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Sample records for serotonin uptake blockade

  1. The presence of a serotonin uptake inhibitor alters pharmacological manipulations of serotonin release.

    PubMed

    Kreiss, D S; Wieland, S; Lucki, I

    1993-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of the presence of the serotonin uptake inhibitor citalopram in the perfusion medium on pharmacological manipulations which increased and decreased striatal serotonin release using in vivo microdialysis. A high performance liquid chromatography detection system equipped with a microbore column was used which reduced the detection limit to 0.5 fmol serotonin/5 microliters sample and enabled basal striatal serotonin release to be measured without the addition of a serotonin uptake inhibitor to the perfusion medium. Although serotonin uptake inhibitors have frequently been used to enhance the serotonin content of dialysate samples, the effects of the presence of serotonin uptake inhibitors on pharmacological manipulations which increased and decreased the release of serotonin have not yet been characterized. Serotonin release was reduced by the systemic administration of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT). Although 5-HT release was reduced by 8-OH-DPAT after the addition of citalopram, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist did not reduce absolute levels of extracellular serotonin below basal values of serotonin measured in the absence of citalopram. In addition, citalopram dramatically prevented the four-fold increase in the release of serotonin produced by the systemic administration of the serotonin-releasing agent fenfluramine. The blockade of fenfluramine's effects by citalopram supports the hypothesis that transport of fenfluramine into serotonergic neurons is necessary to increase serotonin release. This study demonstrates that the use of an HPLC detection system equipped with a microbore column can reliably measure basal serotonin release using in vivo microdialysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Measuring the serotonin uptake site using (/sup 3/H)paroxetine--a new serotonin uptake inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Gleiter, C.H.; Nutt, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that may be involved in ethanol preference and dependence. It is possible to label the serotonin uptake site in brain using the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine, but this also binds to other sites. We have used the new high-affinity uptake blocker paroxetine to define binding to this site and report it to have advantages over imipramine as a ligand.

  3. Lung damage and pulmonary uptake of serotonin in intact dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, C.A.; Christensen, C.W.; Rickaby, D.A.; Linehan, J.H.; Johnston, M.R.

    1985-06-01

    The authors examined the influence of glass bead embolization and oleic acid, dextran, and imipramine infusion on the pulmonary uptake of trace doses of (/sup 3/H)serotonin and the extravascular volume accessible to (/sup 14/C)antipyrine in anesthetized dogs. Embolization and imipramine decreased serotonin uptake by 53 and 61%, respectively, but no change was observed with oleic acid or dextran infusion. The extravascular volume accessible to the antipyrine was reduced by 77% after embolization and increased by 177 and approximately 44% after oleic acid and dextran infusion, respectively. The results suggest that when the perfused endothelial surface is sufficiently reduced, as with embolization, the uptake of trace doses of serotonin will be depressed. In addition, decreases in serotonin uptake in response to imipramine in this study and in response to certain endothelial toxins in other studies suggest that serotonin uptake can reveal certain kinds of changes in endothelial function. However, the lack of a response to oleic acid-induced damage in the present study suggests that serotonin uptake is not sensitive to all forms of endothelial damage.

  4. 4-Iodotomoxetine: a novel ligand for serotonin uptake sites.

    PubMed

    Kung, M P; Chumpradit, S; Billings, J; Kung, H

    1992-01-01

    The tomoxetine analog, R-4-iodotomoxetine, binds in vitro to a single site of rat cortical membranes with high affinity (Kd = 0.03 +/- 0.01 nM, n = 4) and can be blocked by a selective serotonin reuptake site inhibitor, paroxetine. The [125I]R-4-iodotomoxetine binding at equilibrium is saturable and is temperature- and Na(+)-dependent. The number of specific [125I]R-4-iodotomoxetine binding sites (Bmax = 356 +/- 20 fmol/mg protein) is similar to that of [3H]citalopram (329 +/- 30 fmol/mg protein), a known serotonin uptake inhibitor. The binding of [125I]R-4-iodotomoxetine is selectively inhibited by several serotonin uptake blockers, and a good correlation is demonstrated between the potency of various drugs to inhibit in vitro binding of [125I]R-4-iodotomoxetine and [3H]citalopram. In addition, lesions performed with the neurotoxin p-chloroamphetamine, which destroys monoamine neurons, including serotonergic neuronal system, result in a 90% reduction of [125I]R-4-iodotomoxetine binding when compared to sham controls. These results indicate that the binding sites labeled by [125I]R-4-iodotomoxetine are associated with the neuronal serotonin uptake sites. However, the in vivo and ex vivo results do not show regional localization corresponding to the distribution of serotonin uptake sites. The nonspecific uptake may be related to this compound's high lipophilicity (octanol-buffer partition coefficient = 1100 - 1400 at pH 7). Although the in vivo properties of [125I]R-4-iodotomoxetine make it an unlikely candidate for mapping serotonin uptake sites with SPECT, the high affinity and selectivity should make it a useful tool for in vitro studies of the serotonin uptake sites.

  5. Serotonin uptake blockers and the treatment of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, D A

    1989-01-01

    There is growing research and clinical interest in the role of brain serotonin in regulating alcohol consumption, based on two lines of evidence: negative correlations between brain serotonin levels and spontaneous alcohol consumption in rodents, and decreased alcohol intake produced by drug-induced increases in brain serotonin activity in rodents and humans. Specific blockers of neuronal serotonin uptake, such as citalopram, fluoxetine, and zimelidine, are the major drugs used in such studies. More than a dozen studies have consistently found that such specific serotonin uptake blockers reduce alcohol preference and intake in rodents, whereas nonspecific monoamine uptake blockers (e.g., amitriptyline, doxepin) do not. The effect begins within 1 hr of administration, wears off within several days of stopping drug, and often shows tolerance after 4-10 days of daily administration (the opposite time course from antidepressant action in humans). In four human, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, citalopram (40 mg but not 20 mg daily), fluoxetine (80 mg daily), and zimelidine (200 mg more than 300 mg daily) significantly reduced alcohol intake 10-26% in social drinkers, early problem drinkers, and chronic alcoholics. The effect occurred within a few days, wore off within several days of stopping drug, and lasted throughout the 2-4 weeks of drug administration, except that in the fluoxetine study with chronic alcoholics the effect was significant only during the first week. The reduced alcohol intake was not due to sedation, antidepression, or antianxiety effects, or an aversive drug-alcohol interaction, but could be explained in part by decreased appetitive behavior (two studies found that subjects lost weight) or a conditioned (taste) aversion to alcohol promoted by serotonin (as occurs in animals). Further research is also needed to clarify the neuropharmacological mechanism of action, since the alcohol intake-reducing effects in rodents are not blocked by

  6. Serotonin blockade delays learning performance in a cooperative fish.

    PubMed

    Soares, Marta C; Paula, José R; Bshary, Redouan

    2016-09-01

    Animals use learning and memorizing to gather information that will help them to make ecologically relevant decisions. Neuro-modulatory adjustments enable them to make associations between stimuli and appropriate behavior. A key candidate for the modulation of cooperative behavior is serotonin. Previous research has shown that modulation of the serotonergic system spontaneously affects the behavior of the cleaner wrasse Labroides dimidiatus during interactions with so-called 'client' reef fish. Here, we asked whether shifts in serotonin function affect the cleaners' associative learning abilities when faced with the task to distinguish two artificial clients that differ in their value as a food source. We found that the administration of serotonin 1A receptor antagonist significantly slowed learning speed in comparison with saline treated fish. As reduced serotonergic signaling typically enhances fear, we discuss the possibility that serotonin may affect how cleaners appraise, acquire information and respond to client-derived stimuli via manipulation of the perception of danger.

  7. Antihistamine effect on synaptosomal uptake of serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, P. A.; Vernikos, J.

    1980-01-01

    A study on the effects of five H1 and H2 antihistamines on the synaptosomal uptake of serotonin (5HT), norepinephrine (NE), and dopamine (DA) is presented. Brain homogenates from female rats were incubated in Krebs-Ringer phosphate buffer solution in the presence of one of three radioactive neurotransmitters, and one of the five antihistamines. Low concentrations of pyrilamine competitively inhibited 5HT uptake, had little effect on NE uptake, and no effect on DA uptake. Promethazine, diphenhydramine, metiamide, and cimetidine had no effect on 5HT or DA uptake at the same concentration. Diphenhydramine had a small inhibitory effect on NE uptake. It is concluded that pyrilamine is a selective and potent competitive inhibitor of 5HT uptake at concentrations between .05 and .5 micromolars.

  8. Increased serotonin platelet uptake after tianeptine administration in depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Chamba, G; Lemoine, P; Flachaire, E; Ferry, N; Quincy, C; Sassard, J; Ferber, C; Mocaër, E; Kamoun, A; Renaud, B

    1991-09-15

    Tianeptine is a new antidepressant drug reported to enhance serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) uptake in rat brain. The effect of tianeptine on 5-HT platelet uptake was studied in 10 depressed patients treated for 28 days. Tianeptine increases Vmax of 5-HT platelet uptake during treatment without inducing any change in Km. As early as 2 hr after the first administration, Vmax increased significantly (+23%, alpha = 0.01). Although of a lesser magnitude, 5-HT platelet uptake remains increased after chronic administration (+14% on day 10 and +13% on day 28). This suggests that tianeptine affects 5-HT platelet uptake sites, either directly or via an action on modulators of 5-HT uptake. These results, in contrast with the action of other tricyclic antidepressants, confirm the original action of tianeptine on 5-HT platelet metabolism.

  9. Myocardial serotonin exchange: negligible uptake by capillary endothelium

    PubMed Central

    MOFFETT, T. C.; CHAN, I. S.; BASSINGTHWAIGHTE, J. B.

    2010-01-01

    The extraction of serotonin from the blood during transorgan passage through the heart was studied using Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts. Outflow dilution curves of 131I- or 125I-labeled albumin, [14C]sucrose, and [3H]serotonin injected simultaneously into the inflow were fitted with an axially distributed blood-tissue exchange model to examine the extraction process. The model fits of the albumin and sucrose outflow dilution curves were used to define flow heterogeneity, intravascular dispersion, capillary permeability, and the volume of the interstitial space, which reduced the degrees of freedom in fitting the model to the serotonin curves. Serotonin extractions, measured against albumin, during single transcapillary passage, ranged from 24 to 64%. The ratio of the capillary permeability-surface area products for serotonin and sucrose, based on the maximum instantaneous extraction, was 1.37 ± 0.2 (n = 18), very close to the predicted value of 1.39, the ratio of free diffusion coefficients calculated from the molecular weights. This result shows that the observed uptake of serotonin can be accounted for solely on the basis of diffusion between endothelial cells into the interstitial space. Thus it appears that the permeability of the luminal surface of the endothelial cell is negligible in comparison to diffusion through the clefts between endothelial cells. In 18 sets of dilution curves, with and without receptor and transport blockers or competitors (ketanserin, desipramine, imipramine, serotonin), the extractions and estimates of the capillary permeability-surface area product were not reduced, nor were the volumes of distribution. The apparent absence of transporters and receptors in rabbit myocardial capillary endothelium contrasts with their known abundance in the pulmonary vasculature. PMID:3279823

  10. Serotonin uptake in blood platelets of psychiatric patients

    SciTech Connect

    Meltzer, H.Y.; Arora, R.C.; Baber, R.; Tricou, B.J.

    1981-12-01

    Platelet serotonin (5-HT) uptake was determined in 72 newly admitted, unmedicated psychiatric patients. Decreased maximum velocity (Vmax) of 5-HT uptake was present in unipolar and bipolar depressed patients as well as schizoaffective depressed patients. The apparent Michaelis constant (km) of 5-HT uptake was normal in these groups, as was Vmax and Km in manic-depressive and chronic schizophrenic patients. Treatment of depressed patients with notriptyline hydrochloride or imipramine hydrochloride increased Km significantly. There was a trend for the increase in Km in the nortriptyline-treated patients to correlate with clinical improvement. Decreased 5-HT uptake in platelets provides additional evidence for the role of 5-HT in the pathophysiologic process of some forms of depression.

  11. Aberrant seasonal variations of platelet serotonin uptake in endogenous depression.

    PubMed

    Malmgren, R; Aberg-Wistedt, A; Mårtensson, B

    1989-02-15

    The serotonin uptake in platelets of 120 healthy volunteers and 64 endogenously depressed patients was investigated over a 2-year period. In healthy individuals, Km exhibited a significant seasonal rhythm during the bright half of the year. The seasonal rhythm of Vmax assumes the form of a sine curve, with nadir values at the vernal and autumn equinoxes and peak values at the winter and summer solstices. Km in patients was higher than in controls in February and October, and the seasonal variation of Km differed between patients and controls. The monthly mean values of Vmax in patients were, as a rule, lower than corresponding values in controls, but significantly so only in December. Patients had higher Vmax than controls in October and November, and the seasonal variation of Vmax in patients differed from that of controls. The results suggest that Km, a measure of the affinity of the serotonin uptake site, may be subject to photoperiodic regulation in healthy individuals. The annual variation in uptake site densities, as judged by the changes in Vmax, are probably generated by an endogenous superior oscillator. The aberrant uptake kinetics found in the endogenously depressed patients may reflect seasonal susceptibility to the disorder and/or altered serotonergic rhythmicity.

  12. Chronic blockade or constitutive deletion of the serotonin transporter reduces operant responding for food reward.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Amy Cecilia; Hussain, Ali J; Hen, René; Zhuang, Xiaoxi

    2007-11-01

    The therapeutic effects of chronic selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are well documented, yet the elementary behavioral processes that are affected by such treatment have not been fully investigated. We report here the effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment and genetic deletion of the serotonin transporter (SERT) on food reinforced behavior in three paradigms: the progressive ratio operant task, the concurrent choice operant task, and the Pavlovian-to-Instrumental transfer task. We consistently find that chronic pharmacological blockade or genetic deletion of SERT result in similar behavioral consequences: reduced operant responding for natural reward. This is in line with previous studies reporting declines in operant responding for drugs and intracranial self-stimulation with fluoxetine treatment, suggesting that the effect of SERT blockade can be generalized to different reward types. Detailed analyses of behavioral parameters indicate that this reduction in operant responding affect both goal-directed and non-goal-directed behaviors without affecting the Pavlovian cue-triggered excessive operant responding. In addition, both pharmacological and genetic manipulations reduce locomotor activity in the open field novel environment. Our data contrast with the effect of dopamine in increasing operant responding for natural reward specifically in goal-directed behaviors and in increasing Pavlovian cue-triggered excessive operant responding. Serotonin and dopamine have been proposed to serve opposing functions in motivational processes. Our data suggest that their interactions do not result in simple opponency. The fact that pharmacological blockade and genetic deletion of SERT have similar behavioral consequences reinforces the utility of the SERT null mice for investigation of the mechanisms underlying chronic SSRIs treatment.

  13. Brofaromine: a monoamine oxidase-A and serotonin uptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Waldmeier, P C; Glatt, A; Jaekel, J; Bittiger, H

    1993-01-01

    Brofaromine is a tight-binding, reversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A), with concomitant serotonin (5-HT) uptake-inhibiting properties. In psychopharmacologic investigations, the compound shows the properties expected of an MAO inhibitor, antagonizing the effects of reserpine, tetrabenazine, and 5-hydroxytryptophan in rats and mice, and suppressing rapid eye movement sleep in cats. Brofaromine showed antidepressant-like activity in a rat social conflict test. In radioligand binding assays, brofaromine exhibited weak or no interaction with alpha 1- and alpha 2-noradrenergic, 5-HT1, 5-HT2, 5-HT3, cholinergic, histamine H1 and H2, mu-opiate, GABAA, benzodiazepine, adenosine, neurotensin, and substance P receptors. Comparison of in vitro and in vivo potencies to inhibit 5-HT uptake with those of reference drugs, and direct evidence in patients and volunteers suggest that 5-HT uptake inhibition plays a role in the clinical profile of brofaromine.

  14. Platelet serotonin content and uptake in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Guicheney, P.; Legros, M.; Marcel, D.; Kamal, L.; Meyer, P.

    1985-02-18

    Platelet serotonin (5-HT) content and uptake were studied in male SHR and WKY at various ages. Blood was withdrawn from the carotid artery under anesthesia and 5-HT levels determined from platelet rich plasma (PRP) using a HPLC technique coupled with an electrochemical detection method. Platelet 5-HT uptake was studied by incubating PRP at 37/sup 0/C for 10 sec with increasing concentrations of /sup 3/H-5HT. Lineweaver-Burk plots of /sup 3/H-5HT uptake were linear suggesting simple Michaelis-Menten uptake kinetics. The SHR had more platelets than age-matched controls and consequently a higher blood circulating pool of 5-HT. Nevertheless, the 5-HT platelet levels were similar to those of their age-matched rats. The 5 week-old SHR and WKY had greater numbers of platelets and higher 5-HT platelet levels than the older rats of both strains. The affinity constants (Km) and the maximal velocities (Vmax) of platelet 5-HT uptake did not differ significantly between the 12 week- and the 6 month-old SHR and WKY. These data suggest that the SHR do not show the same impairment in platelet 5-HT metabolism as observed in essential hypertension in man.

  15. Ca2+ channel blockade prevents lysergic acid diethylamide-induced changes in dopamine and serotonin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Antkiewicz-Michaluk, L; Románska, I; Vetulani, J

    1997-07-30

    To investigate the effect of a single and multiple administration of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) on cerebral metabolism of dopamine and serotonin, male Wistar rats were treated with low and high doses (0.1 and 2.0 mg/kg i.p.) of LSD and the levels of dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, homovanillic acid, 3-methoxytyramine, serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were assayed by HPLC in the nucleus accumbens, striatum and frontal cortex. Some rats received nifedipine, 5 mg/kg i.p., before each injection of LSD to assess the effect of a Ca2+ channel blockade. High-dose LSD treatment (8 x 2 mg/kg per day) caused a strong stimulation of dopamine metabolism in the nucleus accumbens and striatum, and serotonin metabolism in the nucleus accumbens: the changes were observed 24 (but not 1 h) after the last dose. The changes induced by the low-dose treatment (8 x 0.1 mg/kg per day) had a different pattern, suggesting the release of dopamine from vesicles to cytoplasm. Co-administration of nifedipine completely prevented the LSD-induced biochemical changes. The results suggest that Ca2+ channel blocking agents may prevent development of some behavioral consequences of chronically used LSD.

  16. Acute uptake inhibition increases extracellular serotonin in the rat forebrain.

    PubMed

    Rutter, J J; Auerbach, S B

    1993-06-01

    The effect of acute uptake inhibition on serotonin (5-HT) in the rat central nervous system was monitored by using in vivo dialysis. Peripheral administration of the selective 5-HT uptake blocker, fluoxetine, caused a dose-dependent increase in extracellular 5-HT in both the diencephalon and the striatum. Administration of fluoxetine or sertraline, another selective 5-HT uptake inhibitor, caused a prolonged (24 hr) increase in 5-HT and decrease in 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid. In addition, fluoxetine and sertraline attenuated the 5-HT releasing effect of fenfluramine administered 24 hr later. Local infusion of fluoxetine into the diencephalon caused an increase in 5-HT that was twice as large as the effect of peripheral injection. Peripheral fluoxetine, by enhancing extracellular 5-HT in the raphe, probably resulted in activation of somatodendritic autoreceptors and inhibition of 5-HT neuronal discharge. Thus, the increase in 5-HT in the diencephalon after peripheral fluoxetine presumably reflected a balance between decreased release and inhibition of reuptake. In support of this, after first infusing fluoxetine into the diencephalon to maximally block reuptake, peripheral injection of the uptake inhibitor caused a decrease in 5-HT.

  17. Specific uptake of serotonin by murine lymphoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.C.; Walker, R.F.; Brooks, W.H.; Roszman, T.L.

    1986-03-01

    Recently the authors confirmed and extended earlier observations that serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5HT) can influence immune function. Both 5HT and its precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan inhibit the primary, in vivo antibody response to sheep red blood cells, in mice. Here, the authors report specific in vitro association of this amine with mouse splenocytes. Spleen cells from 6-8 week old CBA/J mice incorporated /sup 3/H-5HT(10/sup -8/ to 2.5 x 10/sup -6/M) in a saturable manner, at 37/sup 0/C. Specificity of uptake was indicated by competition with excess (10/sup -5/M) unlabelled 5HT and with 10/sup -5/M fluoxetine, a selective inhibitor of active 5HT reuptake in rat brain. The 5HT receptor antagonists, methysergide and cyproheptadine, also blocked 5HT uptake. Cell lysis and displacement studies revealed largely intracellular accumulation of /sup 3/H-5HT with little membrane association, in splenocytes. Hofstee analysis of uptake kinetics yielded an apparent Km of 0.82 +/- 0.22 x 10/sup -7/M and Vmax of 501 +/- 108 pM/3 x 10/sup 6/ cells/10 min. Spleen cells fractionated on Sephadex G10 showed virtually no specific 5HT uptake while peritoneal exudate cells from thioglycollate treated mice displayed 5HT uptake kinetics similar to those of splenocytes. The site of specific /sup 3/H-5HT incorporation within a population of spleen cells and the functional significance of this phenomenon to immunomodulation by 5HT remain to be elucidated.

  18. Utility of ten-second uptake periods for kinetic studies of serotonin uptake by intact platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, J.L.; Kirk, K.L.; Stark, H.

    1981-09-01

    When washed human platelets accumulate serotonin (5HT), it is possible with the use of formaldehyde fixative to measure uptake over periods as short as 10 seconds. To evaluate the utility of these short times for kinetic studies of 5HT uptake, we have examined the accuracy with which the 10 second uptake rate reflects changes in the extracellular 5HT concentration. The amount of 5HT taken up over a 10 second period appears to be determined by the concentration of 5HT present in the extracellular medium during that time period, and the uptake rate can change rapidly following sudden changes in the extracellular 5HT concentration. However, the extent of inhibition of 5HT uptake in the presence of imipramine of extracellular 5HT concentrations greater than 10-5M is somewhat different depending on whether the 5HT is allowed to accumulate for a 10-second or a 5- or 10-minute uptake period. A 10-second uptake period thus appears to be useful for kinetic studies of initial 5HT uptake velocities under normal conditions, but under inhibitory conditions may give results differing from those obtained with minute-long periods.

  19. Platelet serotonin uptake and paroxetine binding among allelic genotypes of the serotonin transporter in alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Javors, Martin A; Seneviratne, Chamindi; Roache, John D; Ait-Daoud, Nassima; Bergeson, Susan E; Walss-Bass, M Consuelo; Akhtar, Fatema Z; Johnson, Bankole A

    2005-01-01

    Expression rates of long (L) and short (S) alleles of the serotonin (5-HT) transporter (5-HTT) gene have been shown to differ under various circumstances. We compared 5-HTT uptake (function) level and paroxetine binding (density) in platelets of alcoholics as indices of 5-HTT expression rate among LL, LS, and SS genotypes. Concentration curves of [3H]5-HT and [3H]paroxetine were used to quantify the equilibrium constant (Km) and maximum 5-HT uptake rate (Vmax) for 5-HTT uptake into intact platelets and the dissociation constant (Kd) and maximum specific binding density (Bmax) for paroxetine binding to platelet membranes, respectively. Genotypes were determined using electrophoresis with fluorescent markers. Vmax for 5-HTT uptake did not correlate with Bmax for paroxetine binding (r=-0.095, P=0.415). Means of Vmax and Bmax did not differ in a statistically significant manner among LL, LS, and SS genotypes in these alcoholic subjects. However, Vmax for LL and SS appeared to have a bimodal distribution, so the percentage of subjects with Vmax <200 fmol/min-10(7) platelets was statistically significantly higher in LL than in SS (51.5% vs. 22.7%, respectively), with an odds ratio of 3.6 (P<0.05). The percentage of Vmax <200 fmol/min-10(7) platelets for LS was 39.3% (not significant vs. LL or SS). Previous studies of healthy human controls have shown that 5-HTT density in raphe nuclei and 5-HTT uptake in platelets are higher in the LL genotype than in S carriers. Our findings in currently drinking alcoholics support the hypothesis that those with the LL genotype of the 5'-HTTLPR region of the 5-HTT gene have reduced 5-HTT function.

  20. Characterization and regulation of (/sup 3/H)-serotonin uptake and release in rodent spinal

    SciTech Connect

    Stauderman, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    The uptake and release of (/sup 3/H)-serotonin were investigated in rat spinal cord synaptosomes. In the uptake experiments, sodium-dependent and sodium-independent (/sup 3/H)-serotonin accumulation processes were found. Sodium-dependent (/sup 3/H)-serotonin accumulation was: linear with sodium concentrations up to 180 mM; decreased by disruption of membrane integrity or ionic gradients; associated with purified synaptosomal fractions; and reduced after description of descending serotonergic neurons in the spinal cord. Of the uptake inhibitors tested, the most potent was fluoxetine (IC/sub 50/ 75 nM), followed by desipramine (IC/sub 50/ 430 nM) and nomifensine (IC/sub 50/ 950 nM). The sodium-independent (/sup 3/H)-serotonin accumulation process was insensitive to most treatments and probably represents nonspecific membrane binding. Thus, only sodium-dependent (/sup 3/H)-serotonin uptake represents the uptake process of serotonergic nerve terminals in rat spinal cord homogenates. In the release experiments, K/sup +/-induced release of previously accumulated (/sup 3/H)-serotonin was Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent, and originated from serotonergic synaptosomes. Exogenous serotonin and 5-methyoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine inhibited (/sup 3/H)-serotonin release in a concentration-dependent way. Of the antagonists tested, only methiothepin effectively blocked the effect of serotonin. These data support the existence of presynaptic serotonin autoreceptors on serotonergic nerve terminals in the rat spinal cord that act to inhibit a voltage and Ca/sup 2 +/-sensitive process linked to serotonin release. Alteration of spinai cord serotonergic function may therefore be possible by drugs acting on presynaptic serotonin autoreceptors in the spinal cord.

  1. Chronoamperometry to determine differential reductions in uptake in brain synaptosomes from serotonin transporter knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Perez, Xiomara A; Andrews, Anne M

    2005-02-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) is a neuronal plasma membrane protein whose primary function is to take up the neurotransmitter serotonin from the extracellular space, thereby controlling the spatial and temporal aspects of serotonergic signaling in the brain. In humans, a commonly expressed genetic variant of the serotonin transporter gene results in 40% reductions in SERT expression that have been linked to increases in anxiety-related personality traits and susceptibility to stress-associated depression. Mice have been engineered to express similar reductions in SERT expression to investigate transporter-mediated control of serotonin neurotransmission and behavior. We employed carbon fiber microelectrode voltammetry (chronoamperometry) to examine serotonin clearance rates in brain liposomes (synaptosomes) prepared from mice with 50% (SERT(+/)(-)) or complete (SERT(-)(/)(-)) loss of SERT expression. Initial characterization of uptake showed that transport of serotonin was enhanced in the presence of oxygen and abolished when synaptosomes were stirred. Additionally, uptake was prevented by inclusion of the serotonin-selective reuptake inhibiting drug paroxetine in the incubation medium. Most notably, unlike prior studies using established radiochemical methods in synaptosomes, we determined 60% reductions in serotonin uptake rates in SERT(+/)(-) mice in two different brain regions-striatum and frontal cortex. Serotonin uptake was not detected in either brain region in SERT(-)(/)(-) mice. Thus, electroanalytical methods offer distinct advantages stemming from excellent temporal resolution for determining transporter kinetics. Moreover, these appear necessary for delineating moderate but biologically important changes in neurotransmitter transporter function.

  2. Revisiting serotonin reuptake inhibitors and the therapeutic potential of "uptake-2" in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Daws, Lynette C; Koek, Wouter; Mitchell, Nathan C

    2013-01-16

    Depression is among the most common psychiatric disorders, and in many patients a disorder for which available medications provide suboptimal or no symptom relief. The most commonly prescribed class of antidepressants, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are thought to act by increasing extracellular serotonin in brain by blocking its uptake via the high-affinity serotonin transporter (SERT). However, the relative lack of therapeutic efficacy of SSRIs has brought into question the utility of increasing extracellular serotonin for the treatment of depression. In this Viewpoint, we discuss why increasing extracellular serotonin should not be written off as a therapeutic strategy. We describe how "uptake-2" transporters may explain the relative lack of therapeutic efficacy of SSRIs, as well as why "uptake-2" transporters might be useful therapeutic targets.

  3. Partial neuromuscular blockade in humans enhances muscle blood flow during exercise independently of muscle oxygen uptake and acetylcholine receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Hellsten, Ylva; Krustrup, Peter; Iaia, F Marcello; Secher, Niels H; Bangsbo, Jens

    2009-04-01

    This study examined the role of acetylcholine for skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise by use of the competitive neuromuscular blocking agent cisatracurium in combination with the acetylcholine receptor blocker glycopyrrone. Nine healthy male subjects performed a 10-min bout of one-legged knee-extensor exercise (18 W) during control conditions and with cisatracurium blockade, as well as with cisatracurium blockade with prior glycopyrrone infusion. Thigh blood flow and vascular conductance in control and with cisatracurium infusion were similar at rest and during passive movement of the leg, but higher (P < 0.05) during exercise with cisatracurium than in control (3.83 +/- 0.42 vs. 2.78 +/- 0.21 l/min and 26.9 +/- 3.4 vs. 21.8 +/- 2.0 ml.min(-1).mmHg(-1) at the end of exercise). Thigh oxygen uptake was similar in control and with cisatracurium infusion both at rest and during exercise, being 354 +/- 33 and 406 +/- 34 ml/min, at the end of exercise. Combined infusion of cisatracurium and glycopyrrone caused a similar increase in blood flow as cisatracurium infusion alone. The current results demonstrate that neuromuscular blockade leads to enhanced thigh blood flow and vascular conductance during exercise, events that are not associated with either acetylcholine or an increased oxygen demand. The results do not support an essential role for acetylcholine, released form the neuromuscular junction, in exercise hyperemia or for the enhanced blood flow during neuromuscular blockade. The enhanced exercise hyperemia during partial neuromuscular blockade may be related to a greater recruitment of fast-twitch muscle fibers.

  4. Serotonin enhances platelet procoagulant properties and their activation induced during platelet tissue factor uptake.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Vilchez, Irene; Diaz-Ricart, Maribel; White, James G; Escolar, Gines; Galan, Ana M

    2009-11-01

    Circulating tissue factor (TF) has been linked to thrombus propagation. Our group demonstrated that platelets possess mechanisms to capture TF-rich microvesicles (TF-MVs). Serotonin facilitates the development of platelets with increased procoagulant activity. An enhanced platelet serotonin uptake has been identified with increased cardiovascular risk. We have investigated the involvement of serotonergic mechanisms facilitating the interaction of human platelets with TF-MVs. Inhibitory strategies aimed at blocking serotonin and coagulation mechanisms were also studied. Standard aggregometry, flow cytometry, electron microscopy, and thrombin generation assays were performed. TF-MVs induced platelet aggregation in heparinized platelet-rich plasma (PRP) samples; this aggregation was further accelerated by serotonin. In washed platelets, serotonin enhanced platelet aggregation to TF-MVs with a maximum peak of 55.9 +/- 1.8 vs. 48.7 +/- 2.1% (P < 0.05). Inhibitory strategies with a selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor and with lepirudin decreased these aggregations. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that serotonin induced platelet pseudopodia formation, thus facilitating the engulfment of TF-MVs. In general, serotonin significantly enhanced (P < 0.05) thrombin generation and the expression of activation markers and procoagulant activity in platelets measured for TF-MVs alone. Serotonin enhances the interaction of platelets with TF-MVs, increases platelet activation, and potentiates their overall procoagulant activity. The present results could have significant implications in thrombus formation and in the thrombogenic profile of pathological situations with increased cardiovascular risk.

  5. Pharmacological profile of hypericum extract. Effect on serotonin uptake by postsynaptic receptors.

    PubMed

    Perovic, S; Müller, W E

    1995-11-01

    In the present study is is reported that the methanolic Hypericum extract LI 160 (Jarsin 300) exerts no protective effect against N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-) or gp120- (from the HIV virus) induced cytotoxicity. Moreover, it is established that Hypericum extract causes no activation of arachidonic acid release from neurons activated by gp120; hence it displays no sensitization effect on the NMDA receptor channel. The main outcome of this study is the finding that Hypericum extract causes a 50% inhibition (IC50 value) of serotonin uptake by rat synaptosomes at a concentration of 6.2 microglml. Therefore it is concluded that the antidepressant activity of Hypericum extract is due to an inhibition of serotonin uptake by postsynaptic receptors. Future studies might focus on the effect of Hypericum extract on serotonin binding to neurons, serotonin storage in granules, the rate of synthesis of serotonin, and on the activity of monoamine oxidase.

  6. SEROTONIN TRANSPORTER AND INTEGRIN BETA 3 GENES INTERACT TO MODULATE SEROTONIN UPTAKE IN MOUSE BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, Alonzo; Jessen, Tammy; Varney, Seth; Carneiro, Ana MD

    2013-01-01

    Dysfunctions in serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) systems have been associated with several psychiatric illnesses, including anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorders and autism spectrum disorders. Convergent evidence from genetic analyses of human subjects has implicated the integrin β3 subunit gene (ITGB3) as a modulator of serotonergic systems via genetic interactions with the 5-HT transporter gene (SLC6A4, SERT). While genetic interactions may result from contributions of each gene at several levels, we hypothesize that ITGB3 modulates the 5-HT system at the level of the synapse, through the actions of integrin αvβ3. Here we utilized a genetic approach in mouse models to examine Itgb3 contributions to SERT function both in the context of normal and reduced SERT expression. As integrin αvβ3 is expressed in postsynaptic membranes, we isolated synaptoneurosomes, which maintain intact pre- and post-synaptic associations. Citalopram binding revealed significant Slc6a4-driven reductions in SERT expression in midbrain synapses, whereas no significant changes were observed in hippocampal or cortical projections. Expecting corresponding changes to SERT function, we also measured 5-HT uptake activity in synaptoneurosomal preparations. Itgb3 single heterozygous mice displayed significant reductions in 5-HT Vmax, with no chages in Km, in midbrain preparations. However, in the presence of both Itgb3 and Slc6a4 heterozygozity, 5-HT uptake was similar to wild-type levels, revealing a significant Slc6a4 by Itgb3 genetic interaction in the midbrain. Similar findings were observed in cortical preparations, whereas in the hippocampus, most Vmax changes were driven solely by Slc6a4. Our findings provide evidence that integrin αvβ3 is involved in the regulation of serotonergic systems in some, but not all 5-HT synapses, revealing novel contributions to synaptic specificity within the central nervous system. PMID:24083985

  7. Serotonin transporter and integrin beta 3 genes interact to modulate serotonin uptake in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Alonzo; Jessen, Tammy; Varney, Seth; Carneiro, Ana M D

    2014-07-01

    Dysfunctions in serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) systems have been associated with several psychiatric illnesses, including anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorders and autism spectrum disorders. Convergent evidence from genetic analyses of human subjects has implicated the integrin β3 subunit gene (ITGB3) as a modulator of serotonergic systems via genetic interactions with the 5-HT transporter gene (SLC6A4, SERT). While genetic interactions may result from contributions of each gene at several levels, we hypothesize that ITGB3 modulates the 5-HT system at the level of the synapse, through the actions of integrin αvβ3. Here we utilized a genetic approach in mouse models to examine Itgb3 contributions to SERT function both in the context of normal and reduced SERT expression. As integrin αvβ3 is expressed in postsynaptic membranes, we isolated synaptoneurosomes, which maintain intact pre- and post-synaptic associations. Citalopram binding revealed significant Slc6a4-driven reductions in SERT expression in midbrain synapses, whereas no significant changes were observed in hippocampal or cortical projections. Expecting corresponding changes to SERT function, we also measured 5-HT uptake activity in synaptoneurosomal preparations. Itgb3 single heterozygous mice displayed significant reductions in 5-HT Vmax, with no changes in Km, in midbrain preparations. However, in the presence of both Itgb3 and Slc6a4 heterozygozity, 5-HT uptake was similar to wild-type levels, revealing a significant Slc6a4 by Itgb3 genetic interaction in the midbrain. Similar findings were observed in cortical preparations, whereas in the hippocampus, most Vmax changes were driven solely by Slc6a4. Our findings provide evidence that integrin αvβ3 is involved in the regulation of serotonergic systems in some, but not all 5-HT synapses, revealing novel contributions to synaptic specificity within the central nervous system.

  8. Ethanol intake and sup 3 H-serotonin uptake I: A study in Fawn-Hooded rats

    SciTech Connect

    Daoust, M.; Compagnon, P.; Legrand, E.; Boucly, P. )

    1991-01-01

    Ethanol intake and synaptosomal {sup 3}H-serotonin uptake were studied in male Fawn-Hooded and Sprague-Dawley rats. Fawn-Hooded rats consumed more alcohol and more water than Sprague-Dawley rats. Plasma alcohol levels of Sprague-Dawley rats were not detectable but were about 5 mg/dl in Fawn-Hooded rats. Ethanol intake increased the Vmax of serotonin uptake in Fawn-Hooded rats in hippocampus and cortex, but not in thalamus. In Fawn-Hooded rats, serotonin uptake (Vmax) was higher than in Sprague-Dawley rats cortex. Ethanol intake reduced the Vmax of serotonin uptake in Fawn-Hooded rats in hippocampus and cortex. In cortex, the carrier affinity for serotonin was increased in alcoholized Fawn-Hooded rats. These results indicate that synaptosomal {sup 3}H-serotonin uptake is affected by ethanol intake. In Fawn-Hooded rats, high ethanol consumption is associated with high serotonin uptake. In rats presenting high serotonin uptake, alcoholization reduces {sup 3}H-serotonin internalization in synaptosomes, indicating a specific sensitivity to alcohol intake of serotonin uptake system.

  9. Alterations in dopamine and serotonin uptake systems in the striatum of the weaver mutant mouse.

    PubMed

    Stotz, E H; Palacios, J M; Landwehrmeyer, B; Norton, J; Ghetti, B; Simon, J R; Triarhou, L C

    1994-01-01

    In the striatum of the homozygous weaver mutant mouse (wv/wv), dopamine content, uptake and tyrosine hydroxylase activity are decreased compared to wild-type (+/+) mice. In mice heterozygous for the weaver gene (wv/+), these dopaminergic parameters exhibit only minor reductions compared to +/+ mice. The wv/wv striatum has recently been shown to have an increase in serotonin content. In the present study, the serotonin uptake system of the weaver striatum was investigated. Synaptosomal uptake of [3H] serotonin was determined in the dorsal portion of wv/wv and +/+ striatum, and serotonin uptake sites were examined by the binding of [3H] citalopram in the striatum of wv/wv, wv/+ and +/+ mice. The dopamine uptake system was also investigated in all three genotypes via the binding of [3H] mazindol. Synaptosomal uptake of [3H] serotonin was increased by 79% in the dorsal portion of the wv/wv striatum compared to that seen in the +/+ striatum. The binding of [3H] citalopram was increased by 62% in the dorsolateral and by 111% in the dorsomedial portions of the wv/wv striatum compared to +/+. [3H] Citalopram binding in the wv/+ striatum was also higher than +/+, but this increase did not reach statistical significance. Within the wv/wv striatum, [3H] mazindol binding was almost completely absent (88-89% reduction) in the dorsal portion and severely reduced in the other striatal areas. These data support the notion that the dorsal portion of the wv/wv striatum, which has the severest reduction in dopamine uptake, is hyperinnervated by serotonin fibers.

  10. 2,5-Disubstituted tetrahydrofurans as selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Voelker, Troy; Xia, Haiji; Fandrick, Keith; Johnson, Robert; Janowsky, Aaron; Cashman, John R

    2009-03-01

    Enhancement of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) neurotransmission is a viable means of treating depression. On the basis of this observation, agents that inhibit re-uptake of 5-HT were prepared based on (-)-cocaine and aryltropanes as lead compounds because they are reasonably potent 5-HT re-uptake inhibitors. Molecular dissection of an aryltropane provided a series of 5- and 6-membered ring compounds. From among this library of compounds a series of disubstituted tetrahydrofurans bearing 2-alkyl aryl and 5-alkyl amino groups were identified as having highly potent and selective 5-HT re-uptake inhibition. The compounds were evaluated for their ability to compete with radiolabeled RTI-55 binding and to inhibit re-uptake of neurotransmitters at the human dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine transporters. Based on potency (e.g., K(i)=800 pM) and significant functional selectivity (e.g., IC(50) ratios for human dopamine:serotonin or norepinephrine:serotonin, >or=1397) highly potent and selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors were identified. Optimal features playing a dominant role in binding affinity and re-uptake inhibition included lipophilic substitution on the aromatic moiety, trans relative stereochemistry of the 2,5-disubstituted tetrahydrofuran ring, and a total of four or five methylene groups between the alkyl amine and the alkyl aryl moiety and the tetrahydrofuran group. A number of the most potent serotonin re-uptake inhibitors were tested in Balb/c mice in the forced-swim test (FST), a behavioral test used to measure the effects of antidepressant agents. Acute administration of 32c (10mg/kg), or 32d (10mg/kg) ip tended to decrease the duration of mouse immobility in the FST although the effect was not statistically significant.

  11. Improved Tumor Uptake by Optimizing Liposome Based RES Blockade Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaolian; Yan, Xuefeng; Jacobson, Orit; Sun, Wenjing; Wang, Zhantong; Tong, Xiao; Xia, Yuqiong; Ling, Daishun; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    Minimizing the sequestration of nanomaterials (NMs) by the reticuloendothelial system (RES) can enhance the circulation time of NMs, and thus increase their tumor-specific accumulation. Liposomes are generally regarded as safe (GRAS) agents that can block the RES reversibly and temporarily. With the help of positron emission tomography (PET), we monitored the in vivo tissue distribution of 64Cu-labeled 40 × 10 nm gold nanorods (Au NRs) after pretreatment with liposomes. We systematically studied the effectiveness of liposome administration by comparing (1) differently charged liposomes; (2) different liposome doses; and (3) varying time intervals between liposome dose and NR dose. By pre-injecting 400 μmol/kg positively charged liposomes into mice 5 h before the Au NRs, the liver and spleen uptakes of Au NRs decreased by 30% and 53%, respectively. Significantly, U87MG tumor uptake of Au NRs increased from 11.5 ± 1.1 %ID/g to 16.1 ± 1.3 %ID/g at 27 h post-injection. Quantitative PET imaging is a valuable tool to understand the fate of NMs in vivo and cationic liposomal pretreatment is a viable approach to reduce RES clearance, prolong circulation, and improve tumor uptake. PMID:28042337

  12. Serotonin uptake in cerebral cortex cultures: imipramine-like inhibition by N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine

    SciTech Connect

    de Jong, B.M.; Feenstra, M.G.; Ruijter, J.M.; van Royen, E.A.

    1989-03-01

    In cultured rat neocortex, uptake of (/sup 3/H)serotonin (5-HT) and the SPECT radiopharmaceutical N-isopropyl-p-(/sup 123/I)iodoamphetamine (IMP) was demonstrated after 4 and 14 days in vitro. Both imipramine and cold IMP inhibited (/sup 3/H)5-HT uptake. Uptake of (/sup 123/I)IMP was inhibited by imipramine but not by cold 5-HT. The similarity in the behaviors of IMP and imipramine indicates that uptake of IMP might be related to a serotonergic uptake system in a way that is similar to that in which imipramine is related to such a system.

  13. Autoradiographic localization of /sup 3/H-paroxetine-labeled serotonin uptake sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    De Souza, E.B.; Kuyatt, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Paroxetine is a potent and selective inhibitor of serotonin uptake into neurons. Serotonin uptake sites have been identified, localized, and quantified in rat brain by autoradiography with 3H-paroxetine; 3H-paroxetine binding in slide-mounted sections of rat forebrain was of high affinity (KD = 10 pM) and the inhibition affinity constant (Ki) values of various drugs in competing 3H-paroxetine binding significantly correlated with their reported potencies in inhibiting synaptosomal serotonin uptake. Serotonin uptake sites labeled by 3H-paroxetine were highly concentrated in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei, central gray, superficial layer of the superior colliculus, lateral septal nucleus, paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus, and the islands of Calleja. High concentrations of 3H-paroxetine binding sites were found in brainstem areas containing dopamine (substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area) and norepinephrine (locus coeruleus) cell bodies. Moderate concentrations of 3H-paroxetine binding sites were present in laminae I and IV of the frontal parietal cortex, primary olfactory cortex, olfactory tubercle, regions of the basal ganglia, septum, amygdala, thalamus, hypothalamus, hippocampus, and some brainstem areas including the interpeduncular, trigeminal, and parabrachial nuclei. Lower densities of 3H-paroxetine binding sites were found in other regions of the neocortex and very low to nonsignificant levels of binding were present in white matter tracts and in the cerebellum. Lesioning of serotonin neurons with 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine caused large decreases in 3H-paroxetine binding. The autoradiographic distribution of 3H-paroxetine binding sites in rat brain corresponds extremely well to the distribution of serotonin terminals and cell bodies as well as with the pharmacological sites of action of serotonin.

  14. Effects of 2-substituted-4-phenylquinolines on uptake of serotonin and norepinephrine by isolated brain synaptosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Alhaider, A.A.; Lein, E.J.; Ransom, R.W.; Bolger, M.B.

    1987-03-02

    In this present communication, the in vitro inhibition of the uptake of (/sup 3/H)-L-norepinephrine ((/sup 3/H) NE) and (/sup 3/H)-Serotonin ((/sup 3/H) 5-HT) by eleven synthesized 2-substituted-4-phenylquionlines were studied using rate brain synaptosomal preparations. Compounds with an open side chain were relatively weak inhibitors of the synaptosomal uptake of (/sup 3/H) NE and (/sup 3/H) 5HT. Compounds having a distance of three atoms between the terminal basic nitrogen of the side chain and the quinoline ring were better inhibitors of serotonin uptake than those compounds having a four-atom distance. The replacement of the side chain with a piperazine ring produced compounds which were more potent and selective inhibitors of the uptake of either (/sup 3/H) 5-HT or (/sup 3/H) NE. Further structure-activity relationships are also discussed. 13 references, 1 table.

  15. Efficacy of thyroid blockade on thyroid radioiodine uptake in 123I-mIBG imaging.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Nicholas C; Hassan, Aamna; Grady, Erin; Matsuoka, Dale T; Jacobson, Arnold F

    2014-02-01

    Although iodinated radiopharmaceuticals usually contain a small quantity of unbound iodine, it is difficult to establish the degree to which thyroid activity on scintigraphic images reflects uptake of free radioiodine. The objective of the present study was to examine the effectiveness of thyroid blockade in subjects undergoing (123)I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (mIBG) imaging and to estimate the relative contribution of bound and unbound radioiodine to imaging findings. All subjects were participants in prospective trials of (123)I-mIBG cardiac imaging in which pretreatment with thyroid blockade was optional unless locally required. In a pilot project, 15 subjects (6 blocked) had thyroid uptake measured at 4 h using a probe system. Fifteen-minute (early) and 4-h (late) anterior planar chest images that included the thyroid region were visually scored for thyroid uptake (scale of 0-4) in another group of 152 subjects (98 blocked). Quantitative analysis based on thyroid regions of interest was performed on anterior planar images from a further sample of 669 subjects (442 blocked). For all 3 investigations, quantitative comparisons of thyroid uptake were made between the blocked and nonblocked subjects. There was no statistical difference between probe uptake of the 6 blocked and 9 nonblocked subjects. However, in the second series, mean visual score on the late images was significantly lower for blocked than nonblocked subjects (P < 0.001). In the region-of-interest analyses, net thyroid counts were significantly higher on the late images of nonblocked subjects (P < 0.0001), and compared with early images, 87% of subjects who received blockade showed decreased or unchanged counts whereas 75% of nonblocked subjects had increased net thyroid activity. In nonblocked subjects, an estimated 79% of thyroid counts on late images could be attributed to unbound (123)I. On the basis of 3 different methods for assessing thyroid uptake of (123)I, use of thyroid blockade

  16. Ethanol intake and sup 3 H-serotonin uptake II: A study in alcoholic patients using platelets sup 3 H-paroxetine binding

    SciTech Connect

    Daoust, M.; Boucly, P. ); Ernouf, D. ); Breton, P. ); Lhuintre, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    The kinetic parameters of {sup 3}H-paroxetine binding and {sup 3}H-serotonin uptake were studied in platelets of alcoholic patients. There was no difference between alcoholic and non alcoholic subjects in {sup 3}H-paroxetine binding. When binding and {sup 3}H-serotonin uptake were studied, in the same plasma of the same subjects, the Vmax of serotonin uptake was increased in alcoholics. The data confirm the involvement of serotonin uptake system in alcohol dependance and suggest that serotonin uptake and paroxetine binding sites may be regulated independently in this pathology.

  17. The Design, Synthesis and Structure-Activity Relationship of Mixed Serotonin, Norepinephrine and Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhengming; Yang, Ji; Skolnick, Phil

    The evolution of antidepressants over the past four decades has involved the replacement of drugs with a multiplicity of effects (e.g., TCAs) by those with selective actions (i.e., SSRIs). This strategy was employed to reduce the adverse effects of TCAs, largely by eliminating interactions with certain neurotransmitters or receptors. Although these more selective compounds may be better tolerated by patients, selective drugs, specifically SSRIs, are not superior to older drugs in treating depressed patients as measured by response and remission rates. It may be an advantage to increase synaptic levels of both serotonin and norepinephrine, as in the case of dual uptake inhibitors like duloxetine and venlafaxine. An important recent development has been the emergence of the triple-uptake inhibitors (TUIs/SNDRIs), which inhibit the uptake of the three neurotransmitters most closely linked to depression: serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine. Preclinical studies and clinical trials indicate that a drug inhibiting the reuptake of all three of these neurotransmitters could produce more rapid onset of action and greater efficacy than traditional antidepressants. This review will detail the medicinal chemistry involved in the design, synthesis and discovery of mixed serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine transporter uptake inhibitors.

  18. Revisiting Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and the Therapeutic Potential of “Uptake-2” in Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Depression is among the most common psychiatric disorders, and in many patients a disorder for which available medications provide suboptimal or no symptom relief. The most commonly prescribed class of antidepressants, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are thought to act by increasing extracellular serotonin in brain by blocking its uptake via the high-affinity serotonin transporter (SERT). However, the relative lack of therapeutic efficacy of SSRIs has brought into question the utility of increasing extracellular serotonin for the treatment of depression. In this Viewpoint, we discuss why increasing extracellular serotonin should not be written off as a therapeutic strategy. We describe how “uptake-2” transporters may explain the relative lack of therapeutic efficacy of SSRIs, as well as why “uptake-2” transporters might be useful therapeutic targets. PMID:23336039

  19. Imipramine treatment differentially affects platelet /sup 3/H-imipramine binding and serotonin uptake in depressed patients

    SciTech Connect

    Suranyi-Cadotte, B.E.; Quirion, R.; Nair, N.P.V.; Lafaille, F.; Schwartz, G.

    1985-02-25

    Uptake of serotonin and /sup 3/H-imipramine binding in platelets of depressed patients were investigated simultaneously with changes in clinical state. Both V/sub max/ for serotonin uptake and B/sub max/ for /sup 3/H-imipramine binding were significantly lower in unmedicated depressed patients with respect to normal subjects. Successful treatment with imipramine led to a significant increase in B/sub max/ for /sup 3/H-imipramine binding, without significant change in V/sub max/ for serotonin uptake. B/sub max/ values increased to the normal range following complete, rather than partial clinical improvement. These data indicate that successful antidepressant treatment may increase the density of /sup 3/H-imipramine binding sites on platelets by a process which is independent of the uptake of serotonin. 29 references, 1 table.

  20. Voltammetric characterization of the effect of monoamine uptake inhibitors and releasers on dopamine and serotonin uptake in mouse caudate-putamen and substantia nigra slices

    PubMed Central

    John, Carrie E.; Jones, Sara R.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Fast scan cyclic voltammetry is an electrochemical technique used to measure dynamics of transporter-mediated monoamine uptake in real time and provides a tool to evaluate the detailed effects of monoamine uptake inhibitors and releasers on dopamine and serotonin transporter function. We measured the effects of cocaine, methylphenidate, 2β-propanoyl–3β-(4tolyl) tropane (PTT), fluoxetine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), phentermine and fenfluramine on dopamine and serotonin uptake following electrically stimulated release in mouse caudate-putamen and substantia nigra pars reticulata slices. We determined rank orders of uptake inhibition effects based on two variables; increases in apparent Km for dopamine and serotonin uptake and inhibition constant (Ki) values. For example, the rank order of uptake inhibition based on apparent Km values at the dopamine transporter was amphetamine ≥ PTT ≥ methylphenidate ≫ methamphetamine = phentermine = MDMA > cocaine ≫ fluoxetine = fenfluramine, and at the serotonin transporter was fluoxetine = methamphetamine = fenfluramine = MDMA > amphetamine = cocaine = PTT ≥ methylphenidate > phentermine. Additionally, changes in electrically stimulated release were documented. This is the first study using voltammetry to measure the effects of a wide range of monoamine uptake inhibitors and releasers on dopamine and serotonin uptake in mouse brain slices. These studies also highlight methodological considerations for comparison of effects between heterogeneous brain regions. PMID:17459426

  1. Effect of salbutamol on the cerebral levels, uptake and turnover of serotonin.

    PubMed

    Erdö, S L; Kiss, B; Rosdy, B

    1982-03-12

    The effect of salbutamol (SB) on the cerebral levels of serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) was determined as well as the effect on the uptake and turnover of 5-HT in rat brain. SB failed to inhibit the cerebral uptake of 5-HT and did not change 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels in the brain; however, it significantly increased the cerebral turnover of 5-HT. The latter effect may partly be responsible for the antidepressant properties of the compounds.

  2. Studies of serotonin uptake and serotonin/sub 1A/ receptor using photoaffinity probes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    The serotonergic system in the central nervous system (CNS) has been implicated in many physiological functions. The objectives of this study are: (1) to develop a new photoaffinity probe that can be used to identify the protein associated with the substrate binding site of the 5-HT uptake carrier, (2) to investigate the existence of different conformational states of the 5-HT carrier, (3) to solubilize the 5-HT/sub 1a/ receptor proteins from bovine hippocampus, and (4) to identify the 5-HT/sub 1a/ receptor proteins using a new photoaffinity probe, i.e., 1-(2-(4-aminophenyl)ethyl)4-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)piperazine ((/sup 3/H)p-azido-PAPP), with high affinity for 5-HT/sub 1a/ receptor.

  3. Kinetics and autoradiography of high affinity uptake of serotonin by primary astrocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, D.M.; Kimelberg, H.K.

    1985-07-01

    Primary astrocyte cultures prepared from the cerebral cortices of neonatal rats showed significant accumulation of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; (/sup 3/H)-5-HT). At concentrations in the range of 0.01 to 0.7 microM (/sup 3/H)-5-HT, this uptake was 50 to 85% Na+ dependent and gave a Km of 0.40 +/- 0.11 microM (/sup 3/H)-5-HT and a Vmax of 6.42 +/- 0.85 (+/- SEM) pmol of (/sup 3/H)-5-HT/mg of protein/4 min for the Na+-dependent component. In the absence of Na+ the uptake was nonsaturable. Omission of the monoamine oxidase inhibitor pargyline markedly reduced the Na+-dependent component of (/sup 3/H)-5-HT uptake but had a negligible effect on the Na+-independent component. This suggest significant oxidative deamination of serotonin after it has been taken up by the high affinity system, followed by release of its metabolite. The authors estimated that this system enabled the cells to concentrate (/sup 3/H)-5-HT up to 44-fold at an external (/sup 3/H)-5-HT concentration of 10(-7) M. Inhibition of (/sup 3/H)-5-HT uptake by a number of clinically effective antidepressants was also consistent with a specific high affinity uptake mechanism for 5-HT, the order of effectiveness of inhibition being chlorimipramine greater than fluoxetine greater than imipramine = amitriptyline greater than desmethylimipramine greater than iprindole greater than mianserin. Uptake of (/sup 3/H)-5-HT was dependent on the presence of Cl- as well as Na+ in the medium, and the effect of omission of both ions was nonadditive. Varying the concentration of K+ in the media from 1 to 50 mM had a limited effect on (/sup 3/H)-5-HT uptake.

  4. Impaired Brain Dopamine and Serotonin Release and Uptake in Wistar Rats Following Treatment with Carboplatin

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment, known also as “chemobrain”, is a medical complication of cancer treatment that is characterized by a general decline in cognition affecting visual and verbal memory, attention, complex problem solving skills, and motor function. It is estimated that one-third of patients who undergo chemotherapy treatment will experience cognitive impairment. Alterations in the release and uptake of dopamine and serotonin, central nervous system neurotransmitters that play important roles in cognition, could potentially contribute to impaired intellectual performance in those impacted by chemobrain. To investigate how chemotherapy treatment affects these systems, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at carbon-fiber microelectrodes was used to measure dopamine and serotonin release and uptake in coronal brain slices containing the striatum and dorsal raphe nucleus, respectively. Measurements were taken from rats treated weekly with selected doses of carboplatin and from control rats treated with saline. Modeling the stimulated dopamine release plots revealed an impairment of dopamine release per stimulus pulse (80% of saline control at 5 mg/kg and 58% at 20 mg/kg) after 4 weeks of carboplatin treatment. Moreover, Vmax, the maximum uptake rate of dopamine, was also decreased (55% of saline control at 5 mg/kg and 57% at 20 mg/kg). Nevertheless, overall dopamine content, measured in striatal brain lysates by high performance liquid chromatography, and reserve pool dopamine, measured by FSCV after pharmacological manipulation, did not significantly change, suggesting that chemotherapy treatment selectively impairs the dopamine release and uptake processes. Similarly, serotonin release upon electrical stimulation was impaired (45% of saline control at 20 mg/kg). Measurements of spatial learning discrimination were taken throughout the treatment period and carboplatin was found to alter cognition. These studies support the need for additional

  5. Impaired Brain Dopamine and Serotonin Release and Uptake in Wistar Rats Following Treatment with Carboplatin.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Sam V; Limbocker, Ryan A; Gehringer, Rachel C; Divis, Jenny L; Osterhaus, Gregory L; Newby, Maxwell D; Sofis, Michael J; Jarmolowicz, David P; Newman, Brooke D; Mathews, Tiffany A; Johnson, Michael A

    2016-06-15

    Chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment, known also as "chemobrain", is a medical complication of cancer treatment that is characterized by a general decline in cognition affecting visual and verbal memory, attention, complex problem solving skills, and motor function. It is estimated that one-third of patients who undergo chemotherapy treatment will experience cognitive impairment. Alterations in the release and uptake of dopamine and serotonin, central nervous system neurotransmitters that play important roles in cognition, could potentially contribute to impaired intellectual performance in those impacted by chemobrain. To investigate how chemotherapy treatment affects these systems, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at carbon-fiber microelectrodes was used to measure dopamine and serotonin release and uptake in coronal brain slices containing the striatum and dorsal raphe nucleus, respectively. Measurements were taken from rats treated weekly with selected doses of carboplatin and from control rats treated with saline. Modeling the stimulated dopamine release plots revealed an impairment of dopamine release per stimulus pulse (80% of saline control at 5 mg/kg and 58% at 20 mg/kg) after 4 weeks of carboplatin treatment. Moreover, Vmax, the maximum uptake rate of dopamine, was also decreased (55% of saline control at 5 mg/kg and 57% at 20 mg/kg). Nevertheless, overall dopamine content, measured in striatal brain lysates by high performance liquid chromatography, and reserve pool dopamine, measured by FSCV after pharmacological manipulation, did not significantly change, suggesting that chemotherapy treatment selectively impairs the dopamine release and uptake processes. Similarly, serotonin release upon electrical stimulation was impaired (45% of saline control at 20 mg/kg). Measurements of spatial learning discrimination were taken throughout the treatment period and carboplatin was found to alter cognition. These studies support the need for additional

  6. Different components of /sup 3/H-imipramine binding in rat brain membranes: relation to serotonin uptake sites

    SciTech Connect

    Gobbi, M.; Taddei, C.; Mennini, T.

