}-3-phenylpropanamide) and closely-related vinylsulfones act as broad-spectrum antivirals by targeting cathepsin-mediated cell entry. K11777 is already in advanced stages of development for a number of parasitic diseases, such as Chagas disease, and has proven to be safe and effective in a range of animal models. K11777 inhibition of SARS-CoV and Ebola virus entry was observed in the sub-nanomolar range. In order to assess, whether cysteine or serine proteases promote viral spread in the host, we compared the antiviral activity of an optimized K11777-derivative with that of camostat, an inhibitor of TMPRSS2 and related serine proteases. Employing a pathogenic animal model of SARS-CoV infection, we demonstrated that viral spread and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV is driven by serine rather than cysteine proteases and can be effectively prevented by camostat. Camostat has been clinically used to treat chronic pancreatitis, and thus represents an exciting potential therapeutic for respiratory coronavirus infections. Our results indicate that camostat, or similar serine protease inhibitors, might be an effective option for treatment of SARS and

  3. Mapping protease substrates by using a biotinylated phage substrate library.

    PubMed

    Scholle, Michael D; Kriplani, Ushma; Pabon, Amanda; Sishtla, Kamakshi; Glucksman, Marc J; Kay, Brian K

    2006-05-01

    We describe a bacteriophage M13 substrate library encoding the AviTag (BirA substrate) and combinatorial heptamer peptides displayed at the N terminus of the mature form of capsid protein III. Phages are biotinylated efficiently (> or = 50%) when grown in E. coli cells coexpressing BirA, and such viral particles can be immobilized on a streptavidin-coated support and released by protease cleavage within the combinatorial peptide. We have used this library to map the specificity of human Factor Xa and a neuropeptidase, neurolysin (EC3.4.24.16). Validation by analysis of isolated peptide substrates has revealed that neurolysin recognizes the motif hydrophobic-X-Pro-Arg-hydrophobic, where Arg-hydrophobic is the scissile bond.

  4. Mapping protease substrates using a biotinylated phage substrate library.

    SciTech Connect

    Scholle, M. D.; Kriplani, U.; Pabon, A.; Sishtla, K.; Glucksman, M. J.; Kay, B. K.; Biosciences Division; Chicago Medical School

    2005-05-05

    We describe a bacteriophage M13 substrate library encoding the AviTag (BirA substrate) and combinatorial heptamer peptides displayed at the N terminus of the mature form of capsid protein III. Phages are biotinylated efficiently (> or = 50%) when grown in E. coli cells coexpressing BirA, and such viral particles can be immobilized on a streptavidin-coated support and released by protease cleavage within the combinatorial peptide. We have used this library to map the specificity of human Factor Xa and a neuropeptidase, neurolysin (EC3.4.24.16). Validation by analysis of isolated peptide substrates has revealed that neurolysin recognizes the motif hydrophobic-X-Pro-Arg-hydrophobic, where Arg-hydrophobic is the scissile bond.

  5. Evaluation of proteases and protease inhibitors in Heterodera glycines cysts obtained from laboratory and field populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteases and proteases inhibitors were evaluated in a number of preparations of Heterodera glycines cysts obtained from glasshouse cultures (GH) and field (LR) populations. Using a FRET-peptide library comprising 512 peptide substrate pools that detect 4 endoprotease types (aspartic, cysteine, meta...

  6. A Camelid-derived Antibody Fragment Targeting the Active Site of a Serine Protease Balances between Inhibitor and Substrate Behavior.

    PubMed

    Kromann-Hansen, Tobias; Oldenburg, Emil; Yung, Kristen Wing Yu; Ghassabeh, Gholamreza H; Muyldermans, Serge; Declerck, Paul J; Huang, Mingdong; Andreasen, Peter A; Ngo, Jacky Chi Ki

    2016-07-15

    A peptide segment that binds the active site of a serine protease in a substrate-like manner may behave like an inhibitor or a substrate. However, there is sparse information on which factors determine the behavior a particular peptide segment will exhibit. Here, we describe the first x-ray crystal structure of a nanobody in complex with a serine protease. The nanobody displays a new type of interaction between an antibody and a serine protease as it inserts its complementary determining region-H3 loop into the active site of the protease in a substrate-like manner. The unique binding mechanism causes the nanobody to behave as a strong inhibitor as well as a poor substrate. Intriguingly, its substrate behavior is incomplete, as 30-40% of the nanobody remained intact and inhibitory after prolonged incubation with the protease. Biochemical analysis reveals that an intra-loop interaction network within the complementary determining region-H3 of the nanobody balances its inhibitor versus substrate behavior. Collectively, our results unveil molecular factors, which may be a general mechanism to determine the substrate versus inhibitor behavior of other protease inhibitors.

  7. Map display design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aretz, Anthony J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a cognitive model of a pilot's navigation task and describes an experiment comparing a visual momentum map display to the traditional track-up and north-up approaches. The data show the advantage to a track-up map is its congruence with the ego-centered forward view; however, the development of survey knowledge is hindered by the inconsistency of the rotating display. The stable alignment of a north-up map aids the acquisition of survey knowledge, but there is a cost associated with the mental rotation of the display to a track-up alignment for ego-centered tasks. The results also show that visual momentum can be used to reduce the mental rotation costs of a north-up display.

  8. Gardens on Display.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinheimer, Margaret

    1998-01-01

    Discusses display gardens and their development by students. Presents guidelines for construction and size consideration and describes details of an outdoor garden, volcanic garden, and shoe box dioramas. (DDR)

  9. BspK, a Serine Protease from the Predatory Bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus with Utility for Analysis of Therapeutic Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bratanis, Eleni; Molina, Henrik; Naegeli, Andreas; Collin, Mattias; Lood, Rolf

    2017-02-15

    The development of therapeutic and diagnostic antibodies is a rapidly growing field of research, being the fastest expanding group of products on the pharmaceutical market, and appropriate quality controls are crucial for their application. We have identified and characterized the serine protease termed BspK (Bdellovibrio serine protease K) from Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus and here show its activity on antibodies. Mutation of the serine residue at position 230 rendered the protease inactive. Further investigations of BspK enzymatic characteristics revealed autoproteolytic activity, resulting in numerous cleavage products. Two of the autoproteolytic cleavage sites in the BspK fusion protein were investigated in more detail and corresponded to cleavage after K28 and K210 in the N- and C-terminal parts of BspK, respectively. Further, BspK displayed stable enzymatic activity on IgG within the pH range of 6.0 to 9.5 and was inhibited in the presence of ZnCl2 BspK demonstrated preferential hydrolysis of human IgG1 compared to other immunoglobulins and isotypes, with hydrolysis of the heavy chain at position K226 generating two separate Fab fragments and an intact IgG Fc domain. Finally, we show that BspK preferentially cleaves its substrates C-terminally to lysines similar to the protease LysC. However, BspK displays a unique cleavage profile compared to several currently used proteases on the market.

  10. Military display performance parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Meyer, Frederick

    2012-06-01

    The military display market is analyzed in terms of four of its segments: avionics, vetronics, dismounted soldier, and command and control. Requirements are summarized for a number of technology-driving parameters, to include luminance, night vision imaging system compatibility, gray levels, resolution, dimming range, viewing angle, video capability, altitude, temperature, shock and vibration, etc., for direct-view and virtual-view displays in cockpits and crew stations. Technical specifications are discussed for selected programs.

  11. Liquid Crystal Airborne Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    81/2X 11- 10 -9 .8 display using a large advertising alphanimeric ( TCI ) has been added to the front of the optical box used in the F-4 aircraft for HUD...properties over a wide range of tempera - tures, including normal room temperature. What are Liquid Crystals? Liquid crystals have been classified in three...natic fanctions and to present data needed for the semi- automatic and manual control of system functions. Existing aircraft using CRT display

  12. Intervention for hyperlipidemia associated with protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Melroe, N H; Kopaczewski, J; Henry, K; Huebsch, J

    1999-01-01

    In the past 3 years, treatment for HIV infection has significantly improved the prognosis for HIV-infected persons. The administration of protease inhibitors for the treatment of HIV infection has had a significant role in the reduction of AIDS-related complications. Recent findings have indicated that protease inhibitors may significantly increase lipids to levels that pose a health risk that may be greater than the illness itself. This article reviews the initial findings of a study that investigated the impact of interventions for the treatment of protease inhibitor-related hyperlipidemia. The purpose of the study was to determine if initiation of interventions based on the National Cholesterol Education Program Guidelines would be effective in lowering protease inhibitor-related hyperlipidemia without disrupting the effectiveness of the HIV therapy. A total of 45 HIV-infected individuals who were taking a protease inhibitor and had abnormally elevated lipids were enrolled into this study. Mean serum cholesterol level prior to initiation of a protease inhibitor regimen was 170 mg/dl as compared to a mean cholesterol at time of enrollment of 289 mg/dl and triglycerides of 879 mg/dl. Interventions included diet and exercise and the prescription of gemfibrozil alone or in combination with atorvatstatin. During the course of the study, overall intervention significantly reduced serum cholesterol level to 201 mg/dl (p. 01) over a study period of ten months. Case studies of five medical events related to hyperlipidemia are included. Currently, 26 participants continue in the study. Sixteen participants discontinued protease inhibitor therapy during the course of the study and thus ended their participation.

  13. Ara12 subtilisin-like protease from Arabidopsis thaliana: purification, substrate specificity and tissue localization.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, John M U; Simpson, David J; Hyman, Stefan C; Ndimba, Bongani K; Slabas, Antoni R

    2003-02-15

    A C-terminal portion of Ara12 subtilisin-like protease (residues 542-757) was expressed in Escherichia coli cells as a fusion protein bound to maltose binding protein. Polyclonal antisera raised against the expressed protein were used to examine the tissue specificity and subcellular localization of Ara12. The protease was found predominantly in the silique and stem of plants, but was hardly detectable in leaf and not seen in root tissue. The distribution observed using immunological techniques is different from that seen by an RNA analysis study, which demonstrated similar mRNA abundance in the stem and leaves. Using immunogold labelling, Ara12 was shown to have an extracellular localization and was found in the intercellular spaces in stem tissue. Ara12 protease was purified to homogeneity from Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension cultures by anion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Proteolytic activity of Ara12 was inhibited by a number of serine protease inhibitors, but was almost unaffected by inhibitors of other catalytic classes of proteases. Optimal proteolytic activity was displayed under acidic conditions (pH 5.0). Ara12 activity was relatively thermostable and was stimulated in the presence of Ca2+ ions. Substrate specificity studies were conducted using a series of internally quenched fluorogenic peptide substrates. At the P1 position of substrates, hydrophobic residues, such as Phe and Ala, were preferred to Arg, whilst at the P1' position, Asp, Leu and Ala were most favoured. Possible functions of Ara12 are discussed in the light of the involvement of a number of plant subtilisin-like proteases in morphogenesis.

  14. Sera from dams of calves with bovine neonatal pancytopenia contain alloimmune antibodies directed against calf leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Pardon, Bart; Stuyven, Edith; Stuyvaert, Sabrina; Hostens, Miel; Dewulf, Jeroen; Goddeeris, Bruno Maria; Cox, Eric; Deprez, Piet

    2011-06-15

    Bovine neonatal pancytopenia (BNP) is a bleeding and pancytopenic syndrome in neonatal calves, which recently emerged all over Europe. The present study tested whether antibodies directed against calf leukocytes are present in sera from known BNP dams. Sera from BNP dams (n=11) were combined with leukocytes from 11 calves (5 BNP survivors and 6 controls). After adding a fluorescein conjugated F(ab')(2) fragment of rabbit anti-bovine IgG (H&L) the level of antibody binding was measured by flow cytometry. As control groups both sera from dams from BNP affected (n=48) as from unaffected (n=54) herds were combined with leukocytes from the same calves. With sera from BNP dams, antibody binding could be visualised by immunofluoresence in both peripheral blood as in bone marrow smears. Mean fluoresence intensity values of all leukocyte subpopulations were significantly higher for the BNP dams compared to both control groups (P<0.01). BNP dams showed significantly more antibody binding on multiple leukocyte subpopulations of both BNP survivors and control calves and this from cut off values of MFI 100 onwards (P<0.01). The BNP survivor calves reacted significantly more often with sera from the BNP dams than the control calves (P<0.01). In conclusion the present study supports the hypothesis that BNP is an immune-mediated disease.

  15. Detection of borreliae in archived sera from patients with clinically suspect Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sin Hang; Vigliotti, Jessica S; Vigliotti, Veronica S; Jones, William; Shearer, David M

    2014-03-11

    The diagnoses of Lyme disease based on clinical manifestations, serological findings and detection of infectious agents often contradict each other. We tested 52 blind-coded serum samples, including 20 pre-treatment and 12 post-treatment sera from clinically suspect Lyme disease patients, for the presence of residual Lyme disease infectious agents, using nested PCR amplification of a signature segment of the borrelial 16S ribosomal RNA gene for detection and direct DNA sequencing of the PCR amplicon for molecular validation. These archived sera were split from the samples drawn for the 2-tier serology tests performed by a CDC-approved laboratory, and are used as reference materials for evaluating new diagnostic reagents. Of the 12 post-treatment serum samples, we found DNA evidence of a novel borrelia of uncertain significance in one, which was also positive for the 2-tier serology test. The rest of the post-treatment sera and all 20 control sera were PCR-negative. Of the 20 pre-treatment sera from clinically suspect early Lyme disease patients, we found Borrelia miyamotoi in one which was 2-tier serology-negative, and a Borrelia burgdorferi in two-one negative and one positive for 2-tier serology. We conclude that a sensitive and reliable DNA-based test is needed to support the diagnosis of Lyme disease and Lyme disease-like borreliosis.

  16. Protective immunity induced in Aotus monkeys by recombinant SERA proteins of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed Central

    Inselburg, J; Bzik, D J; Li, W B; Green, K M; Kansopon, J; Hahm, B K; Bathurst, I C; Barr, P J; Rossan, R N

    1991-01-01

    We describe the vaccination of Panamanian monkeys (Aotus sp.) with two recombinant blood stage antigens that each contain a portion of the N-terminal region of the SERA (serine repeat antigen) protein of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We immunized with either a 262-amino-acid SERA fragment (SERA I) that contains amino acids 24 to 285 of the 989-amino-acid protein or a 483-amino-acid SERA fragment (SERA N) that contains amino acids 24 to 506 as part of a fusion protein with human gamma interferon. The recombinant proteins were shown to stimulate protective immunity when administered with complete and incomplete Freund adjuvant. Four of six immunized monkeys challenged by intravenous inoculation with blood stage P. falciparum developed parasitemias that were reduced by at least 1,000-fold. Two of six immunized monkeys developed parasitemias which were comparable to the lowest parasitemia in one of four controls and were 50- to 1,000-fold lower than in the other three controls. PMID:1900809

  17. Inhibition of adenovirus DNA synthesis in vitro by sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, M.S.; Friefeld, B.R.; Keiser, H.D.

    1982-12-01

    Sera containing antinuclear antibodies from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and related disorders were tested for their effect on the synthesis of adenovirus (Ad) DNA in an in vitro replication system. After being heated at 60/sup 0/C for 1 h, some sera from patients with SLE inhibited Ad DNA synthesis by 60 to 100%. Antibodies to double-stranded DNA were present in 15 of the 16 inhibitory sera, and inhibitory activity copurified with anti-double-stranded DNA in the immunoglobulin G fraction. These SLE sera did not inhibit the DNA polymerases ..cap alpha.., BETA, ..gamma.. and had no antibody to the 72,000-dalton DNA-binding protein necessary for Ad DNA synthesis. The presence of antibodies to single-stranded DNA and a variety of saline-extractable antigens (Sm, Ha, nRNP, and rRNP) did not correlate with SLE serum inhibitory activity. Methods previously developed for studying the individual steps in Ad DNA replication were used to determine the site of inhibition by the SLE sera that contained antibody to double-stranded DNA. Concentrations of the SLE inhibitor that decreased the elongation of Ad DNA by greater than 85% had no effect on either the initiation of Ad DNA synthesis or the polymerization of the first 26 deoxyribonucleotides.

  18. Respiratory virus antibodies in human sera from different parts of the world

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Robinson, D.

    1965-01-01

    Over the past few years, many viruses have been isolated, particularly in the USA and Great Britain, from persons with respiratory disease. It is difficult to obtain suitable specimens from diverse areas of the world and test for viruses, but it is possible to obtain sera and test for antibodies. The present article reports the findings of an antibody survey of sera collected from 15 countries. The purpose of this survey was, first, to determine whether persons in these countries possessed antibodies against the “newer” respiratory viruses and therefore had been infected with these or related viruses, and, secondly, to look for quantitative differences in antibodies present in sera from different countries. A worldwide geographical distribution of antibodies was demonstrated which indicated a widespread distribution of those viruses considered in this study. Although it is widely believed that respiratory infections are less common and troublesome in hot or tropical regions, there was no evidence that sera obtained from countries with such climates contained less antibody than sera from countries with more temperate climates. PMID:5294308

  19. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  20. Bacterial proteases, untapped antimicrobial drug targets.

    PubMed

    Culp, Elizabeth; Wright, Gerard D

    2017-04-01

    Bacterial proteases are an extensive collection of enzymes that have vital roles in cell viability, stress response and pathogenicity. Although their perturbation clearly offers the potential for antimicrobial drug development, both as traditional antibiotics and anti-virulence drugs, they are not yet the target of any clinically used therapeutics. Here we describe the potential for and recent progress in the development of compounds targeting bacterial proteases with a focus on AAA+ family proteolytic complexes and signal peptidases (SPs). Caseinolytic protease (ClpP) belongs to the AAA+ family of proteases, a group of multimeric barrel-shaped complexes whose activity is tightly regulated by associated AAA+ ATPases. The opportunity for chemical perturbation of these complexes is demonstrated by compounds targeting ClpP for inhibition, activation or perturbation of its associated ATPase. Meanwhile, SPs are also a proven antibiotic target. Responsible for the cleavage of targeting peptides during protein secretion, both type I and type II SPs have been successfully targeted by chemical inhibitors. As the threat of pan-antibiotic resistance continues to grow, these and other bacterial proteases offer an arsenal of novel antibiotic targets ripe for development.

  1. Lysosomal protease expression in mature enamel.

    PubMed

    Tye, Coralee E; Lorenz, Rachel L; Bartlett, John D

    2009-01-01

    The enamel matrix proteins (amelogenin, enamelin and ameloblastin) are degraded by matrix metalloproteinase-20 and kallikrein-4 during enamel development and mature enamel is virtually protein free. The precise mechanism of removal and degradation of the enamel protein cleavage products from the matrix, however, remains poorly understood. It has been proposed that receptor-mediated endocytosis allows for the cleaved proteins to be removed from the matrix during enamel formation and then transported to the lysosome for further degradation. This study aims to identify lysosomal proteases that are present in maturation-stage enamel organ. RNA from first molars of 11-day-old mice was collected and expression was initially assessed by RT-PCR and then quantified by qPCR. The pattern of expression of selected proteases was assessed by immunohistochemical staining of demineralized mouse incisors. With the exception of cathepsin G, all lysosomal proteases assessed were expressed in maturation-stage enamel organ. Identified proteases included cathepsins B, D, F, H, K, L, O, S and Z. Tripeptidyl peptidases I and II as well as dipeptidyl peptidases I, II, III and IV were also found to be expressed. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed that the maturation-stage ameloblasts express cathepsins L and S and tripeptidyl peptidase II. Our results suggest that the ameloblasts are enriched by a large number of lysosomal proteases at maturation that are likely involved in the degradation of the organic matrix.

  2. Production of alkaline protease from Cellulosimicrobium cellulans

    PubMed Central

    Ferracini-Santos, Luciana; Sato, Hélia H

    2009-01-01

    Cellulosimicrobium cellulans is one of the microorganisms that produces a wide variety of yeast cell wall-degrading enzymes, β-1,3-glucanase, protease and chitinase. Dried cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used as carbon and nitrogen source for cell growth and protease production. The medium components KH2PO4, KOH and dried yeast cells showed a significant effect (p<0.05) on the factorial fractional design. A second design was prepared using two factors: pH and percentage of dried yeast cells. The results showed that the culture medium for the maximum production of protease was 0.2 g/l of MgSO4.7H2O, 2.0 g/l of (NH4)2SO4 and 8% of dried yeast cells in 0.15M phosphate buffer at pH 8.0. The maximum alkaline protease production was 7.0 ± 0.27 U/ml over the center point. Crude protease showed best activity at 50ºC and pH 7.0-8.0, and was stable at 50ºC. PMID:24031317

  3. A serological survey of sera from domestic animals on Easter Island.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, P; Gray, D P; Gibbs, H C; Murphy, D A

    1968-04-01

    Animals' sera collected on Easter Island from December 1964 to February 1965 were tested by appropriate methods for the presence of antibodies to various infections. These included, ornithosis, Q-fever, brucellosis, Johne's disease, leptospirosis, toxoplasmosis and vesicular stomatitis viruses. It appeared that the cattle and sheep were exposed to the ornithosis group of agents. The sheep were also exposed to toxoplasmosis. The low-grade reactions observed on the cattle sera with the leptospira and brucella antigens were not sufficient to indicate past infection. All sera tested with Q-fever and Johne's disease antigens gave negative reactions. The results suggested that neither strain of vesicular stomatitis virus had yet been introduced into this restricted animal population.

  4. SERA-1, the First Supersonic Rocket Developed in the Frame of PERSEUS Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, C.; Pernon, S.; Oswald, J.

    2015-09-01

    SERA-1 is the first supersonic rocket developed in the frame of PERSEUS, a French project that promotes students activities in space launch vehicle fields. The objective of the rocket was to validate technologies for supersonic flights (Mach > 1 .2), to allow a complete restitution of the trajectory and the atmosphere met during the flight, and to qualify PERSEUS procedures for the sizing of atmospheric demonstrators of a future nanosatellites launcher. The project took place on almost 2 school years from September, 2012 till June, 2014. SERA-1 has successfully flown on May 7th, 2014 from Esrange Space Center at Kiruna (Sweden) during a one week students launch campaign as part of EASP program. SERA-1 is a 3 m long, 25 kg lift-off mass rocket that was propelled by a Pro98-6G Green3 CESARONI engine. It has reached an altitude of about 5 500 m with a maximum speed greater than Mach 1.3.

  5. Detection of antibodies against synthetic peptides mimicking ureases fragments in sera of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Konieczna, Iwona; Kwinkowski, Marek; Kolesińska, Beata; Kamiński, Zbigniew; Zarnowiec, Paulina; Kaca, Wiesław

    2012-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease with an autoimmunological background. RA is mostly characterized by systemic inflammation and injuries of synovial joints. There is a hypothesis that bacterial infections may be connected with development of the disease. It has been suggested that molecular mimicry between bacterial and human antigens may be one of possible mechanisms of RA development. One of potential antigens involved in this mechanism is urease - enzyme with high structural conservatism, occurring in pathogenic and commensal bacteria. We found that the level of antibodies against peptide mimicking urease "flap" region is significantly higher in sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis in comparison with volunteer blood donor sera. We also observed that antibodies present in RA sera may bind not only specific peptide antigens but also peptides with a slightly different structure.

  6. Dichroic Liquid Crystal Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadur, Birendra

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * DICHROIC DYES * Chemical Structure * Chemical and Photochemical Stability * THEORETICAL MODELLING * DEFECTS CAUSED BY PROLONGED LIGHT IRRADIATION * CHEMICAL STRUCTURE AND PHOTOSTABILITY * OTHER PARAMETERS AFFECTING PHOTOSTABILITY * CELL PREPARATION * DICHROIC PARAMETERS AND THEIR MEASUREMENTS * Order Parameter and Dichroic Ratio Of Dyes * Absorbance, Order Parameter and Dichroic Ratio Measurements * IMPACT OF DYE STRUCTURE AND LIQUID CRYSTAL HOST ON PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF A DICHROIC MIXTURE * Order Parameter and Dichroic Ratio * EFFECT OF LENGTH OF DICHROIC DYES ON THE ORDER PARAMETER * EFFECT OF THE BREADTH OF DYE ON THE ORDER PARAMETER * EFFECT OF THE HOST ON THE ORDER PARAMETER * TEMPERATURE VARIATION OF THE ORDER PARAMETER OF DYES IN A LIQUID CRYSTAL HOST * IMPACT OF DYE CONCENTRATION ON THE ORDER PARAMETER * Temperature Range * Viscosity * Dielectric Constant and Anisotropy * Refractive Indices and Birefringence * solubility43,153-156 * Absorption Wavelength and Auxochromic Groups * Molecular Engineering of Dichroic Dyes * OPTICAL, ELECTRO-OPTICAL AND LIFE PARAMETERS * Colour And CIE Colour space120,160-166 * CIE 1931 COLOUR SPACE * CIE 1976 CHROMATICITY DIAGRAM * CIE UNIFORM COLOUR SPACES & COLOUR DIFFERENCE FORMULAE120,160-166 * Electro-Optical Parameters120 * LUMINANCE * CONTRAST AND CONTRAST RATIO * SWITCHING SPEED * Life Parameters and Failure Modes * DICHROIC MIXTURE FORMULATION * Monochrome Mixture * Black Mixture * ACHROMATIC BLACK MIXTURE FOR HEILMEIER DISPLAYS * Effect of Illuminant on Display Colour * Colour of the Field-On State * Effect of Dye Linewidth * Optimum Centroid Wavelengths * Effect of Dye Concentration * Mixture Formulation Using More Than Three Dyes * ACHROMATIC MIXTURE FOR WHITE-TAYLOR TYPE DISPLAYS * HEILMEIER DISPLAYS * Theoretical Modelling * Threshold Characteristic * Effects of Dye Concentration on Electro-optical Parameters * Effect of Cholesteric Doping * Effect of Alignment

  7. Beta-arrestin and arrestin are recognized by autoantibodies in sera from multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Ohguro, H; Chiba, S; Igarashi, Y; Matsumoto, H; Akino, T; Palczewski, K

    1993-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS), one of the most common chronic neurologic diseases, is characterized by the presence of multiple plaques of demyelination throughout the central nervous system. Although the etiology of the disease has not been established, it is believed to involve autoimmune mechanisms. We have examined sera from patients with MS for the presence of antibodies to antigens from brain and retina. Immunoblot analysis of soluble fraction of proteins from bovine brain revealed a prominent band at 45 kDa stained with sera of 8-14 patients with MS. In two patients with MS, serum antibody titers during relapse were higher compared with those when the patients were in remission. These antibodies were undetectable in cerebrospinal fluid of our MS patients and additionally were absent in sera of patients with other neurological diseases and normal control subjects. Furthermore, immunoblot analysis of the soluble fraction from bovine retinal rod outer segments revealed a prominent protein band at 48 kDa stained with MS sera. This antigen was purified to homogeneity from bovine retinal outer segments and identified as arrestin. Additionally, sera from MS patients reacted with purified beta-arrestin 1, a 45-kDa protein homologous to arrestin that is found in various tissues. Using limited proteolysis of arrestin and a competitive ELISA test with a synthetic peptide, we identified the recognition site(s) for antibodies in sera of MS patients at a dominant immunogenic site on arrestin located at the C-terminal region of the molecule. We suggest that the presence of circulating antibodies reactive with beta-arrestin or arrestin may be related to the course of MS progression. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8475065

  8. Reactivity of a lecithin-free cardiolipin preparation (cardchol) in leprosy sera

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Henning

    1959-01-01

    Previous experiments have shown that a mixture of cardiolipin and cholesterol in absolute ethanol (named “cardchol”) might be used as an antigen in complement-fixation tests. The reactivity in the complement-fixation test of CWRM (an “ordinary” cardiolipin antigen) was compared with that of cardchol in several experiments, and it could be demonstrated that the reactivity of cardchol was especially pronounced in sera from false-positive reactors. In about 50% of such cases, quantitative determination of the antibody content showed that cardchol was more reactive than CWRM, whereas in syphilitic cases the reactivity of cardchol was inferior to that of CWRM. An exception was primary syphilis, which showed a reactivity level with cardchol equal to or even superior to that of CWRM. Examinations of a certain number of sera from leprosy patients had shown them to be highly reactive with cardchol and non-reactive or weakly reactive with CWRM; this observation is fully confirmed by examination of a larger number of leprosy sera, on which this paper reports. These sera were examined with a battery of tests using lipoidal antigens and with the TPI test. Testing with cardchol proved to give the highest reactivity with these sera, which were mostly non-treponemal. Subdivision of the material according to the clinical stage of leprosy showed that the highest reactivity of cardchol occurred in patients with lepromatous leprosy, particularly in those with leprosy of relatively short duration. Electrophoretic fractionation of these sera demonstrated that the substances reacting with cardchol were situated in the gamma-globulin or gamma- and beta-globulin serum fractions. PMID:14443042

  9. Sera from patients with seropositive neuromyelitis optica spectral disorders caused the degeneration of rodent optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yoshiko; Kanamori, Akiyasu; Nakamura, Makoto; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Nakashima, Ichiro; Negi, Akira

    2014-02-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune inflammatory, neurodestructive disease primarily targeting the optic nerve and spinal cord. An autoantibody against water channel protein aquaporin-4 (AQP4), which is expressed at endofeet of astrocytes has been implicated in the pathogenesis of NMO. We evaluated the impact of sera of seropositive patients with NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSDs) on the rodent optic nerve and retina. Serum was obtained either from patients with seropositive NMOSD (AQP4+), seronegative patient with idiopathic optic neuritis (AQP4-), and healthy volunteers (control). Anti-AQP4 antibody in a serum was measured by a previously established cell-based assay. The patients' sera were applied on the optic nerve after de-sheathed. Immunohistochemistry showed that at 7 days after the treatment, the area of the optic nerve exposed to the AQP4+ sera lost expression of both AQP4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Also, Human-IgG immunoreactivity and marked invasion of inflammation cells were observed in the optic nerve treated with AQP4+ serum. Immnoreactivity of neurofilament was reduced at 14 days after the treatment, not 7 days. Real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed the reduced gene expression of neurofilament in retina from the eye that was exposed to the AQP4+ sera at 14 days. Retrograde fluorogold-labeling on the retinal flatmount disclosed the significantly reduced number of retinal ganglion cells when the AQP4+ sera were applied. The present model has demonstrated that the sera from patients with seropositive NMOSDs led to the regional astrocytic degeneration and inflammatory cell invasion in the optic nerve, resulting in the ultimate loss of RGCs and their axons at areas beyond the injury site.

  10. Interpreting sero-epidemiological studies for influenza in a context of non-bracketing sera

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Tim K.; Fang, Vicky J.; Perera, Ranawaka A. P. M.; Ip, Dennis K. M.; Leung, Gabriel M.; Malik Peiris, J. S.; Cauchemez, Simon; Cowling, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Background In influenza epidemiology, analysis of paired sera collected from people before and after influenza seasons has been used for decades to study the cumulative incidence of influenza virus infections in populations. However, interpretation becomes challenging when sera are collected after the start or before the end of an epidemic, and do not neatly bracket the epidemic. Methods Serum samples were collected longitudinally in a community-based study. Most participants provided their first serum after the start of circulation of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in 2009. We developed a Bayesian hierarchical model to correct for non-bracketing sera and estimate the cumulative incidence of infection from the serological data and surveillance data in Hong Kong. Results We analysed 4843 sera from 2097 unvaccinated participants in the study, collected from April 2009 through December 2010. After accounting for non-bracketing, we estimated that the cumulative incidence of H1N1pdm09 virus infection was 45.1% (95% credible interval, CI: 40.2%, 49.2%), 16.5% (95% CI: 13.0%, 19.7%) and 11.3% (95% CI: 5.9%, 17.5%) for children 0–18y, adults 19–50y and older adults >50y respectively. Including all available data substantially increased precision compared to a simpler analysis based only on sera collected at 6-month intervals in a subset of participants. Conclusions We developed a framework for the analysis of antibody titers that accounted for the timing of sera collection with respect to influenza activity and permitted robust estimation of the cumulative incidence of infection during an epidemic. PMID:26427725

  11. Quantitation of Circulating Neuropilin-1 in Human, Monkey, Mouse, and Rat Sera by ELISA.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanmei; Meng, Y Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) is a single spanning transmembrane glycoprotein that acts as a co-receptor for class 3 semaphorins and vascular endothelial growth factors. Naturally occurring soluble NRP1 isoforms containing partial extracellular domain (ECD) have been reported. In addition to soluble NRP1, full-length NRP1 ECD has also been identified in human and animal sera. Here, we describe primate and rodent NRP1 ELISAs that measure total circulating NRP1 including soluble NPR1 and NRP1 ECD in human, monkey, mouse, and rat sera.

  12. Cleavage Entropy as Quantitative Measure of Protease Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Julian E.; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Huber, Roland G.; Margreiter, Michael A.; Spitzer, Gudrun M.; Wallnoefer, Hannes G.; Liedl, Klaus R.

    2013-01-01

    A purely information theory-guided approach to quantitatively characterize protease specificity is established. We calculate an entropy value for each protease subpocket based on sequences of cleaved substrates extracted from the MEROPS database. We compare our results with known subpocket specificity profiles for individual proteases and protease groups (e.g. serine proteases, metallo proteases) and reflect them quantitatively. Summation of subpocket-wise cleavage entropy contributions yields a measure for overall protease substrate specificity. This total cleavage entropy allows ranking of different proteases with respect to their specificity, separating unspecific digestive enzymes showing high total cleavage entropy from specific proteases involved in signaling cascades. The development of a quantitative cleavage entropy score allows an unbiased comparison of subpocket-wise and overall protease specificity. Thus, it enables assessment of relative importance of physicochemical and structural descriptors in protease recognition. We present an exemplary application of cleavage entropy in tracing substrate specificity in protease evolution. This highlights the wide range of substrate promiscuity within homologue proteases and hence the heavy impact of a limited number of mutations on individual substrate specificity. PMID:23637583

  13. Cleavage entropy as quantitative measure of protease specificity.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Julian E; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Huber, Roland G; Margreiter, Michael A; Spitzer, Gudrun M; Wallnoefer, Hannes G; Liedl, Klaus R

    2013-04-01

    A purely information theory-guided approach to quantitatively characterize protease specificity is established. We calculate an entropy value for each protease subpocket based on sequences of cleaved substrates extracted from the MEROPS database. We compare our results with known subpocket specificity profiles for individual proteases and protease groups (e.g. serine proteases, metallo proteases) and reflect them quantitatively. Summation of subpocket-wise cleavage entropy contributions yields a measure for overall protease substrate specificity. This total cleavage entropy allows ranking of different proteases with respect to their specificity, separating unspecific digestive enzymes showing high total cleavage entropy from specific proteases involved in signaling cascades. The development of a quantitative cleavage entropy score allows an unbiased comparison of subpocket-wise and overall protease specificity. Thus, it enables assessment of relative importance of physicochemical and structural descriptors in protease recognition. We present an exemplary application of cleavage entropy in tracing substrate specificity in protease evolution. This highlights the wide range of substrate promiscuity within homologue proteases and hence the heavy impact of a limited number of mutations on individual substrate specificity.

  14. Insect response to plant defensive protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhu-Salzman, Keyan; Zeng, Rensen

    2015-01-07

    Plant protease inhibitors (PIs) are natural plant defense proteins that inhibit proteases of invading insect herbivores. However, their anti-insect efficacy is determined not only by their potency toward a vulnerable insect system but also by the response of the insect to such a challenge. Through the long history of coevolution with their host plants, insects have developed sophisticated mechanisms to circumvent antinutritional effects of dietary challenges. Their response takes the form of changes in gene expression and the protein repertoire in cells lining the alimentary tract, the first line of defense. Research in insect digestive proteases has revealed the crucial roles they play in insect adaptation to plant PIs and has brought about a new appreciation of how phytophagous insects employ this group of molecules in both protein digestion and counterdefense. This review provides researchers in related fields an up-to-date summary of recent advances.

  15. Dynamic plasmonic colour display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiaoyang; Kamin, Simon; Liu, Na

    2017-02-01

    Plasmonic colour printing based on engineered metasurfaces has revolutionized colour display science due to its unprecedented subwavelength resolution and high-density optical data storage. However, advanced plasmonic displays with novel functionalities including dynamic multicolour printing, animations, and highly secure encryption have remained in their infancy. Here we demonstrate a dynamic plasmonic colour display technique that enables all the aforementioned functionalities using catalytic magnesium metasurfaces. Controlled hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of the constituent magnesium nanoparticles, which serve as dynamic pixels, allow for plasmonic colour printing, tuning, erasing and restoration of colour. Different dynamic pixels feature distinct colour transformation kinetics, enabling plasmonic animations. Through smart material processing, information encoded on selected pixels, which are indiscernible to both optical and scanning electron microscopies, can only be read out using hydrogen as a decoding key, suggesting a new generation of information encryption and anti-counterfeiting applications.

  16. Dynamic plasmonic colour display

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaoyang; Kamin, Simon; Liu, Na

    2017-01-01

    Plasmonic colour printing based on engineered metasurfaces has revolutionized colour display science due to its unprecedented subwavelength resolution and high-density optical data storage. However, advanced plasmonic displays with novel functionalities including dynamic multicolour printing, animations, and highly secure encryption have remained in their infancy. Here we demonstrate a dynamic plasmonic colour display technique that enables all the aforementioned functionalities using catalytic magnesium metasurfaces. Controlled hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of the constituent magnesium nanoparticles, which serve as dynamic pixels, allow for plasmonic colour printing, tuning, erasing and restoration of colour. Different dynamic pixels feature distinct colour transformation kinetics, enabling plasmonic animations. Through smart material processing, information encoded on selected pixels, which are indiscernible to both optical and scanning electron microscopies, can only be read out using hydrogen as a decoding key, suggesting a new generation of information encryption and anti-counterfeiting applications. PMID:28232722

  17. Stereo Painting Display Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, David

    1982-06-01

    The Spanish Surrealist artist Salvador Dali has recently perfected the art of producing two paintings which are stereo pairs. Each painting is separately quite remarkable, presenting a subject with the vivid realism and clarity for which Dali is famous. Due to the surrealistic themes of Dali's art, however, the subjects preser.ted with such naturalism only exist in his imagination. Despite this considerable obstacle to producing stereo art, Dali has managed to paint stereo pairs that display subtle differences of coloring and lighting, in addition to the essential perspective differences. These stereo paintings require a display method that will allow the viewer to experience stereo fusion, but which will not degrade the high quality of the art work. This paper gives a review of several display methods that seem promising in terms of economy, size, adjustability, and image quality.

  18. Ca(2+) -mediated exocytosis of subtilisin-like protease 1: a key step in egress of Plasmodium falciparum merozoites.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shalini; Singh, Maneesh Kumar; Garg, Swati; Chitnis, Chetan E; Singh, Shailja

    2013-06-01

    Egress of Plasmodium falciparum merozoites from host erythrocytes is a critical step in multiplication of blood-stage parasites. A cascade of proteolytic events plays a major role in degradation of membranes leading to egress of merozoites. However, the signals that regulate the temporal activation and/or secretion of proteases upon maturation of merozoites in intra-erythrocytic schizonts remain unclear. Here, we have tested the role of intracellular Ca(2+) in regulation of egress of P. falciparum merozoites from schizonts. A sharp rise in intracellular Ca(2+) just before egress, observed by time-lapse video microscopy, suggested a role for intracellular Ca(2+) in this process. Chelation of intracellular Ca(2+) with chelators such as BAPTA-AM or inhibition of Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores with a phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor blocks merozoite egress. Interestingly, chelation of intracellular Ca(2+) in schizonts was also found to block the discharge of a key protease PfSUB1 (subtilisin-like protease 1) from exonemes of P. falciparum merozoites to parasitophorous vacuole (PV). This leads to inhibition of processing of PfSERA5 (serine repeat antigen 5) and a block in parasitophorous vacuolar membrane (PVM) rupture and merozoite egress. A complete understanding of the steps regulating egress of P. falciparum merozoites may provide novel targets for development of drugs that block egress and limit parasite growth.

  19. Inhibition of the HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases by a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Lescar, J.; Brynda, J.; Rezacova, P.; Stouracova, R.; Riottot, M. M.; Chitarra, V.; Fabry, M.; Horejsi, M.; Sedlacek, J.; Bentley, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody 1696, directed against the HIV-1 protease, displays strong inhibitory effects toward the catalytic activity of the enzyme of both the HIV-1 and HIV-2 isolates. This antibody cross-reacts with peptides that include the N-terminus of the enzyme, a region that is well conserved in sequence among different viral strains and which, furthermore, is crucial for homodimerization to the active enzymatic form. This observation, as well as antigen-binding studies in the presence of an active site inhibitor, suggest that 1696 inhibits the HIV protease by destabilizing its active homodimeric form. To characterize further how the antibody 1696 inhibits the HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases, we have solved the crystal structure of its Fab fragment by molecular replacement and refined it at 3.0 A resolution. The antigen binding site has a deep cavity at its center, which is lined mainly by acidic and hydrophobic residues, and is large enough to accommodate several antigen residues. The structure of the Fab 1696 could form a starting basis for the design of alternative HIV protease-inhibiting molecules of broad specificity. PMID:10631984

  20. Protease inhibitors from marine actinobacteria as a potential source for antimalarial compound.

    PubMed

    Karthik, L; Kumar, Gaurav; Keswani, Tarun; Bhattacharyya, Arindam; Chandar, S Sarath; Bhaskara Rao, K V

    2014-01-01

    The study was planned to screen the marine actinobacterial extract for the protease inhibitor activity and its anti- Pf activity under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Out of 100 isolates, only 3 isolates exhibited moderate to high protease inhibitor activities on trypsin, chymotrypsin and proteinase K. Based on protease inhibitor activity 3 isolates were chosen for further studies. The potential isolate was characterized by polyphasic approach and identified as Streptomyces sp LK3 (JF710608). The lead compound was identified as peptide from Streptomyces sp LK3. The double-reciprocal plot displayed inhibition mode is non-competitive and it confirms the irreversible nature of protease inhibitor. The peptide from Streptomyces sp LK3 extract showed significant anti plasmodial activity (IC50: 25.78 µg/ml). In in vivo model, the highest level of parasitemia suppression (≈ 45%) was observed in 600 mg/kg of the peptide. These analyses revealed no significant changes were observed in the spleen and liver tissue during 8 dpi. The results confirmed up-regulation of TGF-β and down regulation of TNF-α in tissue and serum level in PbA infected peptide treated mice compared to PbA infection. The results obtained infer that the peptide possesses anti- Pf activity activity. It suggests that the extracts have novel metabolites and could be considered as a potential source for drug development.