    1988-01-01

    In the present paper, the authors confirm and extend previous studies showing heterogeneous /sup 3/H-imipramine (/sup 3/H-IMI) binding sites. Inhibition curves of various drugs (serotonin, imipramine, desmethyl-imipramine, d-fenfluramine, d-norfenfluramine and indalpine, a potent serotonin uptake inhibitor) obtained using 2 nM /sup 3/H-IMI and in presence of 120 mM NaCl, confirmed the presence of at least three /sup 3/H-IMI binding sites: two of these were serotonin-insensitive while the third one was selectively inhibited by serotonin and indalpine with nanomolar affinities. Moreover this last component was found to be selectively modulated by chronic imipramine treatment thus suggesting a close relation to serontonin uptake mechanism. These data indicate that the use of a more selective inhibitors of the serotonin-sensitive component (like indalpine or serotonin itself) to define non specific /sup 3/H-IMI, may be of help in understanding its relation with serotonin uptake system. 22 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  7. Comparison of the synaptosomal uptake inhibition of serotonin by St John's wort products.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Löbbert, S; Holoubek, G; Müller, W E; Schubert-Zsilavecz, M; Wurglics, M

    2004-06-01

    Although the number of prescriptions for psychotropic drugs has decreased in recent years, prescriptions for antidepressants are still increasing (Fritze 2002). Hypericum perforatum (St John's wort) is the main psychotherapeutic herbal medicinal product used for treatment of mild-to-moderate depression. The lipophilic constituent hyperforin (2-5% of the extract) demonstrated, similarly to chemical antidepressants, a significant effect on the synaptosomal uptake inhibition of several neurotransmitters in in-vitro assays. In Germany, St John's wort products are distributed via two different markets: products that are pharmacy restricted are only allowed to be distributed in pharmacies; traditionally used products, which do not claim to have a curative character, are allowed to be sold in supermarkets. Depending on the market wherein a St John's wort product is offered, it needs to fulfill the legal requirements regarding pharmaceutical quality, safety and efficacy. Our goal was to compare the quality of St John's wort products distributed in pharmacies with that of those available from supermarkets. Therefore, the quantity of the pharmaceutical active ingredients (the phloroglucinol derivate hyperforin, the flavonoids rutin, hyperoside, isoquercitrin, quercitrin and the biflavonoid biapigenin) was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The naphthodianthrones hypericines and pseudohypericines were quantified by differential pulse polarography (DPP). The efficacy of the products was investigated by measuring their activity to inhibit serotonin (5-HT) uptake in-vitro using a radio ligand uptake assay. It could be demonstrated that the products were different not only in the concentration of pharmaceutically relevant ingredients but also in showing individual IC50 values (concentration producing half-maximal inhibition) in the serotonin reuptake assay (IC50 values between 3.07 and 17.9 microg extract mL(-1)). The results of our study confirm the

  8. Effects of various serotonin agonists, antagonists, and uptake inhibitors on the discriminative stimulus effects of methamphetamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Munzar, P; Laufert, M D; Kutkat, S W; Nováková, J; Goldberg, S R

    1999-10-01

    Neurochemical studies indicate that methamphetamine increases central serotonin (5-HT) levels more markedly than other psychomotor stimulants such as amphetamine or cocaine. In the present study, we investigated 5-HT involvement in the discriminative stimulus effects of methamphetamine. In Sprague-Dawley rats trained to discriminate 1.0 mg/kg methamphetamine i.p. from saline under a fixed-ratio schedule of food presentation, the effects of selected 5-HT agonists, antagonists, and uptake inhibitors were tested. Fluoxetine (1.8-18.0 mg/kg) and clomipramine (3.0-18.0 mg/kg), selective serotonin uptake inhibitors, did not produce any methamphetamine-like discriminative stimulus effects when administered alone, but fluoxetine (5.6 mg/kg), unlike clomipramine (5.6 mg/kg), significantly shifted the methamphetamine dose-response curve to the left. Both 8-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralin (0.03-0.56 mg/kg), a full agonist, and buspirone (1.0-10.0 mg/kg), a partial agonist at 5-HT(1A) receptors, partially generalized to the training dose of methamphetamine but only at high doses that decreased response rate. This generalization was antagonized by the coadministration of the 5-HT(1A) antagonist WAY-100635 (1.0 mg/kg). WAY-100635 (1.0 mg/kg) also partially reversed the leftward shift of the methamphetamine dose-response curve produced by fluoxetine. (+/-)-1-(2, 5-Dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (0.3 mg/kg), a 5-HT(2A/2C) agonist, shifted the methamphetamine dose-response curve to the left, and this leftward shift was antagonized by the coadministration of ketanserin (3.0 mg/kg), a 5-HT(2A/2C) antagonist. Ketanserin (3.0 mg/kg) also produced a shift to the right in the methamphetamine dose-response curve and completely reversed the leftward shift in the methamphetamine dose-response curve produced by fluoxetine. In contrast, tropisetron (1.0 mg/kg), a 5-HT(3) antagonist, produced a shift to the left of the methamphetamine dose-response curve, and this effect of tropisetron

  9. Boron-Doped Diamond Microelectrodes Reveal Reduced Serotonin Uptake Rates in Lymphocytes from Adult Rhesus Monkeys Carrying the Short Allele of the 5-HTTLPR

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Uptake resolved by high-speed chronoamperometry on a second-by-second basis has revealed important differences in brain serotonin transporter function associated with genetic variability. Here, we use chronoamperometry to investigate variations in serotonin transport in primary lymphocytes associated with the rhesus serotonin transporter gene-linked polymorphism (rh5-HTTLPR), a promoter polymorphism whose orthologues occur only in higher order primates including humans. Serotonin clearance by lymphocytes is Na+-dependent and inhibited by the serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor paroxetine (Paxil), indicative of active uptake by serotonin transporters. Moreover, reductions in serotonin uptake rates are evident in lymphocytes from monkeys with one or two copies of the short ‘s’ allele of the rh5-HTTLPR (s/s < s/l < l/l). These findings illustrate that rh5-HTTLPR-related alterations in serotonin uptake are present during adulthood in peripheral blood cells natively expressing serotonin transporters. Moreover, they suggest that lymphocytes can be used as peripheral biomarkers for investigating genetic or pharmacologic alterations in serotonin transporter function. Use of boron-doped diamond microelectrodes for measuring serotonin uptake, in contrast to carbon fiber microelectrodes used previously in the brain, enabled these high-sensitivity and high-resolution measurements. Boron-doped diamond microelectrodes show excellent signal-to-noise and signal-to-background ratios due mainly to low background currents and are highly resistant to fouling when exposed to lymphocytes or high concentrations of serotonin. PMID:20352073

  10. Acute and chronic effects of nicotine on serotonin uptake in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed

    Awtry, Tammy L; Werling, Linda L

    2003-12-01

    We sought to investigate the effect of nicotine exposure (chronic and acute) on serotonin transporter (SERT) activity in two regions of the brain important for behavioral effects of nicotine. We first looked at the effects of chronic nicotine exposure (0.7 mg/kg nicotine, twice a day for 10 days) on [(3)H]5-HT uptake in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus of rats. A significant increase in [(3)H]5-HT uptake was observed in synaptosomes prepared from both regions. To rule out the possibility that the increases were due to the last injection given, in a separate set of experiments a single injection of nicotine was administered the evening before sacrifice. No change in uptake occurred in either region, suggesting that the increases in uptake caused by nicotine was an effect of chronic exposure and not to an acute treatment. SERT binding studies, using prefrontocortical or hippocampal membrane preparations, revealed that chronic nicotine exposure significantly increased B(max) which correlated to an increase in SERT density. Lastly, we looked at the short-term effect of nicotine on [(3)H]5-HT uptake. Rats received a single nicotine injection 15-75 min before sacrifice. PFC synaptosomes displayed a time-dependent increase in uptake, whereas hippocampal synaptosomes showed an increase at only one time point.

  11. Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the aquatic environment: an ecopharmacovigilance approach.

    PubMed

    Silva, Liliana J G; Lino, Celeste M; Meisel, Leonor M; Pena, Angelina

    2012-10-15

    Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) antidepressants are among the most prescribed pharmaceutical active substances throughout the world. The occurrence of these widely used compounds in different environmental compartments (wastewaters, surface, ground and drinking waters, and sediments), justify the growing concern about these emerging environmental pollutants. Viewing an ecopharmacovigilance approach, a comprehensive discussion of the state of the art regarding different contamination sources, fate, degradation and occurrence is presented. Information on the current distribution levels and fate in different environmental matrices continues to be sparse and measures are imperative to improve awareness and encourage precautionary actions to minimize SSRIs' environmental impact.

  12. Hybrid dopamine uptake blocker-serotonin releaser ligands: a new twist on transporter-focused therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Blough, Bruce E; Landavazo, Antonio; Partilla, John S; Baumann, Michael H; Decker, Ann M; Page, Kevin M; Rothman, Richard B

    2014-06-12

    As part of our program to study neurotransmitter releasers, we report herein a class of hybrid dopamine reuptake inhibitors that display serotonin releasing activity. Hybrid compounds are interesting since they increase the design potential of transporter related compounds and hence represent a novel and unexplored strategy for therapeutic drug discovery. A series of N-alkylpropiophenones was synthesized and assessed for uptake inhibition and release activity using rat brain synaptosomes. Substitution on the aromatic ring yielded compounds that maintained hybrid activity, with the two disubstituted analogues (PAL-787 and PAL-820) having the most potent hybrid activity.

  13. Hybrid Dopamine Uptake Blocker–Serotonin Releaser Ligands: A New Twist on Transporter-Focused Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    As part of our program to study neurotransmitter releasers, we report herein a class of hybrid dopamine reuptake inhibitors that display serotonin releasing activity. Hybrid compounds are interesting since they increase the design potential of transporter related compounds and hence represent a novel and unexplored strategy for therapeutic drug discovery. A series of N-alkylpropiophenones was synthesized and assessed for uptake inhibition and release activity using rat brain synaptosomes. Substitution on the aromatic ring yielded compounds that maintained hybrid activity, with the two disubstituted analogues (PAL-787 and PAL-820) having the most potent hybrid activity. PMID:24944732

  14. Isolation from bovine brain of substances inhibiting specific binding of imipramine and serotonin uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhin, A.G.; Kladnitskii, A.V.; Kovaleva, E.S.; Kudryakova, T.B.

    1986-01-01

    The authors search for endogenous ligands of the ''imipramine receptor'' in brain tissue. Binding of tritium-imipramine with the fraction of unpruified bovine brain synaptic membranes was carried out by the method of Raisman et'al. Uptake of tritium-serotonin by synaptosomes of rat cerebral cortex was estimated. The results do not give a final anser to the question of the existence of an endogenous ligand of the ''imipramine receptor'' but they can serve as the basis for research aimed at purifying the active fractions already obtained and identifying the compounds containined in them.

  15. 5-hydroxytryptamine-mediated neurotransmission modulates spontaneous and vagal-evoked glutamate release in the nucleus of the solitary tract effect of uptake blockade.

    PubMed

    Hosford, Patrick S; Mifflin, Steve W; Ramage, Andrew G

    2014-05-01

    The effect of blockade of either 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)/serotonin transporter (SERT) with citalopram or the organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3)/plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) with decynium-22 (D-22) on spontaneous and evoked release of 5-HT in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) was investigated in rat brainstem slices treated with gabazine. 5-HT release was measured indirectly by changes in the frequency and amplitude of glutamatergic miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) [in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX)] and evoked EPSCs. Blockade of 5-HT3 receptors with granisetron reduced, whereas the 5-HT3 agonist phenylbiguanide increased, the frequency of mEPSCs. 5-HT decreased mEPSC frequency at low concentrations and increased frequency at high concentrations. This inhibition was blocked by the 5-HT1A antagonist N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-2-pyridinylcyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY-100635), which was ineffective on its own, whereas the excitation was reversed by granisetron. The addition of citalopram or D-22 caused inhibition, which was prevented by 5-HT1A blockade. Thus, in the NTS, the spontaneous release of 5-HT is able to activate 5-HT3 receptors, but not 5-HT1A receptors, as the release in their vicinity is removed by uptake. The ineffectiveness of corticosterone suggests that the low-affinity, high-capacity transporter is PMAT, not OCT3. For evoked 5-HT release, only D-22 caused an increase in the amplitude of EPSCs, with a decrease in the paired pulse ratio, and increased the number of spontaneous EPSCs after 20-Hz stimulation. Thus, for the evoked release of 5-HT, the low-affinity, high-capacity transporter PMAT, but not 5-HT transporter (5-HTT)/SERT, is important in the regulation of changes in 5-HT extracellular concentration.

  16. Reviewing the serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) footprint in the aquatic biota: uptake, bioaccumulation and ecotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Silva, Liliana J G; Pereira, André M P T; Meisel, Leonor M; Lino, Celeste M; Pena, Angelina

    2015-02-01

    Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) antidepressants are amongst the most prescribed pharmaceutical active substances throughout the world. Their presence, already described in different environmental compartments such as wastewaters, surface, ground and drinking waters, and sediments, and their remarkable effects on non-target organisms justify the growing concern about these emerging environmental pollutants. A comprehensive review of the literature data with focus on their footprint in the aquatic biota, namely their uptake, bioaccumulation and both acute and chronic ecotoxicology is presented. Long-term multigenerational exposure studies, at environmental relevant concentrations and in mixtures of related compounds, such as oestrogenic endocrine disruptors, continue to be sparse and are imperative to better know their environmental impact. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Serotonin Uptake Is Largely Mediated by Platelets versus Lymphocytes in Peripheral Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT), a primary target for many antidepressants, is expressed in the brain and also in peripheral blood cells. Although platelet SERT function is well accepted, lymphocyte SERT function has not been definitively characterized. Due to their small size, platelets often are found in peripheral blood mononuclear cell preparations aimed at isolating lymphocytes, monocytes, and macrophages. The presence of different cells makes it difficult to assign SERT expression and function to specific cell types. Here, we use flow cytometry and IDT307, a monoamine transporter substrate that fluoresces after uptake into cells, to investigate SERT function in lymphocyte and platelet populations independently, as well as simultaneously without prior isolation. We find that murine lymphocytes exhibit temperature-dependent IDT307 transport but uptake is independent of SERT. Lack of measurable SERT function in lymphocytes was corroborated by chronoamperometry using serotonin as a substrate. When we examined rhesus and human mixed blood cell populations, we found that platelets, and not lymphocytes, were primary contributors to SERT function. Overall, these findings indicate that lymphocyte SERT function is minimal. Moreover, flow cytometry, in conjunction with the fluorescent transporter substrate IDT307, can be widely applied to investigate SERT in platelets from populations of clinical significance. PMID:23336055

  18. Central serotonin(2B) receptor blockade inhibits cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion independently of changes of subcortical dopamine outflow.

    PubMed

    Devroye, Céline; Cathala, Adeline; Di Marco, Barbara; Caraci, Filippo; Drago, Filippo; Piazza, Pier Vincenzo; Spampinato, Umberto

    2015-10-01

    The central serotonin2B receptor (5-HT2BR) is currently considered as an interesting pharmacological target for improved treatment of drug addiction. In the present study, we assessed the effect of two selective 5-HT2BR antagonists, RS 127445 and LY 266097, on cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion and dopamine (DA) outflow in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the dorsal striatum of freely moving rats. The peripheral administration of RS 127445 (0.16 mg/kg, i.p.) or LY 266097 (0.63 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced basal DA outflow in the NAc shell, but had no effect on cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced DA outflow in this brain region. Also, RS 127445 failed to modify both basal and cocaine-induced DA outflow in the NAc core and the dorsal striatum. Conversely, both 5-HT2BR antagonists reduced cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion. Furthermore, RS 127445 as well as the DA-R antagonist haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced significantly the late-onset hyperlocomotion induced by the DA-R agonist quinpirole (0.5 mg/kg, s.c.). Altogether, these results demonstrate that 5-HT2BR blockade inhibits cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion independently of changes of subcortical DA outflow. This interaction takes place downstream to DA neurons and could involve an action at the level of dorsostriatal and/or NAc DA transmission, in keeping with the importance of these brain regions in the behavioural responses of cocaine. Overall, this study affords additional knowledge into the regulatory control exerted by the 5-HT2BR on ascending DA pathways, and provides additional support to the proposed role of 5-HT2BRs as a new pharmacological target in drug addiction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Blockade of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, but not blockade of gamma-aminobutyric acidA, serotonin, or opiate receptors, augments responsiveness of locus coeruleus neurons to excitatory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Simson, P E; Weiss, J M

    1989-07-01

    Previous studies in this laboratory indicated that alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in the locus coeruleus play a major role in regulating the responsiveness of neurons in the locus coeruleus to excitatory influences. The present study points to the possibility that alpha 2-receptors are unique among inhibitory receptors in the locus coeruleus in regulating responsiveness of these neurons independently of the spontaneous firing rate. In the first part of the study, blockade of alpha 2-receptors was shown to markedly augment responsiveness of neurons in the locus coeruleus to the excitatory stimulus of compression of the contralateral hind paw at doses of an alpha 2-blocker both above and well below those necessary to increase spontaneous activity of neurons in the locus coeruleus. In contrast, blockade of gamma-aminobutyric acid and serotonin receptors augmented spontaneous firing rates of neurons in the locus coeruleus but failed to augment responsiveness of these neurons to compression of the hindpaw. Blockade of opiate receptors failed to increase either spontaneous firing rates or the responsiveness of neurons of the locus coeruleus to paw compression; moreover, in animals given an opiate agonist over a number of days to produce tonic stimulation of opiate receptors, blockade of opiate receptors augmented spontaneous firing rates of neurons in the locus coeruleus but had no effect on responsiveness to paw compression. In that blockade of each type of inhibitory receptor tested increased the spontaneous firing rates of neurons in the locus coeruleus but only blockade of alpha 2-receptors increased the responsiveness of neurons in the locus coeruleus to stimulation, without affecting the spontaneous firing rate, alpha 2-receptors may be unique among inhibitory receptors in independently regulating the responsiveness of neurons in the locus coeruleus. One possibility discussed for why alpha 2-receptors regulate the responsiveness, independently of the spontaneous

  20. Vascular reactivity, 5-HT uptake, and blood pressure in the serotonin transporter knockout rat.

    PubMed

    Linder, A Elizabeth; Diaz, Jessica; Ni, Wei; Szasz, Theo; Burnett, Robert; Watts, Stephanie W

    2008-04-01

    The handling of serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] depends on the serotonin transporter (SERT). A SERT knockout (KO) rat is a useful model to test the hypothesis that SERT is the primary mechanism for arterial 5-HT uptake and to investigate the impact of SERT removal on blood pressure. Wild-type (WT) and KO rats were used to measure 5-HT content (plasma, raphe, aorta, carotid, and mesenteric artery), aortic isometric contraction, and blood pressure. HPLC supported the lack of circulating 5-HT in plasma (ng/ml plasma, WT, 310 +/- 96; and KO, 1.0 +/- 0.5; P < 0.05). Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses validated the presence of the SERT protein in the WT rats and a lesser expression in the KO rat. The aorta isolated from KO rats had a normal contraction to phenylephrine and norepinephrine and a normal relaxation to the endothelium-dependent agonist acetylcholine compared with the aorta from WT. In contrast, the potency of 5-HT was increased in the aorta from KO rats compared with WT rats [-log EC(50) (M); WT, 5.71 +/- 0.08; and KO, 6.7 +/- 0.18] and maximum contraction was reduced [%phenylephrine (10 muM) contraction, WT, 113 +/- 6%; and KO, 52 +/- 12%]. 5-HT uptake was reduced but not abolished in arteries of the KO compared with the WT rats. Diurnal mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and locomotor activity level of the KO rats were similar to the WT rats. These data suggest that there are other mechanisms of 5-HT uptake in the arteries of the rat and that although the absence of circulating 5-HT and/or SERT function sensitizes arteries to 5-HT, SERT dysfunction does not impair normal blood pressure.

  1. Specific in vitro uptake of serotonin by cells in the anterior pituitary of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, M.A.; Azmitia, E.C.; Krieger, D.T.

    1982-03-01

    In vivo studies have suggested that serotonin (5HT) influences anterior pituitary function at the hypothalamic level. The present in vitro study investigated the possibility that 5HT may act directly on the anterior pituitary. The high affinity uptake of (3H)5HT into adult rat anterior pituitary tissue was examined in two types of experiments. 1) To test the specificity and saturability of uptake of 5HT in the anterior pituitary, pituitary tissue was incubated (37 C) with (3H)5HT (10(-8)-10(-6) M) in the presence and absence of excess (10(-5) M) unlabeled 5HT, norepinephrine, fluoxetine (FLUOX), metergoline, or cyproheptadine. A Hofstee analysis of the specific uptake of (3H)5HT gave an apparent Km value of 4.23 x 10(-7) M and a Vmax of 1576 pmol/g/10 min (3H)5HT. The total uptake of (3H)5HT was not altered by norepinephrine or metergoline, but was significantly reduced (P less than 0.01-0.001) by FLUOX and cyproheptadine. Uptake was shown to be temperature and sodium dependent and not directly dependent on energy derived from glycolysis or aerobic metabolism. 2) To study the site of uptake of 5 HT in the anterior pituitary, in concomitant radioautographic experiments, tissue was incubated with (3H)5HT with and without excess 5HT or FLUOX. Three patterns of silver grain distribution were observed: 1) nonrandom concentrations over select anterior pituitary cells near blood vessels, 2) heavy aggregates of silver grains usually associated with blood vessels, and 3) a seemingly random dispersal of grains over pituitary tissue. Tissue incubated with (3H)5HT alone contained 10% heavily labeled cells, 32% moderately labeled cells, and 58% weakly labeled cells. In contrast, no heavily labeled cells were seen when tissue was incubated with either excess 5HT or FLUOX in addition to (3H)5HT. Our findings of saturable and specific high affinity uptake of (3H)5HT into a subgroup of anterior pituitary cells suggest a direct pituitary action of 5HT.

  2. Definition of an uptake pharmacophore of the serotonin transporter through 3D-QSAR analysis.

    PubMed

    Pratuangdejkul, J; Schneider, B; Jaudon, P; Rosilio, V; Baudoin, E; Loric, S; Conti, M; Launay, J-M; Manivet, P

    2005-01-01

    The serotonergic system plays a critical role in a wide variety of physiological and behavioral processes. Dysregulation of the tightly controlled extracellular concentration of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) appears to be at the origin of a host of metabolic and psychiatric disorders. Since the plasma membrane 5-HT transporter (SERT) is the major protagonist in regulating extracellular 5-HT concentration, SERT is the target of most drugs interacting with the serotonergic system. Unfortunately, some of the drugs towards SERT (e.g. amphetamine derivatives) interfere with cell homeostasis leading to cell toxicity. Developing new SERT ligands devoid of any side-effect represents a major priority in the treatment of 5-HT-associated pathologies. Here, we report structure-activity relationships (SAR) and three-dimensional QSAR (3D-QSAR) studies of a library of 121 compounds including 5-HT analogs, harmanes, benzothiazoles, indanones, amphetamine derivatives and substrate-type 5-HT releasers, with the goal of identifying the structural determinants crucial for SERT uptake. In the absence of data about the bioactive form of 5-HT, conformational analysis of 5-HT was performed using quantum chemistry calculations. This led to three 5-HT stable conformers with anti, -gauche and +gauche side-chain conformation. These conformers, used as templates for superimposition with all the library compounds, enabled the design of a reliable 6-points pharmacophore representative of SERT uptake activity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations performed with compounds that are efficiently, moderately, poorly or not transported by SERT allowed to assess the validity of our pharmacophore. Altogether, our data provide for the first time a reliable pharmacophore of SERT uptake activity, which may help to the design of new drugs targeting SERT.

  3. Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) versus placebo for obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD).

    PubMed

    Soomro, G M; Altman, D; Rajagopal, S; Oakley-Browne, M

    2008-01-23

    Obsessive compulsive disorder is a common and disabling disorder. A significant proportion of patients manifest a chronic course. Individual randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have shown that selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are effective in this condition. Previous systematic reviews or meta-analyses summarising the evidence are methodologically problematic or limited in the scope of their analysis. To examine the efficacy and adverse effects of serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) versus placebo for obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) in adults. CCDANCTR-Studies and CCDANCTR-References were searched on 12/11/2007. Reference lists were checked. Experts in the field were contacted. All RCTs and quasi-RCTs examining the efficacy of SSRIs compared with placebo for OCD in adults were eligible for inclusion. Selection of studies and data extraction were carried out by two review authors independently, and quality assessment of studies was undertaken. Data analysis was conducted using Review Manager software. Summary measures were produced using the weighted mean difference (WMD) for continuous data and relative risk (RR) for dichotomous data, with 95% confidence intervals (CI). SSRIs were examined as an overall group of drugs, and as individual drugs. Seventeen studies were included in the review, involving 3097 participants. Based on all 17 studies, SSRIs as a group were more effective than placebo in reducing the symptoms of OCD between 6 and 13 weeks post-treatment, measured using the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (YBOCS) (WMD -3.21, 95% CI -3.84 to -2.57). The WMD for individual SSRI drugs were similar and not statistically different. Based on 13 studies (2697 participants), SSRIs were more effective than placebo in achieving clinical response at post-treatment (RR 1.84, 95% CI 1.56 to 2.17). The pooled RR was shown to be similar between individual SSRI drugs. Although reported adverse effects data were more limited, with few exceptions

  4. The flavanone homoeriodictyol increases SGLT-1-mediated glucose uptake but decreases serotonin release in differentiated Caco-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoi, Julia Katharina; Holik, Ann-Katrin; Geissler, Katrin; Hans, Joachim; Friedl, Barbara; Liszt, Kathrin; Krammer, Gerhard E.; Ley, Jakob P.; Somoza, Veronika

    2017-01-01

    Flavanoids and related polyphenols, among them hesperitin, have been shown to modulate cellular glucose transport by targeting SGLT-1 and GLUT-2 transport proteins. We aimed to investigate whether homoeriodictyol, which is structurally related to hesperitin, affects glucose uptake in differentiated Caco-2 cells as a model for the intestinal barrier. The results revealed that, in contrast to other polyphenols, the flavanon homoeriodictyol promotes glucose uptake by 29.0 ± 3.83% at a concentration of 100 μM. The glucose uptake stimulating effect was sensitive to phloridzin, but not to phloretin, indicating an involvement of the sodium-coupled glucose transporter SGLT-1, but not of sodium-independent glucose transporters (GLUT). In addition, in contrast to the increased extracellular serotonin levels by stimulation with 500 mM D-(+)-glucose, treatment with 100 μM homoeriodictyol decreased serotonin release by –48.8 ± 7.57% in Caco-2 cells via a phloridzin-sensitive signaling pathway. Extracellular serotonin levels were also reduced by –57.1 ± 5.43% after application of 0.01 μM homoeriodictyol to human neural SH-SY5Y cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that homoeriodictyol affects both the glucose metabolism and the serotonin system in Caco-2 cells via a SGLT-1-meditated pathway. Furthermore, the results presented here support the usage of Caco-2 cells as a model for peripheral serotonin release. Further investigations may address the value of homoeriodictyol in the treatment of anorexia and malnutrition through the targeting of SGLT-1. PMID:28192456

  5. The flavanone homoeriodictyol increases SGLT-1-mediated glucose uptake but decreases serotonin release in differentiated Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lieder, Barbara; Hoi, Julia Katharina; Holik, Ann-Katrin; Geissler, Katrin; Hans, Joachim; Friedl, Barbara; Liszt, Kathrin; Krammer, Gerhard E; Ley, Jakob P; Somoza, Veronika

    2017-01-01

    Flavanoids and related polyphenols, among them hesperitin, have been shown to modulate cellular glucose transport by targeting SGLT-1 and GLUT-2 transport proteins. We aimed to investigate whether homoeriodictyol, which is structurally related to hesperitin, affects glucose uptake in differentiated Caco-2 cells as a model for the intestinal barrier. The results revealed that, in contrast to other polyphenols, the flavanon homoeriodictyol promotes glucose uptake by 29.0 ± 3.83% at a concentration of 100 μM. The glucose uptake stimulating effect was sensitive to phloridzin, but not to phloretin, indicating an involvement of the sodium-coupled glucose transporter SGLT-1, but not of sodium-independent glucose transporters (GLUT). In addition, in contrast to the increased extracellular serotonin levels by stimulation with 500 mM D-(+)-glucose, treatment with 100 μM homoeriodictyol decreased serotonin release by -48.8 ± 7.57% in Caco-2 cells via a phloridzin-sensitive signaling pathway. Extracellular serotonin levels were also reduced by -57.1 ± 5.43% after application of 0.01 μM homoeriodictyol to human neural SH-SY5Y cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that homoeriodictyol affects both the glucose metabolism and the serotonin system in Caco-2 cells via a SGLT-1-meditated pathway. Furthermore, the results presented here support the usage of Caco-2 cells as a model for peripheral serotonin release. Further investigations may address the value of homoeriodictyol in the treatment of anorexia and malnutrition through the targeting of SGLT-1.

  6. The serotonin uptake inhibitor citalopram reduces acute cardiovascular and vegetative effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine ('Ecstasy') in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Liechti, M E; Vollenweider, F X

    2000-01-01

    MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) or 'Ecstasy' is a widely used recreational drug that produces a state of heightened mood but also cardiovascular and vegetative side-effects. In animals, MDMA releases serotonin and, to a lesser extent, dopamine and norepinephrine. The release of serotonin can be blocked by serotonin uptake inhibitors such as citalopram. It is unknown to what extent this mechanism is also responsible for the physiological side-effects of MDMA seen in humans. We investigated the effect of citalopram pretreatment (40 mg i.v.) on vegetative and cardiovascular effects of MDMA (1.5 mg/kg p.o.) in a double-blind placebo-controlled study in 16 healthy volunteers. MDMA moderately increased blood pressure and heart rate, slightly elevated body temperature and produced a broad range of acute and short-term side-effects. Citalopram reduced all these MDMA-induced physiological changes except for body temperature. These findings suggest that physiological effects of MDMA in humans are partially due to an interaction of MDMA with the serotonin carrier and a subsequent release of serotonin.

  7. Stimulation of splenic antigen uptake and of antibody response in mice by India ink or other `blockading' agents

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, S.

    1966-01-01

    India ink or other finely divided agents (trypan blue, saccharated iron oxide, thorotrast, polystyrene latex) were injected intravenously into mice, and sheep erythrocyte stroma injected subsequently by the same route. The splenic uptake of stroma carrying a tag of 131I was consistently higher in mice treated with the `blockading' agents than in untreated controls, the difference in some experiments being greater than ten-fold. In addition to promoting the splenic uptake of antigen, some of the finely divided agents also enhanced the formation of anti-sheep red cell haemolysin in mice immunized with a single intravenous injection of sheep erythrocyte stroma. India ink injected intravenously caused a significant rise in the splenic weight of mice. PMID:5920794

  8. Selective labeling of serotonin uptake sites in rat brain by (/sup 3/H)citalopram contrasted to labeling of multiple sites by (/sup 3/H)imipramine

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amato, R.J.; Largent, B.L.; Snowman, A.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-07-01

    Citalopram is a potent and selective inhibitor of neuronal serotonin uptake. In rat brain membranes (/sup 3/H)citalopram demonstrates saturable and reversible binding with a KD of 0.8 nM and a maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) of 570 fmol/mg of protein. The drug specificity for (/sup 3/H)citalopram binding and synaptosomal serotonin uptake are closely correlated. Inhibition of (/sup 3/H)citalopram binding by both serotonin and imipramine is consistent with a competitive interaction in both equilibrium and kinetic analyses. The autoradiographic pattern of (/sup 3/H)citalopram binding sites closely resembles the distribution of serotonin. By contrast, detailed equilibrium-saturation analysis of (/sup 3/H)imipramine binding reveals two binding components, i.e., high affinity (KD = 9 nM, Bmax = 420 fmol/mg of protein) and low affinity (KD = 553 nM, Bmax = 8560 fmol/mg of protein) sites. Specific (/sup 3/H)imipramine binding, defined as the binding inhibited by 100 microM desipramine, is displaced only partially by serotonin. Various studies reveal that the serotonin-sensitive portion of binding corresponds to the high affinity sites of (/sup 3/H)imipramine binding whereas the serotonin-insensitive binding corresponds to the low affinity sites. Lesioning of serotonin neurons with p-chloroamphetamine causes a large decrease in (/sup 3/H)citalopram and serotonin-sensitive (/sup 3/H)imipramine binding with only a small effect on serotonin-insensitive (/sup 3/H)imipramine binding. The dissociation rate of (/sup 3/H)imipramine or (/sup 3/H)citalopram is not altered by citalopram, imipramine or serotonin up to concentrations of 10 microM. The regional distribution of serotonin sensitive (/sup 3/H)imipramine high affinity binding sites closely resembles that of (/sup 3/H)citalopram binding.

  9. Blockade of Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptors Suppresses Behavioral Sensitization and Naloxone-Precipitated Withdrawal Symptoms in Morphine-Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Gang; Wu, Xian; Tao, Xinrong; Mao, Ruoying; Liu, Xueke; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Li, Guangwu; Stackman, Robert W.; Dong, Liuyi; Zhang, Gongliang

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prescription of opioids is fueling an epidemic of addiction and overdose deaths. Morphine is a highly addictive drug characterized by a high relapse rate – even after a long period of abstinence. Serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission participates in the development of morphine dependence, as well as the expression of morphine withdrawal. In this study, we examined the effect of blockade of 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2ARs) on morphine-induced behavioral sensitization and withdrawal in male mice. 5-HT2AR antagonist MDL 11,939 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) suppressed acute morphine (5.0 mg/kg, s.c.)-induced increase in locomotor activity. Mice received morphine (10 mg/kg, s.c.) twice a day for 3 days and then drug treatment was suspended for 5 days. On day 9, a challenge dose of morphine (10 mg/kg) was administered to induce the expression of behavioral sensitization. MDL 11,939 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) pretreatment suppressed the expression of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization. Another cohort of mice received increasing doses of morphine over a 7-day period to induce morphine-dependence. MDL 11,939 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) prevented naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in morphine-dependent mice on day 7. Moreover, chronic morphine treatment increased 5-HT2AR protein level and decreased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases in the prefrontal cortex. Together, these results by the first time demonstrate that 5-HT2ARs modulate opioid dependence and blockade of 5-HT2AR may represent a novel strategy for the treatment of morphine use disorders. Highlights (i) Blockade of 5-HT2A receptors suppresses the expression of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization. (ii) Blockade of 5-HT2A receptors suppresses naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in morphine-treated mice. (iii) Chronic morphine exposure induces an increase in 5-HT2A receptor protein level and a decrease in ERK protein phosphorylation in prefrontal cortex. PMID:28082900

  10. Circannual variations in the binding of [3H]lysergic acid diethylamide to serotonin2A receptors and of [3H]paroxetine to serotonin uptake sites in platelets from healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Spigset, O; Allard, P; Mjörndal, T

    1998-05-15

    Circannual variations occur in several serotonergic parameters, including platelet serotonin uptake and platelet [3H]imipramine binding. Binding of [3H]lysergic acid diethylamide ([3H]LSD) to platelet serotonin (5-HT)2A receptors and binding of [3H]paroxetine to platelet serotonin uptake sites were studied longitudinally for 1 year in 12 healthy volunteers. For [3H]LSD, the number of binding sites (Bmax) showed no significant seasonal variation (two-way analysis of variance), although Bmax was significantly higher during the months October through February than during the months April through August (32.6 vs. 29.8 fmol/mg protein; p = .015). For [3H]paroxetine, Bmax showed a significant seasonal variation (p = .003) with maximum in August (1322 fmol/mg protein) and minimum in February (1168 fmol/mg protein). The affinity constant (Kd) showed a significant seasonal variation for [3H]LSD binding (p = .046), but not for [3H]paroxetine binding. The seasonal fluctuations in [3H]LSD binding and in paroxetine binding tended to be inversely correlated for Bmax (r = -.70; p = .08) and were significantly negatively correlated for Kd (r = -.88; p = .009). The present study demonstrates a seasonal effect on platelet serotonin uptake site binding and indicates a possible seasonal effect on 5-HT2A receptor binding. The results imply that circannual fluctuations should be taken into account when these platelet serotonin markers are studied.

  11. The comparative effects of environmental enrichment with exercise and serotonin transporter blockade on serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    MacGillivray, Lindsey; Reynolds, Katelyn B; Rosebush, Patricia I; Mazurek, Michael F

    2012-05-01

    We have previously reported that inhibition of the serotonin transporter (SERT) by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine significantly reduces the number of tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH)-positive cells in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). We have been interested in exploring whether this SSRI-induced change in TPH might be modified by housing in an enriched environment. Like SSRI antidepressants, environmental enrichment (EE) and physical exercise have been found to have efficacy in the prevention and alleviation of depression. We postulated that EE with exercise and SERT inhibition would similarly affect TPH regulation and that EE with exercise might modify the effect of fluoxetine on TPH. Three week old male Sprague-Dawley rats were housed in either a standard cage (SE) or an enriched environment (EE). SE animals were singly housed with no access to enrichment objects. EE animals were group housed and were provided with various enrichment objects (e.g. running wheel) that were changed and rearranged regularly. Nine weeks after the experiment began, the rats were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups: (1) SE control; (2) SE fluoxetine; (3) EE control; or (4) EE fluoxetine. Fluoxetine (5 mg/kg/day) was placed in the drinking water. Sections of DRN were processed for TPH immunohistochemistry. The number of TPH-positive cells was determined by blinded, manual counting. Results were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by post-hoc Tukey tests. Significance was set at P < 0.05. For animals housed in a standard environment, fluoxetine induced a significant 29% reduction in the number of TPH-immunoreactive cells in the DRN. A similar reduction in TPH immunoreactivity was observed in animals that were housed in an enriched environment but not exposed to fluoxetine (39%). The number of TPH-positive cells in the DRN for animals housed in an enriched environment and exposed to fluoxetine was not significantly different than animals

  12. Opposite control of mesocortical and mesoaccumbal dopamine pathways by serotonin2B receptor blockade: Involvement of medial prefrontal cortex serotonin1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Devroye, Céline; Haddjeri, Nasser; Cathala, Adeline; Rovera, Renaud; Drago, Filippo; Piazza, Pier Vincenzo; Artigas, Francesc; Spampinato, Umberto

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that serotonin2B receptor (5-HT2BR) antagonists exert opposite facilitatory and inhibitory effects on dopamine (DA) release in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the nucleus accumbens (NAc), respectively, thereby leading to the proposal that these compounds could provide an interesting pharmacological tool for treating schizophrenia. Although the mechanisms underlying these effects remain unknown, several data in the literature suggest that 5-HT1ARs located into the mPFC could participate in this interaction. The present study, using in vivo microdialysis and electrophysiological recordings in rats, assessed this hypothesis by means of two selective 5-HT1AR (WAY 100635) and 5-HT2BR (RS 127445) antagonists. WAY 100635, administered either subcutaneously (0.16 mg/kg, s.c) or locally into the mPFC (0.1 μM), blocked the changes of mPFC and NAc DA release induced by the intraperitoneal administration of RS 127445 (0.16 mg/kg, i.p.). The administration of RS 127445 (0.16 mg/kg, i.p.) increased both dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) 5-HT neuron firing rate and 5-HT outflow in the mPFC. Likewise, mPFC 5-HT outflow was increased following the intra-DRN injection of RS 127445 (0.032 μg/0.2 μl). Finally, intra-DRN injection of RS 127445 increased and decreased DA outflow in the mPFC and the NAc, respectively, these effects being reversed by the intra-mPFC perfusion of WAY 100635. These results demonstrate the existence of a functional interplay between mPFC 5-HT1ARs and DRN 5-HT2BRs in the control of the DA mesocorticolimbic system, and highlight the clinical interest of this interaction, as both receptors represent an important pharmacological target for the treatment of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Lifelong disturbance of serotonin transporter functioning results in fear learning deficits: Reversal by blockade of CRF1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Bijlsma, Elisabeth Y; Hendriksen, Hendrikus; Baas, Johanna M P; Millan, Mark J; Groenink, Lucianne

    2015-10-01

    The inability to associate aversive events with relevant cues (i.e. fear learning) may lead to maladaptive anxiety. To further study the role of the serotonin transporter (SERT) in fear learning, classical fear conditioning was studied in SERT knockout rats (SERT(-/-)) using fear potentiation of the startle reflex. Next, fear acquisition and concomitant development of contextual conditioned fear were monitored during training. To differentiate between developmental and direct effects of reduced SERT functioning, effects of acute and chronic SSRI treatment were studied in adult rats. Considering the known interactions between serotonin and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), we studied the effect of the CRFR1 antagonist CP154,526 on behavioral changes observed and determined CRF1 receptor levels in SERT(-/-) rats. SERT(-/-) showed blunted fear potentiation and enhanced contextual fear, which resulted from a deficit in fear acquisition. Paroxetine treatment did not affect acquisition or expression of fear-potentiated startle, suggesting that disturbed fear learning in SERT(-/-) results from developmental changes and not from reduced SERT functioning. Although CRF1 receptor levels did not differ significantly between genotypes, CP154,526 treatment normalized both cue- and contextual fear in SERT(-/-) during acquisition, but not expression of fear-potentiated startle. The disrupted fear acquisition and concomitant increase in contextual conditioned fear-potentiated startle fear in SERT(-/-) resembles the associative learning deficit seen in patients with panic disorder and suggests that normal SERT functioning is crucial for the development of an adequate fear neuro-circuitry. Moreover, the normalization of fear acquisition by CP154,526 suggests a role for central CRF signaling in the generalization of fear. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  14. Decreased Incentive Motivation Following Knockout or Acute Blockade of the Serotonin Transporter: Role of the 5-HT2C Receptor.

    PubMed

    Browne, Caleb J; Fletcher, Paul J

    2016-09-01

    Acute pharmacological elevation of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) activity decreases operant responding for primary reinforcers, suggesting that 5-HT reduces incentive motivation. The mechanism by which 5-HT alters incentive motivation is unknown, but parallel evidence that 5-HT2C receptor agonists also reduce responding for primary reinforcers implicates this receptor as a potential candidate. These experiments examined whether chronic and acute disruptions of serotonin transporter (SERT) activity altered incentive motivation, and whether the 5-HT2C receptor mediated the effects of elevated 5-HT on behavior. To assess incentive motivation, we measured responding for three different reinforcers: a primary reinforcer (saccharin), a conditioned reinforcer (CRf), and an unconditioned sensory reinforcer (USRf). In the chronic condition, responding was compared between SERT knockout (SERT-KO) mice and their wild-type littermates. In the acute condition, responding was examined in wild-type mice following treatment with 10 or 20 mg/kg citalopram, or its vehicle. The ability of the selective 5-HT2C antagonist SB 242084 to prevent the effects of SERT-KO and citalopram on responding was subsequently examined. Both SERT-KO and citalopram reduced responding for saccharin, a CRf, and a USRf. Treatment with SB 242084 enhanced responding for a CRf and a USRf in SERT-KO mice and blocked the effects of citalopram on CRf and USRf responding. However, SB 242084 was unable to prevent the effects of SERT-KO or citalopram on responding for saccharin. These results support a powerful inhibitory function for 5-HT in the control of incentive motivation, and indicate that the 5-HT2C receptor mediates these effects of 5-HT in a reinforcer-dependent manner.

  15. Impact of 5-HTTLPR on SSRI serotonin transporter blockade during emotion regulation: A preliminary fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Outhred, Tim; Das, Pritha; Dobson-Stone, Carol; Felmingham, Kim L; Bryant, Richard A; Nathan, Pradeep J; Malhi, Gin S; Kemp, Andrew H

    2016-05-15

    The short ('S') allele of the serotonin transporter (5-HTT)-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) is associated with increased negative emotion processing bias, and this polymorphism moderates acute effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment. In this preliminary study, we explore the moderating effect of 5-HTTLPR on the impact of the SSRI, escitalopram during emotion regulation of negative emotional stimuli. Thirty-six healthy Caucasian, female participants underwent two fMRI scanning sessions following single dose escitalopram and placebo administration separated by a seven-day washout period according to a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover design. Functional connectivity analysis was employed with a left (L) amygdala seed and a right interior frontal gyrus (R IFG) target. Changes in functional connectivity with emotion regulation and treatment were linearly related to 5-HTTLPR 'L' allele load such that negative R IFG-L amygdala connectivity was increased with an increasing number of 'L' alleles. Therefore, escitalopram may facilitate the effects of reappraisal by enhancing negative functional connectivity, a finding that is greatest in participants homozygous for the 'L' allele and least in those homozygous for the 'S' allele. Sub-samples of the homozygote 'S/S' and 'L/L' 5-HTTLPR groupings were small. However, the within-subjects nature of the experiment and observing changes at the individual subject level increases our confidence in the findings of the present study. The present study elucidates a potential neural mechanism by which antidepressant treatment produces differential treatment outcomes dependent on the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism, providing new and important leads for models of antidepressant action. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors potentiate gene blunting induced by repeated methylphenidate treatment: Zif268 versus Homer1a.

    PubMed

    Van Waes, Vincent; Vandrevala, Malcolm; Beverley, Joel; Steiner, Heinz

    2014-11-01

    There is a growing use of psychostimulants, such as methylphenidate (Ritalin; dopamine re-uptake inhibitor), for medical treatments and as cognitive enhancers in the healthy. Methylphenidate is known to produce some addiction-related gene regulation. Recent findings in animal models show that selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs), including fluoxetine, can potentiate acute induction of gene expression by methylphenidate, thus indicating an acute facilitatory role for serotonin in dopamine-induced gene regulation. We investigated whether repeated exposure to fluoxetine, in conjunction with methylphenidate, in adolescent rats facilitated a gene regulation effect well established for repeated exposure to illicit psychostimulants such as cocaine-blunting (repression) of gene inducibility. We measured, by in situ hybridization histochemistry, the effects of a 5-day repeated treatment with methylphenidate (5 mg/kg), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) or a combination on the inducibility (by cocaine) of neuroplasticity-related genes (Zif268, Homer1a) in the striatum. Repeated methylphenidate treatment alone produced minimal gene blunting, while fluoxetine alone had no effect. In contrast, fluoxetine added to methylphenidate robustly potentiated methylphenidate-induced blunting for both genes. This potentiation was widespread throughout the striatum, but was most robust in the lateral, sensorimotor striatum, thus mimicking cocaine effects. For illicit psychostimulants, blunting of gene expression is considered part of the molecular basis of addiction. Our results thus suggest that SSRIs, such as fluoxetine, may increase the addiction liability of methylphenidate.

  17. Blockade by anti-glucocorticoids, actinomycin D and cycloheximide of the anti-inflammatory action of some Kampohozai (Chinese traditional medicines) against serotonin.

    PubMed

    Amagaya, S; Higuchi, H; Ogihara, Y

    1984-10-01

    Blockade by anti-glucocorticoids, progesterone and 17 alpha-methyltestosterone, a messenger ribonucleic acid (m-RNA) synthesis inhibitor, actinomycin D, and a protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, of the anti-exudative action of five kinds of Kampohozai (Daisaikoto, Shosaikoto, Saikokeishito, Daiobotanpito and Tokakujokito) were studied to investigate mode of the anti-inflammatory action of those Kampohozai. The inflammatory lesion was provoked by injection of serotonin (0.3 micrograms) in the Tyrode solution (5 microliter) in subplantar region of the hind paw of mice. The above anti-glucocorticoids and the m-RNA and protein synthesis inhibitors suppressed the anti-inflammatory effects of Daisaikoto and Shosaikoto dose-dependently. The action of Saikokeishito was suppressed weakly by treatment with progesterone or 17 alpha-methyltestosterone, but not blocked by treatment with actinomycin D or cycloheximide. On the other hand, Daiobotanpito and Tokakujokito were not blocked by treatment with those four inhibitors. These results suggest that mechanism of anti-inflammatory action of Daisaikoto and Shosaikoto is similar to that of glucocorticoid but Daiobotanpito and Tokakujokito exert anti-inflammatory effects through some other mechanisms.

  18. The effects of combining serotonin reuptake inhibition and 5-HT7 receptor blockade on circadian rhythm regulation in rodents.

    PubMed

    Westrich, Ligia; Sprouse, Jeffrey; Sánchez, Connie

    2013-02-17

    Disruption of circadian rhythms may lead to mood disorders. The present study investigated the potential therapeutic utility of combining a 5-HT7 antagonist with a selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), the standard of care in depression, on circadian rhythm regulation. In tissue explants of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) from PER2::LUC mice genetically modified to report changes in the expression of a key clock protein, the period length of PER2 bioluminescence was shortened in the presence of AS19, a 5-HT7 partial agonist. This reduction was blocked by SB269970, a selective 5-HT7 antagonist. The SSRI, escitalopram, had no effect alone on period length, but a combination with SB269970, yielded significant increases. Dosed in vivo, escitalopram had little impact on the occurrence of activity onsets in rats given access to running wheels, whether the drug was given acutely or sub-chronically. However, preceding the escitalopram treatment with a single acute dose of SB269970 produced robust phase delays, in keeping with the in vitro explant data. Taken together, these findings suggest that the combination of an SSRI and a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist has a greater impact on circadian rhythms than that observed with either agent alone, and that such a multimodal approach may be of therapeutic value in treating patients with poor clock function.

  19. Generation of slow network oscillations in the developing rat hippocampus after blockade of glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    Cattani, Adriano Augusto; Bonfardin, Valérie Delphine; Represa, Alfonso; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Aniksztejn, Laurent

    2007-10-01

    Cell-surface glutamate transporters are essential for the proper function of early cortical networks because their dysfunction induces seizures in the newborn rat in vivo. We have now analyzed the consequences of their inhibition by DL-TBOA on the activity of the developing CA1 rat hippocampal network in vitro. DL-TBOA generated a pattern of recurrent depolarization with an onset and decay of several seconds' duration in interneurons and pyramidal cells. These slow network oscillations (SNOs) were mostly mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in pyramidal cells and by GABA and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in interneurons. However, in both cell types SNOs were blocked by NMDA receptor antagonists, suggesting that their generation requires a glutamatergic drive. Moreover, in interneurons, SNOs were still generated after the blockade of NMDA-mediated synaptic currents with MK-801, suggesting that SNOs are expressed by the activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors. Long-lasting bath application of glutamate or NMDA failed to induce SNOs, indicating that they are generated by periodic but not sustained activation of NMDA receptors. In addition, SNOs were observed in interneurons recorded in slices with or without the strata pyramidale and oriens, suggesting that the glutamatergic drive may originate from the radiatum and pyramidale strata. We propose that in the absence of an efficient transport of glutamate, the transmitter diffuses in the extracellular space to activate extrasynaptic NMDA receptors preferentially present on interneurons that in turn activate other interneurons and pyramidal cells. This periodic neuronal coactivation may contribute to the generation of seizures when glutamate transport dysfunction is present.

  20. Dimethyltryptamine and other hallucinogenic tryptamines exhibit substrate behavior at the serotonin uptake transporter and the vesicle monoamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Nicholas V; Gopalakrishnan, Anupama; Anderson, Lyndsey L; Feih, Joel T; Shulgin, Alexander T; Daley, Paul F; Ruoho, Arnold E

    2009-12-01

    N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is a potent plant hallucinogen that has also been found in human tissues. When ingested, DMT and related N,N-dialkyltryptamines produce an intense hallucinogenic state. Behavioral effects are mediated through various neurochemical mechanisms including activity at sigma-1 and serotonin receptors, modification of monoamine uptake and release, and competition for metabolic enzymes. To further clarify the pharmacology of hallucinogenic tryptamines, we synthesized DMT, N-methyl-N-isopropyltryptamine (MIPT), N,N-dipropyltryptamine (DPT), and N,N-diisopropyltryptamine. We then tested the abilities of these N,N-dialkyltryptamines to inhibit [(3)H]5-HT uptake via the plasma membrane serotonin transporter (SERT) in human platelets and via the vesicle monoamine transporter (VMAT2) in Sf9 cells expressing the rat VMAT2. The tryptamines were also tested as inhibitors of [(3)H]paroxetine binding to the SERT and [(3)H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding to VMAT2. Our results show that DMT, MIPT, DPT, and DIPT inhibit [(3)H]5-HT transport at the SERT with K ( I ) values of 4.00 +/- 0.70, 8.88 +/- 4.7, 0.594 +/- 0.12, and 2.32 +/- 0.46 microM, respectively. At VMAT2, the tryptamines inhibited [(3)H]5-HT transport with K ( I ) values of 93 +/- 6.8, 20 +/- 4.3, 19 +/- 2.3, and 19 +/- 3.1 muM, respectively. On the other hand, the tryptamines were very poor inhibitors of [(3)H]paroxetine binding to SERT and of [(3)H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding to VMAT2, resulting in high binding-to-uptake ratios. High binding-to-uptake ratios support the hypothesis that the tryptamines are transporter substrates, not uptake blockers, at both SERT and VMAT2, and also indicate that there are separate substrate and inhibitor binding sites within these transporters. The transporters may allow the accumulation of tryptamines within neurons to reach relatively high levels for sigma-1 receptor activation and to function as releasable transmitters.

  1. Long-term blockade of the dopamine uptake complex by metaphit, an isothiocyanate derivative of phencyclidine.

    PubMed

    Zimányi, I; Jacobson, A E; Rice, K C; Lajtha, A; Reith, M E

    1989-01-01

    [3H]Mazindol was used to label the dopamine uptake complex in mouse striatum in vitro in the presence and absence of metaphit, an isothiocyanate derivative of phencyclidine. In some experiments, metaphit was present in the incubation fluid throughout the procedure; in other experiments it was eliminated by several washings and centrifugations. It was found that after removal of the metaphit by washing and centrifugation, the mazindol binding was not restored. Membranes that were pretreated with metaphit and washed had a lower density of mazindol binding sites than control membranes; the remaining mazindol sites had the same afinity for [3H]mazindol. These findings are in agreement with the previous studies on [3H]cocaine and [3H]methylphenidate binding. The following observations support that metaphit is irreversibly acting and not slowly dissociating from the mazindol recognition sites of the dopamine uptake carrier complex: 1) Metaphit did not change the off-rate of [3H]mazindol binding, arguing against an allosteric action at a distinct site. 2) The presence of cocaine protected the mazindol binding sites from the action of metaphit, supporting binding of metaphit and mazindol to the same site. 3) Nine hours after metaphit pretreatment and removal, the degree of inhibition of mazindol binding was the same as immediately after pretreatment, consonant with an irreversible effect of metaphit. 4) The potency of metaphit in inhibiting mazindol binding was greater under slightly alkaline conditions, consistent with acylation of the mazindol sites. Furthermore, it was found that intracerebroventricular application of metaphit did not result in a decrease in the binding of [3H]mazindol 5 hr after the administration.

  2. Acute psychological effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "Ecstasy") are attenuated by the serotonin uptake inhibitor citalopram.

    PubMed

    Liechti, M E; Baumann, C; Gamma, A; Vollenweider, F X

    2000-05-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "Ecstasy") is a recreational drug that has been shown to release serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) in animals. The effect of MDMA on 5-HT release can be blocked by 5-HT uptake inhibitors such as citalopram, suggesting that MDMA interacts with the 5-HT uptake site. It is unknown whether this mechanism is also responsible for the psychological effects of MDMA in humans. We investigated the effect of citalopram pretreatment (40 mg iv) on the psychological effects of MDMA (1.5 mg/kg po) in a double-blind placebo-controlled psychometric study in 16 healthy human volunteers. MDMA produced an emotional state with heightened mood, increased self-confidence and extroversion, moderate derealization, and an intensification of sensory perception. Most of these effects were markedly reduced by citalopram. This finding suggests that the psychological effects of MDMA are mediated via action at the 5-HT uptake site to increase 5-HT release through the carrier, as expected from animal studies.

  3. Treating depression in coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure: what's new in using selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors?

    PubMed

    Paraskevaidis, Ioannis; Palios, John; Parissis, John; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Anastasiou-Nana, Maria

    2012-06-01

    Depression is a common co-morbidity in patients with cardiovascular diseases such as chronic coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndromes, post by-pass surgery and chronic heart failure. The presence of depression is independently associated with a decline in health status and an increase in the risk of hospitalization and death for patients with coronary artery disease or congestive heart failure. Novel treatment modalities such as selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may improve depressive symptoms and prognosis of post-myocardial infarction and heart failure patients interacting with the common pathophysiological mechanisms of depression and cardiovascular disease. This review summarizes current experimental and clinical evidence regarding the effects of SSRIs on platelet functions, immune and neurohormonal activation, and cardiac rhythm disturbances in patients with cardiovascular disease.

  4. Binding of [(3)H]lysergic acid diethylamide to serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptors and of [(3)H]paroxetine to serotonin uptake sites in platelets from healthy children, adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Sigurdh, J; Spigset, O; Allard, P; Mjörndal, T; Hägglöf, B

    1999-11-01

    Possible age effects on binding of [(3)H]lysergic acid diethylamide ([(3)H]LSD) to serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptors and of [(3)H]paroxetine to serotonin uptake sites were studied in platelets from healthy children (11-12 years of age), adolescents (16-17 years of age) and adults. Significant overall age effects were found both for the number of binding sites (B(max)) for [(3)H]LSD binding (p < 0.001), the affinity constant (K(d)) for [(3)H]LSD binding (p < 0.001), B(max) for [(3)H]paroxetine binding (p < 0.001) and K(d) for [(3)H] paroxetine binding (p = 0.006). In general, there was a decrease in B(max) with increasing age, which predominantly occurred between the ages 11-12 years and 16-17 years for the 5-HT(2A) receptor, and after 16-17 years of age for the serotonin uptake site. These developmental changes might have an impact on the effect of treatment with serotonergic drugs in children and adolescents. When the platelet serotonin variables investigated are employed in studies in children or adolescents, age matching or, alternatively, introduction of age control in the statistical analysis should be performed.

  5. The effect of prolonged simvastatin application on serotonin uptake, membrane microviscosity and behavioral changes in the animal model.

    PubMed

    Vevera, Jan; Valeš, Karel; Fišar, Zdeněk; Hroudová, Jana; Singh, Namrata; Stuchlík, Aleš; Kačer, Petr; Nekovářová, Tereza

    2016-05-01

    Simvastatin and other statins (HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A) reductase inhibitors) are extensively used in clinical practices and are very effective in decreasing serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. However, their effect on cholesterol synthesis in central nervous system and its behavioral consequences have not been fully understood yet. We have studied selected biologic traits potentially affected by statin treatment - serotonin (5-HT) uptake in platelets, membrane microviscosity in erythrocytes, cholesterol level in the brain (amygdala; hippocampus and prefrontal cortex), as well as behavioral changes in an elevated plus maze and open field test in male Long-Evans rats, which were treated by simvastatin (30mg/kg per day) for 2 or 4weeks. We demonstrated: 1) a decrease in both serotonin transporter (SERT) activity and membrane microviscosity after treatment with simvastatin, 2) lower cholesterol content in all tested brain regions in animals from the simvastatin treated group, and 3) longer time spent in the open arms and a higher number of entrances to the closed arms in the elevated plus maze by animals from the simvastatin group compared to animals from the control group, but no differences in behavior in the open field test. Taken together, our results confirmed complex alterations, including behavioral changes, after the cholesterol lowering treatment. Furthermore, we discuss the possibility that the behavioral changes, traditionally interpreted as an anxiolytic effect, may be interpreted as increased impulsivity. We also confirmed that such behavioral changes may be attributed to changes in serotonergic neurotransmission. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Interaction between neuronal uptake inhibitors and presynaptic serotonin autoreceptors in rat hypothalamic slices: comparison of K+ and electrical depolarization.

    PubMed

    Passarelli, F; Galzin, A M; Langer, S Z

    1987-09-01

    In rat hypothalamic slices prelabeled with [3H]-5-hydroxytryptamine ([3H]-5-HT), exposure to the 5-HT receptor agonist lysergic acid diethylamide (0.1-1 microM) or 5-methoxytryptamine (0.1-10 microM) decreased in a concentration-dependent manner the release of 3H-transmitter elicited by high K+ or electrical stimulation. Exposure to the 5-HT autoreceptor antagonist methiothepin (0.1-1 microM) increased in a concentration-dependent manner the K+ stimulation-evoked overflow of [3H]-5-HT and a similar increase was observed under conditions of electrical stimulation. In contrast, exposure to the nontricyclic 5-HT uptake inhibitor citalopram (0.1-1 microM) did not modify by itself the electrically evoked overflow of [3H]-5-HT, but increased in a concentration-dependent manner the release of 3H-transmitter elicited by K+ stimulation. This effect of citalopram on transmitter release was potentiated when the endogenous stores of 5-HT were depleted by pretreatment with para-chlorophenylalanine methyl ester (300 mg/kg i.p.). Citalopram was shown previously to antagonize the inhibition by lysergic acid diethylamide of the electrically evoked release of [3H]-5-HT in rat hypothalamic slices. Yet, this inhibitor of neuronal uptake of 5-HT did not antagonize the effects of lysergic acid diethylamide when the release of [3H]-5-HT was evoked by K+ depolarization. Electrical stimulation represents a more physiological experimental model for transmitter release than exposure to high K+, and therefore the interaction between 5-HT uptake blockade and presynaptic inhibitory 5-HT autoreceptors, observed in the hypothalamus with electrical stimulation but not with K+ depolarization, remains of biological relevance.

  7. Effect of pharmacologically selective antidepressants on serotonin uptake in rat platelets.

    PubMed

    Fisar, Z; Anders, M; Kalisová, L

    2005-03-01

    We tested a hypothesis that a long-term administration of antidepressants acting through different primary biochemical mechanisms is associated with changes in the platelet serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) transport. Laboratory rats were administered norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (desipramine, maprotiline), selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor (citalopram), reversible monoamine oxidase inhibitor (moclobemide), and lithium (inositol monophosphatase inhibitor among others) during a 4-week period. Apparent kinetic parameters of platelet 5-HT transport were analyzed. Significant decrease in apparent Michaelis constant (K(M)) was found after the administration of all tested antidepressants except for desipramine. There was certain increase in maximal velocity (V(max)) values following the administration of desipramine, maprotiline, and citalopram; however, the all V(max) changes were not significant. V(max)/K(M) ratio representing limiting permeability at low extracellular concentrations of 5-HT was systematically increased in all the tested drugs, but significant changes were occurred only in maprotiline- and citalopram-treated rats. Adaptive changes in platelet 5-HT transport induced by citalopram were opposite to the acute inhibitory effect of this drug on 5-HT transporter activity. An increase in limiting membrane permeability for 5-HT could be included in the common adaptive effect of the long-term administration of antidepressants that differ in pharmacologic selectivity.

  8. Crucial interactions between selective serotonin uptake inhibitors and sigma-1 receptor in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Md Shenuarin; Tagashira, Hideaki; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2013-01-01

    Depression is associated with a substantial increase in the risk of developing heart failure and is independently associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Inversely, cardiovascular disease can lead to severe depression. Thus, therapy with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is strongly recommended to reduce cardiovascular disease-induced morbidity and mortality. However, molecular mechanisms to support evidence-based SSRI treatment of cardiovascular disease have not been elucidated. We recently found very high expression of the sigma-1 receptor, an orphan receptor, in rat heart tissue and defined the cardiac sigma-1 receptor as a direct SSRI target in eliciting cardioprotection in both pressure overload (PO)induced and transverse aortic constriction (TAC)-induced myocardial hypertrophy models in rodents. Our findings suggest that SSRIs such as fluvoxamine protect against PO- and TAC-induced cardiac dysfunction by upregulating sigma-1 receptor expression and stimulating sigma-1 receptor-mediated Akt-eNOS signaling. Here, we discuss the association of depression and cardiovascular diseases, the protective mechanism of SSRIs in heart failure patients, and the pathophysiological relevance of sigma-1 receptors to progression of heart failure. These findings should promote development of clinical therapeutics targeting the sigma-1 receptor in cardiovascular diseases.

  9. The effect of polychlorinated biphenyls on the high affinity uptake of the neurotransmitters, dopamine, serotonin, glutamate and GABA, into rat brain synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Mariussen, E; Fonnum, F

    2001-02-21

    Studies have shown that polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) may affect cognitive functions both in human and also in experimental animals. We have investigated whether this effect could be caused by an inhibition of the uptake of selected neurotransmitters into rat brain synaptosomes. Ortho-chlorinated biphenyls were found to inhibit transmitter transport into synaptosomes from rat brain. In contrast, several nonortho-chlorinated biphenyls did not inhibit uptake. The uptake of dopamine, glutamate, GABA and serotonin was inhibited by the PCB mixtures, Aroclor 1242 and 1254. Under identical condition, the uptake of dopamine was inhibited more efficient than that of glutamate. The inhibition of neurotransmitter uptake was found to be dependent on the chlorination patterns of the PCB congeners, (i) ortho-chlorinated PCBs with four to five chlorine substituents (with the exception of 2,2',6,6'-TeCB) were the most effective inhibitors; (ii) hexa- or heptachlorinated PCBs were poor inhibitors or partial inhibitors (e.g. 2,2',4,4',5,5'-HCB) of glutamate and GABA uptake. Kinetic studies indicated that Aroclor 1242 inhibited dopamine uptake mainly competitively. The uptake of glutamate and GABA was inhibited in either a mixed competitive or in a non-competitive way, respectively. The neurotoxic consequences of the effect of different PCBs on neurotransmitter uptake on the uptake into synaptosomes are discussed.

  10. The ingestion of different dietary proteins by humans induces large changes in the plasma tryptophan ratio, a predictor of brain tryptophan uptake and serotonin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fernstrom, John D; Langham, Kathryn A; Marcelino, Lyndsey M; Irvine, Zoë L E; Fernstrom, Madelyn H; Kaye, Walter H

    2013-12-01

    The ingestion by rats of different proteins causes large differences in the plasma ratio of tryptophan to other large neutral amino acids, which predicts brain tryptophan uptake and serotonin synthesis. We evaluated in humans whether ingesting these proteins also produces large excursions in the tryptophan ratio. Fasting males (n = 6) ingested V-8 Juice containing 40 g of α-lactalbumin, gluten, zein or starch. Blood was drawn before and at 30 min intervals after ingestion for 4 h; tryptophan and other large neutral amino acids were quantitated. Pre-meal plasma tryptophan was ~50 nmol/ml; the tryptophan ratio was ~0.010. α-Lactalbumin increased plasma tryptophan (3-fold) and the tryptophan ratio (50%); starch did not change either tryptophan variable, while gluten caused a modest (25%) and zein a large reduction (50%) in plasma tryptophan. Gluten and zein reduced the tryptophan ratio. The maximal difference in the tryptophan ratio occurred between α-lactalbumin and zein and was large (~3-fold). Since the plasma tryptophan ratio predicts brain tryptophan uptake and serotonin synthesis in rats, the differences in the ratio produced in humans by these proteins may modify serotonin synthesis, and perhaps elicit serotonin-linked changes in behavior. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of serotonin uptake blockers and of 5-hydroxytryptophan on the voluntary consumption of ethanol, water and solid food by UChA and UChB rats.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, R; Contreras, S; Segovia-Riquelme, N; Mardones, J

    1990-01-01

    The effects of zimelidine, fluvoxamine, and citalopram (serotonin uptake blockers), as well as those of 5-hydroxytryptophan (serotonin precursor), on the voluntary consumption of 10% ethanol solution, distilled water and solid food were tested in UChA (genetically low ethanol consumer) and UChB (genetically high ethanol consumer) rats. Since it is well known that drugs which stimulate central serotonergic synapses decrease food and water intake, the data concerning the difference of the respective consumption during the treatment period and the pretreatment one were analysed with a method previously proposed (Alcohol 5:15-19; 1988) to recognize specific effects on ethanol intake. The results showed that while the decrease of ethanol consumption induced by the three serotonin uptake blockers appeared not to be specific of ethanol, the effects of 5-hydroxytryptophan in UChB rats satisfy the criteria for being considered as an expression of a decrease of the specific appetite--or increase satiety--for ethanol. Experimental results cannot help in the explanation of this difference.

  12. Health resource use and costs of vilazodone and other selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors in treating major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zheng-Yi; Sun, Shawn; Chopra, Pooja; Zhong, Yichen; Totev, Todor; Signorovitch, James

    2015-01-01

    Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely prescribed antidepressants. This claims database study compared healthcare resource use and costs among patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) treated with vilazodone vs other SSRIs. Adults with an MDD diagnosis and ≥ 1 prescription fill for vilazodone, citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine, or sertraline were identified from administrative claims data (2010-2012). Patients who concomitantly used adjunctive medication, either a second-generation antidepressant or antipsychotic, were excluded. All-cause and MDD-related healthcare resource use and costs (in 2012 USD) were compared between patients treated with vilazodone vs other SSRIs over a 6-month follow-up period using unadjusted and multivariable analyses. The study cohort included 49 861 patients (mean age = 44.0 years; 70% female). Compared with the vilazodone cohort (n = 3527), patients in the citalopram (n = 12 187), escitalopram (n = 8275), fluoxetine (n = 10 142), paroxetine (n = 3146), and sertraline (n = 12 584) cohorts had significantly more all-cause inpatient hospital visits, longer hospital stays and more frequent emergency department visits, following the index date, after adjusting for baseline characteristics. All-cause medical service costs (inpatient + outpatient + emergency department visits) were significantly higher across all other SSRI cohorts vs vilazodone by $758-$1165 (p < 0.05). Similarly, all-cause total costs, were significantly or numerically (non-significantly) higher across all SSRI cohorts vs vilazodone by $351-$780. The was no clinical measurement of disease severity, partial coverage of the Medicare-eligible population, and short follow-up. MDD treatment with vilazodone was associated with significantly lower rates of inpatient and emergency services, and with significantly lower all-cause medical service costs and numerically (non-significantly) lower total costs to payers than with the other SSRIs

  13. Blockade of uptake for dopamine, but not norepinephrine or 5-HT, increases selection of high effort instrumental activity: Implications for treatment of effort-related motivational symptoms in psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Yohn, Samantha E; Errante, Emily E; Rosenbloom-Snow, Aaron; Somerville, Matthew; Rowland, Margaret; Tokarski, Kristin; Zafar, Nadia; Correa, Merce; Salamone, John D

    2016-10-01

    Deficits in behavioral activation, exertion of effort, and other psychomotor/motivational symptoms are frequently seen in people with depression and other disorders. Depressed people show a decision bias towards selection of low effort activities, and animal tests of effort-related decision making are being used as models of motivational dysfunctions seen in psychopathology. The present studies investigated the ability of drugs that block dopamine transport (DAT), norepinephrine transport (NET), and serotonin transport (SERT) to modulate work output in rats responding on a test of effort-related decision making (i.e., a progressive ratio (PROG)/chow feeding choice task). With this task, rats choose between working for a preferred food (high carbohydrate pellets) by lever pressing on a PROG schedule vs. obtaining a less preferred lab chow that is freely available in the chamber. The present studies focused on the effects of the selective DAT inhibitor GBR12909, the selective SERT inhibitor fluoxetine, and the selective NET inhibitors desipramine and atomoxetine. Acute and repeated administration of GBR12909 shifted choice behavior, increasing measures of PROG lever pressing but decreasing chow intake. In contrast, fluoxetine, desipramine and atomoxetine failed to increase lever pressing output, and actually decreased it at higher doses. In the behaviorally effective dose range, GBR12909 elevated extracellular dopamine levels in accumbens core as measured by microdialysis, but fluoxetine, desipramine and atomoxetine decreased extracellular dopamine. Thus, blockade of DAT increases selection of the high effort instrumental activity, while inhibition of SERT or NET does not. These results have implications for the use of monoamine uptake inhibitors for the treatment of effort-related psychiatric symptoms in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Lasting syndrome of depression produced by reduction in serotonin uptake during postnatal development: evidence from sleep, stress, and behavior.

    PubMed

    Popa, Daniela; Léna, Clément; Alexandre, Chloé; Adrien, Joëlle

    2008-04-02

    Dysfunction of the serotonin system is implicated in sleep and emotional disorders. To test whether these impairments could arise during development, we studied the impact of early-life, transient versus genetic, permanent alterations of serotonin reuptake on sleep-wakefulness patterns, depression-related behavior, and associated physiological features. Here, we show that female mice treated neonatally with a highly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, escitalopram, exhibited signs of depression in the form of sleep anomalies, anhedonia, increased helplessness reversed by chronic antidepressant treatment, enhanced response to acute stress, and increased serotoninergic autoinhibitory feedback. This syndrome was not reproduced by treatment in naive adults but resembled the phenotype of mutant mice lacking the serotonin transporter, except that these exhibited decreased serotonin autoreceptor sensitivity and additional anxiety-like behavior. Thus, alteration of serotonin reuptake during development, whether induced by external or genetic factors, causes a depressive syndrome lasting into adulthood. Such early-life impairments might predispose individuals to sleep and/or mood disorders.

  15. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine destroy serotonin terminals in rat brain: quantification of neurodegeneration by measurement of (/sup 3/H)paroxetine-labeled serotonin uptake sites

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, G.; Yeh, S.Y.; O'Hearn, E.; Molliver, M.E.; Kuhar, M.J.; De Souza, E.B.

    1987-09-01

    This study examines the effects of repeated systemic administration (20 mg/kg s.c., twice daily for 4 days) of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) on levels of brain monoamines, their metabolites and on the density of monoamine uptake sites in various regions of rat brain. Marked reductions (30-60%) in the concentration of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were observed in cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum, hypothalamus and midbrain at 2 weeks after a 4-day treatment regimen of MDMA or MDA; less consistent reductions in serotonin (5-HT) content were observed in these brain regions. In addition, both MDMA and MDA caused comparable and substantial reductions (50-75%) in the density of (/sup 3/H)paroxetine-labeled 5-HT uptake sites in all brain regions examined. In contrast, neither MDMA nor MDA caused any widespread or long-term changes in the content of the catecholaminergic markers (i.e., norepinephrine, dopamine, 3,4 dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid) or in the number of (/sup 3/H)mazindol-labeled norepinephrine or dopamine uptake sites in the brain regions examined. These data demonstrate that MDMA and MDA cause long-lasting neurotoxic effects with respect to both the functional and structural integrity of serotonergic neurons in brain. Furthermore, our measurement of reductions in the density of 5-HT uptake sites provides a means for quantification of the neurodegenerative effects of MDMA and MDA on presynaptic 5-HT terminals.

  16. Cocoa flavonoids attenuate high glucose-induced insulin signalling blockade and modulate glucose uptake and production in human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Herrera, Isabel; Martín, María Ángeles; Goya, Luis; Ramos, Sonia

    2014-02-01

    Insulin resistance is the primary characteristic of type 2 diabetes. Cocoa and its main flavanol, (-)-epicatechin (EC), display some antidiabetic effects, but the mechanisms for their preventive activities related to glucose metabolism and insulin signalling in the liver remain largely unknown. In the present work, the preventive effect of EC and a cocoa polyphenolic extract (CPE) on insulin signalling and on both glucose production and uptake are studied in insulin-responsive human HepG2 cells treated with high glucose. Pre-treatment of cells with EC or CPE reverted decreased tyrosine-phosphorylated and total levels of IR, IRS-1 and -2 triggered by high glucose. EC and CPE pre-treatment also prevented the inactivation of the PI3K/AKT pathway and AMPK, as well as the diminution of GLUT-2 levels induced by high glucose. Furthermore, pre-treatment of cells with EC and CPE avoided the increase in PEPCK levels and the diminished glucose uptake provoked by high glucose, returning enhanced levels of glucose production and decreased glycogen content to control values. These findings suggest that EC and CPE improved insulin sensitivity of HepG2 treated with high glucose, preventing or delaying a potential hepatic dysfunction through the attenuation of the insulin signalling blockade and the modulation of glucose uptake and production.

  17. St. John's wort extract Ze 117 (Hypericum perforatum) inhibits norepinephrine and serotonin uptake into rat brain slices and reduces 3-adrenoceptor numbers on cultured rat brain cells.

    PubMed

    Kientsch, U; Bürgi, S; Ruedeberg, C; Probst, S; Honegger, U E

    2001-07-01

    Despite almost forty years of widespread use, the mode of action of antidepressant drugs is still largely unknown. There is agreement that these drugs interact with central neurotransmission. Common findings are acute inhibitory actions on reuptake mechanisms for norepinephrine (NE) and for serotonin (5-HT) at presynaptic axons and chronic adaptive effects on neurotransmitter receptors on postsynaptic membranes. In particular, beta-adrenoceptor downregulation has been observed after chronic treatment with most antidepressants in vivo and in cell culture systems. We studied the effectiveness of Ze 117 (St. John's wort) extract (Hypericum perforatum) on NE- and 5-HT-uptake into rat brain slices. Potency and efficacy of the Ze 117 extract were compared with those of tricyclic (TCA) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)-type antidepressants. A dose-dependent inhibition was seen on NE and 5-HT uptake into brain slices. The Ze 117 extract was more selective for the uptake of NE than for that of 5-HT. The maximal extent of uptake inhibition by Ze 117 extract was comparable to that of imipramine (IMI), desipramine (DMI) or fluvoxamine for 5-HT, but lower for NE transport, than that of the synthetic antidepressants. Chronic exposure (8 days) of confluent C6-cell cultures to Ze 117 extract resulted in a dose-dependent beta-adrenoceptor downregulation equal to that induced by DMI, a potent TCA. None of these effects could be achieved with either hypericin or hyperforin alone in a relevant dose range. Our results indicate that the St. John's wort extract Ze 117 contains active, but as yet unknown antidepressant principles with effects comparable to those of TCAs.

  18. A requirement of serotonergic p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase for peripheral immune system activation of CNS serotonin uptake and serotonin-linked behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Baganz, N L; Lindler, K M; Zhu, C B; Smith, J T; Robson, M J; Iwamoto, H; Deneris, E S; Hewlett, W A; Blakely, R D

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in central serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) neurotransmission and peripheral immune activation have been linked to multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression, schizophrenia and autism. The antidepressant-sensitive 5-HT transporter (SERT, SLC6A4), a critical determinant of synaptic 5-HT inactivation, can be regulated by pro-inflammatory cytokine signaling. Systemic innate immune system activation via intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection rapidly elevates brain SERT activity and 5-HT clearance. Moreover, the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β rapidly stimulates SERT activity in raphe nerve terminal preparations ex vivo, effects that are attenuated by pharmacological p38 MAPK inhibition. To establish a role of serotonergic p38α MAPK signaling in LPS/IL-1β-induced SERT regulation and attendant behavioral responses, we pursued studies in mice that afford conditional elimination of p38α MAPK in 5-HT neurons (p38α5HT−). We found p38α5HT− and control (p38α5HT+) littermates to be indistinguishable in viability and growth and to express equivalent levels of SERT protein and synaptosomal 5-HT transport activity. Consistent with pharmacological studies, however, IL-1β fails to increase SERT activity in midbrain synaptosomes prepared from p38α5HT− animals. Moreover, although LPS elevated plasma corticosterone and central/peripheral pro-inflammatory cytokines in p38α5HT− animals, elevations in midbrain SERT activity were absent nor were changes in depressive and anxiety-like behaviors observed. Our studies support an obligate role of p38α MAPK signaling in 5-HT neurons for the translation of immune activation to SERT regulation and 5-HT-modulated behaviors. PMID:26529424

  19. A requirement of serotonergic p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase for peripheral immune system activation of CNS serotonin uptake and serotonin-linked behaviors.

    PubMed

    Baganz, N L; Lindler, K M; Zhu, C B; Smith, J T; Robson, M J; Iwamoto, H; Deneris, E S; Hewlett, W A; Blakely, R D

    2015-11-03

    Alterations in central serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) neurotransmission and peripheral immune activation have been linked to multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression, schizophrenia and autism. The antidepressant-sensitive 5-HT transporter (SERT, SLC6A4), a critical determinant of synaptic 5-HT inactivation, can be regulated by pro-inflammatory cytokine signaling. Systemic innate immune system activation via intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection rapidly elevates brain SERT activity and 5-HT clearance. Moreover, the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β rapidly stimulates SERT activity in raphe nerve terminal preparations ex vivo, effects that are attenuated by pharmacological p38 MAPK inhibition. To establish a role of serotonergic p38α MAPK signaling in LPS/IL-1β-induced SERT regulation and attendant behavioral responses, we pursued studies in mice that afford conditional elimination of p38α MAPK in 5-HT neurons (p38α(5HT-)). We found p38α(5HT-) and control (p38α(5HT+)) littermates to be indistinguishable in viability and growth and to express equivalent levels of SERT protein and synaptosomal 5-HT transport activity. Consistent with pharmacological studies, however, IL-1β fails to increase SERT activity in midbrain synaptosomes prepared from p38α(5HT-) animals. Moreover, although LPS elevated plasma corticosterone and central/peripheral pro-inflammatory cytokines in p38α(5HT-) animals, elevations in midbrain SERT activity were absent nor were changes in depressive and anxiety-like behaviors observed. Our studies support an obligate role of p38α MAPK signaling in 5-HT neurons for the translation of immune activation to SERT regulation and 5-HT-modulated behaviors.

  20. A molecular recognizing system of serotonin in rat fetal axonal growth cones: uptake and high affinity binding.

    PubMed

    Mercado, R; Hernández, J

    1992-09-18

    Axonal growth cone particles (AGCP) isolated from prenatal and postnatal rat brain had different high-affinity 5-HT uptake characteristics. In postnatal AGCP the uptake behaves as in the adult rat brain, while in the prenatal AGCP the uptake characteristics seem to be in a transitional stage. Also in prenatal AGCP we observed specific, high-affinity 5-HT binding sites. These results support the idea of an important role for 5-HT during axogenesis.

  1. The human ether-a'-go-go related gene (hERG) K+ channel blockade by the investigative selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor CONA-437: limited dependence on S6 aromatic residues.

    PubMed

    Alexandrou, A J; Milnes, J T; Sun, S Z; Fermini, B; Kim, S C; Jenkinson, S; Leishman, D J; Witchel, H J; Hancox, J C; Leaney, J L

    2014-08-01

    Diverse non-cardiac drugs adversely influence cardiac electrophysiology by inhibiting repolarising K(+) currents mediated by channels encoded by the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG). In this study, pharmacological blockade of hERG K(+) channel current (I(hERG)) by a novel investigative serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), CONA-437, was investigated. Whole-cell patch-clamp measurements of I(hERG) were made from human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells expressing wild-type (WT) or mutant forms of the hERG channel. With a step-ramp voltage-command, peak I(hERG) was inhibited with an IC(50) of 1.34 μM at 35 ±1°C; the IC(50) with the same protocol was not significantly different at room temperature. Voltage-command waveform selection had only a modest effect on the potency of I(hERG) block: the IC50 with a ventricular action potential command was 0.72 μM. I(hERG) blockade developed rapidly with time following membrane depolarisation and showed a weak dependence on voltage, accompanied by a shift of ≈ -5 mV in voltage-dependence of activation. There was no significant effect of CONA-437 on voltage-dependence of I(hERG) inactivation, though at some voltages an apparent acceleration of the time-course of inactivation was observed. Significantly, mutation of the S6 aromatic amino acid residues Y652 and F656 had only a modest effect on I(hERG) blockade by CONA-437 (a 3-4 fold shift in affinity). CONA-437 at up to 30 μM had no significant effect on either Nav1.5 sodium channels or L-type calcium channels. In conclusion, the novel SSRI CONA-437 is particularly notable as a gating-dependent hERG channel inhibitor for which neither S6 aromatic amino-acid constituent of the canonical drug binding site on the hERG channel appears obligatory for I(hERG) inhibition to occur.

  2. Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors for the treatment of depression in coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure: evidence for pleiotropic effects.

    PubMed

    Paraskevaidis, Ioannis; Parissis, John T; Fountoulaki, Katerina; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Kremastinos, Dimitrios

    2006-10-01

    Depression is a common co-morbidity in patients with cardiovascular diseases such as chronic coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndromes, post by-pass surgery and chronic heart failure. There is a significant body of evidence suggesting that the presence of depression is independently associated with a decline in health status and an increase in the risk of hospitalization and death for patients with coronary artery disease or congestive heart failure. Novel treatment modalities such as selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may improve depressive symptoms and prognosis of post-myocardial infarction and heart failure patients interacting with the common pathophysiologic mechanisms of depression and cardiovascular disease. This review summarizes current experimental and clinical evidence regarding the pleiotropic effects of SSRIs on platelet functions, immune and neurohormonal activation, and cardiac rhythm disturbances in patients with cardiovascular disease. These bio-modulatory properties of SSRIs may be translated into improvement of patient clinical outcomes beyond their anti-depressant action.

  3. 5-HT(2C) serotonin receptor blockade prevents tau protein hyperphosphorylation and corrects the defect in hippocampal synaptic plasticity caused by a combination of environmental stressors in mice.

    PubMed

    Busceti, Carla Letizia; Di Pietro, Paola; Riozzi, Barbara; Traficante, Anna; Biagioni, Francesca; Nisticò, Robert; Fornai, Francesco; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Bruno, Valeria

    2015-09-01

    Exposure to multimodal sensory stressors is an everyday occurrence and sometimes becomes very intense, such as during rave parties or other recreational events. A growing body of evidence suggests that strong environmental stressors might cause neuronal dysfunction on their own in addition to their synergistic action with illicit drugs. Mice were exposed to a combination of physical and sensory stressors that are reminiscent of those encountered in a rave party. However, this is not a model of rave because it lacks the rewarding properties of rave. A 14-h exposure to environmental stressors caused an impairment of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and spatial memory, and an enhanced phosphorylation of tau protein in the CA1 and CA3 regions. These effects were transient and critically depended on the activation of 5-HT2C serotonin receptors, which are highly expressed in the CA1 region. Acute systemic injection of the selective 5-HT2C antagonist, RS-102,221 (2 mg/kg, i.p., 2 min prior the onset of stress), prevented tau hyperphosphorylation and also corrected the defects in hippocampal LTP and spatial memory. These findings suggest that passive exposure to a combination of physical and sensory stressors causes a reversible hippocampal dysfunction, which might compromise mechanisms of synaptic plasticity and spatial memory for a few days. Drugs that block 5-HT2C receptors might protect the hippocampus against the detrimental effect of environmental stressors.

  4. Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors potentiate gene blunting induced by repeated methylphenidate treatment: Zif268 vs. Homer1a

    PubMed Central

    Van Waes, Vincent; Vandrevala, Malcolm; Beverley, Joel; Steiner, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing use of psychostimulants such as methylphenidate (Ritalin; dopamine reuptake inhibitor) for medical treatments and as cognitive enhancers in the healthy. Methylphenidate is known to produce some addiction-related gene regulation. Recent findings in animal models show that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) including fluoxetine can potentiate acute induction of gene expression by methylphenidate, thus indicating an acute facilitatory role for serotonin in dopamine-induced gene regulation. We investigated whether repeated exposure to fluoxetine in conjunction with methylphenidate in adolescent rats facilitated a gene regulation effect well-established for repeated exposure to illicit psychostimulants such as cocaine - blunting (repression) of gene inducibility. We measured, by in situ hybridization histochemistry, the effects of a 5-day repeated treatment with methylphenidate (5 mg/kg), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) or a combination on the inducibility (by cocaine) of neuroplasticity-related genes (Zif268, Homer1a) in the striatum. Repeated methylphenidate treatment alone produced minimal gene blunting, while fluoxetine alone had no effect. In contrast, fluoxetine added to methylphenidate robustly potentiated methylphenidate-induced blunting for both genes. This potentiation was widespread throughout the striatum, but was most robust in the lateral, sensorimotor striatum, thus mimicking cocaine effects. For illicit psychostimulants, blunting of gene expression is considered part of the molecular basis of addiction. Our results thus suggest that SSRIs such as fluoxetine may increase the addiction liability of methylphenidate. PMID:23763573

  5. Neuromuscular blockade of slow twitch muscle fibres elevates muscle oxygen uptake and energy turnover during submaximal exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Krustrup, Peter; Secher, Niels H; Relu, Mihai U; Hellsten, Ylva; Söderlund, Karin; Bangsbo, Jens

    2008-12-15

    We tested the hypothesis that a greater activation of fast-twitch (FT) fibres during dynamic exercise leads to a higher muscle oxygen uptake (VO2 ) and energy turnover as well as a slower muscle on-kinetics. Subjects performed one-legged knee-extensor exercise for 10 min at an intensity of 30 W without (CON) and with (CUR) arterial injections of the non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent cisatracurium. In CUR, creatine phosphate (CP) was unaltered in slow twitch (ST) fibres and decreased (P < 0.05) by 28% in FT fibres, whereas in CON, CP decreased (P < 0.05) by 33% and 23% in ST and FT fibres, respectively. From 127 s of exercise, muscle VO2 was higher (P < 0.05) in CUR compared to CON (425 +/- 25 (+/- S.E.M.) versus 332 +/- 30 ml min(-1)) and remained higher (P < 0.05) throughout exercise. Using monoexponential fitting, the time constant of the exercise-induced muscle VO2 response was slower (P < 0.05) in CUR than in CON (55 +/- 6 versus 33 +/- 5 s). During CUR and CON, muscle homogenate CP was lowered (P < 0.05) by 32 and 35%, respectively, and also muscle lactate production was similar in CUR and CON (37.8 +/- 4.1 versus 35.2 +/- 6.2 mmol). Estimated total muscle ATP turnover was 19% higher (P < 0.05) in CUR than in CON (1196 +/- 90 versus 1011 +/- 59 mmol) and true mechanical efficiency was lower (P < 0.05) in CUR than in CON (26.2 +/- 2.0 versus 30.9 +/- 1.5%). In conclusion, the present findings provide evidence that FT fibres are less efficient than ST fibres in vivo at a contraction frequency of 1 Hz, and that the muscle VO2 kinetics is slowed by FT fibre activation.

  6. Neuromuscular blockade of slow twitch muscle fibres elevates muscle oxygen uptake and energy turnover during submaximal exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Krustrup, Peter; Secher, Niels H; Relu, Mihai U; Hellsten, Ylva; Söderlund, Karin; Bangsbo, Jens

    2008-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a greater activation of fast-twitch (FT) fibres during dynamic exercise leads to a higher muscle oxygen uptake () and energy turnover as well as a slower muscle on-kinetics. Subjects performed one-legged knee-extensor exercise for 10 min at an intensity of 30 W without (CON) and with (CUR) arterial injections of the non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent cisatracurium. In CUR, creatine phosphate (CP) was unaltered in slow twitch (ST) fibres and decreased (P < 0.05) by 28% in FT fibres, whereas in CON, CP decreased (P < 0.05) by 33% and 23% in ST and FT fibres, respectively. From 127 s of exercise, muscle was higher (P < 0.05) in CUR compared to CON (425 ± 25 (±s.e.m.) versus 332 ± 30 ml min−1) and remained higher (P < 0.05) throughout exercise. Using monoexponential fitting, the time constant of the exercise-induced muscle response was slower (P < 0.05) in CUR than in CON (55 ± 6 versus 33 ± 5 s). During CUR and CON, muscle homogenate CP was lowered (P < 0.05) by 32 and 35%, respectively, and also muscle lactate production was similar in CUR and CON (37.8 ± 4.1 versus 35.2 ± 6.2 mmol). Estimated total muscle ATP turnover was 19% higher (P < 0.05) in CUR than in CON (1196 ± 90 versus 1011 ± 59 mmol) and true mechanical efficiency was lower (P < 0.05) in CUR than in CON (26.2 ± 2.0 versus 30.9 ± 1.5%). In conclusion, the present findings provide evidence that FT fibres are less efficient than ST fibres in vivo at a contraction frequency of 1 Hz, and that the muscle kinetics is slowed by FT fibre activation. PMID:18955384

  7. [C-11]{beta}CNT: A new monoamine uptake ligand for studying serotonin and dopamine transporter sites in the living brain with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, G.K.; Zheng, Q.H.; Zhou, F.C.

    1996-05-01

    There is considerable interest in measuring serotonin (5HT) and dopamine (DA) function in the human brain. Altered levels of 5HT and DA are recognized in drug abuse, neurotoxicities, psychiatric disorders, and neurodegenerative conditions including Alzheimer`s and Parkinson`s disease. Several phenyltropane analogs of cocaine bind tightly to both DA and 5HT uptake proteins. We have made a new agent from this class called {beta}CNT, 2{beta}-carboxymethyl-3{beta}-(2-naphthyl)-tropane, the isosteric O-for-CH{sub 2} analog of a compound reported to have among the highest measured affinities for DA and 5HT transporters and studied its in vivo brain distributions in animals for the first time. Optically pure {beta}CNT was made from cocaine, and labeled at the O-methyl position by esterification of {beta}CNT-acid with [C-11]CH{sub 3}OTfl under conditions similar to Wilson`s. HPLC-purified (99+%) final products (15-50% eob yield from CO{sub 2}, 40 min synth) had specific activities 0.1-1.2 Ci/{mu}mol at the time of injection. Preliminary [C-11]{beta}{beta}CNT rodent distribution showed very high brain uptake (3% ID at 60 min) and localization (striat: fr cort: hypo: cer: blood, 11: 5: 4: 1: 06). {beta}CNT-PET studies in juvenile pigs (5-20 mCi, 20-35 kg) found rapid brain uptake, and prominent retention (85 min) in midbrain, anterior brainstem and striatum, followed by cortex and olfactory bulb. Paroxetine pretreatment (5HT uptake blocker, 2mg/kg), diminished retention in most brain areas; nomifensine (DA/NE uptake blocker, 6 mg/kg) reduced striatum selectively. Direct comparisons of [C-11]{beta}CNT with other PET transporter radioligands {beta}CFT, {beta}CIT, and {beta}CTT (RTI-32) in the same pig found {beta}CNT had highest overall brain uptake among the agents. These initial results suggest {beta}CNT has favorable properties for imaging both 5HT and DA transporters in vivo, and further evaluation of its potential as a human PET agent is warranted.

  8. Diphenyl diselenide elicits antidepressant-like activity in rats exposed to monosodium glutamate: A contribution of serotonin uptake and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Quines, Caroline B; Rosa, Suzan G; Velasquez, Daniela; Da Rocha, Juliana T; Neto, José S S; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2016-03-15

    Depression is a disorder with symptoms manifested at the psychological, behavioral and physiological levels. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the most widely used additive in the food industry; however, some adverse effects induced by this additive have been demonstrated in experimental animals and humans, including functional and behavioral alterations. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible antidepressant-like effect of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2, an organoselenium compound with pharmacological properties already documented, in the depressive-like behavior induced by MSG in rats. Male and female newborn Wistar rats were divided in control and MSG groups, which received, respectively, a daily subcutaneous injection of saline (0.9%) or MSG (4g/kg/day) from the 1st to 5th postnatal day. At 60th day of life, animals received (PhSe)2 (10mg/kg, intragastrically) 25min before spontaneous locomotor and forced swimming tests (FST). The cerebral cortices of rats were removed to determine [(3)H] serotonin (5-HT) uptake and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity. A single administration of (PhSe)2 was effective against locomotor hyperactivity caused by MSG in rats. (PhSe)2 treatment protected against the increase in the immobility time and a decrease in the latency for the first episode of immobility in the FST induced by MSG. Furthermore, (PhSe)2 reduced the [(3)H] 5-HT uptake and restored Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity altered by MSG. In the present study a single administration of (PhSe)2 elicited an antidepressant-like effect and decrease the synaptosomal [(3)H] 5-HT uptake and an increase in the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity in MSG-treated rats.

  9. Suicide trends in discharged patients with mood disorders: associations with selective serotonin uptake inhibitors and comorbid substance misuse.

    PubMed

    Fazel, Seena; Grann, Martin; Goodwin, Guy M

    2006-03-01

    We determined the rates of suicide in two consecutive time intervals of low and high selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) prescribing for men and women with mood disorders, who were at relatively high risk of suicide, in a discharged hospitalized sample. High quality Swedish national registers were cross-linked to estimate rates of suicide. The results were stratified by three age-bands, and rates of comorbid substance misuse were explored. These were compared with general population suicide rates. There were 1606 suicides in discharged patients with mood disorders. Suicide rates decreased for all women during 1989-94 and 1995-2000 [odds ratio (OR) = 0.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.64-0.85] and a trend was found towards lower rates in men (OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.78-1.02). Approximately 90% of suicides occurred in those aged over 40 years; thus, the inpatient sample lacked the power to discriminate clear effects in the younger age groups. There was no increase or decrease in the rates of substance use disorders in patients who committed suicide. There were 20 851 suicides in the general population during 1989-2000. Suicide rates were lower at all ages for men and women in the general population in the interval of high SSRI prescribing. We conclude that there is no evidence from this study of an increase in suicide rates following the introduction of SSRIs in the general population or in a high-risk inpatient sample.

  10. Fluoxetine, a selective inhibitor of serotonin uptake, potentiates morphine analgesia without altering its discriminative stimulus properties or affinity for opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, M.D.; Lochner, M.A.; Bemis, K.G.; Hymson, D.L.

    1985-06-17

    The analgesic effect of morphine in the rat tail jerk assay was enhanced by the serotonin uptake inhibitor, fluoxetine. Tail jerk latency was not affected by fluoxetine alone. Morphine's affinity for opioid receptors labeled in vitro with /sup 3/H-naloxone or /sup 3/H-D-Ala/sup 2/-D-Leu/sup 5/-enkephalin was not altered by fluoxetine, which has no affinity for these sites at concentrations as high as 1000 nM. In rats trained to discriminate morphine from saline, fluoxetine at doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg were recognized as saline. Increasing the fluoxetine dose to 20 mg/kg did not result in generalization to either saline or morphine. The dose response curve for morphine generalization was not significantly altered by fluoxetine doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg. Those rats treated with the combination of morphine and 20 mg/kg of fluoxetine did not exhibit saline or morphine appropriate responding. Fluoxetine potentiates the analgesic properties of morphine without enhancing its affinity for opioid receptors or its discriminative stimulus properties. 30 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  11. A neurobiological perspective on attachment problems in sexual offenders and the role of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors in the treatment of such problems.

    PubMed

    Beech, Anthony R; Mitchell, Ian J

    2005-02-01

    This paper describes what is currently known about attachment from the development, social-cognitive and biological literatures and outlines the impact on organisms given adverse development experiences that can have an effect upon attachment formation in childhood across these three literatures. We then describe the effects that 'insecure' attachment styles arising in childhood can affect brain chemistry and brain function and subsequently adult social/romantic relationships. In the paper, we note that a number of sexual offenders report adverse childhood experiences and that they possess attachment styles that, taken together, make it likely that they will either seek out intimate attachments in ways where they will have sex with children, perhaps confusing sex with intimacy or in aggressive ways as particularly happens with men who sexually assault adult women. The last section of the paper describes chemical treatment for sexual offenders, focusing on the use of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs). We note evidence for the role of SSRIs in promoting more social/affiliative behaviors and speculate on the effects that SSRIs have in the treatment of sexual offenders by targeting areas of the social brain. Here, we would argue that it would be useful to carry out treatment where there is a combination of SSRI treatment (to promote more prosocial feelings and behaviors) in conjunction with therapy that typically addresses thoughts and behaviors, i.e., cognitive-behavioral therapy/schema-focused therapy.

  12. Effects of different anticoagulants on human platelet size distribution and serotonin (5-HT) induced shape change and uptake kinetics.

    PubMed

    Malmgren, R; Beving, H; Olsson, P

    1985-06-15

    The effect of collecting blood with disodium ethylene diamine tetraacetate (EDTA), citrate (NAC) or acid sodium citrate-dextrose (ACD) as anticoagulants on platelet count and size distribution was investigated. No difference between the three preparations regarding platelet count was found in whole blood. Preparation of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) significantly reduced the platelet count in NAC-PRP (p less than 0.01) to a value of 288 X 10(9)/l compared to those of 365 X 10(9)/l and 368 X 10(9)/l in EDTA and ACD blood respectively. A significant shift in the platelet size in EDTA-PRP towards larger cell volumes was observed. There were no differences in the size distribution pattern between NAC-PRP and ACD-PRP in spite of the differences in platelet count. Platelet 5-HT uptake kinetics in EDTA-PRP showed a 50 per cent reduction in both Km and Vmax compared to that in ACD-PRP. The study shows that the receptor mediating 5-HT induced shape change has a direct opposite pH dependence than that of the 5-HT carrier. Interference of receptor-mediated responses in 5-HT uptake studies in human platelets is clearly minimized at a lowered pH. The finding is probably of importance in disorders associated with platelet hyperaggregability.

  13. Effects of calcium antagonists on serotonin-dependent aggregation and serotonin transport in platelets of patients with migraine.

    PubMed

    Pukhal'skaya, T G; Kolosova, O A; Men'shikov, M Y; Vein, A M

    2000-07-01

    Flunarizine and cinnarizine (IC50 6.8x10(-6) and 2.8x10(-5) M, respectively) inhibited 3H-serotonin uptake by platelets. In higher doses, they blocked serotonin-induced platelet aggregation and stimulated 3H-serotonin release from these cells. Imipramine did not affect serotonin-releasing effects of preparations. In all patients cinnarizine was more potent in inhibiting serotonin uptake, and in half of the patients cinnarizine displayed higher activity as an inductor of serotonin release.

  14. [Neuroleptics and serotonin].

    PubMed

    Hery, F; Hamon, M

    1993-01-01

    To date, there is no doubt that dopamine plays a key role in the behavioural disorders associated with schizophrenia. However, dopamine is not the only neurotransmitter involved in this syndrome, as it interacts with many neuronal systems in brain. Of special interest is the interaction between dopaminergic and serotoninergic systems with evidence from pharmacological data in animals that each of these systems may exert an inhibitory influence on the other. Furthermore, the psychotomimetic effects of drugs affecting serotoninergic neurotransmission such as LSD, psilocybin, N,N-dimethyltryptamine and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine also contributed to draw attention onto a possible involvement of serotoninergic systems in at least some of the disorders typical of schizophrenia. This idea received strong support from recent studies on the multiple receptors for serotonin in the central nervous system. These studies not only demonstrate the existence of several classes of serotonin receptors called 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1C, 5-HT1D, 5-HT2, 5-HT3 and 5-HT4, but led also to the development of novel agonists and antagonists for the stimulation or blockade of each of them. Pharmacological investigations with these ligands revealed that serotonin is probably involved in the behavioural disorders associated with schizophrenia through its binding to three distinct classes of receptors: 5-HT1A, 5-HT2 (or the closely related class 5-HT1C) and 5-HT3.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Treatment of chronic pruritus with the selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors paroxetine and fluvoxamine: results of an open-labelled, two-arm proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Ständer, Sonja; Böckenholt, Barbara; Schürmeyer-Horst, Funda; Weishaupt, Carsten; Heuft, Gereon; Luger, Thomas A; Schneider, Gudrun

    2009-01-01

    Chronic pruritus is difficult to treat and requires the evaluation of new therapeutic modalities. We initiated an open-labelled, two-arm prospective, proof-of-concept study applying two selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors on a long-term basis. Paroxetine and fluvoxamine were tested in a total of 72 pruritic patients (27 men, 45 women, age range 28-88 years, mean age 59.2 years). The reduction in pruritus was evaluated by analysis of visual analogue scores and determination of the maximal antipruritic effect (maximal percentual reduction in pruritus). Forty-nine of 72 patients (68.0%) experienced a weak (n=9), good (n=16) or very good (n=24) antipruritic effect. Statistical analysis proved the efficacy of paroxetine and fluvoxamine with no significant difference. The best response was observed in patients with pruritus due to atopic dermatitis, systemic lymphoma and solid carcinoma. Chronic scratch lesions healed completely in 14/31 patients and partially in 17/31 patients. Adverse drug effects were observed in 70.8% of patients, resulting in discontinuation of treatment in 18 patients. These results support previous reports of high antipruritic potency of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors, which are a good alternative treatment modality in chronic pruritus. This should be confirmed in future double-blind studies.

  16. Serotonin Signal Transduction in Two Groups of Autistic Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: TITLE: Serotonin Signal Transduction in Two Groups of Autistic ...Serotonin Signal Transduction in Two Groups of Autistic Patients 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0820 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Furthermore, while treatment with selective serotonin uptake inhibitors (SSRI) is routine for autistic patients, therapeutic benefit is variable and

  17. [¹⁸F]FDOPA uptake in the raphe nuclei complex reflects serotonin transporter availability. A combined [¹⁸F]FDOPA and [¹¹C]DASB PET study in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pavese, N; Simpson, B S; Metta, V; Ramlackhansingh, A; Chaudhuri, K Ray; Brooks, D J

    2012-01-16

    Brain uptake of [(18)F]FDOPA, measured with PET, reflects the activity of aromatic amino acid decarboxylase, an enzyme largely expressed in monoaminergic nerve terminals. This enzyme catalyzes a number of decarboxylation reactions including conversion of l-dopa into dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptophan into serotonin. For more than 20years [(18)F]FDOPA PET has been used to assess dopaminergic nigrostriatal dysfunction in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). More recently, however, [(18)F]FDOPA PET has also been employed as a marker of serotoninergic and noradrenergic function in PD patients. In this study, we provide further evidence in support of the view that [(18)F]FDOPA PET can be used to evaluate the distribution and the function of serotoninergic systems in the brain. Eighteen patients with PD were investigated with both [(18)F]FDOPA and [(11)C]DASB PET, the latter being a marker of serotonin transport (SERT) availability. We then assessed the relationship between measurements of the two tracers within brain serotoninergic structures. [(18)F]FDOPA uptake in the median raphe nuclei complex of PD patients was significantly correlated with SERT availability in the same structure. Trends towards significant correlations between [(18)F]FDOPA Ki values and [(11)C]DASB binding values were also observed in the hypothalamus and the anterior cingulate cortex, suggesting a serotoninergic contribution to [(18)F]FDOPA uptake in these regions. Conversely, no correlations were found in brain structures with mixed dopaminergic, serotoninergic and noradrenergic innervations, or with predominant dopaminergic innervation. These findings provide evidence that [(18)F]FDOPA PET represents a valid marker of raphe serotoninergic function in PD and supports previous studies where [(18)F]FDOPA PET has been used to assess serotoninergic function in PD.

  18. Serotonin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this website will be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? ... Lab Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization and does not endorse non-AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Serotonin Share ...

  19. Serotonin modulates insect hemocyte phagocytosis via two different serotonin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yi-xiang; Huang, Jia; Li, Meng-qi; Wu, Ya-su; Xia, Ren-ying; Ye, Gong-yin

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) modulates both neural and immune responses in vertebrates, but its role in insect immunity remains uncertain. We report that hemocytes in the caterpillar, Pieris rapae are able to synthesize 5-HT following activation by lipopolysaccharide. The inhibition of a serotonin-generating enzyme with either pharmacological blockade or RNAi knock-down impaired hemocyte phagocytosis. Biochemical and functional experiments showed that naive hemocytes primarily express 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors. The blockade of 5-HT1B significantly reduced phagocytic ability; however, the blockade of 5-HT2B increased hemocyte phagocytosis. The 5-HT1B-null Drosophila melanogaster mutants showed higher mortality than controls when infected with bacteria, due to their decreased phagocytotic ability. Flies expressing 5-HT1B or 5-HT2B RNAi in hemocytes also showed similar sensitivity to infection. Combined, these data demonstrate that 5-HT mediates hemocyte phagocytosis through 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors and serotonergic signaling performs critical modulatory functions in immune systems of animals separated by 500 million years of evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12241.001 PMID:26974346

  20. Serotonin modulates insect hemocyte phagocytosis via two different serotonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yi-Xiang; Huang, Jia; Li, Meng-Qi; Wu, Ya-Su; Xia, Ren-Ying; Ye, Gong-Yin

    2016-03-14

    Serotonin (5-HT) modulates both neural and immune responses in vertebrates, but its role in insect immunity remains uncertain. We report that hemocytes in the caterpillar, Pieris rapae are able to synthesize 5-HT following activation by lipopolysaccharide. The inhibition of a serotonin-generating enzyme with either pharmacological blockade or RNAi knock-down impaired hemocyte phagocytosis. Biochemical and functional experiments showed that naive hemocytes primarily express 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors. The blockade of 5-HT1B significantly reduced phagocytic ability; however, the blockade of 5-HT2B increased hemocyte phagocytosis. The 5-HT1B-null Drosophila melanogaster mutants showed higher mortality than controls when infected with bacteria, due to their decreased phagocytotic ability. Flies expressing 5-HT1B or 5-HT2B RNAi in hemocytes also showed similar sensitivity to infection. Combined, these data demonstrate that 5-HT mediates hemocyte phagocytosis through 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors and serotonergic signaling performs critical modulatory functions in immune systems of animals separated by 500 million years of evolution.

  1. Binding of [3H]paroxetine to serotonin uptake sites and of [3H]lysergic acid diethylamide to 5-HT2A receptors in platelets from women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder during gonadotropin releasing hormone treatment.

    PubMed

    Bixo, M; Allard, P; Bäckström, T; Mjörndal, T; Nyberg, S; Spigset, O; Sundström-Poromaa, I

    2001-08-01

    Changes in serotonergic parameters have been reported in psychiatric conditions such as depression but also in the premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). In addition, hormonal effects on serotonergic activity have been established. In the present study, binding of [3H]paroxetine to platelet serotonin uptake sites and binding of [3H]lysergic acid diethylamide ([3H]LSD) to platelet serotonin (5-HT)2A receptors were studied in patients with PMDD treated with a low dose of a gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist (buserelin) or placebo and compared to controls. The PMDD patients were relieved of premenstrual symptoms like depression and irritability during buserelin treatment. The number of [3H]paroxetine binding sites (Bmax) were significantly higher in the follicular phase in untreated PMDD patients compared to controls. When treated with buserelin the difference disappeared. No differences in [3H]LSD binding between the three groups were shown. The present study demonstrated altered platelet [3H]paroxetine binding characteristics in women with PMDD compared to controls. Furthermore, [3H]paroxetine binding was affected by PMDD treatment with a low dose of buserelin. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that changes in serotonergic transmission could be a trait in the premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

  2. Blockade of interleukin 6 signalling ameliorates systemic insulin resistance through upregulation of glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and improves hepatic steatosis in high-fat diet fed mice.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kanji; Nishimura, Takeshi; Ishiba, Hiroshi; Seko, Yuya; Okajima, Akira; Fujii, Hideki; Tochiki, Nozomi; Umemura, Atsushi; Moriguchi, Michihisa; Sumida, Yoshio; Mitsuyoshi, Hironori; Yasui, Kohichiroh; Minami, Masahito; Okanoue, Takeshi; Itoh, Yoshito

    2015-02-01

    Mice fed high-fat diet (HFD) demonstrate obesity-related systemic insulin resistance (IR). Aim of this study is to clarify the role of interleukin (IL)-6 in IR in vivo focusing on skeletal muscle, adipose tissue and liver. Plasma markers of IR and hepatic IL-6 signalling were examined in eight-week HFD feeding C57/BL6 mice. Furthermore, IR-related molecules in skeletal muscles, adipose tissues and livers were investigated following a single injection of anti- IL-6 receptor neutralizing antibody (MR16-1) in two-week HFD feeding mice. To investigate the role of IL-6 in hepatic steatosis by prolonged HFD, hepatic triglyceride accumulation was assessed in eight-week HFD feeding mice with continuous MR16-1 treatment. High-fat diet for both 2 and 8 weeks elevated plasma IL-6, insulin and leptin, which were decreased by MR16-1 treatment. A single injection of MR16-1 ameliorated IR as assessed by glucose and insulin tolerance test, which may be attributable to upregulation of glucose transporter type 4 via phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase as well as upregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha in livers and, particularly, in skeletal muscles. MR16-1 also decreased mRNA expression of leptin and tumour necrosis factor-alpha and increased that of adiponectin in adipose tissue. High-fat diet for 8 weeks, not 2 weeks, induced hepatic steatosis and increased hepatic triglyceride content, all of which were ameliorated by MR16-1 treatment. Blockade of excessive IL-6 stimulus ameliorated HFD-induced IR in a skeletal muscle and modulated the production of adipokines from an early stage of NAFLD, leading to prevention of liver steatosis for a long term. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Investigations into the route of uptake and pharmacokinetics of intraperitoneally-administered monoclonal antibodies: I. Transdiaphragmatic blockade of the terminal lymphatics in the rat.

    PubMed

    Barrett, J S; Wahl, R L; Wagner, J G; Brown, R; Fisher, S J

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies on the intraperitoneal administration of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies indicate that the diaphragm and, in particular, the lymphatics associated with the diaphragm are more involved in the transport of such high-molecular-mass moieties than was earlier suspected. The current study examines the role of the diaphragm in the i.p. transport of an IgG2a murine monoclonal antibody, 5G6.4, by observing the effect on the absorption of the antibody produced when the diaphragm has been scarred. Normal, sham-operated, and diaphragmatically scarred (abrasions made with 600-grade sandpaper) female Sprague Dawley rats (150-250 g) were administered intraperitoneal injections of 125labeled 5G6.4 in a volume of 2.0 cm3. Approximately 5 micrograms antibody protein was administered in the individual 19-microCi injections per rat. Scarring was effective in partially blocking the amount of labeled antibody that crossed the diaphragm. Mean diaphragm levels (% injected dose/g) of 125I-labeled 5G6.4 from the scarred group were 16.8% lower than values from the sham-operated rats and 37.2% lower than those from the control rats. The blockade was effective in slowing the appearance of the labeled antibody in the systemic circulation. The half-time to absorption was significantly prolonged in the scarred group; mean t1/2 absorption values of 2.5 h for the control group, 5.3 h for the sham-operated group, and 9.6 h for the diaphragmatically blocked group were recorded. Scarring the diaphragm reduced the mean maximum blood concentration by 27.6% over the control group and 23.9% over the sham-operated group. The mean time to maximum blood concentration was lengthened by 93..0% over the control group and 35.3% over the sham-operated group due as a result of scarification. Presumably this impedence to absorption would increase the time that the radiolabeled antibody bathed the peritoneal space. The scarred group also had the largest "system mean residence time" (162.5 h

  4. Serotonin receptors involved in antidepressant effects.

    PubMed

    Artigas, Francesc

    2013-01-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hdroxytryptamine; 5-HT) has been implicated in the pathophysiology and treatment of major depression since the serendipitous discovery of antidepressant drugs in the 1950s. However, despite the generalised use of serotonin-enhancing drugs, such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and the dual serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), the exact neurobiological mechanisms involved in the therapeutic action of these drugs are poorly understood. Better knowledge of these mechanisms may help to identify new therapeutic targets and to overcome the two main limitations of current treatments: reduced efficacy and slowness of action. Here I review the preclinical and clinical evidence supporting the involvement of different 5-HT receptors in the therapeutic action of antidepressant drugs. Presynaptic 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1B) autoreceptors play a major detrimental role in antidepressant treatments, as their activation by the excess of the active (extracellular) 5-HT fraction produced by serotonin transporter (SERT) blockade reduces presynaptic serotonergic function. Conversely, stimulation of postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors in corticolimbic networks appears beneficial for the antidepressant action. The 5-HT(2) receptor family is also involved as 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor blockade improves the antidepressant action of SSRIs, and recent data suggest that 5-HT(2B) receptor activation enhances serotonergic activity. Less is known from the rest of postsynaptic 5-HT receptors. However, 5-HT(3) receptor blockade augments the 5-HT increase evoked by SERT inhibition, and 5-HT(4) receptor activation may have antidepressant effects on its own. Finally, blockade of 5-HT(6) and 5-HT(7) receptors appears also to augment the antidepressant effects of SERT inhibition.

  5. Acetylglyceryl ether phosphorylcholine (AGEPC; platelet-activating factor)-induced stimulation of rabbit platelets: correlation between phosphatidic acid level, 45Ca2+ uptake, and (3H)serotonin secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, S.D.; Hanahan, D.J.

    1984-08-01

    When 32P-labeled rabbits platelet were incubated with 5 X 10(-10) M 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glyceryl-3-phosphorylcholine (AGEPC), either in the presence or absence (0.1 mM EGTA) of added Ca2+, there was a three- to five-fold increase in the (32P)phosphatidic acid (PA) pool within 15 to 20 s. This event was followed by a gradual decrease in the (32P)PA level to near basal level in 5 min. AGEPC effected this change in (32P)PA in a characteristic dose- and time-dependent manner. Polar head group analogs of AGEPC, such as AGEDME and AGEMME, also effected an increase in PA labeling at levels comparable to those previously reported for their activity toward rabbit platelets. Other analogs, i.e., lysoGEPC and the enantiomer, sn-1-AGEPC, which are inactive toward rabbit platelets, also showed no effect on the level of (32P)PA. The finding that the PA level in rabbit platelets could be manipulated by the addition of AGEPC, without any added Ca2+, provided an excellent model system for establishing a correlation between the uptake of Ca2+, serotonin release, and PA level. Thus, PA must be regarded as a sensitive indicator of a reaction mechanism important to the platelet response to AGEPC, and could be the focal point in promoting calcium uptake during the stimulation process.

  6. Kinetics of 3H-serotonin uptake by platelets in infantile autism and developmental language disorder (including five pairs of twins)

    SciTech Connect

    Katsui, T.; Okuda, M.; Usuda, S.; Koizumi, T.

    1986-03-01

    The kinetics of 5-HT uptake by platelets was studied in cases of infantile autism and developmental language disorder (DLD) and normal subjects. Two patients of the autism group were twins, and the seven patients of the DLD group were members of four pairs of twins. The Vmax values (means +/- SD) for autism and DLD were 6.46 +/- .90 pmol 5-HT/10(7) cells/min and 4.85 +/- 1.50 pmol 5-HT/10(7) cells/min, respectively. These values were both significantly higher than that of 2.25 +/- .97 pmole 5-HT/10(7) cells/min for normal children. The Km values of the three groups were not significantly different. Data on the five pairs of twins examined suggested that the elevated Vmax of 5-HT uptake by platelets was determined genetically.

  7. Single Molecule Analysis of Serotonin Transporter Regulation Using Antagonist-Conjugated Quantum Dots Reveals Restricted, p38 MAPK-Dependent Mobilization Underlying Uptake Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jerry C.; Tomlinson, Ian D.; Warnement, Michael R.; Ustione, Alessandro; Carneiro, Ana M. D.; Piston, David W.; Blakely, Randy D.; Rosenthal, Sandra J.

    2012-01-01

    The presynaptic serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) is targeted by widely prescribed antidepressant medications. Altered SERT expression or regulation has been implicated in multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, including anxiety, depression and autism. Here, we implement a generalizable strategy that exploits antagonist-conjugated quantum dots (Qdots) to monitor, for the first time, single SERT proteins on the surface of serotonergic cells. We document two pools of SERT proteins defined by lateral mobility, one that exhibits relatively free diffusion, and a second, localized to cholesterol and GM1 ganglioside-enriched microdomains, that displays restricted mobility. Receptor-linked signalling pathways that enhance SERT activity mobilize transporters that, nonetheless, remain confined to membrane microdomains. Mobilization of transporters arise from a p38 MAPK-dependent untethering of the SERT C-terminus from the juxtamembrane actin cytoskeleton. Our studies establish the utility of ligand-conjugated Qdots for analysis of the behaviour of single membrane proteins and reveal a physical basis for signaling-mediated SERT regulation. PMID:22745492

  8. Single molecule analysis of serotonin transporter regulation using antagonist-conjugated quantum dots reveals restricted, p38 MAPK-dependent mobilization underlying uptake activation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jerry C; Tomlinson, Ian D; Warnement, Michael R; Ustione, Alessandro; Carneiro, Ana M D; Piston, David W; Blakely, Randy D; Rosenthal, Sandra J

    2012-06-27

    The presynaptic serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) is targeted by widely prescribed antidepressant medications. Altered SERT expression or regulation has been implicated in multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, including anxiety, depression and autism. Here, we implement a generalizable strategy that exploits antagonist-conjugated quantum dots (Qdots) to monitor, for the first time, single SERT proteins on the surface of serotonergic cells. We document two pools of SERT proteins defined by lateral mobility, one that exhibits relatively free diffusion, and a second, localized to cholesterol and GM1 ganglioside-enriched microdomains, that displays restricted mobility. Receptor-linked signaling pathways that enhance SERT activity mobilize transporters that, nonetheless, remain confined to membrane microdomains. Mobilization of transporters arises from a p38 MAPK-dependent untethering of the SERT C terminus from the juxtamembrane actin cytoskeleton. Our studies establish the utility of ligand-conjugated Qdots for analysis of the behavior of single membrane proteins and reveal a physical basis for signaling-mediated SERT regulation.