  1. Inhibition of outer membrane proteases of the omptin family by aprotinin.

    PubMed

    Brannon, John R; Burk, David L; Leclerc, Jean-Mathieu; Thomassin, Jenny-Lee; Portt, Andrea; Berghuis, Albert M; Gruenheid, Samantha; Le Moual, Hervé

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial proteases are important virulence factors that inactivate host defense proteins and contribute to tissue destruction and bacterial dissemination. Outer membrane proteases of the omptin family, exemplified by Escherichia coli OmpT, are found in some Gram-negative bacteria. Omptins cleave a variety of substrates at the host-pathogen interface, including plasminogen and antimicrobial peptides. Multiple omptin substrates relevant to infection have been identified; nonetheless, an effective omptin inhibitor remains to be found. Here, we purified native CroP, the OmpT ortholog in the murine pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Purified CroP was found to readily cleave both a synthetic fluorescence resonance energy transfer substrate and the murine cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide. In contrast, CroP was found to poorly activate plasminogen into active plasmin. Although classical protease inhibitors were ineffective against CroP activity, we found that the serine protease inhibitor aprotinin displays inhibitory potency in the micromolar range. Aprotinin was shown to act as a competitive inhibitor of CroP activity and to interfere with the cleavage of the murine cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide. Importantly, aprotinin was able to inhibit not only CroP but also Yersinia pestis Pla and, to a lesser extent, E. coli OmpT. We propose a structural model of the aprotinin-omptin complex in which Lys15 of aprotinin forms salt bridges with conserved negatively charged residues of the omptin active site.

  2. Comparative analysis of proteases in the injected and dissected venom of cone snail species.

    PubMed

    Möller, Carolina; Vanderweit, Nicole; Bubis, José; Marí, Frank

    2013-04-01

    The venom of cone snails has been the subject of intense studies because it contains small neuroactive peptides of therapeutic value. However, much less is known about their larger proteins counterparts and their role in prey envenomation. Here, we analyzed the proteolytic enzymes in the injected venom of Conus purpurascens and Conus ermineus (piscivorous), and the dissected venom of C. purpurascens, Conus marmoreus (molluscivorous) and Conus virgo (vermivorous). Zymograms show that all venom samples displayed proteolytic activity on gelatin. However, the electrophoresis patterns and sizes of the proteases varied considerably among these four species. The protease distribution also varied dramatically between the injected and dissected venom of C. purpurascens. Protease inhibitors demonstrated that serine and metalloproteases are responsible for the gelatinolytic activity. We found fibrinogenolytic activity in the injected venom of C. ermineus suggesting that this venom might have effects on the hemostatic system of the prey. Remarkable differences in protein and protease expression were found in different sections of the venom duct, indicating that these components are related to the storage granules and that they participate in venom biosynthesis. Consequently, different conoproteases play major roles in venom processing and prey envenomation.

  3. Secreted proteases from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 degrade porcine gelatin, hemoglobin and immunoglobulin A.

    PubMed Central

    Negrete-Abascal, E; Tenorio, V R; Serrano, J J; Garcia, C; de la Garza, M

    1994-01-01

    It was found that 48 hour cultures of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae secreted proteases into the medium. Electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels (10%) copolymerized with porcine gelatin (0.1%), of the 70% (NH4)2SO4 precipitate from the culture supernatants, displayed protease activities of different molecular weights: > 200, 200, 90, 80, 70 and 50 kDa. They had activity over a broad range of pHs (4-8), with an optimal pH of 6-7. All were inhibited by 10 mM EDTA, and reactivated by 10 mM calcium. They were stable at -20 degrees C for more than a month. The proteases also degraded porcine IgA and porcine, human, and bovine hemoglobin, although they appeared to be less active against the hemoglobins. The IgA was totally cleaved in 48 h, using supernatants concentrated with polyvinyl pyrrolidone or the 70% (NH4)2SO4. Extracellular proteases could play a role in virulence. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:8004545

  4. Protease Inhibitors from Marine Actinobacteria as a Potential Source for Antimalarial Compound

    PubMed Central

    Karthik, L.; Kumar, Gaurav; Keswani, Tarun; Bhattacharyya, Arindam; Chandar, S. Sarath; Bhaskara Rao, K. V.

    2014-01-01

    The study was planned to screen the marine actinobacterial extract for the protease inhibitor activity and its anti- Pf activity under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Out of 100 isolates, only 3 isolates exhibited moderate to high protease inhibitor activities on trypsin, chymotrypsin and proteinase K. Based on protease inhibitor activity 3 isolates were chosen for further studies. The potential isolate was characterized by polyphasic approach and identified as Streptomyces sp LK3 (JF710608). The lead compound was identified as peptide from Streptomyces sp LK3. The double-reciprocal plot displayed inhibition mode is non-competitive and it confirms the irreversible nature of protease inhibitor. The peptide from Streptomyces sp LK3 extract showed significant anti plasmodial activity (IC50: 25.78 µg/ml). In in vivo model, the highest level of parasitemia suppression (≈45%) was observed in 600 mg/kg of the peptide. These analyses revealed no significant changes were observed in the spleen and liver tissue during 8 dpi. The results confirmed up-regulation of TGF-β and down regulation of TNF-α in tissue and serum level in PbA infected peptide treated mice compared to PbA infection. The results obtained infer that the peptide possesses anti- Pf activity activity. It suggests that the extracts have novel metabolites and could be considered as a potential source for drug development. PMID:24618707

  5. Viewing angle changeable display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Jinbi; Huang, Ziqiang; Yang, Wenjun; Chen, Xiaoxi

    2010-10-01

    Viewing angle changeable display can change the display viewing angle as needed: In the public place the display could have a narrow viewing angle for privacy, while in the private place the displays could have a wide viewing angle for the convenience of the operation and better viewing experience. This article propose a novel adjustable optical transmission device to realize the viewing angle changes for LCD by using the principle of guest- host effect of liquid crystal. The major technology is to insert a special equipment between the backlight and the LCD, through which the backlight will display either parallel or scattered features to get an either narrow or wide viewing angle. The equipment is an adjustable transmission cell (ATC) which is actually a black G-H LC cell. This ATC is the main focus of our invention. The ATC consists of a polarizer sheet and a special guest-host liquid crystal device filled with the two-phase dye (called as GH-LC in this report), to achieve the viewing angle change in the LCD. When an electrical field charges to the ATC, only the so-called near-axis lights can pass through the ATC within a relatively small angle, while the other scattered lights are absorbed sequentially by GH-LC and the polarizer sheet. On the other hand, when there is no electrical charge to the ATC, the cell behaves like a normal polarizer; and the scattered light can pass through the cell and polarizer in a normal way. This paper describes the principle and structure of the device, applies the electric field on the sample to observe the electro-optical properties, combine the theoretical and experimental research, getting the viewing angle effects of the display.

  6. Thin display optical projector

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    1999-01-01

    An optical system (20) projects light into a planar optical display (10). The display includes laminated optical waveguides (12) defining an inlet face (14) at one end and an outlet screen (16) at an opposite end. A first mirror (26) collimates light from a light source (18) along a first axis, and distributes the light along a second axis. A second mirror (28) collimates the light from the first mirror along the second axis to illuminate the inlet face and produce an image on the screen.

  7. Integrated display scanner

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2004-12-21

    A display scanner includes an optical panel having a plurality of stacked optical waveguides. The waveguides define an inlet face at one end and a screen at an opposite end, with each waveguide having a core laminated between cladding. A projector projects a scan beam of light into the panel inlet face for transmission from the screen as a scan line to scan a barcode. A light sensor at the inlet face detects a return beam reflected from the barcode into the screen. A decoder decodes the return beam detected by the sensor for reading the barcode. In an exemplary embodiment, the optical panel also displays a visual image thereon.

  8. Universal electronic stereoscopic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipton, Lenny; Halnon, Jeff

    1996-04-01

    SimulEYES VRTM, a new product for mass consumer electro-stereoscopic displays, is described. The system uses a unique indexing approach to allow content providers latitude in choosing the display mode. Board and PC manufacturers may also take advantage of the elegance of the solution by building in the SimulEYES VR capability. Hardware components consist, in part, of two custom chips which may be integrated at the board level, or employed in a VGA port dongle and control box. The liquid crystal shuttering eyewear is of a unique ergonomic design which is comfortable for people of all ages and most facial types, even when wearing eyeglasses.

  9. Current and Novel Inhibitors of HIV Protease

    PubMed Central

    Pokorná, Jana; Machala, Ladislav; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Konvalinka, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The design, development and clinical success of HIV protease inhibitors represent one of the most remarkable achievements of molecular medicine. This review describes all nine currently available FDA-approved protease inhibitors, discusses their pharmacokinetic properties, off-target activities, side-effects, and resistance profiles. The compounds in the various stages of clinical development are also introduced, as well as alternative approaches, aiming at other functional domains of HIV PR. The potential of these novel compounds to open new way to the rational drug design of human viruses is critically assessed. PMID:21994591

  10. Seminal and colostral protease inhibitors on leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Veselský, L; Cechová, D; Hruban, V; Klaudy, J

    1982-01-01

    For detection of protease inhibitors from cow colostrum (CTI) and bull seminal plasma (BUSI I and BUSI II) on the surface of leukocytes, immunological methods were used. An agglutination and an immunofluorescence test demonstrated components on the surface of bovine, porcine and ovine granulocytes and lymphocytes which were immunologically identical with the protease inhibitors isolated from cow colostrum and bull seminal plasma. When antisera against (CTI, BUSI and BUSI II were absorbed by bovine and porcine liver, kidney and spleen homogenate or by bovine and porcine granulocytes or lymphocytes, the immunological tests were negative.

  11. In vitro selection and characterization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates with reduced sensitivity to hydroxyethylamino sulfonamide inhibitors of HIV-1 aspartyl protease.

    PubMed

    Partaledis, J A; Yamaguchi, K; Tisdale, M; Blair, E E; Falcione, C; Maschera, B; Myers, R E; Pazhanisamy, S; Futer, O; Cullinan, A B

    1995-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants with reduced sensitivity to the hydroxyethylamino sulfonamide protease inhibitors VB-11,328 and VX-478 have been selected in vitro by two independent serial passage protocols with HIV-1 in CEM-SS and MT-4 cell lines. Virus populations with greater than 100-fold-increased resistance to both inhibitors compared with the parental virus have been obtained. DNA sequence analyses of the protease genes from VB-11,328- and VX-478-resistant variants reveal a sequential accumulation of point mutations, with similar resistance patterns occurring for the two inhibitors. The deduced amino acid substitutions in the resistant protease are Leu-10-->Phe, Met-46-->Ile, Ile-47-->Val, and Ile-50-->Val. This is the first observation in HIV protease resistance studies of an Ile-50-->Val mutation, a mutation that appears to arise uniquely against the sulfonamide inhibitor class. When the substitutions observed were introduced as single mutations into an HIV-1 infectious clone (HXB2), only the Ile-50-->Val mutant showed reduced sensitivity (two- to threefold) to VB-11,328 and VX-478. A triple protease mutant infectious clone carrying the mutations Met-46-->Ile, Ile-47-->Val, and Ile-50-->Val, however, showed much greater reduction in sensitivity (14- to 20-fold) to VB-11,328 and VX-478. The same mutations were studied in recombinant HIV protease. The mutant protease Ile-50-->Val displays a much lower affinity for the inhibitors than the parent enzyme (< or = 80-fold). The protease triply mutated at Met-46-->Ile, Ile-47-->Val, and Ile-50-->Val shows an even greater decrease in inhibitor binding (< or = 270-fold). The sulfonamide-resistant HIV protease variants remain sensitive to inhibitors from other chemical classes (Ro 31-8959 and L-735,524), suggesting possibilities for clinical use of HIV protease inhibitors in combination or serially.

  12. In vitro selection and characterization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates with reduced sensitivity to hydroxyethylamino sulfonamide inhibitors of HIV-1 aspartyl protease.

    PubMed Central

    Partaledis, J A; Yamaguchi, K; Tisdale, M; Blair, E E; Falcione, C; Maschera, B; Myers, R E; Pazhanisamy, S; Futer, O; Cullinan, A B

    1995-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants with reduced sensitivity to the hydroxyethylamino sulfonamide protease inhibitors VB-11,328 and VX-478 have been selected in vitro by two independent serial passage protocols with HIV-1 in CEM-SS and MT-4 cell lines. Virus populations with greater than 100-fold-increased resistance to both inhibitors compared with the parental virus have been obtained. DNA sequence analyses of the protease genes from VB-11,328- and VX-478-resistant variants reveal a sequential accumulation of point mutations, with similar resistance patterns occurring for the two inhibitors. The deduced amino acid substitutions in the resistant protease are Leu-10-->Phe, Met-46-->Ile, Ile-47-->Val, and Ile-50-->Val. This is the first observation in HIV protease resistance studies of an Ile-50-->Val mutation, a mutation that appears to arise uniquely against the sulfonamide inhibitor class. When the substitutions observed were introduced as single mutations into an HIV-1 infectious clone (HXB2), only the Ile-50-->Val mutant showed reduced sensitivity (two- to threefold) to VB-11,328 and VX-478. A triple protease mutant infectious clone carrying the mutations Met-46-->Ile, Ile-47-->Val, and Ile-50-->Val, however, showed much greater reduction in sensitivity (14- to 20-fold) to VB-11,328 and VX-478. The same mutations were studied in recombinant HIV protease. The mutant protease Ile-50-->Val displays a much lower affinity for the inhibitors than the parent enzyme (< or = 80-fold). The protease triply mutated at Met-46-->Ile, Ile-47-->Val, and Ile-50-->Val shows an even greater decrease in inhibitor binding (< or = 270-fold). The sulfonamide-resistant HIV protease variants remain sensitive to inhibitors from other chemical classes (Ro 31-8959 and L-735,524), suggesting possibilities for clinical use of HIV protease inhibitors in combination or serially. PMID:7636964

  13. Detection of protease and protease activity using a single nanoscrescent SERS probe

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gang L.; Ellman, Jonathan A.; Lee, Luke P.; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    2013-01-29

    This invention pertains to the in vitro detection of proteases using a single peptide-conjugate nanocrescent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes with at least nanomolar sensitivity. The probe enables detection of proteolytic activity in extremely small volume and at low concentration. In certain embodiments the probes comprise an indicator for the detection of an active protease, where the indicator comprises a nanocrescent attached to a peptide, where said peptide comprises a recognition site for the protease and a Raman tag attached to the peptide.

  14. Virtual Auditory Displays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    timbre , intensity, distance, room modeling, radio communication Virtual Environments Handbook Chapter 4 Virtual Auditory Displays Russell D... musical note “A” as a pure sinusoid, there will be 440 condensations and rarefactions per second. The distance between two adjacent condensations or...and complexity are pitch, loudness, and timbre respectively. This distinction between physical and perceptual measures of sound properties is an

  15. Refreshing Refreshable Braille Displays.

    PubMed

    Russomanno, Alexander; O'Modhrain, Sile; Gillespie, R Brent; Rodger, Matthew W M

    2015-01-01

    The increased access to books afforded to blind people via e-publishing has given them long-sought independence for both recreational and educational reading. In most cases, blind readers access materials using speech output. For some content such as highly technical texts, music, and graphics, speech is not an appropriate access modality as it does not promote deep understanding. Therefore blind braille readers often prefer electronic braille displays. But, these are prohibitively expensive. The search is on, therefore, for a low-cost refreshable display that would go beyond current technologies and deliver graphical content as well as text. And many solutions have been proposed, some of which reduce costs by restricting the number of characters that can be displayed, even down to a single braille cell. In this paper, we demonstrate that restricting tactile cues during braille reading leads to poorer performance in a letter recognition task. In particular, we show that lack of sliding contact between the fingertip and the braille reading surface results in more errors and that the number of errors increases as a function of presentation speed. These findings suggest that single cell displays which do not incorporate sliding contact are likely to be less effective for braille reading.

  16. Ferroelectric liquid crystal display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Paul K. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A ferroelectric liquid crystal display device employs capacitance spoiling layers to minimize unneeded capacitances created by crossovers of X and Y address lines and to accurately define desired capacitances. The spoiler layers comprise low dielectric constant layers which space electrodes from the ferroelectric at crossover points where capacitance is not needed for device operation.

  17. A Plasma Display Terminal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stifle, Jack

    A graphics terminal designed for use as a remote computer input/output terminal is described. Although the terminal is intended for use in teaching applications, it has several features which make it useful in many other computer terminal applications. These features include: a 10-inch square plasma display panel, permanent storage of information…

  18. Color Display Design Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-01

    22 . 20 - MEAN/ALL COLORS/*. .. %.’ 18 -.-. YELLOW u- 16 . . RED /- ........ WHITE ൖ /- MAGENTA -,f 12 - / / CYAN ’"’- 10 /GREEN BLUE C= Ś S• l I I...Hawaii Laboratory P.O. Box 997 Kailua, Hawaii 96734 Attn: Dr. Ross L. Pepper Department of Psychology Panel Displays Incorporated Vanderbilt University

  19. Digital Holography Display (2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheok Peng; Asundi, A.; Yu, Yang; Xiao, Zhen Zhong

    This paper describes the extension work from the last Digital Holography Projector System. From the developed works shows that, some unforeseen factors have created the difficulties for the system alignment. Such factors are the DMD frame rate, light source and diffractive zero order. It is really the challenging development works to achieve the virtual 3D model display on the high speed rotation screen. The three most key factors are emphasizing: 1) The display device's frame rate; 2) The light source orientation angle; and 3) The zero order filtering optic. 1) This device's is the digital micro mirror, in short is DMD. It is the high speed switching device has developed by the most recent technology. The switching frame rate can go up as high as 291fps. At first, the 8 bits depth file must be digitalized and stored for DMD onboard Ram. The digitalized data are transmitting from the PC USB to DMD onboard Ram. Instead of the data are downloading directly from the PC to DVI or VGA during display, this downloading method cause slower down the display speed, which is the common frame rate of 30 Hz. Next, the onboard Ram data then transfer to the DMD mirror's for display, at the 8 bits 291 fps speed. At this frame rate, the display 2D image can almost cover for 10 of out of the 360 0 in 1 revolution. 2) This laser light source must be installed such that free for orientated in any arbitrary angle from 220 to 450. Which is normalized to the DMD mirrors and the brief sketch show on figure (a). The purpose of orientated the light source is ensure that multi diffractive order would be reflected straight from the mirrors. (This multi diffractive order is the phenomenon of the digital micro mirror's characteristic). This mean, the reconstruct images would be followed the DMD normalized direction reflected up to fibre conduit. Moreover, this orientated method install of the laser light source is making space for other optical lenses or device driver/controller. Because, all

  20. Virtual acoustic displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.

    1991-01-01

    A 3D auditory display can potentially enhance information transfer by combining directional and iconic information in a quite naturalistic representation of dynamic objects in the interface. Another aspect of auditory spatial clues is that, in conjunction with other modalities, it can act as a potentiator of information in the display. For example, visual and auditory cues together can reinforce the information content of the display and provide a greater sense of presence or realism in a manner not readily achievable by either modality alone. This phenomenon will be particularly useful in telepresence applications, such as advanced teleconferencing environments, shared electronic workspaces, and monitoring telerobotic activities in remote or hazardous situations. Thus, the combination of direct spatial cues with good principles of iconic design could provide an extremely powerful and information-rich display which is also quite easy to use. An alternative approach, recently developed at ARC, generates externalized, 3D sound cues over headphones in realtime using digital signal processing. Here, the synthesis technique involves the digital generation of stimuli using Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTF's) measured in the two ear-canals of individual subjects. Other similar approaches include an analog system developed by Loomis, et. al., (1990) and digital systems which make use of transforms derived from normative mannikins and simulations of room acoustics. Such an interface also requires the careful psychophysical evaluation of listener's ability to accurately localize the virtual or synthetic sound sources. From an applied standpoint, measurement of each potential listener's HRTF's may not be possible in practice. For experienced listeners, localization performance was only slightly degraded compared to a subject's inherent ability. Alternatively, even inexperienced listeners may be able to adapt to a particular set of HRTF's as long as they provide adequate

  1. Antibodies to tick-borne encephalitis virus in human sera from the western coast of Norway.

    PubMed

    Traavik, T

    1979-02-01

    Sera from 341 individuals living in the distribution area of the tick Ixodes recinus were tested for tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) antibodies by HAI and gel diffusion. Kaolin treatment was unreliable for the removal of non-specific HAI inhibitors. Seven sera positive after this treatment were shown to be negative after acetone extraction/flotation centrifugation. The antibody prevalence rate was 19.6%. Seventy-one % of the sera had titres greater than or equal to 40. The prevalence rate decreased with age. Some sera with low HAI titres could be confirmed by a sensitive Ouchterlony technique, while some with high titres could not, even after ten-fold concentration. Clinical information obtained retrospectively regarding patients with high antibody titres revealed some cases consistent with a TBE virus infection. Antibody prevalence rates indicate that TBE virus is more active than Uukuniemi and Kemorovo group virus in tick-infested areas. Mixed foci of these viruses have been indicated by serological findings and virus isolations.

  2. Tennessee Report (Annual Report to SERA-IEG8 Tall Fescue Toxicosis/Endophyte Workshop)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A number of updates on research projects conducted within Tennessee concerning tall fescue (Lolium arundinacium) and its symbiotic endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum) were presented at the annual SERA-IEG 8 workshop including one with Forage-Animal Production Research Unit scientist collaborations...

  3. Kentucky Report (Annual Report to SERA-IEG8 Tall Fescue Toxicosis/Endophyte Workshop)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A number of updates on research projects conducted within Kentucky concerning tall fescue (Lolium arundinacium) and its symbiotic endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum) were presented at the annual SERA-IEG 8 workshop including a number with Forage-Animal Production Research Unit scientist collaborat...

  4. Identification of haptoglobin as an angiogenic factor in sera from patients with systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Cid, M C; Grant, D S; Hoffman, G S; Auerbach, R; Fauci, A S; Kleinman, H K

    1993-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an important process in chronic inflammatory diseases. We observed that sera from patients with systemic vasculitis stimulated angiogenesis in an in vitro model using human umbilical vein endothelial cells cultured on a basement membrane (Matrigel) substrate. After 40% ammonium sulfate precipitation, angiogenic activity remained in the low molecular weight fraction and could be inactivated by heat. SDS-page of serum FPLC fractions exhibiting maximal angiogenic activity demonstrated two prominent species of 45 and 16-20 kD in patients' sera. These bands were much less apparent in sera obtained from control subjects. Amino-terminal sequencing of the 45-kD protein demonstrated that it was haptoglobin. Purified haptoglobin stimulated angiogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. The angiogenic activity of vasculitis patients' sera was partially inhibited by an antihaptoglobin antibody. Furthermore, serum haptoglobin levels in vasculitis patients correlated both with disease and angiogenic activity. Haptoglobin angiogenic activity was confirmed in two in vivo models using an implanted disc and a subcutaneous injection of basement membrane. Stimulation of angiogenesis is a newly recognized biological function of haptoglobin. The increased levels of haptoglobin found in chronic inflammatory conditions may play an important role in tissue repair. In systemic vasculitis, haptoglobin might also compensate for ischemia by promoting development of collateral vessels. Images PMID:7680672

  5. Dopa oxidase activity and ceruloplasmin in the sera of hamsters with melanoma.

    PubMed

    Vachtenheim, J; Pavel, S; Duchon, J

    1981-01-01

    Two simple spectrophotometric assays have been employed for the measurement of dopa oxidase activity and ceruloplasmin polyphenol oxidase activity in the sera from normal hamsters and hamsters bearing melanotic melanoma. Both activities were found to be augmented in tumor animals, the dopa oxidase activity much more prominently. The levels of the enzymes tested increased proportionally to the tumor mass.

  6. Effect of leukaemic sera & cell-extracts on splenic colony counts (CFU-S).

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Rusia, U; Agarwal, S; Sood, S K

    1991-08-01

    Sera and leukaemic cell extracts from patients of acute leukaemia were evaluated for their effect on the repopulating ability of the pluripotent stem cells and erythroid differentiation by an in vivo splenic colony count (CFU-S) technique. Normal donor marrow cells of mice were treated with sera and cell extracts from patients of acute leukaemic and healthy controls and injected in the recipient mice. The CFU-S performed on the seventh day to assess repopulating ability of the stem cell showed consistently lower CFU-S counts in the test groups, with leukaemic sera (P less than 0.01) as well as leukaemic cell-extracts (P less than 0.001). The erythroid differentiation assessed by 59Fe uptake by the spleens also showed significantly reduced counts in the two test groups (P less than 0.01 and less than 0.001 respectively). The results indicate that both leukaemic sera and cell-extracts exert a significant suppressive effect on the repopulating ability of the stem cells and on their erythroid differentiation.

  7. First Complete Genome Sequences of Zika Virus Isolated from Febrile Patient Sera in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Márquez, S; Carrera, J; Pullan, S T; Lewandowski, K; Paz, V; Loman, N; Quick, J; Bonsall, D; Powell, R; Thézé, J; Pybus, O G; Klenerman, P; Eisenberg, J; Coloma, J; Carroll, M W; Trueba, G; Logue, C H

    2017-02-23

    Here, we present the complete genome sequences of two Zika virus (ZIKV) strains, EcEs062_16 and EcEs089_16, isolated from the sera of febrile patients in Esmeraldas City, in the northern coastal province of Esmeraldas, Ecuador, in April 2016. These are the first complete ZIKV genomes to be reported from Ecuador.

  8. First Complete Genome Sequences of Zika Virus Isolated from Febrile Patient Sera in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, S.; Carrera, J.; Pullan, S. T.; Lewandowski, K.; Paz, V.; Loman, N.; Quick, J.; Bonsall, D.; Powell, R.; Thézé, J.; Pybus, O. G.; Klenerman, P.; Eisenberg, J.; Coloma, J.; Carroll, M. W.; Trueba, G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we present the complete genome sequences of two Zika virus (ZIKV) strains, EcEs062_16 and EcEs089_16, isolated from the sera of febrile patients in Esmeraldas City, in the northern coastal province of Esmeraldas, Ecuador, in April 2016. These are the first complete ZIKV genomes to be reported from Ecuador. PMID:28232448

  9. Antibody in sera of patients infected with Trichomonas vaginalis is to trichomonad proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Alderete, J F; Newton, E; Dennis, C; Neale, K A

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND--A recent report demonstrated the immunogenic character of the cysteine proteinases of Trichomonas vaginalis. It was of interest, therefore, to examine for the presence of serum anti-proteinase antibody among patients with trichomoniasis. METHODS--An immunoprecipitation assay was used involving protein A-bearing Staphylococcus aureus first coated with the IgG fraction of goat anti-human Ig and then mixed with individual sera of patients to bind human antibody. These antibody-coated bacteria were then added to detergent extracts of T vaginalis. Bound immune complexes on S aureus were washed and solubilised for electrophoretic analysis on acrylamide copolymerised with gelatin for detection of proteinase activity. RESULTS--Sera from patients (50/50), but none from sera of normal, uninfected women, possessed IgG to numerous trichomonad cysteine proteinases. The presence of this serum anti-proteinase antibody disappeared after drug treatment and cure of patients of the T vaginalis infection. CONCLUSIONS--The commonality of the anti-proteinase antibody in the sera of patients with trichomoniasis provided evidence for the expression of the same repertoire of parasite proteinases during infection. These observations have important implications for the in vivo relevance of the proteinases and indicate that strategies to use a specific serum antibody response for diagnosis of this infection may be possible. Images PMID:1916796

  10. ON THE STAINING OF PARAAGGLUTINATING E. COLI STRAINS WITH FLUORESCENT SERA OF DIFFERENT SPECIFICITY,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Paraagglutinizing E . coli strains, both isolated naturally and obtained experimentally, were able in different degrees to adsorb serum proteins of...various specificity. In staining E . coli parastrains with fluorescent sera of different specificity (through the direct and indirect method), microbe

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Porcine Parvovirus 2 Recovered from Swine Sera

    PubMed Central

    Kluge, M.; Franco, A. C.; Giongo, A.; Valdez, F. P.; Saddi, T. M.; Brito, W. M. E. D.; Roehe, P. M.

    2016-01-01

    A complete genomic sequence of porcine parvovirus 2 (PPV-2) was detected by viral metagenome analysis on swine sera. A phylogenetic analysis of this genome reveals that it is highly similar to previously reported North American PPV-2 genomes. The complete PPV-2 sequence is 5,426 nucleotides long. PMID:26823583

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Porcine Parvovirus 2 Recovered from Swine Sera.

    PubMed

    Campos, F S; Kluge, M; Franco, A C; Giongo, A; Valdez, F P; Saddi, T M; Brito, W M E D; Roehe, P M

    2016-01-28

    A complete genomic sequence of porcine parvovirus 2 (PPV-2) was detected by viral metagenome analysis on swine sera. A phylogenetic analysis of this genome reveals that it is highly similar to previously reported North American PPV-2 genomes. The complete PPV-2 sequence is 5,426 nucleotides long.

  13. The relevance of coagulation factor X protection of adenoviruses in human sera

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, M R; Doszpoly, A; Turner, G; Nicklin, S A; Baker, A H

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous delivery of adenoviruses is the optimal route for many gene therapy applications. Once in the blood, coagulation factor X (FX) binds to the adenovirus capsid and protects the virion from natural antibody and classical complement-mediated neutralisation in mice. However, to date, no studies have examined the relevance of this FX/viral immune protective mechanism in human samples. In this study, we assessed the effects of blocking FX on adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) activity in the presence of human serum. FX prevented human IgM binding directly to the virus. In individual human sera samples (n=25), approximately half of those screened inhibited adenovirus transduction only when the Ad5–FX interaction was blocked, demonstrating that FX protected the virus from neutralising components in a large proportion of human sera. In contrast, the remainder of sera tested had no inhibitory effects on Ad5 transduction and FX armament was not required for effective gene transfer. In human sera in which FX had a protective role, Ad5 induced lower levels of complement activation in the presence of FX. We therefore demonstrate for the first time the importance of Ad–FX protection in human samples and highlight subject variability and species-specific differences as key considerations for adenoviral gene therapy. PMID:27014840

  14. The relevance of coagulation factor X protection of adenoviruses in human sera.

    PubMed

    Duffy, M R; Doszpoly, A; Turner, G; Nicklin, S A; Baker, A H

    2016-07-01

    Intravenous delivery of adenoviruses is the optimal route for many gene therapy applications. Once in the blood, coagulation factor X (FX) binds to the adenovirus capsid and protects the virion from natural antibody and classical complement-mediated neutralisation in mice. However, to date, no studies have examined the relevance of this FX/viral immune protective mechanism in human samples. In this study, we assessed the effects of blocking FX on adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) activity in the presence of human serum. FX prevented human IgM binding directly to the virus. In individual human sera samples (n=25), approximately half of those screened inhibited adenovirus transduction only when the Ad5-FX interaction was blocked, demonstrating that FX protected the virus from neutralising components in a large proportion of human sera. In contrast, the remainder of sera tested had no inhibitory effects on Ad5 transduction and FX armament was not required for effective gene transfer. In human sera in which FX had a protective role, Ad5 induced lower levels of complement activation in the presence of FX. We therefore demonstrate for the first time the importance of Ad-FX protection in human samples and highlight subject variability and species-specific differences as key considerations for adenoviral gene therapy.

  15. Investigational protease inhibitors as antiretroviral therapies

    PubMed Central

    Midde, Narasimha M.; Patters, Benjamin J.; Rao, PSS; Cory, Theodore J.; Kumar, Santosh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) has tremendously improved the life expectancy of the HIV-infected population over the past three decades. Protease inhibitors have been one of the major classes of drugs in HAART regimens that are effective in treating HIV. However, the emergence of resistance and cross-resistance against protease inhibitors encourages researchers to develop new PIs with broad-spectrum activity, as well as novel means of enhancing the efficacy of existing PIs. Areas covered In this article we discuss recent advances in HIV protease inhibitor (PI) development, focusing on both investigational and experimental agents. We also include a section on pharmacokinetic booster drugs for improved bioavailability of protease inhibitors. Further, we discuss novel drug delivery systems using a variety of nanocarriers for the delivery of PIs across the blood-brain barrier to treat the HIV in the brain. Expert opinion We discuss our opinion on the promises and challenges on the development of novel investigational and experimental PIs that are less toxic and more effective in combating drug-resistance. Further, we discuss the future of novel nanocarriers that have been developed to deliver PIs to the brain cells. Although these are promising findings, many challenges need to be overcome prior to making them a viable option. PMID:27415449

  16. Transient ECM protease activity promotes synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Magnowska, Marta; Gorkiewicz, Tomasz; Suska, Anna; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Rutkowska-Wlodarczyk, Izabela; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Wlodarczyk, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Activity-dependent proteolysis at a synapse has been recognized as a pivotal factor in controlling dynamic changes in dendritic spine shape and function; however, excessive proteolytic activity is detrimental to the cells. The exact mechanism of control of these seemingly contradictory outcomes of protease activity remains unknown. Here, we reveal that dendritic spine maturation is strictly controlled by the proteolytic activity, and its inhibition by the endogenous inhibitor (Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 – TIMP-1). Excessive proteolytic activity impairs long-term potentiation of the synaptic efficacy (LTP), and this impairment could be rescued by inhibition of protease activity. Moreover LTP is altered persistently when the ability of TIMP-1 to inhibit protease activity is abrogated, further demonstrating the role of such inhibition in the promotion of synaptic plasticity under well-defined conditions. We also show that dendritic spine maturation involves an intermediate formation of elongated spines, followed by their conversion into mushroom shape. The formation of mushroom-shaped spines is accompanied by increase in AMPA/NMDA ratio of glutamate receptors. Altogether, our results identify inhibition of protease activity as a critical regulatory mechanism for dendritic spines maturation. PMID:27282248

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa serA Gene Is Required for Bacterial Translocation through Caco-2 Cell Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Masashi; Nagata, Syouya; Yamane, Satoshi; Kunikata, Chinami; Kida, Yutaka; Kuwano, Koichi; Suezawa, Chigusa; Okuda, Jun

    2017-01-01

    To specify critical factors responsible for Pseudomonas aeruginosa penetration through the Caco-2 cell epithelial barrier, we analyzed transposon insertion mutants that demonstrated a dramatic reduction in penetration activity relative to P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. From these strains, mutations could be grouped into five classes, specifically flagellin-associated genes, pili-associated genes, heat-shock protein genes, genes related to the glycolytic pathway, and biosynthesis-related genes. Of these mutants, we here focused on the serA mutant, as the association between this gene and penetration activity is yet unknown. Inactivation of the serA gene caused significant repression of bacterial penetration through Caco-2 cell monolayers with decreased swimming and swarming motilities, bacterial adherence, and fly mortality rate, as well as repression of ExoS secretion; however, twitching motility was not affected. Furthermore, L-serine, which is known to inhibit the D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase activity of the SerA protein, caused significant reductions in penetration through Caco-2 cell monolayers, swarming and swimming motilities, bacterial adherence to Caco-2 cells, and virulence in flies in the wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. Together, these results suggest that serA is associated with bacterial motility and adherence, which are mediated by flagella that play a key role in the penetration of P. aeruginosa through Caco-2 cell monolayers. Oral administration of L-serine to compromised hosts might have the potential to interfere with bacterial translocation and prevent septicemia caused by P. aeruginosa through inhibition of serA function.

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa serA Gene Is Required for Bacterial Translocation through Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Masashi; Nagata, Syouya; Yamane, Satoshi; Kunikata, Chinami; Kida, Yutaka; Kuwano, Koichi; Suezawa, Chigusa; Okuda, Jun

    2017-01-01

    To specify critical factors responsible for Pseudomonas aeruginosa penetration through the Caco-2 cell epithelial barrier, we analyzed transposon insertion mutants that demonstrated a dramatic reduction in penetration activity relative to P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. From these strains, mutations could be grouped into five classes, specifically flagellin-associated genes, pili-associated genes, heat-shock protein genes, genes related to the glycolytic pathway, and biosynthesis-related genes. Of these mutants, we here focused on the serA mutant, as the association between this gene and penetration activity is yet unknown. Inactivation of the serA gene caused significant repression of bacterial penetration through Caco-2 cell monolayers with decreased swimming and swarming motilities, bacterial adherence, and fly mortality rate, as well as repression of ExoS secretion; however, twitching motility was not affected. Furthermore, L-serine, which is known to inhibit the D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase activity of the SerA protein, caused significant reductions in penetration through Caco-2 cell monolayers, swarming and swimming motilities, bacterial adherence to Caco-2 cells, and virulence in flies in the wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. Together, these results suggest that serA is associated with bacterial motility and adherence, which are mediated by flagella that play a key role in the penetration of P. aeruginosa through Caco-2 cell monolayers. Oral administration of L-serine to compromised hosts might have the potential to interfere with bacterial translocation and prevent septicemia caused by P. aeruginosa through inhibition of serA function. PMID:28046014

  19. Electrophoretic analysis of polypeptides immune precipitated from cytomegalovirus-infected cell extracts by human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, L; Hoffman, M; Cremer, N

    1982-01-01

    Serodiagnosis of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection by complement fixation tests depends on showing a fourfold rise in antibody titer from acute- to convalescent-phase sera. Freeze-thaw and glycine-extracted, infected cell culture antigens used for these tests give markedly different titers in reactions with the same sera. In this study, we characterized the CMV-infected cell polypeptides contained in freeze-thaw and glycine-extracted antigens and identified the proteins precipitated by 23 pairs of human acute and convalescent sera. Our results were as follows. First, freeze-thaw and glycine-extracted antigens prepared from infected cells radiolabeled with [35S]methionine and subjected to electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels yielded similar patterns, and the bulk of the label was contained in late structural proteins and glycoproteins. Glycine-extracted preparations contained a greater proportion of soluble 66,000- and 50,000-molecular-weight proteins than did freeze-thaw antigens. Second, convalescent sera precipitated proteins migrating with apparent molecular weights of 150,000, 130,000, 110,000, 96,000, 74,000, 66,000, 50,000, 34,000, 32,000, and 25,000. Of these the 130,000-, 110,000-, 96,000-, 66,000-, 50,000-, and 25,000-molecular-weight proteins comigrated with glucosamine-labeled polypeptides. Both immunoglobulin G and M antibodies in human sera precipitated these proteins from CMV-infected cell preparations. Implications of the results for serodiagnosis of CMV infections are discussed. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 8 FIG. 9 FIG. 10 PMID:6284646

  20. Giantin is the major Golgi autoantigen in human anti-Golgi complex sera

    PubMed Central

    Nozawa, Kazuhisa; Fritzler, Marvin J; von Mühlen, Carlos A; Chan, Edward KL

    2004-01-01

    Anti-Golgi complex antibodies (AGAs) are primarily associated with systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome. Here we report on the immunoreactivity of AGAs against five Golgi autoantigens (giantin, golgin-245, golgin-160, golgin-95/GM130, and golgin-97) and provide data from epitope mapping on the most common Golgi autoantigen, namely giantin. A total of 80 human sera containing AGAs, as defined by indirect immunofluorescence on HEp-2 cells, were analyzed by ELISA using recombinant autoantigens and immunoprecipitation. The proportion of AGA sera that reacted with the five Golgi autoantigens was correlated with the molecular mass of the Golgi antigens. Autoantibodies to giantin, the largest Golgi autoantigen, were the predominant AGAs, being found in 50% of the AGA sera. Epitope mapping of giantin was performed using six recombinant fragments spanning the entire protein. Antigiantin-positive sera with low titer autoantibodies recognized epitopes in the carboxyl-terminal fragments that are proximal to the Golgi membrane, whereas higher titer sera exhibited strong reactivity to amino-terminal and central domains that are likely to extend from the Golgi membrane into the cytoplasm. Our working hypothesis is that aberrantly expressed Golgi complex autoantigens may be released into the immune system when cells undergo lysis. By virtue of a carboxyl-terminal transmembrane domain, giantin is likely to be more stably associated with the cytoplasmic face of the Golgi complex than are other golgins, which are peripheral proteins. The stable association of giantin with the putative released Golgi complex may contribute to its preferential autoantigenicity. PMID:15059272

  1. Multifunctional aerial display through use of polarization-processing display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Keitaro; Ito, Shusei; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu

    2017-02-01

    We have realized a multifunctional aerial display. An aerial image of a polarization-processing display is formed through aerial imaging by retro-reflection. By changing the polarization modulation patterns, we can switch between a three-layered display and a secure display.

  2. Proteases and Protease Inhibitors of Urinary Extracellular Vesicles in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tataruch, Dorota; Gu, Dongfeng; Liu, Xinyu; Forsblom, Carol; Groop, Per-Henrik; Holthofer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus (DM), leads to chronic kidney disease (CKD), and, ultimately, is the main cause for end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Beyond urinary albumin, no reliable biomarkers are available for accurate early diagnostics. Urinary extracellular vesicles (UEVs) have recently emerged as an interesting source of diagnostic and prognostic disease biomarkers. Here we used a protease and respective protease inhibitor array to profile urines of type 1 diabetes patients at different stages of kidney involvement. Urine samples were divided into groups based on the level of albuminuria and UEVs isolated by hydrostatic dialysis and screened for relative changes of 34 different proteases and 32 protease inhibitors, respectively. Interestingly, myeloblastin and its natural inhibitor elafin showed an increase in the normo- and microalbuminuric groups. Similarly, a characteristic pattern was observed in the array of protease inhibitors, with a marked increase of cystatin B, natural inhibitor of cathepsins L, H, and B as well as of neutrophil gelatinase-associated Lipocalin (NGAL) in the normoalbuminuric group. This study shows for the first time the distinctive alterations in comprehensive protease profiles of UEVs in diabetic nephropathy and uncovers intriguing mechanistic, prognostic, and diagnostic features of kidney damage in diabetes. PMID:25874235

  3. Image Descriptors for Displays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    information. In Section V of the report, however, we have extended our descriptor for the total channel capacity of a display to include both chromi - nance and...frequency and for constant chromi - nance. The quantities nl(w) represent the number of perceivable colors for a given spatial frequancy and luminance value...the chromi - nance contribution to the total channel capacity, we shall utilize a linear model for thot distribution of perceived chrominance levels. We

  4. Text File Display Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vavrus, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    LOOK program permits user to examine text file in pseudorandom access manner. Program provides user with way of rapidly examining contents of ASCII text file. LOOK opens text file for input only and accesses it in blockwise fashion. Handles text formatting and displays text lines on screen. User moves forward or backward in file by any number of lines or blocks. Provides ability to "scroll" text at various speeds in forward or backward directions.