  9. Serotonin-Labeled CdSe Nanocrystals: Applications for Neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kippeny, Tadd; Adkins, Erika; Adams, Scott; Thomlinson, Ian; Schroeter, Sally; Defelice, Louis; Blakely, Randy; Rosenthal, Sandra

    2000-03-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter which has been linked to the regulation of critical behaviors including sleep, appetite, and mood. The serotonin transporter (SERT) is a 12-transmembrane domain protein responsible for clearance of serotonin from extracellular spaces following release. In order to assess the potential for use of ligand-conjugated nanocrystals to target cell surface receptors, ion channels, and transporters we have measured the ability of serotonin-labeled CdSe nanocrystals (SNACs) to block the uptake of tritiated serotonin by the human and Drosophila serotonin transporters (hSERT and dSERT). Estimated Ki values, the SNAC concentration at which half of the serotonin transport activity is blocked, were determined by nonlinear regression to be Ki (hSERT ) = 74uM and Ki (dSERT ) = 29uM. These values and our inability to detect free serotonin indicate that SNACs selectively interact with the serotonin recognition site of the transporter. We have also exposed the SNACs to cells containing ionotropic serotonin receptors and have measured the electrical response of the cell using a two microelectrode voltage clamp. We find that serotonin receptors do respond to the SNACs and we measure currents similar to the free serotonin response. These results indicate that ligand-conjugated nanocrystals can be used to label both receptor and transporter proteins. Initial fluorescence labeling experiments will be discussed.

  10. Acute selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors regulate the dorsal raphe nucleus causing amplification of terminal serotonin release.

    PubMed

    Dankoski, Elyse C; Carroll, Susan; Wightman, Robert Mark

    2016-01-09

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were designed to treat depression by increasing serotonin levels throughout the brain via inhibition of clearance from the extracellular space. Although increases in serotonin levels are observed after acute SSRI exposure, 3-6 weeks of continuous use is required for relief from the symptoms of depression. Thus, it is now believed that plasticity in multiple brain systems that are downstream of serotonergic inputs contributes to the therapeutic efficacy of SSRIs. The onset of antidepressant effects also coincides with desensitization of somatodendritic serotonin autoreceptors in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), suggesting that disrupting inhibitory feedback within the serotonin system may contribute to the therapeutic effects of SSRIs. Previously, we showed that chronic SSRI treatment caused a frequency-dependent facilitation of serotonin signaling that persisted in the absence of uptake inhibition. In this work, we use in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in mice to investigate a similar facilitation after a single treatment of the SSRI citalopram hydrobromide. Acute citalopram hydrobromide treatment resulted in frequency-dependent increases of evoked serotonin release in the substantia nigra pars reticulata. These increases were independent of changes in uptake velocity, but required SERT expression. Using microinjections, we show that the frequency-dependent enhancement in release is because of SERT inhibition in the DRN, demonstrating that SSRIs can enhance serotonin release by inhibiting uptake in a location distal to the terminal release site. The novel finding that SERT inhibition can disrupt modulatory mechanisms at the level of the DRN to facilitate serotonin release will help future studies investigate serotonin's role in depression and motivated behavior. In this work, stimulations of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) evoke serotonin release that is recorded in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr) using

  11. Residual Neuromuscular Blockade.

    PubMed

    Plummer-Roberts, Anna L; Trost, Christina; Collins, Shawn; Hewer, Ian

    2016-02-01

    This article provides an update on residual neuromuscular blockade for nurse anesthetists. The neuromuscular junction, pharmacology for producing and reversing neuromuscular blockade, monitoring sites and methods, and patient implications relating to incomplete reversal of neuromuscular blockade are reviewed. Overall recommendations include using multiple settings when employing a peripheral nerve stimulator for monitoring return of neuromuscular function and administering pharmacologic reversal when the train-of-four ratio is below 0.9.

  12. Serotonin dependent masking of hippocampal sharp wave ripples.

    PubMed

    ul Haq, Rizwan; Anderson, Marlene L; Hollnagel, Jan-Oliver; Worschech, Franziska; Sherkheli, Muhammad Azahr; Behrens, Christoph J; Heinemann, Uwe

    2016-02-01

    Sharp wave ripples (SPW-Rs) are thought to play an important role in memory consolidation. By rapid replay of previously stored information during slow wave sleep and consummatory behavior, they result from the formation of neural ensembles during a learning period. Serotonin (5-HT), suggested to be able to modify SPW-Rs, can affect many neurons simultaneously by volume transmission and alter network functions in an orchestrated fashion. In acute slices from dorsal hippocampus, SPW-Rs can be induced by repeated high frequency stimulation that induces long-lasting LTP. We used this model to study SPW-R appearance and modulation by 5-HT. Although stimulation in presence of 5-HT permitted LTP induction, SPW-Rs were "masked"--but appeared after 5-HT wash-out. This SPW-R masking was dose dependent with 100 nM 5-HT being sufficient--if the 5-HT re-uptake inhibitor citalopram was present. Fenfluramine, a serotonin releaser, could also mask SPW-Rs. Masking was due to 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A/C receptor activation. Neither membrane potential nor membrane conductance changes in pyramidal cells caused SPW-R blockade since both remained unaffected by combining 5-HT and citalopram. Moreover, 10 and 30 μM 5-HT mediated SPW-R masking preceded neuronal hyperpolarization and involved reduced presynaptic transmitter release. 5-HT, as well as a 5-HT1A agonist, augmented paired pulse facilitation and affected the coefficient of variance. Spontaneous SPW-Rs in mice hippocampal slices were also masked by 5-HT and fenfluramine. While neuronal ensembles can acquire long lasting LTP during higher 5-HT levels, lower 5-HT levels enable neural ensembles to replay previously stored information and thereby permit memory consolidation memory.

  13. Circulating serotonin in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Maurer-Spurej, E

    2005-08-01

    The role of circulating serotonin is unclear and whether or not serotonin is present in the blood of non-mammalian species is not known. This study provides the first evidence for the presence of serotonin in thrombocytes of birds and three reptilian species, the endothermic leatherback sea turtle, the green sea turtle and the partially endothermic American alligator. Thrombocytes from a fresh water turtle, American bullfrog, Yellowfin tuna, and Chinook salmon did not contain serotonin. Serotonin is a vasoactive substance that regulates skin blood flow, a major mechanism for endothermic body temperature regulation, which could explain why circulating serotonin is present in warm-blooded species. The temperature sensitivity of human blood platelets with concomitant changes in serotonin content further supports a link between circulating serotonin and thermoregulation. Phylogenetic comparison of the presence of circulating serotonin indicated an evolutionary divergence within reptilian species that might coincide with the emergence of endothermy.

  14. Generation of serotonin neurons from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianfeng; Zhong, Xuefei; Liu, Huisheng; Hao, Ling; Huang, Cindy Tzu-Ling; Sherafat, Mohammad Amin; Jones, Jeffrey; Ayala, Melvin; Li, Lingjun; Zhang, Su-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin neurons located in the raphe nucleus of the hindbrain have crucial roles in regulating brain functions and have been implicated in various psychiatric disorders. Yet functional human serotonin neurons are not available for in vitro studies. Through manipulation of the WNT pathway, we demonstrate efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to cells resembling central serotonin neurons, primarily those located in the rhombomeric segments 2–3 of the rostral raphe, which participate in high-order brain functions. The serotonin neurons express a series of molecules essential for serotonergic development, including tryptophan hydroxylase 2, exhibit typical electrophysiological properties and release serotonin in an activity-dependent manner. When treated with the FDA-approved drugs tramadol and escitalopram oxalate, they release or uptake serotonin in a dose- and time-dependent manner, suggesting the utility of these cells for the evaluation of drug candidates. PMID:26655496

  15. Generation of serotonin neurons from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianfeng; Zhong, Xuefei; Liu, Huisheng; Hao, Ling; Huang, Cindy Tzu-Ling; Sherafat, Mohammad Amin; Jones, Jeffrey; Ayala, Melvin; Li, Lingjun; Zhang, Su-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin neurons located in the raphe nucleus of the hindbrain have crucial roles in regulating brain functions and have been implicated in various psychiatric disorders. Yet functional human serotonin neurons are not available for in vitro studies. Through manipulation of the WNT pathway, we demonstrate efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to cells resembling central serotonin neurons, primarily those located in the rhombomeric segments 2-3 of the rostral raphe, which participate in high-order brain functions. The serotonin neurons express a series of molecules essential for serotonergic development, including tryptophan hydroxylase 2, exhibit typical electrophysiological properties and release serotonin in an activity-dependent manner. When treated with the FDA-approved drugs tramadol and escitalopram oxalate, they release or uptake serotonin in a dose- and time-dependent manner, suggesting the utility of these cells for the evaluation of drug candidates.

  16. Serotonin blood test

    MedlinePlus

    5-HT level; 5-hydroxytryptamine level; Serotonin test ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) - serum or blood. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. St Louis, MO: Elsevier ...

  17. Effects of methiothepin on changes in brain serotonin release induced by repeated administration of high doses of anorectic serotoninergic drugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardier, A. M.; Kaakkola, S.; Erfurth, A.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    We previously observed, using in vivo microdialysis, that the potassium-evoked release of frontocortical serotonin (5-HT) is suppressed after rats receive high doses (30 mg/kg, i.p., daily for 3 days) of fluoxetine, a selective blocker of 5-HT reuptake. We now describe similar impairments in 5-HT release after repeated administration of two other 5-HT uptake blockers, zimelidine and sertraline (both at 20 mg/kg, i.p. for 3 days) as well as after dexfenfluramine (7.5 mg/kg, i.p. daily for 3 days), a drug which both releases 5-HT and blocks its reuptake. Doses of these indirect serotonin agonists were about 4-6 times the drug's ED50 in producing anorexia, a serotonin-related behavior. In addition, methiothepin (20 microM), a non-selective receptor antagonist, locally perfused through the dialysis probe 24 h after the last drug injection, enhanced K(+)-evoked release of 5-HT at serotoninergic nerve terminals markedly in control rats and slightly in rats treated with high doses of dexfenfluramine or fluoxetine. On the other hand, pretreatment with methiothepin (10 mg/kg, i.p.) one hour before each of the daily doses of fluoxetine or dexfenfluramine given for 3 days, totally prevented the decrease in basal and K(+)-evoked release of 5-HT. Finally, when methiothepin was injected systemically the day before the first of 3 daily injections of dexfenfluramine, it partially attenuated the long-term depletion of brain 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels induced by repeated administration of high doses of dexfenfluramine. These data suggest that drugs which bring about the prolonged blockade of 5-HT reuptake - such as dexfenfluramine and fluoxetine - can, by causing prolonged increases in intrasynaptic 5-HT levels as measured by in vivo microdialysis, produce receptor-mediated long-term changes in the processes controlling serotonin levels and dynamics.

  18. Effects of methiothepin on changes in brain serotonin release induced by repeated administration of high doses of anorectic serotoninergic drugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardier, A. M.; Kaakkola, S.; Erfurth, A.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    We previously observed, using in vivo microdialysis, that the potassium-evoked release of frontocortical serotonin (5-HT) is suppressed after rats receive high doses (30 mg/kg, i.p., daily for 3 days) of fluoxetine, a selective blocker of 5-HT reuptake. We now describe similar impairments in 5-HT release after repeated administration of two other 5-HT uptake blockers, zimelidine and sertraline (both at 20 mg/kg, i.p. for 3 days) as well as after dexfenfluramine (7.5 mg/kg, i.p. daily for 3 days), a drug which both releases 5-HT and blocks its reuptake. Doses of these indirect serotonin agonists were about 4-6 times the drug's ED50 in producing anorexia, a serotonin-related behavior. In addition, methiothepin (20 microM), a non-selective receptor antagonist, locally perfused through the dialysis probe 24 h after the last drug injection, enhanced K(+)-evoked release of 5-HT at serotoninergic nerve terminals markedly in control rats and slightly in rats treated with high doses of dexfenfluramine or fluoxetine. On the other hand, pretreatment with methiothepin (10 mg/kg, i.p.) one hour before each of the daily doses of fluoxetine or dexfenfluramine given for 3 days, totally prevented the decrease in basal and K(+)-evoked release of 5-HT. Finally, when methiothepin was injected systemically the day before the first of 3 daily injections of dexfenfluramine, it partially attenuated the long-term depletion of brain 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels induced by repeated administration of high doses of dexfenfluramine. These data suggest that drugs which bring about the prolonged blockade of 5-HT reuptake - such as dexfenfluramine and fluoxetine - can, by causing prolonged increases in intrasynaptic 5-HT levels as measured by in vivo microdialysis, produce receptor-mediated long-term changes in the processes controlling serotonin levels and dynamics.

  19. Noninvasive measurement of lung carbon-11-serotonin extraction in man

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, G.; Firnau, G.; Meyer, G.J.; Gratz, K.F. )

    1991-04-01

    The fraction of serotonin extracted on a single passage through the lungs is being used as an early indicator of lung endothelial damage but the existing techniques require multiple arterial blood samples. We have developed a noninvasive technique to measure lung serotonin uptake in man. We utilized the double indicator diffusion principle, a positron camera, {sup 11}C-serotonin as the substrate, and {sup 11}CO-erythrocytes as the vascular marker. From regions of interest around each lung, we recorded time-activity curves in 0.5-sec frames for 30 sec after a bolus injection of first the vascular marker {sup 11}CO-erythrocytes and 10 min later {sup 11}C-serotonin. A second uptake measurement was made after imipramine 25-35 mg was infused intravenously. In three normal volunteers, the single-pass uptake of {sup 11}C-serotonin was 63.9% +/- 3.6%. This decreased in all subjects to a mean of 53.6% +/- 1.4% after imipramine. The rate of lung washout of {sup 11}C was also significantly prolonged after imipramine. This noninvasive technique can be used to measure lung serotonin uptake to detect early changes in a variety of conditions that alter the integrity of the pulmonary endothelium.

  20. Analysis of real-time serotonin (5-HT) availability during experimental colitis in mouse.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Paul P; Barajas-Espinosa, Alma; Neshat, Shadia; Bertrand, Rebecca L; Lomax, Alan E

    2010-03-01

    Serotonin (5-HT)-containing enterochromaffin (EC) cells of the intestine transduce chemical and mechanical stimuli from the intestinal lumen by releasing 5-HT on to afferent nerve terminals. Dysfunctional mucosal 5-HT signaling has been implicated in heightened visceral sensitivity and altered motility in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and in animal models. Our aim was to characterize the release and uptake of 5-HT in the mouse dextran sulfate sodium (DSS; 5% wt/vol) model of colitis. We made electrochemical recordings and used an ELISA assay to determine mucosal 5-HT release and uptake in untreated mice and mice with DSS-induced colitis. Peak and steady-state 5-HT concentrations were measured before and during blockade of the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) with 1 microM fluoxetine. Electrochemical recordings showed that colons from DSS-treated mice had roughly twice the steady-state levels of extracellular 5-HT and compression-evoked 5-HT release compared with untreated mice. Fluoxetine doubled the compression-evoked and steady-state 5-HT levels in control and DSS mice. These data were supported by ELISA assays, which showed enhanced 5-HT release during colitis, by immunohistochemical analyses, which showed increases in EC cell numbers, and by real-time PCR, which identified a decrease in SERT mRNA expression in the mucosa during colitis. These data are the first to demonstrate 5-HT release close to its release site and near its site of action during DSS-colitis. We conclude that DSS-colitis increases 5-HT availability primarily by an increase in the numbers of EC cells and/or of content of 5-HT in these EC cells.

  1. Possible serotonin syndrome associated with tramadol and sertraline coadministration.

    PubMed

    Mason, B J; Blackburn, K H

    1997-02-01

    To report a possible case of serotonin syndrome associated with coadministration of tramadol hydrochloride and sertraline hydrochloride. A 42-year-old woman developed atypical chest pain, sinus tachycardia, confusion, psychosis, sundowning, agitation, diaphoresis, and tremor. She was taking multiple medications, including tramadol and sertraline. The tramadol dosage had recently been increased, resulting in what was believed to be serotonergic syndrome. Serotonin syndrome is a toxic hyperserotonergic state that develops soon after initiation or dosage increments of the offending agent. Patients may differ in their susceptibility to the development of serotonin syndrome. The (+) enantiomer of tramadol inhibits serotonin uptake. Tramadol is metabolized to an active metabolite, M1, by the CYP2D6 enzyme. If this metabolite has less serotonergic activity than tramadol, inhibition of CYP2D6 by sertraline could have been a factor in the interaction. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for serotonin syndrome with concomitant administration of sertraline and tramadol.

  2. Serotonin Receptors in Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Berumen, Laura Cristina; Rodríguez, Angelina; Miledi, Ricardo; García-Alcocer, Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is an ancient molecular signal and a recognized neurotransmitter brainwide distributed with particular presence in hippocampus. Almost all serotonin receptor subtypes are expressed in hippocampus, which implicates an intricate modulating system, considering that they can be localized as autosynaptic, presynaptic, and postsynaptic receptors, even colocalized within the same cell and being target of homo- and heterodimerization. Neurons and glia, including immune cells, integrate a functional network that uses several serotonin receptors to regulate their roles in this particular part of the limbic system. PMID:22629209

  3. Monitoring serotonin signaling on a subsecond time scale

    PubMed Central

    Dankoski, Elyse C.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin modulates a variety of processes throughout the brain, but it is perhaps best known for its involvement in the etiology and treatment of depressive disorders. Microdialysis studies have provided a clear picture of how ambient serotonin levels fluctuate with regard to behavioral states and pharmacological manipulation, and anatomical and electrophysiological studies describe the location and activity of serotonin and its targets. However, few techniques combine the temporal resolution, spatial precision, and chemical selectivity to directly evaluate serotonin release and uptake. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is an electrochemical method that can detect minute changes in neurotransmitter concentration on the same temporal and spatial dimensions as extrasynaptic neurotransmission. Subsecond measurements both in vivo and in brain slice preparations enable us to tease apart the processes of release and uptake. These studies have particularly highlighted the significance of regulatory mechanisms to proper functioning of the serotonin system. This article will review the findings of FSCV investigations of serotonergic neurotransmission and discuss this technique's potential in future studies of the serotonin system. PMID:23760548

  4. Neuroendocrine Signaling Via the Serotonin Transporter Regulates Clearance of Apoptotic Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takeshi; Doe, Jenna M.; Horstmann, Sarah A.; Ahmad, Shama; Ahmad, Aftab; Min, Sung-Joon; Reynolds, Paul R.; Suram, Saritha; Gaydos, Jeanette; Burnham, Ellen L.; Vandivier, R. William

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) is a CNS neurotransmitter increasingly recognized to exert immunomodulatory effects outside the CNS that contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases. 5-HT signals to activate the RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway, a pathway known for its ability to regulate phagocytosis. The clearance of apoptotic cells (i.e. efferocytosis) is a key modulator of the immune response that is inhibited by the RhoA/ROCK pathway. Because efferocytosis is defective in many of the same illnesses where 5-HT has been implicated in disease pathogenesis, we hypothesized that 5-HT would suppress efferocytosis via activation of RhoA/ROCK. The effect of 5-HT on efferocytosis was examined in murine peritoneal and human alveolar macrophages, and its mechanisms were investigated using pharmacologic blockade and genetic deletion. 5-HT impaired efferocytosis by murine peritoneal macrophages and human alveolar macrophages. 5-HT increased phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase subunit 1 (Mypt-1), a known ROCK target, and inhibitors of RhoA and ROCK reversed the suppressive effect of 5-HT on efferocytosis. Peritoneal macrophages expressed the 5-HT transporter and 5-HT receptors (R) 2a, 2b, but not 2c. Inhibition of 5-HTR2a and 5-HTR2b had no effect on efferocytosis, but blockade of the 5-HT transporter prevented 5-HT-impaired efferocytosis. Genetic deletion of the 5-HT transporter inhibited 5-HT uptake into peritoneal macrophages, prevented 5-HT-induced phosphorylation of Mypt-1, reversed the inhibitory effect of 5-HT on efferocytosis, and decreased cellular peritoneal inflammation. These results suggest a novel mechanism by which 5-HT might disrupt efferocytosis and contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:24570000

  5. Repeated swim impairs serotonin clearance via a corticosterone-sensitive mechanism: organic cation transporter 3, the smoking gun.

    PubMed

    Baganz, Nicole; Horton, Rebecca; Martin, Kathryn; Holmes, Andrew; Daws, Lynette C

    2010-11-10

    Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is associated with increased extracellular serotonin (5-HT) in limbic brain regions. The mechanism through which this occurs remains unclear. One way could be via HPA axis-dependent impairment of serotonin transporter (SERT) function, the high-affinity uptake mechanism for 5-HT. Consistent with this idea, we found that 5-HT clearance rate in hippocampus was dramatically reduced in mice exposed to repeated swim, a stimulus known to activate the HPA axis. However, this phenomenon also occurred in mice lacking SERT, ruling out SERT as a mechanism. The organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3) is emerging as an important regulator of brain 5-HT. Moreover, corticosterone, which is released upon HPA axis activation, blocks 5-HT uptake by OCT3. Repeated swim produced a persistent elevation in plasma corticosterone, and, consistent with prolonged blockade by corticosterone, we found that OCT3 expression and function were reduced in these mice. Importantly, this effect of repeated swim to reduce 5-HT clearance rate was corticosterone dependent, as evidenced by its absence in adrenalectomized mice, in which plasma corticosterone levels were essentially undetectable. Behaviorally, mice subjected to repeated swim spent less time immobile in the tail suspension test than control mice, but responded similarly to SERT- and norepinephrine transporter-selective antidepressants. Together, these results show that reduced 5-HT clearance following HPA axis activation is likely mediated, at least in part, by the corticosterone-sensitive OCT3, and that drugs developed to selectively target OCT3 (unlike corticosterone) may be candidates for the development of novel antidepressant medications.

  6. [ROLE OF SEROTONIN IN THE REGULATION OF RESPIRATION AND BILE SECRETORY FUNCTION OF THE LIVER].

    PubMed

    Yanchuk, P I; Athamnah, S M; Reshetnik, E M; Levadyanska, J A; Nikitina, N O; Veselsky, S P

    2015-01-01

    In acute experiments on laboratory male rats we have shown that serotonin (10 mkg/kg, intraportal) increased the oxygen consumption of by liver on 28.8% (P < 0.001) and reduced oxygen tension levels on 19.3% (P < 0.001). The action of serotonin on tissue respiration in liver realized through 5-HT(2) receptors because previous blockade by ketanserin (3 mg/kg) led to remove the effects of exogenous serotonin and inhibition of the action of endogenous autacoid. Serotonin reduced the amount of secreted bile on 13.5% (P < 0.05), and increases the concentration of conjugated bile acids and decreases the content of free cholate, indicating enhanced conjugation with taurine and glycine in the liver cells. However, serotonin didn't stimulate synthesis of primary bile acids. Introduction of serotonin in the conditions of 5-HT2 receptors blockade by ketanserin also led to speed decrease of bile secretion, but in this case stimulating effect of autacoid on bile acid conjugation with taurine and glycine wasn't manifested and content of free cholate wasn't reduced.

  7. Origins of serotonin innervation of forebrain structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellar, K. J.; Brown, P. A.; Madrid, J.; Bernstein, M.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Mehler, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    The tryptophan hydroxylase activity and high-affinity uptake of (3H) serotonin ((3H)5-HT) were measured in five discrete brain regions of rats following lesions of the dorsal or median raphe nuclei. Dorsal raphe lesions reduced enzyme and uptake activity in the striatum only. Median raphe lesions reduced activities in the hippocampus, septal area, frontal cortex, and, to a lesser extent, in the hypothalamus. These data are consistent with the suggestion that the dorsal and median raphe nuclei are the origins of two separate ascending serotonergic systems - one innervating striatal structures and the other mesolimbic structures, predominantly. In addition, the data suggest that measurements of high-affinity uptake of (3H)5-HT may be a more reliable index of innervation than either 5-HT content or tryptophan hydroxylase activity.

  8. Origins of serotonin innervation of forebrain structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellar, K. J.; Brown, P. A.; Madrid, J.; Bernstein, M.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Mehler, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    The tryptophan hydroxylase activity and high-affinity uptake of (3H) serotonin ((3H)5-HT) were measured in five discrete brain regions of rats following lesions of the dorsal or median raphe nuclei. Dorsal raphe lesions reduced enzyme and uptake activity in the striatum only. Median raphe lesions reduced activities in the hippocampus, septal area, frontal cortex, and, to a lesser extent, in the hypothalamus. These data are consistent with the suggestion that the dorsal and median raphe nuclei are the origins of two separate ascending serotonergic systems - one innervating striatal structures and the other mesolimbic structures, predominantly. In addition, the data suggest that measurements of high-affinity uptake of (3H)5-HT may be a more reliable index of innervation than either 5-HT content or tryptophan hydroxylase activity.

  9. Serotonin syndrome presenting as pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilima Deepak; Jain, Ajay B.

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin syndrome (SS) is a potentially life-threatening condition resulting from excessive central and peripheral serotonergic activity. Clinically, it is a triad of mental-status changes, neuromuscular abnormalities, and autonomic disturbances. It can be caused by intentional self-poisoning, overdose, or inadvertent drug interactions. We report the case of a 58-year-old male with type 2 diabetes mellitus and obsessive compulsive disorder who developed pulmonary edema as a possible complication of SS. SS was caused by a combination of three specific serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, and sertraline), linezolid, and fentanyl. The hospital course was further complicated by difficult weaning from the ventilator. SS was identified and successfully treated with cyproheptadine and lorazepam. The case highlights the importance of effective consultation-liaison and prompt recognition of SS as the presentation may be complex in the presence of co-morbid medical illness. PMID:26997733

  10. SEROTONIN BINDING TO PREPARATIONS FROM RAT BRAIN,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    BRAIN , SEROTONIN, SEROTONIN, OXIDOREDUCTASES, LYSERGIC ACIDS, RESERPINE, CHLORPROMAZINE, ACETYLCHOLINE, FATTY ACIDS, NOREPINEPHRINE, LEARNING, PERMEABILITY, MITOCHONDRIA, MORPHOLOGY(BIOLOGY), DRUGS, PHYSIOLOGY.

  11. Traceable Coulomb blockade thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahtela, O.; Mykkänen, E.; Kemppinen, A.; Meschke, M.; Prunnila, M.; Gunnarsson, D.; Roschier, L.; Penttilä, J.; Pekola, J.

    2017-02-01

    We present a measurement and analysis scheme for determining traceable thermodynamic temperature at cryogenic temperatures using Coulomb blockade thermometry. The uncertainty of the electrical measurement is improved by utilizing two sampling digital voltmeters instead of the traditional lock-in technique. The remaining uncertainty is dominated by that of the numerical analysis of the measurement data. Two analysis methods are demonstrated: numerical fitting of the full conductance curve and measuring the height of the conductance dip. The complete uncertainty analysis shows that using either analysis method the relative combined standard uncertainty (k  =  1) in determining the thermodynamic temperature in the temperature range from 20 mK to 200 mK is below 0.5%. In this temperature range, both analysis methods produced temperature estimates that deviated from 0.39% to 0.67% from the reference temperatures provided by a superconducting reference point device calibrated against the Provisional Low Temperature Scale of 2000.

  12. Increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein concentrations in mice lacking brain serotonin.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Golo; Mosienko, Valentina; Gertz, Karen; Alenina, Natalia; Hellweg, Rainer; Klempin, Friederike

    2016-04-01

    The interplay between BDNF signaling and the serotonergic system remains incompletely understood. Using a highly sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we studied BDNF concentrations in hippocampus and cortex of two mouse models of altered serotonin signaling: tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph)2-deficient (Tph2 (-/-)) mice lacking brain serotonin and serotonin transporter (SERT)-deficient (SERT(-/-)) mice lacking serotonin re-uptake. Surprisingly, hippocampal BDNF was significantly elevated in Tph2 (-/-) mice, whereas no significant changes were observed in SERT(-/-) mice. Furthermore, BDNF levels were increased in the prefrontal cortex of Tph2 (-/-) but not of SERT(-/-) mice. Our results emphasize the interaction between serotonin signaling and BDNF. Complete lack of brain serotonin induces BDNF expression.

  13. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs)

    MedlinePlus

    ... dangerous reactions when combined with certain medications or herbal supplements. Serotonin syndrome. Rarely, an antidepressant can cause high ... antidepressants, certain pain or headache medications, and the herbal supplement St. John's wort. Signs and symptoms of serotonin ...

  14. Multiple receptor subtypes mediate the effects of serotonin on rat subfornical organ neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scrogin, K. E.; Johnson, A. K.; Schmid, H. A.

    1998-01-01

    The subfornical organ (SFO) receives significant serotonergic innervation. However, few reports have examined the functional effects of serotonin on SFO neurons. This study characterized the effects of serotonin on spontaneously firing SFO neurons in the rat brain slice. Of 31 neurons tested, 80% responded to serotonin (1-100 microM) with either an increase (n = 15) or decrease (n = 10) in spontaneous activity. Responses to serotonin were dose dependent and persisted after synaptic blockade. Excitatory responses could also be mimicked by the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2A/2C receptor agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI; 1-10 microM) and could be blocked by the 5-HT2A/2C-receptor antagonist LY-53,857 (10 microM). LY-53,857 unmasked inhibitory responses to serotonin in 56% of serotonin-excited cells tested. Serotonin-inhibited cells were also inhibited by the 5-HT1A-receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT; 1-10 microM; n = 7). The data indicate that SFO neurons are responsive to serotonin via postsynaptic activation of multiple receptor subtypes. The results suggest that excitatory responses to serotonin are mediated by 5-HT2A or 5-HT2C receptors and that inhibitory responses may be mediated by 5-HT1A receptors. In addition, similar percentages of serotonin-excited and -inhibited cells were also sensitive to ANG II. As such the functional relationship between serotonin and ANG II in the SFO remains unclear.

  15. Multiple receptor subtypes mediate the effects of serotonin on rat subfornical organ neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scrogin, K. E.; Johnson, A. K.; Schmid, H. A.

    1998-01-01

    The subfornical organ (SFO) receives significant serotonergic innervation. However, few reports have examined the functional effects of serotonin on SFO neurons. This study characterized the effects of serotonin on spontaneously firing SFO neurons in the rat brain slice. Of 31 neurons tested, 80% responded to serotonin (1-100 microM) with either an increase (n = 15) or decrease (n = 10) in spontaneous activity. Responses to serotonin were dose dependent and persisted after synaptic blockade. Excitatory responses could also be mimicked by the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2A/2C receptor agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI; 1-10 microM) and could be blocked by the 5-HT2A/2C-receptor antagonist LY-53,857 (10 microM). LY-53,857 unmasked inhibitory responses to serotonin in 56% of serotonin-excited cells tested. Serotonin-inhibited cells were also inhibited by the 5-HT1A-receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT; 1-10 microM; n = 7). The data indicate that SFO neurons are responsive to serotonin via postsynaptic activation of multiple receptor subtypes. The results suggest that excitatory responses to serotonin are mediated by 5-HT2A or 5-HT2C receptors and that inhibitory responses may be mediated by 5-HT1A receptors. In addition, similar percentages of serotonin-excited and -inhibited cells were also sensitive to ANG II. As such the functional relationship between serotonin and ANG II in the SFO remains unclear.

  16. Platelet serotonin promotes the recruitment of neutrophils to sites of acute inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Suidan, Georgette L.; Demers, Melanie; Herr, Nadine; Carbo, Carla; Brill, Alexander; Cifuni, Stephen M.; Mauler, Maximilian; Cicko, Sanja; Bader, Michael; Idzko, Marco; Bode, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The majority of peripheral serotonin is stored in platelets, which secrete it on activation. Serotonin releases Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) and we asked whether absence of platelet serotonin affects neutrophil recruitment in inflammatory responses. Tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph)1–deficient mice, lacking non-neuronal serotonin, showed mild leukocytosis compared with wild-type (WT), primarily driven by an elevated neutrophil count. Despite this, 50% fewer leukocytes rolled on unstimulated mesenteric venous endothelium of Tph1−/− mice. The velocity of rolling leukocytes was higher in Tph1−/− mice, indicating fewer selectin-mediated interactions with endothelium. Stimulation of endothelium with histamine, a secretagogue of WPBs, or injection of serotonin normalized the rolling in Tph1−/− mice. Diminished rolling in Tph1−/− mice resulted in reduced firm adhesion of leukocytes after lipopolysaccharide treatment. Blocking platelet serotonin uptake with fluoxetine in WT mice reduced serum serotonin by > 80% and similarly reduced leukocyte rolling and adhesion. Four hours after inflammatory stimulation, neutrophil extravasation into lung, peritoneum, and skin wounds was reduced in Tph1−/− mice, whereas in vitro neutrophil chemotaxis was independent of serotonin. Survival of lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxic shock was improved in Tph1−/− mice. In conclusion, platelet serotonin promotes the recruitment of neutrophils in acute inflammation, supporting an important role for platelet serotonin in innate immunity. PMID:23243271

  17. Biological Clocks in the Duodenum and the Diurnal Regulation of Duodenal and Plasma Serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Ebert-Zavos, Elizabeth; Horvat-Gordon, Maria; Taylor, Alexander; Bartell, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin in blood plasma is primarily synthesized in the duodenum, as brain derived serotonin does not cross the blood-brain barrier. Because serotonin in the brain and retina is synthesized under the control of a circadian clock, we sought to determine if a circadian clock in the duodenum regulates serotonin synthesis and release in blood. We examined gene expression in the duodenum of chickens at different times of the day and found that the duodenum rhythmically expresses molecular circadian clock genes and genes controlling serotonin biosynthesis, specifically tryptophan hydroxylase, in a light dark cycle (LD). Analysis of the duodenum and blood plasma showed that the amount of serotonin in the duodenum varies across the day and that serotonin profiles in blood plasma are also rhythmic in LD, but were not rhythmic in constant darkness. Because serotonin in the gut affects duodenal nutrient absorption and gut motility, the control of serotonin production in the duodenum by LD cycles could provide an additional mechanism by which the external environment controls nutrient uptake and digestive function. The diurnal regulation of plasma serotonin may also serve as an additional biochemical signal in the blood encoding time and could be used by target tissues to indicate the status of nutrient absorption. PMID:23737937

  18. Platelet serotonin promotes the recruitment of neutrophils to sites of acute inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Duerschmied, Daniel; Suidan, Georgette L; Demers, Melanie; Herr, Nadine; Carbo, Carla; Brill, Alexander; Cifuni, Stephen M; Mauler, Maximilian; Cicko, Sanja; Bader, Michael; Idzko, Marco; Bode, Christoph; Wagner, Denisa D

    2013-02-07

    The majority of peripheral serotonin is stored in platelets, which secrete it on activation. Serotonin releases Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) and we asked whether absence of platelet serotonin affects neutrophil recruitment in inflammatory responses. Tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph)1–deficient mice, lacking non-neuronal serotonin, showed mild leukocytosis compared with wild-type (WT), primarily driven by an elevated neutrophil count. Despite this, 50% fewer leukocytes rolled on unstimulated mesenteric venous endothelium of Tph1(-/-) mice. The velocity of rolling leukocytes was higher in Tph1(-/-) mice, indicating fewer selectin-mediated interactions with endothelium. Stimulation of endothelium with histamine, a secretagogue of WPBs, or injection of serotonin normalized the rolling in Tph1(-/-) mice. Diminished rolling in Tph1(-/-) mice resulted in reduced firm adhesion of leukocytes after lipopolysaccharide treatment. Blocking platelet serotonin uptake with fluoxetine in WT mice reduced serum serotonin by > 80% and similarly reduced leukocyte rolling and adhesion. Four hours after inflammatory stimulation, neutrophil extravasation into lung, peritoneum, and skin wounds was reduced in Tph1(-/-) mice, whereas in vitro neutrophil chemotaxis was independent of serotonin. Survival of lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxic shock was improved in Tph1(-/-) mice. In conclusion, platelet serotonin promotes the recruitment of neutrophils in acute inflammation, supporting an important role for platelet serotonin in innate immunity.

  19. A case of serotonin syndrome associated with methadone overdose.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Terry T; Martinez, Daniel N

    2008-01-01

    A chronic pain patient prescribed 20 mg of methadone per day was seen at the Emergency Department within one hour following a witnessed intentional 200 mg ingestion. In addition, he was taking the serotonin re-uptake inhibitor antidepressant drugs, sertraline and venlafaxine as prescribed. Methadone is also a serotonin re-uptake inhibitor which has been involved in serotonin toxicity reactions. Initially, no symptoms of narcotic overdose (depressed central nervous system, respiration, or blood pressure) could be distinguished, and the standard narcotic urine screen was negative. No decontamination or antagonist therapy was given, and the patient was discharged to a psychiatric unit for observation. At 5 hours post-ingestion he presented in a panic with hallucinations and elevated blood pressure, pulse, and respiration. These symptoms are characteristic of serotonin syndrome which is often described as mental status changes, autonomic hyperactivity, and neuromuscular abnormalities. At 10 hours post-ingestion the patient was found unconscious. He had aspirated stomach contents into his lungs. His respiration, blood pressure, and pulse were all severely depressed. He never regained conciousness, and he died 5 days later. The medical examiner's finding was probable acute methadone intoxication. In this case serotonin syndrome appears to have opposed and delayed typical narcotic symptoms. Methadone has additional pharmacologic and toxicologic properties which may complicate the assessment and treatment in overdose situations.

  20. Serotonin syndrome: fentanyl and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor interactions.

    PubMed

    Greenier, Ewa; Lukyanova, Valentina; Reede, Lynn

    2014-10-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a rare but potentially fatal adverse drug reaction associated with increased serotonergic activity in the central nervous system. It is characterized by a triad of symptoms, which include altered mental status, neuromuscular hyperactivity, and autonomic instability or hyperactivity. Due to the potential of rapid onset, it is important for clinicians to recognize the signs and symptoms of serotonin syndrome. Serotonin syndrome symptoms may resemble other conditions. Although this article focuses on serotonin syndrome as a result of an adverse interaction of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and fentanyl, it is important for not only anesthesia professionals, but all clinicians--such as those in emergency medicine and critical care--to be aware of this syndrome and its management. This article discusses the clinical manifestations of the serotonin syndrome and highlights reported cases of serotonin syndrome specifically related to an interaction between SSRIs and fentanyl, a commonly used opioid in anesthesia practice.

  1. Vascular tone and reactivity to serotonin in the internal and external carotid vascular beds of the dog.

    PubMed

    Vidrio, H; Hong, E

    1976-04-01

    The effects of intra-arterial infusions of serotonin on internal and external carotid blood flow were determined in anesthetized dogs by electromagnetic flow measurements. Serotonin decreased flow in the internal carotid and increased it in the external carotid. Both responses were blocked by the serotonin antagonist methysergide. The alpha adrenergic antagonist zolertine, the ganglionic blocking agent chlorisondamine and the vasodilator diazoxide blocked external carotid dilator responses but did not modify constriction in the internal carotid. Blockade of external carotid responses by the three drugs was also demonstrated in experiments in which this bed was perfused at a constant rate. These results indicate that the internal and external carotid vascular beds of the dog react in opposite ways to serotonin, that both responses are mediated through the same type of serotonin receptors and that the dilator responses of the external carotid are dependent on vascular tone.

  2. Serotonin and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Serena-Lynn; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Decreased serotonin function has consistently been shown to be highly correlated with impulsive aggression across a number of different experimental paradigms. Such lowered serotonergic indices appear to correlate with the dimension of aggression dyscontrol and/or impulsivity rather than with psychiatric diagnostic categories per se. Implications…

  3. Platelet serotonin modulates immune functions.

    PubMed

    Mauler, M; Bode, C; Duerschmied, D

    2016-01-01

    This short review addresses immune functions of platelet serotonin. Platelets transport serotonin at a high concentration in dense granules and release it upon activation. Besides haemostatic, vasotonic and developmental modulation, serotonin also influences a variety of immune functions (mediated by different serotonin receptors). First, platelet serotonergic effects are directed against invading pathogens via activation and proliferation of lymphocytes, modulation of cytokine release, and recruitment of neutrophils to sites of acute inflammation by induction of selectin expression on endothelial cells. Second, serotonin levels are elevated in autoimmune diseases, such as asthma or rheumatoid arthritis, and during tissue regeneration after ischemia of myocardium or brain. Specific antagonism of serotonin receptors appears to improve survival after myocardial infarction or sepsis and to attenuate asthmatic attacks in animal models. It will be of great clinical relevance if these findings can be translated into human applications. In conclusion, targeting immune modulatory effects of platelet serotonin may provide novel therapeutic options for common health problems.

  4. Serotonin Transporter Gene (SLC6A4) Polymorphism and Mucosal Serotonin Levels in Southeastern Iranian Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Mojgan; Tahmasebi Abdar, Hossein; Mollaei, Hamid Reza; Hajghani, Hossein; Baneshi, Mohammad Reza; Hayatbakhsh, Mohammad Mahdi

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a digestive system disorder with an unknown etiology. Serotonin has a key role in the secretion and motility of the intestine. Polymorphism in serotonin re-uptake transporter (SERT or SLC6A4) gene may have a functional role in the gut of patients with IBS. The aims of the present study were to investigate the association between SLC6A4 gene polymorphism and IBS and to detect the correlation between rectal serotonin levels and IBS sub-types. METHODS SLC6A4 gene polymorphism in 131 patients with IBS and 211 healthy controls were analysed using the quantitative polymerase chain reaction high-resolution melting (qPCR-HRM) curve technique. Serotonin was measured in rectal biopsies of patients with IBS using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. RESULTS The patients were categorized into three groups: IBS with diarrhoea (IBS-D): 70 patients, IBS with constipation (IBS-C): 18 patients, and IBS with mixed symptoms (IBS-M): 43 patients. The frequency of SLC6A4 s/s and l/s genotypes was significantly higher in IBS-C than IBS-D, IBS-M, and controls (p=0.036). Serotonin levels were similar in IBS sub-types. CONCLUSION SLC6A4 polymorphism is a possible candidate gene associated with the pathogenesis of IBS-C. Although serotonin levels did not differ in rectal biopsies of IBS sub-types, further investigation is recommended.

  5. The serotonin system in autism spectrum disorder: from biomarker to animal models

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Christopher L.; Anacker, Allison M.J.; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Elevated whole blood serotonin, or hyperserotonemia, was the first biomarker identified in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and is present in more than 25% of affected children. The serotonin system is a logical candidate for involvement in ASD due to its pleiotropic role across multiple brain systems both dynamically and across development. Tantalizing clues connect this peripheral biomarker with changes in brain and behavior in ASD, but the contribution of the serotonin system to ASD pathophysiology remains incompletely understood. Studies of whole blood serotonin levels in ASD and in a large founder population indicate greater heritability than for the disorder itself and suggest an association with recurrence risk. Emerging data from both neuroimaging and postmortem samples also indicate changes in the brain serotonin system in ASD. Genetic linkage and association studies of both whole blood serotonin levels and of ASD risk point to the chromosomal region containing the serotonin transporter (SERT) gene in males but not in females. In ASD families with evidence of linkage to this region, multiple rare SERT amino acid variants lead to a convergent increase in serotonin uptake in cell models. A knock-in mouse model of one of these variants, SERT Gly56Ala, recapitulates the hyperserotonemia biomarker and shows increased brain serotonin clearance, increased serotonin receptor sensitivity, and altered social, communication, and repetitive behaviors. Data from other rodent models also suggest an important role for the serotonin system in social behavior, in cognitive flexibility, and in sensory development. Recent work indicates that reciprocal interactions between serotonin and other systems, such as oxytocin, may be particularly important for social behavior. Collectively, these data point to the serotonin system as a prime candidate for treatment development in a subgroup of children defined by a robust, heritable biomarker. PMID:26577932

  6. The serotonin system in autism spectrum disorder: From biomarker to animal models.

    PubMed

    Muller, C L; Anacker, A M J; Veenstra-VanderWeele, J

    2016-05-03

    Elevated whole blood serotonin, or hyperserotonemia, was the first biomarker identified in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and is present in more than 25% of affected children. The serotonin system is a logical candidate for involvement in ASD due to its pleiotropic role across multiple brain systems both dynamically and across development. Tantalizing clues connect this peripheral biomarker with changes in brain and behavior in ASD, but the contribution of the serotonin system to ASD pathophysiology remains incompletely understood. Studies of whole blood serotonin levels in ASD and in a large founder population indicate greater heritability than for the disorder itself and suggest an association with recurrence risk. Emerging data from both neuroimaging and postmortem samples also indicate changes in the brain serotonin system in ASD. Genetic linkage and association studies of both whole blood serotonin levels and of ASD risk point to the chromosomal region containing the serotonin transporter (SERT) gene in males but not in females. In ASD families with evidence of linkage to this region, multiple rare SERT amino acid variants lead to a convergent increase in serotonin uptake in cell models. A knock-in mouse model of one of these variants, SERT Gly56Ala, recapitulates the hyperserotonemia biomarker and shows increased brain serotonin clearance, increased serotonin receptor sensitivity, and altered social, communication, and repetitive behaviors. Data from other rodent models also suggest an important role for the serotonin system in social behavior, in cognitive flexibility, and in sensory development. Recent work indicates that reciprocal interactions between serotonin and other systems, such as oxytocin, may be particularly important for social behavior. Collectively, these data point to the serotonin system as a prime candidate for treatment development in a subgroup of children defined by a robust, heritable biomarker.

  7. Does serotonin deficit mediate susceptibility to ADHD?

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Emili; Nandagopal, Krishnadas

    2015-03-01

    The onset of attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder (ADHD) in childhood is characterized by developmentally inappropriate levels of hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattention. A chronic deficit of serotonin (5-HT) at the synapse may trigger symptoms of ADHD. This review focuses on neuro-anatomical, experimental and clinical pharmacological evidence, as well as the genetic underpinnings of serotoninergic involvement in the etiology of ADHD. Neuro-anatomical investigations suggest that serotonin through the orbitofrontal-striatal circuitry may regulate behavioral domains of hyperactivity and impulsivity in ADHD. Studies from animal models of ADHD indicate intimate interplay between 5-HT and dopaminergic neurotransmission. Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors, as also non-stimulant drugs acting on the 5-HT system are, however, clinically effective. They impart less severe side effects in patients with no risk of addiction. Oral administration of l-tryptophan, the amino acid precursor of 5-HT, significantly alleviates ADHD symptoms. Given the multifactorial nature of ADHD, candidate gene and genome-wide association studies have suggested that serotoninergic gene variants are associated with increased risk of ADHD with each locus individually exerting a modest effect on overall risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Oral branched-chain amino acid supplements that reduce brain serotonin during exercise in rats also lower brain catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sujean; Disilvio, Briana; Fernstrom, Madelyn H; Fernstrom, John D

    2013-11-01

    Exercise raises brain serotonin release and is postulated to cause fatigue in athletes; ingestion of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), by competitively inhibiting tryptophan transport into brain, lowers brain tryptophan uptake and serotonin synthesis and release in rats, and reputedly in humans prevents exercise-induced increases in serotonin and fatigue. This latter effect in humans is disputed. But BCAA also competitively inhibit tyrosine uptake into brain, and thus catecholamine synthesis and release. Since increasing brain catecholamines enhances physical performance, BCAA ingestion could lower catecholamines, reduce performance and thus negate any serotonin-linked benefit. We therefore examined in rats whether BCAA would reduce both brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. Sedentary and exercising rats received BCAA or vehicle orally; tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis rates were measured 1 h later in brain. BCAA reduced brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations, and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. These reductions in tyrosine concentrations and catecholamine synthesis, but not tryptophan or serotonin synthesis, could be prevented by co-administering tyrosine with BCAA. Complete essential amino acid mixtures, used to maintain or build muscle mass, were also studied, and produced different effects on brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. Since pharmacologically increasing brain catecholamine function improves physical performance, the finding that BCAA reduce catecholamine synthesis may explain why this treatment does not enhance physical performance in humans, despite reducing serotonin synthesis. If so, adding tyrosine to BCAA supplements might allow a positive action on performance to emerge.

  9. Optogenetic Control of Serotonin and Dopamine Release in Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetic control of neurotransmitter release is an elegant method to investigate neurobiological mechanisms with millisecond precision and cell type-specific resolution. Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) can be expressed in specific neurons, and blue light used to activate those neurons. Previously, in Drosophila, neurotransmitter release and uptake have been studied after continuous optical illumination. In this study, we investigated the effects of pulsed optical stimulation trains on serotonin or dopamine release in larval ventral nerve cords. In larvae with ChR2 expressed in serotonergic neurons, low-frequency stimulations produced a distinct, steady-state response while high-frequency patterns were peak shaped. Evoked serotonin release increased with increasing stimulation frequency and then plateaued. The steady-state response and the frequency dependence disappeared after administering the uptake inhibitor fluoxetine, indicating that uptake plays a significant role in regulating the extracellular serotonin concentration. Pulsed stimulations were also used to evoke dopamine release in flies expressing ChR2 in dopaminergic neurons and similar frequency dependence was observed. Release due to pulsed optical stimulations was modeled to determine the uptake kinetics. For serotonin, Vmax was 0.54 ± 0.07 μM/s and Km was 0.61 ± 0.04 μM; and for dopamine, Vmax was 0.12 ± 0.03 μM/s and Km was 0.45 ± 0.13 μM. The amount of serotonin released per stimulation pulse was 4.4 ± 1.0 nM, and the amount of dopamine was 1.6 ± 0.3 nM. Thus, pulsed optical stimulations can be used to mimic neuronal firing patterns and will allow Drosophila to be used as a model system for studying mechanisms underlying neurotransmission. PMID:24849718

  10. Neurochemical, behavioral and physiological effects of pharmacologically enhanced serotonin levels in serotonin transporter (SERT)-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Meredith A.; Jensen, Catherine L.; French, Helen T.; Stein, Alison R.; Huang, Su-Jan; Tolliver, Teresa J.; Murphy, Dennis L.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale Serotonin transporter (SERT) knockout (−/−) mice have an altered phenotype in adulthood, including high baseline anxiety and depressive-like behaviors, associated with increased baseline extracellular serotonin levels throughout life. Objectives To examine the effects of increases in serotonin following administration of the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP) in SERT wildtype (+/+), heterozygous (+/−) and −/− mice. Results 5-HTP increased serotonin in all five brain areas examined, with ~2–5-fold increases in SERT +/+ and +/− mice, and greater 4.5–11.7-fold increases in SERT −/− mice. Behaviorally, 5-HTP induced exaggerated serotonin syndrome behaviors in SERT −/− mice, with similar effects in male and female mice. Studies suggest promiscuous serotonin uptake by the dopamine transporter (DAT) in SERT −/− mice, and here, the DAT blocker GBR 12909 enhanced 5-HTP-induced behaviors in SERT −/− mice. Physiologically, 5-HTP induced exaggerated temperature effects in SERT-deficient mice. The 5-HT1A antagonist WAY 100635 decreased 5-HTP-induced hypothermia in SERT +/+ and +/− mice, with no effect in SERT −/− mice, whereas the 5-HT7 antagonist SB 269970 decreased this exaggerated response in SERT −/− mice only. WAY 100635 and SB 269970 together completely blocked 5-HTP-induced hypothermia in SERT +/− and −/− mice. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that SERT −/− mice have exaggerated neurochemical, behavioral and physiological responses to further increases in serotonin, and provide the first evidence of intact 5-HT7 receptor function in SERT −/− mice, with interesting interactions between 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptors. As roles for 5-HT7 receptors in anxiety and depression were recently established, the current findings have implications for understanding the high anxiety and depressive-like phenotype of SERT-deficient mice. PMID:18712364

  11. The role of serotonin and neurotransmitters during craniofacial development.

    PubMed

    Moiseiwitsch, J R

    2000-01-01

    Several neurotransmitters, in particular serotonin (5-HT), have demonstrated multiple functions during early development and mid-gestational craniofacial morphogenesis. Early studies indicated that 5-HT is present in the oocyte, where it appears to function as a regulator of cell cleavage. Later, it has a significant role during gastrulation, during which there are significant areas of 5-HT uptake in the primitive streak. Subsequently, in association with neurulation, 5-HT uptake is seen in the floor plate of the developing neural tube. During neural crest formation and branchial arch formation, 5-HT has been demonstrated to facilitate cell migration and stimulate cell differentiation. During morphogenesis of the craniofacial structures, 5-HT stimulates dental development and may aid in cusp formation. All of the most commonly prescribed antidepressant drugs inhibit serotonin uptake, yet they do not appear to cause major craniofacial malformations in vivo. Given the wide spectrum of effects that 5-HT has during development, it is difficult to understand why these anti-depressants are not major teratogens. Redundancy within the system may allow receptor and uptake pathways to function normally even with lower than normal levels of circulating serotonin. Serotonin-binding proteins, that are expressed in most craniofacial regions at critical times during craniofacial development, may have a buffering capacity that maintains adequate 5-HT tissue concentrations over a wide range of 5-HT serum concentrations. Dental development appears to be particularly sensitive to even small fluctuations in concentrations of 5-HT. Therefore, it may be that children of patients who have received selective serotonergic re-uptake inhibitors (such as Prozac and Zoloft) or the less selective tricyclic anti-depressant drugs (such as Elavil) would be at a higher risk for developmental dental defects such as anodontia and hypodontia. In this review, the evidence supporting a role for 5-HT

  12. Serotonin and brain development.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Monsheel S K; Sanders-Bush, Elaine

    2004-01-01

    The role of the serotonergic system in the neuroplastic events that create, repair, and degenerate the brain has been explored. Synaptic plasticity occurs throughout life and is critical during brain development. Evidence from biochemical, pharmacological, and clinical studies demonstrates the huge importance of an intact serotonergic system for normal central nervous system (CNS)function. Serotonin acts as a growth factor during embryogenesis, and serotonin receptor activity forms a crucial part of the cascade of events leading to changes in brain structure. The serotonergic system interacts with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), S100beta, and other chemical messengers, in addition to ts cross talk with the GABAergic, glutamatergic, and dopaminergic neurotransmitter systems. Disruption of these processes may contribute to CNS disorders that have been associated with impaired development. Furthermore, many psychiatric drugs alter serotonergic activity and have been shown to create changes in brain structure with long-term treatment. However, the mechanisms for their therapeutic efficacy are still unclear. Treatments for psychiatric illness are usually chronic and alleviate psychiatric symptoms, rather than cure these diseases. Therefore, greater exploration of the serotonin system during brain development and growth could lead to real progress in the discovery of treatments for mental disorders.

  13. UWA-121, a mixed dopamine and serotonin re-uptake inhibitor, enhances L-DOPA anti-parkinsonian action without worsening dyskinesia or psychosis-like behaviours in the MPTP-lesioned common marmoset.

    PubMed

    Huot, Philippe; Johnston, Tom H; Lewis, Katie D; Koprich, James B; Reyes, M Gabriela; Fox, Susan H; Piggott, Matthew J; Brotchie, Jonathan M

    2014-07-01

    L-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is the most effective treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD), but its long-term administration is complicated by wearing-off and dyskinesia. UWA-101, a dual, equipotent inhibitor of dopamine (DAT) and serotonin (SERT) transporters, has previously been shown to successfully extend duration of anti-parkinsonian benefit of L-DOPA (ON-time), without exacerbating dyskinesia, in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-lesioned marmoset. However, UWA-101 is racemic and it is unclear whether one or both enantiomers contribute to its actions, and whether a better therapeutic effect might be attained by using a single antipode. In the current study, we synthesised the two enantiomers of UWA-101, R-101 (UWA-121) and S-101 (UWA-122), characterised their pharmacological profiles and administered them to MPTP-lesioned marmosets. Parkinsonism, dyskinesia, psychosis-like behaviours and duration of ON-time were evaluated. UWA-121 is a dual DAT > SERT inhibitor, with an approximate 10:1 DAT:SERT affinity ratio (inhibitory constants (Ki) of 307 and 3830 nM, respectively). In combination with L-DOPA, UWA-121 extended duration of ON-time when compared to L-DOPA/vehicle treatment (by 40%, P < 0.01). UWA-121 also extended duration of ON-time without dyskinesia (by 215%, P < 0.05) and ON-time without psychosis-like behaviours when compared to L-DOPA/vehicle treatment (by 345%, P < 0.01). UWA-121 did not worsen the severity of dyskinesia or psychosis-like behaviours (P > 0.05). UWA-122 is a selective SERT inhibitor (Ki 120 nM, Ki at DAT > 50 μM) and, in combination with L-DOPA, had no effect on ON-time, dyskinesia or psychosis-like behaviours (P > 0.05). These data indicate that dual DAT and SERT inhibitors effectively enhance L-DOPA anti-parkinsonian action without worsening dyskinesia and that compounds with such a pharmacological profile represent promising agents against wearing-off in PD.

  14. Pharmacological and Behavioral Characterization of D-473, an Orally Active Triple Reuptake Inhibitor Targeting Dopamine, Serotonin and Norepinephrine Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Aloke K.; Santra, Soumava; Sharma, Horrick; Voshavar, Chandrashekhar; Xu, Liping; Mabrouk, Omar; Antonio, Tamara; Reith, Maarten E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a debilitating disease affecting a wide cross section of people around the world. The current therapy for depression is less than adequate and there is a considerable unmet need for more efficacious treatment. Dopamine has been shown to play a significant role in depression including production of anhedonia which has been one of the untreated symptoms in MDD. It has been hypothesized that drugs acting at all three monoamine transporters including dopamine transporter should provide more efficacious antidepressants activity. This has led to the development of triple reuptake inhibitor D-473 which is a novel pyran based molecule and interacts with all three monoamine transporters. The monoamine uptake inhibition activity in the cloned human transporters expressed in HEK-293 cells (70.4, 9.18 and 39.7 for DAT, SERT and NET, respectively) indicates a serotonin preferring triple reuptake inhibition profile for this drug. The drug D-473 exhibited good brain penetration and produced efficacious activity in rat forced swim test under oral administration. The optimal efficacy dose did not produce any locomotor activation. Microdialysis experiment demonstrated that systemic administration of D-473 elevated extracellular level of the three monoamines DA, 5-HT, and NE efficaciously in the dorsal lateral striatum (DLS) and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) area, indicating in vivo blockade of all three monoamine transporters by D-473. Thus, the current biological data from D-473 indicate potent antidepressant activity of the molecule. PMID:25427177

  15. Pharmacological and behavioral characterization of D-473, an orally active triple reuptake inhibitor targeting dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine transporters.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Aloke K; Santra, Soumava; Sharma, Horrick; Voshavar, Chandrashekhar; Xu, Liping; Mabrouk, Omar; Antonio, Tamara; Reith, Maarten E A

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a debilitating disease affecting a wide cross section of people around the world. The current therapy for depression is less than adequate and there is a considerable unmet need for more efficacious treatment. Dopamine has been shown to play a significant role in depression including production of anhedonia which has been one of the untreated symptoms in MDD. It has been hypothesized that drugs acting at all three monoamine transporters including dopamine transporter should provide more efficacious antidepressants activity. This has led to the development of triple reuptake inhibitor D-473 which is a novel pyran based molecule and interacts with all three monoamine transporters. The monoamine uptake inhibition activity in the cloned human transporters expressed in HEK-293 cells (70.4, 9.18 and 39.7 for DAT, SERT and NET, respectively) indicates a serotonin preferring triple reuptake inhibition profile for this drug. The drug D-473 exhibited good brain penetration and produced efficacious activity in rat forced swim test under oral administration. The optimal efficacy dose did not produce any locomotor activation. Microdialysis experiment demonstrated that systemic administration of D-473 elevated extracellular level of the three monoamines DA, 5-HT, and NE efficaciously in the dorsal lateral striatum (DLS) and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) area, indicating in vivo blockade of all three monoamine transporters by D-473. Thus, the current biological data from D-473 indicate potent antidepressant activity of the molecule.

  16. Serotonin syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Likasitwattanakul, Surachai

    2005-07-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a rare but potentially fatal complication of drugs that have effects on central nervous system serotonin. It is characterized by sudden onset of altered mental status, increased neuromuscular activity and autonomic instability. The author reports a child with suprasellar region tumor who presented with depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder and received a combination of sertaline (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) and clomipramine (tricyclic antidepressant). Symptoms of serotonin syndrome occurred within 24 hours after increasing the dose of sertaline. The patient's symptoms resolved rapidly with discontinuation of the offending drugs and supportive care.

  17. N-methyl-citalopram: A quaternary selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bismuth-Evenzal, Yona; Roz, Netta; Gurwitz, David; Rehavi, Moshe

    2010-11-15

    We describe the synthesis and the pharmacological characterization of a new quaternary selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) N-methyl-citalopram (NMC) with periphery restricted action due to its inability to cross the blood brain barrier. NMC recognized and blocked the human platelet serotonin transporter (SERT) with similar affinity to that of citalopram as was evident from competition binding studies with [(3)H]citalopram and uptake studies with [(3)H]5-HT. In contrast, the affinity of NMC to rat brain SERT was 10-fold lower than its parent compound citalopram. Similarly to citalopram, NMC did not inhibit dopamine and noradrenaline uptake in rat brain synaptosomes at 10(-7)M as well as [(3)H]ketanserin binding to rat brain membranes at 10(-5)M, demonstrating its SSRI profile. A comparison of radioactivity retained in perfused mice brain following in vivo intraperitoneal injections of tritium-labeled NMC or citalopram showed that unlike citalopram, NMC did not penetrate the brain. Taken together, our observations suggest that N-methyl-citalopram is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that does not penetrate the mouse brain. Epidemiological studies have suggested that chronic use of SSRI drugs may confer a protective effect against myocardial infarction (MI) apparently reflecting reduced platelet aggregation secondary to reduced platelet serotonin levels. N-methyl-citalopram may therefore have a potential as a new anti-platelet drug that does not cross the blood brain barrier and is thus devoid of the adverse CNS effects of SSRI drugs.

  18. Analysis of pre- and postsynaptic factors of the serotonin system in rabbit retina

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    [3H]Serotonin is accumulated by a specific set of amacrine cells in the rabbit retina. These cells also accumulate the neurotoxin, 5,7- dihydroxytryptamine, and show signs of necrosis within 4 h of in vivo exposure to the drug. Biochemical analysis of [3H]serotonin uptake reveal a sodium- and temperature-dependent, high affinity uptake system with a Km of 0.94 microM and Vmax of 1.08 pmol/mg protein/min. [3H]Tryptophan is also accumulated in rabbit retinal homogenates by a high affinity process. Accumulated [3H]serotonin is released in response to potassium-induced depolarization of intact, isolated retinas. In vitro binding studies of rabbit retinal homogenate membranes demonstrate specific sets of binding sites with characteristics of the postsynaptic serotonin receptor. These data strongly suggest that rabbit retina contains virtually all of the molecular components required for a functional serotonergic neurotransmitter system. The only significant difference between the serotonin system in rabbit retina and that in the well-established serotonin transmitter systems in nonmammalin retinas and in brains of most species is the relatively low concentration of endogenous serotonin in rabbit retinas, as demonstrated by high-performance liquid chromatography, histofluorescence, or immunocytochemistry. PMID:3965480

  19. A study of blood serotonin and serotonin transporter promoter variant (5-HTTLPR) polymorphism in Egyptian autistic children

    PubMed Central

    Meguid, Nagwa A.; Gebril, Ola H.; Khalil, Rehab O.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex, heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder with onset during early childhood. Most studies have reported an elevation in platelet serotonin in persons with autism. The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) transporter in the brain uptakes 5-HT from extracellular spaces. It is also present in platelets, where it takes up 5-HT from plasma. Polymorphisms in serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) were frequently studied in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Materials and Methods: We have measured the plasma 5-HT levels in 20 autistic male children and 20 control male children by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. In addition, the SLC6A4 promoter region (5-HTTLPR) insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism was studied, using whole genomic DNA. Results: Plasma serotonin was significantly low in autistic children compared to control (P = 0.001), although correlation to severity of autism was not significant. The frequency of short (S) allele in autism cases was 10% and in the control group it was absent. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated an increased prevalence of 5-HTTLPR S allele in autism subjects. Significantly decreased plasma serotonin was detected in autism subjects, with no significant relationship between 5-HTTLPR genotype and plasma 5-HT being evident. PMID:26015920

  20. Unraveling the modulatory actions of serotonin on male rat sexual responses.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Casillas, A; Rodríguez-Quintero, C M; Rodríguez-Manzo, G; Fernández-Guasti, A

    2015-08-01

    Animal studies and clinical investigations reveal that serotonin plays a central role in the control of the ejaculatory threshold. The chronic use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) frequently results in sexual dysfunction, inviting to analyze the modulatory actions of serotonin on male sexual function in depth. Even though the main effect of serotonin on male sexual responses is inhibitory, this neuromodulator also mediates brief important stimulatory actions. Serotonin (5-HT) can activate two intracellular signaling pathways: a lower-threshold facilitatory pathway, and a higher-threshold inhibitory pathway, leading to biphasic effects. We propose that these divergent actions are related to the stimulation or inhibition of glutamatergic and GABAergic interneurons. Experimental evidence suggests that low 5-HT concentrations produce stimulatory actions on male ejaculatory aspects that might be mediated by the blockade of the GABAergic neurotransmission in the MPOA and spinal cord, which in turn releases a tonic inhibition that allows other neurotransmitters such as glutamate, noradrenaline, oxytocin and dopamine to initiate a sequence of molecular events resulting in the expression of ejaculation. Similar serotonin actions, mediated via interneurons, have been proposed for the regulation of other processes and occur in many central nervous system areas, indicating that it is not an isolated phenomenon.

  1. Reduced serotonin synthesis and regional cerebral blood flow after anxiolytic treatment of social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Frick, Andreas; Åhs, Fredrik; Appel, Lieuwe; Jonasson, My; Wahlstedt, Kurt; Bani, Massimo; Merlo Pich, Emilio; Bettica, Paolo; Långström, Bengt; Lubberink, Mark; Fredrikson, Mats; Furmark, Tomas

    2016-11-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is associated with increased fear-related neural activity in the amygdala and we recently found enhanced serotonin synthesis rate in the same region. Anxiolytic agents like selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) antagonists reduce amygdala activity and may attenuate serotonin formation according to animal studies. Here, we examined the effects of SSRI pharmacotherapy, NK1R antagonism, and placebo on serotonin synthesis rate in relation to neural activity, measured as regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), and symptom improvement in SAD. Eighteen SAD patients were randomized to receive daily double-blind treatment for six weeks either with the SSRI citalopram (n=6; 40mg), the NK1R antagonist GR205171 (n=6; 5mg; 4 weeks following 2 weeks of placebo), or placebo (n=6). Serotonin synthesis rate at rest and rCBF during stressful public speaking were assessed, before and after treatment, using positron emission tomography with the tracers [(11)C]5-hydroxytryptophan and [(15)O]water respectively. The Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS-SR) indexed symptom severity. All groups exhibited attenuated amygdala serotonin synthesis rate after treatment, which was associated with reduced amygdala rCBF during public speaking and accompanied by symptom improvement. These results are consistent with the notion that serotonin in the amygdala exerts an anxiogenic influence and, conversely, that anxiolysis is achieved through decreased serotonin formation in the amygdala.

  2. Coulomb-blockade and Pauli-blockade magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Széchenyi, Gábor; Pályi, András

    2017-01-01

    Scanning-probe magnetometry is a valuable experimental tool to investigate magnetic phenomena at the micro- and nanoscale. We theoretically analyze the possibility of measuring magnetic fields via the electrical current flowing through quantum dots. We characterize the shot-noise-limited magnetic-field sensitivity of two devices: a single dot in the Coulomb blockade regime, and a double dot in the Pauli blockade regime. Constructing such magnetometers using carbon nanotube quantum dots would benefit from the large, strongly anisotropic and controllable g tensors, the low abundance of nuclear spins, and the small detection volume allowing for nanoscale spatial resolution; we estimate that a sensitivity below 1 μ T/√{Hz} can be achieved with this material. As quantum dots have already proven to be useful as scanning-probe electrometers, our proposal highlights their potential as hybrid sensors having in situ switching capability between electrical and magnetic sensing.

  3. Coulomb blockade in graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Sols, F; Guinea, F; Neto, A H

    2007-10-19

    We propose that recent transport experiments revealing the existence of an energy gap in graphene nanoribbons may be understood in terms of Coulomb blockade. Electron interactions play a decisive role at the quantum dots which form due to the presence of necks arising from the roughness of the graphene edge. With the average transmission as the only fitting parameter, our theory shows good agreement with the experimental data.

  4. Serotonin transporter and memory.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Alfredo; Perez-Garcia, Georgina; Ponce-Lopez, Teresa; Tellez, Ruth; Castillo, Carlos

    2011-09-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) has been associated to diverse functions and diseases, though seldom to memory. Therefore, we made an attempt to summarize and discuss the available publications implicating the involvement of the SERT in memory, amnesia and anti-amnesic effects. Evidence indicates that Alzheimer's disease and drugs of abuse like d-methamphetamine (METH) and (+/-)3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") have been associated to decrements in the SERT expression and memory deficits. Several reports have indicated that memory formation and amnesia affected the SERT expression. The SERT expression seems to be a reliable neural marker related to memory mechanisms, its alterations and potential treatment. The pharmacological, neural and molecular mechanisms associated to these changes are of great importance for investigation.

  5. Up-regulation of tryptophan hydroxylase expression and serotonin synthesis by sertraline.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Who; Park, So Yeon; Hwang, Onyou

    2002-04-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin is involved in a variety of brain functions, and abnormal changes in serotonin neurotransmission are associated with an array of psychiatric disorders, including depression. Sertraline is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and an effective antidepressant. Sertraline increases the serotonin concentration in the synaptic cleft by a short-term action; however, clinical improvement is observed only after several weeks, suggesting that the therapeutic effect may be caused by long-term alterations in serotonin transmission. We determined the effects of sertraline on serotonin synthesis in vivo and in vitro. Long-term treatment of rats with sertraline up-regulated mRNA and protein levels of the serotonin-synthesizing enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), as determined by in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry, respectively. In vitro studies using RBL-2H3 cells also showed an increase in mRNA and protein levels of TPH by sertraline, as determined by Northern blot and immunoblot analyses, respectively. This was accompanied by increases in the levels of TPH enzymatic activity and total serotonin. These data demonstrate that in addition to the known short-term action as an uptake blocker, sertraline also exerts a long-term effect on the serotonin neurotransmission by enhancing serotonin synthesis. A similar effect was observed with another SSRI, fluoxetine, but not with the non-SSRI chlorpromazine. The up-regulation of TPH gene expression by sertraline was attenuated by the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor N-[2-(p-bromocinnamylamine)-ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamine, suggesting that a mechanism involving the PKA signaling pathway might at least in part mediate the long-term therapeutic action.

  6. Dextromethorphan, chlorphenamine and serotonin toxicity: case report and systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Monte, Andrew A; Chuang, Ryan; Bodmer, Michael

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this review was to describe a patient with serotonin toxicity after an overdose of dextromethorphan and chlorphenamine and to perform a systematic literature review exploring whether dextromethorphan and chlorphenamine may be equally contributory in the development of serotonin toxicity in overdose. A Medline literature review was undertaken to identify cases of serotonin toxicity due to dextromethorphan and/or chlorphenamine. Case reports were included if they included information on the ingested dose or plasma concentrations of dextromethorphan and/or chlorphenamine, information about co-ingestions and detailed clinical information to evaluate for serotonin toxicity. Cases were reviewed by two toxicologists and serotonin toxicity, defined by the Hunter criteria, was diagnosed when appropriate. The literature was then reviewed to evaluate whether chlorphenamine may be a serotonergic agent. One hundred and fifty-five articles of dextromethorphan or chlorphenamine poisoning were identified. There were 23 case reports of dextromethorphan, of which 18 were excluded for lack of serotonin toxicity. No cases were identified in which serotonin toxicity could be solely attributed to chlorphenamine. This left six cases of dextrometorphane and/or chlorphenamine overdose, including our own, in which serotonin toxicity could be diagnosed based on the presented clinical information. In three of the six eligible cases dextromethorphan and chlorphenamine were the only overdosed drugs. There is substantial evidence from the literature that chlorphenamine is a similarly potent serotonin re-uptake inhibitor when compared with dextrometorphan. Chlorphenamine is a serotonergic medication and combinations of chlorphenamine and dextromethorphan may be dangerous in overdose due to an increased risk of serotonin toxicity. © 2010 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2010 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. Dextromethorphan, chlorphenamine and serotonin toxicity: case report and systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Monte, Andrew A; Chuang, Ryan; Bodmer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this review was to describe a patient with serotonin toxicity after an overdose of dextromethorphan and chlorphenamine and to perform a systematic literature review exploring whether dextromethorphan and chlorphenamine may be equally contributory in the development of serotonin toxicity in overdose. A Medline literature review was undertaken to identify cases of serotonin toxicity due to dextromethorphan and/or chlorphenamine. Case reports were included if they included information on the ingested dose or plasma concentrations of dextromethorphan and/or chlorphenamine, information about co-ingestions and detailed clinical information to evaluate for serotonin toxicity. Cases were reviewed by two toxicologists and serotonin toxicity, defined by the Hunter criteria, was diagnosed when appropriate. The literature was then reviewed to evaluate whether chlorphenamine may be a serotonergic agent. One hundred and fifty-five articles of dextromethorphan or chlorphenamine poisoning were identified. There were 23 case reports of dextromethorphan, of which 18 were excluded for lack of serotonin toxicity. No cases were identified in which serotonin toxicity could be solely attributed to chlorphenamine. This left six cases of dextrometorphane and/or chlorphenamine overdose, including our own, in which serotonin toxicity could be diagnosed based on the presented clinical information. In three of the six eligible cases dextromethorphan and chlorphenamine were the only overdosed drugs. There is substantial evidence from the literature that chlorphenamine is a similarly potent serotonin re-uptake inhibitor when compared with dextrometorphan. Chlorphenamine is a serotonergic medication and combinations of chlorphenamine and dextromethorphan may be dangerous in overdose due to an increased risk of serotonin toxicity. PMID:21175434

  8. Two Distinct Central Serotonin Receptors with Different Physiological Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Lebovitz, Richard M.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1981-05-01

    Two distinct serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) receptors designated serotonin 1 and serotonin 2 bind tritium-labeled serotonin and tritium-labeled spiroperidol, respectively. Drug potencies at serotonin 2 sites, but not at serotonin 1 sites, predict their effects on the ``serotonin behavioral syndrome,'' indicating that serotonin 2 sites mediate these behaviors. The limited correlation of drug effects with regulation by guanine nucleotides suggests that serotonin 1 sites might be linked to adenylate cyclase. Drug specificities of serotonin-elicited synaptic inhibition and excitation may reflect serotonin 1 and serotonin 2 receptor interactions, respectively.

  9. The serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram suppresses activity in the neonatal rat barrel cortex in vivo.

    PubMed

    Akhmetshina, Dinara; Zakharov, Andrei; Vinokurova, Daria; Nasretdinov, Azat; Valeeva, Guzel; Khazipov, Roustem

    2016-06-01

    Inhibition of serotonin uptake, which causes an increase in extracellular serotonin levels, disrupts the development of thalamocortical barrel maps in neonatal rodents. Previous in vitro studies have suggested that the disruptive effect of excessive serotonin on barrel map formation involves a depression at thalamocortical synapses. However, the effects of serotonin uptake inhibitors on the early thalamocortical activity patterns in the developing barrel cortex in vivo remain largely unknown. Here, using extracellular recordings of the local field potentials and multiple unit activity (MUA) we explored the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram (10-20mg/kg, intraperitoneally) on sensory evoked activity in the barrel cortex of neonatal (postnatal days P2-5) rats in vivo. We show that administration of citalopram suppresses the amplitude and prolongs the delay of the sensory evoked potentials, reduces the power and frequency of the early gamma oscillations, and suppresses sensory evoked and spontaneous neuronal firing. In the adolescent P21-29 animals, citalopram affected neither sensory evoked nor spontaneous activity in barrel cortex. We suggest that suppression of the early thalamocortical activity patterns contributes to the disruption of the barrel map development caused by SSRIs and other conditions elevating extracellular serotonin levels.

  10. Epigenetic Mechanisms of Serotonin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Terrell; González-Maeso, Javier

    2015-07-15

    Histone modifications and DNA methylation represent central dynamic and reversible processes that regulate gene expression and contribute to cellular phenotypes. These epigenetic marks have been shown to play fundamental roles in a diverse set of signaling and behavioral outcomes. Serotonin is a monoamine that regulates numerous physiological responses including those in the central nervous system. The cardinal signal transduction mechanisms via serotonin and its receptors are well established, but fundamental questions regarding complex interactions between the serotonin system and heritable epigenetic modifications that exert control on gene function remain a topic of intense research and debate. This review focuses on recent advances and contributions to our understanding of epigenetic mechanisms of serotonin receptor-dependent signaling, with focus on psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression.

  11. Effect of H1- and H2-histamine receptor blockade on postexercise insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Pellinger, Thomas K; Dumke, Breanna R; Halliwill, John R

    2013-01-01

    Following a bout of dynamic exercise, humans experience sustained postexercise vasodilatation in the previously exercised skeletal muscle which is mediated by activation of histamine (H1 and H2) receptors. Skeletal muscle glucose uptake is also enhanced following dynamic exercise. Our aim was to determine if blunting the vasodilatation during recovery from exercise would have an adverse effect on blood glucose regulation. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that insulin sensitivity following exercise would be reduced with H1- and H2-receptor blockade versus control (no blockade). We studied 20 healthy young subjects (12 exercise; eight nonexercise sham) on randomized control and H1- and H2-receptor blockade (fexofenadine and ranitidine) days. Following 60 min of upright cycling at 60% VO2 peak or nonexercise sham, subjects consumed an oral glucose tolerance beverage (1.0 g/kg). Blood glucose was determined from “arterialized” blood samples (heated hand vein). Postexercise whole-body insulin sensitivity (Matsuda insulin sensitivity index) was reduced 25% with H1- and H2-receptor blockade (P < 0.05), whereas insulin sensitivity was not affected by histamine receptor blockade in the sham trials. These results indicate that insulin sensitivity following exercise is blunted by H1- and H2-receptor blockade and suggest that postexercise H1- and H2-receptor–mediated skeletal muscle vasodilatation benefits glucose regulation in healthy humans. PMID:24303118

  12. Collective multiphoton blockade in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, C. J.; Yang, Y. P.; Agarwal, G. S.

    2017-06-01

    We present a study of collective multiphoton blockade in coherently driven atoms in a single-mode cavity. Considering two atoms strongly coupled to an optical cavity, we show that the two-photon blockade with two-photon antibunching, and the three-photon blockade with three-photon antibunching can be observed simultaneously. The three-photon blockade probes both dressed states in the two-photon and three-photon spaces. The two-photon and three-photon blockades strongly depend on the location of the two atoms in the strong-coupling regime. The asymmetry in the atom-cavity coupling constants opens pathways for multiphoton blockade which is also shown to be sensitive to the atomic decay and pumping strengths. The work presented here predicts many quantum statistical features due to the collective behavior of atoms and can be useful to generate nonclassical photon pairs.

  13. Platelet Serotonin Transporter Function Predicts Default-Mode Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kasess, Christian H.; Meyer, Bernhard M.; Hofmaier, Tina; Diers, Kersten; Bartova, Lucie; Pail, Gerald; Huf, Wolfgang; Uzelac, Zeljko; Hartinger, Beate; Kalcher, Klaudius; Perkmann, Thomas; Haslacher, Helmuth; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Kasper, Siegfried; Freissmuth, Michael; Windischberger, Christian; Willeit, Matthäus; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Esterbauer, Harald; Brocke, Burkhard; Moser, Ewald; Sitte, Harald H.; Pezawas, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Background The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT) from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence. Methods A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy subjects and maximal 5-HT uptake velocity (Vmax) was assessed in blood platelets. We used a mixed-effects multilevel analysis technique (MEMA) to test for linear relationships between whole-brain, blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activity and platelet Vmax. Results The present study demonstrates that increases in platelet Vmax significantly predict default-mode network (DMN) suppression in healthy subjects independent of genetic variation within SLC6A4. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses indicate that platelet Vmax is related to global DMN activation and not intrinsic DMN connectivity. Conclusion This study provides evidence that platelet Vmax predicts global DMN activation changes in healthy subjects. Given previous reports on platelet-synaptosomal Vmax coupling, results further suggest an important role of neuronal 5-HT reuptake in DMN regulation. PMID:24667541

  14. Depressed patients have decreased binding of tritiated imipramine to platelet serotonin ''transporter''

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, S.M.; Rehavi, M.; Skolnick, P.; Ballenger, J.C.; Goodwin, F.K.

    1981-12-01

    The high-affinity tritiated (3H) imipramine binding sites are functionally (and perhaps structurally) associated with the presynaptic neuronal and platelet uptake sites for serotonin. Since there is an excellent correlation between the relative potencies of a series of antidepressants in displacing 3H-imipramine from binding sites in human brain and platelet, we have examined the binding of 3H-imipramine to platelets from 14 depressed patients and 28 age- and sex-matched controls. A highly significant decrease in the number of 3H-imipramine binding sites, with no significant change in the apparent affinity constants, was observed in platelets from the depressed patients compared with the controls. These results, coupled with previous studies showing a significant decrease in the maximal uptake of serotonin in platelets from depressed patients, suggest that an inherited or acquired deficiency of the serotonin transport protein or proteins may be involved in the pathogenesis of depression.

  15. Serotonin transporter activity in platelets and canine aggression.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Belén; García-Belenguer, Sylvia; Palacio, Jorge; Chacón, Gema; Villegas, Ainara; Alcalde, Ana I

    2010-10-01

    Several studies have suggested an inhibitory action of the serotonergic system in the regulation of canine aggression, but the role of the serotonin (5-HT) transporter (5-HTT) has not been investigated. Platelet 5-HT uptake has been proposed as a peripheral marker of brain 5-HTT. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between platelet 5-HTT activity and canine aggression by measuring the rate of 5-HT uptake mediated by 5-HTT in platelets and serum concentrations of 5-HT in both aggressive (n=14) and non-aggressive dogs (n=17). Aggressive dogs showed significantly higher 5-HT uptake by 5-HTT in platelets and lower serum concentrations of 5-HT, compared with the control group. These results suggested an association between an alteration in the serotonergic system and canine aggression, possibly mediated by an increased 5-HT transport.

  16. Melatonin production: proteasomal proteolysis in serotonin N-acetyltransferase regulation.

    PubMed

    Gastel, J A; Roseboom, P H; Rinaldi, P A; Weller, J L; Klein, D C

    1998-02-27

    The nocturnal increase in circulating melatonin in vertebrates is regulated by 10- to 100-fold increases in pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) activity. Changes in the amount of AA-NAT protein were shown to parallel changes in AA-NAT activity. When neural stimulation was switched off by either light exposure or L-propranolol-induced beta-adrenergic blockade, both AA-NAT activity and protein decreased rapidly. Effects of L-propranolol were blocked in vitro by dibutyryl adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) or inhibitors of proteasomal proteolysis. This result indicates that adrenergic-cAMP regulation of AA-NAT is mediated by rapid reversible control of selective proteasomal proteolysis. Similar proteasome-based mechanisms may function widely as selective molecular switches in vertebrate neural systems.

  17. Unifying concept of serotonin transporter-associated currents.

    PubMed

    Schicker, Klaus; Uzelac, Zeljko; Gesmonde, Joan; Bulling, Simon; Stockner, Thomas; Freissmuth, Michael; Boehm, Stefan; Rudnick, Gary; Sitte, Harald H; Sandtner, Walter

    2012-01-02

    Serotonin (5-HT) uptake by the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) is driven by ion gradients. The stoichiometry of transported 5-HT and ions is predicted to result in electroneutral charge movement. However, hSERT mediates a current when challenged with 5-HT. This discrepancy can be accounted for by an uncoupled ion flux. Here, we investigated the mechanistic basis of the uncoupled currents and its relation to the conformational cycle of hSERT. Our observations support the conclusion that the conducting state underlying the uncoupled ion flux is in equilibrium with an inward facing state of the transporter with K+ bound. We identified conditions associated with accumulation of the transporter in inward facing conformations. Manipulations that increased the abundance of inward facing states resulted in enhanced steady-state currents. We present a comprehensive kinetic model of the transport cycle, which recapitulates salient features of the recorded currents. This study provides a framework for exploring transporter-associated currents.

  18. Association between serotonin transporter gene polymorphism and recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Manchanda, Aastha; Iyengar, Asha R.; Patil, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anxiety-related traits have been attributed to sequence variability in the genes coding for serotonin transmission in  the brain. Two alleles, termed long (L) and short (S) differing by 44 base pairs, are found in a polymorphism identified in the promoter region of serotonin transporter gene. The presence of the short allele  and SS and LS genotypes is found to be associated with the reduced expression of this gene decreasing the uptake of serotonin in the brain leading to various anxiety-related traits. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is an oral mucosal disease with varied etiology including the presence of stress, anxiety, and genetic influences. The present study aimed to determine this serotonin transporter gene polymorphism in patients with RAS and compare it with normal individuals. Materials and Methods: This study included 20 subjects with various forms of RAS and 20 normal healthy age- and gender-matched individuals. Desquamated oral mucosal cells were collected for DNA extraction and subjected to polymerase chain reaction for studying insertion/deletion in the 5-HTT gene-linked polymorphic region. Cross tabulations followed by Chi-square tests were performed to compare the significance of findings, P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The LS genotype was the most common genotype found in the subjects with aphthous stomatitis (60%) and controls (40%). The total percentage of LS and SS genotypes and the frequency of S allele were found to be higher in the subjects with aphthous stomatitis as compared to the control group although a statistically significant correlation could not be established, P = 0.144 and 0.371, respectively. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, occurrence of RAS was not found to be associated with polymorphic promoter region in serotonin transporter gene. PMID:27274339

  19. Association between serotonin transporter gene polymorphism and recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Manchanda, Aastha; Iyengar, Asha R; Patil, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety-related traits have been attributed to sequence variability in the genes coding for serotonin transmission in  the brain. Two alleles, termed long (L) and short (S) differing by 44 base pairs, are found in a polymorphism identified in the promoter region of serotonin transporter gene. The presence of the short allele  and SS and LS genotypes is found to be associated with the reduced expression of this gene decreasing the uptake of serotonin in the brain leading to various anxiety-related traits. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is an oral mucosal disease with varied etiology including the presence of stress, anxiety, and genetic influences. The present study aimed to determine this serotonin transporter gene polymorphism in patients with RAS and compare it with normal individuals. This study included 20 subjects with various forms of RAS and 20 normal healthy age- and gender-matched individuals. Desquamated oral mucosal cells were collected for DNA extraction and subjected to polymerase chain reaction for studying insertion/deletion in the 5-HTT gene-linked polymorphic region. Cross tabulations followed by Chi-square tests were performed to compare the significance of findings, P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The LS genotype was the most common genotype found in the subjects with aphthous stomatitis (60%) and controls (40%). The total percentage of LS and SS genotypes and the frequency of S allele were found to be higher in the subjects with aphthous stomatitis as compared to the control group although a statistically significant correlation could not be established, P = 0.144 and 0.371, respectively. Within the limitations of this study, occurrence of RAS was not found to be associated with polymorphic promoter region in serotonin transporter gene.

  20. Facilitation of Serotonin Signaling by SSRIs is Attenuated by Social Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Dankoski, Elyse C; Agster, Kara L; Fox, Megan E; Moy, Sheryl S; Wightman, R Mark

    2014-01-01

    Hypofunction of the serotonergic system is often associated with major depression and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly prescribed to treat these disorders, and require 3–6 weeks of chronic treatment before improvements in the symptoms are observed. SSRIs inhibit serotonin's transporter, and in doing so, increase extracellular serotonin concentrations. Thus, efficacy of SSRIs likely depends upon the brain's adaptive response to sustained increases in serotonin levels. Individual responsiveness to SSRI treatment may depend on a variety of factors that influence these changes, including ongoing stress. Social isolation is a passive, naturalistic form of chronic mild stress that can model depression in rodents. In this study, we examined how 20-day treatment with the SSRI citalopram (CIT) alters marble-burying (MB), open field behavior, and serotonin signaling in single- vs pair-housed animals. We used in vivo voltammetry to measure electrically evoked serotonin, comparing release rate, net overflow, and clearance. Pair-housed mice were significantly more responsive to CIT treatment, exhibiting reduced MB and facilitation of serotonin release that positively correlated with the frequency of electrical stimulation. These effects of CIT treatment were attenuated in single-housed mice. Notably, although CIT treatment enhanced serotonin release in pair-housed mice, it did not significantly alter uptake rate. In summary, we report that chronic SSRI treatment facilitates serotonin release in a frequency-dependent manner, and this effect is blocked by social isolation. These findings suggest that the efficacy of SSRIs in treating depression and OCD may depend on ongoing stressors during treatment. PMID:24981046

  1. Facilitation of serotonin signaling by SSRIs is attenuated by social isolation.

    PubMed

    Dankoski, Elyse C; Agster, Kara L; Fox, Megan E; Moy, Sheryl S; Wightman, R Mark

    2014-12-01

    Hypofunction of the serotonergic system is often associated with major depression and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly prescribed to treat these disorders, and require 3-6 weeks of chronic treatment before improvements in the symptoms are observed. SSRIs inhibit serotonin's transporter, and in doing so, increase extracellular serotonin concentrations. Thus, efficacy of SSRIs likely depends upon the brain's adaptive response to sustained increases in serotonin levels. Individual responsiveness to SSRI treatment may depend on a variety of factors that influence these changes, including ongoing stress. Social isolation is a passive, naturalistic form of chronic mild stress that can model depression in rodents. In this study, we examined how 20-day treatment with the SSRI citalopram (CIT) alters marble-burying (MB), open field behavior, and serotonin signaling in single- vs pair-housed animals. We used in vivo voltammetry to measure electrically evoked serotonin, comparing release rate, net overflow, and clearance. Pair-housed mice were significantly more responsive to CIT treatment, exhibiting reduced MB and facilitation of serotonin release that positively correlated with the frequency of electrical stimulation. These effects of CIT treatment were attenuated in single-housed mice. Notably, although CIT treatment enhanced serotonin release in pair-housed mice, it did not significantly alter uptake rate. In summary, we report that chronic SSRI treatment facilitates serotonin release in a frequency-dependent manner, and this effect is blocked by social isolation. These findings suggest that the efficacy of SSRIs in treating depression and OCD may depend on ongoing stressors during treatment.

  2. Interactions of β-lactoglobulin with serotonin and arachidonyl serotonin.

    PubMed

    Taheri-Kafrani, Asghar; Choiset, Yvan; Faizullin, Dzhigangir A; Zuev, Yuri F; Bezuglov, Vladimir V; Chobert, Jean-Marc; Bordbar, Abdol-Khalegh; Haertlé, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    β-Lactoglobulin (β-LG) is a lipocalin, which is the major whey protein of cow's milk and the milk of other mammals. However, it is absent from human milk. The biological function of β-LG is not clear, but its potential role in carrying fatty acids through the digestive tract has been suggested. β-LG has been found in complexes with lipids such as butyric and oleic acids and has a high affinity for a wide variety of compounds. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), an important compound found in animals and plants, has various functions, including the regulation of mood, appetite, sleep, muscle contraction, and some cognitive functions such as memory and learning. In this study, the interaction of serotonin and one of its derivatives, arachidonyl serotonin (AA-5HT), with β-LG was investigated using circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence intensity measurements. These two ligands interact with β-LG forming equimolar complexes. The binding constant for the serotonin/β-LG interaction is between 10⁵ and 10⁶ M(-1) , whereas for the AA-5HT/β-LG complex it is between 10⁴ and 10⁵ M(-1) as determined by measurements of either protein or ligand fluorescence. The observed binding affinities were higher in hydroethanolic media (25% EtOH). The interactions between serotonin/β-LG and AA-5HT/β-LG may compete with self-association (micellization) of both the ligand and the protein. According to far- and near-UV CD results, these ligands have no apparent influence on β-LG secondary structure, however they partially destabilize its tertiary structure. Their binding by β-LG may be one of the peripheral mechanisms of the regulation of the content of serotonin and its derivatives in the bowel of milk-fed animals.

  3. Serotonin, Inhibition, and Negative Mood

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Peter; Huys, Quentin J. M

    2008-01-01

    Pavlovian predictions of future aversive outcomes lead to behavioral inhibition, suppression, and withdrawal. There is considerable evidence for the involvement of serotonin in both the learning of these predictions and the inhibitory consequences that ensue, although less for a causal relationship between the two. In the context of a highly simplified model of chains of affectively charged thoughts, we interpret the combined effects of serotonin in terms of pruning a tree of possible decisions, (i.e., eliminating those choices that have low or negative expected outcomes). We show how a drop in behavioral inhibition, putatively resulting from an experimentally or psychiatrically influenced drop in serotonin, could result in unexpectedly large negative prediction errors and a significant aversive shift in reinforcement statistics. We suggest an interpretation of this finding that helps dissolve the apparent contradiction between the fact that inhibition of serotonin reuptake is the first-line treatment of depression, although serotonin itself is most strongly linked with aversive rather than appetitive outcomes and predictions. PMID:18248087

  4. Serotonin neurotransmission in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2012-09-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) show extreme dieting weight loss, hyperactivity, depression/anxiety, self-control, and behavioral impulsivity. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) is involved in almost all the behavioral changes observed in AN patients. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute toward the pathogenesis of AN. It is a frequent disorder among adolescent girls and young women and starts as an attempt to lose weight to look beautiful and attractive. Failure to see the turning point when fasting becomes unreasonable leads to malnutrition and AN. Tryptophan, the precursor of serotonin and an essential amino acid, is only available in the diet. It is therefore likely that excessive diet restriction and malnutrition decrease brain serotonin stores because the precursor is less available to the rate-limiting enzyme of 5-HT biosynthesis, which normally exists unsaturated with its substrate. Evidence shows that diet restriction-induced exaggerated feedback control over 5-HT synthesis and the smaller availability of tryptophan decreases serotonin neurotransmission at postsynaptic sites, leading to hyperactivity, depression, and behavioral impulsivity. A compensatory upregulation of postsynaptic 5-HT-1A receptors and hypophagic serotonin receptors may be involved in anxiety and suppression of appetite. It is suggested that tryptophan supplementation may improve pharmacotherapy in AN.

  5. Imaging neurotransmitter uptake and depletion in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, W. |; Haydon, P.G.; Yeung, E.S.

    1997-08-01

    An ultraviolet (UV) laser-based optical microscope and charge-coupled device (CCD) detection system was used to obtain chemical images of biological cells. Subcellular structures can be easily seen in both optical and fluorescence images. Laser-induced native fluorescence detection provides high sensitivity and low limits of detection, and it does not require coupling to fluorescent dyes. We were able to quantitatively monitor serotonin that has been taken up into and released from individual astrocytes on the basis of its native fluorescence. Different regions of the cells took up different amounts of serotonin with a variety of uptake kinetics. Similarly, we observed different serotonin depletion dynamics in different astrocyte regions. There were also some astrocyte areas where no serotonin uptake or depletion was observed. Potential applications include the mapping of other biogenic species in cells as well as the ability to image their release from specific regions of cells in response to external stimuli. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  6. Residual neuromuscular blockade in critical care.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jason; Collins, Angela S; Rowan, Brea O

    2012-06-01

    Neuromuscular blockade is a pharmacological adjunct for anesthesia and for surgical interventions. Neuromuscular blockers can facilitate ease of instrumentation and reduce complications associated with intubation. An undesirable sequela of these agents is residual neuromuscular blockade. Residual neuromuscular blockade is linked to aspiration, diminished response to hypoxia, and obstruction of the upper airway that may occur soon after extubation. If an operation is particularly complex or requires a long anesthesia time, residual neuromuscular blockade can contribute to longer stays in the intensive care unit and more hours of mechanical ventilation. Given the risks of this medication class, it is essential to have an understanding of the mechanism of action of, assessment of, and factors affecting blockade and to be able to identify factors that affect pharmacokinetics.

  7. Hindbrain serotonin and the rapid induction of sodium appetite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menani, J. V.; De Luca, L. A. Jr; Thunhorst, R. L.; Johnson, A. K.

    2000-01-01

    Both systemically administered furosemide and isoproterenol produce water intake (i.e., thirst). Curiously, however, in light of the endocrine and hemodynamic effects produced by these treatments, they are remarkably ineffective in eliciting intake of hypertonic saline solutions (i.e., operationally defined as sodium appetite). Recent work indicates that bilateral injections of the serotonin receptor antagonist methysergide into the lateral parabrachial nuclei (LPBN) markedly enhance a preexisting sodium appetite. The present studies establish that a de novo sodium appetite can be induced with LPBN-methysergide treatment under experimental conditions in which only water is typically ingested. The effects of bilateral LPBN injections of methysergide were studied on the intake of water and 0. 3 M NaCl following acute (beginning 1 h after treatment) diuretic (furosemide)-induced sodium and water depletion and following subcutaneous isoproterenol treatment. With vehicle injected into the LPBN, furosemide treatment and isoproterenol injection both caused water drinking but essentially no intake of hypertonic saline. In contrast, bilateral treatment of the LPBN with methysergide induced the intake of 0.3 M NaCl after subcutaneous furosemide and isoproterenol. Water intake induced by subcutaneous furosemide or isoproterenol was not changed by LPBN-methysergide injections. The results indicate that blockade of LPBN-serotonin receptors produces a marked intake of hypertonic NaCl (i.e., a de novo sodium appetite) after furosemide treatment as well as subcutaneous isoproterenol.

  8. Hindbrain serotonin and the rapid induction of sodium appetite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menani, J. V.; De Luca, L. A. Jr; Thunhorst, R. L.; Johnson, A. K.

    2000-01-01

    Both systemically administered furosemide and isoproterenol produce water intake (i.e., thirst). Curiously, however, in light of the endocrine and hemodynamic effects produced by these treatments, they are remarkably ineffective in eliciting intake of hypertonic saline solutions (i.e., operationally defined as sodium appetite). Recent work indicates that bilateral injections of the serotonin receptor antagonist methysergide into the lateral parabrachial nuclei (LPBN) markedly enhance a preexisting sodium appetite. The present studies establish that a de novo sodium appetite can be induced with LPBN-methysergide treatment under experimental conditions in which only water is typically ingested. The effects of bilateral LPBN injections of methysergide were studied on the intake of water and 0. 3 M NaCl following acute (beginning 1 h after treatment) diuretic (furosemide)-induced sodium and water depletion and following subcutaneous isoproterenol treatment. With vehicle injected into the LPBN, furosemide treatment and isoproterenol injection both caused water drinking but essentially no intake of hypertonic saline. In contrast, bilateral treatment of the LPBN with methysergide induced the intake of 0.3 M NaCl after subcutaneous furosemide and isoproterenol. Water intake induced by subcutaneous furosemide or isoproterenol was not changed by LPBN-methysergide injections. The results indicate that blockade of LPBN-serotonin receptors produces a marked intake of hypertonic NaCl (i.e., a de novo sodium appetite) after furosemide treatment as well as subcutaneous isoproterenol.

  9. Detecting phonon blockade with photons

    SciTech Connect

    Didier, Nicolas; Pugnetti, Stefano; Fazio, Rosario; Blanter, Yaroslav M.

    2011-08-01

    Measuring the quantum dynamics of a mechanical system, when few phonons are involved, remains a challenge. We show that a superconducting microwave resonator linearly coupled to the mechanical mode constitutes a very powerful probe for this scope. This new coupling can be much stronger than the usual radiation pressure interaction by adjusting a gate voltage. We focus on the detection of phonon blockade, showing that it can be observed by measuring the statistics of the light in the cavity. The underlying reason is the formation of an entangled state between the two resonators. Our scheme realizes a phonotonic Josephson junction, giving rise to coherent oscillations between phonons and photons as well as a self-trapping regime for a coupling smaller than a critical value. The transition from the self-trapping to the oscillating regime is also induced dynamically by dissipation.

  10. Approach to novel functional foods for stress control 4. Regulation of serotonin transporter by food factors.

    PubMed

    Ito, Mikiko; Haito, Sakiko; Furumoto, Mari; Kawai, Yoshichika; Terao, Junji; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi

    2005-11-01

    Serotonin transporters (SERTs) are pre-synaptic proteins specialized for the clearance of serotonin following vesicular release at central nervous system (CNS) and enteric nervous system synapses. SERTs are high affinity targets in vivo for antidepressants such as serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). These include 'medical' psychopharmacological agents such as analgesics and antihistamines, a plant extract called St John's Wort (Hypericum). Osteoclasts are the primary cells responsible for bone resorption. They arise by the differentiation of osteoclast precursors of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. The expression of SERTs was increased in RANKL-induced osteoclast-like cells. Using RANKL stimulation of RAW264.7 cells as a model system for osteoclast differentiation, we studied the direct effects of food factor on serotonin uptake. The SSRIs (fluoxetine and fluvoxamine) inhibited markedly (approximately 95%) in serotonin transport in differentiated osteoclast cells. The major components of St. John's Wort, hyperforin and hypericine were significantly decreased in serotonin transport activity. Thus, a new in vitro model using RANKL-induced osteoclast-like cells may be useful to analyze the regulation of SERT by food factors and SSRIs.

  11. Serotonin upregulates the activity of phagocytosis through 5-HT1A receptors

    PubMed Central

    Freire-Garabal, M; Núñez, M J; Balboa, J; López-Delgado, P; Gallego, R; García-Caballero, T; Fernández-Roel, M D; Brenlla, J; Rey-Méndez, M

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether serotonin could regulate the in vitro activity of phagocytosis through 5-hydroxytryptamine or serotonin (5-HT1A) receptors. Mouse peritoneal macrophages were cultured with serotonin and the activity of phagocytosis was assessed by the uptake of zymosan and latex particles added to the culture media. Specific binding of [3H]8-OH-DPAT and immunohistochemistry using an affinity-purified anti-5-HT1A-receptor antibody were assayed in the macrophages. In addition, we took advantage of the availability of pharmacological inhibitors of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) to explore its role in the regulation of the 5-HT1A receptor. Serotonin increased the in vitro activity of phagocytosis in a dose-dependent manner. The 5-HT1A receptor agonist (±)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propyl-amino)-tetralin (R(+)-8-OH-DPAT) reproduced these effects. Serotonin- or R(+)-8-OH-DPAT-induced increases in phagocytosis were blocked by the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY100635 and the NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate. Moreover, mouse peritoneal macrophages expressed specific binding sites for [3H]8-OH-DPAT when cultivated in the presence of zymosan or latex beads. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the expression of the 5-HT1A receptor protein in the macrophages. These results show that serotonin can upregulate the activity of peritoneal macrophages through 5-HT1A receptors. PMID:12770951

  12. Role of melatonin, serotonin 2B, and serotonin 2C receptors in modulating the firing activity of rat dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Chenu, Franck; Shim, Stacey; El Mansari, Mostafa; Blier, Pierre

    2014-02-01

    Melatonin has been widely used for the management of insomnia, but is devoid of antidepressant effect in the clinic. In contrast, agomelatine which is a potent melatonin receptor agonist is an effective antidepressant. It is, however, a potent serotonin 2B (5-HT(2B)) and serotonin 2C (5-HT(2C)) receptor antagonist as well. The present study was aimed at investigating the in vivo effects of repeated administration of melatonin (40 mg/kg/day), the 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist SB 242084 (0.5 mg/kg/day), the selective 5-HT(2B) receptor antagonist LY 266097 (0.6 mg/kg/day) and their combination on ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA), locus coeruleus (LC) norepinephrine (NE), and dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) serotonin (5-HT) firing activity. Administration of melatonin twice daily increased the number of spontaneously active DA neurons but left the firing of NE neurons unaltered. Long-term administration of melatonin and SB 242084, by themselves, had no effect on the firing rate and burst parameters of 5-HT and DA neurons. Their combination, however, enhanced only the number of spontaneously active DA neurons, while leaving the firing of 5-HT neurons unchanged. The addition of LY 266097, which by itself is devoid of effect, to the previous regimen increased for DA neurons the number of bursts per minute and the percentage of spikes occurring in bursts. In conclusion, the combination of melatonin receptor activation as well as 5-HT(2C) receptor blockade resulted in a disinhibition of DA neurons. When 5-HT(2B) receptors were also blocked, the firing and the bursting activity of DA neurons were both enhanced, thus reproducing the effect of agomelatine.

  13. Differences in serotonin transporter binding affinity in patients with major depressive disorder and night eating syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, J D; Amsterdam, J; Newberg, A; Allison, K C; Wintering, N; Stunkard, A J

    2009-03-01

    We examined serotonin transporter (SERT) binding affinity using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and night eating syndrome (NES). There are similarities between MDD and NES in affective symptoms, appetite disturbance, nighttime awakenings, and, particularly, response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Six non-depressed patients with NES and seven patients with MDD underwent SPECT brain imaging with 123I-ADAM, a radiopharmaceutical agent selective for SERT sites. Uptake ratios of 123I-ADAM SERT binding were obtained for the midbrain, basal ganglia, and temporal lobe regions compared to the cerebellum reference region. Patients with NES had significantly greater SERT uptake ratios (effect size range 0.64-0.84) in the midbrain, right temporal lobe, and left temporal lobe regions than those with MDD whom we had previously studied. Pathophysiological differences in SERT uptake between patients with NES and MDD suggest these are distinct clinical syndromes.

  14. Internalization of Tissue Factor-Rich Microvesicles by Platelets Occurs Independently of GPIIb-IIIa, and Involves CD36 Receptor, Serotonin Transporter and Cytoskeletal Assembly.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Vilchez, Irene; Diaz-Ricart, Maribel; Galan, Ana M; Roque, Merce; Caballo, Carolina; Molina, Patricia; White, James G; Escolar, Gines

    2016-02-01

    Platelets are important in hemostasis, but also detect particles and pathogens in the circulation. Phagocytic and endocytic activities of platelets are widely recognized; however, receptors and mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. We previously demonstrated that platelets internalize and store phospholipid microvesicles enriched in human tissue factor (TF+MVs) and that platelet-associated TF enhances thrombus formation at sites of vascular damage. Here, we investigate the mechanisms implied in the interactions of TF+MVs with platelets and the effects of specific inhibitory strategies. Aggregometry and electron microscopy were used to assess platelet activation and TF+MVs uptake. Cytoskeletal assembly and activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and RhoA were analyzed by western blot and ELISA. Exposure of platelets to TF+MVs caused reversible platelet aggregation, actin polymerization and association of contractile proteins to the cytoskeleton being maximal at 1 min. The same kinetics were observed for activation of PI3K and translocation of RhoA to the cytoskeleton. Inhibitory strategies to block glycoprotein IIb-IIIa (GPIIb-IIIa), scavenger receptor CD36, serotonin transporter (SERT) and PI3K, fully prevented platelet aggregation by TF+MVs. Ultrastructural techniques revealed that uptake of TF+MVs was efficiently prevented by anti-CD36 and SERT inhibitor, but only moderately interfered by GPIIb-IIIa blockade. We conclude that internalization of TF+MVs by platelets occurs independently of receptors related to their main hemostatic function (GPIIb-IIIa), involves the scavenger receptor CD36, SERT and engages PI3-Kinase activation and cytoskeletal assembly. CD36 and SERT appear as potential therapeutic targets to interfere with the association of TF+MVs with platelets and possibly downregulate their prothrombotic phenotype.

  15. Serotonin Increases Cilia-Driven Particle Transport via an Acetylcholine-Independent Pathway in the Mouse Trachea

    PubMed Central

    Krasteva, Gabriela; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Background Mucociliary clearance in the airways is driven by the coordinated beating of ciliated cells. Classical neuromediators such as noradrenalin and acetylcholine increase ciliary beat frequency and thus cilia-driven transport. Despite the fact that the neuromediator serotonin is ciliostimulatory in invertebrates and has been implied in releasing acetylcholine from the airway epithelium, its role in regulating cilia function in vertebrate airways is not established. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined the effects of serotonin on ciliary beat frequency and cilia-driven particle transport in the acutely excised submerged mouse trachea and determined the sources of serotonin in this tissue by immunohistochemistry. Serotonin (100 µM) increased cilary beat frequency (8.9±1.2 Hz to 17.0±2.7 Hz) and particle transport speed (38.9±4.6 µm/s to 83.4±8.3 µm/s) to an extent that was comparable to a supramaximal dose of ATP. The increase in particle transport speed was totally prevented by methysergide (100 µM). Blockade of muscarinic receptors by atropine (1 µM) did not reduce the effect of serotonin, although it was effective in preventing the increase in particle transport speed mediated by muscarine (100 µM). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated serotonin in mast cells pointing towards mast cells and platelets as possible endogenous sources of serotonin. Conclusions/Significance These results indicate that serotonin is a likely endogenous mediator that can increase cilia-driven transport independent from acetylcholine during activation of mast cells and platelets. PMID:19290057

  16. Serotonin and Blood Pressure Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Shaun F.; Davis, Robert Patrick; Barman, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) was discovered more than 60 years ago as a substance isolated from blood. The neural effects of 5-HT have been well investigated and understood, thanks in part to the pharmacological tools available to dissect the serotonergic system and the development of the frequently prescribed selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors. By contrast, our understanding of the role of 5-HT in the control and modification of blood pressure pales in comparison. Here we focus on the role of 5-HT in systemic blood pressure control. This review provides an in-depth study of the function and pharmacology of 5-HT in those tissues that can modify blood pressure (blood, vasculature, heart, adrenal gland, kidney, brain), with a focus on the autonomic nervous system that includes mechanisms of action and pharmacology of 5-HT within each system. We compare the change in blood pressure produced in different species by short- and long-term administration of 5-HT or selective serotonin receptor agonists. To further our understanding of the mechanisms through which 5-HT modifies blood pressure, we also describe the blood pressure effects of commonly used drugs that modify the actions of 5-HT. The pharmacology and physiological actions of 5-HT in modifying blood pressure are important, given its involvement in circulatory shock, orthostatic hypotension, serotonin syndrome and hypertension. PMID:22407614

  17. Serotonin and GI clinical disorders.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Robin

    2008-11-01

    Serotonin is widely distributed throughout the gut within both the enteric nerves and enterochromaffin (EC) cells. EC cells are located in the gut mucosa with maximal numbers in the duodenum and rectum where they act as signal transducers, responding to pressure and luminal substances both bacterial and dietary. Activation leads to serotonin release which acts on a range of receptors on mucosal afferent and myenteric interneurones to initiate secretomotor reflexes. These cause nausea and vomiting as well as intestinal secretion, propulsion and if pronounced, diarrhoea. Inflammation in animal models acts via T lymphocytes to increase EC cell numbers and mucosal serotonin (5-HT) content while inflammatory cytokines decrease serotonin transporter (SERT) function. Inflammation due to coeliac disease and following gastrointestinal infection increases mucosal 5-HT availability by a combination of increased EC cells and depressed SERT. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) developing after gastrointestinal infection and IBS with diarrhoea is associated with excess 5-HT. The associated diarrhoeal symptoms respond well to 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists. These drugs also inhibit the nausea and vomiting occurring in patients undergoing chemotherapy which cause a marked increase in release of 5-HT as well as other mediators. Other conditions including IBS-C and constipation may have inadequate 5-HT release and benefit from both 5-HT(3) and 5-HT(4) receptor agonists.

  18. Serotonin and Aggressiveness in Chickens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Serotonin (5-HT) regulates aggressive behavior in animals. This study examined if 5-HT regulation of aggressiveness is gene-dependent. Chickens from two divergently selected lines KGB and MBB (Kind Gentle Birds and Mean Bad Birds displaying low and high aggressiveness, respectively) and DXL (Dekalb ...

  19. Lethal effect of the serotonin-xylocaineR association in ganglion-blocked rats.

    PubMed

    Valle, L B; Oliveira-Filho, R M; Armonia, P L; Saraceni, G; Nassif, M; De Lucia, R

    1976-12-01

    In rats anestetized with urethane and under ganglionic blockade by hexamethonium (20 mg/kg, i.v.), the i.v. injection of serotonin (60 mug/kg) determined apnea, ECG alterations and a brief hypotensive response which is similar to that as elicited when 5-HT is given to intact rats. During the hypertension which follows that initial response, apnea is still present along with more severe ECG changes. After that, blood pressure falls into a prolonged hypotension, which is invariably accompanied by death. Neither norepinephrine, nor respiratory analeptics (CoramineR, RemeflinF) were able to prevent the fatal outcome. Only artificial respiration was found to be useful in some instances. It was concluded that the association serotonin plus lidocaine becomes lethal when given to ganglion-blocked rate, and this toxic effect can be ascribed mainly to the respiratory depressor activity of the drugs.

  20. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    Many antidepressants inhibit serotonin or norepinephrine reuptake or both to achieve their clinical effect. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class of antidepressants (SSRIs) includes citalopram, escitalopram (active enantiomer of citalopram), fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. The SSRIs are as effective as tricyclic antidepressants in treatment of major depression with less significant side effects. As a result, they have become the largest class of medications prescribed to humans for depression. They are also used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorders, alcoholism, obesity, migraines, and chronic pain. An SSRI (fluoxetine) has been approved for veterinary use in treatment of canine separation anxiety. SSRIs act specifically on synaptic serotonin concentrations by blocking its reuptake in the presynapse and increasing levels in the presynaptic membrane. Clinical signs of SSRI overdose result from excessive amounts of serotonin in the central nervous system. These signs include nausea, vomiting, mydriasis, hypersalivation, and hyperthermia. Clinical signs are dose dependent and higher dosages may result in the serotonin syndrome that manifests itself as ataxia, tremors, muscle rigidity, hyperthermia, diarrhea, and seizures. Current studies reveal no increase in appearance of any specific clinical signs of serotonin toxicity with regard to any SSRI medication. In people, citalopram has been reported to have an increased risk of electrocardiographic abnormalities. Diagnosis of SSRI poisoning is based on history, clinical signs, and response to therapy. No single clinical test is currently available to confirm SSRI toxicosis. The goals of treatment in this intoxication are to support the animal, prevent further absorption of the drug, support the central nervous system, control hyperthermia, and halt any seizure activity. The relative safety of the SSRIs in overdose despite the occurrence of serotonin syndrome makes them

  1. Serotonin release varies with brain tryptophan levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    This study examines directly the effects on serotonin release of varying brain tryptophan levels within the physiologic range. It also addresses possible interactions between tryptophan availability and the frequency of membrane depolarization in controlling serotonin release. We demonstrate that reducing tryptophan levels in rat hypothalamic slices (by superfusing them with medium supplemented with 100 microM leucine) decreases tissue serotonin levels as well as both the spontaneous and the electrically-evoked serotonin release. Conversely, elevating tissue tryptophan levels (by superfusing slices with medium supplemented with 2 microM tryptophan) increases both the tissue serotonin levels and the serotonin release. Serotonin release was found to be affected independently by the tryptophan availability and the frequency of electrical field-stimulation (1-5 Hz), since increasing both variables produced nearly additive increases in release. These observations demonstrate for the first time that both precursor-dependent elevations and reductions in brain serotonin levels produce proportionate changes in serotonin release, and that the magnitude of the tryptophan effect is unrelated to neuronal firing frequency. The data support the hypothesis that serotonin release is proportionate to intracellular serotonin levels.

  2. Serotonin release varies with brain tryptophan levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    This study examines directly the effects on serotonin release of varying brain tryptophan levels within the physiologic range. It also addresses possible interactions between tryptophan availability and the frequency of membrane depolarization in controlling serotonin release. We demonstrate that reducing tryptophan levels in rat hypothalamic slices (by superfusing them with medium supplemented with 100 microM leucine) decreases tissue serotonin levels as well as both the spontaneous and the electrically-evoked serotonin release. Conversely, elevating tissue tryptophan levels (by superfusing slices with medium supplemented with 2 microM tryptophan) increases both the tissue serotonin levels and the serotonin release. Serotonin release was found to be affected independently by the tryptophan availability and the frequency of electrical field-stimulation (1-5 Hz), since increasing both variables produced nearly additive increases in release. These observations demonstrate for the first time that both precursor-dependent elevations and reductions in brain serotonin levels produce proportionate changes in serotonin release, and that the magnitude of the tryptophan effect is unrelated to neuronal firing frequency. The data support the hypothesis that serotonin release is proportionate to intracellular serotonin levels.

  3. Role of serotonin in fish reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Parvathy; Ogawa, Satoshi; Parhar, Ishwar S.

    2015-01-01

    The neuroendocrine mechanism regulates reproduction through the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis which is evolutionarily conserved in vertebrates. The HPG axis is regulated by a variety of internal as well as external factors. Serotonin, a monoamine neurotransmitter, is involved in a wide range of reproductive functions. In mammals, serotonin regulates sexual behaviors, gonadotropin release and gonadotropin-release hormone (GnRH) secretion. However, the serotonin system in teleost may also play unique role in the control of reproduction as the mechanism of reproductive control in teleosts is not always the same as in the mammalian models. In fish, the serotonin system is also regulated by natural environmental factors as well as chemical substances. In particular, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly detected as pharmaceutical contaminants in the natural environment. Those factors may influence fish reproductive functions via the serotonin system. This review summarizes the functional significance of serotonin in the teleosts reproduction. PMID:26097446

  4. Role of serotonin in fish reproduction.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Parvathy; Ogawa, Satoshi; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2015-01-01

    The neuroendocrine mechanism regulates reproduction through the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis which is evolutionarily conserved in vertebrates. The HPG axis is regulated by a variety of internal as well as external factors. Serotonin, a monoamine neurotransmitter, is involved in a wide range of reproductive functions. In mammals, serotonin regulates sexual behaviors, gonadotropin release and gonadotropin-release hormone (GnRH) secretion. However, the serotonin system in teleost may also play unique role in the control of reproduction as the mechanism of reproductive control in teleosts is not always the same as in the mammalian models. In fish, the serotonin system is also regulated by natural environmental factors as well as chemical substances. In particular, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly detected as pharmaceutical contaminants in the natural environment. Those factors may influence fish reproductive functions via the serotonin system. This review summarizes the functional significance of serotonin in the teleosts reproduction.

  5. Platelet-Derived Serotonin Mediates Liver Regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesurtel, Mickael; Graf, Rolf; Aleil, Boris; Walther, Diego J.; Tian, Yinghua; Jochum, Wolfram; Gachet, Christian; Bader, Michael; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2006-04-01

    The liver can regenerate its volume after major tissue loss. In a mouse model of liver regeneration, thrombocytopenia, or impaired platelet activity resulted in the failure to initiate cellular proliferation in the liver. Platelets are major carriers of serotonin in the blood. In thrombocytopenic mice, a serotonin agonist reconstituted liver proliferation. The expression of 5-HT2A and 2B subtype serotonin receptors in the liver increased after hepatectomy. Antagonists of 5-HT2A and 2B receptors inhibited liver regeneration. Liver regeneration was also blunted in mice lacking tryptophan hydroxylase 1, which is the rate-limiting enzyme for the synthesis of peripheral serotonin. This failure of regeneration was rescued by reloading serotonin-free platelets with a serotonin precursor molecule. These results suggest that platelet-derived serotonin is involved in the initiation of liver regeneration.

  6. Sexual side effects of serotonergic antidepressants: mediated by inhibition of serotonin on central dopamine release?

    PubMed

    Bijlsma, Elisabeth Y; Chan, Johnny S W; Olivier, Berend; Veening, Jan G; Millan, Mark J; Waldinger, Marcel D; Oosting, Ronald S

    2014-06-01

    Antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction adversely affects the quality of life of antidepressant users and reduces compliance with treatment. Animal models provide an instructive approach for examining potential sexual side effects of novel drugs. This review discusses the stability and reproducibility of our standardized test procedure that assesses the acute, subchronic and chronic effects of psychoactive compounds in a 30 minute mating test. In addition, we present an overview of the effects of several different (putative) antidepressants on male rat sexual behavior, as tested in our standardized test procedure. By comparing the effects of these mechanistically distinct antidepressants (paroxetine, venlafaxine, bupropion, buspirone, DOV 216,303 and S32006), this review discusses the putative mechanism underlying sexual side effects of antidepressants and their normalization. This review shows that sexual behavior is mainly inhibited by antidepressants that increase serotonin neurotransmission via blockade of serotonin transporters, while those that mainly increase the levels of dopamine and noradrenaline are devoid of sexual side effects. Those sexual disturbances cannot be normalized by simultaneously increasing noradrenaline neurotransmission, but are normalized by increasing both noradrenaline and dopamine neurotransmission. Therefore, it is hypothesized that the sexual side effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may be mediated by their inhibitory effects on dopamine signaling in sex brain circuits. Clinical development of novel antidepressants should therefore focus on compounds that simultaneously increase both serotonin and dopamine signaling. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Serotonin-containing neurons in basal insects: In search of ground patterns among tetraconata.