  5. Image Descriptors for Displays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-03-01

    gain an insight into the detailed mechanisms of aliasing, but it does not predict how important aliasing is. Our statistical approach predicts the...undersampled limit has a maximum edge discrimination ability equivalent to an analog display with a flat pass- band and limiting resolution given by... discrimination ability of the observer is proportional to the statistical average of a quantity that is representative of the perceived information content

  6. Attention-Seeking Displays

    PubMed Central

    Számadó, Szabolcs

    2015-01-01

    Animal communication abounds with extravagant displays. These signals are usually interpreted as costly signals of quality. However, there is another important function for these signals: to call the attention of the receiver to the signaller. While there is abundant empirical evidence to show the importance of this stage, it is not yet incorporated into standard signalling theory. Here I investigate a general model of signalling - based on a basic action-response game - that incorporates this searching stage. I show that giving attention-seeking displays and searching for them can be an ESS. This is a very general result and holds regardless whether only the high quality signallers or both high and low types give them. These signals need not be costly at the equilibrium and they need not be honest signals of any quality, as their function is not to signal quality but simply to call the attention of the potential receivers. These kind of displays are probably more common than their current weight in the literature would suggest. PMID:26287489

  7. Engine monitoring display study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornsby, Mary E.

    1992-01-01

    The current study is part of a larger NASA effort to develop displays for an engine-monitoring system to enable the crew to monitor engine parameter trends more effectively. The objective was to evaluate the operational utility of adding three types of information to the basic Boeing Engine Indicating and Crew Alerting System (EICAS) display formats: alphanumeric alerting messages for engine parameters whose values exceed caution or warning limits; alphanumeric messages to monitor engine parameters that deviate from expected values; and a graphic depiction of the range of expected values for current conditions. Ten training and line pilots each flew 15 simulated flight scenarios with five variants of the basic EICAS format; these variants included different combinations of the added information. The pilots detected engine problems more quickly when engine alerting messages were included in the display; adding a graphic depiction of the range of expected values did not affect detection speed. The pilots rated both types of alphanumeric messages (alert and monitor parameter) as more useful and easier to interpret than the graphic depiction. Integrating engine parameter messages into the EICAS alerting system appears to be both useful and preferred.

  8. Microgap flat panel display

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.

    1998-01-01

    A microgap flat panel display which includes a thin gas-filled display tube that utilizes switched X-Y "pixel" strips to trigger electron avalanches and activate a phosphor at a given location on a display screen. The panel utilizes the principal of electron multiplication in a gas subjected to a high electric field to provide sufficient electron current to activate standard luminescent phosphors located on an anode. The X-Y conductive strips of a few micron widths may for example, be deposited on opposite sides of a thin insulating substrate, or on one side of the adjacent substrates and function as a cathode. The X-Y strips are separated from the anode by a gap filled with a suitable gas. Electrical bias is selectively switched onto X and Y strips to activate a "pixel" in the region where these strips overlap. A small amount of a long-lived radioisotope is used to initiate an electron avalanche in the overlap region when bias is applied. The avalanche travels through the gas filled gap and activates a luminescent phosphor of a selected color. The bias is adjusted to give a proportional electron multiplication to control brightness for given pixel.

  9. Microgap flat panel display

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.

    1998-12-08

    A microgap flat panel display is disclosed which includes a thin gas-filled display tube that utilizes switched X-Y ``pixel`` strips to trigger electron avalanches and activate a phosphor at a given location on a display screen. The panel utilizes the principal of electron multiplication in a gas subjected to a high electric field to provide sufficient electron current to activate standard luminescent phosphors located on an anode. The X-Y conductive strips of a few micron widths may for example, be deposited on opposite sides of a thin insulating substrate, or on one side of the adjacent substrates and function as a cathode. The X-Y strips are separated from the anode by a gap filled with a suitable gas. Electrical bias is selectively switched onto X and Y strips to activate a ``pixel`` in the region where these strips overlap. A small amount of a long-lived radioisotope is used to initiate an electron avalanche in the overlap region when bias is applied. The avalanche travels through the gas filled gap and activates a luminescent phosphor of a selected color. The bias is adjusted to give a proportional electron multiplication to control brightness for given pixel. 6 figs.

  10. Glutamate alteration of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in GABAergic neurons: the role of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Monnerie, Hubert; Le Roux, Peter D

    2008-09-01

    Brain cell vulnerability to neurologic insults varies greatly, depending on their neuronal subpopulation. Among cells that survive a pathological insult such as ischemia or brain trauma, some may undergo morphological and/or biochemical changes that could compromise brain function. We previously reported that surviving cortical GABAergic neurons exposed to glutamate in vitro displayed an NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated alteration in the levels of the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65/67) [Monnerie, H., Le Roux, P., 2007. Reduced dendrite growth and altered glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65- and 67-kDa isoform protein expression from mouse cortical GABAergic neurons following excitotoxic injury in vitro. Exp. Neurol. 205, 367-382]. In this study, we examined the mechanisms by which glutamate excitotoxicity caused a change in cortical GABAergic neurons' GAD protein levels. Removing extracellular calcium prevented the NMDAR-mediated decrease in GAD protein levels, measured using Western blot techniques, whereas inhibiting calcium entry through voltage-gated calcium channels had no effect. Glutamate's effect on GAD protein isoforms was significantly attenuated by preincubation with the cysteine protease inhibitor N-Acetyl-L-Leucyl-L-Leucyl-L-norleucinal (ALLN). Using class-specific protease inhibitors, we observed that ALLN's effect resulted from the blockade of calpain and cathepsin protease activities. Cell-free proteolysis assay confirmed that both proteases were involved in glutamate-induced alteration in GAD protein levels. Together these results suggest that glutamate-induced excitotoxic stimulation of NMDAR in cultured cortical neurons leads to altered GAD protein levels from GABAergic neurons through intracellular calcium increase and protease activation including calpain and cathepsin. Biochemical alterations in surviving cortical GABAergic neurons in various disease states may contribute to the altered balance between excitation

  11. Purification and characterization of secretory serine protease from necrotrophic oomycete, Pythium myriotylum Dreschler.

    PubMed

    Aswati Nair, Ravindranathan; Geethu, Chellappan

    2015-01-01

    Progressive increase in extracellular proteolytic activity with respect to growth was detected in cultures of necrotrophic oomycete Pythium myriotylum Dreschler with maximum activity detected at stationary phase of growth. The secretory protease from P. myriotylum designated, spPm1 was purified to homogeneity giving a single band of 47 kDa molecular mass on non-reducing SDS-PAGE and exhibiting caseinolytic activity in the zymogram. Under reducing conditions, an additional band of 27.0 kDa molecular size observed was subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis. Resulting peptide identified as an autolytic product and generated under reducing conditions on SDS-PAGE, showed homology to domains of oomycete effector molecules. spPm1 retained proteolytic activity over broad pH (5.0-12.0) and temperature (10-80 °C) ranges with optimal pH and temperature at 8.0 and 60 °C respectively. spPm1 was identified as a serine protease following experiments with inhibitors specific to various protease groups. spPm1 displayed high stability to surfactants, organic solvents, oxidizing agents and to metal-ion chelator, EDTA. Kinetic parameters, Km and Vmax were determined as 0.04 mM and 7.52 U min(-1) mg(-1) respectively. Preferential hydrolysis of synthetic fluorogenic substrate, SAAPPPA (N-succinyl-L-alanyl-alanyl-proline-phenylalanine-p-nitroanilide) confirmed spPm1 as belonging to subtilisin serine protease family. The excellent stability of spPm1 protease characterized from P. myriotylum is discussed with respect to its potential industrial applications.

  12. Natural cysteine protease inhibitors in protozoa: Fifteen years of the chagasin family.

    PubMed

    Costa, Tatiana F R; Lima, Ana Paula C A

    2016-03-01

    Chagasin-type inhibitors comprise natural inhibitors of papain-like cysteine proteases that are distributed among Protist, Bacteria and Archaea. Chagasin was identified in the pathogenic protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi as an approximately 11 kDa protein that is a tight-binding and highly thermostable inhibitor of papain, cysteine cathepsins and endogenous parasite cysteine proteases. It displays an Imunoglobulin-like fold with three exposed loops to one side of the molecule, where amino acid residues present in conserved motifs at the tips of each loop contact target proteases. Differently from cystatins, the loop 2 of chagasin enters the active-site cleft, making direct contact with the catalytic residues, while loops 4 and 6 embrace the enzyme from the sides. Orthologues of chagasin are named Inhibitors of Cysteine Peptidases (ICP), and share conserved overall tri-dimensional structure and mode of binding to proteases. ICPs are tentatively distributed in three families: in family I42 are grouped chagasin-type inhibitors that share conserved residues at the exposed loops; family I71 contains Plasmodium ICPs, which are large proteins having a chagasin-like domain at the C-terminus, with lower similarity to chagasin in the conserved motif at loop 2; family I81 contains Toxoplasma ICP. Recombinant ICPs tested so far can inactivate protozoa cathepsin-like proteases and their mammalian counterparts. Studies on their biological roles were carried out in a few species, mainly using transgenic protozoa, and the conclusions vary. However, in all cases, alterations in the levels of expression of chagasin/ICPs led to substantial changes in one or more steps of parasite biology, with higher incidence in influencing their interaction with the hosts. We will cover most of the findings on chagasin/ICP structural and functional properties and overview the current knowledge on their roles in protozoa.

  13. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of SplD Protease from Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Zdzalik, Michal; Kalinska, Magdalena; Wysocka, Magdalena; Stec-Niemczyk, Justyna; Cichon, Przemyslaw; Stach, Natalia; Gruba, Natalia; Stennicke, Henning R.; Jabaiah, Abeer; Markiewicz, Michal; Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Wladyka, Benedykt; Daugherty, Patrick S.; Lesner, Adam; Rolka, Krzysztof; Dubin, Adam; Potempa, Jan; Dubin, Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a dangerous human pathogen. A number of the proteins secreted by this bacterium are implicated in its virulence, but many of the components of its secretome are poorly characterized. Strains of S. aureus can produce up to six homologous extracellular serine proteases grouped in a single spl operon. Although the SplA, SplB, and SplC proteases have been thoroughly characterized, the properties of the other three enzymes have not yet been investigated. Here, we describe the biochemical and structural characteristics of the SplD protease. The active enzyme was produced in an Escherichia coli recombinant system and purified to homogeneity. P1 substrate specificity was determined using a combinatorial library of synthetic peptide substrates showing exclusive preference for threonine, serine, leucine, isoleucine, alanine, and valine. To further determine the specificity of SplD, we used high-throughput synthetic peptide and cell surface protein display methods. The results not only confirmed SplD preference for a P1 residue, but also provided insight into the specificity of individual primed- and non-primed substrate-binding subsites. The analyses revealed a surprisingly narrow specificity of the protease, which recognized five consecutive residues (P4-P3-P2-P1-P1’) with a consensus motif of R-(Y/W)-(P/L)-(T/L/I/V)↓S. To understand the molecular basis of the strict substrate specificity, we crystallized the enzyme in two different conditions, and refined the structures at resolutions of 1.56 Å and 2.1 Å. Molecular modeling and mutagenesis studies allowed us to define a consensus model of substrate binding, and illustrated the molecular mechanism of protease specificity. PMID:24130791

  14. Expression, characterization, and cellular localization of knowpains, papain-like cysteine proteases of the Plasmodium knowlesi malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajesh; Atul; Soni, Awakash; Puri, Sunil Kumar; Sijwali, Puran Singh

    2012-01-01

    Papain-like cysteine proteases of malaria parasites degrade haemoglobin in an acidic food vacuole to provide amino acids for intraerythrocytic parasites. These proteases are potential drug targets because their inhibitors block parasite development, and efforts are underway to develop chemotherapeutic inhibitors of these proteases as the treatments for malaria. Plasmodium knowlesi has recently been shown to be an important human pathogen in parts of Asia. We report expression and characterization of three P. knowlesi papain-like proteases, termed knowpains (KP2-4). Recombinant knowpains were produced using a bacterial expression system, and tested for various biochemical properties. Antibodies against recombinant knowpains were generated and used to determine their cellular localization in parasites. Inhibitory effects of the cysteine protease inhibitor E64 were assessed on P. knowlesi culture to validate drug target potential of knowpains. All three knowpains were present in the food vacuole, active in acidic pH, and capable of degrading haemoglobin at the food vacuolar pH (≈5.5), suggesting roles in haemoglobin degradation. The proteases showed absolute (KP2 and KP3) to moderate (KP4) preference for peptide substrates containing leucine at the P2 position; KP4 preferred arginine at the P2 position. While the three knowpains appear to have redundant roles in haemoglobin degradation, KP4 may also have a role in degradation of erythrocyte cytoskeleton during merozoite egress, as it displayed broad substrate specificity and was primarily localized at the parasite periphery. Importantly, E64 blocked erythrocytic development of P. knowlesi, with enlargement of food vacuoles, indicating inhibition of haemoglobin hydrolysis and supporting the potential for inhibition of knowpains as a strategy for the treatment of malaria. Functional expression and characterization of knowpains should enable simultaneous screening of available cysteine protease inhibitor libraries

  15. SERA Scenarios of Early Market Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Introductions: Modeling Framework, Regional Markets, and Station Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, B.; Melaina, M.; Penev, M.; Daniel, W.

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the development and analysis of detailed temporal and spatial scenarios for early market hydrogen fueling infrastructure clustering and fuel cell electric vehicle rollout using the Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization and Analysis (SERA) model. The report provides an overview of the SERA scenario development framework and discusses the approach used to develop the nationwidescenario.

  16. Drying and irradiation of calf and horse serum. II. Influence on mycoplasma content of the calf sera.

    PubMed

    Jurmanová, K; Veber, P; Lesko, J; Hána, L

    1975-05-01

    Drying of calf sera produced only a negligible change in their content of Acholeplasma laidlawii organisms and reduced the content of Mycoplasma arginini organisms by 2 to 4 logs. Gamma-irradiation of liquid and dried calf sera killed M. arginini and A. laidlawii organisms at irradiation levels of 0.2-0.3 and 0.4-0.6 Mrads, respectively.

  17. Stage Cylindrical Immersive Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramyan, Lucy; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Powell, Mark W.; Mittman, David S.; Shams, Khawaja S.

    2011-01-01

    Panoramic images with a wide field of view intend to provide a better understanding of an environment by placing objects of the environment on one seamless image. However, understanding the sizes and relative positions of the objects in a panorama is not intuitive and prone to errors because the field of view is unnatural to human perception. Scientists are often faced with the difficult task of interpreting the sizes and relative positions of objects in an environment when viewing an image of the environment on computer monitors or prints. A panorama can display an object that appears to be to the right of the viewer when it is, in fact, behind the viewer. This misinterpretation can be very costly, especially when the environment is remote and/or only accessible by unmanned vehicles. A 270 cylindrical display has been developed that surrounds the viewer with carefully calibrated panoramic imagery that correctly engages their natural kinesthetic senses and provides a more accurate awareness of the environment. The cylindrical immersive display offers a more natural window to the environment than a standard cubic CAVE (Cave Automatic Virtual Environment), and the geometry allows multiple collocated users to simultaneously view data and share important decision-making tasks. A CAVE is an immersive virtual reality environment that allows one or more users to absorb themselves in a virtual environment. A common CAVE setup is a room-sized cube where the cube sides act as projection planes. By nature, all cubic CAVEs face a problem with edge matching at edges and corners of the display. Modern immersive displays have found ways to minimize seams by creating very tight edges, and rely on the user to ignore the seam. One significant deficiency of flat-walled CAVEs is that the sense of orientation and perspective within the scene is broken across adjacent walls. On any single wall, parallel lines properly converge at their vanishing point as they should, and the sense of

  18. Resistance through inhibition: ectopic expression of serine protease inhibitor offers stress tolerance via delayed senescence in yeast cell.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rakesh S; Tanpure, Rahul S; Singh, Rajan Kumar; Gupta, Vidya S; Giri, Ashok P

    2014-09-26

    Protease inhibitors have been known to confer multiple stress tolerance in transgenic plants. We have assessed growth of yeast (Pichia pastoris GS115) strains expressing inhibitory repeat domains (PpIRD(+)) of previously characterized Capsicum annuum protease inhibitors under high salt, heavy metal and oxidative stress. PpIRD(+) strains exhibited multiple stress tolerance and showed differential molecular responses at transcriptional and translational level on exposure to stress inducing agents like heavy metal, high salt and H2O2. PpIRD(+) strains display significant reduction in metacaspase (Yca1) activity, the key enzyme in apoptosis, indicates the possibility of cross reactivity of IRDs (serine protease inhibitor) with cysteine proteases. PpIRD(+) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae knockout with Yca1 (ΔYca1) strain showed similar growth characteristics under stress, which indicated the delayed senescence due to cellular metacaspase inhibition. Molecular docking study showed a close proximity of IRDs reactive site and the active site of metacaspase in the complex that signified their strong interactions. Maintenance of GAPDH activity, primary target of metacaspase, in PpIRD(+) strain evidenced the inhibition of metacaspase activity and survival of these cells under stress. This report demonstrates a potential molecular mechanism of protease inhibitor-based multiple stress tolerance in yeast strains.

  19. Recombinant expression, purification, and kinetic and inhibitor characterisation of human site-1-protease.

    PubMed

    Bodvard, Kristofer; Mohlin, Johanna; Knecht, Wolfgang

    2007-02-01

    Human site-1-protease (S1P, MEROPS S08.8063), also widely known as subtilisin/kexin isozyme 1 (SKI-1), is a membrane bound subtilisin-related serine protease, that belongs to a group of nine mammalian proprotein convertases. Among these proteases, S1P displays unique substrate specificity, by showing preferred cleavage after non-basic amino acids. S1P plays a key role in a proteolytic pathway that controls the cholesterol content of membranes, cells and blood. S1P also participates in the activation of viral coat glycoproteins of the lassa virus, the lympocytic choriomeningitis virus and the crimean congo hemorrhagic fever virus. We expressed recombinant human S1P using the baculovirus expression vector system and characterized the highly purified enzyme. Featuring a new chromogenic substrate (Acetyl-Arg-Arg-Leu-Leu-p-nitroanilide) we show that the enzymatic activity of S1P is not calcium dependent, but can be modulated by a variety of mono- and divalent cations. S1P displayed pronounced positive cooperativity with a substrate derived from the viral coat glycoprotein of the lassa virus. The screening of a limited number of protease inhibitors showed that S1P was not inhibited by specific inhibitors of other proprotein convertases or by Pefabloc SC (4-(2-aminoethyl) benzene sulphonyl fluoride, AEBSF). We found 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin (DCI) to be a potent slow binding inhibitor of human S1P, with a K(iapp) = 6.8 microM, thus representing a new small molecule inhibitor of S1P. These findings show that S1P differs significantly from other proprotein convertases with respect to kinetics, co-factor requirement and inhibition.

  20. Evaluation of trypanocidal activity of combinations of anti-sleeping sickness drugs with cysteine protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Steverding, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is unsatisfactory because only a few drugs, with serious side effects and poor efficacy, are available. As drug combination regimes often achieve greater therapeutic efficacy than monotherapies, here the trypanocidal activity of the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777 in combination with current anti-HAT drugs using bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei was investigated. Isobolographic analysis was used to determine the interaction between cysteine protease inhibitors (K11777, CA-074Me and CAA0225) and anti-HAT drugs (suramin, pentamidine, melarsoprol and eflornithine). Bloodstream forms of T. brucei were incubated in culture medium containing cysteine protease inhibitors or anti-HAT drugs alone or in combination at a 1:1 fixed-dose ratio. After 48 h incubation, live cells were counted, the 50% growth inhibition values determined and combination indices calculated. The general cytotoxicity of drug combinations was evaluated with human leukaemia HL-60 cells. Combinations of K11777 with suramin, pentamidine and melarsoprol showed antagonistic effects while with eflornithine a synergistic effect was observed. Whereas eflornithine antagonises with CA-074Me, an inhibitor inactivating the targeted TbCATL only under reducing conditions, it synergises with CAA0255, an inhibitor structurally related to CA-074Me which inactivates TbCATL independently of thiols. These findings indicate an essential role of thiols for the synergistic interaction between K11777 and eflornithine. Encouragingly, the K11777/eflornithine combination displayed higher trypanocidal than cytotoxic activity. The results of this study suggest that the combination of the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777 and eflornithine display promising synergistic trypanocidal activity that warrants further investigation of the drug combination as possible alternative treatment of HAT.

  1. Defense Display Strategy and Roadmaps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-06

    ultra-resolution, true 3D , and intelligent displays (integration of computers and communication functions into screens). The new strategy is Service...led. Keywords: defense, electronic displays, high definition, micro-display, 25-megapixel, true 3D , novel and intelligent displays 1...megapixel and true 3D devices. The approved roadmap is illustrated in Figure 1. * Paper

  2. A Multifunctional Protease Inhibitor To Regulate Endolysosomal Function

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Proteases constitute a major class of drug targets. Endosomal compartments harbor several protease families whose attenuation may be beneficial to a number of biological processes, including inflammation, cancer metastasis, antigen presentation, and parasite clearance. As a step toward the goal of generalized but targeted protease inhibition in the endocytic pathway, we describe here the synthesis, characterization, and cellular application of a novel multifunctional protease inhibitor. We show that pepstatin A, a potent but virtually insoluble inhibitor of cathepsins D and E, can be conjugated to a single site on cystatin C, a potent inhibitor of the papain-like cysteine proteases (PLCP) and of asparagine endopeptidease (AEP), to create a highly soluble compound capable of suppressing the activity of all 3 principal protease families found in endosomes and lysosomes. We demonstrate that this cystatin–pepstatin inhibitor (CPI) can be taken up by cells to modulate protease activity and affect biological responses. PMID:21910425

  3. Comparative study on the protease inhibitors from fish eggs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustadi; Kim, K. Y.; Kim, S. M.

    2005-07-01

    The protease inhibitor was purified from five different fish eggs. The molecular weights of Pacific herring, chum salmon, pond smelt, glassfish, and Alaska pollock egg protease inhibitors were 120, 89, 84.5, 17, and l6.8kDa, respectively. The specific inhibitory activity of glassfish egg protease inhibitor was the highest followed by those of Pacific herring and Alaska pollock in order. The specific inhibitory activity and purity of glassfish egg protease inhibitor were 19.70 Umg-1 protein and 164.70 folds of purification, respectively. Glassfish egg protease inhibitor was reasonably stable at 50-65°C and pH 8, which was more stable at high temperature and pH than protease inhibitors from the other fish species. Glassfish egg protease inhibitor was noncompetitive with inhibitor constant ( K i) of 4.44 nmolL-1.

  4. A study on trypsin, Aspergillus flavus and Bacillus sp. protease inhibitory activity in Cassia tora (L.) syn Senna tora (L.) Roxb. seed extract

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Proteases play an important role in virulence of many human, plant and insect pathogens. The proteinaceous protease inhibitors of plant origin have been reported widely from many plant species. The inhibitors may potentially be used for multiple therapeutic applications in viral, bacterial, fungal diseases and physiological disorders. In traditional Indian medicine system, Cassia tora (Senna tora) is reportedly effective in treatment of skin and gastrointestinal disorders. The present study explores the protease inhibitory activity of the above plant seeds against trypsin, Aspergillus flavus and Bacillus sp. proteases. Methods The crushed seeds of Cassia tora were washed thoroughly with acetone and hexane for depigmentation and defatting. The proteins were fractionated by ammonium sulphate (0-30, 30-60, 60-90%) followed by dialysis and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The inhibitory potential of crude seed extract and most active dialyzed fraction against trypsin and proteases was established by spot test using unprocessed x-ray film and casein digestion methods, respectively. Electrophoretic analysis of most active fraction (30-60%) and SEC elutes were carried employing Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Gelatin SDS-PAGE. Inhibition of fungal spore germination was studied in the presence of dialyzed active inhibitor fraction. Standard deviation (SD) and ANOVA were employed as statistical tools. Results The crude seeds' extract displayed strong antitryptic, bacterial and fungal protease inhibitory activity on x-ray film. The seed protein fraction 30-60% was found most active for trypsin inhibition in caseinolytic assay (P < 0.001). The inhibition of caseinolytic activity of the proteases increased with increasing ratio of seed extract. The residual activity of trypsin, Aspergillus flavus and Bacillus sp. proteases remained only 4, 7 and 3.1%, respectively when proteases were incubated with 3 mg ml-1 seed protein

  5. Management of protease inhibitor-associated hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Penzak, Scott R; Chuck, Susan K

    2002-01-01

    Dyslipidemia, characterized by elevated serum levels of triglycerides and reduced levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, has been recognized in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. It is thought that elevated levels of circulating cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-alpha, may alter lipid metabolism in patients with HIV infection. Protease inhibitors, such as saquinavir, indinavir and ritonavir, have been found to decrease mortality and improve quality of life in patients with HIV infection. However, these drugs have been associated with a syndrome of fat redistribution, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia. Elevations in serum total cholesterol and triglyceride levels, along with dyslipidemia that typically occurs in patients with HIV infection, may predispose patients to complications such as premature atherosclerosis and pancreatitis. It has been estimated that hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia occur in greater than 50% of protease inhibitor recipients after 2 years of therapy, and that the risk of developing hyperlipidemia increases with the duration of treatment with protease inhibitors. In general, treatment of hyperlipidemia should follow National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines; efforts should be made to modify/control coronary heart disease risk factors (i.e. smoking; hypertension; diabetes mellitus) and maximize lifestyle modifications, primarily dietary intervention and exercise, in these patients. Where indicated, treatment usually consists of either pravastatin or atorvastatin for patients with elevated serum levels of LDL-C and/or total cholesterol. Atorvastatin is more potent in lowering serum total cholesterol and triglycerides compared with other hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, but it is also associated with more drug interactions compared with pravastatin. Simvastatin

  6. Landing Hazard Avoidance Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernathy, Michael Franklin (Inventor); Hirsh, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Landing hazard avoidance displays can provide rapidly understood visual indications of where it is safe to land a vehicle and where it is unsafe to land a vehicle. Color coded maps can indicate zones in two dimensions relative to the vehicles position where it is safe to land. The map can be simply green (safe) and red (unsafe) areas with an indication of scale or can be a color coding of another map such as a surface map. The color coding can be determined in real time based on topological measurements and safety criteria to thereby adapt to dynamic, unknown, or partially known environments.

  7. Pictorial Format Display Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    the pathway moved out of the theoretical field of view of the HUDM It did not disappear from the HUD, however, instead it was pegged to the side of...the HUD in the direction of its current position. When the pathway was pegged to the side, a transitional flight director symbol (an inverted "T...of view,. the flashing tractor beam remained, and the "jewel light" was pegged to the side of the display at the end of the ’flashing tractor beam

  8. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macro­globulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group. PMID:26143919

  9. Chimeric Virus-Like Particle Vaccines Displaying Conserved Enterovirus 71 Epitopes Elicit Protective Neutralizing Antibodies in Mice through Divergent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaohua; Ku, Zhiqiang; Liu, Qingwei; Wang, Xiaoli; Shi, Jinping; Zhang, Yunfang; Kong, Liangliang; Cong, Yao

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative agent of hand, food, and mouth disease, which frequently occurs in young children. Since there are 11 subgenotypes (A, B1 to B5, and C1 to C5) within EV71, an EV71 vaccine capable of protecting against all of these subgenotypes is desirable. We report here the vaccine potential and protective mechanism of two chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs) presenting conserved neutralizing epitopes of EV71. We show that fusions of hepatitis B core antigen (HBc) with the SP55 or SP70 epitope of EV71, designated HBcSP55 and HBcSP70, respectively, can be rapidly generated and self-assembled into VLPs with the epitopes displayed on the surface. Immunization with the chimeric VLPs induced carrier- and epitope-specific antibody responses in mice. Anti-HBcSP55 and anti-HBcSP70 sera, but not anti-HBc sera, were able to neutralize in vitro multiple genotypes and strains of EV71. Importantly, passive immunization with anti-HBcSP55 or anti-HBcSP70 sera protected neonatal mice against lethal EV71 infections. Interestingly, anti-HBcSP70 sera could inhibit EV71 attachment to susceptible cells, whereas anti-HBcSP55 sera could not. However, both antisera were able to neutralize EV71 infection in vitro at the postattachment stage. The divergent mechanism of neutralization and protection conferred by anti-SP70 and anti-SP55 sera is in part attributed to their respective ability to bind authentic viral particles. Collectively, our study not only demonstrates that chimeric VLPs displaying the SP55 and SP70 epitopes are promising candidates for a broad-spectrum EV71 vaccine but also reveals distinct mechanisms of neutralization by the SP55- and SP70-targeted antibodies. PMID:24131712

  10. Immune inhibition of virus release from herpes simplex virus-infected cells by human sera.

    PubMed

    Shariff, D M; Hallworth, J; Desperbasques, M; Buchan, A; Skinner, G R

    1988-01-01

    Human sera contain antibody (IVR antibody) which will inhibit the release of herpes simplex virus type 1 from virus-infected cells. This antibody activity was removed by adsorption of sera with virus-infected cell extract. There was a positive correlation between IVR and neutralizing antibody activity, particularly when measured by augmented neutralization test; measurement of IVR antibody was equally as sensitive as measurement of neutralizing antibody by augmented neutralization test. IVR antibody levels provided indication of a history of recurrent herpes labialis, the pattern of antibody response following primary herpetic infection, and indication of response to Skinner herpes vaccine in human subjects. It is suggested that consideration should be given to measurement of IVR antibody in both clinical and epidemiological studies of herpes and other virus infections.

  11. Enteropeptidase, a type II transmembrane serine protease.

    PubMed

    Zheng, X Long; Kitamoto, Yasunori; Sadler, J Evan

    2009-06-01

    Enteropeptidase, a type II transmembrane serine protease, is localized to the brush border of the duodenal and jejunal mucosa. It is synthesized as a zymogen (proenteropeptidase) that requires activation by another protease, either trypsin or possibly duodenase. Active enteropeptidase then converts the pancreatic precursor, trypsinogen, to trypsin by cleavage of the specific trypsinogen activation peptide, Asp-Asp-Asp-Asp-Lys- Ile that is highly conserved in vertebrates. Trypsin, in turn, activates other digestive zymogens such as chymotrypsinogen, proelastase, procarboxypeptidase and prolipase in the lumen of the gut. The important biological function of enteropeptidase is highlighted by the manifestation of severe diarrhea, failure to thrive, hypoproteinemia and edema as a result of congenital deficiency of enteropeptidase activity in the gut. Conversely, duodenopancreatic reflux of proteolytically active enteropeptidase may cause acute and chronic pancreatitis.

  12. Functional interplay between tetraspanins and proteases.

    PubMed

    Yáñez-Mó, María; Gutiérrez-López, Maria Dolores; Cabañas, Carlos

    2011-10-01

    Several recent publications have described examples of physical and functional interations between tetraspanins and specific membrane proteases belonging to the TM-MMP and α-(ADAMs) and γ-secretases families. Collectively, these examples constitute an emerging body of evidence supporting the notion that tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs) represent functional platforms for the regulation of key cellular processes including the release of surface protein ectodomains ("shedding"), regulated intramembrane proteolysis ("RIPing") and matrix degradation and assembly. These cellular processes in turn play a crucial role in an array of physiological and pathological phenomena. Thus, TEMs may represent new therapeutical targets that may simultaneously affect the proteolytic activity of different enzymes and their substrates. Agonistic or antagonistic antibodies and blocking soluble peptides corresponding to tetraspanin functional regions may offer new opportunities in the treatment of pathologies such as chronic inflammation, cancer, or Alzheimer's disease. In this review article, we will discuss all these aspects of functional regulation of protease activities by tetraspanins.

  13. Mycobacterial Caseinolytic Protease Gene Regulator ClgR Is a Substrate of Caseinolytic Protease

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yoshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mycobacterial caseinolytic protease ClpP1P2 is a degradative protease that recently gained interest as a genetically and pharmacologically validated drug target for tuberculosis. The first whole-cell active ClpP1P2 inhibitor, the human proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, is currently undergoing lead optimization to introduce selectivity for the bacterial target. How inhibition of ClpP1P2 translates into whole-cell antimicrobial activity is little understood. Previous work has shown that the caseinolytic protease gene regulator ClgR is an activator of the clpP1P2 genes and also suggested that this transcription factor may be a substrate of the protease. Here, we employ promoter activity reporters and direct mRNA level measurements showing that bortezomib treatment of Mycobacterium bovis BCG increased transcription of clpP1P2 and other ClgR-dependent promoters, suggesting that inhibition of ClpP1P2 increases cellular ClgR levels. Then, we carried out red fluorescent protein-ClgR fusion analyses to show that ClgR is indeed a substrate of ClpP1P2 and to identify ClgR’s C-terminal nonapeptide APVVSLAVA as the signal sufficient for recognition and efficient protein degradation by ClpP1P2. Interestingly, accumulation of ClgR appears to be toxic for bacilli, suggesting a mechanism for how pharmacological inhibition of ClpP1P2 protease activity by bortezomib translates into whole-cell antibacterial activity. IMPORTANCE With 9 million new cases and more than 1 million deaths per year, tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is the biggest infectious disease killer globally. New drugs for the treatment of the drug-resistant forms of the disease are needed. Recently, a new target-lead couple, the mycobacterial protease ClpP1P2 and the human anticancer drug bortezomib, was identified. However, we know little about how expression of this protease is regulated, which proteins in the bacterium it degrades, how the protease recognizes its target proteins

  14. Presence of factors chemotactic for granulocytes in hypereosinophilic syndrome sera: relation with alterations in eosinophil migration.

    PubMed Central

    Gosset, P; Prin, L; Capron, M; Auriault, C; Tonnel, A B; Capron, A

    1986-01-01

    Recent work has underlined a structural and metabolic heterogeneity amongst blood eosinophils in various hypereosinophilic diseases. Little is known about the factors responsible for this variability. We have identified granulocyte chemotactic factors, termed GCFs in the sera of five patients with hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES). Sera from normal controls or from 20 patients with blood hypereosinophilia of various causes, but with little or no hypodense blood eosinophils, did not demonstrate any chemotactic activity. Two distinct GCFs were characterized, either by gel filtration or isoelectric focusing (molecular weights of 600 kD and 240 kD; pIs of approximately 5 and 7). These fractions are sensitive to proteolytic enzymes and to heating to 100 degrees C but not to 56 degrees C. The activity of GCFs has been tested towards neutrophils and eosinophils. The fractions of 240 kD and pI 7 appear more selective for the eosinophil lineage. Checkerboard analysis shows that such fractions are primarily chemotactic. In addition, hypodense eosinophils appear defective in random motility and chemotaxis towards chemotactic agents which are effective on normodense eosinophils. Moreover, preincubation of normodense eosinophils with HES sera rendered these cells unresponsive to very efficient chemotactic agents such as leukotriene B4 (LTB4) (decrease in migration of 91%; P less than 10(-3), formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanyl (Fmlp) (decrease of 95%; P less than 10(-2)), HES sera (decrease of 91 to 93%). These findings suggest a process of deactivation of blood eosinophils with the possible retention within the circulation of activated hypodense eosinophils in HES. PMID:3780047

  15. Blood Levels of Zinc in Creole Horses Used in Sera Production

    SciTech Connect

    Baptista, Tatyana S.; Zamboni, Cibele B.; Kovacs, Luciana; Freitas, M. G.; Marcelino, Jose R.

    2010-08-04

    Using Neutron Activation Analysis Zn concentrations were determined in blood of horses (Creole breed). No significant difference was observed between male (0.0029{+-}.0007 gL{sup -1}) and female (0.0031{+-}.0011 gL{sup -1}) animals. These data are an important support to understand the physiological functions of Zn in blood during the process of sera production at Butantan Institute (Sao Paulo, Brazil) using horses.

  16. Mediation of Cytotoxic Effects of Streptococcal M Protein by Nontype-Specific Antibody in Human Sera

    PubMed Central

    Beachey, Edwin H.; Stollerman, Gene H.

    1973-01-01

    The cytotoxic moiety(ies) in highly purified streptococcal M protein has been shown to be distinct from the type-specific M determinant. This nontype-specific M-associated determinant(s) (NTSM) causes humoral and cellular immunotoxic responses in man. NTSM is common to M protein prepared from all streptococcal serotypes studied so far. In this study, immunoabsorbents prepared by entrapping purified M proteins in polyacrylamide gel were employed to identify, separate, and purify antibodies directed against NTSM as well as against the type-specific M (TSM) determinants. We found that anti-NTSM present in human blood mediated cytotoxic platelet and leukocyte reactions in the presence of “M proteins” prepared from groups A, C, and G streptococci. Human sera that produced cytotoxic reactions and fixed complement in the presence of highly purified M protein but that contained no antibody to the homologous TSM determinant were used as a source of anti-NTSM. Anti-NTSM was absorbed with and eluted from M protein-polyacrylamide particles and identified as IgG. Antibodies to NTSM were present in most normal human sera and some primate sera (rhesus monkey and baboons) but not in the sera of other common laboratory animals. Further absorption studies showed NTSM to be a component not only of extractable M protein but also of protoplast membranes and of cell walls of avirulent streptococci that lacked extractable TSM antigen. Preparation of antisera that can distinguish between the type-specific protective moiety and the closely associated immunotoxic components in purified M protein vaccines may help answer whether or not M-associated moieties play a role in pathogenesis of poststreptococcal diseases. Images PMID:4125717

  17. Elevated HGF Levels in Sera from Breast Cancer Patients Detected Using a Protein Microarray ELISA

    SciTech Connect

    Woodbury, Ronald L. ); Varnum, Susan M. ); Zangar, Richard C. )

    2002-01-01

    We developed an ELISA in high-density microassay format to detect hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in human serum. The microassay can detect HGF at sub-pg/mL concentrations in sample volumes of 100 uL or less. The microassay is also quantitative and was used to detect elevated HGF levels in sera from recurrent breast cancer patients. The microarray format provides the potential for high-throughput quantitation of multiple biomarkers in parallel.

  18. Acanthamoeba protease activity promotes allergic airway inflammation via protease-activated receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Kyung; Cho, Min Kyoung; Kang, Shin Ae; Park, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yu, Hak Sun

    2014-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living amoeba commonly present in the environment and often found in human airway cavities. Acanthamoeba possesses strong proteases that can elicit allergic airway inflammation. To our knowledge, the aeroallergenicity of Acanthamoeba has not been reported. We repeatedly inoculated mice with Acanthamoeba trophozoites or excretory-secretory (ES) proteins intra-nasally and evaluated symptoms and airway immune responses. Acanthamoeba trophozoites or ES proteins elicited immune responses in mice that resembled allergic airway inflammation. ES proteins had strong protease activity and activated the expression of several chemokine genes (CCL11, CCL17, CCL22, TSLP, and IL-25) in mouse lung epithelial cells. The serine protease inhibitor phenyl-methane-sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) inhibited ES protein activity. ES proteins also stimulated dendritic cells and enhanced the differentiation of naive T cells into IL-4-secreting T cells. After repeated inoculation of the protease-activated receptor 2 knockout mouse with ES proteins, airway inflammation and Th2 immune responses were markedly reduced, but not to basal levels. Furthermore, asthma patients had higher Acanthamoeba-specific IgE titers than healthy controls and we found Acanthamoeba specific antigen from house dust in typical living room. Our findings suggest that Acanthamoeba elicits allergic airway symptoms in mice via a protease allergen. In addition, it is possible that Acanthamoeba may be one of the triggers human airway allergic disease.

  19. Peptide inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin by mRNA display

    SciTech Connect

    Yiadom, Kwabena P.A.B.; Muhie, Seid; Yang, David C.H. . E-mail: yangdc@georgetown.edu

    2005-10-07

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are extremely toxic. The metalloproteases associated with the toxins cleave proteins essential for neurotransmitter secretion. Inhibitors of the metalloprotease are currently sought to control the toxicity of BoNTs. Toward that goal, we produced a synthetic cDNA for the expression and purification of the metalloprotease of BoNT/A in Escherichia coli as a biotin-ubiquitin fusion protein, and constructed a combinatorial peptide library to screen for BoNT/A light chain inhibitors using mRNA display. A protease assay was developed using immobilized intact SNAP-25 as the substrate. The new peptide inhibitors showed a 10-fold increase in affinity to BoNT/A light chain than the parent peptide. Interestingly, the sequences of the new peptide inhibitors showed abundant hydrophobic residues but few hydrophilic residues. The results suggest that mRNA display may provide a general approach in developing peptide inhibitors of BoNTs.

  20. Role of rhomboid proteases in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rather, Philip

    2013-12-01

    The first member of the rhomboid family of intramembrane serine proteases in bacteria was discovered almost 20years ago. It is now known that rhomboid proteins are widely distributed in bacteria, with some bacteria containing multiple rhomboids. At the present time, only a single rhomboid-dependent function in bacteria has been identified, which is the cleavage of TatA in Providencia stuartii. Mutational analysis has shown that loss of the GlpG rhomboid in Escherichia coli alters cefotaxime resistance, loss of the YqgP (GluP) rhomboid in Bacillus subtilis alters cell division and glucose uptake, and loss of the MSMEG_5036 and MSMEG_4904 genes in Mycobacterium smegmatis results in altered colony morphology, biofilm formation and antibiotic susceptibilities. However, the cellular substrates for these proteins have not been identified. In addition, analysis of the rhombosortases, together with their possible Gly-Gly CTERM substrates, may shed new light on the role of these proteases in bacteria. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Intramembrane Proteases.

  1. Extracellular proteases from eight psychrotolerant Antarctic strains.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Susana C; Coria, Silvia H; MacCormack, Walter P

    2004-01-01

    Extracellular proteases from 8 Antarctic psychrotolerant Pseudomonas sp. strains were purified and characterised. All of them are neutral metalloproteases, have an apparent molecular mass of 45kDa, optimal activity at 40 degrees C and pH 7-9, retaining significant activity at pH 5-11. With the exception of P96-18, which is less stable, all retain more than 50% activity after 3 h of incubation at pH 5-9 and show low thermal stability (their half-life times range from 20 to 60 min at 40 degrees C and less than 5 min at 50 degrees C). These proteases can be used in commercial processes carried out at neutral pH and moderate temperatures, and are of special interest for their application in mixtures of enzymes where final thermal selective inactivation is needed. Results also highlight the relevance of Antarctic biotopes for the isolation of protease-producing enzymes active at low temperatures.