    PubMed

    Stemme, Torben; Stern, Michael; Bicker, Gerd

    2017-01-01

    The ventral nerve cord of Tetraconata contains a comparably low number of serotonin-immunoreactive neurons, facilitating individual identification of cells and their characteristic neurite morphology. This offers the rather unique possibility of establishing homologies at the single cell level. Because phylogenetic relationships within Tetraconata are still discussed controversially, comparisons of individually identifiable neurons can help to unravel these issues. Serotonin immunoreactivity has been investigated in numerous tetraconate taxa, leading to reconstructions of hypothetical ground patterns for major lineages. However, detailed descriptions of basal insects are still missing, but are crucial for meaningful evolutionary considerations. We investigated the morphology of individually identifiable serotonin-immunoreactive neurons in the ventral nerve cord of Zygentoma (Thermobia domestica, Lepisma saccharina, Atelura formicaria) and Archaeognatha (Machilis germanica, Dilta hibernica). To improve immunocytochemical resolution, we also performed preincubation experiments with 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan and serotonin. Additionally, we checked for immunolabeling of tryptophan hydroxylase, an enzyme associated with the synthesis of serotonin. Besides the generally identified groups of anterolateral, medial, and posterolateral neurons within each ganglion of the ventral nerve cord, we identified several other immunoreactive cells, which seem to have no correspondence in other tetraconates. Furthermore, we show that not all immunoreactive neurons produce serotonin, but have the capability for serotonin uptake. Comparisons with the patterns of serotonin-containing neurons in major tetraconate taxa suggest a close phylogenetic relationship of Remipedia, Cephalocarida, and Hexapoda, supporting the Miracrustacea hypothesis. J. Comp. Neurol., 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:79-115, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals

  8. Dopamine blockade and clinical response: Evidence for two biological subgroups of schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Wolkin, A.; Barouche, F.; Wolf, A.P.; Rotrosen, J.; Fowler, J.S.; Shiue, C.Y.; Cooper, T.B.; Brodie, J.D. )

    1989-07-01

    Because CNS neuroleptic concentration cannot be directly measured in patients, the relation between clinical response and extent of dopamine receptor blockade is unknown. This relationship is critical in ascertaining whether nonresponse to neuroleptics is the result merely of inadequate CNS drug levels or of more basic biological differences in pathophysiology. Using ({sup 18}F)N-methylspiroperidol and positron emission tomography, the authors assessed dopamine receptor occupancy in 10 schizophrenic patients before and after treatment with haloperidol. Responders and nonresponders had virtually identical indices of ({sup 18}F)N-methylspiroperidol uptake after treatment, indicating that failure to respond clinically was not a function of neuroleptic uptake or binding in the CNS.

  9. Rydberg blockade in a hot atomic beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, S.; Burgdörfer, J.; Zhang, X.; Dunning, F. B.

    2017-04-01

    The dipole blockade of very-high-n , n ˜300 , strontium 5 s n f 1F3 Rydberg atoms in a hot atomic beam is studied. For such high n , the blockade radius can exceed the linear dimensions of the excitation volume. Rydberg atoms formed inside the excitation volume can, upon leaving the region, continue to suppress excitation until they have moved farther away than the blockade radius. Moreover, the high density of states originating from the many magnetic sublevels associated with the F states results in a small but finite probability of excitation of L =3 n 1F3 atom pairs at small internuclear separations below the blockade radius. We demonstrate that these effects can be distinguished from one another by the distinct features they imprint on the Mandel Q parameter as a function of the duration of the exciting laser.

  10. Serotonin syndrome after concomitant treatment with linezolid and meperidine.

    PubMed

    Das, Prabodh K; Warkentin, Dawn I; Hewko, Robert; Forrest, Donna L

    2008-01-15

    Serotonin syndrome has been reported with administration of linezolid and serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Meperidine blocks the neuronal reuptake of serotonin. Serotonin syndrome after concomitant linezolid and meperidine therapy has not been described. We describe serotonin syndrome after concomitant use of linezolid and meperidine in a 27-year-old man with acute leukemia.

  11. Real-time, Spatially Resolved Analysis of Serotonin Transporter Activity And Regulation Using the Fluorescent Substrate, ASP+

    PubMed Central

    Oz, M.; Libby, T.; Kivell, B.; Jaligam, V.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Shippenberg, T.S.

    2010-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) mediates clearance of serotonin from the synapse, thereby, regulating extracellular serotonin concentrations. Radioligand uptake techniques are typically used to assess SERT function in tissue and heterologous expression systems. The need for sufficient protein in samples, however, requires use of homogenate preparations, potentially masking effects limited to specific cell populations. 4-(4-(dimethylamino)-styryl)-N-methylpyridinium (ASP+) is a fluorescent monoamine transporter substrate that has been used for real-time monitoring of dopamine and norepinephrine transporter function in single cells. The present live cell imaging studies examine the utility of ASP+ for quantifying hSERT function in HEK-293 and neuroblastoma cells. We show rapid membrane binding and intracellular ASP+ accumulation in hSERT expressing cells. Accumulation is saturable; dependent on temperature and the presence of sodium and chloride in the media, and attenuated by serotonin. Acute or prolonged exposure of cells to serotonin re-uptake inhibitors produces a concentration-dependent decrease in accumulation. Similar effects are produced by PKC activation whereas p38MAPK activation increases ASP+ accumulation. These data demonstrate the validity of ASP+ as a probe for monitoring SERT function in living cells. Alterations in SERT binding and uptake can be quantified in the same cell and use of a within cell design permits analysis of time-related alterations in SERT function. PMID:20524964

  12. Serotonin and Serotonin Transporter Gene Variant in Rotating Shift Workers

    PubMed Central

    Sookoian, Silvia; Gemma, Carolina; Gianotti, Tomas Fernández; Burgueño, Adriana; Alvarez, Azucena; González, Claudio Daniel; Pirola, Carlos Jose

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: Because serotonin (5-HT) is a neurotransmitter associated with circadian rhythm regulation, we explored a possible relation among 5-HT, serotonin metabolite, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA), and the functional polymorphism of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) promoter with rotating shift work. Design and Participants: 683 men were included in this study: 437 day workers were compared with 246 rotating shift workers. Results: Platelet 5-HT content differed significantly (P = 0.002) between day workers (41.28±1.99 pg/mg) and rotating shift workers (37.91±4.16 pg/mg); 5-HIAA content was also significantly (P = 0.00004) higher in day workers (11.40±0.82 pg/mg) than in rotating shift workers (9.33±1.02 pg/mg). We looked for further differences in SLC6A4 promoter (5-HTTLPR, 44 bp insertion: long (L)/deletion: short (S) alleles). We found a significant (P = 0.016) difference in genotype distribution between day workers LL: 126 (28.8%), LS: 202 (46.2%), and SS: 109 (24.9%), and rotating shift workers LL: 47 (19.1%), LS: 124 (50.4%), and SS: 75 (30.5%). When we divided the subjects between workers with less and more than 60 month rotating shift-work exposure, the difference in SLC6A4 genotypes frequency was only significant in the group with ≥60 months (P = 0.011). In addition, there was a significantly lower content of platelet 5-HIM in S allele carriers in comparison with the other genotypes (SS: 9.2±1.0 pg/mg vs. SL/LL: 11.0±0.8 pg/mg, P <0.02). Conclusions: Platelet 5-HT and 5-HIM contents were significantly lower in rotating shift workers than day workers, and there was a significant association between the S variant of SLC6A4 promoter and shift work. These findings may be important for targeting effective therapeutic strategies to ameliorate the associated comorbidities and behavioral problems in rotating shift workers. Citation: Sookoian S; Gemma C; Gianotti TF; Burgueño A; Alvarez A; Gonzalez CD; Pirola CJ. Serotonin and serotonin

  13. Serotonin in fear conditioning processes.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Elizabeth P

    2015-01-15

    This review describes the latest developments in our understanding of how the serotonergic system modulates Pavlovian fear conditioning, fear expression and fear extinction. These different phases of classical fear conditioning involve coordinated interactions between the extended amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal cortices. Here, I first define the different stages of learning involved in cued and context fear conditioning and describe the neural circuits underlying these processes. The serotonergic system can be manipulated by administering serotonin receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and these can have significant effects on emotional learning and memory. Moreover, variations in serotonergic genes can influence fear conditioning and extinction processes, and can underlie differential responses to pharmacological manipulations. This research has considerable translational significance as imbalances in the serotonergic system have been linked to anxiety and depression, while abnormalities in the mechanisms of conditioned fear contribute to anxiety disorders.

  14. Activity of etv5a and etv5b genes in the hypothalamus of fasted zebrafish is influenced by serotonin.

    PubMed

    Mechaly, Alejandro S; Richardson, Ebony; Rinkwitz, Silke

    2016-12-29

    Serotonin has been implicated in the inhibition of food intake in vertebrates. However, the mechanisms through which serotonin acts has yet to be elucidated. Recently, ETV5 (ets variant gene 5) has been associated with obesity and food intake control mechanisms in mammals. We have analyzed a putative physiological function of the two etv5 paralogous genes (etv5a and etv5b) in neuronal food intake control in adult zebrafish that have been exposed to different nutritional conditions. A feeding assay was established and fluoxetine, a selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI), was applied. Gene expression changes in the hypothalamus were determined using real-time PCR. Fasting induced an up-regulation of etv5a and etv5b in the hypothalamus, whereas increased serotonin levels in the fasted fish counteracted the increase in expression. To investigate potential mechanisms the expression of further food intake control genes was determined. The results show that an increase of serotonin in fasting fish causes a reduction in the activity of genes stimulating food intake. This is in line with a previously demonstrated anorexigenic function of serotonin. Our results suggest that obesity-associated ETV5 has a food intake stimulating function and that this function is modulated through serotonin.

  15. Serotonin Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors: A Pharmacological Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are a family of antidepressants that inhibit the reuptake of both serotonin and norepinephrine. While these drugs are traditionally considered a group of inter-related antidepressants based upon reuptake inhibition, they generally display different chemical structures as well as different pharmacological properties. In this article, we discuss these and other differences among the serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, including the year of approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration, generic availability, approved clinical indications, half-lives, metabolism and excretion, presence or not of active metabolites, dosing schedules, proportionate effects on serotonin and norepinephrine, and the timing of serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake (i.e., sequential or simultaneous). Again, while serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are grouped as a family of antidepressants, they exhibit a surprising number of differences— differences that may ultimately relate to clinical nuances in patient care. PMID:24800132

  16. Modulation of motoneuron activity by serotonin.

    PubMed

    Perrier, Jean-François

    2016-02-01

    Serotonin is a major neuromodulator in the central nervous system involved in most physiological functions including appetite regulation, sexual arousal, sleep regulation and motor control. The activity of neurons from the raphe spinal tract, which release serotonin on motoneurons, is positively correlated with motor behaviour. During moderate physical activity, serotonin is released from synaptic terminals onto the dendrites and cell bodies of motoneurons. Serotonin increases the excitability of motoneurons and thereby facilitate muscle contraction by acting on several parallel intracellular pathways. By activating 5-HT1A receptors, serotonin inhibits TWIK-related acid-sensitive potassium channels and small conductance calcium-activated potassium channels. In parallel, serotonin binds to 5-HT2 receptors, which promotes the low-threshold L-type Ca(2+) channels. During intense physical activity, more serotonin is released. The reuptake systems saturate and serotonin spills over to reach extrasynaptic 5-HT1A receptors located on the axon initial segment of motoneurons. This in turn induces the inhibition of the Na(+) channels responsible for the initiation of action potentials. Fewer nerve impulses are generated and muscle contraction becomes weaker. By decreasing the gain of motoneurons, serotonin triggers central fatigue.

  17. Common drugs inhibit human organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1)-mediated neurotransmitter uptake.

    PubMed

    Boxberger, Kelli H; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Lampe, Jed N

    2014-06-01

    The human organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1) is a polyspecific transporter involved in the uptake of positively charged and neutral small molecules in the liver. To date, few endogenous compounds have been identified as OCT1 substrates; more importantly, the effect of drugs on endogenous substrate transport has not been examined. In this study, we established monoamine neurotransmitters as substrates for OCT1, specifically characterizing serotonin transport in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Kinetic analysis yielded a Km of 197 micomolar and a Vmax of 561 pmol/mg protein/minute for serotonin. Furthermore, we demonstrated that serotonin uptake was inhibited by diphenhydramine, fluoxetine, imatinib, and verapamil, with IC50 values in the low micromolar range. These results were recapitulated in primary human hepatocytes, suggesting that OCT1 plays a significant role in hepatic elimination of serotonin and that xenobiotics may alter the elimination of endogenous compounds as a result of interactions at the transporter level.

  18. Common Drugs Inhibit Human Organic Cation Transporter 1 (OCT1)-Mediated Neurotransmitter Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Boxberger, Kelli H.; Hagenbuch, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The human organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1) is a polyspecific transporter involved in the uptake of positively charged and neutral small molecules in the liver. To date, few endogenous compounds have been identified as OCT1 substrates; more importantly, the effect of drugs on endogenous substrate transport has not been examined. In this study, we established monoamine neurotransmitters as substrates for OCT1, specifically characterizing serotonin transport in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Kinetic analysis yielded a Km of 197 micomolar and a Vmax of 561 pmol/mg protein/minute for serotonin. Furthermore, we demonstrated that serotonin uptake was inhibited by diphenhydramine, fluoxetine, imatinib, and verapamil, with IC50 values in the low micromolar range. These results were recapitulated in primary human hepatocytes, suggesting that OCT1 plays a significant role in hepatic elimination of serotonin and that xenobiotics may alter the elimination of endogenous compounds as a result of interactions at the transporter level. PMID:24688079

  19. Antidepressant-like behavioral effects of IGF-I produced by enhanced serotonin transmission.

    PubMed

    Hoshaw, Brian A; Hill, Tiffany I; Crowley, James J; Malberg, Jessica E; Khawaja, Xavier; Rosenzweig-Lipson, Sharon; Schechter, Lee E; Lucki, Irwin

    2008-10-10

    Previous research has suggested that mobilization of neurotrophic factors, such as insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), can be involved in the effects of antidepressant treatments. The current experiments showed that IGF-I leads to antidepressant-like effects in the modified rat forced swim test when tested 3 days, but not 1 day, after i.c.v. administration. These effects were sustained longer than the antidepressants paroxetine and desipramine. In addition, blockade of the IGF-I receptor with the IGF-I antagonist JB1 30 min before IGF-I administration prevented the antidepressant-like effects of IGF-I. However, when JB1 was administered 3 days after IGF-I administration and 30 min prior to testing, the antidepressant-like effects of IGF-I were still present suggesting that IGF-1 produces a long-term activation of neural systems involved in the antidepressant response. Because the pattern of antidepressant-like effects of IGF-I resembled those of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, the role of serotonin in the behavioral effects of IGF-I was studied. Depletion of serotonin, by the tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor para-chlorophenylalanine, blocked the antidepressant-like effects of IGF-I. Administration of IGF-I increased basal serotonin levels in the ventral hippocampus and altered the effects of acute citalopram. IGF-I administration did not change hippocampal cell proliferation at the 3-day timepoint when behavioral effects were seen. In addition, IGF-I did not alter the expression of mRNA levels of tryptophan hydroxylase or SERT in the brain stem, or [3H] citalopram binding in the hippocampus or cortex. Thus, IGF-I administration initiates a long-lasting cascade of neurochemical effects involving increased serotonin levels that results in antidepressant-like behavioral effects.

  20. Localization of serotonin in the nervous system of Biomphalaria glabrata, an intermediate host for schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Nadia; Vallejo, Deborah; Miller, Mark W

    2012-10-01

    The digenetic trematode Schistosoma mansoni that causes the form of schistosomiasis found in the Western Hemisphere requires the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata as its primary intermediate host. It has been proposed that the transition from the free-living S. mansoni miracidium to parasitic mother sporocyst depends on uptake of biogenic amines, e.g. serotonin, from the snail host. However, little is known about potential sources of serotonin in B. glabrata tissues. This investigation examined the localization of serotonin-like immunoreactivity (5HTli) in the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral tissues of B. glabrata. Emphasis was placed on the cephalic and anterior pedal regions that are commonly the sites of S. mansoni miracidium penetration. The anterior foot and body wall were densely innervated by 5HTli fibers but no peripheral immunoreactive neuronal somata were detected. Within the CNS, clusters of 5HTli neurons were observed in the cerebral, pedal, left parietal, and visceral ganglia, suggesting that the peripheral serotonergic fibers originate from the CNS. Double-labeling experiments (biocytin backfill × serotonin immunoreactivity) of the tentacular nerve and the three major pedal nerves (Pd n. 10, Pd n. 11, and Pd n. 12) disclosed central neurons that project to the cephalopedal periphery. Overall, the central distribution of 5HTli neurons suggests that, as in other gastropods, serotonin regulates the locomotion, reproductive, and feeding systems of Biomphalaria. The projections to the foot and body wall indicate that serotonin may also participate in defensive, nociceptive, or inflammation responses. These observations identify potential sources of host-derived serotonin in this parasite-host system. Inc.

  1. 5-Hydroxytryptamine drives apoptosis in biopsylike Burkitt lymphoma cells: reversal by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Serafeim, Adamantios; Grafton, Gillian; Chamba, Anita; Gregory, Christopher D; Blakely, Randy D; Bowery, Norman G; Barnes, Nicholas M; Gordon, John

    2002-04-01

    Serotonin (5-HT), a well-known neurotransmitter of the central nervous system, has been implicated in diverse aspects of immune regulation. Here we show that 5-HT can efficiently drive programmed cell death in established Burkitt lymphoma (BL) lines that remain faithful to the original biopsy phenotype (group 1). Group 1 BL cells cultured in the presence of 5-HT exhibited marked suppression of DNA synthesis that was accompanied by extensive apoptosis-serotonin-driven apoptosis was complete within 24 hours, was preceded by early caspase activation, and was accompanied by a decline in mitochondrial membrane potential. BL cells that had drifted to a lymphoblastic group 3 phenotype were relatively resistant to these actions of serotonin, and the forced ectopic expression of either bcl-2 or bcl-x(L) provided substantial protection from 5-HT-induced apoptosis. 5-HT receptor antagonists (SDZ205-557, granisetron, methysergide) failed to inhibit serotonin-induced apoptosis, whereas the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI)-fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil), and citalopram (Celexa)-substantially blocked the monoamine actions. Western blot analysis showed that BL cells expressed protein for the 5-HT transporter, and transport assays confirmed active uptake of serotonin by the cells. Unlike what was suggested for neuronal cells, there was no evidence that intracellular oxidative metabolites were responsible for the 5-HT-induced programmed death of BL cells. These data indicate that serotonin drives apoptosis in biopsylike BL cells after its entry through an active transport mechanism, and they suggest a novel therapeutic modality for Burkitt lymphoma.

  2. Listeria monocytogenes Inhibits Serotonin Transporter in Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Latorre, E; Pradilla, A; Chueca, B; Pagán, R; Layunta, E; Alcalde, A I; Mesonero, J E

    2016-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive bacterium that can cause a serious infection. Intestinal microorganisms have been demonstrated to contribute to intestinal physiology not only through immunological responses but also by modulating the intestinal serotonergic system. Serotonin (5-HT) is a neuromodulator that is synthesized in the intestinal epithelium and regulates the whole intestinal physiology. The serotonin transporter (SERT), located in enterocytes, controls intestinal 5-HT availability and therefore serotonin's effects. Infections caused by L. monocytogenes are well described as being due to the invasion of intestinal epithelial cells; however, the effect of L. monocytogenes on the intestinal epithelium remains unknown. The main aim of this work, therefore, was to study the effect of L. monocytogenes on SERT. Caco2/TC7 cell line was used as an enterocyte-like in vitro model, and SERT functional and molecular expression assays were performed. Our results demonstrate that living L. monocytogenes inhibits serotonin uptake by reducing SERT expression at the brush border membrane. However, neither inactivated L. monocytogenes nor soluble metabolites were able to affect SERT. The results also demonstrate that L. monocytogenes yields TLR2 and TLR10 transcriptional changes in intestinal epithelial cells and suggest that TLR10 is potentially involved in the inhibitory effect observed on SERT. Therefore, L. monocytogenes, through TLR10-mediated SERT inhibition, may induce increased intestinal serotonin availability and potentially contributing to intestinal physiological changes and the initiation of the inflammatory response.

  3. [Specific aspects of thrombocyte system of serotonin in patients with different manifestations of schizoaffective psychosis].

    PubMed

    Brusov, O S; Dikaia, V I; Zlobina, G P; Faktor, M I; Pavlova, O A; Bologov, P V; Korenev, A N

    2000-01-01

    45 women with different manifestations of schizoaffective psychosis (SAP) were examined. The diagnosis corresponded to ICD-10 (F25). According to the classification elaborated in Mental Health Research Centre of Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, groups of patients were identified with different variants of the psychoses course: a nuclear SAP type; a borderline SAP variation with phasic-recurrent course; SAP with progredient variation (schizoaffective variation of schizophrenia). The patients were examined both during the attack and remission. A rate of serotonine uptake (Vmax) in blood platelets, a specific imipramine binding (Bmax) and the level of serotonin in blood platelets were evaluated. It was found that dynamics of both Vmax and the level of serotonin in different SAP types were different, that was related to clinical and biological SAP heterogeneity. A tendency to decreasing of serotonin system functional activity was found in progredient SAP variations, especially during the remission, which was of low quality in these cases. On the contrary, in the borderline variations the indices of the decreased function of serotonin system corresponded well to those of acute psychosis. In nuclear type--a type with the most favourable course of psychosis--any significant changes weren't revealed as compared with the normal parameters.

  4. Involvement of serotonin mechanism in methamphetamine-induced chronic pulmonary toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Liu, M; Wang, H M; Bai, Y; Zhang, X H; Sun, Y X; Wang, H L

    2013-07-01

    The widest distribution and the highest uptake of methamphetamine (MA) in the human body occurred in the lungs, so that more and more attention should be paid to MA-induced pulmonary toxicity. MA induces the release of serotonin, which is an important mediator in pulmonary disease. The purpose of this study is to investigate the chronic response of the lung to MA and its potential mechanism in rats. Models of the chronic toxicity of MA were established with MA of 5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg (intraperitoneally, twice per day) for 5 weeks. It was found that the high dose of MA induced rat pulmonary toxicity: crowded lung parenchyma, thickened septum, reduced number of alveolar sacs, inflammatory cell infiltration, and pulmonary arteriolar remodeling. In addition, MA resulted in a significant increase in the lung serotonin concentration and the marked upregulation of tryptophan hydroxylase 1, vesicular monoamine transporter 2, serotonin transporter, and downregulation of monoamine oxidase-A. These findings suggest that MA induced chronic pulmonary toxicity, which is concerned with the elevated serotonin concentration in rat lungs by increased synthesis, reduced metabolism, augmented accumulation, and promoted release of serotonin.

  5. Sugammadex: A Review of Neuromuscular Blockade Reversal.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2016-07-01

    Sugammadex (Bridion(®)) is a modified γ-cyclodextrin that reverses the effect of the steroidal nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents rocuronium and vecuronium. Intravenous sugammadex resulted in rapid, predictable recovery from moderate and deep neuromuscular blockade in patients undergoing surgery who received rocuronium or vecuronium. Recovery from moderate neuromuscular blockade was significantly faster with sugammadex 2 mg/kg than with neostigmine, and recovery from deep neuromuscular blockade was significantly faster with sugammadex 4 mg/kg than with neostigmine or spontaneous recovery. In addition, recovery from neuromuscular blockade was significantly faster when sugammadex 16 mg/kg was administered 3 min after rocuronium than when patients spontaneously recovered from succinylcholine. Sugammadex also demonstrated efficacy in various special patient populations, including patients with pulmonary disease, cardiac disease, hepatic dysfunction or myasthenia gravis and morbidly obese patients. Intravenous sugammadex was generally well tolerated. In conclusion, sugammadex is an important option for the rapid reversal of rocuronium- or vecuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade.

  6. Collisional blockade in microscopic optical dipole traps.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, N; Reymond, G; Grangier, P

    2002-07-08

    We analyze the operating regimes of a very small optical dipole trap, loaded from a magneto-optical trap, as a function of the atom loading rate, i.e., the number of atoms per second entering the dipole trap. We show that, when the dipole trap volume is small enough, a "collisional blockade" mechanism locks the average number of trapped atoms on the value 0.5 over a large range of loading rates. We also discuss the "weak loading" and "strong loading" regimes outside the blockade range, and we demonstrate experimentally the existence of these three regimes.

  7. Observation of ionic Coulomb blockade in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jiandong; Liu, Ke; Graf, Michael; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Kis, Andras; di Ventra, Massimiliano; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2016-08-01

    Emergent behaviour from electron-transport properties is routinely observed in systems with dimensions approaching the nanoscale. However, analogous mesoscopic behaviour resulting from ionic transport has so far not been observed, most probably because of bottlenecks in the controlled fabrication of subnanometre nanopores for use in nanofluidics. Here, we report measurements of ionic transport through a single subnanometre pore junction, and the observation of ionic Coulomb blockade: the ionic counterpart of the electronic Coulomb blockade observed for quantum dots. Our findings demonstrate that nanoscopic, atomically thin pores allow for the exploration of phenomena in ionic transport, and suggest that nanopores may also further our understanding of transport through biological ion channels.

  8. Serotonin: Modulator of a Drive to Withdraw

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tops, Mattie; Russo, Sascha; Boksem, Maarten A. S.; Tucker, Don M.

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin is a fundamental neuromodulator in both vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems, with a suspected role in many human mental disorders. Yet, because of the complexity of serotonergic function, researchers have been unable to agree on a general theory. One function suggested for serotonin systems is the avoidance of threat. We propose…

  9. [Increased spontaneous uterine motility with serotonin].

    PubMed

    Lechner, W; Sölder, E; Sölder, B; Kölle, D; Huter, O

    1992-01-01

    The influence of serotonine, a vasoactive neurotransmitter, on the spontaneous motility of uterine strips was investigated. A highly significant (p less than 0.001) increase of uterine activity was observed when serotonine 10(-6) M was added to the perfusing medium.

  10. Serotonin: Modulator of a Drive to Withdraw

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tops, Mattie; Russo, Sascha; Boksem, Maarten A. S.; Tucker, Don M.

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin is a fundamental neuromodulator in both vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems, with a suspected role in many human mental disorders. Yet, because of the complexity of serotonergic function, researchers have been unable to agree on a general theory. One function suggested for serotonin systems is the avoidance of threat. We propose…

  11. Serotonin research: contributions to understanding psychoses.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Mark A; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2008-09-01

    The history of serotonin research is closely related to the study of hallucinogenic drugs that function as agonists at serotonin-2A receptors. The fundamental idea that psychotic states seen in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia might be attributable, in part, to abnormalities in serotonergic systems began with the almost simultaneous discovery of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), psilocybin and serotonin. Sixty years of study have confirmed early speculations regarding the important relationship between serotonin and both drug-induced and disorder-based psychotic states. Now, modern biochemical, pharmacological, behavioral, neuroimaging, genetic and molecular biological sciences are converging to understand how serotonergic systems interact with other monoaminergic and glutamatergic systems to modulate states of consciousness and contribute to psychotic disorders such as the group of schizophrenias. This review summarizes experimental assessments of the serotonergic hallucinogen model psychosis in relation to the serotonin hypothesis of schizophrenia.

  12. How serotonin shapes moral judgment and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Jenifer Z; Crockett, Molly J

    2013-01-01

    Neuroscientists are now discovering how hormones and brain chemicals shape social behavior, opening potential avenues for pharmacological manipulation of ethical values. Here, we review recent studies showing how altering brain chemistry can alter moral judgment and behavior, focusing in particular on the neuromodulator serotonin and its role in shaping values related to harm and fairness. We synthesize previous findings and consider the potential mechanisms through which serotonin could increase the aversion to harming others. We present a process model whereby serotonin influences social behavior by shifting social preferences in the positive direction, enhancing the value people place on others’ outcomes. This model may explain previous findings relating serotonin function to prosocial behavior, and makes new predictions regarding how serotonin may influence the neural computation of value in social contexts. PMID:25627116

  13. Serotonin, neural markers, and memory.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Diverse neuropsychiatric disorders present dysfunctional memory and no effective treatment exits for them; likely as result of the absence of neural markers associated to memory. Neurotransmitter systems and signaling pathways have been implicated in memory and dysfunctional memory; however, their role is poorly understood. Hence, neural markers and cerebral functions and dysfunctions are revised. To our knowledge no previous systematic works have been published addressing these issues. The interactions among behavioral tasks, control groups and molecular changes and/or pharmacological effects are mentioned. Neurotransmitter receptors and signaling pathways, during normal and abnormally functioning memory with an emphasis on the behavioral aspects of memory are revised. With focus on serotonin, since as it is a well characterized neurotransmitter, with multiple pharmacological tools, and well characterized downstream signaling in mammals' species. 5-HT1A, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors as well as SERT (serotonin transporter) seem to be useful neural markers and/or therapeutic targets. Certainly, if the mentioned evidence is replicated, then the translatability from preclinical and clinical studies to neural changes might be confirmed. Hypothesis and theories might provide appropriate limits and perspectives of evidence.

  14. Serotonin, neural markers, and memory

    PubMed Central

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Diverse neuropsychiatric disorders present dysfunctional memory and no effective treatment exits for them; likely as result of the absence of neural markers associated to memory. Neurotransmitter systems and signaling pathways have been implicated in memory and dysfunctional memory; however, their role is poorly understood. Hence, neural markers and cerebral functions and dysfunctions are revised. To our knowledge no previous systematic works have been published addressing these issues. The interactions among behavioral tasks, control groups and molecular changes and/or pharmacological effects are mentioned. Neurotransmitter receptors and signaling pathways, during normal and abnormally functioning memory with an emphasis on the behavioral aspects of memory are revised. With focus on serotonin, since as it is a well characterized neurotransmitter, with multiple pharmacological tools, and well characterized downstream signaling in mammals' species. 5-HT1A, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors as well as SERT (serotonin transporter) seem to be useful neural markers and/or therapeutic targets. Certainly, if the mentioned evidence is replicated, then the translatability from preclinical and clinical studies to neural changes might be confirmed. Hypothesis and theories might provide appropriate limits and perspectives of evidence. PMID:26257650

  15. Neuromuscular blockade in the elderly patient.

    PubMed

    Lee, Luis A; Athanassoglou, Vassilis; Pandit, Jaideep J

    2016-01-01

    Neuromuscular blockade is a desirable or even essential component of general anesthesia for major surgical operations. As the population continues to age, and more operations are conducted in the elderly, due consideration must be given to neuromuscular blockade in these patients to avoid possible complications. This review considers the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of neuromuscular blockade that may be altered in the elderly. Compartment distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs may vary due to age-related changes in physiology, altering the duration of action with a need for reduced dosage (eg, aminosteroids). Other drugs (atracurium, cisatracurium) have more reliable duration of action and should perhaps be considered for use in the elderly. The range of interpatient variability that neuromuscular blocking drugs may exhibit is then considered and drugs with a narrower range, such as cisatracurium, may produce more predictable, and inherently safer, outcomes. Ultimately, appropriate neuromuscular monitoring should be used to guide the administration of muscle relaxants so that the risk of residual neuromuscular blockade postoperatively can be minimized. The reliability of various monitoring is considered. This paper concludes with a review of the various reversal agents, namely, anticholinesterase drugs and sugammadex, and the alterations in dosing of these that should be considered for the elderly patient.

  16. [Serum serotonin in patients with tension headaches].

    PubMed

    Karaulova, Iu V; Shutov, A A

    2005-01-01

    Tension headache (TH) is one of the most frequent types of idiopathic headaches. The leading role in its pathogenesis is played by depression and dysmetabolism of the neurotransmitter serotonin. The subjects were 100 patients with TH. The examination included study of headache intensity, complex psychometric testing, and immune-enzyme measurement of serotonin serum level, performed before and after treatment with the anti-depressant prodep. All the patients had moderate pain syndrome, depression, and moderate or severe anxiety, which demonstrated negative correlation with serotonin serum level. In particular, the intensity of episodic THs (n = 24) was 52 mm visual analogue scale, reactive anxiety level was as high as 51.08 +/- 4.2, the level of depression was moderate (12.9 Beck scale); serotonin blood level showed a tendency to fall (205.72 +/- 6.74 ng/ml). In 76 patients, suffering from chronic THs with a cephalgia intensity of 62 mm visual analogue scale, high indexes of reactive and personal anxiety (46.81 -/+ 2.68 and 54.2 +/- 3.64, respectively), and high depression level were associated with a prominent decrease of serotonin blood concentration (119.38 +/- 9.42 ng/ml). A course of treatment with prodep led to significant decrease of headache intensity and improved depression, while an increase of serum serotonin level was observed. Thus, serotonin serum level may be used as a marker of pain intensity and the level of depression, and an objective indicator of anti-depressive therapy.

  17. Unifying Concept of Serotonin Transporter-associated Currents*

    PubMed Central

    Schicker, Klaus; Uzelac, Zeljko; Gesmonde, Joan; Bulling, Simon; Stockner, Thomas; Freissmuth, Michael; Boehm, Stefan; Rudnick, Gary; Sitte, Harald H.; Sandtner, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) uptake by the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) is driven by ion gradients. The stoichiometry of transported 5-HT and ions is predicted to result in electroneutral charge movement. However, hSERT mediates a current when challenged with 5-HT. This discrepancy can be accounted for by an uncoupled ion flux. Here, we investigated the mechanistic basis of the uncoupled currents and its relation to the conformational cycle of hSERT. Our observations support the conclusion that the conducting state underlying the uncoupled ion flux is in equilibrium with an inward facing state of the transporter with K+ bound. We identified conditions associated with accumulation of the transporter in inward facing conformations. Manipulations that increased the abundance of inward facing states resulted in enhanced steady-state currents. We present a comprehensive kinetic model of the transport cycle, which recapitulates salient features of the recorded currents. This study provides a framework for exploring transporter-associated currents. PMID:22072712

  18. [Serotonin now: Part 1. Neurobiology and developmental genetics].

    PubMed

    Kriegebaum, C; Gutknecht, L; Schmitt, A; Lesch, K-P; Reif, A

    2010-06-01

    As soon as in the 1960's, the role of serotonin (5-Hydroxytryptamin, 5-HT) in psychiatric disorders was realized, which was further substantiated by several lines of evidence amounting to a huge body of knowledge. The indolamine 5-HT belongs to the class of monoamine transmitters and can be found in the serotonergic neurons of the raphe nuclei in the brain stem. In the periphery, it is mainly present in the gastrointestinal system and the pineal gland. 5-HT is implicated in a variety of cognitive, emotional and vegetative behaviors, as well as in the regulation of circadian rhythms. Apart from its role as a neurotransmitter, it has an important function in prenatal development, where its expression pattern is tightly regulated, and in adult neurogenesis. The numerous effects of 5-HT are mediated by specific pre- and postsynaptic receptors, whose localization and functions are further described here. The serotonin transporter (SERT), which accomplishes the re-uptake of 5-HT into the neuron following its release in the synaptic cleft, not only has an important role in the termination of serotonergic neurotransmission but is also an important drug target for antidepressant compounds. In this part of the review, the neurobiological underpinnings of 5-HT synthesis, metabolism, and neurotransmission as well as the corresponding physiological consequences are summarized, while in the second part, an overview on clinical findings is provided and critically discussed.

  19. Serotonin Syndrome With Fluoxetine: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dipen Dineshkumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Serotonin syndrome is a rare but serious complication of treatment with serotonergic agents. In its severe manifestations, death can ensue. Early recognition and aggressive management are crucial to mitigating the syndrome. Often the presentation can be subtle and easy to miss. Case Reports: We present 2 cases of serotonin syndrome seen in the psychiatric consultation service of a busy academic hospital. Both patients had favorable outcomes because of early recognition and aggressive management. Conclusion: Physicians should carefully consider and rule out the clinical diagnosis of serotonin syndrome when presented with an agitated or confused patient who is taking serotonergic agents. PMID:27999518

  20. Serotonin: A New Hope in Alzheimer's Disease?

    PubMed

    Claeysen, Sylvie; Bockaert, Joël; Giannoni, Patrizia

    2015-07-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia affecting 35 million individuals worldwide. Current AD treatments provide only brief symptomatic relief. It is therefore urgent to replace this symptomatic approach with a curative one. Increasing serotonin signaling as well as developing molecules that enhance serotonin concentration in the synaptic cleft have been debated as possible therapeutic strategies to slow the progression of AD. In this Viewpoint, we discuss exciting new insights regarding the modulation of serotonin signaling for AD prevention and therapy.

  1. Metoclopramide-induced Serotonin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Harada, Taku; Hirosawa, Takanobu; Morinaga, Kouhei; Shimizu, Taro

    2017-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman with bipolar disorder who was taking mirtazapine presented with mydriasis, abnormal diaphoresis, myoclonus and muscle rigidity after taking metocloplamide. Her medical history, which included the use of serotonergic agents, and the presence of symptoms including myoclonus and muscle rigidity were consistent with a diagnosis of serotonin syndrome (SS) according to the Hunter criteria. The symptoms diminished following three days of treatment with oral lorazepam and cyproheptadine and a reduced dose of mirtazapine. Metoclopramide is frequently used to various gastric symptom. Metoclopramide is not widely known to induce SS. This potentially fatal condition should be avoided by exercising care in the use of drugs that have the potential to cause drug-drug interactions.

  2. Metoclopramide-induced Serotonin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Taku; Hirosawa, Takanobu; Morinaga, Kouhei; Shimizu, Taro

    2017-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman with bipolar disorder who was taking mirtazapine presented with mydriasis, abnormal diaphoresis, myoclonus and muscle rigidity after taking metocloplamide. Her medical history, which included the use of serotonergic agents, and the presence of symptoms including myoclonus and muscle rigidity were consistent with a diagnosis of serotonin syndrome (SS) according to the Hunter criteria. The symptoms diminished following three days of treatment with oral lorazepam and cyproheptadine and a reduced dose of mirtazapine. Metoclopramide is frequently used to various gastric symptom. Metoclopramide is not widely known to induce SS. This potentially fatal condition should be avoided by exercising care in the use of drugs that have the potential to cause drug-drug interactions. PMID:28321081

  3. Decreased Serotonin Levels and Serotonin-Mediated Osteoblastic Inhibitory Signaling in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Klavdianou, Kalliopi; Liossis, Stamatis-Nick; Papachristou, Dionysios J; Theocharis, Georgios; Sirinian, Chaido; Kottorou, Anastasia; Filippopoulou, Alexandra; Andonopoulos, Andrew P; Daoussis, Dimitrios

    2016-03-01

    Evidence suggests that serotonin is an inhibitor of bone formation. We aimed to assess: 1) serum serotonin levels in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), a prototype bone-forming disease, compared with patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and healthy subjects; 2) the effect(s) of TNFα blockers on serum serotonin levels in patients with AS and RA; and 3) the effect(s) of serum of AS patients on serotonin signaling. Serum serotonin levels were measured in 47 patients with AS, 28 patients with RA, and 40 healthy subjects by radioimmunoassay; t test was used to assess differences between groups. The effect of serum on serotonin signaling was assessed using the human osteoblastic cell line Saos2, evaluating levels of phospho-CREB by Western immunoblots. Serotonin serum levels were significantly lower in patients with AS compared with healthy subjects (mean ± SEM ng/mL 122.9 ± 11.6 versus 177.4 ± 24.58, p = 0.038) and patients with RA (mean ± SEM ng/mL 244.8 ± 37.5, p = 0.0004). Patients with AS receiving TNFα blockers had significantly lower serotonin levels compared with patients with AS not on such treatment (mean ± SEM ng/mL 95.8 ± 14.9 versus 149.2 ± 16.0, p = 0.019). Serotonin serum levels were inversely correlated with pCREB induction in osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells. Serotonin levels are low in patients with AS and decrease even further during anti-TNFα treatment. Differences in serotonin levels are shown to have a functional impact on osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells. Therefore, serotonin may be involved in new bone formation in AS.

  4. Platelet serotonin transporter (5HTt): physiological influences on kinetic characteristics in a large human population.

    PubMed

    Banović, Miroslav; Bordukalo-Niksić, Tatjana; Balija, Melita; Cicin-Sain, Lipa; Jernej, Branimir

    2010-01-01

    The present study had two goals: first, to give a detailed description of a reliable method for full kinetic analysis of serotonin transporter (5HTt) on the membrane of human platelets, and second, as a main issue, to report on physiological influences on kinetic characteristics of this transmembrane transport on a large population of healthy individuals. Full kinetic analyses of platelet serotonin uptake were performed on 334 blood donors of both sexes by the use of 14C-radioisotopic method, which was first optimized according to assumptions of enzyme kinetic analyses, with regard to platelet concentration, duration of uptake, concentration of substrate as well as important technical parameters (underpressure of filtration, blanks, incubating temperature, etc). Kinetic parameters of platelet serotonin uptake in the whole population were for V(max): 142 +/- 25.3 pmol 5HT/10(8) platelets/minute and for K(m): 0.404 +/- 0.089 microM 5HT. Besides the report on kinetic values of 5HT transporter protein, we have also described major physiological influences on the mentioned parameters, V(max), K(m) and their derivative, V(max)/K(m) (transporter efficiency): range and frequency distribution of normal values, intraindividual stability over time, lack of age influence, gender dependence and seasonal variations. The report on kinetic values and main physiological influences on platelet serotonin transport kinetics, obtained by the use of thoroughly reassessed methodology, and on by far the largest human population studied until now, offers a reliable frame of reference for pathophysiological studies of this parameter in various clinical fields.

  5. [Axolemmal transporters for neurotransmitter uptake].

    PubMed

    García-López, M

    Neurotransmission is a fundamental process in interneuronal communication. It starts with the release of the neurotransmitter following a nerve impulse and ends either by uptake by specific specific transporters or by metabolization to an inactive compound. In this review we will consider the molecular, ion dependence and electrogenic properties of the axolemal transporters for neurotransmitters and also the pathological consequences of their impairment as well as the drugs that can interact with them. Most axolemmal transporters have been cloned and grouped into two large families according to their molecular characteristics and electrogenic properties: 1. Those dependent on Na+/Cl- include transporters of GABA, noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin, choline, proline, betaine, glycine and taurine, and 2. Those dependent on Na+/K+, which include the transporters of glutamate, alanine, serine and cysteine. The clonation of transporters has permitted (and will continue to permit) the correlation of molecular alterations of transporters with different neuro-degenerative disorders (e.g. multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease), with brain lesions (e.g. cerebral ischemia, status epilepticus) and with psychiatric alterations (e.g. schizophrenia, depression). In this respect, chemical synthesis of new selective drugs which interact with the different systems for uptake of neurotransmitters will offer new approaches to the treatment of many disorders of the central nervous system which still have no satisfactory drug treatment.

  6. Spiperone: evidence for uptake into secretory granules.

    PubMed Central

    Dannies, P S; Rudnick, M S; Fishkes, H; Rudnick, G

    1984-01-01

    Spiperone, a dopamine antagonist widely used as a specific ligand for dopamine and serotonin receptors, is actively accumulated into the F4C1 strain of rat pituitary tumor cells. The accumulation of 10 nM [3H]spiperone was linear for 3 min and reached a steady state after 10 min. Spiperone accumulation was reduced 50% by preincubation with 5 microM reserpine, an inhibitor of biogenic amine transport into secretory granules, and was also blocked by monensin and ammonium chloride, both of which increase the pH of intracellular storage organelles. Uptake was not affected by replacing sodium in the buffer with lithium at equimolar concentrations. Spiperone at 1 microM inhibited by over 50% serotonin transport into membrane vesicles isolated from platelet dense granules; this concentration inhibited the Na+-dependent plasma membrane transport system less than 10%. The data indicate spiperone specifically interacts with the secretory granule amine transport system and suggest that this transport system is found in the F4C1 pituitary cell strain as well as in platelets and neurons. The data also suggest that experiments utilizing spiperone to measure dopamine and serotonin receptors be interpreted with caution. PMID:6584920

  7. Serotonin hypothesis of autism: implications for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Rebecca A; Lee, Li-Ching; Crum, Rosa M; Zimmerman, Andrew W; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2013-06-01

    Serotonin, a neurotransmitter found throughout the brain and body, has long been of interest in autism. Repeated findings of elevated platelet serotonin levels in approximately one third of children with autism has led some to believe that dysfunctional serotonin signaling may be a causal mechanism for the disorder. Because serotonin is critical to fetal brain development, concerns have arisen regarding prenatal exposure to substances that manipulate serotonin levels, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). This review examines evidence regarding the serotonin system and autism spectrum disorders (ASD), as well as what the literature has reported thus far on developmental effects of prenatal exposure to SSRIs. Possible mechanisms by which SSRIs could affect the fetus during pregnancy and clinical implications are also discussed. Though the majority of studies conducted in infants and children suggest prenatal exposure to SSRIs does not affect neurodevelopment, interpretation must be tempered given small sample sizes. The only published study that focused on prenatal SSRI exposure and ASD found an increased risk with exposure to SSRIs, especially during the first trimester. Obstacles that will be faced in future research are isolating medication effects from maternal depression and, given the infrequent occurrence of exposure and outcome, obtaining an adequate sample size. Whether serotonin is an etiologic factor in ASD, and what it points to as a marker for subgrouping, remains unclear. Understanding how the development of ASD might be affected by prenatal factors that influence serotonin levels, such as SSRIs, could identify modifiable targets for prevention.

  8. Comparison of the effects of sertraline and its metabolite desmethylsertraline on blockade of central 5-HT reuptake in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sprouse, J; Clarke, T; Reynolds, L; Heym, J; Rollema, H

    1996-04-01

    N-demethylation of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline to desmethylsertraline yields a compound with 10- to 20-fold less potency at blocking serotonin (5-HT) reuptake as measured in vitro. In the present study desmethylsertraline (DMS) was examined in two in vivo models of reuptake inhibition--elevation of extracellular 5-HT in the corpus striatum as measured by microdialysis and inhibition of firing of serotonin-containing dorsal raphe neurons. Whereas sertraline (1, 3.2, and 10 mg/kg s.c.) produced a dose-dependent increase in extracellular 5-HT and a decrease in 5-HIAA in rat striatum, desmethylsertraline was without effect on either parameter. In similar fashion, desmethylsertraline had no effect on dorsal raphe cell firing at a dose (1,000 micrograms/kg i.v.) nearly 20-fold the ED50 for sertraline (52 micrograms/kg). Taken together, these data suggest that DMS does not contribute to the blockade of central 5-HT reuptake produced by sertraline in vivo and therefore would be expected to play a negligible role in its clinical activity.

  9. The influence of serotonin on fear learning.

    PubMed

    Hindi Attar, Catherine; Finckh, Barbara; Büchel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Learning of associations between aversive stimuli and predictive cues is the basis of Pavlovian fear conditioning and is driven by a mismatch between expectation and outcome. To investigate whether serotonin modulates the formation of such aversive cue-outcome associations, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and dietary tryptophan depletion to reduce brain serotonin (5-HT) levels in healthy human subjects. In a Pavlovian fear conditioning paradigm, 5-HT depleted subjects compared to a non-depleted control group exhibited attenuated autonomic responses to cues indicating the upcoming of an aversive event. These results were closely paralleled by reduced aversive learning signals in the amygdala and the orbitofrontal cortex, two prominent structures of the neural fear circuit. In agreement with current theories of serotonin as a motivational opponent system to dopamine in fear learning, our data provide first empirical evidence for a role of serotonin in representing formally derived learning signals for aversive events.

  10. Serotonin Syndrome: Prophylactic Treatment With Cyproheptadine.

    PubMed

    Deardorff, O Greg; Khan, Talha; Kulkarni, Gaurav; Doisy, Richard; Loehr, Colleen

    2016-08-25

    Despite the numerous advantages of linezolid therapy, one disadvantage continuing to hinder its use is the risk of serotonin syndrome when coadministered with other serotonergic agents. Developing a better understanding of serotonin syndrome is essential for the prevention and management of this potentially life-threatening condition. This report describes a patient with schizophrenia, depression, and severe, acute osteomyelitis. The patient was taking multiple serotonergic agents and required the use of linezolid without the possibility of a sufficient washout period. The severity of the patient's condition in conjunction with increased risk for serotonin syndrome warranted prophylactic treatment with cyproheptadine. The complex pathophysiology of prophylactic treatment of serotonin syndrome with cyproheptadine is worthy of discussion.

  11. Serotonin and Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors (SNRIs)

    MedlinePlus

    Serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) Antidepressant SNRIs help relieve depression symptoms, such as irritability and sadness, but some are also used for anxiety disorders and nerve pain. Here's ...

  12. [Cancer immunotherapy by immuno-checkpoint blockade].

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    As cancer immunotherapies utilizing anti-tumor T-cell responses, immuno-checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell immunotherapy have recently achieved durable responses even in advanced cancer patients with metastases. Administration of antibodies on the T-cell surface, CTLA-4 and PD-1 (or PD-1 ligand PD-L1), resulted in tumor regression of not only melanoma and renal cell cancer which were known to be relatively sensitive to immunotherapy, but also various malignancies including lung, bladder, ovarian, gastric, and head and neck cancers, as well as hematological malignancies such as Hodgkin and B-cell malignant lymphomas. These findings have changed the status of immunotherapy in the development of cancer treatments. Currently, development of combinations employing cancer immunotherapy with immuno-checkpoint blockade, as well as personalized cancer immunotherapy based on the evaluation of pretreatment immune status, are in progress.

  13. A novel mechanism for regulating hepatic glycogen synthesis involving serotonin and cyclin-dependent kinase-5.

    PubMed

    Tudhope, Susan J; Wang, Chung-Chi; Petrie, John L; Potts, Lloyd; Malcomson, Fiona; Kieswich, Julius; Yaqoob, Muhammad M; Arden, Catherine; Hampson, Laura J; Agius, Loranne

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic autonomic nerves regulate postprandial hepatic glucose uptake, but the signaling pathways remain unknown. We tested the hypothesis that serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) exerts stimulatory and inhibitory effects on hepatic glucose disposal. Ligands of diverse 5-HT receptors were used to identify signaling pathway(s) regulating glucose metabolism in hepatocytes. 5-HT had stimulatory and inhibitory effects on glycogen synthesis in hepatocytes mediated by 5-HT1/2A and 5-HT2B receptors, respectively. Agonists of 5-HT1/2A receptors lowered blood glucose and increased hepatic glycogen after oral glucose loading and also stimulated glycogen synthesis in freshly isolated hepatocytes with greater efficacy than 5-HT. This effect was blocked by olanzapine, an antagonist of 5-HT1/2A receptors. It was mediated by activation of phosphorylase phosphatase, inactivation of glycogen phosphorylase, and activation of glycogen synthase. Unlike insulin action, it was not associated with stimulation of glycolysis and was counteracted by cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitors. A role for cdk5 was supported by adaptive changes in the coactivator protein p35 and by elevated glycogen synthesis during overexpression of p35/cdk5. These results support a novel mechanism for serotonin stimulation of hepatic glycogenesis involving cdk5. The opposing effects of serotonin, mediated by distinct 5-HT receptors, could explain why drugs targeting serotonin function can cause either diabetes or hypoglycemia in humans.

  14. In vivo binding of /sup 3/H-N-methylspiperone to dopamine and serotonin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.J.; Smith, A.C.; Kuhar, M.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1987-03-09

    /sup 3/H-N-methylspiperone (/sup 3/H-NMSP) was used to label dopamine-2 and serotonin-2 in vivo in the mouse. The striatum/cerebellum binding ratio reached a maximum of 80 eight hours after intravenous administration of /sup 3/H-NMSP. The frontal cortex/cerebellum ratio was 5 one hour after injection. The binding of /sup 3/H-NMSP was saturable in the frontal cortex and cerebellum between doses of 10 and 1000 ..mu..g/kg. Between 0.01 and 10 ..mu..g/kg the ratio total/nonspecific binding increased from 14 to 21. Inhibition of /sup 3/H-NMSP binding in the frontal cortex and striatum by ketanserin, a selective serotonin-2 antagonist, demonstrated that 20% of the total binding in the striatum was to serotonin-2 rectors and 91% of the total binding in the frontal cortex was to serotonin-2 receptors. Compared to /sup 3/H-spiperone, /sup 3/H-NMSP 1) results in a much higher specific/nonspecific binding ratio in the striatum and frontal cortex and 2) displays more than a two-fold higher brain uptake. 18 references, 4 figures.

  15. The role of serotonin in cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    Oostland, M; van Hooft, J A

    2013-09-17

    In adult animals, the cerebellum is richly innervated by serotonin: serotonergic fibres are the third main afferent fibres into the cerebellum. However, the physiology of the serotonergic system and its functional significance are not fully known during development in the cerebellum. In this review we will focus on the serotonergic regulation of the cerebellum during postnatal development. We hypothesize a powerful role for serotonin in the physiology of the developing cerebellum. A presumably tonic activation of serotonin receptors by binding of serotonin becomes specific by temporally and spatially restricted expression of different serotonin receptors, each with their own (sometimes antagonizing) functions. During the first postnatal week, activation of 5-HT₁ receptors expressed by both granule cells and Purkinje cells stimulates dendritic growth and synapse formation. Later, activation of 5-HT₃ receptors expressed by granule cells limits dendritic growth of Purkinje cells via mediating the secretion of reelin, influences physiological maturation of Purkinje cells, modulates synaptic plasticity at parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses and thereby affects competition with the climbing fibres on Purkinje cell dendrites resulting in proper climbing fibre elimination. Last, activation of 5-HT₂ receptors expressed by granule cells and Purkinje cells both during late postnatal development and in the mature cerebellum promotes the stability of synaptic activity. Thus, we propose that serotonin controls cerebellar development in three phases: (1) stimulation of dendritic growth and formation of synapses, (2) hard-wiring of neuronal connections with limits to dendritic growth but ensuring synaptic plasticity, and (3) stabilization of synapses. Taken together, serotonin receptors expressed by different cells in the cerebellum have a specialized role during postnatal development, but with some similar main effects. Distinct spatial and temporal expression of these

  16. hERG Blockade by Iboga Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Alper, Kenneth; Bai, Rong; Liu, Nian; Fowler, Steven J; Huang, Xi-Ping; Priori, Silvia G; Ruan, Yanfei

    2016-01-01

    The iboga alkaloids are a class of naturally occurring and synthetic compounds, some of which modify drug self-administration and withdrawal in humans and preclinical models. Ibogaine, the prototypic iboga alkaloid that is utilized clinically to treat addictions, has been associated with QT prolongation, torsades de pointes and fatalities. hERG blockade as IKr was measured using the whole-cell patch clamp technique in HEK 293 cells. This yielded the following IC50 values: ibogaine manufactured by semisynthesis via voacangine (4.09 ± 0.69 µM) or by extraction from T. iboga (3.53 ± 0.16 µM); ibogaine's principal metabolite noribogaine (2.86 ± 0.68 µM); and voacangine (2.25 ± 0.34 µM). In contrast, the IC50 of 18-methoxycoronaridine, a product of rational synthesis and current focus of drug development was >50 µM. hERG blockade was voltage dependent for all of the compounds, consistent with low-affinity blockade. hERG channel binding affinities (K i) for the entire set of compounds, including 18-MC, ranged from 0.71 to 3.89 µM, suggesting that 18-MC binds to the hERG channel with affinity similar to the other compounds, but the interaction produces substantially less hERG blockade. In view of the extended half-life of noribogaine, these results may relate to observations of persistent QT prolongation and cardiac arrhythmia at delayed intervals of days following ibogaine ingestion. The apparent structure-activity relationships regarding positions of substitutions on the ibogamine skeleton suggest that the iboga alkaloids might provide an informative paradigm for investigation of the structural biology of the hERG channel.

  17. Ritanserin, a serotonin-S2 receptor antagonist, does not prevent 5-hydroxytryptophan-induced beta-EP, beta-LPH and cortisol secretion.

    PubMed

    Facchinetti, F; Martignoni, E; Nappi, G; Marini, S; Petraglia, F; Sandrini, G; Genazzani, A R

    1987-01-01

    Ritanserin, a new serotonin antagonist selective upon S2 receptor subclass is available. Thus, in order to better define the positive control of serotoninergic pathway on proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-related peptide release, a group of 7 healthy male volunteers has been submitted to a 5-hydroxytryptophane (5-OH-TP) test (200 mg p.o.) before and after 4 days Ritanserin pretreatment. Plasma beta-endorphin (beta-EP), beta-lipotropin (beta-LPH) and cortisol levels were measured hourly for 4 h after each 5-OH-TP loading. Hormonal levels were measured by specific RIAs on extracted (cortisol) and chromatographed (beta-EP and beta-LPH) plasma samples. Basal plasma concentrations of the three hormones were unchanged by Ritanserin pretreatment. Similarly, the integrated areas of beta-LPH, beta-EP and cortisol release in response to 5-OH-TP remained unaffected by the receptor blockade. These data confirm that serotonin-acting drugs are able to stimulate POMC-related peptide release and indicate that such interaction is not mediated through S2 receptor subclass.

  18. Corneal stroma PDGF blockade and myofibroblast development

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Harmeet; Chaurasia, Shyam S.; de Medeiros, Fabricio W.; Agrawal, Vandana; Salomao, Marcella Q.; Singh, Nirbhai; Ambati, Balamurali K.; Wilson, Steven E.

    2009-01-01

    Myofibroblast development and haze generation in the corneal stroma is mediated by cytokines, including transforming growth factor beta (TGF β), and possibly other cytokines. This study examined the effects of stromal PDGF-β blockade on the development of myofibroblasts in response to -9.0 diopter photorefractive keratectomy in the rabbit. Rabbits that had haze generating photorefractive keratectomy (PRK, for 9 diopters of myopia) in one eye were divided into three different groups: stromal application of plasmid pCMV.PDGFRB.23KDEL expressing a subunit of PDGF receptor b (domains 2-3, which bind PDGF-B), stromal application of empty plasmid pCMV, or stromal application of balanced salt solution (BSS). The plasmids (at a concentration 1000 ng/μl) or BSS was applied to the exposed stroma immediately after surgery and every 24 hours for 4-5 days until the epithelium healed. The group treated with pCMV.PDGFRB.23KDEL showed lower αSMA+ myofibroblast density in the anterior stroma compared to either control group (P≤ 0.001). Although there was also lower corneal haze at the slit lamp at one month after surgery, the difference in haze after PDGF-B blockade was not statistically significant compared to either control group. Stromal PDGF-B blockade during the early postoperative period following PRK decreases stromal αSMA+ myofibroblast generation. PDGF is an important modulator of myofibroblast development in the cornea. PMID:19133260

  19. Effect of beta blockade on singing performance.

    PubMed

    Gates, G A; Saegert, J; Wilson, N; Johnson, L; Shepherd, A; Hearne, E M

    1985-01-01

    The symptoms associated with performance anxiety, or the so-called stage fright syndrome, are similar to those of alpha and beta adrenergic stimulation. Suppression of symptoms and improvement in instrumentalist's performance after beta blockade suggest that this modality would be of benefit for singers as well. To evaluate the dose-effect relationship of beta blockade upon singing performance and the possible effect of these agents upon performance maturation, we studied 34 singing students during end of semester juries, using a double-blind crossover paradigm. Students performed once with either placebo, 20, 40, or 80 mg of nadolol, and again 48 hours later, with placebo. There was a significant dose-related, limiting effect upon intraperformance cardiac rate. A small, but statistically significant, dichotomous effect upon performance rating was noted: low-dose nadolol tended to enhance performance, whereas larger doses impaired performance. We conclude that the effects of low dose beta blockade upon singing are minimally helpful and high doses may detract from performance ability.