  2. Corruption of Innate Immunity by Bacterial Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Potempa, Jan; Pike, Robert N.

    2009-01-01

    The innate immune system of the human body has developed numerous mechanisms to control endogenous and exogenous bacteria and thus prevent infections by these microorganisms. These mechanisms range from physical barriers such as the skin or mucosal epithelium to a sophisticated array of molecules and cells that function to suppress or prevent bacterial infection. Many bacteria express a variety of proteases, ranging from non-specific and powerful enzymes that degrade many proteins involved in innate immunity to proteases that are extremely precise and specific in their mode of action. Here we have assembled a comprehensive picture of how bacterial proteases affect the host’s innate immune system to gain advantage and cause infection. This picture is far from being complete since the numbers of mechanisms utilized are as astonishing as they are diverse, ranging from degradation of molecules vital to innate immune mechanisms to subversion of the mechanisms to allow the bacterium to hide from the system or take advantage of it. It is vital that such mechanisms are elucidated to allow strategies to be developed to aid the innate immune system in controlling bacterial infections. PMID:19756242

  3. Effect of lanthanides on Porphyromonas gingivalis proteases.

    PubMed

    Sunkara, Sasi K; Ciancio, Sebastian G; Sojar, Hakimuddin T

    2010-01-01

    Host and bacterial proteases play a vital role in periodontitis. Inhibitors of these proteases are necessary for control of this disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of lanthanides on proteins from Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major pathogen in periodontitis. Benzoyl-L-Arg-p-nitroanilide (BAPNA); H-Gly-Pro-pNA x HCl and gelatin were used to evaluate the activity of P. gingivalis proteins in the presence of lanthanides. Proteins extracted from cell surfaces and culture media of P. gingivalis were assessed for activity in the presence of different lanthanides by BAPNA assay. Only gadolinium chloride was used for H-Gly-Pro-pNA x HCl assay and gelatin-zymography. Concentration-dependent reduction of absorbance was observed in the presence of lanthanides with BAPNA and a similar observation was made with gadolinium chloride using H-Gly-Pro-pNa. Collagenolytic activity in cell surface extracts and culture media-precipitated proteins was absent in the presence of gadolinium chloride. These results suggest that the lanthanide gadolinium can be a potential inhibitor of P. gingivalis proteases.

  4. Corruption of innate immunity by bacterial proteases.

    PubMed

    Potempa, Jan; Pike, Robert N

    2009-01-01

    The innate immune system of the human body has developed numerous mechanisms to control endogenous and exogenous bacteria and thus prevent infections by these microorganisms. These mechanisms range from physical barriers such as the skin or mucosal epithelium to a sophisticated array of molecules and cells that function to suppress or prevent bacterial infection. Many bacteria express a variety of proteases, ranging from non-specific and powerful enzymes that degrade many proteins involved in innate immunity to proteases that are extremely precise and specific in their mode of action. Here we have assembled a comprehensive picture of how bacterial proteases affect the host's innate immune system to gain advantage and cause infection. This picture is far from being complete since the numbers of mechanisms utilized are as astonishing as they are diverse, ranging from degradation of molecules vital to innate immune mechanisms to subversion of the mechanisms to allow the bacterium to hide from the system or take advantage of it. It is vital that such mechanisms are elucidated to allow strategies to be developed to aid the innate immune system in controlling bacterial infections.

  5. Sera from cancer patients contain two oscillating ECTO-NOX activities with different period lengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Sui; Morre, Dorothy M.; Morre, D. James

    2003-01-01

    ECTO-NOX protein's are cell surface-associated and growth-related hydroquinone oxidases with both protein disulfide-thiol interchange activity and the capacity to oxidize NAD(P)H. The activities of these ECTO-NOX proteins are not steady state but fluctuate to create a repeating pattern of oscillations. Two forms of ECTO-NOX activities have been distinguished. The constitutive ECTO-NOX (CNOX), is hormone responsive and refractory to quinone-site inhibitors. A tumor-associated NOX (tNOX) is unregulated, refractory to hormones and growth factors and responds to quinone-site inhibitors. CNOX proteins are widely distributed and exhibit oscillations in enzymatic activity with a period length of 24 min. tNOX proteins are cancer specific and exhibit oscillations with a period length of about 22 min. Our findings now demonstrate the presence of the novel oscillating tNOX activity in sera of patients with cancer whereas the constitutive NOX of non-cancer cells is present in sera of both cancer patients and healthy volunteers. We conclude that ECTO-NOX proteins in sera exhibit oscillatory characteristics similar to those of ECTO-NOX forms of the cell surface.

  6. EBV-positive human sera contain antibodies against the EBV BMRF-2 protein

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianqiao; Palefsky, Joel M.; Herrera, Rossana; Sunshine, Carl; Tugizov, Sharof M.

    2009-01-01

    We previously showed that the EBV glycoprotein BMRF-2 contains a functional integrin-binding Arg–Gly–Asp (RGD) domain that plays an important role in viral infection and cell-to-cell spread of progeny virions in oral epithelial cells. In this study, we found that EBV-seropositive human sera contain antibodies against BMRF-2. The inhibitory effect of EBV-positive sera on EBV infection of oral epithelial cells was substantially reduced by pre-incubation of serum samples with the BMRF-2 RGD peptide, suggesting that anti-BMRF-2 human antibodies possess neutralizing activity. EBV-specific sera reacted strongly with the BMRF-2 extracellular domain (170-213 aa) containing the RGD motif, whereas they reacted only weakly or not at all with a mutated form of the BMRF-2 extracellular domain containing AAA instead of RGD. These data indicate that that RGD motif of BMRF-2 is part of an immunodominant antigenic determinant within the extracellular domain of BMRF-2 that may contribute to EBV neutralization during EBV reactivation. PMID:19698968

  7. Detection of thyroglobulin in antithyroglobulin antibody-positive sera by isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    Malvoisin, Etienne; Makhloufi, Djamila; Livrozet, Jean-Michel

    2015-07-20

    Circulating antibodies have the potential to interfere with the measurement of thyroglobulin (Tg) in sera of patients. Here, we determined Tg concentration by isoelectric focusing (IEF) on agarose gel using for detection a rabbit antiserum to human Tg termed FLX. Tg was determined in sera of thyroid patients and HIV-infected patients under antiviral therapy. We showed that Tg IEF was not affected by the presence of anti-Tg antibodies (TgAb). Tg concentrations measured by IEF in TgAb-negative sera were in most of the cases, similar to those obtained by IRMA (immunoradiometric assay). However, in 5 of the 96 thyroid patients, and none of the 46 healthy subjects, Tg was undetectable by antiserum FLX and measurable by IRMA. In HIV-infected patients (64 men and 60 women), Tg was not recognized by FLX in 23 men and 9 women and this was related to abnormal CD4. We hypothesize that the decreased binding of FLX to Tg may be the result of conformational change on the Tg molecule, a phenomenon apparently related to immunodeficiency in HIV-infected patients. For thyroid patients, Tg IEF may be very useful for the interpretation of results when Tg measurements by IRMA and automated immunoassays are affected by interferences.

  8. Evaluation of recombinant Lig antigen-based ELISA for detection of leptospiral antibodies in canine sera.

    PubMed

    La-Ard, Anchalee; Amavisit, Patamaporn; Sukpuaram, Thavajchai; Wajjwalku, Worawidh

    2011-01-01

    Abstract. The objectives of this study were to clone the conserved region of leptospiral immunoglobulin-like protein (lig) gene and evaluate the utility of the recombinant Lig as an ELISA antigen for detection of leptospiral antibodies in canine sera. Leptospira kirschneri serovar Grippotyposa strain Moskva V was chosen to be a target for cloning the conserved region of Lig gene. This assay was evaluated with canine sera (n = 91) that were MAT-negative (< 1:100 dilution) and sera (n = 103) that were MAT-positive (> or = 1:100 dilution) using 24 serovars. The ELISA showed a relative sensitivity as compared to MAT of 84.5% whereas the specificity was 76.9%. This assay is simple and can be routinely prepared in large amounts. It was concluded that the GST.Lig recombinant protein-based ELISA could be used as a screening test for serodiagnosis of canine leptospirosis with also for confirmation of MAT-positive test results.

  9. Autoantibody to glial fibrillary acidic protein in the sera of cattle with bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Sachiko; Miyasho, Taku; Maeda, Naoyuki; Doh-ura, Katsumi; Yokota, Hiroshi

    2009-08-01

    It is desirable to make the diagnosis in live cattle with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), and thus surrogate markers for the disease have been eagerly sought. Serum proteins from BSE cattle were analyzed by 2-D Western blotting and TOF-MS. Autoantibodies against proteins in cytoskeletal fractions prepared from normal bovine brains were found in the sera of BSE cattle. The protein recognized was identified to be glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), which is expressed mainly in astrocytes in the brain. The antigen protein, GFAP, was also found in the sera of BSE cattle. The percentages of both positive sera in the autoantibody and GFAP were 44.0% for the BSE cattle, 0% for the healthy cattle, and 5.0% for the clinically suspected BSE-negative cattle. A significant relationship between the presence of GFAP and the expression of its autoantibody in the serum was recognized in the BSE cattle. These findings suggest a leakage of GFAP into the peripheral blood during neurodegeneration associated with BSE, accompanied by the autoantibody production, and might be useful in understanding the pathogenesis and in developing a serological diagnosis of BSE in live cattle.

  10. Detection of Babesia divergens in southern Norway by using an immunofluorescence antibody test in cow sera

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The incidence of bovine babesiosis, caused by Babesia divergens (Apicomplexa: Piroplasmida) has decreased markedly since the 1930 s, but may re-emerge as a consequence of climate change and changes in legislation and pasturing practices. This is a potentially serious disease, with both economical and animal welfare consequences. Therefore, there is a need to survey the distribution of B. divergens. Methods We tested sera from 306 healthy pastured cows from 24 farms along the southern Norwegian coast by using an indirect immunofluorescence IgG antibody test (IFAT). Fractions of seropositive cows were compared by calculating 95% CI. Results The results of this test showed that 27% of the sera were positive for B. divergens antibodies. The fraction of antibody-positive sera that we detected showed a two-humped distribution, with a high fraction of positives being found in municipalities in the western and eastern parts of the study area, while the municipalities between these areas had few or no positive serum samples. Conclusions Neither the farmers' observations nor the Norwegian Dairy Herd Recording System give an adequate picture of the distribution of bovine babesiosis. Serological testing of cows by using IFAT is a convenient way of screening for the presence of B. divergens in an area. PMID:20925923

  11. Allosteric Partial Inhibition of Monomeric Proteases. Sulfated Coumarins Induce Regulation, not just Inhibition, of Thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Verespy III, Stephen; Mehta, Akul Y.; Afosah, Daniel; Al-Horani, Rami A.; Desai, Umesh R.

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteases can offer major regulatory advantages, but remains a concept on paper to date; although it has been routinely documented for receptors and oligomeric proteins. Thrombin, a key protease of the coagulation cascade, displays significant conformational plasticity, which presents an attractive opportunity to discover small molecule probes that induce sub-maximal allosteric inhibition. We synthesized a focused library of some 36 sulfated coumarins to discover two agents that display sub-maximal efficacy (~50%), high potency (<500 nM) and high selectivity for thrombin (>150-fold). Michaelis-Menten, competitive inhibition, and site-directed mutagenesis studies identified exosite 2 as the site of binding for the most potent sulfated coumarin. Stern-Volmer quenching of active site-labeled fluorophore suggested that the allosteric regulators induce intermediate structural changes in the active site as compared to those that display ~80–100% efficacy. Antithrombin inactivation of thrombin was impaired in the presence of the sulfated coumarins suggesting that allosteric partial inhibition arises from catalytic dysfunction of the active site. Overall, sulfated coumarins represent first-in-class, sub-maximal inhibitors of thrombin. The probes establish the concept of allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteins. This concept may lead to a new class of anticoagulants that are completely devoid of bleeding. PMID:27053426

  12. Ficolin-2 inhibitors are present in sera after prolonged storage at −80 °C

    PubMed Central

    Geno, Kimball Aaron; Kennedy, Richard E.; Sawyer, Patricia; Brown, Cynthia J.

    2016-01-01

    Ficolins can activate the lectin pathway of the complement system that provides innate immune protection against pathogens, marks host cellular debris for clearance, and promotes inflammation. Baseline inflammation increases with aging in a phenomenon known as “inflammaging.” Although IL-6 and C-reactive protein are known to increase with age, contributions of many complement factors, including ficolins, to inflammaging have been little studied. Ficolin-2 is abundant in human serum and can recognize many target structures; therefore, ficolin-2 has potential to contribute to inflammaging. We hypothesized that inflammaging would alter ficolin-2 levels among older adults and examined 360 archived sera collected from older individuals. We found that these sera had apparently reduced ficolin-2 levels and that 84.2% of archived sera exhibited ficolin-2 inhibitors, which suppressed apparent amounts of ficolin-2 detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Fresh serum samples were obtained from donors whose archived sera showed inhibitors, but the fresh sera did not have ficolin-2 inhibitors. Ficolin-2 inhibitors were present in other long-stored sera from younger persons. Furthermore, noninhibiting samples and fresh sera from older adults had apparently normal amounts of ficolin-2. Thus, ficolin-2 inhibitors may arise as an artifact of long-term storage of serum at −80 °C. PMID:27896034

  13. Cathepsin F Cysteine Protease of the Human Liver Fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini

    PubMed Central

    Laha, Thewarach; Sripa, Banchob; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Morales, Maria E.; Mann, Victoria H.; Parriott, Sandi K.; Suttiprapa, Sutas; Robinson, Mark W.; To, Joyce; Dalton, John P.; Loukas, Alex; Brindley, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini is classified as a class I carcinogen due to the association between cholangiocarcinoma and chronic O. viverrini infection. During its feeding activity within the bile duct, the parasite secretes several cathepsin F cysteine proteases that may induce or contribute to the pathologies associated with hepatobiliary abnormalities. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we describe the cDNA, gene organization, phylogenetic relationships, immunolocalization, and functional characterization of the cathepsin F cysteine protease gene, here termed Ov-cf-1, from O. viverrini. The full length mRNA of 1020 nucleotides (nt) encoded a 326 amino acid zymogen consisting of a predicted signal peptide (18 amino acids, aa), prosegment (95 aa), and mature protease (213 aa). BLAST analysis using the Ov-CF-1 protein as the query revealed that the protease shared identity with cathepsin F-like cysteine proteases of other trematodes, including Clonorchis sinensis (81%), Paragonimus westermani (58%), Schistosoma mansoni and S. japonicum (52%), and with vertebrate cathepsin F (51%). Transcripts encoding the protease were detected in all developmental stages that parasitize the mammalian host. The Ov-cf-1 gene, of ∼3 kb in length, included seven exons interrupted by six introns; the exons ranged from 69 to 267 bp in length, the introns from 43 to 1,060 bp. The six intron/exon boundaries of Ov-cf-1 were conserved with intron/exon boundaries in the human cathepsin F gene, although the gene structure of human cathepsin F is more complex. Unlike Ov-CF-1, human cathepsin F zymogen includes a cystatin domain in the prosegment region. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the fluke, human, and other cathepsin Fs branched together in a clade discrete from the cathepsin L cysteine proteases. A recombinant Ov-CF-1 zymogen that displayed low-level activity was expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Although the recombinant protease did not

  14. Serine protease activity in developmental stages of Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Fetterer, R H; Miska, K B; Lillehoj, H; Barfield, R C

    2007-04-01

    A number of complex processes are involved in Eimeria spp. survival, including control of sporulation, intracellular invasion, evasion of host immune responses, successful reproduction, and nutrition. Proteases have been implicated in many of these processes, but the occurrence and functions of serine proteases have not been characterized. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that the Eimeria tenella genome contains several serine proteases that lack homology to trypsin. Using RT-PCR, a gene encoding a subtilisin-like and a rhomboid protease-like serine protease was shown to be developmentally regulated, both being poorly expressed in sporozoites (SZ) and merozoites (MZ). Casein substrate gel electrophoresis of oocyst extracts during sporulation demonstrated bands of proteolytic activity with relative molecular weights (Mr) of 18, 25, and 45 kDa that were eliminated by coincubation with serine protease inhibitors. A protease with Mr of 25 kDa was purified from extracts of unsporulated oocysts by a combination of affinity and anion exchange chromatography. Extracts of SZ contained only a single band of inhibitor-sensitive proteolytic activity at 25 kDa, while the pattern of proteases from extracts of MZ was similar to that of oocysts except for the occurrence of a 90 kDa protease, resistant to protease inhibitors. Excretory-secretory products (ESP) from MZ contained AEBSF (4-[2-Aminoethyl] benzenesulphonyl fluoride)-sensitive protease activity with a specific activity about 10 times greater than that observed in MZ extracts. No protease activity was observed in the ESP from SZ. Pretreatment of SZ with AEBSF significantly reduced SZ invasion and the release of the microneme protein, MIC2. The current results suggest that serine proteases are present in all the developmental stages examined.

  15. Structural determinants of tobacco vein mottling virus protease substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping; Austin, Brian P; Tözsér, József; Waugh, David S

    2010-11-01

    Tobacco vein mottling virus (TVMV) is a member of the Potyviridae, one of the largest families of plant viruses. The TVMV genome is translated into a single large polyprotein that is subsequently processed by three virally encoded proteases. Seven of the nine cleavage events are carried out by the NIa protease. Its homolog from the tobacco etch virus (TEV) is a widely used reagent for the removal of affinity tags from recombinant proteins. Although TVMV protease is a close relative of TEV protease, they exhibit distinct sequence specificities. We report here the crystal structure of a catalytically inactive mutant TVMV protease (K65A/K67A/C151A) in complex with a canonical peptide substrate (Ac-RETVRFQSD) at 1.7-Å resolution. As observed in several crystal structures of TEV protease, the C-terminus (∼20 residues) of TVMV protease is disordered. Unexpectedly, although deleting the disordered residues from TEV protease reduces its catalytic activity by ∼10-fold, an analogous truncation mutant of TVMV protease is significantly more active. Comparison of the structures of TEV and TVMV protease in complex with their respective canonical substrate peptides reveals that the S3 and S4 pockets are mainly responsible for the differing substrate specificities. The structure of TVMV protease suggests that it is less tolerant of variation at the P1' position than TEV protease. This conjecture was confirmed experimentally by determining kinetic parameters k(cat) and K(m) for a series of oligopeptide substrates. Also, as predicted by the cocrystal structure, we confirm that substitutions in the P6 position are more readily tolerated by TVMV than TEV protease.

  16. Structural determinants of tobacco vein mottling virus protease substrate specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ping; Austin, Brian P.; Tozer, Jozsef; Waugh, David

    2010-10-28

    Tobacco vein mottling virus (TVMV) is a member of the Potyviridae, one of the largest families of plant viruses. The TVMV genome is translated into a single large polyprotein that is subsequently processed by three virally encoded proteases. Seven of the nine cleavage events are carried out by the NIa protease. Its homolog from the tobacco etch virus (TEV) is a widely used reagent for the removal of affinity tags from recombinant proteins. Although TVMV protease is a close relative of TEV protease, they exhibit distinct sequence specificities. We report here the crystal structure of a catalytically inactive mutant TVMV protease (K65A/K67A/C151A) in complex with a canonical peptide substrate (Ac-RETVRFQSD) at 1.7-{angstrom} resolution. As observed in several crystal structures of TEV protease, the C-terminus ({approx}20 residues) of TVMV protease is disordered. Unexpectedly, although deleting the disordered residues from TEV protease reduces its catalytic activity by {approx}10-fold, an analogous truncation mutant of TVMV protease is significantly more active. Comparison of the structures of TEV and TVMV protease in complex with their respective canonical substrate peptides reveals that the S3 and S4 pockets are mainly responsible for the differing substrate specificities. The structure of TVMV protease suggests that it is less tolerant of variation at the P1{prime} position than TEV protease. This conjecture was confirmed experimentally by determining kinetic parameters k{sub cat} and K{sub m} for a series of oligopeptide substrates. Also, as predicted by the cocrystal structure, we confirm that substitutions in the P6 position are more readily tolerated by TVMV than TEV protease.

  17. A functional proteomics screen of proteases in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    McKerrow, J. H.; Bhargava, V.; Hansell, E.; Huling, S.; Kuwahara, T.; Matley, M.; Coussens, L.; Warren, R.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Proteases facilitate several steps in cancer progression. To identify proteases most suitable for drug targeting, actual enzyme activity and not messenger RNA levels or immunoassay of protein is the ideal assay readout. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An automated microtiter plate assay format was modified to allow detection of all four major classes of proteases in tissue samples. Fifteen sets of colorectal carcinoma biopsies representing primary tumor, adjacent normal colon, and liver metastases were screened for protease activity. RESULTS: The major proteases detected were matrix metalloproteases (MMP9, MMP2, and MMP1), cathepsin B, cathepsin D, and the mast cell serine proteases, tryptase and chymase. Matrix metalloproteases were expressed at higher levels in the primary tumor than in adjacent normal tissue. The mast cell proteases, in contrast, were at very high levels in adjacent normal tissue, and not detectable in the metastases. Cathepsin B activity was significantly higher in the primary tumor, and highest in the metastases. The major proteases detected by activity assays were then localized in biopsy sections by immunohistochemistry. Mast cell proteases were abundant in adjacent normal tissue, because of infiltration of the lamina propria by mast cells. Matrix metalloproteases were localized to the tumor cells themselves; whereas, cathepsin B was predominantly expressed by macrophages at the leading edge of invading tumors. Although only low levels of urinary plasminogen activator were detected by direct enzyme assay, immunohistochemistry showed abundant protein within the tumor. CONCLUSIONS: This analysis, surveying all major classes of proteases by assays of activity rather than immunolocalization or in situ hybridization alone, serves to identify proteases whose activity is not completely balanced by endogenous inhibitors and which may be essential for tumor progression. These proteases are logical targets for initial efforts to produce low

  18. Monoclonal antibody to a cancer-specific and drug-responsive hydroquinone (NADH) oxidase from the sera of cancer patients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, NaMi; Chueh, Pin-Ju; Kim, Chinpal; Caldwell, Sara; Morre, Dorothy M.; Morre, D. James

    2002-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were generated in mice to a 34-kDa circulating form of a drug-responsive hydroquinone (NADH) oxidase with a protein disulfide-thiol interchange activity specific to the surface of cancer cells and the sera of cancer patients. Screening used Western blots with purified 34-kDa tNOX from HeLa cells and the sera of cancer patients. Epitopes were sought that inhibited the drug-responsive oxidation of NADH with the sera of cancer patients, but which had no effect on NADH oxidation with the sera of healthy volunteers. Two such antisera were generated. One, designated monoclonal antibody (mAb) 12.1, was characterized extensively. The NADH oxidase activity inhibited by mAb 12.1 also was inhibited by the quinone site inhibitor capsaicin (8-methyl- N-vanillyl-6-noneamide). The inhibition was competitive for the drug-responsive protein disulfide-thiol interchange activity assayed either by restoration of activity to scrambled RNase or by cleavage of a dithiodipyridine substrate, and was uncompetitive for NADH oxidation. Both the mAb 12.1 and the postimmune antisera immunoprecipitated drug-responsive NOX activity and identified the same 34-kDa tNOX protein in the sera of cancer patients that was absent from sera of healthy volunteers, and was utilized as immunogen. Preimmune sera from the same mouse as the postimmune antisera was without effect. Both mouse ascites containing mAb 12.1 and postimmune sera (but not preimmune sera) slowed the growth of human cancer cell lines in culture, but did not affect the growth of non-cancerous cell lines. Immunocytochemical and histochemical findings showed that mAb 12.1 reacted with the surface membranes of human carcinoma cells and tissues.

  19. Black optic display

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    1997-01-01

    An optical display includes a plurality of stacked optical waveguides having first and second opposite ends collectively defining an image input face and an image screen, respectively, with the screen being oblique to the input face. Each of the waveguides includes a transparent core bound by a cladding layer having a lower index of refraction for effecting internal reflection of image light transmitted into the input face to project an image on the screen, with each of the cladding layers including a cladding cap integrally joined thereto at the waveguide second ends. Each of the cores is beveled at the waveguide second end so that the cladding cap is viewable through the transparent core. Each of the cladding caps is black for absorbing external ambient light incident upon the screen for improving contrast of the image projected internally on the screen.

  20. Three dimensional interactive display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) interactive display and method of forming the same, includes a transparent capaciflector (TC) camera formed on a transparent shield layer on the screen surface. A first dielectric layer is formed on the shield layer. A first wire layer is formed on the first dielectric layer. A second dielectric layer is formed on the first wire layer. A second wire layer is formed on the second dielectric layer. Wires on the first wire layer and second wire layer are grouped into groups of parallel wires with a turnaround at one end of each group and a sensor pad at the opposite end. An operational amplifier is connected to each of the sensor pads and the shield pad biases the pads and receives a signal from connected sensor pads in response to intrusion of a probe. The signal is proportional to probe location with respect to the monitor screen.

  1. An alternative method for inactivating heteroagglutinins in human sera applicable to rubella haemagglutination inhibition testing at low dilutions.

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, P P

    1976-01-01

    Serum agglutinins of chick and pigeon cells are predominantly immunoglobulin M and can be inactivated by 2 mercaptoethanol. 2 Mercaptoethanol is more effective than strong suspensions of red cells in removing the agglutinins of indicator cells from sera being prepared for HAI tests. In rubella HAI tests from a dilution of 1 to 10 dilute 2 mercaptoethanol offer a convenient method of removing agglutinins, and, at higher concentration, allow dilutions of sera from 1 in 2-5 to be tested without significant interference by heteroagglutinins. HAI titres are comparable when red cell absorbed and 2 mercaptoethanol treated sera are tested in parallel. Images PMID:946972

  2. Applicability and significance of salicylate screening in sera of voluntary blood donors: evaluation of two analytical methods.

    PubMed Central

    Sharon, R; Frutkoff, I; Kidroni, G; Menczel, J

    1982-01-01

    Salicylate concentrations in 3819 sera of apparently healthy voluntary blood donors were determined in view of the significance of this drug in the induction of allergic reactions and its possible interference in platelet function. Two hundred and ninety-five sera were found by a modified colorimetric determination to contain salicylates. The colorimetric determination was compared with a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of salicylate-containing sera. Drug concentrations detected were mostly in the range of 20-100 mg/l. Such concentrations have been reported to evoke allergic reactions and to affect the haemostatic action of platelets. PMID:7061719

  3. Characterization of the 41kDa allergen Asp v 13, a subtilisin-like serine protease from Aspergillus versicolor.

    PubMed

    Shi, C; Miller, J D

    2011-09-01

    Aspergillus versicolor is common on moldy building materials. Asp v 13, the principal allergen is produced by strains collected from across Canada. In this paper, we report a 1833bp Asp v 13 open reading frame predicted to encode a protein of 403 amino acids in length with three introns. A BLAST search of Asp v 13, a phylogenic tree calculation and alignment with its homologous proteins from other species indicated that Asp v 13 is a secretory, subtilisin-like serine protease widely distributed in Aspergillus species. His-tagged Asp v 13 was over-expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using Ni-NTA columns with a yield of 1mg/L. Based on immuno binding assay of recombinant protein both antibodies developed against the natural protein, and human sera IgE, the recombinant protein was similar to the natural form. Six IgE- and seven IgG-binding epitopes were also identified with selected human sera along the entire amino acid sequence of Asp v 13. Most residues binding these epitopes are exposed on the surface and correspond to charged regions of the molecule.

  4. Cystatins, serpins and other families of protease inhibitors in plants.

    PubMed

    Volpicella, Mariateresa; Leoni, Claudia; Costanza, Alessandra; De Leo, Francesca; Gallerani, Raffaele; Ceci, Luigi R

    2011-08-01

    Plant protease inhibitors (PIs) are generally small proteins present in high concentrations in storage tissues (tubers and seeds), and to a lower level in leaves. Even if most of them are active against serine and cysteine proteases, PIs active against aspartic proteases and carboxypeptidases have also been identified. Inhibitors of serine proteases are further classifiable in several families on the basis of their structural features. They comprise the families known as Bowman-Birk, Kunitz, Potato I and Potato II, which are the subject of review articles included in this special issue. In the present article we aim to give an overview of other families of plant PIs, active either against serine proteases or other class of proteases, describing their distribution, activity and main structural characteristics.

  5. Display Factors and Subjective Evaluation of Dynamic Text Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Joey C. Y.; Chan, Alan H. S.

    2009-01-01

    Communications technology has exploded in past decades, leading to the question of which display method is the best to deliver electronic text messages. Many of these systems employ cathode ray tubes, liquid crystal displays, gas plasma displays, or light-emitting diodes as the output device. In order to overcome the limitations of screen size of the display units, numerous means of presenting dynamic display on screens have been invented. There are many factors that affect the readability of electronic text. This paper reviews some related empirical studies concerning the various display methods of dynamic text presentation, such as text display type, character type, text display direction, and text/background color combination, highlighting method and validity of highlighting. The subjective evaluation questionnaire is also discussed. According to the readability and preference ratings of the subjects given under different conditions, the best display method and color for comprehending the delivered messages were investigated. General recommendations of displaying dynamic information are made for the large display units which have been widely used for delivering important messages.

  6. Diversity of both the cultivable protease-producing bacteria and bacterial extracellular proteases in the coastal sediments of King George Island, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming-Yang; Wang, Guang-Long; Li, Dan; Zhao, Dian-Li; Qin, Qi-Long; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Chen, Bo; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Protease-producing bacteria play a vital role in degrading sedimentary organic nitrogen. However, the diversity of these bacteria and their extracellular proteases in most regions remain unknown. In this paper, the diversity of the cultivable protease-producing bacteria and of bacterial extracellular proteases in the sediments of Maxwell Bay, King George Island, Antarctica was investigated. The cultivable protease-producing bacteria reached 10(5) cells/g in all 8 sediment samples. The cultivated protease-producing bacteria were mainly affiliated with the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria, and the predominant genera were Bacillus (22.9%), Flavobacterium (21.0%) and Lacinutrix (16.2%). Among these strains, Pseudoalteromonas and Flavobacteria showed relatively high protease production. Inhibitor analysis showed that nearly all the extracellular proteases from the bacteria were serine proteases or metalloproteases. These results begin to address the diversity of protease-producing bacteria and bacterial extracellular proteases in the sediments of the Antarctic Sea.

  7. Novel proteases from the genome of the carnivorous plant Drosera capensis: Structural prediction and comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Butts, Carter T; Bierma, Jan C; Martin, Rachel W

    2016-10-01

    In his 1875 monograph on insectivorous plants, Darwin described the feeding reactions of Drosera flypaper traps and predicted that their secretions contained a "ferment" similar to mammalian pepsin, an aspartic protease. Here we report a high-quality draft genome sequence for the cape sundew, Drosera capensis, the first genome of a carnivorous plant from order Caryophyllales, which also includes the Venus flytrap (Dionaea) and the tropical pitcher plants (Nepenthes). This species was selected in part for its hardiness and ease of cultivation, making it an excellent model organism for further investigations of plant carnivory. Analysis of predicted protein sequences yields genes encoding proteases homologous to those found in other plants, some of which display sequence and structural features that suggest novel functionalities. Because the sequence similarity to proteins of known structure is in most cases too low for traditional homology modeling, 3D structures of representative proteases are predicted using comparative modeling with all-atom refinement. Although the overall folds and active residues for these proteins are conserved, we find structural and sequence differences consistent with a diversity of substrate recognition patterns. Finally, we predict differences in substrate specificities using in silico experiments, providing targets for structure/function studies of novel enzymes with biological and technological significance. Proteins 2016; 84:1517-1533. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Comparative studies on the thermal properties of a trypsin-like protease intwo hermit crabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, Birgit

    1992-03-01

    The thermal characteristics of a trypsin-like protease were surveyed comparatively in two hermit crabs, Pagurus bernhardus (Linné) 1758 from the German Bight, and Clibanarius striolatus Dana 1852 from the Western Indo-Pacific. In both enzymes, activity is maximal at a temperature around 50°C. Compared with Pagurus, the protease in Clibanarius is characterized by a considerably higher stability at elevated temperatures. Furthermore, the latter is less inhibited by two specific trypsin inhibitors. On an energetical level, distinct differences between the species are displayed. In both species, Km is strongly affected by temperature; lowest Km values do not coincide with the mean environmental temperature. The affinity of Pagurus protease for substrate at 40°C is about 17 times that at 0°C; in Clibanarius this factor amounts only to 4.4. At temperatures >10°C, activation energy in the tropical species Clibanarius is distinctly higher (28.3 kJ·mol-1) than in the boreal species Pagurus (20.0 kJ·mol-1).

  9. Developing Intepretive Soil Education Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansmeyer, T. L.; Cooper, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    Describes several soil educational displays developed for park and nature center trails. Displays include full-scale soil monoliths displayed along the trails with explanations on why and how the soils are different, and micro-monoliths exhibiting the different soil types. (MDH)

  10. Characterization of a papain-like cysteine protease essential for the survival of Babesia ovis merozoites.

    PubMed

    Carletti, Tamara; Barreto, Carmo; Mesplet, Maria; Mira, Anabela; Weir, William; Shiels, Brian; Oliva, Abel Gonzalez; Schnittger, Leonhard; Florin-Christensen, Monica

    2016-02-01

    Babesia ovis, a tick-transmitted intraerythrocytic protozoan parasite, causes severe infections in small ruminants from Southern Europe, Middle East, and Northern Africa. With the aim of finding potential targets for the development of control methods against this parasite, sequence analysis of its genome led to the identification of four putative cysteine proteases of the C1A family. Orthology between B. ovis, B. bovis, T. annulata, and T. parva sequences showed that each B. ovis C1A peptidase sequence clustered within one of the four ortholog groups previously reported for these piroplasmids. The ortholog of bovipain-2 of B. bovis and falcipain-2 of Plasmodium falciparum, respectively, was designated "ovipain-2" and further characterized. In silico analysis showed that ovipain-2 has the typical topology of papain-like cysteine peptidases and a highly similar predicted three dimensional structure to bovipain-2 and falcipain-2, suggesting susceptibility to similar inhibitors. Immunoblotting using antibodies raised against a recombinant form of ovipain-2 (r-ovipain-2) demonstrated expression of ovipain-2 in in vitro cultured B. ovis merozoites. By immunofluorescence, these antibodies reacted with merozoites and stained the cytoplasm of infected erythrocytes. This suggests that ovipain-2 is secreted by the parasite and could be involved in intra- and extracellular digestion of hemoglobin and/or cleavage of erythrocyte proteins facilitating parasite egress. A significant reduction in the percentage of parasitized erythrocytes was obtained upon incubation of B. ovis in vitro cultures with anti-r-ovipain-2 antibodies, indicating an important functional role for ovipain-2 in the intra erythrocytic development cycle of this parasite. Finally, studies of the reactivity of sera from B. ovis-positive and negative sheep against r-ovipain-2 showed that this protease is expressed in vivo, and can be recognized by host antibodies. The results of this study suggest that ovipain-2

  11. Economic Methods of Ginger Protease'sextraction and Purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yuanyuan; Tong, Junfeng; Wei, Siqing; Du, Xinyong; Tang, Xiaozhen

    This article reports the ginger protease extraction and purification methods from fresh ginger rhizome. As to ginger protease extraction, we adapt the steps of organic solvent dissolving, ammonium sulfate depositing and freeze-drying, and this method can attain crude enzyme powder 0.6% weight of fresh ginger rhizome. The purification part in this study includes two steps: cellulose ion exchange (DEAE-52) and SP-Sephadex 50 chromatography, which can purify crude ginger protease through ion and molecular weight differences respectively.

  12. Engineering Environmentally-Stable Proteases to Specifically Neutralize Protein Toxins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    agents , such as Soman and Sarin . 2. Linkage to binding molecules Conjugating an antibody (or any other binding module) with an initiating protease...to develop the tools and principles necessary to engineer subtilisin proteases which specifically target and deactivate biological warfare agent (BWA...warfare agent (BWA) toxins. We have engineered and evolved subtilisin proteases to specifically target and deactivate BoNT, SEB, ricin, and B

  13. Immunoreactive Proteins of Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum CCM 7952 and Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum CCDM 372 Identified by Gnotobiotic Mono-Colonized Mice Sera, Immune Rabbit Sera and Non-immune Human Sera

    PubMed Central

    Górska, Sabina; Dylus, Ewa; Rudawska, Angelika; Brzozowska, Ewa; Srutkova, Dagmar; Schwarzer, Martin; Razim, Agnieszka; Kozakova, Hana; Gamian, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The Bifidobacteria show great diversity in the cell surface architecture which may influence the physicochemical properties of the bacterial cell and strain specific properties. The immunomodulatory role of bifidobacteria has been extensively studied, however studies on the immunoreactivity of their protein molecules are very limited. Here, we compared six different methods of protein isolation and purification and we report identification of immunogenic and immunoreactive protein of two human Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum strains. We evaluated potential immunoreactive properties of proteins employing polyclonal sera obtained from germ free mouse, rabbit and human. The protein yield was isolation method-dependent and the reactivity of proteins detected by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting was heterogeneous and varied between different serum samples. The proteins with the highest immunoreactivity were isolated, purified and have them sequenced. Among the immunoreactive proteins we identified enolase, aspartokinase, pyruvate kinase, DnaK (B. longum ssp. longum CCM 7952) and sugar ABC transporter ATP-binding protein, phosphoglycerate kinase, peptidoglycan synthethase penicillin-binding protein 3, transaldolase, ribosomal proteins and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (B. longum ssp. longum CCDM 372). PMID:27746766

  14. Detergent alkaline proteases: enzymatic properties, genes, and crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Katsuhisa; Ozaki, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Tohru; Ito, Susumu

    2007-06-01

    Subtilisin-like serine proteases from bacilli have been used in various industrial fields worldwide, particularly in the production of laundry and automatic dishwashing detergents. They belong to family A of the subtilase superfamily, which is composed of three clans, namely, true subtilisins, high-alkaline proteases, and intracellular proteases. We succeeded in the large-scale production of a high-alkaline protease (M-protease) from alkaliphilic Bacillus clausii KSM-K16, and the enzyme has been introduced into compact heavy-duty laundry detergents. We have also succeeded in the industrial-scale production of a new alkaline protease, KP-43, which was originally resistant to chemical oxidants and to surfactants, produced by alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. strain KSM-KP43 and have incorporated it into laundry detergents. KP-43 and related proteases form a new clan, oxidatively stable proteases, in subtilase family A. In this review, we describe the enzymatic properties, gene sequences, and crystal structures of M-protease, KP-43, and related enzymes.

  15. Extracellular Bacterial Proteases in Chronic Wounds: A Potential Therapeutic Target?

    PubMed Central

    Suleman, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Bacterial biofilms are considered to be responsible for over 80% of persistent infections, including chronic lung infections, osteomyelitis, periodontitis, endocarditis, and chronic wounds. Over 60% of chronic wounds are colonized with bacteria that reside within a biofilm. The exaggerated proteolytic environment of chronic wounds, more specifically elevated matrix metalloproteinases, is thought to be one of the possible reasons as to why chronic wounds fail to heal. However, the role of bacterial proteases within chronic wounds is not fully understood. Recent Advances: Recent research has shown that bacterial proteases can enable colonization and facilitate bacterial immune evasion. The inhibition of bacterial proteases such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase B (LasB) has resulted in the disruption of the bacterial biofilm in vitro. P. aeruginosa is thought to be a key pathogen in chronic wound infection, and therefore, the disruption of these biofilms, potentially through the targeting of P. aeruginosa bacterial proteases, is an attractive therapeutic endeavor. Critical Issues: Disrupting biofilm formation through the inhibition of bacterial proteases may lead to the dissemination of bacteria from the biofilm, allowing planktonic cells to colonize new sites within the wound. Future Directions: Despite a plethora of evidence supporting the role of bacterial proteases as virulence factors in infection, there remains a distinct lack of research into the effect of bacterial proteases in chronic wounds. To assess the viability of targeting bacterial proteases, future research should aim to understand the role of these proteases in a variety of chronic wound subtypes. PMID:27785379

  16. Extracellular Bacterial Proteases in Chronic Wounds: A Potential Therapeutic Target?

    PubMed

    Suleman, Louise

    2016-10-01

    Significance: Bacterial biofilms are considered to be responsible for over 80% of persistent infections, including chronic lung infections, osteomyelitis, periodontitis, endocarditis, and chronic wounds. Over 60% of chronic wounds are colonized with bacteria that reside within a biofilm. The exaggerated proteolytic environment of chronic wounds, more specifically elevated matrix metalloproteinases, is thought to be one of the possible reasons as to why chronic wounds fail to heal. However, the role of bacterial proteases within chronic wounds is not fully understood. Recent Advances: Recent research has shown that bacterial proteases can enable colonization and facilitate bacterial immune evasion. The inhibition of bacterial proteases such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase B (LasB) has resulted in the disruption of the bacterial biofilm in vitro. P. aeruginosa is thought to be a key pathogen in chronic wound infection, and therefore, the disruption of these biofilms, potentially through the targeting of P. aeruginosa bacterial proteases, is an attractive therapeutic endeavor. Critical Issues: Disrupting biofilm formation through the inhibition of bacterial proteases may lead to the dissemination of bacteria from the biofilm, allowing planktonic cells to colonize new sites within the wound. Future Directions: Despite a plethora of evidence supporting the role of bacterial proteases as virulence factors in infection, there remains a distinct lack of research into the effect of bacterial proteases in chronic wounds. To assess the viability of targeting bacterial proteases, future research should aim to understand the role of these proteases in a variety of chronic wound subtypes.

  17. Colorimetry for CRT displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golz, Jürgen; MacLeod, Donald I. A.

    2003-05-01

    We analyze the sources of error in specifying color in CRT displays. These include errors inherent in the use of the color matching functions of the CIE 1931 standard observer when only colorimetric, not radiometric, calibrations are available. We provide transformation coefficients that prove to correct the deficiencies of this observer very well. We consider four different candidate sets of cone sensitivities. Some of these differ substantially; variation among candidate cone sensitivities exceeds the variation among phosphors. Finally, the effects of the recognized forms of observer variation on the visual responses (cone excitations or cone contrasts) generated by CRT stimuli are investigated and quantitatively specified. Cone pigment polymorphism gives rise to variation of a few per cent in relative excitation by the different phosphors-a variation larger than the errors ensuing from the adoption of the CIE standard observer, though smaller than the differences between some candidate cone sensitivities. Macular pigmentation has a larger influence, affecting mainly responses to the blue phosphor. The estimated combined effect of all sources of observer variation is comparable in magnitude with the largest differences between competing cone sensitivity estimates but is not enough to disrupt very seriously the relation between the L and M cone weights and the isoluminance settings of individual observers. It is also comparable with typical instrumental colorimetric errors, but we discuss these only briefly.

  18. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    SciTech Connect

    Lager, Darrell; Azevado, Stephen

    1986-06-01

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time- and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG - a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible and are indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time- and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments,commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a repeat sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.

  19. Specificity of anti-lymphocyte antibodies in sera from patients with AIDS-related complex (ARC) and healthy homosexuals.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, R Q; Johnson, E A; Donnelly, R P; Lavia, M F; Tsang, K Y

    1988-01-01

    The presence and specificity of anti-lymphocyte antibodies (ALA) was investigated in sera from male homosexuals with AIDS-Related Complex (ARC) as well as healthy homosexuals. Individuals in the healthy homosexual group had no detectable antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Antibodies reactive with normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells were detected by Western blot analysis in sera from both groups of homosexuals. Of those individuals whose sera contained ALA, 71% of ARC patients and 83% of healthy homosexuals had antibodies recognizing a 73 kilodalton (kD) molecule. ALA present in ARC sera reacted with CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes while little reactivity with B cells was observed. Our results indicate that ALA appear in homosexuals prior to HIV infection and are reactive primarily with T lymphocytes. A 73 kD structure associated with the T cell membrane is frequently the target for these antibodies. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3052941

  20. An acousto-optical method for registration of erythrocytes' agglutination reaction—sera color influence on the resolving power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubrovski, V. A.; Medvedeva, M. F.; Torbin, S. O.

    2016-01-01

    The absorption spectra of agglutinating sera were used to determine blood groups. It was shown experimentally that the sera color significantly affects the resolving power of the acousto-optical method of blood typing. In order to increase the resolving power of the method and produce an invariance of the method for sera color, we suggested introducing a probing light beam individually for different sera. The proposed technique not only improves the resolving power of the method, but also reduces the risk of false interpretation of the experimental results and, hence, error in determining the blood group of the sample. The latter is especially important for the typing of blood samples with weak agglutination of erythrocytes. This study can be used in the development of an instrument for instrumental human blood group typing based on the acousto-optical method.

  1. Heart-reactive antibodies in rabbit anti-Streptococcus mutans sera fail to cross-react with Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Swartzwelder, F J; Barua, P K; Albini, B; Stinson, M W

    1988-02-01

    Immunization of rabbits with Streptococcus mutans antigens results in the production of serum antibodies that bind in vitro to human, rabbit, and monkey cardiac muscle. Antibodies to heart, however, have also been reported to occur at lower titers in the sera of unimmunized rabbits. In this study, the specificities of heart-reactive antibodies (HRA) in sera of unimmunized and S. mutans-immunized rabbits were compared using indirect immunofluorescence, Western blot, and Bio-Dot immunoassays. Both groups of sera gave striational indirect immunofluorescence-staining patterns on thin sections of native human and monkey cardiac muscle. Western blot analyses revealed that antibodies in normal sera bound 9 to 20 components of human, rabbit, and monkey heart. The major bands had Mr of 205,000, 160,000, 135,000, and 70,000. Several of the normal sera did not have antibody activity to S. mutans antigens, indicating that these HRA do not cross-react with these bacteria. Although immunization of rabbits with S. mutans caused increased titers of HRA (two to three doubling dilutions), Western blot assays using anti-S. mutans sera showed banding patterns qualitatively similar to those of normal sera on heart extracts. Antibodies to skeletal muscle myosin were detected in both serum groups. Of eighteen normal rabbit sera sixteen had antimyosin titers of 10 to 40, whereas all eighteen anti-S. mutans sera had titers of 10 to 160. Affinity-purified antimyosin antibodies isolated from anti-S. mutans serum did not bind to S. mutans components. Conversely, affinity-purified antibodies to S. mutans antigens did not bind to myosin or to other cardiac muscle components. Among these were antibodies to the 185-kDa cell wall protein (also known as B, I/II, IF, Spa A, and P1) previously believed to possess antigenic mimicry. HRA were removed from anti-S. mutans sera by absorption with S. mutans but this effect was not specific, because a non-cross-reactive internal standard antibody was also

  2. Unique interactive projection display screen

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1997-11-01

    Projection systems continue to be the best method to produce large (1 meter and larger) displays. However, in order to produce a large display, considerable volume is typically required. The Polyplanar Optic Display (POD) is a novel type of projection display screen, which for the first time, makes it possible to produce a large projection system that is self-contained and only inches thick. In addition, this display screen is matte black in appearance allowing it to be used in high ambient light conditions. This screen is also interactive and can be remotely controlled via an infrared optical pointer resulting in mouse-like control of the display. Furthermore, this display need not be flat since it can be made curved to wrap around a viewer as well as being flexible.

  3. LED instrument approach instruction display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meredith, B. D.; Kelly, W. L., IV; Crouch, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    A display employing light emitting diodes (LED's) was developed to demonstrate the feasibility of such displays for presenting landing and navigation information to reduce the workload of general aviation pilots during IFR flight. The display consists of a paper tape reader, digital memory, control electronics, digital latches, and LED alphanumeric displays. A presentable digital countdown clock-timer is included as part of the system to provide a convenient means of monitoring time intervals for precise flight navigation. The system is a limited capability prototype assembled to test pilot reaction to such a device under simulated IFR operation. Pilot opinion indicates that the display is helpful in reducing the IFR pilots workload when used with a runway approach plate. However, the development of a compact, low power second generation display was recommended which could present several instructions simultaneously and provide information update capability. A microprocessor-based display could fulfill these requirements.

  4. Cockroach-allergen study: allergen patterns of three common cockroach species probed by allergic sera collected in two cities.

    PubMed

    Kang, B C; Wilson, M; Price, K H; Kambara, T

    1991-06-01

    Antigens/allergens of three common cockroach extracts, crude whole body extract of the American cockroach (CRa-A), crude whole body extract of the German cockroach (CRa-G), and crude whole body extract of the Oriental cockroach (CRa-O), were studied with crossed immunoelectrophoresis, crossed radioimmunoelectrophoresis, and Western blot analysis. Sera of cockroach-allergic patients with asthma, 10 from Chicago, Ill. (C group) and six patients from Lexington, Ky. (L group), were used; results were then compared with sera of control subjects with asthma. Qualitative differences in protein bands were noted among CRa-A, CRa-G, and CRa-O by crossed immunoelectrophoresis and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Allergen bands on Western blot were analyzed for distribution by molecular weight (MW) with relative intensity scores. Results were compared by species and by geography. Two to 12 allergenic bands of variable MW (14 kd to greater than 116 kd) were identified by 13 of 16 individual sera from cockroach-allergic patients from all three extracts. CRa-A demonstrated 55 bands with an intensity score of 125; CRa-G, 58 bands with an intensity score of 100; and CRa-O, 51 bands with an intensity score of 108. Allergenic bands of CRa-A were identified by six sera of the C group and one sera of the L group, whereas bands of both CRa-G and CRa-O were noted by nine sera of the C group and four sera of the L group. All three species had an allergen band in MW range of 40 to 45 kd that reacted to most sera from cockroach-allergic patients with asthma.

  5. Cloning and analysis of WF146 protease, a novel thermophilic subtilisin-like protease with four inserted surface loops.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang; Bian, Yan; Tang, Bing; Chen, Xiangdong; Shen, Ping; Peng, Zhenrong

    2004-01-30

    Cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding WF146 protease, an extracellular subtilisin-like protease from the thermophile Bacillus sp. WF146, revealed that the WF146 protease was translated as a 416-amino acid precursor consisting of a putative 18-amino acid signal peptide, a 10-kDa N-terminal propeptide and a 32-kDa mature protease region. The mature WF146 protease shares a high degree of amino acid sequence identity with two psychrophilic subtilisins, S41 (68.2%) and S39 (65.4%), and a mesophilic subtilisin, SSII (67.1%). Significantly, these closely related proteases adapted to different temperatures all had four inserted surface loops not found in other subtilisins. However, unlike those of S41, S39 and SSII, the inserted loops of the WF146 protease possessed stabilizing features, such as the introduction of Pro residues into the loop regions. Interestingly, the WF146 protease contained five of the seven mutations previously found in a hyperstable variant of subtilisin S41 obtained by directed evolution. The proform of WF146 protease (pro-WF146 protease) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli in an inactive soluble form. After heat treatment, the 42-kDa pro-WF146 protease converted to a 32-kDa active mature form by processing the N-terminal propeptide. The purified mature WF146 protease hydrolyzed casein with an optimum temperature of 85 degrees C, and lost activity with a half-life of 30 min at 80 degrees C in the presence of 10 mM CaCl2.

  6. Preclinical Profile and Characterization of the Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Protease Inhibitor Asunaprevir (BMS-650032)

    PubMed Central

    Sheaffer, Amy K.; Friborg, Jacques; Hernandez, Dennis; Falk, Paul; Zhai, Guangzhi; Levine, Steven; Chaniewski, Susan; Yu, Fei; Barry, Diana; Chen, Chaoqun; Lee, Min S.; Mosure, Kathy; Sun, Li-Qiang; Sinz, Michael; Meanwell, Nicholas A.; Colonno, Richard J.; Knipe, Jay; Scola, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Asunaprevir (ASV; BMS-650032) is a hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease inhibitor that has demonstrated efficacy in patients chronically infected with HCV genotype 1 when combined with alfa interferon and/or the NS5A replication complex inhibitor daclatasvir. ASV competitively binds to the NS3/4A protease complex, with Ki values of 0.4 and 0.24 nM against recombinant enzymes representing genotypes 1a (H77) and 1b (J4L6S), respectively. Selectivity was demonstrated by the absence of any significant activity against the closely related GB virus-B NS3 protease and a panel of human serine or cysteine proteases. In cell culture, ASV inhibited replication of HCV replicons representing genotypes 1 and 4, with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) ranging from 1 to 4 nM, and had weaker activity against genotypes 2 and 3 (EC50, 67 to 1,162 nM). Selectivity was again demonstrated by the absence of activity (EC50, >12 μM) against a panel of other RNA viruses. ASV exhibited additive or synergistic activity in combination studies with alfa interferon, ribavirin, and/or inhibitors specifically targeting NS5A or NS5B. Plasma and tissue exposures in vivo in several animal species indicated that ASV displayed a hepatotropic disposition (liver-to-plasma ratios ranging from 40- to 359-fold across species). Twenty-four hours postdose, liver exposures across all species tested were ≥110-fold above the inhibitor EC50s observed with HCV genotype-1 replicons. Based on these virologic and exposure properties, ASV holds promise for future utility in a combination with other anti-HCV agents in the treatment of HCV-infected patients. PMID:22869577

  7. Determinants of Affinity and Proteolytic Stability in Interactions of Kunitz Family Protease Inhibitors with Mesotrypsin

    SciTech Connect

    Salameh, M.A.; Soares, A.; Navaneetham, D.; Sinha, D.; Walsh, P. N.; Radisky, E. S.

    2010-11-19

    An important functional property of protein protease inhibitors is their stability to proteolysis. Mesotrypsin is a human trypsin that has been implicated in the proteolytic inactivation of several protein protease inhibitors. We have found that bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), a Kunitz protease inhibitor, inhibits mesotrypsin very weakly and is slowly proteolyzed, whereas, despite close sequence and structural homology, the Kunitz protease inhibitor domain of the amyloid precursor protein (APPI) binds to mesotrypsin 100 times more tightly and is cleaved 300 times more rapidly. To define features responsible for these differences, we have assessed the binding and cleavage by mesotrypsin of APPI and BPTI reciprocally mutated at two nonidentical residues that make direct contact with the enzyme. We find that Arg at P{sub 1} (versus Lys) favors both tighter binding and more rapid cleavage, whereas Met (versus Arg) at P'{sub 2} favors tighter binding but has minimal effect on cleavage. Surprisingly, we find that the APPI scaffold greatly enhances proteolytic cleavage rates, independently of the binding loop. We draw thermodynamic additivity cycles analyzing the interdependence of P1 and P'{sub 2} substitutions and scaffold differences, finding multiple instances in which the contributions of these features are nonadditive. We also report the crystal structure of the mesotrypsin {center_dot} APPI complex, in which we find that the binding loop of APPI displays evidence of increased mobility compared with BPTI. Our data suggest that the enhanced vulnerability of APPI to mesotrypsin cleavage may derive from sequence differences in the scaffold that propagate increased flexibility and mobility to the binding loop.

  8. Structural basis of the resistance of an insect carboxypeptidase to plant protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bayés, Alex; Comellas-Bigler, Mireia; de la Vega, Monica Rodríguez; Maskos, Klaus; Bode, Wolfram; Aviles, Francesc X.; Jongsma, Maarten A.; Beekwilder, Jules; Vendrell, Josep

    2005-01-01

    Corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea), also called tomato fruitworm, is a common pest of many Solanaceous plants. This insect is known to adapt to the ingestion of plant serine protease inhibitors by using digestive proteases that are insensitive to inhibition. We have now identified a B-type carboxypeptidase of H. zea (CPBHz) insensitive to potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor (PCI) in corn earworm. To elucidate the structural features leading to the adaptation of the insect enzyme, the crystal structure of the recombinant CPBHz protein was determined by x-ray diffraction. CPBHz is a member of the A/B subfamily of metallocarboxypeptidases, which displays the characteristic metallocarboxypeptidase α/β-hydrolase fold, and does not differ essentially from the previously described Helicoverpa armigera CPA, which is very sensitive to PCI. The data provide structural insight into several functional properties of CPBHz. The high selectivity shown by CPBHz for C-terminal lysine residues is due to residue changes in the S1′ substrate specificity pocket that render it unable to accommodate the side chain of an arginine. The insensitivity of CPBHz to plant inhibitors is explained by the exceptional positioning of two of the main regions that stabilize other carboxypeptidase–PCI complexes, the β8-α9 loop, and α7 together with the α7-α8 loop. The rearrangement of these two regions leads to a displacement of the active-site entrance that impairs the proper interaction with PCI. This report explains a crystal structure of an insect protease and its adaptation to defensive plant protease inhibitors. PMID:16260742

  9. Structural basis of the resistance of an insect carboxypeptidase to plant protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bayés, Alex; Comellas-Bigler, Mireia; Rodríguez de la Vega, Monica; Maskos, Klaus; Bode, Wolfram; Aviles, Francesc X; Jongsma, Maarten A; Beekwilder, Jules; Vendrell, Josep

    2005-11-15

    Corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea), also called tomato fruitworm, is a common pest of many Solanaceous plants. This insect is known to adapt to the ingestion of plant serine protease inhibitors by using digestive proteases that are insensitive to inhibition. We have now identified a B-type carboxypeptidase of H. zea (CPBHz) insensitive to potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor (PCI) in corn earworm. To elucidate the structural features leading to the adaptation of the insect enzyme, the crystal structure of the recombinant CPBHz protein was determined by x-ray diffraction. CPBHz is a member of the A/B subfamily of metallocarboxypeptidases, which displays the characteristic metallocarboxypeptidase alpha/beta-hydrolase fold, and does not differ essentially from the previously described Helicoverpa armigera CPA, which is very sensitive to PCI. The data provide structural insight into several functional properties of CPBHz. The high selectivity shown by CPBHz for C-terminal lysine residues is due to residue changes in the S1' substrate specificity pocket that render it unable to accommodate the side chain of an arginine. The insensitivity of CPBHz to plant inhibitors is explained by the exceptional positioning of two of the main regions that stabilize other carboxypeptidase-PCI complexes, the beta8-alpha9 loop, and alpha7 together with the alpha7-alpha8 loop. The rearrangement of these two regions leads to a displacement of the active-site entrance that impairs the proper interaction with PCI. This report explains a crystal structure of an insect protease and its adaptation to defensive plant protease inhibitors.

  10. Thermodynamics of a Ca(2+)-dependent highly thermostable alkaline protease from a haloalkliphilic actinomycete.

    PubMed

    Gohel, S D; Singh, S P

    2015-01-01

    An alkaline protease from salt-tolerant alkaliphilic actinomycetes, Nocardiopsis alba OK-5 was purified by a single-step hydrophobic interaction chromatography and characterized. The purified protease with an estimated molecular mass of 20 kDa was optimally active at 70 °C in 0-3 M NaCl and 0-100 mM Ca(2+) displaying significant stability at 50-80 °C. The enzyme was stable at 80 °C in 100 mM Ca(2+) with Kd of 17 × 10(-3) and t1/2 of 32 min. The activation energy (Ea), enthalpy (ΔH*), and entropy (ΔS*) for the protease deactivation calculated in the presence of 200 mM Ca(2+) were 38.15 kJ/mol, 35.49 kJ/mol and 183.48 J/mol, respectively. The change in free energy (ΔG*) for protease deactivation at 60 °C in 200 mM Ca(2+) was 95.88 kJ/mol. Decrease in ΔH* reflected reduced cooperativity of deactivation and unfolding. The enzyme was intrinsically stable that counteracted heat denaturation by a weak cooperativity during the unfolding. Further, the enzyme was highly stable in the presence of various cations, surfactants, H2O2, β-mercaptoethanol, and commercial detergents. The compatibility of the enzyme with various cations, surfactants, and detergent matrices suggests its suitability as an additive in the detergents and peptide synthesis.

  11. Determinants of Affinity and Proteolytic Stability in Interactions of Kunitz Family Protease Inhibitors with Mesotrypsin

    SciTech Connect

    M Salameh; A Soares; D Navaneetham; D Sinha; P Walsh; E Radisky

    2011-12-31

    An important functional property of protein protease inhibitors is their stability to proteolysis. Mesotrypsin is a human trypsin that has been implicated in the proteolytic inactivation of several protein protease inhibitors. We have found that bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), a Kunitz protease inhibitor, inhibits mesotrypsin very weakly and is slowly proteolyzed, whereas, despite close sequence and structural homology, the Kunitz protease inhibitor domain of the amyloid precursor protein (APPI) binds to mesotrypsin 100 times more tightly and is cleaved 300 times more rapidly. To define features responsible for these differences, we have assessed the binding and cleavage by mesotrypsin of APPI and BPTI reciprocally mutated at two nonidentical residues that make direct contact with the enzyme. We find that Arg at P{sub 1} (versus Lys) favors both tighter binding and more rapid cleavage, whereas Met (versus Arg) at P'{sub 2} favors tighter binding but has minimal effect on cleavage. Surprisingly, we find that the APPI scaffold greatly enhances proteolytic cleavage rates, independently of the binding loop. We draw thermodynamic additivity cycles analyzing the interdependence of P{sub 1} and P'{sub 2} substitutions and scaffold differences, finding multiple instances in which the contributions of these features are nonadditive. We also report the crystal structure of the mesotrypsin-APPI complex, in which we find that the binding loop of APPI displays evidence of increased mobility compared with BPTI. Our data suggest that the enhanced vulnerability of APPI to mesotrypsin cleavage may derive from sequence differences in the scaffold that propagate increased flexibility and mobility to the binding loop.

  12. Reversible Unfolding of Rhomboid Intramembrane Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Rashmi; Arutyunova, Elena; Panwar, Pankaj; Gimpl, Katharina; Keller, Sandro; Lemieux, M. Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Denaturant-induced unfolding of helical membrane proteins provides insights into their mechanism of folding and domain organization, which take place in the chemically heterogeneous, anisotropic environment of a lipid membrane. Rhomboid proteases are intramembrane proteases that play key roles in various diseases. Crystal structures have revealed a compact helical bundle with a buried active site, which requires conformational changes for the cleavage of transmembrane substrates. A dimeric form of the rhomboid protease has been shown to be important for activity. In this study, we examine the mechanism of refolding for two distinct rhomboids to gain insight into their secondary structure-activity relationships. Although helicity is largely abolished in the unfolded states of both proteins, unfolding is completely reversible for HiGlpG but only partially reversible for PsAarA. Refolding of both proteins results in reassociation of the dimer, with a 90% regain of catalytic activity for HiGlpG but only a 70% regain for PsAarA. For both proteins, a broad, gradual transition from the native, folded state to the denatured, partly unfolded state was revealed with the aid of circular dichroism spectroscopy as a function of denaturant concentration, thus arguing against a classical two-state model as found for many globular soluble proteins. Thermal denaturation has irreversible destabilizing effects on both proteins, yet reveals important functional details regarding substrate accessibility to the buried active site. This concerted biophysical and functional analysis demonstrates that HiGlpG, with a simple six-transmembrane-segment organization, is more robust than PsAarA, which has seven predicted transmembrane segments, thus rendering HiGlpG amenable to in vitro studies of membrane-protein folding. PMID:27028647

  13. Evaluation of a C-reactive protein latex agglutination detection test with sera from patients with sexually transmitted diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Schalla, W O; Arko, R J; Thompson, S E

    1984-01-01

    A total of 149 sera, including 79 pre- and posttreatment sera from 33 patients with disseminated gonococcal infections, 18 from patients with uncomplicated gonococcal infections, 6 from patients with pelvic inflammatory disease, 4 from patients with genital Chlamydia trachomatis infections, and 42 from normal volunteers, were examined for C-reactive protein with a latex agglutination C-reactive protein detection kit (Difco Laboratories, Detroit, Mich.). Results were quantitated with LC-Partigen C-reactive protein radial immuno-diffusion plates (Calbiochem-Behring, La Jolla, Calif.). Positive latex agglutination results were observed in all of the pretreatment sera and some of the posttreatment sera of patients with disseminated gonococcal infections and in two sera from patients with pelvic inflammatory disease, which corresponded to quantitative C-reactive protein levels in the radial immunodiffusion plates. C-reactive protein levels were not detectable in the serum samples from normal volunteers or patients with uncomplicated gonococcal infections or genital chlamydial infections. Positive latex agglutination occurred as early as 20 s in sera with high C-reactive protein levels, and all positive results were observed within 90 s of the 3-min test limit. Positive latex test results were obtained with C-reactive protein levels as low as 1 mg/dl (10 micrograms/ml). PMID:6440907

  14. Differential Immune Reactivity Pattern of SW48 and SW1116 Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines with Colorectal Cancer Patients Sera

    PubMed Central

    Ghalamfarsa, Ghasem; Hosseini, Seyyed Vahid; Hamidinia, Maryam; Ghaderi, Abbas; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Mojtahedi, Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide. It is also known as the second leading cause of deaths as the early stage detection is not yet available by current methods. So identification of biomarkers can also be functional in early diagnosis and prognosis. Materials and Methods: We examined sera from 60 CRC patients of different stages as a source of auto-antibody as well as two human CRC cell lines with different invasive capacities (SW48 and SW1116) as the source of antigens. The pattern of immune reactivity in immuneblotting tests between mentioned cell lines and CRC patients’ sera were evaluated by ImageJ software. Results: The Immune reactivity pattern of two cell lines (SW48 and SW1116) with CRC patients’ sera were different in band intensities and the most immune reactivity intensity was observed in SW48 cell lysate with sera from Stage III CRC patients. Conclusion: Due to the humoral immune response, sera from Stage III CRC patients contained autoantibodies that demonstrated higher immune reactivity. Moreover, SW48 cell line with high aggressive behavior reacted to CRC patients’ sera with greater intensity compared with less aggressive behavior cell line (SW1116). Therefore, it is required to use other techniques such as two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. PMID:28217651

  15. Angiogenic activity of sera from extrinsic allergic alveolitis patients in relation to clinical, radiological, and functional pulmonary changes.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Tadeusz M; Demkow, Urszula; Filewska, Małgorzata; Bialas, Beata; Zycinska, Katarzyna; Radzikowska, Elzbieta; Wardyn, Andrzej K; Skopinska-Rozewska, Ewa

    2010-10-01

    Extrinsic allergic alveolitis (EAA) caused by inhaled organic environmental allergens can progress to a fibrotic end-stage lung disease. Neovascularization plays an important role in pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of sera from EAA patients on the angiogenic capability of normal peripheral human mononuclear cells (MNC) in relation to the clinical, radiological, and functional changes. The study population consisted of 30 EAA patients and 16 healthy volunteers. Routine pulmonary function tests were undertaken using ERS standards. As an angiogenic test, leukocyte-induced angiogenesis assay according to Sidky and Auerbach was used. Compared with sera from healthy volunteers, sera from our EAA patients significantly stimulated angiogenesis (P < 0.001). However, sera from healthy donors also stimulated angiogenesis compared to PBS (P < 0.001). No correlation was found between serum angiogenic activity and clinical symptoms manifested by evaluated patients. A decrease in DLco and in lung compliance in EAA patients was observed but no significant correlation between pulmonary functional tests and serum angiogenic activity measured by the number of microvessels or an angiogenesis index was found. However, the proangiogenic effect of sera from EAA patients differed depending on the stage of the disease and was stronger in patients with fibrotic changes. The present study suggests that angiogenesis plays a role in the pathogenesis of EAA. It could be possible that the increase in the angiogenic activity of sera from EAA patients depends on the phase of the disease.

  16. Multiple Proteases to Localize Oxidation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Liqing; Robinson, Renã A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins present in cellular environments with high levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and/or low levels of antioxidants are highly susceptible to oxidative post-translational modification (PTM). Irreversible oxidative PTMs can generate a complex distribution of modified protein molecules, recently termed as proteoforms. Using ubiquitin as a model system, we mapped oxidative modification sites using trypsin, Lys-C, and Glu-C peptides. Several M+16 Da proteoforms were detected as well as proteoforms that include other previously unidentified oxidative modifications. This work highlights the use of multiple protease digestions to give insights to the complexity of oxidative modifications possible in bottom-up analyses. PMID:25775238

  17. Rapid Release of Protease Inhibitors from Soybeans

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, David L.; Yang, Wen-Kuang; Foard, Donald E.; Lin, K.-T. -Davis

    1978-01-01

    Specific antisera were prepared against the Bowman-Birk trypsin inhibitor and four other trypsin inhibitors of low molecular weight isolated from soybeans (Glycine max L. cv. Tracy). These antisera were used to detect the presence and amount of the inhibitors in: (a) seeds and protein extracts of soybean meal; (b) seedlings; and (c) the water surrounding the seeds and roots of seedlings. Lectin activities in seeds, seedlings, and water were also determined at the same time as the protease inhibitor activities. By competitive inhibition of immunoprecipitation, the combined five low molecular weight protease inhibitors were found to constitute the following percentages of proteins (w/w): 6.3% in defatted soybean meal; 8.1% of the protein extracted from the meal by a buffer of pH 8.6; 8.3, 14.7, 15.2, 16.1, 17.2, and 18.9% of the protein in a lyophilisate of water in which seeds were incubated for 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 hours, respectively; 8.2% in a lyophilisate of water in which roots of seedlings grew for 20 days; 1.5% in cotyledons; and less than 0.1% in epicotyls, hypocotyls, and roots of 12-day-old seedlings. Hemagglutination activities, expressed as the lowest amount of protein required to give a positive agglutination of 0.2 ml of 2% rabbit red blood cells, were as follows: purified soybean lectin, 0.08 μg; lyophilisate of water in which seeds were incubated for 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 hours, 10, 2.5, 5, 5, and 2.5 μg, respectively; lyophilisate of water in which roots grew for 20 days, 5 μg; 12-day-old cotyledons, roots, epicotyls, and hypocotyls, 12.5, 100, >1,000, and >500 μg, respectively. The results indicate that a large amount of protease inhibitors as well as lectins are released from seeds during the first 8 hours of imbibition. Neither lima bean trypsin inhibitor (mol wt, 10,000) nor Kunitz soybean trypsin inhibitor (mol wt, 21,500) showed competitive inhibition in tests with antisera against low molecular weight soybean protease inhibitors

  18. Increased activity of unlinked Zika virus NS2B/NS3 protease compared to linked Zika virus protease.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, Benjamin D; Slater, Kristin; Spellmon, Nicholas; Holcomb, Joshua; Medapureddy, Prasanna; Muzzarelli, Kendall M; Yang, Zhe; Ovadia, Reuben; Amblard, Franck; Kovari, Iulia A; Schinazi, Raymond F; Kovari, Ladislau C

    2017-03-22

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus spread by daytime-active Aedes spp. mosquitoes such as A. aegypti and A. albopictus. Previously thought to be a mild infection, the latest ZIKV outbreak in the Americas is causally associated with more severe symptoms as well as severe birth defects, such as microcephaly. Currently no vaccine or antiviral exists. However, recent progress has demonstrated the viral NS2B/NS3 protease may be a suitable target for the development of small-molecule antiviral agents. To better understand the ZIKV protease, we expressed, purified, and characterized unlinked and linked NS2B/NS3 protease corresponding to an isolate from the recent outbreak in Puerto Rico. Unlinked ZIKV protease is more active and binds substrate with greater affinity than linked ZIKV protease. Therefore, we propose that unlinked ZIKV protease be used when evaluating or designing ZIKV protease inhibitors. Additionally, potent inhibitors of related viral proteases, like West Nile Virus and Dengue virus, may serve as advanced starting points to identify and develop ZIKV protease inhibitors.

  19. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    SciTech Connect

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-06-30

    The X-ray structure of protease-cleaved E. coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  20. Prevalence of neutralizing antibodies to 9 rotavirus strains representing 7 G-serotypes in sheep sera.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, M; Lanza, I; Alvarez, M; Cármenes, P

    1995-08-01

    Neutralizing antibodies to 9 rotavirus strains representing serotypes G1, G3, G5, G6, G8, G9, and G10 were investigated in 212 ovine serum samples from 3 age groups, 1-week-old lambs, 2- to 3-months-old lambs and adult sheep. All sera from 1-week-old lambs had neutralizing antibodies to all 9 rotavirus strains. Both neutralizing antibody titers and prevalences to all 9 strains markedly decreased in the 2- to 3-months-old lamb group and increased again in the adult sheep group. Also, adult sheep sera neutralized a larger number of rotavirus strains than 2- to 3-months-old lamb sera. The highest neutralizing antibody titers and prevalences were found to strains B223 and K923, representing serotype G10, to strain RRV, representing serotype G3, and to strain NCDV, representing serotype G6, indicating that these could be the predominant 3 rotavirus serotypes in Spanish sheep. The rotavirus serotypes infecting sheep observed by us differ from those described for cattle, where G6 is the most prevalent serotype followed by G10, and G3 has been seldom found. Very low prevalences were observed for strains WA and OSU representing serotypes G1 and G5 respectively, suggesting that they probably do not infect sheep and neutralizing antibodies found are derived from heterotypic responses to other serotypes. Intermediate prevalences and titers were found to strains UK (serotype G6), 69M (serotype G8) and WI61 (serotype G9). Neutralizing antibodies distinguished between different strains sharing their VP7 specificity: B223 and K923, a bovine and an ovine serotype G10 strains, and NCDV and UK, two serotype G6 bovine rotavirus strains with different VP4 antigen.

  1. Detection of tumor-specific autoantibodies in sera of patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Nagashio, Ryo; Sato, Yuichi; Jiang, Shi-Xu; Ryuge, Shinichiro; Kodera, Yoshio; Maeda, Tadakazu; Nakajima, Takashi

    2008-12-01

    The presence of autoantibodies (AAs) in sera from two pulmonary carcinoma patients, adenocarcinoma (AD) and small cell carcinoma (SCLC) was screened by immunoblotting using cell lysate of four cell lines (LCN1, large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC); N231, SCLC; A549, AD; RERF-LC-AI, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)). To identify the antigens recognized by AAs, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was immunoblotted and target spots were cut out from the membrane and gel. After trypsin digestion, the proteins were analyzed by mass-spectrometry using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometer. By this method, cytokeratin18 (CK18) and villin1 were identified with AAs in sera from patients with AD and SCLC, respectively. Thus, the expressions of CK18 and villin1 were further immunohistochemically studied on 124 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded pulmonary carcinomas of various histologic types (44 AD, 27 SCC, 29 SCLC, and 34 LCNEC) using commercially available CK18 and villin1 antibodies. Positive CK18 immunostaining was observed in almost all cases with staining intensities significantly higher in AD and LCNEC than in SCC and SCLC. Villin1 was detected in 17/44 (38.6%) of AD and 21/34 (61.8%) of LCNEC, respectively, while in only one each of SCLC and SCC. Thus, villin1 and CK18 may be useful markers to distinguish LCNEC/AD from SCLC/SCC, and the present method might be useful to identify specific tumor-associated molecules in sera from pulmonary carcinoma patients with different histologic types.

  2. Efficient inactivation of viruses and mycoplasma in animal sera using UVC irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kurth, J; Waldmann, R; Heith, J; Mausbach, K; Burian, R

    1999-01-01

    Transmission of viruses by animal sera represents a considerable risk for humans and animals particularly when the serum is used for the production of pharmaceutical products such as vaccines. Procedures applicable for inactivating large numbers of different viruses, both enveloped and non-enveloped, are therefore mandatory. For this purpose we have developed and validated UVC irradiation as the virus-inactivation procedure of choice for serum to be used in an industrial setting. Spiking experiments in foetal calf serum (FCS) were performed by independent contract laboratories and revealed constantly high clearance rates for various viruses such as bovine parvovirus, parainfluenza type III virus, bovine diarrhoea virus, foot-and-mouth disease virus and different forms of mycoplasmas. UVC-treated sera maintained their growth-promoting activities for various cell types (MRC-5, Vero, CHO). Conventional growth curves generated in the presence of 10% and 1% UVC-treated FCS differed only slightly from controls, indicating the lack of significant damage during UVC exposure. Experiments using a sensitive photometric-based acid phosphatase assay (APA), which correlates well with the more tedious cell counting procedure, confirmed these findings even in the presence of minimal serum requirements. UVC treatment of animal sera appears advantageous compared to currently recommended inactivation procedures, such as Gamma irradiation, for at least three reasons: (i) it possesses a high inactivation capacity for parvoviruses, a pathogen that cannot be destroyed easily by conventional methods; (ii) it causes no noticeable impairment in cell growth and (iii) it can be performed in a controlled manner at the production site.

  3. Phages and HIV-1: From Display to Interplay

    PubMed Central

    Delhalle, Sylvie; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Chevigné, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The complex hide-and-seek game between HIV-1 and the host immune system has impaired the development of an efficient vaccine. In addition, the high variability of the virus impedes the long-term control of viral replication by small antiviral drugs. For more than 20 years, phage display technology has been intensively used in the field of HIV-1 to explore the epitope landscape recognized by monoclonal and polyclonal HIV-1-specific antibodies, thereby providing precious data about immunodominant and neutralizing epitopes. In parallel, biopanning experiments with various combinatorial or antibody fragment libraries were conducted on viral targets as well as host receptors to identify HIV-1 inhibitors. Besides these applications, phage display technology has been applied to characterize the enzymatic specificity of the HIV-1 protease. Phage particles also represent valuable alternative carriers displaying various HIV-1 antigens to the immune system and eliciting antiviral responses. This review presents and summarizes the different studies conducted with regard to the nature of phage libraries, target display mode and biopanning procedures. PMID:22606007

  4. Augmenting digital displays with computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing

    As we inevitably step deeper and deeper into a world connected via the Internet, more and more information will be exchanged digitally. Displays are the interface between digital information and each individual. Naturally, one fundamental goal of displays is to reproduce information as realistically as possible since humans still care a lot about what happens in the real world. Human eyes are the receiving end of such information exchange; therefore it is impossible to study displays without studying the human visual system. In fact, the design of displays is rather closely coupled with what human eyes are capable of perceiving. For example, we are less interested in building displays that emit light in the invisible spectrum. This dissertation explores how we can augment displays with computation, which takes both display hardware and the human visual system into consideration. Four novel projects on display technologies are included in this dissertation: First, we propose a software-based approach to driving multiview autostereoscopic displays. Our display algorithm can dynamically assign views to hardware display zones based on multiple observers' current head positions, substantially reducing crosstalk and stereo inversion. Second, we present a dense projector array that creates a seamless 3D viewing experience for multiple viewers. We smoothly interpolate the set of viewer heights and distances on a per-vertex basis across the arrays field of view, reducing image distortion, crosstalk, and artifacts from tracking errors. Third, we propose a method for high dynamic range display calibration that takes into account the variation of the chrominance error over luminance. We propose a data structure for enabling efficient representation and querying of the calibration function, which also allows user-guided balancing between memory consumption and the amount of computation. Fourth, we present user studies that demonstrate that the ˜ 60 Hz critical flicker fusion

  5. Regulated proteolysis by cortical granule serine protease 1 at fertilization.

    PubMed

    Haley, Sheila A; Wessel, Gary M

    2004-05-01

    Cortical granules are specialized organelles whose contents interact with the extracellular matrix of the fertilized egg to form the block to polyspermy. In sea urchins, the granule contents form a fertilization envelope (FE), and this construction is critically dependent upon protease activity. An autocatalytic serine protease, cortical granule serine protease 1 (CGSP1), has been identified in the cortical granules of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus eggs, and here we examined the regulation of the protease activity and tested potential target substrates of CGSP1. We found that CGSP1 is stored in its full-length, enzymatically quiescent form in the granule, and is inactive at pH 6.5 or below. We determined the pH of the cortical granule by fluorescent indicators and micro-pH probe measurements and found the granules to be pH 5.5, a condition inhibitory to CGSP1 activity. Exposure of the protease to the pH of seawater (pH 8.0) at exocytosis immediately activates the protease. Activation of eggs at pH 6.5 or lower blocks activation of the protease and the resultant FE phenotypes are indistinguishable from a protease-null phenotype. We find that native cortical granule targets of the protease are beta-1,3 glucanase, ovoperoxidase, and the protease itself, but the structural proteins of the granule are not proteolyzed by CGSP1. Whole mount immunolocalization experiments demonstrate that inhibition of CGSP1 activity affects the localization of ovoperoxidase but does not alter targeting of structural proteins to the FE. The mistargeting of ovoperoxidase may lead to spurious peroxidative cross-linking activity and contribute to the lethality observed in protease-null cells. Thus, CGSP1 is proteolytically active only when secreted, due to the low pH of the cortical granules, and it has a small population of targets for cleavage within the cortical granules.

  6. Secretion of Proteases by an Opportunistic Fungal Pathogen Scedosporium aurantiacum

    PubMed Central

    Kautto, Liisa; Nevalainen, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Scedosporium aurantiacum is an opportunistic filamentous fungus increasingly isolated from the sputum of cystic fibrosis patients, and is especially prevalent in Australia. At the moment, very little is known about the infection mechanism of this fungus. Secreted proteases have been shown to contribute to fungal virulence in several studies with other fungi. Here we have compared the profiles of proteases secreted by a clinical isolate Scedosporium aurantiacum (WM 06.482) and an environmental strain (WM 10.136) grown on a synthetic cystic fibrosis sputum medium supplemented with casein or mucin. Protease activity was assessed using class-specific substrates and inhibitors. Subtilisin-like and trypsin-like serine protease activity was detected in all cultures. The greatest difference in the secretion of proteases between the two strains occurred in mucin-supplemented medium, where the activities of the elastase-like, trypsin-like and aspartic proteases were, overall, 2.5–75 fold higher in the clinical strain compared to the environmental strain. Proteases secreted by the two strains in the mucin-supplemented medium were further analyzed by mass spectrometry. Six homologs of fungal proteases were identified from the clinical strain and five from the environmental strain. Of these, three were common for both strains including a subtilisin peptidase, a putative leucine aminopeptidase and a PA-SaNapH-like protease. Trypsin-like protease was identified by mass spectrometry only in the clinical isolate even though trypsin-like activity was present in all cultures. In contrast, high elastase-like activity was measured in the culture supernatant of the clinical strain but could not be identified by mass spectrometry searching against other fungi in the NCBI database. Future availability of an annotated genome will help finalise identification of the S. aurantiacum proteases. PMID:28060882

  7. Secretion of Proteases by an Opportunistic Fungal Pathogen Scedosporium aurantiacum.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhiping; Kautto, Liisa; Nevalainen, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Scedosporium aurantiacum is an opportunistic filamentous fungus increasingly isolated from the sputum of cystic fibrosis patients, and is especially prevalent in Australia. At the moment, very little is known about the infection mechanism of this fungus. Secreted proteases have been shown to contribute to fungal virulence in several studies with other fungi. Here we have compared the profiles of proteases secreted by a clinical isolate Scedosporium aurantiacum (WM 06.482) and an environmental strain (WM 10.136) grown on a synthetic cystic fibrosis sputum medium supplemented with casein or mucin. Protease activity was assessed using class-specific substrates and inhibitors. Subtilisin-like and trypsin-like serine protease activity was detected in all cultures. The greatest difference in the secretion of proteases between the two strains occurred in mucin-supplemented medium, where the activities of the elastase-like, trypsin-like and aspartic proteases were, overall, 2.5-75 fold higher in the clinical strain compared to the environmental strain. Proteases secreted by the two strains in the mucin-supplemented medium were further analyzed by mass spectrometry. Six homologs of fungal proteases were identified from the clinical strain and five from the environmental strain. Of these, three were common for both strains including a subtilisin peptidase, a putative leucine aminopeptidase and a PA-SaNapH-like protease. Trypsin-like protease was identified by mass spectrometry only in the clinical isolate even though trypsin-like activity was present in all cultures. In contrast, high elastase-like activity was measured in the culture supernatant of the clinical strain but could not be identified by mass spectrometry searching against other fungi in the NCBI database. Future availability of an annotated genome will help finalise identification of the S. aurantiacum proteases.

  8. Detection of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin in human fecal samples and anti-enterotoxin in sera.