  20. Effect of flibanserin (BIMT 17), fluoxetine, 8-OH-DPAT and buspirone on serotonin synthesis in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, A; Baschirotto, A; Grippa, N; Borsini, F

    1999-12-01

    In male rats, the effects of the administration of the novel serotonergic agent flibanserin on the synthesis of 5-HT were evaluated in the frontal cortex (FC), hippocampus (Hip) and brainstem (Br). The selective serotonergic uptake blocker, fluoxetine, and two serotonin1A (5-HT1A) agonists, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetraline (8-OH-DPAT) and buspirone, were used as reference compounds. The synthesis of 5-HT was assessed by measuring the accumulation of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) after blockade of aromatic amino acid decarboxylase induced by m-hydroxybenzylhydrazine (NSD-1015), at 100 mg/kg i.p., 30 min before sacrifice. Flibanserin, 8-OH-DPAT and buspirone were given 15 min before NSD-1015, while fluoxetine 120 min before NSD-1015. In our experimental conditions, a different efficacy, expressed as percentage of maximal inhibition (Max) of 5-HTP accumulation, and a different potency, expressed in terms of minimal effective dose (MED), were observed in different brain areas with tested compounds. Flibanserin (1-32 mg/kg) decreased 5-HT synthesis with preferential activity in the FC, compared to the Hip and Br, both in terms of potency (MED=2 mg/kg in FC, 16 mg/kg in Hip and Br) and efficacy (Max=65% in FC, 44% in Hip and 29% in Br). Fluoxetine (1-30 mg/kg) decreased 5-HT synthesis with preferential activity in FC than in Hip and Br, only in terms of potency (MED=3 mg/kg in FC, 10 mg/kg in Hip and Br), this result being similar to that observed for flibanserin. In contrast, it showed greater efficacy both in FC and Hip (Max about 60%), than in Br (Max=49%). On the contrary, 8-OH-DPAT (0.3-3 mg/kg) decreased 5-HT synthesis with the same potency in all brain regions (MED=3 mg/kg) and showed the greatest efficacy in FC than in Hip and Br (Max=56% in FC, 49% in Hip and 40% in Br). Furthermore, buspirone (3-30 mg/kg), while inhibiting 5-HTP accumulation in all areas with the same efficacy (Max about 30%), seemed to have higher potency in Br than in FC and Hip (MED=3

  1. A role for serotonin in the antidepressant activity of NG-Nitro-L-arginine, in the rat forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Gigliucci, Valentina; Buckley, Kathleen Niamh; Nunan, John; O'Shea, Karen; Harkin, Andrew

    2010-02-01

    The present study determined regional serotonin (5-HT) synthesis and metabolism changes associated with the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NA) and the influence of 5-HT receptor blockade in the antidepressant-like actions of L-NA in the forced swimming test (FST). Regional effects of L-NA (5,10 and 20mg/kg i.p.) on tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) activity, the rate limiting enzyme for 5-HT synthesis, were determined by measuring accumulation of the transient intermediate 5-hydoxytryptophan (5-HTP) following in vivo administration of the amino acid decarboxylase inhibitor, NSD 1015 (100mg/kg). L-NA (5-20mg/kg) dose dependently increased 5-HTP accumulation, particularly in the amygdaloid cortex, following exposure to the FST. L-NA also provoked an increase in regional brain 5-HIAA concentrations and in the 5-HIAA:5-HT metabolism ratio. Co-treatment with NSD-1015 failed to consistently modify the antidepressant-like effects of L-NA in the FST. Sub-active doses of L-NA (1mg/kg) and the 5-HT re-uptake inhibitor fluoxetine (2.5mg/kg) acted synergistically to increase swimming in the test. Co-treatment with the non-selective 5-HT receptor antagonist metergoline (1, 2 and 4mg/kg), attenuated the L-NA (20mg/kg)-induced reduction in immobility and increase in swimming behaviours. Metergoline alone however provoked an increase in immobility and reduction in swimming behaviours in the test. A similar response was obtained following co-treatment with the preferential 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist ketanserin (5mg/kg) and the 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist RO-430440 (5mg/kg). Co-treatment with the 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist WAY 100635 (0.3mg/kg) or the 5-HT(1B) receptor antagonist GR 127935 (4mg/kg) failed to influence the antidepressant-like activity of L-NA. Taken together these data provide further support for a role for 5-HT in the antidepressant-like properties of NOS inhibitors.

  2. A functional-dimensional approach to depression: serotonin deficiency as a target syndrome in a comparison of 5-hydroxytryptophan and fluvoxamine.

    PubMed

    Pöldinger, W; Calanchini, B; Schwarz, W

    1991-01-01

    H.M. van Praag has been suggesting a reappraisal of syndromes in psychiatry for over 20 years. He has tried to define syndromes originating from the same biochemical disorder. He has denoted this concept as 'functional psychopathology'. As an example of such a functional syndrome, he has cited the serotonin-shortage syndrome which unifies various psychiatric symptoms under a new point of view. The treatment of the serotonin-shortage syndrome is best served by psychopharmaca which raise the metabolism of serotonin in the synaptic cleft, e.g. the selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors. Borrowing F. Freyhan's concept of 'target symptoms', one can now speak of 'functional target syndromes', within the frame of functional psychopathology.

  3. A pharmacological analysis of serotonergic receptors: effects of their activation of blockade in learning.

    PubMed

    Meneses, A; Hong, E

    1997-02-01

    1. The authors have tested several 5-HT selective agonists and antagonists (5-HT1A/1B, 5-HT2A/2B/2C, 5-HT3 or 5-HT4), an uptake inhibitor and 5-HT depletors in the autoshaping learning task. 2. The present work deals with the receptors whose stimulation increases or decreases learning. 3. Impaired consolidation of learning was observed after the presynaptic activation of 5-HT1B, 5-HT3 or 5-HT4 or the blockade of postsynaptic 5-HT2C/2B receptors. 4. In contrast, an improvement occurred after the presynaptic activation of 5-HT1A, 5-HT2C, and the blockade of presynaptic 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C and 5-HT3 receptors. 5. The blockade of postsynaptic 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT3 or 5-HT4 receptors and 5-HT inhibition of synthesis and its depletion did no alter learning by themselves. 6. The present data suggest that multiple pre- and postsynaptic serotonergic receptors are involved in the consolidation of learning. 7. Stimulation of most 5-HT receptors increases learning, however, some of 5-HT subtypes seem to limit the data storage. 8. Furthermore, the role of 5-HT receptors in learning seem to require an interaction with glutamatergic, GABAergic and cholinergic neurotransmission systems.

  4. Immunomodulatory effects mediated by serotonin.

    PubMed

    Arreola, Rodrigo; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Cruz-Fuentes, Carlos; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Garcés-Alvarez, María Eugenia; Hurtado-Alvarado, Gabriela; Quintero-Fabian, Saray; Pavón, Lenin

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) induces concentration-dependent metabolic effects in diverse cell types, including neurons, entherochromaffin cells, adipocytes, pancreatic beta-cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, epithelial cells, and leukocytes. Three classes of genes regulating 5-HT function are constitutively expressed or induced in these cells: (a) membrane proteins that regulate the response to 5-HT, such as SERT, 5HTR-GPCR, and the 5HT3-ion channels; (b) downstream signaling transduction proteins; and (c) enzymes controlling 5-HT metabolism, such as IDO and MAO, which can generate biologically active catabolites, including melatonin, kynurenines, and kynurenamines. This review covers the clinical and experimental mechanisms involved in 5-HT-induced immunomodulation. These mechanisms are cell-specific and depend on the expression of serotonergic components in immune cells. Consequently, 5-HT can modulate several immunological events, such as chemotaxis, leukocyte activation, proliferation, cytokine secretion, anergy, and apoptosis. The effects of 5-HT on immune cells may be relevant in the clinical outcome of pathologies with an inflammatory component. Major depression, fibromyalgia, Alzheimer disease, psoriasis, arthritis, allergies, and asthma are all associated with changes in the serotonergic system associated with leukocytes. Thus, pharmacological regulation of the serotonergic system may modulate immune function and provide therapeutic alternatives for these diseases.

  5. Immunomodulatory Effects Mediated by Serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Arreola, Rodrigo; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Cruz-Fuentes, Carlos; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Garcés-Alvarez, María Eugenia; Hurtado-Alvarado, Gabriela; Quintero-Fabian, Saray; Pavón, Lenin

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) induces concentration-dependent metabolic effects in diverse cell types, including neurons, entherochromaffin cells, adipocytes, pancreatic beta-cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, epithelial cells, and leukocytes. Three classes of genes regulating 5-HT function are constitutively expressed or induced in these cells: (a) membrane proteins that regulate the response to 5-HT, such as SERT, 5HTR-GPCR, and the 5HT3-ion channels; (b) downstream signaling transduction proteins; and (c) enzymes controlling 5-HT metabolism, such as IDO and MAO, which can generate biologically active catabolites, including melatonin, kynurenines, and kynurenamines. This review covers the clinical and experimental mechanisms involved in 5-HT-induced immunomodulation. These mechanisms are cell-specific and depend on the expression of serotonergic components in immune cells. Consequently, 5-HT can modulate several immunological events, such as chemotaxis, leukocyte activation, proliferation, cytokine secretion, anergy, and apoptosis. The effects of 5-HT on immune cells may be relevant in the clinical outcome of pathologies with an inflammatory component. Major depression, fibromyalgia, Alzheimer disease, psoriasis, arthritis, allergies, and asthma are all associated with changes in the serotonergic system associated with leukocytes. Thus, pharmacological regulation of the serotonergic system may modulate immune function and provide therapeutic alternatives for these diseases. PMID:25961058

  6. Iodine-123 MIBG imaging in a generalized pancreatic polypeptide-gastrin-serotonin secreting tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, G.; Vanden Houte, K.; Segers, O.; Bossuyt, A.

    1988-05-01

    The usefulness of radio-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a specific radiopharmaceutical agent for scintigraphic imaging and treatment of phaeochromocytoma and neuroblastoma, has been extended to the location of carcinoid tumors. Scintigraphic evaluation with I-123 MIBG in a patient with a histologically proven endocrine tumor (apudoma) of unknown origin with liver and bone metastases is reported. Elevated plasma hormone levels of gastrin, pancreatic polypeptide, and serotonin were found. Tumoral content of these hormones was immunocytochemically confirmed on liver biopsy. I-123 MIBG uptake could be seen in those areas of the liver with deficient lesions in the Tc-99m colloid image with a maximal uptake in a large mass at the level of the left liver lobe. No abnormal uptake could be observed at any other level, which was in contrast with autopsy findings of generalized metastatic disease.

  7. Mapping Cholesterol Interaction Sites on Serotonin Transporter through Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Mariarosaria; Masetti, Matteo; Recanatini, Maurizio; Cavalli, Andrea; Bottegoni, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin transporter (SERT) modulates serotonergic signaling via re-uptake of serotonin in pre-synaptic cells. The inclusion in cholesterol-enriched membrane domains is crucial for SERT activity, suggesting a cross-talk between the protein and the sterol. Here, we develop a protocol to identify potential cholesterol interaction sites coupling statistical analysis to multi-microsecond coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of SERT in a previously validated raft-like membrane model. Six putative sites were found, including a putative CRAC motif on TM4 and a CARC motif on TM10. Among them, four hot-spots near regions related to ion binding, transport, and inhibition were detected. Our results encourage prospective studies to unravel mechanistic features of the transporter and related drug discovery implications. PMID:27907003

  8. Biaryls as potent, tunable dual neurokinin 1 receptor antagonists and serotonin transporter inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Degnan, Andrew P; Tora, George O; Han, Ying; Rajamani, Ramkumar; Bertekap, Robert; Krause, Rudolph; Davis, Carl D; Hu, Joanna; Morgan, Daniel; Taylor, Sarah J; Krause, Kelly; Li, Yu-Wen; Mattson, Gail; Cunningham, Melissa A; Taber, Matthew T; Lodge, Nicholas J; Bronson, Joanne J; Gillman, Kevin W; Macor, John E

    2015-08-01

    Depression is a serious illness that affects millions of patients. Current treatments are associated with a number of undesirable side effects. Neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonists have recently been shown to potentiate the antidepressant effects of serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in a number of animal models. Herein we describe the optimization of a biaryl chemotype to provide a series of potent dual NK1R antagonists/serotonin transporter (SERT) inhibitors. Through the choice of appropriate substituents, the SERT/NK1R ratio could be tuned to afford a range of target selectivity profiles. This effort culminated in the identification of an analog that demonstrated oral bioavailability, favorable brain uptake, and efficacy in the gerbil foot tap model. Ex vivo occupancy studies with compound 58 demonstrated the ability to maintain NK1 receptor saturation (>88% occupancy) while titrating the desired level of SERT occupancy (11-84%) via dose selection.

  9. Serotonin regulates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Kim, Hail; Yoshida, Masashi; Fujiwara, Tomonori; Aoyagi, Kyota; Toyofuku, Yukiko; Nakamichi, Yoko; Nishiwaki, Chiyono; Okamura, Tadashi; Uchida, Toyoyoshi; Fujitani, Yoshio; Akagawa, Kimio; Kakei, Masafumi; Watada, Hirotaka; German, Michael S; Nagamatsu, Shinya

    2013-11-26

    In preparation for the metabolic demands of pregnancy, β cells in the maternal pancreatic islets increase both in number and in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) per cell. Mechanisms have been proposed for the increased β cell mass, but not for the increased GSIS. Because serotonin production increases dramatically during pregnancy, we tested whether flux through the ionotropic 5-HT3 receptor (Htr3) affects GSIS during pregnancy. Pregnant Htr3a(-/-) mice exhibited impaired glucose tolerance despite normally increased β cell mass, and their islets lacked the increase in GSIS seen in islets from pregnant wild-type mice. Electrophysiological studies showed that activation of Htr3 decreased the resting membrane potential in β cells, which increased Ca(2+) uptake and insulin exocytosis in response to glucose. Thus, our data indicate that serotonin, acting in a paracrine/autocrine manner through Htr3, lowers the β cell threshold for glucose and plays an essential role in the increased GSIS of pregnancy.

  10. Direct PIP2 binding mediates stable oligomer formation of the serotonin transporter

    PubMed Central

    Anderluh, Andreas; Hofmaier, Tina; Klotzsch, Enrico; Kudlacek, Oliver; Stockner, Thomas; Sitte, Harald H.; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2017-01-01

    The human serotonin transporter (hSERT) mediates uptake of serotonin from the synaptic cleft and thereby terminates serotonergic signalling. We have previously found by single-molecule microscopy that SERT forms stable higher-order oligomers of differing stoichiometry at the plasma membrane of living cells. Here, we report that SERT oligomer assembly at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane follows a dynamic equilibration process, characterized by rapid exchange of subunits between different oligomers, and by a concentration dependence of the degree of oligomerization. After trafficking to the plasma membrane, however, the SERT stoichiometry is fixed. Stabilization of the oligomeric SERT complexes is mediated by the direct binding to phosphoinositide phosphatidylinositol-4,5-biphosphate (PIP2). The observed spatial decoupling of oligomer formation from the site of oligomer operation provides cells with the ability to define protein quaternary structures independent of protein density at the cell surface. PMID:28102201

  11. Sepsis-induced elevation in plasma serotonin facilitates endothelial hyperpermeability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yicong; Hadden, Coedy; Cooper, Anthonya; Ahmed, Asli; Wu, Hong; Lupashin, Vladimir V.; Mayeux, Philip R.; Kilic, Fusun

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpermeability of the endothelial barrier and resulting microvascular leakage are a hallmark of sepsis. Our studies describe the mechanism by which serotonin (5-HT) regulates the microvascular permeability during sepsis. The plasma 5-HT levels are significantly elevated in mice made septic by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). 5-HT-induced permeability of endothelial cells was associated with the phosphorylation of p21 activating kinase (PAK1), PAK1-dependent phosphorylation of vimentin (P-vimentin) filaments, and a strong association between P-vimentin and ve-cadherin. These findings were in good agreement with the findings with the endothelial cells incubated in serum from CLP mice. In vivo, reducing the 5-HT uptake rates with the 5-HT transporter (SERT) inhibitor, paroxetine blocked renal microvascular leakage and the decline in microvascular perfusion. Importantly, mice that lack SERT showed significantly less microvascular dysfunction after CLP. Based on these data, we propose that the increased endothelial 5-HT uptake together with 5-HT signaling disrupts the endothelial barrier function in sepsis. Therefore, regulating intracellular 5-HT levels in endothelial cells represents a novel approach in improving sepsis-associated microvascular dysfunction and leakage. These new findings advance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying cellular responses to intracellular/extracellular 5-HT ratio in sepsis and refine current views of these signaling processes during sepsis. PMID:26956613

  12. Sepsis-induced elevation in plasma serotonin facilitates endothelial hyperpermeability.

    PubMed

    Li, Yicong; Hadden, Coedy; Cooper, Anthonya; Ahmed, Asli; Wu, Hong; Lupashin, Vladimir V; Mayeux, Philip R; Kilic, Fusun

    2016-03-09

    Hyperpermeability of the endothelial barrier and resulting microvascular leakage are a hallmark of sepsis. Our studies describe the mechanism by which serotonin (5-HT) regulates the microvascular permeability during sepsis. The plasma 5-HT levels are significantly elevated in mice made septic by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). 5-HT-induced permeability of endothelial cells was associated with the phosphorylation of p21 activating kinase (PAK1), PAK1-dependent phosphorylation of vimentin (P-vimentin) filaments, and a strong association between P-vimentin and ve-cadherin. These findings were in good agreement with the findings with the endothelial cells incubated in serum from CLP mice. In vivo, reducing the 5-HT uptake rates with the 5-HT transporter (SERT) inhibitor, paroxetine blocked renal microvascular leakage and the decline in microvascular perfusion. Importantly, mice that lack SERT showed significantly less microvascular dysfunction after CLP. Based on these data, we propose that the increased endothelial 5-HT uptake together with 5-HT signaling disrupts the endothelial barrier function in sepsis. Therefore, regulating intracellular 5-HT levels in endothelial cells represents a novel approach in improving sepsis-associated microvascular dysfunction and leakage. These new findings advance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying cellular responses to intracellular/extracellular 5-HT ratio in sepsis and refine current views of these signaling processes during sepsis.

  13. Targeting the Serotonin 5-HT7 Receptor in the Search for Treatments for CNS Disorders: Rationale and Progress to Date.

    PubMed

    Nikiforuk, Agnieszka

    2015-04-01

    The 5-HT7 (5-hydroxytryptamine 7, serotonin 7) receptor is one of the most recently identified members of the serotonin receptor family. Pharmacological tools, including selective antagonists and, more recently, agonists, along with 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7R) knock-out mice have revealed the involvement of this receptor in central nervous system processes. Its well-established role in controlling body temperature and regulating sleep and circadian rhythms has implicated this receptor in mood disorders. Thus, the 5-HT7R has gained much attention as a possible target for the treatment of depression. Although preclinical data support the antidepressant-like actions of 5-HT7R antagonists, their clinical efficacy has not been yet established. Other evidence has implicated the 5-HT7R in learning and memory. Preclinical findings suggest that blockade of this receptor may be beneficial against schizophrenia-like cognitive deficits. Other possible indications include nociception, epilepsy, migraine, autism spectrum disorders, and Rett Syndrome. However, the question is whether the beneficial effects may be achieved by activation or blockade of 5-HT7Rs. Hence, this review briefly summarises the recent findings on the role of 5-HT7Rs and their ligands in CNS disorders.

  14. Role of Ca(2+) and protein kinase C in the serotonin (5-HT) transport in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Turetta, L; Bazzan, E; Bertagno, K; Musacchio, E; Deana, R

    2002-05-01

    Accumulation of serotonin (5-HT) into human platelets was not affected by the presence of the extra-cellular calcium chelator EGTA, while decreased by platelet incubation with the membrane permeant chelator BAPTA-AM. Serotonin uptake also diminished upon platelet exposure to EGTA/thapsigargin or EGTA/ionomycin which increased the cytosolic [Ca(2+)] to levels lower than those inducing secretion of dense granules. The latter inhibition depended in part on changes of intra-granular pH, since the accumulation of acridine orange, which is driven into the dense granules by the intra-granular acid pH gradient, was slightly decreased in the presence of EGTA/thapsigargin. These compounds also inhibited the 5-HT uptake in platelets pre-incubated with reserpine and bafilomycin that prevent 5-HT from entering into the dense granules. Inhibitors of protease, protein phosphatase, Na(+)/H(+) exchanger or ciclo-oxygenase activities did not modify the serotonin accumulation. Addition of EGTA/thapsigargin to reserpine-treated, [(14)C]5-HT-loaded, platelets caused an imipramine-insensitive release of labelled serotonin. This release was reduced by both BAPTA-AM or protein kinase C inhibitor bisindoylmaleimide (GF). The latter compound, either alone or together with EGTA/thapsigargin, inhibited the 5-HT accumulation in reserpine-treated platelets. It is concluded that both cytosolic [Ca(2+)] and protein kinase C are involved in the regulation of the plasma membrane 5-HT transport.

  15. FLUID AND ION SECRETION BY MALPIGHIAN TUBULES OF LARVAL CHIRONOMIDS, Chironomus riparius: EFFECTS OF REARING SALINITY, TRANSPORT INHIBITORS, AND SEROTONIN.

    PubMed

    Zadeh-Tahmasebi, Melika; Bui, Phuong; Donini, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Larvae of Chironomus riparius respond to ion-poor and brackish water (IPW, BW) conditions by activating ion uptake mechanisms in the anal papillae and reducing ion absorption at the rectum, respectively. The role that the Malpighian tubules play in ion and osmoregulation under these conditions is not known in this species. This study examines rates of fluid secretion and major cation composition of secreted fluid from tubules of C. riparius reared in IPW, freshwater (FW) and BW. Fluid secretion of tubules from FW and BW larvae was similar but tubules from IPW larvae secrete fluid at higher rates, are more sensitive to serotonin stimulation, and the secreted fluid contains less Na(+) . Therefore in IPW, tubules work in concert with anal papillae to eliminate excess water while conserving Na(+) in the hemolymph. Tubules do not appear to play a significant role in ion/osmoregulation under BW. Serotonin immunoreactivity in the nervous system and gastrointestinal tract of larval C. riparius was similar to that seen in mosquito larvae with the exception that the hindgut was devoid of staining. Hemolymph serotonin titer was similar in FW and IPW; hence, serotonin is not responsible for the observed high rates of fluid secretion in IPW. Instead, it is suggested that serotonin may work in a synergistic manner with an unidentified hormonal factor in IPW. Ion transport mechanisms in the tubules of C. riparius are pharmacologically similar to those of other insects.

  16. [The action of 1-aminoadamantane. Comparative studies with isolated nerve endings and thrombocytes on the release of serotonin and dopamine].

    PubMed

    Haacke, U; Sturm, G; Süwer, V; Wesemann, W; Wildenhahn, G

    1977-07-01

    Nerve endings isolated from rat brain accumulate exogenous serotonin and dopamine. Both biogenic amines are released from nerve endings as well by means of electrical stimulation with rectangular pulses of alternating polarity as by incubation with 5 X 10(-4) to 5 X 10(-5) M solutions of the adamantane derivatives 1-aminoadamantane hydrochloride (D 1) and 1-amino-3,5-dimethyladamantane hydrochloride (memantine, D 145). The electrically stimulated liberation is small but is significantly increased after simultaneous incubation of the nerve endings with subthreshold concentrations of 1-aminoadamantanes (5X10(-6) to 5X10(-5) M). The reuptake of released serotonin is noncompetitively inhibited by 1-aminoadamantanes. Also in blood platelets frequently used as model cells of the nerve endings the serotonin uptake is inhibited by small concentrations of D 145, 10(-5) to 2X10(-4) M. High concentrations of D 145- greater than 2X10(-3) M, induce the "release-reaction", the simultaneous liberation of serotonin, ATP, and ADP. In the concentration range of 2X10(-4) to 2X10(-3) M D 145 only serotonin is set free.

  17. Residual neuromuscular blockade and postoperative critical respiratory events: literature review.

    PubMed

    Kiekkas, Panagiotis; Bakalis, Nick; Stefanopoulos, Nikolaos; Konstantinou, Evangelos; Aretha, Diamanto

    2014-11-01

    To investigate and synthesise published literature on the associations between residual neuromuscular blockade and critical respiratory events of postoperative adult patients in the postanaesthesia care unit. Residual neuromuscular blockade continues to be common among patients transferred to the postanaesthesia care unit after general anaesthesia, while negative effects of residual neuromuscular blockade on respiratory function have been demonstrated in laboratory volunteers. Literature review. Using key terms, a search was conducted in Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Database and EMBASE (January 1990-May 2013) for clinical trials or observational studies on the associations between residual neuromuscular blockade and critical respiratory events, published in English-language journals. Nine articles met the inclusion criteria. Residual neuromuscular blockade definition threshold differed between studies. Among critical respiratory events, only hypoxaemia was investigated in all included studies. Residual neuromuscular blockade was significantly associated with increased incidence of hypoxaemia during postanaesthesia care unit stay in most studies, while associations with the rest of the critical respiratory events were inconclusive. Although limited, existing research has provided evidence that patients with residual neuromuscular blockade are at high risk of early postoperative hypoxaemia. Further studies are needed to investigate independent associations between residual neuromuscular blockade and critical respiratory events, along with causality of these associations. The clinical importance of residual neuromuscular blockade for groups at high risk of critical respiratory events should also be investigated. Healthcare professionals have to be aware of the increased risk of hypoxaemia in patients with residual neuromuscular blockade. Efforts to decrease residual neuromuscular blockade incidence

  18. Autism spectrum disorder associated with low serotonin in CSF and mutations in the SLC29A4 plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) gene

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may have low brain serotonin concentrations as reflected by the serotonin end-metabolite 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5HIAA) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Methods We sequenced the candidate genes SLC6A4 (SERT), SLC29A4 (PMAT), and GCHFR (GFRP), followed by whole exome analysis. Results The known heterozygous p.Gly56Ala mutation in the SLC6A4 gene was equally found in the ASD and control populations. Using a genetic candidate gene approach, we identified, in 8 patients of a cohort of 248 with ASD, a high prevalence (3.2%) of three novel heterozygous non-synonymous mutations within the SLC29A4 plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) gene, c.86A > G (p.Asp29Gly) in two patients, c.412G > A (p.Ala138Thr) in five patients, and c.978 T > G (p.Asp326Glu) in one patient. Genome analysis of unaffected parents confirmed that these PMAT mutations were not de novo but inherited mutations. Upon analyzing over 15,000 normal control chromosomes, only SLC29A4 c.86A > G was found in 23 alleles (0.14%), while neither c.412G > A (<0.007%) nor c.978 T > G (<0.007%) were observed in all chromosomes analyzed, emphasizing the rareness of the three alterations. Expression of mutations PMAT-p.Ala138Thr and p.Asp326Glu in cellulae revealed significant reduced transport uptake activity towards a variety of substrates including serotonin, dopamine, and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), while mutation p.Asp29Gly had reduced transport activity only towards MPP+. At least two ASD subjects with either the PMAT-Ala138Thr or the PMAT-Asp326Glu mutation with altered serotonin transport activity had, besides low 5HIAA in CSF, elevated serotonin levels in blood and platelets. Moreover, whole exome sequencing revealed additional alterations in these two ASD patients in mainly serotonin-homeostasis genes compared to their non-affected family members. Conclusions Our findings link mutations in SLC29A4 to the ASD

  19. The antidepressant bupropion is a negative allosteric modulator of serotonin type 3A receptors.

    PubMed

    Pandhare, Akash; Pappu, Aneesh Satya; Wilms, Henrik; Blanton, Michael Paul; Jansen, Michaela

    2017-02-01

    The FDA-approved antidepressant and smoking cessation drug bupropion is known to inhibit dopamine and norepinephrine reuptake transporters, as well as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) which are cation-conducting members of the Cys-loop superfamily of ion channels, and more broadly pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs). In the present study, we examined the ability of bupropion and its primary metabolite hydroxybupropion to block the function of cation-selective serotonin type 3A receptors (5-HT3ARs), and further characterized bupropion's pharmacological effects at these receptors. Mouse 5-HT3ARs were heterologously expressed in HEK-293 cells or Xenopus laevis oocytes for equilibrium binding studies. In addition, the latter expression system was utilized for functional studies by employing two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings. Both bupropion and hydroxybupropion inhibited serotonin-gated currents from 5-HT3ARs reversibly and dose-dependently with inhibitory potencies of 87 μM and 112 μM, respectively. Notably, the measured IC50 value for hydroxybupropion is within its therapeutically-relevant concentrations. The blockade by bupropion was largely non-competitive and non-use-dependent. Unlike its modulation at cation-selective pLGICs, bupropion displayed no significant inhibition of the function of anion-selective pLGICs. In summary, our results demonstrate allosteric blockade by bupropion of the 5-HT3AR. Importantly, given the possibility that bupropion's major active metabolite may achieve clinically relevant concentrations in the brain, our novel findings delineate a not yet identified pharmacological principle underlying its antidepressant effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 5-HT1B autoreceptor regulation of serotonin transporter activity in synaptosomes

    PubMed Central

    Hagan, Catherine E.; McDevitt, Ross A.; Liu, Yusha; Furay, Amy R.; Neumaier, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin-1B (5-HT1B) autoreceptors are located in serotonin (5-HT) terminals along with serotonin transporters (SERT), and play a critical role in autoregulation of serotonergic neurotransmission, and are implicated in disorders of serotonergic function, particularly emotional regulation. SERT modulates serotonergic neurotransmission by high-affinity reuptake of 5-HT. Alterations in SERT activity are associated with increased risk for depression and anxiety. Several neurotransmitter receptors are known to regulate SERT Km and Vmax, and previous work suggests that 5-HT1B autoreceptors may regulate 5-HT reuptake, in addition to modulating 5-HT release and synthesis. We used rotating disk electrode voltammetry to investigate 5-HT1B autoreceptor regulation of SERT-mediated 5-HT uptake into synaptosomes. The selective 5-HT1B antagonist SB224289 decreased SERT activity in synaptosomes prepared from wild-type but not 5-HT1B knockout mice, whereas SERT uptake was enhanced after pre-treatment with the selective 5-HT1B agonist CP94253. Furthermore, SERT activity varies as a function of 5-HT1B receptor expression—specifically, genetic deletion of 5-HT1B decreased SERT function, while viral-mediated overexpression of 5-HT1B autoreceptors in rat raphe neurons increased SERT activity in rat hippocampal synaptosomes. Considered collectively, these results provide evidence that 5-HT1B autoreceptors regulate SERT activity. Since SERT clearance rate varies as a function of 5-HT1B autoreceptor expression levels and is modulated by both activation and inhibition of 5-HT1B autoreceptors, this dynamic interaction may be an important mechanism of serotonin autoregulation with therapeutic implications. PMID:22961814

  1. Synapsins Differentially Control Dopamine and Serotonin Release

    PubMed Central

    Kile, Brian M.; Guillot, Thomas S.; Venton, B. Jill; Wetsel, William C.; Augustine, George J.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2010-01-01

    Synapsins are a family of synaptic vesicle proteins that are important for neurotransmitter release. Here we have used triple knockout (TKO) mice lacking all three synapsin genes to determine the roles of synapsins in the release of two monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine and serotonin. Serotonin release evoked by electrical stimulation was identical in substantia nigra pars reticulata slices prepared from TKO and wild-type mice. In contrast, release of dopamine in response to electrical stimulation was approximately doubled in striatum of TKO mice, both in vivo and in striatal slices, in comparison to wild-type controls. This was due to loss of synapsin III, because deletion of synapsin III alone was sufficient to increase dopamine release. Deletion of synapsins also increased the sensitivity of dopamine release to extracellular calcium ions. Although cocaine did not affect the release of serotonin from nigral tissue, this drug did enhance dopamine release. Cocaine-induced facilitation of dopamine release was a function of external calcium, an effect that was reduced in TKO mice. We conclude that synapsins play different roles in the control of release of dopamine and serotonin, with release of dopamine being negatively regulated by synapsins, specifically synapsin III, while serotonin release appears to be relatively independent of synapsins. These results provide further support for the concept that synapsin function in presynaptic terminals varies according to the neurotransmitter being released. PMID:20660258

  2. Synapsins differentially control dopamine and serotonin release.

    PubMed

    Kile, Brian M; Guillot, Thomas S; Venton, B Jill; Wetsel, William C; Augustine, George J; Wightman, R Mark

    2010-07-21

    Synapsins are a family of synaptic vesicle proteins that are important for neurotransmitter release. Here we have used triple knock-out (TKO) mice lacking all three synapsin genes to determine the roles of synapsins in the release of two monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine and serotonin. Serotonin release evoked by electrical stimulation was identical in substantia nigra pars reticulata slices prepared from TKO and wild-type mice. In contrast, release of dopamine in response to electrical stimulation was approximately doubled in striatum of TKO mice, both in vivo and in striatal slices, in comparison to wild-type controls. This was due to loss of synapsin III, because deletion of synapsin III alone was sufficient to increase dopamine release. Deletion of synapsins also increased the sensitivity of dopamine release to extracellular calcium ions. Although cocaine did not affect the release of serotonin from nigral tissue, this drug did enhance dopamine release. Cocaine-induced facilitation of dopamine release was a function of external calcium, an effect that was reduced in TKO mice. We conclude that synapsins play different roles in the control of release of dopamine and serotonin, with release of dopamine being negatively regulated by synapsins, specifically synapsin III, while serotonin release appears to be relatively independent of synapsins. These results provide further support for the concept that synapsin function in presynaptic terminals varies according to the neurotransmitter being released.

  3. Convulsive ergotism: epidemics of the serotonin syndrome?

    PubMed

    Eadie, Mervyn J

    2003-07-01

    Between 1085 and 1927, epidemics of "convulsive ergotism" were widespread east of the Rhine in Europe due to consumption of grain contaminated with ergot, which is produced by the fungus Claviceps purpurea. West of the Rhine, consumption of ergot-contaminated food caused epidemics of gangrenous ergotism. The clinical features of convulsive ergotism--muscle twitching and spasms, changes in mental state, hallucinations, sweating, and fever lasting for several weeks--suggest serotonergic overstimulation of the CNS (ie, the serotonin syndrome). The ergot alkaloids are serotonin agonists. Dihydroergotamine binds to serotonin receptors in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, which is the site of neuropathological changes in convulsive ergotism. Dihydroergotamine given to human beings can cause the serotonin syndrome. Ergots produced by different strains of Claviceps purpurea, and those growing in different soils, may have different ergot alkaloid compositions. An alkaloid, present in high concentrations in ergots from east of the Rhine, may have caused convulsive ergotism at a circulating concentration insufficient to produce peripheral ischaemia. The serotonin syndrome may, therefore, have been a public-health problem long before it was recognised as a complication of modern psychopharmacology.

  4. Ascending serotonin neuron diversity under two umbrellas.

    PubMed

    Commons, Kathryn G

    2016-09-01

    Forebrain serotonin relevant for many psychological disorders arises in the hindbrain, primarily within the dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DR and MR). These nuclei are heterogeneous, containing several distinct groups of serotonin neurons. Here, new insight into the afferent and efferent connectivity of these areas is reviewed in correlation with their developmental origin. These data suggest that the caudal third of the DR, the area originally designated B6, may be misidentified as part of the DR as it shares many features of connectivity with the MR. By considering the rostral DR independently and affiliating the B6 to the MR, the diverse subgroups of serotonin neurons can be arranged with more coherence into two umbrella groups, each with distinctive domains of influence. Serotonin neurons within the rostral DR are uniquely interconnected with brain areas associated with emotion and motivation such as the amygdala, accumbens and ventral pallidum. In contrast serotonin neurons in the B6 and MR are characterized by their dominion over the septum and hippocampus. This distinction between the DR and B6/MR parallels their developmental origin and likely impacts their role in both behavior and psychopathology. Implications and further subdivisions within these areas are discussed.

  5. Organizational effects of oxytocin on serotonin innervation.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Jennifer L; Roache, Laura; Nguyen, Khanhbao N; Cushing, Bruce S; Troyer, Emma; Papademetriou, Eros; Raghanti, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    Oxytocin (OT) has an organizational effect within the central nervous system and can have long-lasting effects on the expression of social behavior. OT has recently been implicated in modulating the release of serotonin through activation of receptors in the raphe nuclei. Here we test the hypothesis that OT can have an organizational effect on the serotonergic system. Male prairie voles received an intraperitoneal injection on postnatal day 1 with 3.0 or .3 µg OT, an OT antagonist, or a saline control. Brains were collected on day 21 and immunostained for serotonin. Serotonin axons were quantified in the anterior hypothalamus, cortical amygdala, medial amygdala, paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, and ventromedial hypothalamus. Males treated with 3.0 µg OT displayed significantly higher serotonin axon length densities in the anterior hypothalamus, cortical amygdala, and the ventromedial hypothalamus than control males. These results support the hypothesis that OT has an organizational effect on the serotonin system during the neonatal period, and that these effects are site-specific.

  6. Serotonin-dependent kinetics of feeding bursts underlie a graded response to food availability in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Suk; Iwanir, Shachar; Kopito, Ronen B.; Scholz, Monika; Calarco, John A.; Biron, David; Levine, Erel

    2017-01-01

    Animals integrate physiological and environmental signals to modulate their food uptake. The nematode C. elegans, whose food uptake consists of pumping bacteria from the environment into the gut, provides excellent opportunities for discovering principles of conserved regulatory mechanisms. Here we show that worms implement a graded feeding response to the concentration of environmental bacteria by modulating a commitment to bursts of fast pumping. Using long-term, high-resolution, longitudinal recordings of feeding dynamics under defined conditions, we find that the frequency and duration of pumping bursts increase and the duration of long pauses diminishes in environments richer in bacteria. The bioamine serotonin is required for food-dependent induction of bursts as well as for maintaining their high rate of pumping through two distinct mechanisms. We identify the differential roles of distinct families of serotonin receptors in this process and propose that regulation of bursts is a conserved mechanism of behaviour and motor control. PMID:28145493

  7. Serotonin-dependent kinetics of feeding bursts underlie a graded response to food availability in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Suk; Iwanir, Shachar; Kopito, Ronen B; Scholz, Monika; Calarco, John A; Biron, David; Levine, Erel

    2017-02-01

    Animals integrate physiological and environmental signals to modulate their food uptake. The nematode C. elegans, whose food uptake consists of pumping bacteria from the environment into the gut, provides excellent opportunities for discovering principles of conserved regulatory mechanisms. Here we show that worms implement a graded feeding response to the concentration of environmental bacteria by modulating a commitment to bursts of fast pumping. Using long-term, high-resolution, longitudinal recordings of feeding dynamics under defined conditions, we find that the frequency and duration of pumping bursts increase and the duration of long pauses diminishes in environments richer in bacteria. The bioamine serotonin is required for food-dependent induction of bursts as well as for maintaining their high rate of pumping through two distinct mechanisms. We identify the differential roles of distinct families of serotonin receptors in this process and propose that regulation of bursts is a conserved mechanism of behaviour and motor control.

  8. Oscillatory Serotonin Function in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Ronald M.; Cowan, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    Oscillations in brain activities with periods of minutes to hours may be critical for normal mood behaviors. Ultradian (faster than circadian) rhythms of mood behaviors and associated central nervous system activities are altered in depression. Recent data suggest that ultradian rhythms in serotonin (5HT) function also change in depression. In two separate studies, 5HT metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were measured every 10 m for 24 h before and after chronic antidepressant treatment. Antidepressant treatments were associated with enhanced ultradian amplitudes of CSF metabolite levels. Another study used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)to measure amplitudes of dorsal raphé activation cycles following sham or active dietary depletions of the 5HT precursor (tryptophan). During depletion, amplitudes of dorsal raphé activation cycles increased with rapid 6 s periods (about 0.18 Hz)while functional connectivity weakened between dorsal raphé and thalamus at slower periods of 20 s (0.05 Hz). A third approach studied MDMA (ecstasy) users because of their chronically diminished 5HT function compared to non-MDMA polysubstance users (Karageorgiou et al., 2009). Compared to a non-MDMA using cohort, MDMA users showed diminished fMRI intra-regional coherence in motor regions along with altered functional connectivity, again suggesting effects of altered 5HT oscillatory function. These data support a hypothesis that qualities of ultradian oscillations in 5HT function may critically influence moods and behaviors. Dysfunctional 5HT rhythms in depression may be a common endpoint and biomarker for depression, linking dysfunction of slow brain network oscillators to 5HT mechanisms affected by commonly available treatments. 5HT oscillatory dysfunction may define illness subtypes and predict responses to serotonergic agents. Further studies of 5HT oscillations in depression are indicated. PMID:23592367

  9. Brain neurochemistry and macronutrient selection: a role for serotonin feedback?

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    Experimental manipulations that clearly affected brain serotonin concentrations had no effect on diet selection. These findings challenge the importance of serotonin as part of a negative-feedback loop modulating macronutrient selection.

  10. [Axillary blockade of the brachial plexus. A prospective study of blockade success using electric nerve stimulation].

    PubMed

    Eifert, B; Hähnel, J; Kustermann, J

    1994-12-01

    Axillary block is a common anesthetic technique for operations on the hand and forearm. In our hospital, with many trainees in anaesthesia, only 250-300 axillary blocks per year are performed by about 30 colleagues. This implies a small number of blocks for each anaesthetist. The present study was designed to assess whether it is possible to teach this technique and use it with an adequate degree of success under these conditions. We used a nerve stimulator and studied whether the success of the block under these conditions is independent of anaesthetist's experience in this technique. Furthermore, we examined other factors involved in the success of the block. METHODS. The study included 112 patients subjected to elective surgery of the upper extremity; all received an axillary block. We used a nerve stimulator and injected mepivacaine 1% without adrenaline. The following parameters were recorded: the number of blocks to date performed by the anaesthetist; the minimal current required for nerve stimulation; the dose of local anaesthetic; the time between the end of injection and the beginning of surgery; the quality of sensory and motor blockade after 10, 20, and 30 min. Sensory blockade was assessed by the pinprick method (no blockade, analgesia, anaesthesia); motor blockade was judged by comparing the muscle strength of both arms (no blockade, paresis, paralysis). Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney test, with P < 0.05 considered statistically significant. RESULTS. Of the 112 blocks, 95 (85%) were successful; 17 (15%) failed and the patients required general anaesthesia. Eight of the successful blocks showed a decrease in analgesic quality after > or = 70 min and required additional analgesics or general anaesthesia. We found no correlation between the experience of the anaesthetist and the success of the block. The minimal required current for nerve stimulation in the success group was 0.4 mA and differed significantly from the value of 0.6 mA in the

  11. Future directions for serotonin and antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Artigas, Francesc

    2013-01-16

    Despite the widespread use of antidepressant medications that block serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) and/or norepinephrine (NE) transporters, such as SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) or SNRIs (serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors), the underlying neurobiological basis of action of these agents is poorly understood. Increases in serotonergic function are hypothesized to have beneficial effects on depressive symptoms. However, which of the 14 different neuronal receptors sensitive to 5-HT accounts for the therapeutic effects of SSRIs and SNRIs remains undetermined. The development of drugs that activate or block specific 5-HT receptors may help to circumvent the two main limitations of current antidepressants: low efficacy and delayed onset of therapeutic action. What follows is a short summary of the author's views on this matter.

  12. Future Directions for Serotonin and Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of antidepressant medications that block serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) and/or norepinephrine (NE) transporters, such as SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) or SNRIs (serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors), the underlying neurobiological basis of action of these agents is poorly understood. Increases in serotonergic function are hypothesized to have beneficial effects on depressive symptoms. However, which of the 14 different neuronal receptors sensitive to 5-HT accounts for the therapeutic effects of SSRIs and SNRIs remains undetermined. The development of drugs that activate or block specific 5-HT receptors may help to circumvent the two main limitations of current antidepressants: low efficacy and delayed onset of therapeutic action. What follows is a short summary of the author’s views on this matter. PMID:23336036

  13. Desvenlafaxine succinate: A new serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Deecher, Darlene C; Beyer, Chad E; Johnston, Grace; Bray, Jenifer; Shah, S; Abou-Gharbia, M; Andree, Terrance H

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize a new chemical entity, desvenlafaxine succinate (DVS). DVS is a novel salt form of the isolated major active metabolite of venlafaxine. Competitive radioligand binding assays were performed using cells expressing either the human serotonin (5-HT) transporter (hSERT) or norepinephrine (NE) transporter (hNET) with K(i) values for DVS of 40.2 +/- 1.6 and 558.4 +/- 121.6 nM, respectively. DVS showed weak binding affinity (62% inhibition at 100 microM) at the human dopamine (DA) transporter. Inhibition of [3H]5-HT or [3H]NE uptake by DVS for the hSERT or hNET produced IC50 values of 47.3 +/- 19.4 and 531.3 +/- 113.0 nM, respectively. DVS (10 microM), examined at a large number of nontransporter targets, showed no significant activity. DVS (30 mg/kg orally) rapidly penetrated the male rat brain and hypothalamus. DVS (30 mg/kg orally) significantly increased extracellular NE levels compared with baseline in the male rat hypothalamus but had no effect on DA levels using microdialysis. To mimic chronic selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment and to block the inhibitory 5-HT(1A) autoreceptors, a 5-HT(1A) antagonist, N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-2-pyridinylcyclo hexanecarboxamide maleate salt (WAY-100635) (0.3 mg/kg s.c.), was administered with DVS (30 mg/kg orally). 5-HT increased 78% compared with baseline with no additional increase in NE or DA levels. In conclusion, DVS is a new 5-HT and NE reuptake inhibitor in vitro and in vivo that demonstrates good brain-to-plasma ratios, suggesting utility in a variety of central nervous system-related disorders.

  14. Noradrenaline blockade specifically enhances metacognitive performance

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Tobias U; Allen, Micah; Purg, Nina; Moutoussis, Michael; Rees, Geraint; Dolan, Raymond J

    2017-01-01

    Impairments in metacognition, the ability to accurately report one’s performance, are common in patients with psychiatric disorders, where a putative neuromodulatory dysregulation provides the rationale for pharmacological interventions. Previously, we have shown how unexpected arousal modulates metacognition (Allen et al., 2016). Here, we report a double-blind, placebo-controlled, study that examined specific effects of noradrenaline and dopamine on both metacognition and perceptual decision making. Signal theoretic analysis of a global motion discrimination task with adaptive performance staircasing revealed that noradrenergic blockade (40 mg propranolol) significantly increased metacognitive performance (type-II area under the curve, AUROC2), but had no impact on perceptual decision making performance. Blockade of dopamine D2/3 receptors (400 mg amisulpride) had no effect on either metacognition or perceptual decision making. Our study is the first to show a pharmacological enhancement of metacognitive performance, in the absence of any effect on perceptual decision making. This enhancement points to a regulatory role for noradrenergic neurotransmission in perceptual metacognition. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24901.001 PMID:28489001

  15. Association between serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Farjadian, Shirin; Moghtaderi, Mozhgan; Fakhraei, Bahareh; Nasiri, Mahboubeh; Farjam, Mojtaba

    2013-12-01

    Asthma is a common chronic inflammatory disease of the airways in which genetic factors play a major role in its pathogenesis. High serotonin serum levels in patients with asthma suggest that serotonin is involved in the pathophysiology of the disease. Serotonin clearance is mediated by the serotonin reuptake transporter, and functional polymorphisms in this gene lead to altered serotonin reuptake efficiency. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and asthma. Serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR, rs35521 and STin2.VNTR) were assessed by PCR-based methods in 100 children with mild to moderate persistent asthma and compared with 100 healthy controls. There were no significant differences in allele, genotype or haplotype frequencies between patients and controls. No association was observed between SERT gene polymorphisms after stratification of patients for sex, age, spirometry indices, family history, passive smoking behavior and concomitant allergic rhinitis. Significant differences were observed in the distribution of 5-HTTLPR alleles (p = 0.025) and genotypes (p = 0.021) between patients with and without atopic dermatitis. Despite strong evidence suggesting the role of serotonin in the pathophysiology of asthma, we found no association between serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and mild to moderate persistent asthma. Further serotonin transporter gene analyses in patients with severe asthma may open up new horizons in the utilization of common serotonin regulators to treat asthma, based on their pharmacogenetic effects. However, serotonin may also be indirectly influenced by emotional stress during asthma attacks.

  16. [Serotonin and its receptors in the cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Nadeev, A D; Zharkikh, I L; Avdonin, P V; Goncharov, N V

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin in cardiovascular system plays an important role in blood coagulation, allergy, and inflammation, as well as in blood vessel tone regulation. In this review, the mechanisms of serotonin effects upon the cells of blood vessels are considered and the list of main agonists and antagonists is presented. The signaling pathways activated by serotonin and their interaction in normal and pathological states are described.

  17. Role of peripheral serotonin in glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hitoshi; Rose, Michael T; Aso, Hisashi

    2011-06-01

    Two independent serotonin systems exist, one in the brain and the other in the periphery. Serotonin is a well known monoaminergic neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and it is known to regulate feeding behavior, meal size, and body weight. On the other hand, there is much less evidence for the role of serotonin as a gastrointestinal hormone, particularly with respect to its effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of peripheral serotonin on glucose and lipid metabolism and the implications of this for further research. The enterochromaffin cells of the gastrointestinal tract produce peripheral serotonin postprandially. In mice, it induces a decrease in the concentration of circulating lipids as well as hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia through its action on several serotonin receptors. Further, serotonin metabolites act as endogenous agonists for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and serotonin accelerates adipocyte differentiation via serotonin receptor 2A and 2C. Studies of serotonin are likely to provide new insights into the field of lipid accumulation and metabolism. Recent studies show new physiological functions of peripheral serotonin, linked to glucose and lipid metabolism. Peripheral serotonin may serve as an attractive new therapeutic target for the treatment of metabolic disorders in the near future.

  18. Role of serotonin in seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Sharma, P K; Garg, V K; Singh, A K; Mondal, S C

    2013-01-01

    This review was prepared with an aim to show role of serotonin in seasonal affective disorder. Seasonal affective disorder, which is also called as winter depression or winter blues, is mood disorder in which persons with normal mental health throughout most of the year will show depressive symptoms in the winter or, less commonly, in the summer. Serotonin is an important endogenous neurotransmitter which also acts as neuromodulator. The least invasive, natural, and researched treatment of seasonal affective disorder is natural or otherwise is light therapy. Negative air ionization, which acts by liberating charged particles on the sleep environment, has also become effective in treatment of seasonal affective disorder.  

  19. [Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and gastrointestinal hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takatsugu; Abe, Koichiro; Kuyama, Yasushi

    2013-04-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are widely used antidepressants characterized by less-frequent adverse effects compared with classical anti-depressive agents. On the other hand, SSRI can cause hemorrhagic events more due to impaired platelet aggregation induced by a depletion of serotonin in the peripheral platelet. Epidemiological studies have indicated that patients taking SSRI are predisposed to gastrointestinal hemorrhage, especially in case that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are prescribed concomitantly. Here we describe a risk of the gastrointestinal hemorrhage in patients taking SSRI.

  20. Interaction of psychoactive tryptamines with biogenic amine transporters and serotonin receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Blough, Bruce E.; Landavazo, Antonio; Decker, Ann M.; Partilla, John S.; Baumann, Michael H.; Rothman, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Synthetic hallucinogenic tryptamines, especially those originally described by Alexander Shulgin, continue to be abused in the United States. The range of subjective experiences produced by different tryptamines suggests that multiple neurochemical mechanisms are involved in their actions, in addition to the established role of agonist activity at serotonin-2A (5-HT2A) receptors. Objectives This study evaluated the interaction of a series of synthetic tryptamines with biogenic amine neurotransmitter transporters and with serotonin (5-HT) receptor subtypes implicated in psychedelic effects. Methods Neurotransmitter transporter activity was determined in rat brain synaptosomes. Receptor activity was determined using calcium mobilization and DiscoveRx PathHunter® assays in HEK293, Gα16-CHO, and CHOk1 cells transfected with human receptors. Results Twenty-one tryptamines were analyzed in transporter uptake and release assays, and 5-HT2A, serotonin 1A (5-HT1A), and 5-HT2A β-arrestin functional assays. Eight of the compounds were found to have 5-HT-releasing activity. Thirteen compounds were found to be 5-HT uptake inhibitors or were inactive. All tryptamines were 5-HT2A agonists with a range of potencies and efficacies, but only a few compounds were 5-HT1A agonists. Most tryptamines recruited β-arrestin through 5-HT2A activation. Conclusions All psychoactive tryptamines are 5-HT2A agonists, but 5-HT transporter (SERT) activity may contribute significantly to the pharmacology of certain compounds. The in vitro transporter data confirm structure-activity trends for releasers and uptake inhibitors whereby releasers tend to be structurally smaller compounds. Interestingly, two tertiary amines were found to be selective substrates at SERT, which dispels the notion that 5-HT-releasing activity is limited only to primary or secondary amines. PMID:24800892

  1. Interaction of psychoactive tryptamines with biogenic amine transporters and serotonin receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Blough, Bruce E; Landavazo, Antonio; Decker, Ann M; Partilla, John S; Baumann, Michael H; Rothman, Richard B

    2014-10-01

    Synthetic hallucinogenic tryptamines, especially those originally described by Alexander Shulgin, continue to be abused in the USA. The range of subjective experiences produced by different tryptamines suggests that multiple neurochemical mechanisms are involved in their actions, in addition to the established role of agonist activity at serotonin 2A (5-HT₂A) receptors. This study evaluated the interaction of a series of synthetic tryptamines with biogenic amine neurotransmitter transporters and with serotonin (5-HT) receptor subtypes implicated in psychedelic effects. Neurotransmitter transporter activity was determined in rat brain synaptosomes. Receptor activity was determined using calcium mobilization and DiscoveRx PathHunter assays in HEK293, Gα16-CHO, and CHOk1 cells transfected with human receptors. Twenty-one tryptamines were analyzed in transporter uptake and release assays, and 5-HT₂A, serotonin 1A (5-HT₁A), and 5-HT₂A β-arrestin functional assays. Eight of the compounds were found to have 5-HT-releasing activity. Thirteen compounds were found to be 5-HT uptake inhibitors or were inactive. All tryptamines were 5-HT₂A agonists with a range of potencies and efficacies, but only a few compounds were 5-HT1A agonists. Most tryptamines recruited β-arrestin through 5-HT₂A activation. All psychoactive tryptamines are 5-HT₂A agonists, but 5-HT transporter (SERT) activity may contribute significantly to the pharmacology of certain compounds. The in vitro transporter data confirm structure-activity trends for releasers and uptake inhibitors whereby releasers tend to be structurally smaller compounds. Interestingly, two tertiary amines were found to be selective substrates at SERT, which dispels the notion that 5-HT-releasing activity is limited only to primary or secondary amines.

  2. Serotonin Transporter and Receptor Expression in Osteocytic MLO-Y4 Cells

    PubMed Central

    BLIZIOTES, M.; ESHLEMAN, A.; BURT-PICHAT, B.; ZHANG, X.-W.; HASHIMOTO, J.; WIREN, K.; CHENU, C.

    2006-01-01

    Neurotransmitter regulation of bone metabolism has been a subject of increasing interest and investigation. We reported previously that osteoblastic cells express a functional serotonin (5-HT) signal transduction system, with mechanisms for responding to and regulating uptake of 5-HT. The clonal murine osteocytic cell line, MLO-Y4, demonstrates expression of the serotonin transporter (5-HTT), and the 5-HT1A, and 5-HT2A receptors by real-time RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis. Immunohistochemistry using antibodies for the 5-HTT, and the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors reveals expression of all three proteins in both osteoblasts and osteocytes in rat tibia. 5-HTT binding sites were demonstrated in the MLO-Y4 cells with nanomolar affinity for the stable cocaine analog [125I]RTI-55. Imipramine and fluoxetine, antagonists with specificity for 5-HTT, show the highest potency to antagonize [125I]RTI-55 binding in the MLO-Y4 cells. GBR-12935, a relatively selective dopamine transporter antagonist, had a much lower potency, as did desipramine, a selective norepinephrine transporter antagonist. The maximal [3H]5-HT uptake rate in MLO-Y4 cells was 2.85 pmol/15 min/well, with a Km value of 290 nM. Imipramine and fluoxetine inhibited specific [3H]5-HT uptake with IC50 values in the nanomolar range. 5-HT rapidly stimulated PGE2 release from MLO-Y4 cells; the EC50 for 5-HT was 0.1 μM, with a 3-fold increase seen at 60 min. The rate limiting enzyme for serotonin synthesis, tryptophan hydroxylase, is expressed in MLO-Y4 cells as well as osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. Thus, osteocytes, as well as osteoblasts, are capable of 5-HT synthesis, and express functional receptor and transporter components of the 5-HT signal transduction system. PMID:16884969

  3. Electromagnetically induced transparency and fluorescence in blockaded Rydberg atomic system.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng; Zheng, Huaibin; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Yao, Xin; Zhang, Yunzhe; Zhang, Yiqi; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2013-10-28

    We investigate the interaction between dark states and Rydberg excitation blockade by using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), fluorescence, and four-wave mixing (FWM) signals both theoretically and experimentally. By scanning the frequency detunings of the probe and dressing fields, respectively, we first observe these signals (three coexisting EIT windows, two fluorescence signals, and two FWM signals) under Rydberg excitation blockade. Next, frequency detuning dependences of these signals are obtained, in which the modulated results are well explained by introducing the dressing effects (leading to the dark states) with the corrected factor of the Rydberg excitation blockade. In addition, the variations by changing the principal quantum number n of Rydberg state shown some interesting phenomena resulting from Rydberg blockade are observed. The unique nature of such blockaded signals can have potential application in the demonstration of quantum computing.

  4. Serotonin syndrome associated with polypharmacy in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Poeschla, Brian D; Bartle, Pauline; Hansen, Karen P

    2011-01-01

    The increasing use of serotonergic agents, alone and in combination, across multiple disciplines, makes it likely that the prevalence of serotonin syndrome will rise. Caution should be used, especially in the elderly, to avoid unnecessary and potentially harmful polypharmacy. We describe a case of serotonin syndrome in a 79-year-old man taking mirtazapine, venlafaxine and quetiapine. As this case illustrates, serotonin syndrome can be caused by combinations of direct serotonin agonists (e.g., serotonergic antidepressants) and indirect serotonin agonists (e.g., atypical antipsychotics).

  5. Uremic anorexia: a consequence of persistently high brain serotonin levels? The tryptophan/serotonin disorder hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, A; Selgas, R; Codoceo, R; Bajo, A

    2000-01-01

    Anorexia is a frequent part of uremic syndrome, contributing to malnutrition in dialysis patients. Many factors have been suggested as responsible for uremic anorexia. In this paper we formulate a new hypothesis to explain the appetite disorders in dialysis patients: "the tryptophan/serotonin disorder hypothesis." We review current knowledge of normal hunger-satiety cycle control and the disorders described in uremic patients. There are four phases in food intake regulation: (1) the gastric phase, during which food induces satiety through gastric distention and satiety peptide release; (2) the post absorptive phase, during which circulating compounds, including glucose and amino acids, cause satiety by hepatic receptors via the vagus nerve; (3) the hepatic phase, during which adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration is the main stimulus inducing hunger or satiety, with cytokines inhibiting ATP production; and (4) the central phase, during which appetite is regulated through peripheral (circulating plasma substances and neurotransmitters) and brain stimuli. Brain serotonin is the final target for peripheral mechanisms controlling appetite. High brain serotonin levels and a lower serotonin/dopamine ratio cause anorexia. Plasma and brain amino acid concentrations are recognized factors involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and appetite control. Tryptophan is the substrate of serotonin synthesis. High plasma levels of anorectics such as tryptophan (plasma and brain), cholecystokinin, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1, and leptin, and deficiencies of nitric oxide and neuropeptide Y have been described in uremia; all increase intracerebral serotonin. We suggest that brain serotonin hyperproduction due to a uremic-dependent excess of tryptophan may be the final common pathway involved in the genesis of uremic anorexia. Various methods of ameliorating anorexia by decreasing the central effects of serotonin are proposed.