    PubMed Central

    Naik, H S; Duncan, C L

    1978-01-01

    By using counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP), Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin was successfully demonstrated in fecal samples collected within 1 day of attack from sick individuals involved in a bacteriologically and epidemiologically proven outbreak of C. perfringens food poisoning. In contrast, enterotoxin was not demonstrable in fecal samples of apparently healthy individuals both at high- and low-risk exposure to the organism and enterotoxin or in fecal samples collected 4 to 5 days after a food poisoning outbreak. A 100% prevalence of C. perfringens anti-enterotoxin in sera of human volunteers at high- as well as low-risk exposure to the organism and enterotoxin was recorded with CIEP. PMID:211142

  9. Simultaneous determination of iron and copper in children's sera by FAAS.

    PubMed

    Luterotti, Svjetlana; Kordić, Tončica Vukman; Dodig, Slavica

    2011-03-01

    A new and simple flame atomic-absorption spectrometric (FAAS) method is proposed for simultaneous determination of iron and copper in children's sera. It is based on single-step sample pretreatment (deproteinization with 3 mol L-1 HCl, ratio 1:1) and single-step calibration using 1.5 mol L-1 HCl standard. During method's optimization a short multifactorial design experiment was used. The proposed method assures accuracy, sensitivity and precision comparable to that of the reference methods. The new approach is simple and time-, labour- and serum-saving, the latter being especially important in pediatric diagnostics.

  10. PACS displays: how to select the right display technology.

    PubMed

    Hirschorn, David S; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Flynn, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    The medical imaging display is a precision instrument with many features not found in commercial-grade displays. The more one understands what these features are and their corresponding clinical value, the better one can make a purchase decision. None of these displays maintain themselves for 5 years or more without some degree of automatic or manual performance testing. Routine calibration conformance checks are beginning to be mandated by the departments of health of many states. Most manufacturers provide mechanisms to perform these checks and keep track of their results, some more easily than others. A consistent display brightness of about 400 cd/m(2) and close conformance to the DICOM curve are the key components of a successful check. Displays are typically characterized by the number of pixels they contain, usually 2, 3, or 5 megapixels, but this is the least useful determinant of image quality. What matters most is the size of the pixels and the size of the whole display, which should be selected on the basis of the typical viewing distance. The farther one's eyes are from the display, the larger the pixels and the overall display size can be while still feeding the eye as much information as it can see. Care should be taken to use the appropriate display in a given setting for the clinical purpose at hand.

  11. 6000 x 2000 display prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuishi, Tetsuya; Small, David; MacNeil, Ronald L.

    1992-07-01

    While electronic technology has evolved enormously, there are no displays which are both very large and of high resolution. This paper describes our 6 K X 2 K, 60 inch by 20 inch, display prototype which consists of three 2 K X 2 K CRT displays connected seamlessly. Using a custom frame and a half-silvered mirror, the three images are joined by reflecting the center display image from above and transmitting the two side display images directly. Two problems must be solved to achieve a truly seamless effect. First, viewers can still see seams between regular screen images even if the displays are strictly aligned. Second, each physical display has a different geometrical space, and the center display image must be drawn in reverse because it will be reflected by the mirror. We developed a seamless window system to solve these problems. The window system displays overlapping images with translucent borders to enable better blending of the three display screens. Custom application software treats the system as a single 6 K X 2 K area. A concept named ''virtual framebuffer architecture'' enables us to implement the two kinds of seamlessness easily. To evaluate the visual effects, we developed some application systems which include video in a window, stereo sound and a high speed channel to the Connection Machine II for image processing.

  12. Display Parameters and Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadur, Birendra

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * HUMAN FACTORS * Anthropometry * Sensory * Cognitive * Discussions * THE HUMAN VISUAL SYSTEM - CAPABILITIES AND LIMITATIONS * Cornea * Pupil and Iris * Lens * Vitreous Humor * Retina * RODS - NIGHT VISION * CONES - DAY VISION * RODS AND CONES - TWILIGHT VISION * VISUAL PIGMENTS * MACULA * BLOOD * CHOROID COAT * Visual Signal Processing * Pathways to the Brain * Spatial Vision * Temporal Vision * Colour Vision * Colour Blindness * DICHROMATISM * Protanopia * Deuteranopia * Tritanopia * ANOMALOUS TRICHROMATISM * Protanomaly * Deuteranomaly * Tritanomaly * CONE MONOCHROMATISM * ROD MONOCHROMATISM * Using Colour Effectively * COLOUR MIXTURES AND THE CHROMATICITY DIAGRAM * Colour Matching Functions and Chromaticity Co-ordinates * CIE 1931 Colour Space * CIE PRIMARIES * CIE COLOUR MATCHING FUNCTIONS AND CHROMATICITY CO-ORDINATES * METHODS FOR DETERMINING TRISTIMULUS VALUES AND COLOUR CO-ORDINATES * Spectral Power Distribution Method * Filter Method * CIE 1931 CHROMATICITY DIAGRAM * ADDITIVE COLOUR MIXTURE * CIE 1976 Chromaticity Diagram * CIE Uniform Colour Spaces and Colour Difference Formulae * CIELUV OR L*u*v* * CIELAB OR L*a*b* * CIE COLOUR DIFFERENCE FORMULAE * Colour Temperature and CIE Standard Illuminants and source * RADIOMETRIC AND PHOTOMETRIC QUANTITIES * Photopic (Vλ and Scotopic (Vλ') Luminous Efficiency Function * Photometric and Radiometric Flux * Luminous and Radiant Intensities * Incidence: Illuminance and Irradiance * Exitance or Emittance (M) * Luminance and Radiance * ERGONOMIC REQUIREMENTS OF DISPLAYS * ELECTRO-OPTICAL PARAMETERS AND REQUIREMENTS * Contrast and Contrast Ratio * Luminance and Brightness * Colour Contrast and Chromaticity * Glare * Other Aspects of Legibility * SHAPE AND SIZE OF CHARACTERS * DEFECTS AND BLEMISHES * FLICKER AND DISTORTION * ANGLE OF VIEW * Switching Speed * Threshold and Threshold Characteristic * Measurement Techniques For Electro-optical Parameters * RADIOMETRIC

  13. Partial purification and characterization of extracellular protease from a halophilic and thermotolerant strain Streptomyces pseudogrisiolus NRC-15.

    PubMed

    Awad, Hassan M; Mostafa, El-Sayed E; Saad, Moataza M; Selim, Mohsen H; Hassan, Helmy M

    2013-08-01

    An alkaline protease was purified from a halophilic and thermotolerant potent alkaline protease-producing strain Streptomyces pseudogrisiolus NRC-15 using ammonium sulphate precipitation and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography. The enzyme was purified to 77.24-folds with a yield of 91.8% and the specific activity was 112 U/mg of protein. The protease showed a single band on SDS-PAGE with its molecular mass at 20 kDa and exhibited a maximum relative activity of 100% using casein as a substrate and. The enzyme had an optimum pH of 9.5 and displayed optimum activity at 50 degrees C. The enzyme activity was completely inhibited by the serine protease inhibitor PMSF, suggesting the presence of serine residue in the active site. The enzyme activity was increased by the metal ions Ca2+, Co2+, K+ and Mg2+. The enzyme significantly enhanced the removal of stains when used with wheel detergent, indicating the potential of the enzyme for using as a laundry detergent additive to improve the performance of heavy-duty laundry detergent.

  14. Preparation of Antioxidant Peptides from Salmon Byproducts with Bacterial Extracellular Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ribang; Chen, Leilei; Liu, Dan; Huang, Jiafeng; Zhang, Jiang; Xiao, Xiao; Lei, Ming; Chen, Yuelin; He, Hailun

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial extracellular proteases from six strains of marine bacteria and seven strains of terrestrial bacteria were prepared through fermentation. Proteases were analyzed through substrate immersing zymography and used to hydrolyze the collagen and muscle proteins from a salmon skin byproduct, respectively. Collagen could be degraded much more easily than muscle protein, but it commonly showed weaker antioxidant capability. The hydrolysate of muscle proteins was prepared with crude enzymes from Pseudoalteromonas sp. SQN1 displayed the strongest activity of antioxidant in DPPH and hydroxyl radical scavenging assays (74.06% ± 1.14% and 69.71% ± 1.97%), but did not perform well in Fe2+ chelating assay. The antioxidant fractions were purified through ultrafiltration, cation exchange chromatography, and size exclusion chromatography gradually, and the final purified fraction U2-S2-I displayed strong activity of antioxidant in DPPH, hydroxyl radical scavenging assays (IC50 = 0.263 ± 0.018 mg/mL and 0.512 ± 0.055 mg/mL), and oxygen radical absorption capability assay (1.960 ± 0.381 mmol·TE/g). The final purified fraction U2-S2-I possessed the capability to protect plasmid DNA against the damage of hydroxyl radical and its effect was similar to that of the original hydrolysis product. It indicated that U2-S2-I might be the major active fraction of the hydrolysate. This study proved that bacterial extracellular proteases could be utilized in hydrolysis of a salmon byproduct. Compared with collagen, muscle proteins was an ideal material used as an enzymatic substrate to prepare antioxidant peptides. PMID:28085023

  15. Immunoglobulin (Ig)G purified from human sera mirrors intravenous Ig human leucocyte antigen (HLA) reactivity and recognizes one's own HLA types, but may be masked by Fab complementarity-determining region peptide in the native sera.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, M H; Terasaki, P I; Maehara, C Y; Jucaud, V; Kawakita, S; Pham, T; Yamashita, W

    2015-02-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) reacted with a wide array of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles, in contrast to normal sera, due possibly to the purification of IgG from the pooled plasma. The reactivity of IgG purified from normal sera was compared with that of native sera to determine whether any serum factors mask the HLA reactivity of anti-HLA IgG and whether IgG purified from sera can recognize the HLA types of the corresponding donors. The purified IgG, unlike native sera, mirrored IVIg reactivity to a wide array of HLA-I/-II alleles, indicating that anti-HLA IgG may be masked in normal sera - either by peptides derived from soluble HLA or by those from antibodies. A < 3 kDa peptide from the complementarity-determining region (CDR) of the Fab region of IgG (but not the HLA peptides) masked HLA recognition by the purified IgG. Most importantly, some of the anti-HLA IgG purified from normal sera - and serum IgG from a few donors - indeed recognized the HLA types of the corresponding donors, confirming the presence of auto-HLA antibodies. Comparison of HLA types with the profile of HLA antibodies showed auto-HLA IgG to the donors' HLA antigens in this order of frequency: DPA (80%), DQA (71%), DRB345 (67%), DQB (57%), Cw (50%), DBP (43%), DRB1 (21%), A (14%) and B (7%). The auto-HLA antibodies, when unmasked in vivo, may perform immunoregulatory functions similar to those of therapeutic preparations of IVIg.

  16. Biochemical and molecular characterization of a detergent-stable serine alkaline protease from Bacillus pumilus CBS with high catalytic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Jaouadi, Bassem; Ellouz-Chaabouni, Semia; Rhimi, Moez; Bejar, Samir

    2008-09-01

    an ORF of 1149bp encoding a protein of 383 aa organized into a signal peptide (29 aa), a pro-protein (79 aa) and a mature enzyme (275 aa). The deduced amino acid sequence inspection displays an important homology with other bacterial proteases. The highest homology of 98.1% was found with BPP-A protease from Bacillus pumilus MS-1, with only 8 aa of difference.

  17. Structural determinants of MALT1 protease activity.

    PubMed

    Wiesmann, Christian; Leder, Lukas; Blank, Jutta; Bernardi, Anna; Melkko, Samu; Decock, Arnaud; D'Arcy, Allan; Villard, Frederic; Erbel, Paulus; Hughes, Nicola; Freuler, Felix; Nikolay, Rainer; Alves, Juliano; Bornancin, Frederic; Renatus, Martin

    2012-05-25

    The formation of the CBM (CARD11-BCL10-MALT1) complex is pivotal for antigen-receptor-mediated activation of the transcription factor NF-κB. Signaling is dependent on MALT1 (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1), which not only acts as a scaffolding protein but also possesses proteolytic activity mediated by its caspase-like domain. It remained unclear how the CBM activates MALT1. Here, we provide biochemical and structural evidence that MALT1 activation is dependent on its dimerization and show that mutations at the dimer interface abrogate activity in cells. The unliganded protease presents itself in a dimeric yet inactive state and undergoes substantial conformational changes upon substrate binding. These structural changes also affect the conformation of the C-terminal Ig-like domain, a domain that is required for MALT1 activity. Binding to the active site is coupled to a relative movement of caspase and Ig-like domains. MALT1 binding partners thus may have the potential of tuning MALT1 protease activity without binding directly to the caspase domain.

  18. Efficacy of immune sera from human immunoglobulin transgenic mice immunized with a peptide mimotope of Cryptococcus neoformans glucuronoxylomannan.

    PubMed

    Maitta, Robert W; Datta, Kausik; Pirofski, Liise-Anne

    2004-09-28

    The efficacy of antibody mediated immunity against Cryptococcus neoformans has not been established experimentally for human antibodies. Our group has previously shown that immunization with a conjugate consisting of a peptide mimotope of the C. neoformans capsular polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), P13, and diphtheria toxoid (P13-DT) prolonged survival of transgenic mice with human immunoglobulin loci, XenoMouse mice, which were challenged with a lethal dose of C. neoformans. In the study reported herein, we determined the efficacy of human antibodies in the sera of immunized XenoMouse mice against C. neoformans in passive transfer experiments in naïve BALB/c mice. Survival studies were performed with sera from XenoMouse mice expressing human IgG2/kappa (G2/k mice) or IgG4/kappa (G4/k mice) that had been immunized with P13-tetanus toxoid (TT)/Alhydrogel with or without CpG, and G2/k mice that had been immunized with P13-DT/Alhydrogel/CpG or Alhydrogel/CpG, obtained on day 7 (early sera) and days 30 or 35-59 (late sera) after primary immunization. Compared to mice receiving sera from G2/k-PBS-treated mice, the survival of naïve mice was prolonged by both early and late sera from G2/k-P13-DT/Alhydrogel/CpG-immunized mice, but only late sera from G2/k-P13-TT/Alhydrogel/CpG-immunized mice. Late, but not early sera from G2/k-Alhydrogel/CpG-immunized mice also prolonged survival. For all sera, prolongation of survival was associated with GXM-specific serum IgM. Sera from G2/k mice that received P13-TT without CpG, and all groups of G4/k mice had low to undetectable levels of antibody to GXM and were not protective. Our findings suggest that GXM-specific human IgM may be a functional mediator of protection against C. neoformans.

  19. Laser illuminated flat panel display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    A 10 inch laser illuminated flat panel Planar Optic Display (POD) screen has been constructed and tested. This POD screen technology is an entirely new concept in display technology. Although the initial display is flat and made of glass, this technology lends itself to applications where a plastic display might be wrapped around the viewer. The display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optical waveguides where each glass waveguide represents a vertical line of resolution. A black cladding layer, having a lower index of refraction, is placed between each waveguide layer. Since the cladding makes the screen surface black, the contrast is high. The prototype display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately I inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  20. Effect of proteases on the. beta. -thromboglobulin radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Donlon, J.A.; Helgeson, E.A.; Donlon, M.A.

    1985-02-11

    Rat peritoneal mast cells and mast cell granules were evaluated by radioimmunoassay for the presence of ..beta..-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4. The initial assays indicated that a ..beta..-thromboglobulin cross reacting material was released from mast cells by compound 48/80 in a similar dose-dependent manner as histamine release. The material was also found to be associated with purified granules. However, the use of protease inhibitors in the buffers completely abolished the positive assays. Further evaluation of the effects of various proteases on the ..beta..-thromboglobulin assay indicated that elastase would also generate a false positive assay which could then be neutralized by the use of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin as a protease inhibitor. There was no protease effect on the platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay which always showed no detectable amounts with mast cells, granules or proteases. These results clearly indicate the artifactual positive assays which can arise when using certain radioimmunoassay tests in the presence of cell proteases. The use of protease inhibitors is a necessary control when applying a radioimmunoassay to a system with potentially active proteases. 24 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  1. Expression and characterization of Coprothermobacter proteolyticus alkaline serine protease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    TECHNICAL ABSTRACT A putative protease gene (aprE) from the thermophilic bacterium Coprothermobacter proteolyticus was cloned and expressed in Bacillus subtilis. The enzyme was determined to be a serine protease based on inhibition by PMSF. Biochemical characterization demonstrated the enzyme had...

  2. Flat panel planar optic display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1994-11-01

    A prototype 10 inch flat panel Planar Optic Display, (POD), screen has been constructed and tested. This display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optic class sheets bonded together with a cladding layer between each sheet where each glass sheet represents a vertical line of resolution. The display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately 1 inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  3. Prototyping user displays using CLIPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosta, Charles P.; Miller, Ross; Krolak, Patrick; Vesty, Matt

    1990-01-01

    CLIPS is being used as an integral module of a rapid prototyping system. The prototyping system consists of a display manager for object browsing, a graph program for displaying line and bar charts, and a communications server for routing messages between modules. A CLIPS simulation of a physical model provides dynamic control of the user's display. Currently, a project is well underway to prototype the Advanced Automation System (AAS) for the Federal Aviation Administration.

  4. Neutralizing Antibodies from the Sera of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected Individuals Bind to Monomeric gp120 and Oligomeric gp140

    PubMed Central

    Stamatos, Nicholas M.; Mascola, John R.; Kalyanaraman, Vaniambadi S.; Louder, Mark K.; Frampton, Lynn M.; Birx, Deborah L.; VanCott, Thomas C.

    1998-01-01

    Antibodies that neutralize primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) appear during HIV-1 infection but are difficult to elicit by immunization with current vaccine products comprised of monomeric forms of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120. The limited neutralizing antibody response generated by gp120 vaccine products could be due to the absence or inaccessibility of the relevant epitopes. To determine whether neutralizing antibodies from HIV-1-infected patients bind to epitopes accessible on monomeric gp120 and/or oligomeric gp140 (ogp140), purified total immunoglobulin from the sera of two HIV-1-infected patients as well as pooled HIV immune globulin were selectively depleted of antibodies which bound to immobilized gp120 or ogp140. After passage of each immunoglobulin preparation through the respective columns, antibody titers against gp120 and ogp140 were specifically reduced at least 128-fold. The gp120- and gp140-depleted antibody fraction from each serum displayed reduced neutralization activity against three primary and two T-cell line-adapted (TCLA) HIV-1 isolates. Significant residual neutralizing activity, however, persisted in the depleted sera, indicating additional neutralizing antibody specificities. gp120- and ogp140-specific antibodies eluted from each column neutralized both primary and TCLA viruses. These data demonstrate the presence and accessibility of epitopes on both monomeric gp120 and ogp140 that are specific for antibodies that are capable of neutralizing primary isolates of HIV-1. Thus, the difficulties associated with eliciting neutralizing antibodies by using current monomeric gp120 subunit vaccines may be related less to improper protein structure and more to ineffective immunogen formulation and/or presentation. PMID:9811699

  5. Program For A Pushbutton Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busquets, Anthony M.; Luck, William S., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Programmable Display Pushbutton (PDP) is pushbutton device available from Micro Switch having programmable 16X35 matrix of light-emitting diodes on pushbutton surface. Any desired legends display on PDP's, producing user-friendly applications reducing need for dedicated manual controls. Interacts with operator, calls for correct response before transmitting next message. Both simple manual control and sophisticated programmable link between operator and host system. Programmable Display Pushbutton Legend Editor (PDPE) computer program used to create light-emitting-diode (LED) displays for pushbuttons. Written in FORTRAN.

  6. Liquid crystal Fresnel lens display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Qian; Abhishek Kumar, Srivastava; Alwin Tam, Ming-Wai; Zheng, Zhi-Gang; Shen, Dong; Vladimir, Chigrinov G.; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2016-09-01

    A novel see-through display with a liquid crystal lens array was proposed. A liquid crystal Fresnel lens display (LCFLD) with a holographic screen was demonstrated. The proposed display system has high efficiency, simple fabrication, and low manufacturing cost due to the absence of a polarizer and color filter. Project supported by Partner State Key Laboratory on Advanced Displays and Optoelectronics Technologies HKUST, China, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61435008 and 61575063), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. WM1514036).

  7. The display of tactile information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrick, Carl E.

    1991-01-01

    There are a number of examples of natural tactile displays that can five us some insights about the solid geometry of touch, and recent experimental work on the subject has extended our thinking considerably. The concern of here is, however, more with synthetic or artificial displays for the production of a virtual environment. Features of synthetic displays that have enjoyed some success in one of the following two enterprises are discussed: the study of the spatio-temporal dimensions of stimuli that afford accurate and rapid processing of environmental information, or the use of displays in the design of sensory aids for disabled persons.

  8. Miniature information displays: primary applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvelda, Phillip; Lewis, Nancy D.

    1998-04-01

    Positioned to replace current liquid crystal display technology in many applications, miniature information displays have evolved to provide several truly portable platforms for the world's growing personal computing and communication needs. The technology and functionality of handheld computer and communicator systems has finally surpassed many of the standards that were originally established for desktop systems. In these new consumer electronics, performance, display size, packaging, power consumption, and cost have always been limiting factors for fabricating genuinely portable devices. The rapidly growing miniature information display manufacturing industry is making it possible to bring a wide range of highly anticipated new products to new markets.

  9. Maintenance Procedure Display: Head Mounted Display (HMD) Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Milrian; Litaker, Harry L., Jr.; Solem, Jody A.; Holden, Kritina L.; Hoffman, Ronald R.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing maintenance procedures for head mounted displays is shown. The topics include: 1) Study Goals; 2) Near Eye Displays (HMDs); 3) Design; 4) Phase I-Evaluation Methods; 5) Phase 1 Results; 6) Improved HMD Mounting; 7) Phase 2 -Evaluation Methods; 8) Phase 2 Preliminary Results; and 9) Next Steps.

  10. Characterization of two different agglutinators in the latex fixation test, occurring in normal human sera

    PubMed Central

    Klein, F.; Valkenburg, H. A.; Van Zwet, Theda L.; Lafeber, Geertruida J. M.

    1966-01-01

    Using a sensitive modification of the latex fixation test it is possible to detect a small agglutinating effect in about 60 per cent of normal human sera, after these have been heated for 30 minutes at 56°. This was shown to be caused by an IgM globulin with the properties of a rheumatoid factor. The factor is able to react with human IgG globulin and may represent an antibody to the IgG part of circulating antigen—antibody complexes. The heat treatment probably inactivates an inhibitor of the latex fixation reaction. In addition all normal human sera give an agglutination reaction with IgG coated latex at incubation temperatures of 37° or lower. It was shown that these reactions are caused by a thermolabile, non-reducible component with a sedimentation constant of about 10. This component is probably identical with the complement component C'1q. The agglutinating activity was found in the α2—β1 region after electrophoresis of untreated serum, but in the slow γ region after treatment of the serum with EDTA. This kind of agglutination may cause false positive reactions in latex tests which are carried out at 37° or less. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 3 PMID:4160336

  11. Purification and inhibitory profile of phospholipase A2 inhibitors from Australian elapid sera.

    PubMed Central

    Hains, P G; Broady, K W

    2000-01-01

    Although the resistance of snakes to their own venom is well known, until now no investigators have examined the serum of Australian snakes. Here we describe the identification and purification of a range of phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) inhibitors from the serum of Australian elapids. All PLA(2) inhibitors were composed of two protein chains, an alpha-chain and a beta-chain. The alpha-chains were approx. 22.5 kDa in size and variably glycosylated, whereas the beta-chains were approx. 19.8 kDa in size and not glycosylated. Identification of isoforms of the two subunit chains was significant because three of the six sera examined were from single snake specimens. In addition, the glycosylation patterns of the alpha-chains were thoroughly investigated in these unpooled sera. The functional and structural properties of the purified inhibitors were studied. Uniquely, a snake PLA(2) inhibitor was found to inhibit human type II PLA(2) enzyme, which has implications for the treatment of the many diseases in which PLA(2) enzymes have been implicated. Further, we demonstrate that the inhibitor forms a non-covalent association with a purified PLA(2) enzyme. Finally, the purified PLA(2) inhibitor was shown to protect in vivo against the lethal affects of a homologous PLA(2) enzyme, suggesting a role for PLA(2) inhibitors in the treatment of snake bite victims. PMID:10657250

  12. Sialoglycoprotease of Pasteurella haemolytica A1: detection of antisialoglycoprotease antibodies in sera of calves.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C W; Shewen, P E; Cladman, W M; Conlon, J A; Mellors, A; Lo, R Y

    1994-01-01

    Log phase culture supernate from Pasteurella haemolytica biotype A, serotype 1 contains a proteolytic enzyme specific for O-sialoglycoproteins. Using two methods, Western immunoblotting and enzyme neutralization assay, it was demonstrated that certain bovine sera from two previous P. haemolytica A1 vaccination and challenge trials contained antibodies (Ab) (isotypes IgG1 and IgG2 on Western immunoblot) to the sialoglycoprotease (Gcp). In these trials, selected calves were vaccinated twice with either the commercial culture supernate vaccine Presponse or given phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). One trial was conducted during spring, P. haem XIX, and the other during the winter, P. haem XXI. Although there was no clear evidence for induction of anti-Gcp in response to vaccination, several calves seroconverted following intrapulmonary challenge with live P. haemolytica A1. This is the first report of anti-Gcp Ab in bovine sera. The results indicated that the Gcp is immunogenic and that the bacterium produces the enzyme in vivo. Further, animals with an anti-Gcp response had less pneumonia at necropsy, suggesting the Gcp may induce protective immunity. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:8004547

  13. Antibodies reacting to carbonic anhydrase isozymes (I and II) and albumin in sera from dogs.

    PubMed

    Nishita, Toshiho; Miyazaki, Rui; Miyazaki, Takae; Ochiai, Hideharu; Orito, Kensuke

    2016-06-01

    IgGs to carbonic anhydrase isozymes (CA-I and CA-II) and albumin were identified in dog serum. IgG titers were determined in the sera of asymptomatic dogs, and in dogs with atopic dermatitis, diarrhea and/or vomiting, diabetes and/or pancreatitis, kidney disease, hepatic disease, and thyroid gland disease, using ELISA. Low titres of IgG-reactive CA-I, CA-II, BSA, and CSA were found in the sera of healthy beagles. Compared with healthy beagles, there was a significant difference in the titers of antibodies against CA-I in asymptomatic dogs, dogs with diabetes and/or pancreatitis, or thyroid gland disease, or hepatic disease. Compared with healthy beagles, there was a significant difference in the antibody titer of anti-CA-II IgG in asymptomatic dogs and in those with hepatic disease. There was a significant difference in the antibody titer of anti-BSA IgG between healthy beagles and dogs with hepatic disease.

  14. Circulating Haptoglobin Is an Independent Prognostic Factor in the Sera of Patients with Epithelial Ovarian Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Changqing; Annamalai, Loganath; Guo, Changfa; Kothandaraman, Narasimhan; Koh, Stephen Chee Liang; Zhang, Huoming; Biswas, Arijit; Choolani, Mahesh

    2007-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE This study was conducted to evaluate the prognostic significance of haptoglobin levels in the overall survival of patients presenting with various stages of epithelial ovarian cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS We employed an in-house sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method to determine the concentrations of preoperative haptoglobin and C-reactive protein (CRP) in sera samples obtained from 66 malignant tumors, 60 benign tumors, and 10 normal healthy women. RESULTS Levels of serum haptoglobin significantly correlated with tumor type (P < .001) and International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage (P < .05). A significant correlation was observed between clinical stage and patient survival (r = 5.99, P = .026). Our data also indicated that elevated serum haptoglobin levels were associated with poor outcome for overall survival using both univariate and multivariate analyses (P = .048 and P = .036 respectively). Using Pearson's correlation, we have noted that serum CRP concentrations significantly correlated with haptoglobin levels (r2 = 0.22, P < .001). Immunohistochemical findings and Western blot analyses were compatible with sera levels of haptoglobin in which a higher intensity of staining occurred in late-stage epithelial ovarian cancers. CONCLUSION This study provides evidence that preoperative serum levels of haptoglobin could serve as an independent prognostic factor in patients presenting with epithelial ovarian cancer. PMID:17325738

  15. Cytokines in sera from insulin-dependent diabetic patients at diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, M G; Pozzilli, P; Bird, C; Wadhwa, M; Meager, A; Visalli, N; Gearing, A J; Andreani, D; Thorpe, R

    1991-01-01

    Cytokines are known to play an important role in autoimmunity and have been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM). In the present study we have measured IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) (using both immunoassays and bioassays) in sera from 50 patients affected by IDDM at the time of clinical diagnosis and 51 age and sex matched controls. Detectable levels of IL-1, IL-2, IL-6 and IFN-gamma were found in the serum of a small percentage of subjects and were not significantly different between patients and controls. IL-4 was detectable in a higher number of both patients and controls and circulating TNF-alpha (greater than 1 U/ml) was found in a percentage of patients (24%) significantly higher than controls (P less than 0.01). Raised levels of TNF-alpha were detectable using an immunoenzymatic assay whereas TNF bioactivity in these samples was negligible. We conclude that the presence of immunoreactive TNF-alpha in the patient's sera may reflect an increased localized production of this cytokine at pancreatic level. However, the measurement in serum of other cytokines does not add information on the role that they may play in the pathogenesis of IDDM. PMID:1934594

  16. Identification of Candida albicans antigens reactive with immunoglobulin E antibody of human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Ishiguro, A; Homma, M; Torii, S; Tanaka, K

    1992-01-01

    Candida albicans antigens which reacted with immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies of 57 allergic patients were detected by immunoblotting. Of the various antigens, the 175-, 125-, 46-, 43-, and 37-kDa antigenic components reacted most frequently with the patient sera. To purify the major antigens, C. albicans cells were fractionated. The 46-, 43-, and 37-kDa antigens were recovered in cytoplasmic fractions, but the 175- and 125-kDa antigens were not recovered in any fraction. The 46-, 43-, and 37-kDa antigens were purified from cytoplasmic fractions by DEAE and P11 ion-exchange chromatography. Antigens were isolated by cutting bands out of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. The purified components confirmed by immunoblotting were next processed for amino acid sequencing. Parts of the sequences of the 46-, 43-, and 37-kDa antigens had significant levels of homology with Saccharomyces cerevisiae glycolytic enzyme enolase, phosphoglycerate kinase, and aldolase, respectively. Rabbit IgG antibodies prepared against the 46- and 43-kDa antigens strongly cross-reacted with the homologous proteins of S. cerevisiae. However, S. cerevisiae enolase and phosphoglycerate kinase did not cross-react with IgE of patient sera. This result suggests that IgE antibodies against only small parts of their epitopes are elevated in the allergic patients. Since enolase is reported to be a major antigen for systemic candidiasis, this enzyme may be the immunodominant protein in both allergies and fungal infections. Images PMID:1548078

  17. Characterization and reactivity of broiler chicken sera to selected recombinant Campylobacter jejuni chemotactic proteins.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Hung-Yueh; Hiett, Kelli L; Line, John E; Seal, Bruce S

    2014-05-01

    Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative rod bacterium, is the leading causative agent of human acute bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Consumption and handling of raw or undercooked poultry are regarded as a major source for human infection. Because bacterial chemotaxis guides microorganisms to colonization and invasion in the host cells, proteins involved in chemotactic processes can be novel targets for vaccine development. In this communication, we report amplification, cloning and expression of the C. jejuni chemotactic proteins in an Escherichia coli expression system. A total of 15 chemotactic protein genes were successfully expressed. These recombinant proteins were confirmed by nucleotide sequencing, SDS-PAGE analysis and immunoblot analysis of six-His and hemagglutinin tags. Twelve recombinant chemotactic proteins were further tested whether they were antigenic using sera from broiler chickens older than 4 weeks. The immunoblot results show that each chicken serum reacted to a variety of the recombinant proteins, but all sera reacted to the Cjj0473 gene product (annotated as a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein), suggesting that anti-Campylobacter antibodies may be prevalent in the poultry population. These antibody screening results provide a rationale for further evaluation of the Cjj0473 protein as a potential vaccine for broilers to improve human food safety.

  18. Functional Implications of Domain Organization Within Prokaryotic Rhomboid Proteases.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Rashmi; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Intramembrane proteases are membrane embedded enzymes that cleave transmembrane substrates. This interesting class of enzyme and its water mediated substrate cleavage mechanism occurring within the hydrophobic lipid bilayer has drawn the attention of researchers. Rhomboids are a family of ubiquitous serine intramembrane proteases. Bacterial forms of rhomboid proteases are mainly composed of six transmembrane helices that are preceded by a soluble N-terminal domain. Several crystal structures of the membrane domain of the E. coli rhomboid protease ecGlpG have been solved. Independently, the ecGlpG N-terminal cytoplasmic domain structure was solved using both NMR and protein crystallography. Despite these structures, we still do not know the structure of the full-length protein, nor do we know the functional role of these domains in the cell. This chapter will review the structural and functional roles of the different domains associated with prokaryotic rhomboid proteases. Lastly, we will address questions remaining in the field.

  19. Alkaline protease production by a strain of marine yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Wang; Zhenming, Chi; Chunling, Ma

    2006-07-01

    Yeast strain 10 with high yield of protease was isolated from sediments of saltern near Qingdao, China. The protease had the highest activity at pH 9.0 and 45°C. The optimal medium for the maximum alkaline protease production of strain 10 was 2.5g soluble starch and 2.0g NaNO3 in 100mL seawater with initial pH 6.0. The optimal cultivation conditions for the maximum protease production were temperature 24.5°C, aeration rate 8.0L min-1 and agitation speed 150r min-1 Under the optimal conditions, 623.1 U mg-1 protein of alkaline protease was reached in the culture within 30h of fermentation.

  20. Poliovirus protease 3C(pro) kills cells by apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Barco, A; Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    2000-01-20

    The tetracycline-based Tet-Off expression system has been used to analyze the effects of poliovirus protease 3C(pro) on human cells. Stable HeLa cell clones that express this poliovirus protease under the control of an inducible, tightly regulated promoter were obtained. Tetracycline removal induces synthesis of 3C protease, followed by drastic morphological alterations and cellular death. Degradation of cellular DNA in nucleosomes and generation of apoptotic bodies are observed from the second day after 3C(pro) induction. The cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, an enzyme involved in DNA repair, occurs after induction of 3C(pro), indicating caspase activation by this poliovirus protease. The 3C(pro)-induced apoptosis is blocked by the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Our findings suggest that the protease 3C is responsible for triggering apoptosis in poliovirus-infected cells by a mechanism that involves caspase activation.

  1. Purification and characterization of an alkaline protease from Acetes chinensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiachao; Liu, Xin; Li, Zhaojie; Xu, Jie; Xue, Changhu; Gao, Xin

    2005-07-01

    An alkaline protease from Acetes chinensis was purified and characterized in this study. The steps of purification include ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography with Q-sepharose Fast Flow, gel filtration chromatography with S300 and the second ion-exchange chromatography with Q-sepharose Fast Flow. The protease was isolated and purified, which was present and active on protein substrates (azocasein and casein). The specific protease activity was 17.15 folds and the recovery was 4.67. The molecular weight of the protease was estimated at 23.2 kD by SDS-PAGE. With azocasein as the susbstrate, the optimal temperature was 55°C and the optimal pH value was 5.5. Ion Ca2+ could enhance the proteolytic activity of the protease, while Cu2+, EDTA and PMSF could inhibit its activity.

  2. The use of hybrid phage displaying antigen epitope and recombinant protein in the diagnosis of systemic Candida albicans infection in rabbits and cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Quanping, Su; Yanyan, Huai; Yicun, Wang; Zhigang, Ju; Yuling, Geng; Li, Wang

    2010-12-01

    Hsp90 and Sap2 are 2 immunodominant antigens of Candida albicans. Both of them can induce the production of antibody. In this article, systemically infected rabbits were used to study the Hsp90 and Sap2 antibody production. Also, pET28a-Hsp90 protein, pET28a-Sap2 protein, hybrid phage displaying LKVIRK epitope, and hybrid phage displaying VKYTS epitope were used for diagnosis of the antibody in cancer patients. The results showed that the Sap2 antibody appeared earlier than Hsp90 antibody in systemically infected rabbits. Meanwhile, both of the antibodies can perform protection in rabbits. The conclusion is that Sap2 antibody, which appears at early stage in systemic candidiasis, may be better than Hsp90 antibody for the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis. For 141 sera of cancer patients, 52 sera were detected Sap2 antibody and 57 sera were detected Hsp90 antibody. Only 14 sera contained both the 2 antibodies. Although recombinant protein was slightly more sensitive than hybrid phage, there was no significant difference between them. For its easy preparation, less expensive hybrid phage displaying antigen epitope may be a better agent for diagnosis of candidiasis.

  3. Updated defense display market assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    1999-08-01

    This paper addresses the number, function and size of principal military displays and establishes a basis to determine the opportunities for technology insertion in the immediate future and into the next millennium. Principal military displays are defined as those occupying appreciable crewstation real-estate and/or those without which the platform could not carry out its intended mission. DoD 'office' applications are excluded from this study. The military displays market is specified by such parameters as active area and footprint size, and other characteristics such as luminance, gray scale, resolution, angle, color, video capability, and night vision imaging system compatibility. Funded, future acquisitions, planned and predicted crewstation modification kits, and form-fit upgrades are taken into account. This paper provides an overview of the DoD niche market, allowing both government and industry a necessary reference by which to meet DoD requirements for military displays in a timely and cost-effective manner. The aggregate DoD installed base for direct-view and large-area military displays is presently estimated to be in excess of 313,000. Miniature displays are those which must be magnified to be viewed, involve a significantly different manufacturing paradigm and are used in helmet mounted displays and thermal weapon sight applications. Some 114,000 miniature displays are presently included within future weapon system acquisition plans. For vendor production planning purposes it is noted that foreign military sales could substantially increase these quantities. The vanishing vendor syndrome (VVS) for older display technologies continues to be a growing, pervasive problem throughout DoD, which consequently must leverage the more modern, especially flat panel, display technologies being developed to replace older, especially cathode ray tube, technology for civil-commercial markets. Total DoD display needs (FPD, HMD) are some 427,000.

  4. Proteases of Stored Product Insects and Their Inhibition by Specific Protease Inhibitors from Soybeans and Wheat Grain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-16

    Tenebria molitor MIDGUT PROTEASES; LOCUST CAECAL PROTEASES; BOWMAN-BIRK TRYPSIN-CHMOTRYPSIN INHIBITOR (SOYBEANS) CHICKPEAS TRYPSIN-CHYMOTRYPSIN...and Kunitz (STI) from soybeans, CI from chickpeas , chicken ovomucoid and turkey ovomucoid. It was Jnactivated by phenylemthvsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF...soybeans and Cl from chickpeas , by chicken ovomucoid and turkey overmucoid, as well as by the Kunitz (STI) soybean trypsin inhibitor that hardly

  5. SUMO proteases ULP1c and ULP1d are required for development and osmotic stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Castro, Pedro Humberto; Couto, Daniel; Freitas, Sara; Verde, Nuno; Macho, Alberto P; Huguet, Stéphanie; Botella, Miguel Angel; Ruiz-Albert, Javier; Tavares, Rui Manuel; Bejarano, Eduardo Rodríguez; Azevedo, Herlânder

    2016-09-01

    Sumoylation is an essential post-translational regulator of plant development and the response to environmental stimuli. SUMO conjugation occurs via an E1-E2-E3 cascade, and can be removed by SUMO proteases (ULPs). ULPs are numerous and likely to function as sources of specificity within the pathway, yet most ULPs remain functionally unresolved. In this report we used loss-of-function reverse genetics and transcriptomics to functionally characterize Arabidopsis thaliana ULP1c and ULP1d SUMO proteases. GUS reporter assays implicated ULP1c/d in various developmental stages, and subsequent defects in growth and germination were uncovered using loss-of-function mutants. Microarray analysis evidenced not only a deregulation of genes involved in development, but also in genes controlled by various drought-associated transcriptional regulators. We demonstrated that ulp1c ulp1d displayed diminished in vitro root growth under low water potential and higher stomatal aperture, yet leaf transpirational water loss and whole drought tolerance were not significantly altered. Generation of a triple siz1 ulp1c ulp1d mutant suggests that ULP1c/d and the SUMO E3 ligase SIZ1 may display separate functions in development yet operate epistatically in response to water deficit. We provide experimental evidence that Arabidopsis ULP1c and ULP1d proteases act redundantly as positive regulators of growth, and operate mainly as isopeptidases downstream of SIZ1 in the control of water deficit responses.

  6. Design of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors with C3-Substituted Hexahydrocyclopentafuranyl Urethanes as P2-Ligands: Synthesis, Biological Evaluation, and Protein-Ligand X-ray Crystal Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K; Chapsal, Bruno D; Parham, Garth L; Steffey, Melinda; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Amano, Masayuki; Weber, Irene T; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2011-11-07

    We report the design, synthesis, biological evaluation, and the X-ray crystal structure of a novel inhibitor bound to the HIV-1 protease. Various C3-functionalized cyclopentanyltetrahydrofurans (Cp-THF) were designed to interact with the flap Gly48 carbonyl or amide NH in the S2-subsite of the HIV-1 protease. We investigated the potential of those functionalized ligands in combination with hydroxyethylsulfonamide isosteres. Inhibitor 26 containing a 3-(R)-hydroxyl group on the Cp-THF core displayed the most potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity. Our studies revealed a preference for the 3-(R)-configuration over the corresponding 3-(S)-derivative. Inhibitor 26 exhibited potent activity against a panel of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 variants. A high resolution X-ray structure of 26-bound HIV-1 protease revealed important molecular insight into the ligand-binding site interactions.

  7. You Be the Judge: Display.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koeninger, Jimmy G.

    The instructional package was developed to provide the distributive education teacher-coordinator with visual materials that can be used to supplement existing textbook offerings in the area of display (visual merchandising). Designed for use with 35mm slides of retail store displays, the package allows the student to view the slides of displays…

  8. Flexible Bistable Cholesteric Reflective Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Deng-Ke

    2006-03-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystals (ChLCs) exhibit two stable states at zero field condition-the reflecting planar state and the nonreflecting focal conic state. ChLCs are an excellent candidate for inexpensive and rugged electronic books and papers. This paper will review the display cell structure,materials and drive schemes for flexible bistable cholesteric (Ch) reflective displays.

  9. Displays: Entering a New Dimension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkman, Neal

    2007-01-01

    As display technologies prepare to welcome 3-D, the 21st-century classroom will soon bear little resemblance to anything students and teachers have ever seen. In this article, the author presents the latest innovations in the world of digital display technology. These include: (1) Touchlight, an interactive touch screen program that takes a normal…

  10. Systemic sclerosis sera affect fibrillin-1 deposition by dermal blood microvascular endothelial cells: therapeutic implications of cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by endothelial cell injury, autoimmunity and fibrosis. The following three fibrillin-1 alterations have been reported in SSc. (1) Fibrillin-1 microfibrils are disorganized in SSc dermis. (2) Fibrillin-1 microfibrils produced by SSc fibroblasts are unstable. (3) Mutations in the FBN1 gene and anti-fibrillin-1 autoantibodies have been reported in SSc. Fibrillin-1 microfibrils, which are abundantly produced by blood and lymphatic microvascular endothelial cells (B-MVECs and Ly-MVECs, respectively), sequester in the extracellular matrix the latent form of the potent profibrotic cytokine transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). In the present study, we evaluated the effects of SSc sera on the deposition of fibrillin-1 and microfibril-associated glycoprotein 1 (MAGP-1) and the expression of focal adhesion molecules by dermal B-MVECs and Ly-MVECs. Methods Dermal B-MVECs and Ly-MVECs were challenged with sera from SSc patients who were treatment-naïve or under cyclophosphamide (CYC) treatment and with sera from healthy controls. Fibrillin-1/MAGP-1 synthesis and deposition and the expression of αvβ3 integrin/phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase and vinculin/actin were evaluated by immunofluorescence and quantified by morphometric analysis. Results Fibrillin-1 and MAGP-1 colocalized in all experimental conditions, forming a honeycomb pattern in B-MVECs and a dense mesh of short segments in Ly-MVECs. In B-MVECs, fibrillin-1/MAGP-1 production and αvβ3 integrin expression significantly decreased upon challenge with sera from naïve SSc patients compared with healthy controls. Upon challenge of B-MVECs with sera from CYC-treated SSc patients, fibrillin-1/MAGP-1 and αvβ3 integrin levels were comparable to those of cells treated with healthy sera. Ly-MVECs challenged with SSc sera did not differ from those treated with healthy control sera in the expression of any of the molecules assayed

  11. Drugs derived from phage display

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Andrew E; Sexton, Daniel J; Ladner, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    Phage display, one of today’s fundamental drug discovery technologies, allows identification of a broad range of biological drugs, including peptides, antibodies and other proteins, with the ability to tailor critical characteristics such as potency, specificity and cross-species binding. Further, unlike in vivo technologies, generating phage display-derived antibodies is not restricted by immunological tolerance. Although more than 20 phage display-derived antibody and peptides are currently in late-stage clinical trials or approved, there is little literature addressing the specific challenges and successes in the clinical development of phage-derived drugs. This review uses case studies, from candidate identification through clinical development, to illustrate the utility of phage display as a drug discovery tool, and offers a perspective for future developments of phage display technology. PMID:24262785

  12. Three-dimensional display technologies.

    PubMed

    Geng, Jason

    2013-01-01

    The physical world around us is three-dimensional (3D), yet traditional display devices can show only two-dimensional (2D) flat images that lack depth (i.e., the third dimension) information. This fundamental restriction greatly limits our ability to perceive and to understand the complexity of real-world objects. Nearly 50% of the capability of the human brain is devoted to processing visual information [Human Anatomy & Physiology (Pearson, 2012)]. Flat images and 2D displays do not harness the brain's power effectively. With rapid advances in the electronics, optics, laser, and photonics fields, true 3D display technologies are making their way into the marketplace. 3D movies, 3D TV, 3D mobile devices, and 3D games have increasingly demanded true 3D display with no eyeglasses (autostereoscopic). Therefore, it would be very beneficial to readers of this journal to have a systematic review of state-of-the-art 3D display technologies.

  13. PEGylated substrates of NSP4 protease: A tool to study protease specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocka, Magdalena; Gruba, Natalia; Grzywa, Renata; Giełdoń, Artur; Bąchor, Remigiusz; Brzozowski, Krzysztof; Sieńczyk, Marcin; Dieter, Jenne; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Rolka, Krzysztof; Lesner, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Herein we present the synthesis of a novel type of peptidomimetics composed of repeating diaminopropionic acid residues modified with structurally diverse heterobifunctional polyethylene glycol chains (abbreviated as DAPEG). Based on the developed compounds, a library of fluorogenic substrates was synthesized. Further library deconvolution towards human neutrophil serine protease 4 (NSP4) yielded highly sensitive and selective internally quenched peptidomimetic substrates. In silico analysis of the obtained peptidomimetics revealed the presence of an interaction network with distant subsites located on the enzyme surface.

  14. INFORMATION DISPLAY: CONSIDERATIONS FOR DESIGNING COMPUTER-BASED DISPLAY SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    O'HARA,J.M.; PIRUS,D.; BELTRATCCHI,L.

    2004-09-19

    This paper discussed the presentation of information in computer-based control rooms. Issues associated with the typical displays currently in use are discussed. It is concluded that these displays should be augmented with new displays designed to better meet the information needs of plant personnel and to minimize the need for interface management tasks (the activities personnel have to do to access and organize the information they need). Several approaches to information design are discussed, specifically addressing: (1) monitoring, detection, and situation assessment; (2) routine task performance; and (3) teamwork, crew coordination, collaborative work.

  15. Flat panel display Impurity doping technology for flat panel displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2005-08-01

    Features of the flat panel displays (FPDs) such as liquid crystal display (LCD) and organic light emitting diode (OLED) display, etc. using low temperature poly-Si (LTPS) thin film transistors (TFTs) are briefly reviewed comparing with other FPDs. The requirements for fabricating TFTs used for high performance FPDs and system on glass (SoG) are addressed. This paper focuses on the impurity doping technology, which is one of the key technologies together with crystallization by laser annealing, formation of high quality gate insulator and gate-insulator/poly-Si interface. The issues to be solved in impurity doping technology for state of the art and future TFTs are clarified.

  16. Immunoblot studies to analyze antibody to the Rickettsia typhi group antigen in sera from patients with acute febrile cerebrovasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Hechemy, K E; Fox, J A; Gröschel, D H; Hayden, F G; Wenzel, R P

    1991-01-01

    In 1986, an unusual syndrome of acute febrile cerebrovasculitis in the Piedmont Region of Virginia was reported. All patients had encephalopathy and prior exposure to both a sylvan environment and flea-infested animals. The initial serological studies suggested a rickettsial origin, corroborating clinical, epidemiological, and histopathological findings. Sera from four of five patients were subsequently studied by immunoblotting. Unabsorbed and absorbed sera were tested with electrophoresed and electroblotted Rickettsia typhi, Legionella bozemanii, and Proteus vulgaris OX19 antigens. The unabsorbed sera reacted with all three antigens. The P. vulgaris- and L. bozemanii-absorbed sera reacted with R. typhi only and without significantly less intensity. In contrast, the reactivity of R. typhi-absorbed sera was significantly lower with all three antigens. These results indicate that these patients had specific antibodies to a typhus group antigen. Although our findings suggest that a rickettsia of the typhus group may have caused this syndrome, no definitive diagnosis could be achieved because a rickettsial organism was not isolated. Images PMID:1723073

  17. Novel pseudosymmetric inhibitors of HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Faessler, A.; Roesel, J.; Gruetter, M.; Tintelnot-Blomley, M.; Alteri, E.; Bold, G.; Lang, M.

    1993-12-31

    Taking into account the unique C-2 symmetric nature of the HIV-1 protease homodimer, the authors have designed and synthesized novel inhibitors featuring an almost symmetric structure. Compounds containing the easily accessible Phe[CH(OH)CH{sub 2}N(NH)]Cha dipeptide isostere as a nonhydrolyzable replacement of the scissile amide bond of the natural substrate are potent inhibitors in vitro with IC{sub 50} values of 9 to 50 nM. The antiviral activity depends mainly on the nature of the anylated valine residues linked to the dipeptide mimic. In this series, CGP 53820 combines both high potency and excellent specificity. Its predicted symmetric binding pattern is illustrated by the X-ray structure analysis performed with the corresponding enzyme-inhibitor complex.

  18. Highly potent fibrinolytic serine protease from Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Uesugi, Yoshiko; Usuki, Hirokazu; Iwabuchi, Masaki; Hatanaka, Tadashi

    2011-01-05

    We introduce a highly potent fibrinolytic serine protease from Streptomyces omiyaensis (SOT), which belongs to the trypsin family. The fibrinolytic activity of SOT was examined using in vitro assays and was compared with those of known fibrinolytic enzymes such as plasmin, tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), urokinase, and nattokinase. Compared to other enzymes, SOT showed remarkably higher hydrolytic activity toward mimic peptides of fibrin and plasminogen. The fibrinolytic activity of SOT is about 18-fold higher than that of plasmin, and is comparable to that of t-PA by fibrin plate assays. Furthermore, SOT had some plasminogen activator-like activity. Results show that SOT and nattokinase have very different fibrinolytic and fibrinogenolytic modes, engendering significant synergetic effects of SOT and nattokinase on fibrinolysis. These results suggest that SOT presents important possibilities for application in the therapy of thrombosis.

  19. Enzyme specificity and effects of gyroxin, a serine protease from the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus, on protease-activated receptors.

    PubMed

    Yonamine, Camila M; Kondo, Marcia Y; Nering, Marcela B; Gouvêa, Iuri E; Okamoto, Débora; Andrade, Douglas; da Silva, José Alberto A; Prieto da Silva, Alvaro R B; Yamane, Tetsuo; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz; Lapa, Antônio J; Hayashi, Mirian A F; Lima-Landman, Maria Teresa R

    2014-03-01

    Gyroxin is a serine protease displaying a thrombin-like activity found in the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus. Typically, intravenous injection of purified gyroxin induces a barrel rotation syndrome in mice. The serine protease thrombin activates platelets aggregation by cleaving and releasing a tethered N-terminus peptide from the G-protein-coupled receptors, known as protease-activated receptors (PARs). Gyroxin also presents pro-coagulant activity suggested to be dependent of PARs activation. In the present work, the effects of these serine proteases, namely gyroxin and thrombin, on PARs were comparatively studied by characterizing the hydrolytic specificity and kinetics using PARs-mimetic FRET peptides. We show for the first time that the short (sh) and long (lg) peptides mimetizing the PAR-1, -2, -3, and -4 activation sites are all hydrolyzed by gyroxin exclusively after the Arg residues. Thrombin also hydrolyzes PAR-1 and -4 after the Arg residue, but hydrolyzes sh and lg PAR-3 after the Lys residue. The kcat/KM values determined for gyroxin using sh and lg PAR-4 mimetic peptides were at least 2150 and 400 times smaller than those determined for thrombin, respectively. For the sh and lg PAR-2 mimetic peptides the kcat/KM values determined for gyroxin were at least 6500 and 2919 times smaller than those determined for trypsin, respectively. The kcat/KM values for gyroxin using the PAR-1 and -3 mimetic peptides could not be determined due to the extreme low hydrolysis velocity. Moreover, the functional studies of the effects of gyroxin on PARs were conducted in living cells using cultured astrocytes, which express all PARs. Despite the ability to cleavage the PAR-1, -2, -3, and -4 peptides, gyroxin was unable to activate the PARs expressed in astrocytes as determined by evaluating the cytosolic calcium mobilization. On the other hand, we also showed that gyroxin is able to interfere with the activation of PAR-1 by thrombin or

  20. Identification, isolation, and molecular cloning of a hookworm protease: an approach towards a defined vaccine for ancylostomiasis

    SciTech Connect

    Hotez, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    The hookworm Ancylostoma caninum was shown to release in vitro a 37 kDa protease that catalyzed the hydrolysis of fibrinogen, plasminogen, and elastin. The enzyme was purified from parasite extracts by ion-exchange chromatography, followed by gel filtration and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. An amino-terminal sequence was determined. When assayed with radiolabeled fibrin as substrate, the enzyme displayed optimal activity at pH 9-11; it was inactivated by dialysis against ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid. Antiserum raised against the protease in rabbits cross-reacted on western blots with soluble antigen from the infective larval stage of the parasite. A cDNA library from hookworm mRNA was constructed in the expression vector bacteriophage lambdagtll. A positive clone was identified with the rabbit antiserum that was shown to contain an 800-bp insert. The insert was mapped, subcloned into M13, and sequenced, revealing an open reading frame of 789 nucleotides corresponding to 263 amino acids.

  1. Effects of PRE and POST Therapy Drug-Pressure Selected Mutations on HIV-1 Protease Conformational Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jeffrey D.; Gonzales, Estrella G.; Huang, Xi; Smith, Adam N.; deVera, Ian Mitchelle S.; D’Amore, Peter W.; Rocca, James R.; Goodenow, Maureen; Dunn, Ben M.; Fanucci, Gail E.

    2015-01-01

    Conformational sampling of pre- and post-therapy subtype B HIV-1 protease sequences derived from a pediatric subject infected via maternal transmission with HIV-1 were characterized by double electron-electron resonance spectroscopy. The conformational ensemble of the PRE construct resembles native-like inhibitor bound states. In contrast, the POST construct, which contains accumulated drug-pressure selected mutations, has a predominantly semi-open conformational ensemble, with increased populations of open-like states. The single point mutant L63P, which is contained in PRE and POST, has decreased dynamics, particularly in the flap region, and also displays a closed-like conformation of inhibitor-bound states. These findings support our hypothesis that secondary mutations accumulate in HIV-1 protease to shift conformational sampling to stabilize open-like conformations, while maintaining the predominant semi-open conformation for activity. PMID:24983495

  2. The LonA Protease Regulates Biofilm Formation, Motility, Virulence, and the Type VI Secretion System in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Andrew; Townsley, Loni; Gallego-Hernandez, Ana L.; Beyhan, Sinem; Kwuan, Laura

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The presence of the Lon protease in all three domains of life hints at its biological importance. The prokaryotic Lon protease is responsible not only for degrading abnormal proteins but also for carrying out the proteolytic regulation of specific protein targets. Posttranslational regulation by Lon is known to affect a variety of physiological traits in many bacteria, including biofilm formation, motility, and virulence. Here, we identify the regulatory roles of LonA in the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae. We determined that the absence of LonA adversely affects biofilm formation, increases swimming motility, and influences intracellular levels of cyclic diguanylate. Whole-genome expression analysis revealed that the message abundance of genes involved in biofilm formation was decreased but that the message abundances of those involved in virulence and the type VI secretion system were increased in a lonA mutant compared to the wild type. We further demonstrated that a lonA mutant displays an increase in type VI secretion system activity and is markedly defective in colonization of the infant mouse. These findings suggest that LonA plays a critical role in the environmental survival and virulence of V. cholerae. IMPORTANCE Bacteria utilize intracellular proteases to degrade damaged proteins and adapt to changing environments. The Lon protease has been shown to be important for environmental adaptation and plays a crucial role in regulating the motility, biofilm formation, and virulence of numerous plant and animal pathogens. We find that LonA of the human pathogen V. cholerae is in line with this trend, as the deletion of LonA leads to hypermotility and defects in both biofilm formation and colonization of the infant mouse. In addition, we show that LonA regulates levels of cyclic diguanylate and the type VI secretion system. Our observations add to the known regulatory repertoire of the Lon protease and the current understanding of V. cholerae physiology

  3. A novel organic solvent- and detergent-stable serine alkaline protease from Trametes cingulata strain CTM10101.

    PubMed

    Omrane Benmrad, Maroua; Moujehed, Emna; Ben Elhoul, Mouna; Zaraî Jaouadi, Nadia; Mechri, Sondes; Rekik, Hatem; Kourdali, Sidali; El Hattab, Mohamed; Badis, Abdelmalek; Sayadi, Sami; Bejar, Samir; Jaouadi, Bassem

    2016-10-01

    A protease-producing fungus was isolated from an alkaline wastewater of chemical industries and identified as Trametes cingulata strain CTM10101 on the basis of the ITS rDNA gene-sequencing. It was observed that the fungus strongly produce extracellular protease grown at 30°C in potato-dextrose-broth (PDB) optimized media (13500U/ml). The pure serine protease isolated by Trametes cingulata (designated SPTC) was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation-dialysis followed by heat-treatment and UNO S-1 FPLC cation-exchange chromatography. The chemical characterization carried on include phisico-chemical determination and spectroscopie analysis. The MALDI-TOF/MS analysis revealed that the purified enzyme was a monomer with a molecular mass of 31405.16-Da. The enzyme had an NH2-terminal sequence of ALTTQTEAPWALGTVSHKGQAST, thus sharing high homology with those of fungal-proteases. The optimum pH and temperature values of its proteolytic activity were pH 9 and 60°C, respectively, and its half-life times at 60 and 70°C were 9 and 5-h, respectively. It was completely inhibited by PMSF and DFP, which strongly suggested its belonging to the serine protease family. Compared to Flavourzyme(®)500L from Aspergillus oryzae and Thermolysin typeX from Geobacillus stearothermophilus, SPTC displayed higher levels of hydrolysis, substrate specificity, and catalytic efficiency as well as elevated organic solvent tolerance and considerable detergent stability. Finally, SPTC could potentially be used in peptide synthesis and detergent formulations.

  4. Characterization of thermostable serine alkaline protease from an alkaliphilic strain Bacillus pumilus MCAS8 and its applications.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Renganathan; Jayashree, Shanmugam; Annapurna, Balumuri; Seshadri, Sundaram

    2012-12-01

    This study describes the characterization and optimization of medium components for an extracellular detergent, surfactant, organic solvent and thermostable serine alkaline protease produced by alkaliphilic Bacillus pumilus MCAS8 strain isolated from Pulicat lake sediments, Tamil Nadu, India. The strain yielded maximum protease (2,214 U/ml) under optimized conditions: carbon source, citric acid-1.5 % (w/w); inducer, soyabean meal-2 % (w/w); pH 11.0; shaking condition 37 °C for 48 h. The enzyme had pH and temperature optima of 9.0 and 60 °C, respectively. The enzyme displayed the molecular mass of 36 kDa in sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis study and exhibited activity at a wide range of pH (6.0-11.0) and thermostability (20-70 °C). More than 70 % residual activity was observed when the enzyme was incubated with dithiothreitol, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid and H(2)O(2) for 30 min. The protease activity was also enhanced by divalent cations such as Ba(2+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) and was strongly inhibited by Fe(2+), Zn(2+), Sr(2+), Hg(2+) and urea. The enzyme retained more than 50 % of its initial activity after pre-incubation for 1 h in the presence of 5 % (v/v) organic solvents such as dimethyl sulphoxide and acetone. The protease could hydrolyse various native proteinaceous substrates (1 % w/v) such as bovine serum albumin, casein, skim milk, gelatine, azocasein and haemoglobin. Wash performance analysis of enzyme revealed that it could effectively remove blood stains from the cotton fabric, thus making it suitable to use as an effective detergent additive. The protease enzyme also exhibited promising result in the dehairing of goat skin. The potency of the eco-friendly enzyme without using any chemicals against washing and dehairing showed that the enzyme could be used for various industrial applications.

  5. Effects of different dietary conditions on the expression of trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like protease genes in the digestive system of the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Spit, Jornt; Zels, Sven; Dillen, Senne; Holtof, Michiel; Wynant, Niels; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2014-05-01

    While technological advancements have recently led to a steep increase in genomic and transcriptomic data, and large numbers of protease sequences are being discovered in diverse insect species, little information is available about the expression of digestive enzymes in Orthoptera. Here we describe the identification of Locusta migratoria serine protease transcripts (cDNAs) involved in digestion, which might serve as possible targets for pest control management. A total of 5 putative trypsin and 15 putative chymotrypsin gene sequences were characterized. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these are distributed among 3 evolutionary conserved clusters. In addition, we have determined the relative gene expression levels of representative members in the gut under different feeding conditions. This study demonstrated that the transcript levels for all measured serine proteases were strongly reduced after starvation. On the other hand, larvae of L. migratoria displayed compensatory effects to the presence of Soybean Bowman Birk (SBBI) and Soybean Trypsin (SBTI) inhibitors in their diet by differential upregulation of multiple proteases. A rapid initial upregulation was observed for all tested serine protease transcripts, while only for members belonging to class I, the transcript levels remained elevated after prolonged exposure. In full agreement with these results, we also observed an increase in proteolytic activity in midgut secretions of locusts that were accustomed to the presence of protease inhibitors in their diet, while no change in sensitivity to these inhibitors was observed. Taken together, this paper is the first comprehensive study on dietary dependent transcript levels of proteolytic enzymes in Orthoptera. Our data suggest that compensatory response mechanisms to protease inhibitor ingestion may have appeared early in insect evolution.

  6. Effects of detergents on the West Nile virus protease activity.

    PubMed

    Ezgimen, Manolya D; Mueller, Niklaus H; Teramoto, Tadahisa; Padmanabhan, R

    2009-05-01

    Detergents such as Triton X-100 are often used in drug discovery research to weed out small molecule promiscuous and non-specific inhibitors which act by aggregation in solution and undesirable precipitation in aqueous assay buffers. We evaluated the effects of commonly used detergents, Triton X-100, Tween-20, Nonidet-40 (NP-40), Brij-35, and CHAPS, on the enzymatic activity of West Nile virus (WNV) protease. Unexpectedly, Triton X-100, Tween-20, and NP-40 showed an enhancement of in vitro WNV protease activity from 2 to 2.5-fold depending on the detergent and its concentration. On the other hand, Brij-35, at 0.001% enhanced the protease activity by 1.5-fold and CHAPS had the least enhancing effect. The kinetic analysis showed that the increase in protease activity by Triton X-100 was dose-dependent. Furthermore, at Triton X-100 and Tween-20 concentrations higher than 0.001%, the inhibition of compound B, one of the lead compounds against WNV protease identified in a high throughput screen (IC(50) value of 5.7+/-2.5 microM), was reversed. However, in the presence of CHAPS, compound B still showed good inhibition of WNV protease. Our results, taken together, indicate that nonionic detergents, Triton X-100, Tween, and NP-40 are unsuitable for the purpose of discrimination of true versus promiscuous inhibitors of WNV protease in high throughput assays.

  7. Exploring a new serine protease from Cucumis sativus L.

    PubMed

    Nafeesa, Zohara; Shivalingu, B R; Vivek, H K; Priya, B S; Swamy, S Nanjunda

    2015-03-01

    Coagulation is an important physiological process in hemostasis which is activated by sequential action of proteases. This study aims to understand the involvement of aqueous fruit extract of Cucumis sativus L. (AqFEC) European burp less variety in blood coagulation cascade. AqFEC hydrolyzed casein in a dose-dependent manner. The presence of protease activity was further confirmed by casein zymography which revealed the possible presence of two high molecular weight protease(s). The proteolytic activity was inhibited only by phenyl methyl sulphonyl fluoride suggesting the presence of serine protease(s). In a dose-dependent manner, AqFEC also hydrolysed Aα and Bβ subunits of fibrinogen, whereas it failed to degrade the γ subunit of fibrinogen even at a concentration as high as 100 μg and incubation time up to 4 h. AqFEC reduced the clotting time of citrated plasma by 87.65%. The protease and fibrinogenolytic activity of AqFEC suggests its possible role in stopping the bleeding and ensuing wound healing process.

  8. Salt stress represses production of extracellular proteases in Bacillus pumilus.

    PubMed

    Liu, R F; Huang, C L; Feng, H

    2015-05-11

    Bacillus pumilus is able to secrete subtilisin-like prote-ases, one of which has been purified and characterized biochemically, demonstrating great potential for use in industrial applications. In the current study, the biosynthesis and transcription of extracellular pro-teases in B. pumilus (BA06) under salt stress were investigated using various methods, including a proteolytic assay, zymogram analysis, and real-time PCR. Our results showed that total extracellular proteolytic activity, both in fermentation broth and on milk-containing agar plates, was considerably repressed by salt in a dosage-dependent manner. As Bacillus species usually secret multiple extracellular proteases, a vari-ety of individual extracellular protease encoding genes were selected for real-time PCR analysis. It was shown that proteases encoded by the aprE and aprX genes were the major proteases in the fermentation broth in terms of their transcripts in B. pumilus. Further, transcription of aprE, aprX, and epr genes was indeed repressed by salt stress. In con-trast, transcription of other genes (e.g., vpr and wprA) was not repressed or significantly affected by the salt. Conclusively, salt stress represses total extracellular proteolytic activity in B. pumilus, which can largely be ascribed to suppression of the major protease-encoding genes (aprE, aprX) at the transcriptional level. In contrast, transcription of other pro-tease-encoding genes (e.g., vpr, wprA) was not repressed by salt stress.

  9. German cockroach frass proteases cleave pro-matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Valerie S; Page, Kristen

    2007-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, secreted as pro-MMP-9, is cleaved by serine proteases at the N-terminus to generate active MMP-9. Pro-MMP-9 has been found in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with asthma. Because many inhaled aeroallergens contain active proteases, the authors sought to determine whether German cockroach (GC) fecal remnants (frass) and house dust mite (HDM) were able to cleave pro-MMP-9. Treatment of recombinant human (rh) pro-MMP-9 with GC frass resulted in a dose- and time-dependent cleavage. This was abrogated by pretreating frass with an inhibitor of serine, but not cysteine protease activity. GC frass also induced cleavage of pro-MMP-9 from primary human neutrophils dependent on the active serine proteases in GC frass. HDM was less potent at cleaving pro-MMP-9. Alpha1-antitrypsin (A1AT), a naturally occurring protease inhibitor, attenuated GC frass-induced cleavage of pro-MMP-9. A1AT partially inactivated the serine protease activity in GC frass, while GC frass cleaved A1AT in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These data suggest that GC frass-derived serine proteases could regulate the activity of MMP-9 and that A1AT may play an important role in modulating GC frass activity in vivo. These data suggest a mechanism by which inhalation of GC frass could regulate airway remodeling through the activation of pro-MMP-9.

  10. Laundry detergent compatibility of the alkaline protease from Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Banik, Rathindra Mohan; Prakash, Monika

    2004-01-01

    The endogenous protease activity in various commercially available laundry detergents of international companies was studied. The maximum protease activity was found at 50 degrees C in pH range 10.5-11.0 in all the tested laundry detergents. The endogenous protease activity in the tested detergents retained up to 70% on incubation at 40 degrees C for 1 h, whereas less than 30% activity was only found on incubation at 50 degrees C for 1 h. The alkaline protease from an alkalophilic strain of Bacillus cereus was studied for its compatibility in commercial detergents. The cell free fermented broth from shake flask culture of the organism showed maximum activity at pH 10.5 and 50 degrees C. The protease from B. cereus showed much higher residual activity (more than 80%) on incubation with laundry detergents at 50 degrees C for 1 h or longer. The protease enzyme from B. cereus was found to be superior over the endogenous proteases present in the tested commercial laundry detergents in comparison to the enzyme stability during the washing at higher temperature, e.g., 40-50 degrees C.

  11. Rabbit endogenous retrovirus-H encodes a functional protease.

    PubMed

    Voisset, Cécile; Myers, Richard E; Carne, Alex; Kellam, Paul; Griffiths, David J

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that 'human retrovirus-5' sequences found in human samples belong to a rabbit endogenous retrovirus family named RERV-H. A part of the gag-pro region of the RERV-H genome was amplified by PCR from DNA in human samples and several forms of RERV-H protease were expressed in bacteria. The RERV-H protease was able to cleave itself from a precursor protein and was also able to cleave the RERV-H Gag polyprotein precursor in vitro whereas a form of the protease with a mutation engineered into the active site was inactive. Potential N- and C-terminal autocleavage sites were characterized. The RERV-H protease was sensitive to pepstatin A, showing it to be an aspartic protease. Moreover, it was strongly inhibited by PYVPheStaAMT, a pseudopeptide inhibitor specific for Mason-Pfizer monkey virus and avian myeloblastosis-associated virus. A structural model of the RERV-H protease was constructed that, together with the activity data, confirms that this is a retroviral aspartic protease.

  12. Tone compatibility between HDR displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bist, Cambodge; Cozot, Rémi; Madec, Gérard; Ducloux, Xavier

    2016-09-01

    High Dynamic Range (HDR) is the latest trend in television technology and we expect an in ux of HDR capable consumer TVs in the market. Initial HDR consumer displays will operate on a peak brightness of about 500-1000 nits while in the coming years display peak brightness is expected to go beyond 1000 nits. However, professionally graded HDR content can range from 1000 to 4000 nits. As with Standard Dynamic Range (SDR) content, we can expect HDR content to be available in variety of lighting styles such as low key, medium key and high key video. This raises concerns over tone-compatibility between HDR displays especially when adapting to various lighting styles. It is expected that dynamic range adaptation between HDR displays uses similar techniques as found with tone mapping and tone expansion operators. In this paper, we survey simple tone mapping methods of 4000 nits color-graded HDR content for 1000 nits HDR displays. We also investigate tone expansion strategies when HDR content graded in 1000 nits is displayed on 4000 nits HDR monitors. We conclude that the best tone reproduction technique between HDR displays strongly depends on the lighting style of the content.

  13. Lizard threat display handicaps endurance.

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Y

    2003-01-01

    Honest-signalling theory asserts that threat displays reliably advertise attributes that influence fighting success. Endurance, as measured by treadmill performance, predicts the outcome of agonistic interactions among lizards. If threat displays in lizards function to advertise endurance capacity then variation in threat displays should correlate with endurance. I tested this prediction for the duration of threat posturing in male side-blotched lizards (Uta stansburiana) and examined whether threat displays act as quality handicaps, reliable signals that expend the attribute that is advertised. Individual variation in the duration of threat posturing correlated with endurance, while an experimental reduction of endurance diminished the duration of threat posturing. As expected of a quality handicap, endurance fell below baseline after display production. A restriction of aerobic metabolism can account for this effect. In threat posturing, lateral compression of the thorax may interfere with respiration or with circulation, limiting aerobic metabolism and causing a compensatory increase in anaerobic metabolism, thereby generating lactate and diminishing locomotor capacity. Concentrations of lactate measured after display production were higher than baseline, consistent with the proposed mechanism. By restricting aerobic metabolism, the threat posture can act as a quality handicap, simultaneously advertising and expending the endurance capacity of displaying lizards. PMID:12803896

  14. Characterisation of a detergent-stable alkaline protease from a novel thermophilic strain Paenibacillus tezpurensis sp. nov. AS-S24-II.

    PubMed

    Rai, Sudhir K; Roy, Jetendra K; Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2010-02-01

    An alkaline-protease-producing bacterial strain (AS-S24-II) isolated from a soil sample in Assam is a Gram-stain-positive, catalase-positive, endospore-forming rod and grows at temperatures ranging from 30 degrees C to 60 degrees C and salinity ranging from 0% to 7% (w/v) NaCl. Phenotypic characterisation, chemotaxonomic properties, presence of Paenibacillus-specific signature sequences, and ribotyping data suggested that the strain AS-S24-II represents a novel species of the genus Paenibacillus, for which the name Paenibacillus tezpurensis sp. nov. (MTCC 8959) is proposed. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that P. lentimorbus strain DNG-14 and P. lentimorbus strain DNG-16 represent the closest phylogenetic neighbour of this novel strain. Alkaline protease production (598 x 10(3) U l(-1)) by P. tezpurensis sp. nov. in SmF was optimised by response surface method. A laundry-detergent-stable, Ca(2+)-independent, 43-kDa molecular weight alkaline serine protease from this strain was purified with a 1.7-fold increase in specific activity. The purified protease displayed optimum activity at pH 9.5 and 45-50 degrees C temperature range and exhibited a significant stability and compatibility with surfactants and most of the tested commercial laundry detergents at room temperature. Further, the protease improved the wash performance of detergents, thus demonstrating its feasibility for inclusion in laundry detergent formulations.

  15. Investigations on a hyper-proteolytic mutant of Beauveria bassiana: broad substrate specificity and high biotechnological potential of a serine protease.

    PubMed

    Borgi, Ines; Gargouri, Ali

    2014-02-01

    A new strain of Beauveria bassiana was identified on the basis of the 18S rRNA gene sequence homology. This strain, called P2, is a spontaneously arisen mutant that was isolated after successive sub-culturing the wild-type B. bassiana P1 strain. P2 showed hyper-production of extracellular protease(s) as much as ninefold more than P1. An extracellular protease (SBP) having a molecular weight of 32 kDa was purified from the P2 strain. SBP was completely inhibited by the phenyl methyl sulphonyl fluoride, which suggests that it belongs to the serine protease family. Based on the homology analysis of its N-terminal and the gene sequences, the enzyme was identified as subtilisin. The enzyme displays maximum activity at 60 °C and pH 8, and was stable at pH 6-12. The enzyme hydrolyses natural proteins such as keratin and is activated in presence of β-mercaptoethanol and Tween detergents. SBP was compatible with some laundry detergent formulations and showed high efficacy in the removal of blood stains from cotton fabric. Moreover, it was observed to degrade the melanised feathers and to hydrolyse the gelatine from X-ray films. All these results highlight the suitability of SBP protease as a very efficient microbial bio-resource.

  16. Monitoring of aflatoxins and ochratoxin A in Czechoslovak human sera by immunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Fukal, L. ); Reisnerova, H. )

    1990-03-01

    Since a level of food contamination with aflatoxins and ochratoxin A has been found low in Czechoslovakia, human exposure to these mycotoxins may not be negligible. However, analysis of food samples provides only indirect evidence of mycotoxin ingestion and no evidence about mycotoxin absorption. Direct evidence can only be obtained by analysis of human body fluids. Therefore, the authors decided to carry out a monitoring of aflatoxin and ochratoxin A level in human sera. In general, TLC and HPLC are most commonly used to analyze mycotoxins and its metabolites. The recent development of immunochemical techniques opens the possibility of determining individual exposure in a relatively large human population. These assays have the advantage of high specificity and sensitivity. Sample through-put is high, and the methods are technically simple and can be performed at low cost.

  17. Simple visual assay for determination of Pasteurella haemolytica cytotoxin neutralizing antibody titers in cattle sera.

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, M J; Confer, A W; Kreps, J A

    1985-01-01

    A simple visual assay is described for determining the capacity of bovine serum to neutralize the cytotoxin produced by Pasteurella haemolytica serotype 1. The test was reproducible from day to day with different target cell populations and cytotoxin preparations. Cytotoxin neutralization titers obtained by the visual assay were comparable to those determined by the trypan blue exclusion and 51Cr-release methods. The visual assay was used to measure neutralization titers of bovine sera obtained from vaccination experiments and fractions of purified serum obtained by gel filtration. The major advantages of the visual assay over other assays are that it is rapid, inexpensive, and does not use radioisotopes. It also does not require specialized equipment, making it adaptable to most laboratories. Images PMID:3905853

  18. Antiheart antibody-dependent cytotoxicity in the sera of mice chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Laguens, R P; Meckert, P C; Chambó, J G

    1988-01-01

    Sera of mice chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi contain antibodies that bind to the surface of living adult syngeneic heart muscle cells. In a syngeneic system, with nonadherent spleen mononuclear cells as effector cells and cardiocytes as targets, antibody-dependent cytotoxicity (ADCC), revealed by the liberation of creatine phosphokinase from damaged cardiocytes, was observed after incorporation of serum samples from infected mice. Target damage was decreased after absorption with syngeneic myocardium, but absorption with T. cruzi epimastigotes or trypomastigotes or with syngeneic skeletal muscle had no effect on ADCC. No complement-dependent lysis against heart muscle cells was detected in the same serum samples. These observations indicate that serum from chronically chagasic mice contain antibodies that bind to the surface of living adult syngeneic cardiocytes and are able to exert ADCC, suggesting that they could play a role in the pathogenesis of the heart damage that occurs in Chagas' disease. Images PMID:3126153

  19. Albumin bound and alpha 2-macroglobulin bound zinc concentrations in the sera of healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Foote, J W; Delves, H T

    1984-09-01

    Reference ranges for albumin bound and alpha 2-macroglobulin bound zinc concentrations have been determined in a study of sera obtained from 134 healthy adults. The concentrations of zinc bound to alpha 2-macroglobulin were remarkably constant with a mean (+/-SD) of 2.4 +/- 0.6 mumol/l; the variations in total serum zinc concentrations were almost entirely accounted for by variations in the zinc associated with albumin. There were no sex related differences in the transport of zinc in serum; neither was this sensitive to the use of oral contraceptives. These data provide a baseline for further investigations into the effects of zinc deficiency on the serum transport of the metal.

  20. Antiherpesvirus Activity in Human Sera and Urines after Administration of Adenine Arabinoside

    PubMed Central

    Champney, Keith J.; Lauter, Carl B.; Bailey, Elizabeth J.; Lerner, A. Martin

    1978-01-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of adenine arabinoside (ara-A) in rabbit kidney microtiter tissue cultures (RK-13) to a prototype strain of herpes simplex virus, type 1 (E115) based upon inhibition of cytopathic effects is 1.5 μg/ml. In this system, the MIC of arabinosylhypoxanthine (ara-Hx), the major in vivo metabolic derivative of ara-A, is 75 μg/ml. Inhibition of cytopathic effects of herpes simplex virus, type 1 (HSV-1) in microtiter wells of RK-13 cells varies directly with the concentrations of ara-A or ara-Hx, and inversely with residual HSV-1. The MIC of ara-A for HSV-1 in RK-13 cells is 5-20 times lower than similar measures with vero renal, mouse embryo, or human foreskin cultures. With RK-13 tissue cultures in microtiter plates, an assay for “ara-A equivalents” in human body fluids was developed which compares in sensitivity with high pressure liquid chromatography and has the advantage of simultaneously measuring combined antiherpesvirus effects of ara-A and its major metabolic derivative, ara-Hx. In vitro checkerboard studies in RK-13 cells confirmed that ara-A and ara-Hx in combination had antiviral effects which are synergistic. The total of the fractional MIC of ara-A plus ara-Hx in combination also varies inversely with residual HSV-1 in microtiter wells. Because virus adsorption is complete at 2 h before specimens to be tested are added in this assay, and because human interferon is not measured in rabbit cells, the antiviral assay is not affected by the presence of type-specific antiherpesvirus antibody or human interferon. Antiviral activity (AVA) was assayed as ara-A equivalents in sera and urines from 10 patients with serious herpesvirus infections who received 2.5-20 mg/kg daily of ara-A by intramuscular or intravenous routes. When a dosage schedule of 10 mg/kg per day or more was used, sustained concentrations of AVA that ranged from 0.8 to 14.4 μg/ml were found. When an inhibitor of adenosine deaminase (covidarabine) was

  1. Characterization of allergens of the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis: detection and frequency of IgE antibodies in canine sera.

    PubMed

    Greene, W K; Carnegie, R L; Shaw, S E; Thompson, R C; Penhale, W J

    1993-02-01

    Flea allergens, fractionated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and transferred to nitrocellulose, were identified using 20 flea-allergic dog sera in an enhanced chemiluminescent assay for canine IgE antibodies. At least 15 different flea components in the molecular weight range of 14-150 K bound IgE and every serum demonstrated a different pattern of binding. Three of the components with apparent molecular weights of 25, 40 and 58 K were each bound by at least 40% of the sera. No reactivity was seen when normal dog sera were used. These results demonstrate a greater number of flea allergens and a far greater diversity of the IgE antibody response to flea allergens than has previously been described, and suggest that immediate hypersensitivity may be an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of canine flea allergy.

  2. Purification and biochemical characterization of two detergent-stable serine alkaline proteases from Streptomyces sp. strain AH4.

    PubMed

    Touioui, Souraya Boulkour; Jaouadi, Nadia Zaraî; Boudjella, Hadjira; Ferradji, Fatma Zohra; Belhoul, Mouna; Rekik, Hatem; Badis, Abdelmalek; Bejar, Samir; Jaouadi, Bassem

    2015-07-01

    Streptomyces sp. strain AH4 exhibited a high ability to produce two extracellular proteases when cultured on a yeast malt-extract (ISP2)-casein-based medium. Pure proteins were obtained after heat treatment (30 min at 70 °C) and ammonium sulphate fractionation (30-60 %), followed by size exclusion HPLC column. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the purified enzymes (named SAPS-P1 and SAPS-P2) were monomers with molecular masses of 36,417.13 and 21,099.10 Da, respectively. Their identified N-terminal amino acid displayed high homologies with those of Streptomyces proteases. While SAPS-P1 was optimally active at pH 12.0 and 70 °C, SAPS-P2 showed optimum activity at pH 10.0 and 60 °C. Both enzymes were completely stable within a wide range of temperature (45-75 °C) and pH (8.0-11.5). They were noted to be completely inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride and diisopropyl fluorophosphates, which confirmed their belonging to the serine proteases family. Compared to SAPS-P2, SAPS-P1 showed high thermostability and excellent stability towards bleaching, denaturing, and oxidizing agents. Both enzymes displayed marked stability and compatibility with a wide range of commercial laundry detergents and significant catalytic efficiencies compared to Subtilisin Carlsberg and Protease SG-XIV. Overall, the results indicated that SAPS-P1 and SAPS-P2 can be considered as potential promising candidates for future application as bioadditives in detergent formulations.

  3. Expression and immunological characterization of cardamom mosaic virus coat protein displaying HIV gp41 epitopes.

    PubMed

    Damodharan, Subha; Gujar, Ravindra; Pattabiraman, Sathyamurthy; Nesakumar, Manohar; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth; Vadakkuppattu, Ramanathan D; Usha, Ramakrishnan

    2013-05-01

    The coat protein of cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV), a member of the genus Macluravirus, assembles into virus-like particles when expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system. The N and C-termini of the coat protein were engineered with the Kennedy peptide and the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes of gp41 of HIV. The chimeric proteins reacted with sera from HIV positive persons and also stimulated secretion of cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from these persons. Thus, a system based on the coat protein of CdMV can be used to display HIV-1 antigens.

  4. Texture-Based Correspondence Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerald-Yamasaki, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Texture-based correspondence display is a methodology to display corresponding data elements in visual representations of complex multidimensional, multivariate data. Texture is utilized as a persistent medium to contain a visual representation model and as a means to create multiple renditions of data where color is used to identify correspondence. Corresponding data elements are displayed over a variety of visual metaphors in a normal rendering process without adding extraneous linking metadata creation and maintenance. The effectiveness of visual representation for understanding data is extended to the expression of the visual representation model in texture.

  5. Circular displays: control/display arrangements and stereotype strength with eight different display locations.

    PubMed

    Chan, Alan H S; Hoffmann, Errol R

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments are reported that were designed to investigate control/display arrangements having high stereotype strengths when using circular displays. Eight display locations relative to the operator and control were tested with rotational and translational controls situated on different planes according to the Frame of Reference Transformation Tool (FORT) model of Wickens et al. (2010). (Left. No, Right! Development of the Frame of Reference Transformation Tool (FORT), Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 54th Annual Meeting, 54: 1022-1026). In many cases, there was little effect of display locations, indicating the importance of the Worringham and Beringer (1998. Directional stimulus-response compatibility: a test of three alternative principles. Ergonomics, 41(6), 864-880) Visual Field principle and an extension of this principle for rotary controls (Hoffmann and Chan (2013). The Worringham and Beringer 'visual field' principle for rotary controls. Ergonomics, 56(10), 1620-1624). The initial indicator position (12, 3, 6 and 9 o'clock) had a major effect on control/display stereotype strength for many of the six controls tested. Best display/control arrangements are listed for each of the different control types (rotational and translational) and for the planes on which they are mounted. Data have application where a circular display is used due to limited display panel space and applies to space-craft, robotics operators, hospital equipment and home appliances. Practitioner Summary: Circular displays are often used when there is limited space available on a control panel. Display/control arrangements having high stereotype strength are listed for four initial indicator positions. These arrangements are best for design purposes.

  6. BspK, a Serine Protease from the Predatory Bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus with Utility for Analysis of Therapeutic Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Henrik; Naegeli, Andreas; Collin, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The development of therapeutic and diagnostic antibodies is a rapidly growing field of research, being the fastest expanding group of products on the pharmaceutical market, and appropriate quality controls are crucial for their application. We have identified and characterized the serine protease termed BspK (Bdellovibrio serine protease K) from Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus and here show its activity on antibodies. Mutation of the serine residue at position 230 rendered the protease inactive. Further investigations of BspK enzymatic characteristics revealed autoproteolytic activity, resulting in numerous cleavage products. Two of the autoproteolytic cleavage sites in the BspK fusion protein were investigated in more detail and corresponded to cleavage after K28 and K210 in the N- and C-terminal parts of BspK, respectively. Further, BspK displayed stable enzymatic activity on IgG within the pH range of 6.0 to 9.5 and was inhibited in the presence of ZnCl2. BspK demonstrated preferential hydrolysis of human IgG1 compared to other immunoglobulins and isotypes, with hydrolysis of the heavy chain at position K226 generating two separate Fab fragments and an intact IgG Fc domain. Finally, we show that BspK preferentially cleaves its substrates C-terminally to lysines similar to the protease LysC. However, BspK displays a unique cleavage profile compared to several currently used proteases on the market. IMPORTANCE The rapid development of novel therapeutic antibodies is partly hindered by difficulties in assessing their quality and safety. The lack of tools and methods facilitating such quality controls obstructs and delays the process of product approval, eventually affecting the patients in need of treatment. These difficulties in product evaluations indicate a need for new and comprehensive tools for such analysis. Additionally, recent concerns raised regarding the limitations of established products on the market (e.g., trypsin) further highlight a general

  7. Predicting Antidisease Immunity Using Proteome Arrays and Sera from Children Naturally Exposed to Malaria*

    PubMed Central

    Finney, Olivia C.; Danziger, Samuel A.; Molina, Douglas M.; Vignali, Marissa; Takagi, Aki; Ji, Ming; Stanisic, Danielle I.; Siba, Peter M.; Liang, Xiawu; Aitchison, John D.; Mueller, Ivo; Gardner, Malcolm J.; Wang, Ruobing

    2014-01-01

    Malaria remains one of the most prevalent and lethal human infectious diseases worldwide. A comprehensive characterization of antibody responses to blood stage malaria is essential to support the development of future vaccines, sero-diagnostic tests, and sero-surveillance methods. We constructed a proteome array containing 4441 recombinant proteins expressed by the blood stages of the two most common human malaria parasites, P. falciparum (Pf) and P. vivax (Pv), and used this array to screen sera of Papua New Guinea children infected with Pf, Pv, or both (Pf/Pv) that were either symptomatic (febrile), or asymptomatic but had parasitemia detectable via microscopy or PCR. We hypothesized that asymptomatic children would develop antigen-specific antibody profiles associated with antidisease immunity, as compared with symptomatic children. The sera from these children recognized hundreds of the arrayed recombinant Pf and Pv proteins. In general, responses in asymptomatic children were highest in those with high parasitemia, suggesting that antibody levels are associated with parasite burden. In contrast, symptomatic children carried fewer antibodies than asymptomatic children with infections detectable by microscopy, particularly in Pv and Pf/Pv groups, suggesting that antibody production may be impaired during symptomatic infections. We used machine-learning algorithms to investigate the relationship between antibody responses and symptoms, and we identified antibody responses to sets of Plasmodium proteins that could predict clinical status of the donors. Several of these antibody responses were identified by multiple comparisons, including those against members of the serine enriched repeat antigen family and merozoite protein 4. Interestingly, both P. falciparum serine enriched repeat antigen-5 and merozoite protein 4 have been previously investigated for use in vaccines. This machine learning approach, never previously applied to proteome arrays, can be used to

  8. A Macroecological Analysis of SERA Derived Forest Heights and Implications for Forest Volume Remote Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Brolly, Matthew; Woodhouse, Iain H.; Niklas, Karl J.; Hammond, Sean T.

    2012-01-01

    Individual trees have been shown to exhibit strong relationships between DBH, height and volume. Often such studies are cited as justification for forest volume or standing biomass estimation through remote sensing. With resolution of common satellite remote sensing systems generally too low to resolve individuals, and a need for larger coverage, these systems rely on descriptive heights, which account for tree collections in forests. For remote sensing and allometric applications, this height is not entirely understood in terms of its location. Here, a forest growth model (SERA) analyzes forest canopy height relationships with forest wood volume. Maximum height, mean, H100, and Lorey's height are examined for variability under plant number density, resource and species. Our findings, shown to be allometrically consistent with empirical measurements for forested communities world-wide, are analyzed for implications to forest remote sensing techniques such as LiDAR and RADAR. Traditional forestry measures of maximum height, and to a lesser extent H100 and Lorey's, exhibit little consistent correlation with forest volume across modeled conditions. The implication is that using forest height to infer volume or biomass from remote sensing requires species and community behavioral information to infer accurate estimates using height alone. SERA predicts mean height to provide the most consistent relationship with volume of the height classifications studied and overall across forest variations. This prediction agrees with empirical data collected from conifer and angiosperm forests with plant densities ranging between 102–106 plants/hectare and heights 6–49 m. Height classifications investigated are potentially linked to radar scattering centers with implications for allometry. These findings may be used to advance forest biomass estimation accuracy through remote sensing. Furthermore, Lorey's height with its specific relationship to remote sensing physics is

  9. Neutralizing capacity of murine sera induced by different antigens of scorpion venom.

    PubMed

    Calderon-Aranda, E S; Hozbor, D; Possani, L D

    1993-03-01

    Approximately 700 people die in Mexico each year from scorpion stings. The only useful therapy available is antiserum obtained from horses immunized with macerates of venomous gland from scorpions of the genus Centruroides. We report the results of experiments conducted with mice and rats in order to evaluate the relevant components of the venom from Centruroides noxius in the induction of a protective response against scorpion envenomation, either in vivo or in vitro. Gland macerates of whole telsons (stinger), soluble venom extracted by electrical stimulation, toxic fractions from gel filtration on Sephadex G-50 and highly purified toxin 2 from this scorpion venom were all used to produce hyperimmune mice and rats, which were challenged in vivo with the equivalent of the lethal dose 50% (LD50) of soluble venom, or their sera were prepared for in vitro neutralization experiments using non-immunized animals. The maximum neutralizing capacity (100%) was obtained when soluble venom was used as antigen, while purified toxin 2 produces 80% survival in vivo. The neutralizing capacity of murine antisera evaluated in vitro was: sera antifraction II > antitoxin 2 > antitotal venom > anti-gland macerates of whole telsons. Two additional aspects were further investigated in the present work. One is the demonstration by immunoblotting that proteins corresponding to the electrophoretic mobility of toxins known to block sodium channels are highly immunodominant in this venom. Second, there is a strong cross-reactivity of antisera produced with Centruroides noxius when assayed against venoms from other dangerous species of Centruroides scorpions from Mexico, but not against the Israeli scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus. Finally, the immunodominance of toxic fractions in the immune response was observed either with immunization using Freund's adjuvant or by means of adsorption to nitrocellulose membranes. This latter vehicle was shown to be an excellent detoxifying agent, without

  10. A macroecological analysis of SERA derived forest heights and implications for forest volume remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Brolly, Matthew; Woodhouse, Iain H; Niklas, Karl J; Hammond, Sean T

    2012-01-01

    Individual trees have been shown to exhibit strong relationships between DBH, height and volume. Often such studies are cited as justification for forest volume or standing biomass estimation through remote sensing. With resolution of common satellite remote sensing systems generally too low to resolve individuals, and a need for larger coverage, these systems rely on descriptive heights, which account for tree collections in forests. For remote sensing and allometric applications, this height is not entirely understood in terms of its location. Here, a forest growth model (SERA) analyzes forest canopy height relationships with forest wood volume. Maximum height, mean, H₁₀₀, and Lorey's height are examined for variability under plant number density, resource and species. Our findings, shown to be allometrically consistent with empirical measurements for forested communities world-wide, are analyzed for implications to forest remote sensing techniques such as LiDAR and RADAR. Traditional forestry measures of maximum height, and to a lesser extent H₁₀₀ and Lorey's, exhibit little consistent correlation with forest volume across modeled conditions. The implication is that using forest height to infer volume or biomass from remote sensing requires species and community behavioral information to infer accurate estimates using height alone. SERA predicts mean height to provide the most consistent relationship with volume of the height classifications studied and overall across forest variations. This prediction agrees with empirical data collected from conifer and angiosperm forests with plant densities ranging between 10²-10⁶ plants/hectare and heights 6-49 m. Height classifications investigated are potentially linked to radar scattering centers with implications for allometry. These findings may be used to advance forest biomass estimation accuracy through remote sensing. Furthermore, Lorey's height with its specific relationship to remote sensing

  11. Predicting antidisease immunity using proteome arrays and sera from children naturally exposed to malaria.

    PubMed

    Finney, Olivia C; Danziger, Samuel A; Molina, Douglas M; Vignali, Marissa; Takagi, Aki; Ji, Ming; Stanisic, Danielle I; Siba, Peter M; Liang, Xiawu; Aitchison, John D; Mueller, Ivo; Gardner, Malcolm J; Wang, Ruobing

    2014-10-01

    Malaria remains one of the most prevalent and lethal human infectious diseases worldwide. A comprehensive characterization of antibody responses to blood stage malaria is essential to support the development of future vaccines, sero-diagnostic tests, and sero-surveillance methods. We constructed a proteome array containing 4441 recombinant proteins expressed by the blood stages of the two most common human malaria parasites, P. falciparum (Pf) and P. vivax (Pv), and used this array to screen sera of Papua New Guinea children infected with Pf, Pv, or both (Pf/Pv) that were either symptomatic (febrile), or asymptomatic but had parasitemia detectable via microscopy or PCR. We hypothesized that asymptomatic children would develop antigen-specific antibody profiles associated with antidisease immunity, as compared with symptomatic children. The sera from these children recognized hundreds of the arrayed recombinant Pf and Pv proteins. In general, responses in asymptomatic children were highest in those with high parasitemia, suggesting that antibody levels are associated with parasite burden. In contrast, symptomatic children carried fewer antibodies than asymptomatic children with infections detectable by microscopy, particularly in Pv and Pf/Pv groups, suggesting that antibody production may be impaired during symptomatic infections. We used machine-learning algorithms to investigate the relationship between antibody responses and symptoms, and we identified antibody responses to sets of Plasmodium proteins that could predict clinical status of the donors. Several of these antibody responses were identified by multiple comparisons, including those against members of the serine enriched repeat antigen family and merozoite protein 4. Interestingly, both P. falciparum serine enriched repeat antigen-5 and merozoite protein 4 have been previously investigated for use in vaccines. This machine learning approach, never previously applied to proteome arrays, can be used to

  12. Validation of creatinine assays utilizing HPLC and IDMS traceable standards in sera of children.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, George J; Kwong, Tai; Erway, Brian; Warady, Bradley; Sokoll, Lori; Hellerstein, Stanley; Dharnidharka, Vikas; Furth, Susan; Muñoz, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate serum creatinine (SCr) concentrations assayed in the Central Biochemistry Laboratory of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) study utilizing an enzymatic assay (Siemens Advia 2400) against a method traceable to reference isotope dilution mass spectroscopy (IDMS) developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) measured SCr after external validation utilizing IDMS-based standard reference materials. Sera from the first 201 subjects enrolled in CKiD were analyzed and compared for creatinine concentration by enzymatic and HPLC methods. Fifty "normal" pediatric sera were subsequently analyzed. Finally, a "pediatric" reference standard was prepared and examined for accuracy and precision. Enzymatic SCr concentrations (median 1.4 mg/dl) of CKiD subjects were well correlated with HPLC (r = 0.984) but were slightly higher (+7%; p < 0.001). Agreement was poorer at lower SCr (median 0.4 mg/dl) when using samples from normal children and the "pediatric" reference standard. However, the Roche enzymatic assay was comparable with HPLC in accuracy and precision. Referring physicians should be aware of the accuracy and reproducibility of their laboratory's SCr assay. Our enzymatic assay agreed well with HPLC in CKiD subjects with elevated SCr. We suggest that NIST develop a pediatric SCr standard reference material for use by assay manufacturers to improve accuracy and precision of assays at the low SCr levels observed in most pediatric patients.

  13. High detection rates of TTV-like mini virus sequences in sera from Brazilian blood donors.

    PubMed

    Niel, C; Lampe, E

    2001-09-01

    TT virus (TTV) is an unenveloped virus with a single-stranded, circular DNA genome of 3,818-3,853 nucleotides (nt) that infects humans and non-human primates. Recently, the existence of a novel human virus, TTV-like mini virus (TLMV), that shows a genetic organization similar to that of TTV, but with smaller virion particle and genome, was proposed [Takahashi et al. (2000) Archives of Virology 145:979-993]. To date, no information is available with respect to the prevalence and pathogenicity of TLMV. A sensitive PCR assay was developed by using two oligonucleotide primers (LS2 and LA2) designed from the conserved non-coding region of the TLMV genome. One hundred thirty-seven sera from volunteer Brazilian blood donors were tested and 99 (72%) were TLMV DNA positive. No significant differences were observed between the groups of TLMV positive and negative subjects in relation to sex ratio, seroprevalence of TTV DNA, prevalence of anti-hepatitis A virus antibodies, area of residence, occurrence of daily contact with animals, family income, education level, and level of alanine aminotransferase. The specificity of the PCR assay was demonstrated after cloning of amplification products and determination of the nucleotide sequences (200-228 nt) of clones derived from 23 individuals. When DNAs extracted from TLMV/TTV-coinfected sera were submitted to PCR with LS2 and LA2 primers, the amplification products were derived exclusively from the TLMV genome. A markedly wide range of sequence divergence, even higher than that existent among TTV strains, was noted among TLMV isolates, with a maximum evolutionary distance of 0.80.

  14. Standardized Method of Measuring Acanthamoeba Antibodies in Sera from Healthy Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Cynthia L.; Wright, John A.; Coletta, Michael; Newsome, Anthony L.

    2001-01-01

    Acanthamoeba species can cause serious, debilitating, and sometimes life-threatening infections. Three groups have been identified using morphological and immunological comparisons. Previous serological studies have utilized a variety of antigen preparations and assay methods and reported disparate (3 to 100%) results. This study was designed to (i) optimize an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detecting serum antibodies to each of the Acanthamoeba serogroups and (ii) test 55 healthy individuals for specific immunoglobulin G reactivity. The highest signal-to-background ratio was found when 3,000 fixed, intact trophozoites per well were used with a 1:10 serum dilution. Sera yielding optical densities of <0.25 against all three Acanthamoeba serogroups were used to define the cutoff for positive results. The highest background reactivity with these sera was seen with Acanthamoeba polyphaga (serogroup 2), followed by Acanthamoeba culbertsoni (serogroup 3) and Acanthamoeba astronyxis (serogroup 1). Of 55 subjects tested, the highest number of positive results was seen with A. polyphaga (81.8%), followed by A. astronyxis (52.8%) and A. culbertsoni (40%). Seven serum samples (12.7%) were negative for all three Acanthamoeba serogroups, 16 (29.1%) were positive for one serogroup only, 16 were positive for two serogroups, and 16 reacted to all three serogroups. Further analysis showed no significant associations between serogroup reactivity and age or gender. However, some ethnic differences were noted, especially with A. polyphaga antigens. In that case, serum samples from Hispanic subjects were 14.5 times less likely to be positive (P = 0.0025) and had lower mean absorbance values (P = 0.047) than those from Caucasian subjects. Overall, these data suggest that Acanthamoeba colonization or infection is more common than previously thought. Mild or asymptomatic infections may contribute to the observed serum reactivities. PMID:11427418

  15. Microarray screening of Guillain-Barré syndrome sera for antibodies to glycolipid complexes

    PubMed Central

    Halstead, Susan K.; Kalna, Gabriela; Islam, Mohammad B.; Jahan, Israt; Mohammad, Quazi D.; Jacobs, Bart C.; Endtz, Hubert P.; Islam, Zhahirul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the patterns of autoantibodies to glycolipid complexes in a large cohort of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and control samples collected in Bangladesh using a newly developed microarray technique. Methods: Twelve commonly studied glycolipids and lipids, plus their 66 possible heteromeric complexes, totaling 78 antigens, were applied to polyvinylidene fluoride–coated slides using a microarray printer. Arrays were probed with 266 GBS and 579 control sera (2 μL per serum, diluted 1/50) and bound immunoglobulin G detected with secondary antibody. Scanned arrays were subjected to statistical analyses. Results: Measuring antibodies to single targets was 9% less sensitive than to heteromeric complex targets (49.2% vs 58.3%) without significantly affecting specificity (83.9%–85.0%). The optimal screening protocol for GBS sera comprised a panel of 10 glycolipids (4 single glycolipids GM1, GA1, GD1a, GQ1b, and their 6 heteromeric complexes), resulting in an overall assay sensitivity of 64.3% and specificity of 77.1%. Notable heteromeric targets were GM1:GD1a, GM1:GQ1b, and GA1:GD1a, in which exclusive binding to the complex was observed. Conclusions: Rationalizing the screening protocol to capture the enormous diversity of glycolipid complexes can be achieved by miniaturizing the screening platform to a microarray platform, and applying simple bioinformatics to determine optimal sensitivity and specificity of the targets. Glycolipid complexes are an important category of glycolipid antigens in autoimmune neuropathy cases that require specific analytical and bioinformatics methods for optimal detection. PMID:27790627

  16. Archaeosomes display immunoadjuvant potential for a vaccine against Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Higa, Leticia H.; Corral, Ricardo S.; Morilla, María José; Romero, Eder L.; Petray, Patricia B.

    2013-01-01

    Archaeosomes (ARC), vesicles made from lipids extracted from Archaea, display strong adjuvant properties. In this study, we evaluated the ability of the highly stable ARC formulated from total polar lipids of a new Halorubrum tebenquichense strain found in Argentinean Patagonia, to act as adjuvant for soluble parasite antigens in developing prophylactic vaccine against the intracellular protozoan T. cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. We demonstrated for the first time that C3H/HeN mice subcutaneously immunized with trypanosomal antigens entrapped in these ARC (ARC-TcAg) rapidly developed higher levels of circulating T. cruzi antibodies than those measured in the sera from animals receiving the antigen alone. Enhanced humoral responses elicited by ARC-TcAg presented a dominant IgG2a antibody isotype, usually associated with Th1-type immunity and resistance against T. cruzi. More importantly, ARC-TcAg-vaccinated mice displayed reduced parasitemia during early infection and were protected against an otherwise lethal challenge with the virulent Tulahuén strain of the parasite. Our findings suggest that, as an adjuvant, H. tebenquichense-derived ARC may hold great potential to develop a safe and helpful vaccine against this relevant human pathogen. PMID:23291939

  17. Epitope recognition patterns of thyroglobulin antibody in sera from patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis on different thyroid functional status

    PubMed Central

    Liu, M; Zhao, L; Gao, Y; Huang, Y; Lu, G; Guo, X

    2012-01-01

    Thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) is a diagnostic serological marker of Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). The pathogenesis of HT progression from euthyroidism to hypothyroidism is still not clear. Epitope recognition patterns of TgAb have been shown to be different in individuals who are euthyroid or who have clinical disease. The aim of our study was to investigate the role of thyroglobulin (Tg) epitope specificities in HT progression. Sera from 107 patients with newly diagnosed HT were collected and divided into three groups: patients with hypothyroidism (H, n = 39), subclinical hypothyroidism (sH, n = 31) and euthyroidism (Eu, n = 37). A panel of Tg murine monoclonal antibodies (mAb: PB2, 5E6, 1D4, 5F9, Tg6) and a hircine pAb (N15) were employed as the probe antibodies to define the antigenic determinants recognized by HT sera on competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Eight of 39 sera samples in H and seven of 31 in sH inhibited PB2 binding, respectively, whereas none did in Eu. The ratio of sera samples, inhibiting PB2 binding in Eu, was significantly lower than that in H (P = 0·011) and in sH (P = 0·008). For N15, five of 39 sera samples in H, six of 31 in sH and 15 of 37 in Eu inhibited its binding, respectively. The ratio of sera samples, inhibiting N15 binding in Eu, was significantly higher than that in H (P = 0·013). Our study demonstrated that HT patients in different thyroid functional status exhibited different Tg epitope recognition patterns. Epitope patterns of TgAb might be used as a prediction marker of HT progression. PMID:23121669

  18. Epitope recognition patterns of thyroglobulin antibody in sera from patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis on different thyroid functional status.

    PubMed

    Liu, M; Zhao, L; Gao, Y; Huang, Y; Lu, G; Guo, X

    2012-12-01

    Thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) is a diagnostic serological marker of Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). The pathogenesis of HT progression from euthyroidism to hypothyroidism is still not clear. Epitope recognition patterns of TgAb have been shown to be different in individuals who are euthyroid or who have clinical disease. The aim of our study was to investigate the role of thyroglobulin (Tg) epitope specificities in HT progression. Sera from 107 patients with newly diagnosed HT were collected and divided into three groups: patients with hypothyroidism (H, n = 39), subclinical hypothyroidism (sH, n = 31) and euthyroidism (Eu, n = 37). A panel of Tg murine monoclonal antibodies (mAb: PB2, 5E6, 1D4, 5F9, Tg6) and a hircine pAb (N15) were employed as the probe antibodies to define the antigenic determinants recognized by HT sera on competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Eight of 39 sera samples in H and seven of 31 in sH inhibited PB2 binding, respectively, whereas none did in Eu. The ratio of sera samples, inhibiting PB2 binding in Eu, was significantly lower than that in H (P = 0.011) and in sH (P = 0.008). For N15, five of 39 sera samples in H, six of 31 in sH and 15 of 37 in Eu inhibited its binding, respectively. The ratio of sera samples, inhibiting N15 binding in Eu, was significantly higher than that in H (P = 0.013). Our study demonstrated that HT patients in different thyroid functional status exhibited different Tg epitope recognition patterns. Epitope patterns of TgAb might be used as a prediction marker of HT progression.

  19. Heterogeneity of Trichomonas vaginalis and discrimination among trichomonal isolates and subpopulations with sera of patients and experimentally infected mice.

    PubMed Central

    Alderete, J F; Suprun-Brown, L; Kasmala, L; Smith, J; Spence, M

    1985-01-01

    The antibody response in trichomoniasis patients was examined with a variety of methodologies including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, indirect immunofluorescence, immunoblotting, and radioimmunoprecipitation-electrophoresis-autoradiography. Based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay recognition of trichomonal isolates, sera from patients with trichomoniasis were categorized into reactive class I (IA, IB, and IC) and nonreactive class II sera. A diminished ability to precipitate antibody-binding trichomonad membrane proteins by the whole cell radioimmunoprecipitation assay was noted from class IA to class II sera. The antigenic distinctions among various Trichomonas vaginalis isolates appeared due to high-molecular-weight protein antigens detected by class IA sera in a whole cell radioimmunoprecipitation assay. The heterogeneity in antigenic patterns was confirmed among the isolates with sera from experimental animals. Also, live T. vaginalis cells appear to have only a few of the entire repertoire of major immunogenic surface proteins accessible to antibody binding. Immunoblotting demonstrated that the high-molecular-weight proteins responsible for trichomonal isolate heterogeneity are present in all isolates. The data suggest that trichomonads of a given isolate express only a subset of internally synthesized protein antigens on their surface. Importantly, the presence of these protein antigens on T. vaginalis membranes correlated with antibody production in subcutaneously challenged mice. Finally, indirect immunofluorescence studies with highly reactive, pooled sera from either patients or mice revealed a subpopulation of nonstaining trichomonads. These data support the view that heterogeneity among T. vaginalis is dependent upon the surface disposition of highly immunogenic protein antigens. Strategies may now be developed not only for studying potential vaccine reagents, but also for examining possible antigenic phenotypic variations in this experimental

  20. Anti-FIRs (PUF60) auto-antibodies are detected in the sera of early-stage colon cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Sohei; Hoshino, Tyuji; Hiwasa, Takaki; Satoh, Mamoru; Rahmutulla, Bahityar; Tsuchida, Sachio; Komukai, Yuji; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Shimada, Hideaki; Nomura, Fumio; Matsushita, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Anti-PUF60, poly(U)-binding-splicing factor, autoantibodies are reported to be detected in the sera of dermatomyositis and Sjogren's syndrome that occasionally associated with malignancies. PUF60 is identical with far-upstream element-binding protein-interacting repressor (FIR) that is a transcriptional repressor of c-myc gene. In colorectal cancers, a splicing variant of FIR that lacks exon2 (FIRΔexon2) is overexpressed as a dominant negative form of FIR. In this study, to reveal the presence and the significance of anti-FIRs (FIR/FIRΔexon2) antibodies in cancers were explored in the sera of colorectal and other cancer patients. Anti-FIRs antibodies were surely detected in the preoperative sera of 28 colorectal cancer patients (32.2% of positive rates), and the detection rate was significantly higher than that in healthy control sera (Mann–Whitney U test, p < 0.01). The level of anti-FIRs antibodies significantly decreased after the operation (p < 0.01). Anti-FIRs antibodies were detected in the sera of early-stage and/or recurrent colon cancer patients in which anti-p53 antibodies, CEA, and CA19-9 were not detected as well as in the sera of other cancer patients. Furthermore, the area under the curve of receiver operating characteristic for anti-FIRs antibodies was significantly larger (0.85) than that for anti-p53 antibodies or CA19-9. In conclusions, the combination of anti-FIRs antibodies with other clinically available tumor markers further improved the specificity and accuracy of cancer diagnosis. PMID:27756887

  1. Characterization of the protease activity of detergents: laboratory practicals for studying the protease profile and activity of various commercial detergents.

    PubMed

    Valls, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

    2011-07-01

    Detergent enzymes account for about 30% of the total worldwide production of enzymes and are one of the largest and most successful applications of modern industrial biotechnology. Proteases can improve the wash performance of household, industrial, and institutional laundry detergents used to remove protein-based stains such as blood, grass, body fluids, and food soils. This article describes two easy and cheap laboratory exercises to study the presence, profile, and basic enzymology of detergent proteases. These laboratory practicals are based on the determination of the detergent protease activity of various commercial detergents using the N-succinyl-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-prolyl-L-phenylalanine p-nitroanilide method and the bovine serum albumin degradation capacity. Students are also required to elucidate the enzymatic subtype of detergent proteases by studying the inhibitory potential of several types of protease inhibitors revealed by the same experimental methodology. Additionally, the results of the exercises can be used to provide additional insights on elementary enzymology by studying the influence of several important parameters on protease activity such as temperature (in this article) and the influence of pH and effects of surfactants and oxidizers (proposed). Students also develop laboratory skills, problem-solving capacities, and the ability to write a laboratory report. The exercises are mainly designed for an advanced undergraduate project in the biochemistry and biotechnology sciences. Globally, these laboratory practicals show students the biotechnological applications of proteases in the detergent industry and also reinforce important enzymology concepts.

  2. 21 CFR 184.1027 - Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1027 Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product. (a) Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product is an enzyme preparation that includes carbohydrase and protease...

  3. Detection of Legume Protease Inhibitors by the Gel-X-ray Film Contact Print Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulimani, Veerappa H.; Sudheendra, Kulkarni; Giri, Ashok P.

    2002-01-01

    Redgram (Cajanus cajan L.) extracts have been analyzed for the protease inhibitors using a new, sensitive, simple, and rapid method for detection of electrophoretically separated protease inhibitors. The detection involves equilibrating the gel successively in the protease assay buffer and protease solution, rinsing the gel in assay buffer, and…

  4. Validation of Protein Markers for Lung Cancer Using CARET Sera and Proteomics Techniques — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    1.1 To validate the finding from pilot studies with CARET sera of autoantibodies to annexins I and II and PGP9.5 as potential biomarkers for lung cancers before the clinical diagnosis, evaluating sensitivity and specificity by time before diagnosis, treatment arm, gender, histologic type, and smoking status. 1.2 To determine whether a pattern of occurrence of autoantibodies in lung cancer sera may be diagnostic of lung cancer that is not dependent on the occurrence of any particular autoantibody. 1.3 To compare the findings for individual biomarker candidates and combinations of biomarker candidates in participants who were current smokers versus former smokers.

  5. Digital display of astronomical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandi, S. A.

    1982-08-01

    A brief summary is given of techniques to enhance for photographic display digital astronomical images. The phenomenon of photographic deresolution is discussed and a proposed algorithm, the highpass squared filter, is presented to correct for this effect.

  6. Color speckle in laser displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Kazuo

    2015-07-01

    At the beginning of this century, lighting technology has been shifted from discharge lamps, fluorescent lamps and electric bulbs to solid-state lighting. Current solid-state lighting is based on the light emitting diodes (LED) technology, but the laser lighting technology is developing rapidly, such as, laser cinema projectors, laser TVs, laser head-up displays, laser head mounted displays, and laser headlamps for motor vehicles. One of the main issues of laser displays is the reduction of speckle noise1). For the monochromatic laser light, speckle is random interference pattern on the image plane (retina for human observer). For laser displays, RGB (red-green-blue) lasers form speckle patterns independently, which results in random distribution of chromaticity, called color speckle2).

  7. Fluidic-thermochromic display device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grafstein, D.; Hilborn, E. H.

    1968-01-01

    Fluidic decoder and display device has low-power requirements for temperature control of thermochromic materials. An electro-to-fluid converter translates incoming electrical signals into pneumatics signal of sufficient power to operate the fluidic logic elements.

  8. Animated Displays IV: Linear Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chagnon, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Describes several demonstrations that can be easily reproduced to help students understand optical polarization. Displays and supplement text include polarization by reflection; polarization by scattering; liquid crystals; optical activity; calcite; birefringent plastics; retardation plates; photoelasticity; and the "Optical Barber…

  9. Multiplane binocular visual display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    Electro-optic system is interfaced with digital computer in flight simulator to generate simultaneous multiple-image planes in real time. System may have applications with other display and remote-control systems.

  10. Ten inch Planar Optic Display

    SciTech Connect

    Beiser, L.; Veligdan, J.

    1996-04-01

    A Planar Optic Display (POD) is being built and tested for suitability as a high brightness replacement for the cathode ray tube, (CRT). The POD display technology utilizes a laminated optical waveguide structure which allows a projection type of display to be constructed in a thin (I to 2 inch) housing. Inherent in the optical waveguide is a black cladding matrix which gives the display a black appearance leading to very high contrast. A Digital Micromirror Device, (DMD) from Texas Instruments is used to create video images in conjunction with a 100 milliwatt green solid state laser. An anamorphic optical system is used to inject light into the POD to form a stigmatic image. In addition to the design of the POD screen, we discuss: image formation, image projection, and optical design constraints.

  11. A Well Tempered Mammographic Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    ambient light levels. A calibration procedure was developed that derived a display function for the mammogram display based upon equalizing the just...noticeable difference in contrast over the intensity range of the monitor at ambient illumination. The maximum and minimum pixel intensity determined... medio -lateral oblique views was developed. The time to detection and the detection accuracy using ROC analysis was compared for two radiologists reading

  12. Large Screen Display Technology Survey.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    source, which are made incident upon this combination, are blocked at the f focal plane. By inserting an optical scattering device (a small prism or...Systems Products, Inc. One Tico Road Titusville, Florida 32780 Contact: Debra Day, Area Manager Richard Smith, Technical Staff Telephone: (305) 269-6680...lamp. Optics coupled with an oil-immersion prism project color-filtered light on the display screen. A display resolution of 1024 X 1024 elements is

  13. Alternative display and interaction devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolas, M. T.; McDowall, I. E.; Mead, R. X.; Lorimer, E. R.; Hackbush, J. E.; Greuel, C.

    1995-01-01

    While virtual environment systems are typically thought to consist of a head mounted display and a flex-sensing glove, alternative peripheral devices are beginning to be developed in response to application requirements. Three such alternatives are discussed: fingertip sensing gloves, fixed stereoscopic viewers, and counterbalanced head mounted displays. A subset of commercial examples that highlight each alternative is presented as well as a brief discussion of interesting engineering and implementation issues.

  14. Effective color design for displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Lindsay W.

    2002-06-01

    Visual communication is a key aspect of human-computer interaction, which contributes to the satisfaction of user and application needs. For effective design of presentations on computer displays, color should be used in conjunction with the other visual variables. The general needs of graphic user interfaces are discussed, followed by five specific tasks with differing criteria for display color specification - advertising, text, information, visualization and imaging.

  15. The role of proteases in regulating Eph/ephrin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Atapattu, Lakmali; Lackmann, Martin; Janes, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    Proteases regulate a myriad of cell functions, both in normal and disease states. In addition to protein turnover, they regulate a range of signaling processes, including those mediated by Eph receptors and their ephrin ligands. A variety of proteases is reported to directly cleave Ephs and/or ephrins under different conditions, to promote receptor and/or ligand shedding, and regulate receptor/ligand internalisation and signaling. They also cleave other adhesion proteins in response to Eph-ephrin interactions, to indirectly facilitate Eph-mediated functions. Proteases thus contribute to Eph/ephrin mediated changes in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, in cell morphology and in cell migration and invasion, in a manner which appears to be tightly regulated by, and co-ordinated with, Eph signaling. This review summarizes the current literature describing the function and regulation of protease activities during Eph/ephrin-mediated cell signaling. PMID:25482632

  16. A Trichomonas vaginalis Rhomboid Protease and Its Substrate Modulate Parasite Attachment and Cytolysis of Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Riestra, Angelica M.; Gandhi, Shiv; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Moradian, Annie; Hess, Sonja; Urban, Sinisa; Johnson, Patricia J.

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is an extracellular eukaryotic parasite that causes the most common, non-viral sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Although disease burden is high, molecular mechanisms underlying T. vaginalis pathogenesis are poorly understood. Here, we identify a family of putative T. vaginalis rhomboid proteases and demonstrate catalytic activity for two, TvROM1 and TvROM3, using a heterologous cell cleavage assay. The two T. vaginalis intramembrane serine proteases display different subcellular localization and substrate specificities. TvROM1 is a cell surface membrane protein and cleaves atypical model rhomboid protease substrates, whereas TvROM3 appears to localize to the Golgi apparatus and recognizes a typical model substrate. To identify TvROM substrates, we interrogated the T. vaginalis surface proteome using both quantitative proteomic and bioinformatic approaches. Of the nine candidates identified, TVAG_166850 and TVAG_280090 were shown to be cleaved by TvROM1. Comparison of amino acid residues surrounding the predicted cleavage sites of TvROM1 substrates revealed a preference for small amino acids in the predicted transmembrane domain. Over-expression of TvROM1 increased attachment to and cytolysis of host ectocervical cells. Similarly, mutations that block the cleavage of a TvROM1 substrate lead to its accumulation on the cell surface and increased parasite adherence to host cells. Together, these data indicate a role for TvROM1 and its substrate(s) in modulating attachment to and lysis of host cells, which are key processes in T. vaginalis pathogenesis. PMID:26684303

  17. Streptococcus agalactiae CspA is a serine protease that inactivates chemokines.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Joshua D; Shelver, Daniel W

    2009-03-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus [GBS]) remains a leading cause of invasive infections in neonates and has emerged as a pathogen of the immunocompromised and elderly populations. The virulence mechanisms of GBS are relatively understudied and are still poorly understood. Previous evidence indicated that the GBS cspA gene is necessary for full virulence and the cleavage of fibrinogen. The predicted cspA product displays homology to members of the extracellular cell envelope protease family. CXC chemokines, many of which can recruit neutrophils to sites of infection, are important signaling peptides of the immune system. In this study, we purified CspA and demonstrated that it readily cleaved the CXC chemokines GRO-alpha, GRO-beta, GRO-gamma, neutrophil-activating peptide 2 (NAP-2), and granulocyte chemotactic protein 2 (GCP-2) but did not cleave interleukin-8. CspA did not cleave a panel of other test substrates, suggesting that it possesses a certain degree of specificity. CXC chemokines also underwent cleavage by whole GBS cells in a cspA-dependent manner. CspA abolished the abilities of three representative CXC chemokines, GRO-gamma, NAP-2, and GCP-2, to attract and activate neutrophils. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicated that CspA is a serine protease with S575 at its active site. D180 was also implicated as part of the signature serine protease catalytic triad, and both S575 and D180 were required for both N-terminal and C-terminal autocatalytic processing of CspA.

  18. Pyoverdine and proteases affect the response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to gallium in human serum.

    PubMed

    Bonchi, Carlo; Frangipani, Emanuela; Imperi, Francesco; Visca, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Gallium is an iron mimetic which has recently been repurposed as an antibacterial agent due to its capability to disrupt bacterial iron metabolism. In this study, the antibacterial activity of gallium nitrate [Ga(NO3)3] was investigated in complement-free human serum (HS) on 55 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis patients. The susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to Ga(NO3)3 in HS was dependent on the bacterial ability to acquire iron from serum binding proteins (i.e., transferrin). The extent of serum protein degradation correlated well with P. aeruginosa growth in HS, while pyoverdine production did not. However, pyoverdine-deficient P. aeruginosa strains were unable to grow in HS and overcome iron restriction, albeit capable of releasing proteases. Predigestion of HS with proteinase K promoted the growth of all strains, irrespective of their ability to produce proteases and/or pyoverdine. The MICs of Ga(NO3)3 were higher in HS than in an iron-poor Casamino Acids medium, where proteolysis does not affect iron availability. Coherently, strains displaying high proteolytic activity were less susceptible to Ga(NO3)3 in HS. Our data support a model in which both pyoverdine and proteases affect the response of P. aeruginosa to Ga(NO3)3 in HS. The relatively high Ga(NO3)3 concentration required to inhibit the growth of highly proteolytic P. aeruginosa isolates in HS poses a limitation to the potential of Ga(NO3)3 in the treatment of P. aeruginosa bloodstream infections.

  19. A Trichomonas vaginalis Rhomboid Protease and Its Substrate Modulate Parasite Attachment and Cytolysis of Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Riestra, Angelica M; Gandhi, Shiv; Sweredoski, Michael J; Moradian, Annie; Hess, Sonja; Urban, Sinisa; Johnson, Patricia J

    2015-12-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is an extracellular eukaryotic parasite that causes the most common, non-viral sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Although disease burden is high, molecular mechanisms underlying T. vaginalis pathogenesis are poorly understood. Here, we identify a family of putative T. vaginalis rhomboid proteases and demonstrate catalytic activity for two, TvROM1 and TvROM3, using a heterologous cell cleavage assay. The two T. vaginalis intramembrane serine proteases display different subcellular localization and substrate specificities. TvROM1 is a cell surface membrane protein and cleaves atypical model rhomboid protease substrates, whereas TvROM3 appears to localize to the Golgi apparatus and recognizes a typical model substrate. To identify TvROM substrates, we interrogated the T. vaginalis surface proteome using both quantitative proteomic and bioinformatic approaches. Of the nine candidates identified, TVAG_166850 and TVAG_280090 were shown to be cleaved by TvROM1. Comparison of amino acid residues surrounding the predicted cleavage sites of TvROM1 substrates revealed a preference for small amino acids in the predicted transmembrane domain. Over-expression of TvROM1 increased attachment to and cytolysis of host ectocervical cells. Similarly, mutations that block the cleavage of a TvROM1 substrate lead to its accumulation on the cell surface and increased parasite adherence to host cells. Together, these data indicate a role for TvROM1 and its substrate(s) in modulating attachment to and lysis of host cells, which are key processes in T. vaginalis pathogenesis.

  20. Characterisation of a secretory serine protease inhibitor (SjB6) from Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Proteins belonging to the serine protease inhibitor (serpin) superfamily play essential physiological roles in many organisms. In pathogens, serpins are thought to have evolved specifically to limit host immune responses by interfering with the host immune-stimulatory signals. Serpins are less well characterised in parasitic helminths, although some are thought to be involved in mechanisms associated with host immune modulation. In this study, we cloned and partially characterised a secretory serpin from Schistosoma japonicum termed SjB6, these findings provide the basis for possible functional roles. Methods SjB6 gene was identified through database mining of our previously published microarray data, cloned and detailed sequence and structural analysis and comparative modelling carried out using various bioinformatics and proteomics tools. Gene transcriptional profiling was determined by real-time PCR and the expression of native protein determined by immunoblotting. An immunological profile of the recombinant protein produced in insect cells was determined by ELISA. Results SjB6 contains an open reading frame of 1160 base pairs that encodes a protein of 387 amino acid residues. Detailed sequence analysis, comparative modelling and structural-based alignment revealed that SjB6 contains the essential structural motifs and consensus secondary structures typical of inhibitory serpins. The presence of an N-terminal signal sequence indicated that SjB6 is a secretory protein. Real-time data indicated that SjB6 is expressed exclusively in the intra-mammalian stage of the parasite life cycle with its highest expression levels in the egg stage (p < 0.0001). The native protein is approximately 60 kDa in size and recombinant SjB6 (rSjB6) was recognised strongly by sera from rats experimentally infected with S. japonicum. Conclusions The significantly high expression of SjB6 in schistosome eggs, when compared to other life cycle stages, suggests a possible