  6. Postsynaptic serotonergic blockade following chronic antidepressive treatment with trazodone in an animal model of depression.

    PubMed

    Hingtgen, J N; Hendrie, H C; Aprison, M H

    1984-03-01

    Acute pretreatment with clinically equivalent doses of antidepressive drugs has been observed to block D,L-5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) induced behavioral depression in rats working on a food-reinforced operant schedule. Data from studies designed to distinguish presynaptic from postsynaptic events, indicated that the antidepressants were acting in part as blockers of postsynaptic serotonergic receptors. Using the same 5-HTP model of depression, we studied both the chronic and acute effects of a recently introduced antidepressant, triazolopyridine compound. Rats working for milk reinforcement and exhibiting behavioral depression following administration of 50 mg/kg 5-HTP were pretreated (one hr before 5-HTP) with 1, 2, or 4 mg/kg trazodone with resulting blockade of 5-HTP induced depression of 35, 62 and 70% respectively. Chronic administration of trazodone (2 mg/kg trazodone/day) also resulted in a significant blockade of the 5-HTP effect (75%). Neither 2 mg/kg or 4 mg/kg trazodone was found to potentiate the shorter period of depression following 25 mg/kg 5-HTP. Chronic treatment with the antidepressant drugs, amitriptyline or mianserin also blocked 5-HTP depression. Thus, as in our earlier studies, these data suggest an important postsynaptic mechanism associated with chronic administration of trazodone, amitriptyline and mianserin which could be implicated in the therapeutic effectiveness of these drugs. The potency of trazodone in relation to other antidepressant drugs in our behavioral model of depression paralleled their potency in displacing radioligand binding to 5-HT receptors, and gives additional support for the new hypersensitive postsynaptic serotonin receptor theory of depression.

  7. Serotonin and emotion, learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Alfredo; Liy-Salmeron, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamien, 5-HT) has been linked to emotional and motivational aspects of human behavior, including anxiety, depression, impulsivity, etc. Several clinically effective drugs exert effects via 5-HT systems. Growing evidence suggests that those effects play an important role in learning and memory. Whether the role of serotonin is related to memory and/or behavioral or emotional aspects remains an important question. A key question that remains is whether 5-HT markers (e.g., receptors) directly or indirectly participate and/or contribute to the physiological and pharmacological basis of memory and its pathogenesis. The major aim of this paper is to re-examine some recent advances regarding mammalian 5-HT receptors and transporter in light of their physiological, pathophysiological and therapeutic implications for memory. We particularly address evidence involving 5-HT systems in behavioral, pharmacological, molecular, genetic and imaging results and memory. Finally, this paper aims to summarize a portion of the evidence about serotonin, memory and emotion from animal and human studies and provide an overview of potential tools, markers and cellular and molecular candidate mechanisms. It should be noted that there are several subjects that this paper only briefly touches upon, presenting only what may be the most salient findings in the context of memory, emotion and serotonin.

  8. [The role of serotonin in behavior modulation].

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, H G; Grozdanovic, Z

    1995-06-01

    The central projection systems represent an expansive and important component of the brainstem reticular core which provide modulatory input into multiple target networks throughout the entire vertebrate neuraxis. Most of the afferent input into the cranial raphe originates within sensory uni- and polymodal, associative and limbic cortices suggesting that serotonin modulates preprocessed information. The serotonergic neurons discharge in a remarkably stable and tonic fashion during wakefulness. Some 5-HT neurons increase their discharge rate phasically in association with the activation of central rhythmic pattern generators involved in consummatory and grooming behaviour. In concert with enhancing motor functions, the serotonergic systems discretely deamplify sensory attentiveness and pain processing, thereby establishing an essential and protective filter mechanism against distracting and irritating noise effects of sensory afferent input level. In addition, serotonin restrains the latency to responding, i.e. impulsivity. These effects of serotonin are mediated by multiple receptor subtypes with distinct pre- and postsynaptic localisation and regional distribution pattern, acting via amplifying (5-HT2 receptors) or desamplifying (5-HT1 receptors) G-protein-dependent transduction mechanisms. The breakdown of these protective and adaptive functions of 5-HT in complex behaviour and in basic aspects of sensorimotor integration may have a pathogenetic role in disorders of impulse control (e.g. bulimia nervosa and OCD) which have been found to respond to high-dose, long-term treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

  9. Serotonin in Autism and Pediatric Epilepsies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chugani, Diane C.

    2004-01-01

    Serotonergic abnormalities have been reported in both autism and epilepsy. This association may provide insights into underlying mechanisms of these disorders because serotonin plays an important neurotrophic role during brain development--and there is evidence for abnormal cortical development in both autism and some forms of epilepsy. This…

  10. A circannual rhythm in bovine pineal serotonin.

    PubMed

    Philo, R; Reiter, R J

    1980-06-15

    Bovine pineal serotonin (5-HT) was analyzed at the time of the solstices and equinoxes from December, 1975 until June, 1978. The highest values of 5-HT were detected at the winter solstices and lowest values at the summer solstices of each year examined. The peaks in bovine pineal 5-HT correspond with a lessened fertility in cattle reported during the winter months.

  11. A current view of serotonin transporters

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, Louis J.

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin transporters (SERTs) are largely recognized for one aspect of their function—to transport serotonin back into the presynaptic terminal after its release. Another aspect of their function, however, may be to generate currents large enough to have physiological consequences. The standard model for electrogenic transport is the alternating access model, in which serotonin is transported with a fixed ratio of co-transported ions resulting in net charge per cycle. The alternating access model, however, cannot account for all the observed currents through SERT or other monoamine transporters.  Furthermore, SERT agonists like ecstasy or antagonists like fluoxetine generate or suppress currents that the standard model cannot support.  Here we survey evidence for a channel mode of transport in which transmitters and ions move through a pore. Available structures for dopamine and serotonin transporters, however, provide no evidence for a pore conformation, raising questions of whether the proposed channel mode actually exists or whether the structural data are perhaps missing a transient open state. PMID:27540474

  12. Modulation of auditory brainstem responses by serotonin and specific serotonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Papesh, Melissa A; Hurley, Laura M

    2016-02-01

    The neuromodulator serotonin is found throughout the auditory system from the cochlea to the cortex. Although effects of serotonin have been reported at the level of single neurons in many brainstem nuclei, how these effects correspond to more integrated measures of auditory processing has not been well-explored. In the present study, we aimed to characterize the effects of serotonin on far-field auditory brainstem responses (ABR) across a wide range of stimulus frequencies and intensities. Using a mouse model, we investigated the consequences of systemic serotonin depletion, as well as the selective stimulation and suppression of the 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors, on ABR latency and amplitude. Stimuli included tone pips spanning four octaves presented over a forty dB range. Depletion of serotonin reduced the ABR latencies in Wave II and later waves, suggesting that serotonergic effects occur as early as the cochlear nucleus. Further, agonists and antagonists of specific serotonergic receptors had different profiles of effects on ABR latencies and amplitudes across waves and frequencies, suggestive of distinct effects of these agents on auditory processing. Finally, most serotonergic effects were more pronounced at lower ABR frequencies, suggesting larger or more directional modulation of low-frequency processing. This is the first study to describe the effects of serotonin on ABR responses across a wide range of stimulus frequencies and amplitudes, and it presents an important step in understanding how serotonergic modulation of auditory brainstem processing may contribute to modulation of auditory perception.

  13. Modulation of defensive reflex conditioning in snails by serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Andrianov, Vyatcheslav V.; Bogodvid, Tatiana K.; Deryabina, Irina B.; Golovchenko, Aleksandra N.; Muranova, Lyudmila N.; Tagirova, Roza R.; Vinarskaya, Aliya K.; Gainutdinov, Khalil L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights Daily injection of serotonin before a training session accelerated defensive reflex conditioning in snails.Daily injection of 5-hydroxytryptophan before a training session in snails with a deficiency of serotonin induced by the “neurotoxic” analog of serotonin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine, restored the ability of snails to learn.After injection of the “neurotoxic” analogs of serotonin 5,6- and 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine as well as serotonin, depolarization of the membrane and decrease of the threshold potential of premotor interneurons was observed. We studied the role of serotonin in the mechanisms of learning in terrestrial snails. To produce a serotonin deficit, the “neurotoxic” analogs of serotonin, 5,6- or 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,6/5,7-DHT) were used. Injection of 5,6/5,7-DHT was found to disrupt defensive reflex conditioning. Within 2 weeks of neurotoxin application, the ability to learn had recovered. Daily injection of serotonin before a training session accelerated defensive reflex conditioning and daily injections of 5-HTP in snails with a deficiency of serotonin induced by 5,7-DHT restored the snail's ability to learn. We discovered that injections of the neurotoxins 5,6/5,7-DHT as well as serotonin, caused a decrease in the resting and threshold potentials of the premotor interneurons LPa3 and RPa3. PMID:26557063

  14. Peripheral serotonin enhances lipid metabolism by accelerating bile acid turnover.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hitoshi; Akasaka, Daisuke; Ogasawara, Hideki; Sato, Kan; Miyake, Masato; Saito, Kazuki; Takahashi, Yu; Kanaya, Takashi; Takakura, Ikuro; Hondo, Tetsuya; Chao, Guozheng; Rose, Michael T; Ohwada, Shyuichi; Watanabe, Kouichi; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Aso, Hisashi

    2010-10-01

    Serotonin is synthesized by two distinct tryptophan hydroxylases, one in the brain and one in the periphery. The latter is known to be unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. These two serotonin systems have apparently independent functions, although the functions of peripheral serotonin have yet to be fully elucidated. In this study, we have investigated the physiological effect of peripheral serotonin on the concentrations of metabolites in the circulation and in the liver. After fasting, mice were ip injected with 1 mg serotonin. The plasma glucose concentration was significantly elevated between 60 and 270 min after the injection. In contrast, plasma triglyceride, cholesterol, and nonesterified fatty acid concentrations were decreased. The hepatic glycogen synthesis and concentrations were significantly higher at 240 min. At the same time, the hepatic triglyceride content was significantly lower than the basal levels noted before the serotonin injection, whereas the hepatic cholesterol content was significantly higher by 60 min after the injection. Furthermore, serotonin stimulated the contraction of the gallbladder and the excretion of bile. After the serotonin injection, there was a significant induction of apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter expression, resulting in a decrease in the concentration of bile acids in the feces. Additionally, data are presented to show that the functions of serotonin are mediated through diverse serotonin receptor subtypes. These data indicate that peripheral serotonin accelerates the metabolism of lipid by increasing the concentration of bile acids in circulation.

  15. Serotonin modulates glutamatergic transmission to neurons in the lateral habenula.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guiqin; Zuo, Wanhong; Wu, Liangzhi; Li, Wenting; Wu, Wei; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-04-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is bilaterally connected with serotoninergic raphe nuclei, and expresses high density of serotonin receptors. However, actions of serotonin on the excitatory synaptic transmission to LHb neurons have not been thoroughly investigated. The LHb contains two anatomically and functionally distinct regions: lateral (LHbl) and medial (LHbm) divisions. We compared serotonin's effects on glutamatergic transmission across the LHb in rat brains. Serotonin bi-directionally and differentially modulated glutamatergic transmission. Serotonin inhibited glutamatergic transmission in higher percentage of LHbl neurons but potentiated in higher percentage of LHbm neurons. Magnitude of potentiation was greater in LHbm than in LHbl. Type 2 and 3 serotonin receptor antagonists attenuated serotonin's potentiation. The serotonin reuptake blocker, and the type 2 and 3 receptor agonists facilitated glutamatergic transmission in both LHbl and LHbm neurons. Thus, serotonin via activating its type 2, 3 receptors, increased glutamate release at nerve terminals in some LHb neurons. Our data demonstrated that serotonin affects both LHbm and LHbl. Serotonin might play an important role in processing information between the LHb and its downstream-targeted structures during decision-making. It may also contribute to a homeostatic balance underlying the neural circuitry between the LHb and raphe nuclei.

  16. Projections and interconnections of genetically defined serotonin neurons in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Sun Jung; Jensen, Patricia; Dymecki, Susan M; Commons, Kathryn G.

    2012-01-01

    Brain serotonin neurons are heterogeneous and can be distinguished by several anatomical and physiological characteristics. Toward resolving this heterogeneity into classes of functional relevance, subtypes of mature serotonin neurons were previously identified based on gene expression differences initiated during development in different rhombomeric (r) segments of the hindbrain. This redefinition of mature serotonin neuron subtypes based on the criteria of genetic lineage, along with the enabling genetic fate mapping tools, now allows various functional properties, such as axonal projections, to be allocated onto these identified subtypes. Furthermore, our approach uniquely enables interconnections between the different serotonin neuron subtypes to be determined; this is especially relevant because serotonin neuron activity is regulated by several feedback mechanisms. We used intersectional and subtractive genetic fate mapping tools to generate three independent lines of mice in which serotonin neurons arising in different rhombomeric segments, either r1, r2 or both r3 and r5, were uniquely distinguished from all other serotonin neurons by their expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein. Each of these subgroups of serotonergic neurons had a unique combination of forebrain projection targets. Typically more than one subgroup innervated an individual target area. Unique patterns of interconnections between the different groups of serotonin neurons were also observed and these pathways could subserve feedback regulatory circuits. Overall, the current findings suggest that activation of subsets of serotonin neurons could result in topographic serotonin release in the forebrain coupled with feedback inhibition of serotonin neurons with alternative projection targets. PMID:22151329

  17. Novel drug development for neuromuscular blockade.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Amit; Kaye, Alan D; Wyche, Melville Q; Salinas, Orlando J; Mancuso, Kenneth; Urman, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological advances in anesthesia in recent decades have resulted in safer practice and better outcomes. These advances include improvement in anesthesia drugs with regard to efficacy and safety profiles. Although neuromuscular blockers were first introduced over a half century ago, few new neuromuscular blockers and reversal agents have come to market and even fewer have remained as common clinically employed medications. In recent years, newer agents have been studied and are presented in this review. With regard to nondepolarizer neuromuscular blocker agents, the enantiomers Gantacurium and CW002, which are olefinic isoquinolinium diester fumarates, have shown potential for clinical application. Advantages include ultra rapid reversal of neuromuscular blockade via cysteine adduction and minimal systemic hemodynamic effects with administration.

  18. Experimental realization of a Coulomb blockade refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feshchenko, A. V.; Koski, J. V.; Pekola, J. P.

    2014-11-01

    We present an experimental realization of a Coulomb blockade refrigerator (CBR) based on a single-electron transistor (SET). In the present structure, the SET island is interrupted by a superconducting inclusion to permit charge transport while preventing heat flow. At certain values of the bias and gate voltages, the current through the SET cools one of the junctions. The measurements follow the theoretical model down to ˜80 mK, which was the base temperature of the current measurements. The observed cooling increases rapidly with decreasing temperature, in agreement with the theory, reaching about a 15 mK drop at the base temperature. The CBR appears as a promising electronic cooler at temperatures well below 100 mK.

  19. Beta blockade and physical training in rats.

    PubMed

    Harri, M

    1982-01-01

    Beta adrenergic blocking agents are widely used in the treatment of hypertension. Recent findings indicate that long-term physical training also could reduce elevated blood pressure and many physicians therefore recommend their patients to include physical training in their everyday program. However, it is not known whether a combination of beta blockade and physical training influences the responses of an organism to physical training. This problem was investigated using laboratory rats as an experimental animal model. Both swimming and running training were used, and a group of animals was trained without any medication while the other group performed their daily training session under the influence of 10 mg/kg of propranolol. Some of the effects produced by swimming training, such as hypertrophy of brown adipose tissue and heart muscle, resting bradycardia, increased tachycardic and tail skin temperature responses to isoprenaline, increased calorigenic response to noradrenaline and delayed cooling rate in cold water were similar to those produced by cold acclimation or repeated noradrenaline injections. It is thus tempting to conclude that the training-induced release of noradrenaline was responsible for the changes mentioned. Propranolol, when associated with the training, effectively hampered these changes. Running training increased the activity of oxidative enzymes in the skeletal muscle much more than did swimming training or repeated noradrenaline injections. Furthermore, running training neither induced hypertrophy of the brown fat nor enhanced calorigenic response to noradrenaline; it even led to enhanced rate of body cooling in cold water. Therefore the adaptive changes caused by running training most probably are not due to cold acclimation effects in spite of that propranolol, when associated with the running sessions, antagonized the development of running-induced changes, too. Some of these changes, such as cardiomegaly, training bradycardia and

  20. Effect of long-term fluoxetine treatment on the human serotonin transporter in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Iceta, Ruth; Mesonero, José E; Alcalde, Ana I

    2007-03-27

    Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) broadly used in the treatment of human mood disorders and gastrointestinal diseases involving the serotoninergic system. The effectiveness of this therapy depends on repeated long-term treatment. Most of the long-term studies in vivo of SSRI effects on serotoninergic activity have focused on their effects on autoreceptors or postsynaptic receptors. The chronic effect of SSRIs on the activity of the serotonin transporter (SERT) has been less studied and the results have been contradictory. The aim of this study was to determine the specific effect of long-term fluoxetine treatment on human serotonin transporter (hSERT) in vitro, by using the human enterocyte-like cell line Caco-2. Results show that fluoxetine diminished the 5-HT uptake in a concentration-dependent way and that this effect was reversible. Fluoxetine affected mainly the hSERT transport rate by reducing the availability of the transporter in the membrane with no significant alteration of either the total hSERT protein content or the hSERT mRNA level. These results suggest that the effect of fluoxetine on the expression of hSERT is post-translational and has shown itself to be independent of PKC and PKA activity. This study may be useful to clarify the effect of the long-term fluoxetine therapy in both gastrointestinal and central nervous system disorders.

  1. Oligonucleotide-induced alternative splicing of serotonin 2C receptor reduces food intake.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaiyi; Shen, Manli; Gresch, Paul J; Ghamari-Langroudi, Masoud; Rabchevsky, Alexander G; Emeson, Ronald B; Stamm, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    The serotonin 2C receptor regulates food uptake, and its activity is regulated by alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Alternative exon skipping is predicted to generate a truncated receptor protein isoform, whose existence was confirmed with a new antiserum. The truncated receptor sequesters the full-length receptor in intracellular membranes. We developed an oligonucleotide that promotes exon inclusion, which increases the ratio of the full-length to truncated receptor protein. Decreasing the amount of truncated receptor results in the accumulation of full-length, constitutively active receptor at the cell surface. After injection into the third ventricle of mice, the oligonucleotide accumulates in the arcuate nucleus, where it changes alternative splicing of the serotonin 2C receptor and increases pro-opiomelanocortin expression. Oligonucleotide injection reduced food intake in both wild-type and ob/ob mice. Unexpectedly, the oligonucleotide crossed the blood-brain barrier and its systemic delivery reduced food intake in wild-type mice. The physiological effect of the oligonucleotide suggests that a truncated splice variant regulates the activity of the serotonin 2C receptor, indicating that therapies aimed to change pre-mRNA processing could be useful to treat hyperphagia, characteristic for disorders like Prader-Willi syndrome. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  2. Intra- and Interhemispheric Propagation of Electrophysiological Synchronous Activity and Its Modulation by Serotonin in the Cingulate Cortex of Juvenile Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rovira, Víctor; Geijo-Barrientos, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Disinhibition of the cortex (e.g., by GABA -receptor blockade) generates synchronous and oscillatory electrophysiological activity that propagates along the cortex. We have studied, in brain slices of the cingulate cortex of mice (postnatal age 14–20 days), the propagation along layer 2/3 as well as the interhemispheric propagation through the corpus callosum of synchronous discharges recorded extracellularly and evoked in the presence of 10 μM bicuculline by electrical stimulation of layer 1. The latency of the responses obtained at the same distance from the stimulus electrode was longer in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC: 39.53 ± 2.83 ms, n = 7) than in retrosplenial cortex slices (RSC: 21.99 ± 2.75 ms, n = 5; p<0.05), which is equivalent to a lower propagation velocity in the dorso-ventral direction in ACC than in RSC slices (43.0 mm/s vs 72.9 mm/s). We studied the modulation of this propagation by serotonin. Serotonin significantly increased the latency of the intracortical synchronous discharges (18.9% in the ipsilateral hemisphere and 40.2% in the contralateral hemisphere), and also increased the interhemispheric propagation time by 86.4%. These actions of serotonin were mimicked by the activation of either 5-HT1B or 5-HT2A receptors, but not by the activation of the 5-HT1A subtype. These findings provide further knowledge about the propagation of synchronic electrical activity in the cerebral cortex, including its modulation by serotonin, and suggest the presence of deep differences between the ACC and RSC in the structure of the local cortical microcircuits underlying the propagation of synchronous discharges. PMID:26930051

  3. Intra- and Interhemispheric Propagation of Electrophysiological Synchronous Activity and Its Modulation by Serotonin in the Cingulate Cortex of Juvenile Mice.

    PubMed

    Rovira, Víctor; Geijo-Barrientos, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Disinhibition of the cortex (e.g., by GABA -receptor blockade) generates synchronous and oscillatory electrophysiological activity that propagates along the cortex. We have studied, in brain slices of the cingulate cortex of mice (postnatal age 14-20 days), the propagation along layer 2/3 as well as the interhemispheric propagation through the corpus callosum of synchronous discharges recorded extracellularly and evoked in the presence of 10 μM bicuculline by electrical stimulation of layer 1. The latency of the responses obtained at the same distance from the stimulus electrode was longer in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC: 39.53 ± 2.83 ms, n = 7) than in retrosplenial cortex slices (RSC: 21.99 ± 2.75 ms, n = 5; p<0.05), which is equivalent to a lower propagation velocity in the dorso-ventral direction in ACC than in RSC slices (43.0 mm/s vs 72.9 mm/s). We studied the modulation of this propagation by serotonin. Serotonin significantly increased the latency of the intracortical synchronous discharges (18.9% in the ipsilateral hemisphere and 40.2% in the contralateral hemisphere), and also increased the interhemispheric propagation time by 86.4%. These actions of serotonin were mimicked by the activation of either 5-HT1B or 5-HT2A receptors, but not by the activation of the 5-HT1A subtype. These findings provide further knowledge about the propagation of synchronic electrical activity in the cerebral cortex, including its modulation by serotonin, and suggest the presence of deep differences between the ACC and RSC in the structure of the local cortical microcircuits underlying the propagation of synchronous discharges.

  4. Release and modulation of release of serotonin in rabbit superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, T; Limberger, N; Starke, K

    1989-01-01

    The release of previously incorporated [3H]serotonin and its presynaptic modulation were studied in slices of rabbit superior colliculus. Electrical stimulation at frequencies of 0.017-3 Hz greatly increased the outflow of tritiated compounds; this response was almost abolished by tetrodotoxin and in a low calcium medium. Unlabelled serotonin, when added in the presence of nitroquipazine, an inhibitor of high-affinity neuronal serotonin uptake, reduced the electrically evoked overflow of tritium, an effect antagonized by metitepin. Given alone, metitepin caused an increase. The evoked overflow was also decreased by clonidine, and the effect of clonidine was counteracted by phentolamine. Phentolamine itself increased the overflow response. However, this was probably not due to antagonism against an inhibitory effect of endogenous noradrenaline because, first, the selective alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist idazoxan did not share with phentolamine the overflow-enhancing effect, second, phentolamine continued to increase the overflow after noradrenergic axons had been destroyed by 6-hydroxydopamine, and third, the facilitatory effects of metitepin and phentolamine were not additive. Phentolamine, like metitepin, antagonized the presynaptic inhibitory effect of serotonin, indicating that it may increase the evoked overflow of tritium by blocking serotonin receptors rather than alpha-adrenoceptors. Ethylketocyclazocine decrease the electrically evoked overflow, and its effect was prevented by naloxone: peptides selective for opioid mu- or delta-receptors caused no change. Nicotine increased the basal outflow of tritium (in the absence of electrical stimulation); the increase was attenuated by hexamethonium and low calcium medium. No or minimal changes in tritium outflow were obtained with beta-adrenoceptor, dopamine receptor, muscarine receptor and GABA receptor ligands or with substance P and glutamate. In conjunction with our previous studies, these results indicate

  5. Energy Gaps and Interaction Blockade in Confined Quantum Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Capelle, K.; Borgh, M.; Kaerkkaeinen, K.; Reimann, S. M.

    2007-07-06

    We investigate universal properties of strongly confined particles that turn out to be dramatically different from what is observed for electrons in atoms and molecules. For a large class of harmonically confined systems, such as small quantum dots and optically trapped atoms, many-body particle addition and removal energies, and energy gaps, are accurately obtained from single-particle eigenvalues. Transport blockade phenomena are related to the derivative discontinuity of the exchange-correlation functional. This implies that they occur very generally, with Coulomb blockade being a particular realization of a more general phenomenon. In particular, we predict a van der Waals blockade in cold atom gases in traps.

  6. Unconventional Photon Blockade Based on Two-Photon Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y. H.; Shen, H. Z.

    2017-09-01

    The study on the unconventional photon blockade mainly focus on Kerr nonlinearity. In this paper, we study the unconventional photon blockade based on another kind of nonlinearity, that is two-photon tunneling. The optimal conditions for strong antibunching are found by analytic calculations and numerical simulations, and the results are compared with the unconventional photon blockade based on Kerr nonlinearity, we find that the two-photon tunneling system has advantages for the larger antibunching area. Finally, we show that, after the symmetric-antisymmetric mode transformation, the two kinds of nonlinearities are equivalent from the perspective of photon antibunching.

  7. Paravertebral blockade of the brachial plexus in dogs.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Kip A; Creighton, Catherine M

    2008-11-01

    Local anesthetic techniques have the unique ability to block peripheral nociceptive input associated with surgical trauma and inflammation and to prevent sensitization of central nociceptive pathways and the development of pathologic pain. Complete neural blockade of the canine brachial plexus is difficult to achieve using the traditional axillary technique. This article describes paravertebral blockade of the brachial plexus in dogs and a new modified paravertebral technique. Both techniques are relatively easy to perform and produce complete blockade of the forelimb, including the shoulder. A review of relevant clinical anatomy and guidelines for using electrical nerve locators are also included.

  8. Optimal Photon Blockade on the Maximal Atomic Coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Chang-shui

    2016-12-01

    There is generally no obvious evidence in any direct relation between photon blockade and atomic coherence. Here instead of only illustrating the photon statistics, we show an interesting relation between the steady-state photon blockade and the atomic coherence by designing a weakly driven cavity QED system with a two-level atom trapped. It is shown for the first time that the maximal atomic coherence has a perfect correspondence with the optimal photon blockade. The negative effects of the strong dissipations on photon statistics, atomic coherence and their correspondence are also addressed. The numerical simulation is also given to support all of our results.

  9. Tail Biting in Pigs: Blood Serotonin and Fearfulness as Pieces of the Puzzle?

    PubMed Central

    Ursinus, Winanda W.; Van Reenen, Cornelis G.; Reimert, Inonge; Bolhuis, J. Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Tail biting in pigs is a widespread problem in intensive pig farming. The tendency to develop this damaging behaviour has been suggested to relate to serotonergic functioning and personality characteristics of pigs. We investigated whether tail biting in pigs can be associated with blood serotonin and with their behavioural and physiological responses to novelty. Pigs (n = 480) were born in conventional farrowing pens and after weaning at four weeks of age they were either housed barren (B) or in straw-enriched (E) pens. Individual pigs were exposed to a back test and novel environment test before weaning, and after weaning to a novel object (i.e. bucket) test in an unfamiliar arena. A Principal Component Analysis on behaviours during the tests and salivary cortisol (novel object test only) revealed five factors for both housing systems, labeled ‘Early life exploration’, ‘Near bucket’, ‘Cortisol’, ‘Vocalizations & standing alert’, and ‘Back test activity’. Blood samples were taken at 8, 9 and 22 weeks of age to determine blood platelet serotonin. In different phases of life, pigs were classified as tail biter/non-tail biter based on tail biting behaviour, and as victim/non-victim based on tail wounds. A combination of both classifications resulted in four pig types: biters, victims, biter/victims, and neutrals. Generally, only in phases of life during which pigs were classified as tail biters, they seemed to have lower blood platelet serotonin storage and higher blood platelet uptake velocities. Victims also seemed to have lower blood serotonin storage. Additionally, in B housing, tail biters seemed to consistently have lower scores of the factor ‘Near bucket’, possibly indicating a higher fearfulness in tail biters. Further research is needed to elucidate the nature of the relationship between peripheral 5-HT, fearfulness and tail biting, and to develop successful strategies and interventions to prevent and reduce tail biting. PMID

  10. Platelet serotonin level predicts survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Luc; Spreux-Varoquaux, Odile; Bensimon, Gilbert; Jullien, Philippe; Lacomblez, Lucette; Salachas, François; Bruneteau, Gaëlle; Pradat, Pierre-François; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Meininger, Vincent

    2010-10-13

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a life-threatening neurodegenerative disease involving upper and lower motor neurons loss. Clinical features are highly variable among patients and there are currently few known disease-modifying factors underlying this heterogeneity. Serotonin is involved in a range of functions altered in ALS, including motor neuron excitability and energy metabolism. However, whether serotoninergic activity represents a disease modifier of ALS natural history remains unknown. Platelet and plasma unconjugated concentrations of serotonin and plasma 5-HIAA, the major serotonin metabolite, levels were measured using HPLC with coulometric detection in a cohort of 85 patients with ALS all followed-up until death and compared to a control group of 29 subjects. Platelet serotonin levels were significantly decreased in ALS patients. Platelet serotonin levels did not correlate with disease duration but were positively correlated with survival of the patients. Univariate Cox model analysis showed a 57% decreased risk of death for patients with platelet serotonin levels in the normal range relative to patients with abnormally low platelet serotonin (p = 0.0195). This protective effect remained significant after adjustment with age, gender or site of onset in multivariate analysis. Plasma unconjugated serotonin and 5-HIAA levels were unchanged in ALS patients compared to controls and did not correlate with clinical parameters. The positive correlation between platelet serotonin levels and survival strongly suggests that serotonin influences the course of ALS disease.

  11. Relationship between evaluation by quantitative fatty acid myocardial scintigraphy and response to beta-blockade therapy in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ito, T; Hoshida, S; Nishino, M; Aoi, T; Egami, Y; Takeda, T; Kawabata, M; Tanouchi, J; Yamada, Y; Kamada, T

    2001-12-01

    Predicting the effect of beta-blockade therapy on the clinical outcome of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is difficult prior to the initiation of therapy. Myocardial fatty acid metabolism has been shown to be impaired in patients with DCM. We examined whether the extent of myocardial injury, as assessed by iodine-123 15-( p-iodophenyl)-3- R, S-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) myocardial scintigraphy, is related to the response of patients with DCM to beta-blockade therapy. Thirty-seven patients with DCM were examined using BMIPP myocardial scintigraphy before and after 6 months of treatment with metoprolol. Myocardial BMIPP uptake (%BM uptake) was estimated quantitatively as a percentage of the total injected count ratio. The left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic dimensions (LVDd, LVDs) and ejection fraction (LVEF) were also evaluated. The patients were divided into two groups according to their functional improvement (>10% elevation of LVEF) after 6 months of metoprolol therapy. Twenty-eight patients responded to the therapy, while nine did not. Prior to the therapy, no significant differences in LVDd, LVDs or LVEF were observed between the responders and non-responders. However, the %BM uptake was significantly lower in the non-responders than in the responders (1.0%+/-0.2% vs 2.1%+/-0.5%, P<0.001). The %BM uptake could be used to distinguish the responders from the non-responders with a sensitivity of 0.93 and a specificity of 1.00 at a threshold value of 1.4. After the metoprolol therapy, the %BM uptake improved significantly in the responders (2.5%+/-0.5%, P<0.01) but did not change in the non-responders. These results indicate that myocardial BMIPP uptake could predict the response of DCM patients to beta-blockade therapy.

  12. Activity blockade and GABAA receptor blockade produce synaptic scaling through chloride accumulation in embryonic spinal motoneurons and interneurons.

    PubMed

    Lindsly, Casie; Gonzalez-Islas, Carlos; Wenner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic scaling represents a process whereby the distribution of a cell's synaptic strengths are altered by a multiplicative scaling factor. Scaling is thought to be a compensatory response that homeostatically controls spiking activity levels in the cell or network. Previously, we observed GABAergic synaptic scaling in embryonic spinal motoneurons following in vivo blockade of either spiking activity or GABAA receptors (GABAARs). We had determined that activity blockade triggered upward GABAergic scaling through chloride accumulation, thus increasing the driving force for these currents. To determine whether chloride accumulation also underlies GABAergic scaling following GABAAR blockade we have developed a new technique. We expressed a genetically encoded chloride-indicator, Clomeleon, in the embryonic chick spinal cord, which provides a non-invasive fast measure of intracellular chloride. Using this technique we now show that chloride accumulation underlies GABAergic scaling following blockade of either spiking activity or the GABAAR. The finding that GABAAR blockade and activity blockade trigger scaling via a common mechanism supports our hypothesis that activity blockade reduces GABAAR activation, which triggers synaptic scaling. In addition, Clomeleon imaging demonstrated the time course and widespread nature of GABAergic scaling through chloride accumulation, as it was also observed in spinal interneurons. This suggests that homeostatic scaling via chloride accumulation is a common feature in many neuronal classes within the embryonic spinal cord and opens the possibility that this process may occur throughout the nervous system at early stages of development.

  13. Pharmacological Blockade of 5-HT7 Receptors as a Putative Fast Acting Antidepressant Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Mnie-Filali, Ouissame; Faure, Céline; Lambás-Señas, Laura; Mansari, Mostafa El; Belblidia, Hassina; Gondard, Elise; Etiévant, Adeline; Scarna, Hélène; Didier, Anne; Berod, Anne; Blier, Pierre; Haddjeri, Nasser

    2011-01-01

    Current antidepressants still display unsatisfactory efficacy and a delayed onset of therapeutic action. Here we show that the pharmacological blockade of serotonin 7 (5-HT7) receptors produced a faster antidepressant-like response than the commonly prescribed antidepressant fluoxetine. In the rat, the selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB-269970 counteracted the anxiogenic-like effect of fluoxetine in the open field and exerted an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swim test. In vivo, 5-HT7 receptors negatively regulate the firing activity of dorsal raphe 5-HT neurons and become desensitized after long-term administration of fluoxetine. In contrast with fluoxetine, a 1-week treatment with SB-269970 did not alter 5-HT firing activity but desensitized cell body 5-HT autoreceptors, enhanced the hippocampal cell proliferation, and counteracted the depressive-like behavior in olfactory bulbectomized rats. Finally, unlike fluoxetine, early-life administration of SB-269970, did not induce anxious/depressive-like behaviors in adulthood. Together, these findings indicate that the 5-HT7 receptor antagonists may represent a new class of antidepressants with faster therapeutic action. PMID:21326194

  14. Serotonin: a never-ending story.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Berend

    2015-04-15

    The neurotransmitter serotonin is an evolutionary ancient molecule that has remarkable modulatory effects in almost all central nervous system integrative functions, such as mood, anxiety, stress, aggression, feeding, cognition and sexual behavior. After giving a short outline of the serotonergic system (anatomy, receptors, transporter) the author's contributions over the last 40 years in the role of serotonin in depression, aggression, anxiety, stress and sexual behavior is outlined. Each area delineates the work performed on animal model development, drug discovery and development. Most of the research work described has started from an industrial perspective, aimed at developing animals models for psychiatric diseases and leading to putative new innovative psychotropic drugs, like in the cases of the SSRI fluvoxamine, the serenic eltoprazine and the anxiolytic flesinoxan. Later this research work mainly focused on developing translational animal models for psychiatric diseases and implicating them in the search for mechanisms involved in normal and diseased brains and finding new concepts for appropriate drugs.

  15. Pharmacological Blockade of Serotonin 5-HT7 Receptor Reverses Working Memory Deficits in Rats by Normalizing Cortical Glutamate Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Bonaventure, Pascal; Aluisio, Leah; Shoblock, James; Boggs, Jamin D.; Fraser, Ian C.; Lord, Brian; Lovenberg, Timothy W.; Galici, Ruggero

    2011-01-01

    The role of 5-HT7 receptor has been demonstrated in various animal models of mood disorders; however its function in cognition remains largely speculative. This study evaluates the effects of SB-269970, a selective 5-HT7 antagonist, in a translational model of working memory deficit and investigates whether it modulates cortical glutamate and/or dopamine neurotransmission in rats. The effect of SB-269970 was evaluated in the delayed non-matching to position task alone or in combination with MK-801, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, and, in separate experiments, with scopolamine, a non-selective muscarinic antagonist. SB-269970 (10 mg/kg) significantly reversed the deficits induced by MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) but augmented the deficit induced by scopolamine (0.06 mg/kg). The ability of SB-269970 to modulate MK-801-induced glutamate and dopamine extracellular levels was separately evaluated using biosensor technology and microdialysis in the prefrontal cortex of freely moving rats. SB-269970 normalized MK-801 -induced glutamate but not dopamine extracellular levels in the prefrontal cortex. Rat plasma and brain concentrations of MK-801 were not affected by co-administration of SB-269970, arguing for a pharmacodynamic rather than a pharmacokinetic mechanism. These results indicate that 5-HT7 receptor antagonists might reverse cognitive deficits associated with NMDA receptor hypofunction by selectively normalizing glutamatergic neurotransmission. PMID:21701689

  16. Kupffer cell blockade prevents induction of portal venous tolerance in rat cardiac allograft transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kamei, T.; Callery, M.P.; Flye, M.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Pretransplant portal venous (pv) administration of donor antigen induces allospecific partial tolerance. Although the involved mechanism has not been defined, antigen presentation by Kupffer cells (KC) in the liver is considered to be critical. We evaluated the effect of KC blockade on this pv tolerance induction in Buffalo (RT1b) rats receiving Lewis (RT1(1)) cardiac heterotopic allografts. Control rats received no treatment, while experimental animals received 25 X 10(6) ultraviolet B-irradiated (12,000 J/m2) donor spleen cells via either the iv (systemic intravenous) or the pv routes 7 days before transplantation. Gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), a rare earth metal known to inhibit KC phagocytosis, was given (7 mg/kg) 1 and 2 days before pv preimmunization. Cardiac graft prolongation was obtained by pv (MST = 13.3 +/- 1.9 days, n = 6, vs control = 7.3 +/- 0.5 days, n = 6; P less than 0.001) but not by iv preimmunization (7.7 +/- 0.7 days, n = 6, NS vs control). KC blockade abolished the pv tolerance, as indicated by abrogation of graft prolongation (PV + GdCl3 = 8.0 +/- 0.8 days, n = 6, NS vs control). These findings suggest that effective alloantigen uptake by KC in the liver is essential for the induction of pv tolerance in rat cardiac transplantation.

  17. Effect of intestinal chylomicron secretory blockade on apolipoprotein synthesis in the newborn piglet.

    PubMed

    Black, D D

    1992-04-01

    Pluronic L-81 is a hydrophobic surfactant which blocks intestinal chylomicron secretion at the pre-Golgi level without affecting triacylglycerol uptake and re-esterification. To study the effects of such blockade on apolipoprotein synthesis, newborn female piglets received 24 h intraduodenal infusions of low-triacylglycerol, or high-triacylglycerol with or without Pluronic L-81, diets, followed by determination of apolipoprotein (apo) B-48, A-I and A-IV synthesis and content and apo B and A-IV mRNA levels in the small intestine. Jejunal apo B-48 content, synthesis and mRNA levels were down-regulated below basal levels by the addition of Pluronic to the high-triacylglycerol infusion. The normal increase in apo A-I synthesis induced by triacylglycerol absorption was ablated in both jejunum and ileum, even though the expected increase in apo A-I content in jejunum still occurred. Although attenuated, the expected increase in jejunal apo A-IV synthesis and mRNA levels with triacylglycerol absorption was still present with Pluronic treatment. These results suggest very different mechanisms of cellular regulation and trafficking for the various apolipoproteins incorporated into nascent intestinal chylomicrons. Apo B may be specifically down-regulated by the chylomicron secretory blockade induced by Pluronic L-81.

  18. Tumor-Specific Multiple Stimuli-Activated Dendrimeric Nanoassemblies with Metabolic Blockade Surmount Chemotherapy Resistance.

    PubMed

    Li, Yachao; Xu, Xianghui; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Yunkun; Zhang, Zhijun; Gu, Zhongwei

    2017-01-24

    Chemotherapy resistance remains a serious impediment to successful antitumor therapy around the world. However, existing chemotherapeutic approaches are difficult to cope with the notorious multidrug resistance in clinical treatment. Herein, we developed tumor-specific multiple stimuli-activated dendrimeric nanoassemblies with a metabolic blockade to completely combat both physiological barriers and cellular factors of multidrug resistance. With a sophisticated molecular and supramolecular engineering, this type of tumor-specific multiple stimuli-activated nanoassembly based on dendrimeric prodrugs can hierarchically break through the sequential physiological barriers of drug resistance, including stealthy dendritic PEGylated corona to optimize blood transportation, robust nanostructures for efficient tumor passive targeting and accumulation, enzyme-activated tumor microenvironment targeted to deepen tumor penetration and facilitate cellular uptake, cytoplasmic redox-sensitive disintegration for sufficient release of encapsulated agents, and lysosome acid-triggered nucleus delivery of antitumor drugs. In the meantime, we proposed a versatile tactic of a tumor-specific metabolism blockade for provoking several pathways (ATP restriction, apoptotic activation, and anti-apoptotic inhibition) to restrain multiple cellular factors of drug resistance. The highly efficient antitumor activity to drug-resistant MCF-7R tumor in vitro and in vivo supports this design and strongly defeats both physiological barriers and cellular factors of chemotherapy resistance. This work sets up an innovative dendrimeric nanosystem to surmount multidrug resistance, contributing to the development of a comprehensive nanoparticulate strategy for future clinical applications.

  19. Serotonergic systems in the balance: CRHR1 and CRHR2 differentially control stress-induced serotonin synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Donner, Nina C.; Siebler, Philip H.; Johnson, Danté T.; Villarreal, Marcos D.; Mani, Sofia; Matti, Allison J.; Lowry, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety and affective disorders are often associated with hypercortisolism and dysfunctional serotonergic systems, including increased expression of TPH2, the gene encoding the rate-limiting enzyme of neuronal serotonin synthesis. We previously reported that chronic glucocorticoid exposure is anxiogenic and increases rat Tph2 mRNA expression, but it was still unclear if this also translates to increased TPH2 protein levels and in vivo activity of the enzyme. Here, we found that adult male rats treated with corticosterone (CORT, 100 μg/ml) via the drinking water for 21 days indeed show increased TPH2 protein expression in the dorsal and ventral part of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRD, DRV) during the light phase, abolishing the enzyme’s diurnal rhythm. In a second study, we systemically blocked the conversion of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) to serotonin immediately before rats treated with CORT or vehicle were either exposed to 30 min acoustic startle stress or home cage control conditions. This allowed us to measure 5-HTP accumulation as a direct readout of basal versus stress-induced in vivo TPH2 activity. As expected, basal TPH2 activity was elevated in the DRD, DRV and MnR of CORT-treated rats. In response to stress, a multitude of serotonergic systems reacted with increased TPH2 activity, but the stress-, anxiety-, and learned helplessness-related dorsal and caudal DR (DRD/DRC) displayed stress-induced increases in TPH2 activity only after chronic CORT-treatment. To address the mechanisms underlying this region-specific CORT-dependent sensitization, we stereotaxically implanted CORT-treated rats with cannulae targeting the DR, and pharmacologically blocked either corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 (CRHR1) or type 2 (CRHR2) 10 min prior to acoustic startle stress. CRHR2 blockade prevented stress-induced increases of TPH2 activity within the DRD/DRC, while blockade of CRHR1 potentiated stress-induced TPH2 activity in the entire DR. Stress-induced TPH

  20. Serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SSRIs) against atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wozniak, Greta; Toska, Aikaterini; Saridi, Maria; Mouzas, Odysseas

    2011-01-01

    Summary Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are a class of drug widely used for treatment of mood disorders, including depression and cardiovascular disease. A search for related articles in the PubMed database was attempted. It covered studies, reports, reviews and editorials of the last 5 years. Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-6, stimulate central serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission and are over-expressed in depression, which has been linked with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) hyperactivity. They have also been implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of other stress-induced disorders, like myocardial infarction (MI) and coronary heart disease (CHD), as they seem to modulate cardiovascular function by a variety of mechanisms. Biological mechanisms like these may explain the link between depression and CHD. There are a variety of environmental factors as well as genetic factors that might influence the pharmacogenetics of antidepressant drugs. New generation selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SSRIs) causing a reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality may be related to serotonin platelet abnormalities in depressed patients that are effectively treated by SSRIs. SSRIs such as fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline and citalopram are not only considered to be free from the cardiotoxicity of their predecessors but also to function as safe and efficacious agents against depression, platelet activation, atherosclerosis and development and prognosis of coronary heart disease. However, there is a need for more studies in order to establish the exact biochemical mechanisms that are responsible for these diseases and the immunoregulatory effects of chronic use of SSRI medications. PMID:21873959

  1. Selective relaxant binding agents for reversal of neuromuscular blockade.

    PubMed

    Bom, Anton; Epemolu, Ola; Hope, Frank; Rutherford, Samantha; Thomson, Karen

    2007-06-01

    Traditionally, reversal of neuromuscular blockade during anaesthesia was achieved by increasing the acetylcholine concentration in the neuromuscular junction using acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. However, this is ineffective against profound blockade. Furthermore, the increase in acetylcholine level is not limited to the neuromuscular junction, resulting in unwanted side effects requiring co-treatment with muscarinic antagonists. Selective relaxant binding agents offer a new approach for the reversal of neuromuscular blockade: encapsulation of the neuromuscular blocking agent, resulting in inactivation. As part of this new approach, cyclodextrin molecules have been designed that selectively encapsulate steroidal neuromuscular blocking agents. Both animal and human experiments have demonstrated that fast, effective and complete recovery from both normal and profound neuromuscular blockade is now possible. Furthermore, these cyclodextrin derivatives do not have the unwanted side effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

  2. Phonon blockade in a quadratically coupled optomechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hong; Liao, Chang-Geng; Shang, Xiao; Ye, Ming-Yong; Lin, Xiu-Min

    2017-07-01

    Phonon blockade is achieved in a quadratically coupled optomechanical system, in which the nonlinear interaction between phonons is induced by a driving field via radiation pressure. It is different from the previous standard methods, where the nonlinear interaction for observing phonon blockade is obtained by coupling the mechanical resonator to a two-level system. The effective coupling strength can be tuned by controlling the amplitudes of the driving field, which allows large nonlinearities for the optomechanical system. The second-order correlation function is discussed both analytically and numerically to characterize the phonon statistical properties and the results show that the phonon blockade is available when the effective coupling strength is larger than the mechanical decay rate. This work provides a possible way to experimentally realize phonon blockade.

  3. Dual renin-angiotensin-aldosterone blockade: promises and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, Steven G; Chrysant, George S

    2015-01-01

    Single renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade has been shown to be effective and safe for the treatment of hypertension, coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure (HF), diabetes, and chronic kidney disease (CKD) with proteinuria. Due to the action of RAAS blockers at various levels of the RAAS cascade, it was hypothesized that dual RAAS blockade would result in more complete inhibition of angiotensin II (Ang II) production and be more effective in blocking its detrimental cardiovascular remodeling effects. Unfortunately, several clinical trials in patients with hypertension, CHD, HF, and CKD with proteinuria have demonstrated no superiority of dual versus single RAAS blockade, but a higher incidence of adverse events. Based on these findings, dual RAAS blockade is no longer recommended for the routine treatment of various cardiovascular diseases, except diabetic nephropathy with proteinuria and HF with reduced ejection fraction. All the new information gathered from studies within the last 3 years will be presented in this review.

  4. Rydberg blockade effects at n ˜300 in strontium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Dunning, F. B.; Yoshida, S.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2015-11-01

    Rydberg blockade at n ˜300 , is examined using strontium n F13 Rydberg atoms excited in an atomic beam in a small volume defined by two tightly focused crossed laser beams. The observation of blockade for such states is challenging due to their extreme sensitivity to stray fields and the many magnetic sublevels associated with F states which results in a high local density of states. Nonetheless, with a careful choice of laser polarization to selectively excite only a limited number of these sublevels, sizable blockade effects are observed on an ˜0.1 mm length scale extending blockade measurements into the near-macroscopic regime and enabling study of the dynamics of strongly coupled many-body high-n Rydberg systems under carefully controlled conditions.

  5. Blockade involving high- n, n ~ 300 , strontium Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Shuhei; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Zhang, Xinyue; Dunning, F. Barry

    2016-05-01

    The blockade of high- n strontium n1F3 Rydberg states contained in a hot atomic beam is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. One difficulty in such experiments is that, once created, Rydberg atoms move out of the excitation volume reducing blockade effects. While the effects of such motion are apparent, the data provide strong evidence of blockade, consistent with theoretical predictions. Because of their relatively high angular momentum (L = 3) , a pair of n1F3 Rydberg atoms have many degenerate states whose degeneracy is removed by Rydberg-Rydberg interactions yielding a high density of states near the target energy. To evaluate the effect of blockade not only the energy shifts but also the modification of the oscillator strengths for excitation have to be taken into account. The n-scaling of the interactions and the importance of high-order multipoles will also be discussed. Research supported by the NSF and Robert A. Welch Foundation.

  6. Radiotherapy and immune checkpoint blockades: a snapshot in 2016

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Taeryool; Kim, In Ah

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint blockades including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), programmed death-1 (PD-1), and programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) have been emerged as a promising anticancer therapy. Several immune checkpoint blockades have been approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and have shown notable success in clinical trials for patients with advanced melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer. Radiotherapy is a promising combination partner of immune checkpoint blockades due to its potent pro-immune effect. This review will cover the current issue and the future perspectives for combined with radiotherapy and immune checkpoint blockades based upon the available preclinical and clinical data. PMID:28030901

  7. Activation of transcription factor genes in striatum by cocaine: role of both serotonin and dopamine systems.

    PubMed

    Bhat, R V; Baraban, J M

    1993-10-01

    Acute administration of cocaine increases expression of the transcription factor genes c-fos and zif268 in the striatum. This response is thought to be mediated via D1 dopamine (DA) receptors, as it is blocked by the selective D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390. However, the directly acting D1 receptor agonists, apomorphine and SKF 38393, do not mimic cocaine's activation of these genes raising the possibility that D1 receptor activation is necessary, but not sufficient, to trigger transcription factor expression. Because cocaine blocks uptake of norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5-HT), as well as DA, we examined whether cocaine's ability to inhibit NE and 5-HT uptake may contribute to its induction of c-fos and zif268 expression in striatum. In examining the effects of selective monoamine uptake inhibitors, we observed that fluoxetine or citalopram, selective inhibitors of 5-HT uptake, potentiated the ability of mazindol, a DA and NE uptake inhibitor, to induce zif268 and c-fos expression, even though these 5-HT uptake inhibitors had no effect when administered alone. In contrast, the selective NE uptake inhibitor, desipramine, administered alone, or in combination with fluoxetine, did not increase expression of zif268 or c-fos. Furthermore, selective denervation of 5-HT projections by p-chloroamphetamine treatment attenuated the increase in zif268 and c-fos expression induced by cocaine in the striatum. In contrast, selective lesions of NE projections with N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride failed to block cocaine's activation of these genes in the striatum. Taken together, these findings indicate that cocaine's ability to induce striatal expression of c-fos and zif268 is mediated by its effects on both the 5-HT and DA systems.

  8. Serotonin, atherosclerosis, and collateral vessel spasm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenberg, N.

    1988-01-01

    Studies on animal models demonstrate that platelet products contribute to vascular spasm in ischemic syndromes and that this is reversible with administration of ketanserin and thromboxane synthesis inhibitors. Laboratory animals (dogs, rabbits, and rats) that had femoral artery ligations exhibited supersensitivity to serotonin within days in their collateral blood vessels. This supersensitivity lasted at least 6 months. The response to serotonin was reversed by ketanserin, but not by 5HT-1 antagonists. Supersensitivity does not extend to norepinephrine, and alpha blockers do not influence the response to serotonin. It appears that platelet activation by endothelial injury contributes to ischemia through blood vessel occlusion and vascular spasm. When platelet activation occurs in vivo, blood vessel occlusion and vascular spasm are reversible in part by using ketanserin or agents that block thromboxane synthesis or its action. Combining both classes of agents reverses spasm completely. These findings support existing evidence that platelet products contribute to vascular disease, and provide an approach to improved management with currently available pharmacologic agents.

  9. Neurotransmitter alterations in PTSD: catecholamines and serotonin.

    PubMed

    Southwick, S M; Paige, S; Morgan, C A; Bremner, J D; Krystal, J H; Charney, D S

    1999-10-01

    In this chapter we review trauma-related studies involving epinephrine (E), norepinephrine (NE), and serotonin (5-HT). Central catecholamine neurons seem to play a critical role in level of alertness, vigilance, orienting, selective attention, memory, fear conditioning, and cardiovascular responses to life-threatening stimuli. Evidence of catecholamine dysregulation in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) includes exaggerated increases in heart rate and blood pressure when exposed to visual and auditory reminders of trauma, elevated 24-hour urine catecholamine excretion, decreased platelet alpha-2 adrenergic receptor number, exaggerated behavioral, cardiovascular, and biochemical responses to IY yohimbine, decreased cortical brain metabolism secondary to IV yohimbine, and clinical efficacy of adrenergic blocking agents. Serotonin seems to play numerous roles in the central nervous system, including regulation of sleep, aggression, appetite, cardiovascular and respiratory activity, motor output, anxiety, mood, neuroendocrine secretion, and analgesia. Evidence of serotonergic dysregulation in PTSD includes frequent symptoms of aggression, impulsivity, depression and suicidality, decreased platelet paroxetine binding, blunted prolactin response to fenfluramine, exaggerated reactivity to m-chloro-phenyl-piperazine, and clinical efficacy of serotonin reuptake inhibitors. It has been suggested that alterations in NE, E, and 5-HT may have relevance for symptoms commonly seen in survivors with PTSD, including hypervigilance, exaggerated startle, irritability, impulsivity, aggression, intrusive memories, depressed mood, and suicidality.

  10. The serotonin system and spiritual experiences.

    PubMed

    Borg, Jacqueline; Andrée, Bengt; Soderstrom, Henrik; Farde, Lars

    2003-11-01

    The serotonin system has long been of interest in biological models of human personality. The purpose of this positron emission tomography (PET) study was to search for relationships between serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptor density and personality traits. Fifteen normal male subjects, ages 20-45 years, were examined with PET and the radioligand [(11)C]WAY100635. Personality traits were assessed with the Swedish version of the Temperament and Character Inventory self-report questionnaire. Binding potential, an index for the density of available 5-HT(1A) receptors, was calculated for the dorsal raphe nuclei, the hippocampal formation, and the neocortex. For each region, correlation coefficients between 5-HT(1A) receptor binding potential and Temperament and Character Inventory personality dimensions were calculated and analyzed in two-tailed tests for significance. The authors found that the binding potential correlated inversely with scores for self-transcendence, a personality trait covering religious behavior and attitudes. No correlations were found for any of the other six Temperament and Character Inventory dimensions. The self-transcendence dimension consists of three distinct subscales, and further analysis showed that the subscale for spiritual acceptance correlated significantly with binding potential but not with the other two subscales. This finding in normal male subjects indicated that the serotonin system may serve as a biological basis for spiritual experiences. The authors speculated that the several-fold variability in 5-HT(1A) receptor density may explain why people vary greatly in spiritual zeal.

  11. Activity patterns of serotonin neurons underlying cognitive flexibility.

    PubMed

    Matias, Sara; Lottem, Eran; Dugué, Guillaume P; Mainen, Zachary F

    2017-03-21

    Serotonin is implicated in mood and affective disorders. However, growing evidence suggests that a core endogenous role is to promote flexible adaptation to changes in the causal structure of the environment, through behavioral inhibition and enhanced plasticity. We used long-term photometric recordings in mice to study a population of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons, whose activity we could link to normal reversal learning using pharmacogenetics. We found that these neurons are activated by both positive and negative prediction errors, and thus report signals similar to those proposed to promote learning in conditions of uncertainty. Furthermore, by comparing the cue responses of serotonin and dopamine neurons, we found differences in learning rates that could explain the importance of serotonin in inhibiting perseverative responding. Our findings show how the activity patterns of serotonin neurons support a role in cognitive flexibility, and suggest a revised model of dopamine-serotonin opponency with potential clinical implications.

  12. Serotonin: a regulator of neuronal morphology and circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Daubert, Elizabeth A.; Condron, Barry G.

    2010-01-01

    Serotonin is an important neuromodulator associated with a wide range of physiological effects in the central nervous system. The exact mechanisms for how serotonin influences brain development are not well understood, although studies in invertebrate and vertebrate model organisms are beginning to unravel a regulatory role for serotonin in neuronal morphology and circuit formation. Recent data suggests a developmental window during which altered serotonin levels permanently impact circuitry, however, the temporal constraints and molecular mechanisms responsible are still under investigation. Growing evidence suggests that alterations in early serotonin signaling contribute to a number of neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Thus, understanding how altered serotonin signaling affects neuronal morphology and plasticity, and ultimately animal physiology and pathophysiology, will be of great significance. PMID:20561690

  13. Peripheral Serotonin: a New Player in Systemic Energy Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Namkung, Jun; Kim, Hail; Park, Sangkyu

    2015-12-01

    Whole body energy balance is achieved through the coordinated regulation of energy intake and energy expenditure in various tissues including liver, muscle and adipose tissues. A positive energy imbalance by excessive energy intake or insufficient energy expenditure results in obesity and related metabolic diseases. Although there have been many obesity treatment trials aimed at the reduction of energy intake, these strategies have achieved only limited success because of their associated adverse effects. An ancient neurotransmitter, serotonin is among those traditional pharmacological targets for anti-obesity treatment because it exhibits strong anorectic effect in the brain. However, recent studies suggest the new functions of peripheral serotonin in energy homeostasis ranging from the endocrine regulation by gut-derived serotonin to the autocrine/paracrine regulation by adipocyte-derived serotonin. Here, we discuss the role of serotonin in the regulation of energy homeostasis and introduce peripheral serotonin as a possible target for anti-obesity treatment.

  14. Control of neuromuscular blockade in the presence of sensor faults.

    PubMed

    Lemos, João M; Magalhães, Hugo; Mendonça, Teresa; Dionísio, Rui

    2005-11-01

    The problem of embedding sensor fault tolerance in feedback control of neuromuscular blockade is considered. For tackling interruptions of feedback measurements, a structure based upon Bayesian inference as well as a predictive filter is proposed. This algorithm is general and can be applied to different situations. Here, it is incorporated in an adaptive automatic system for feedback control of neuromuscular blockade using continuous infusion of muscle relaxants. A significant contribution consists in the experimental clinical testing of the algorithm in patients undergoing surgery.

  15. From Napoleon To Netanyahu: Blockading Through Two Centuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    galley ship in ancient times, blockading continues to be a fundamental activity of navies. Over the centuries, its meaning and roles evolved in...of the latter, strategic importance. This does not mean that they were not both necessary and effective. Throughout the history of warfare and...Throughout blockading’s history , this is AU/ACSC/Howard, J/AY16 4 readily visible by the wide variety of names blockading activities receive by those

  16. Interleukin-6 blockade in ocular inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mesquida, M; Leszczynska, A; Llorenç, V; Adán, A

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a key cytokine featuring redundancy and pleiotropic activity. It plays a central role in host defence against environmental stress such as infection and injury. Dysregulated, persistent interleukin (IL)-6 production has been implicated in the development of various autoimmune, chronic inflammatory diseases and even cancers. Significant elevation of IL-6 has been found in ocular fluids derived from refractory/chronic uveitis patients. In experimental autoimmune uveitis models with IL-6 knock-out mice, IL-6 has shown to be essential for inducing inflammation. IL-6 blockade can suppress acute T helper type 17 (Th17) responses via its differentiation and, importantly, can ameliorate chronic inflammation. Tocilizumab, a recombinant humanized anti-IL-6 receptor antibody, has been shown to be effective in several autoimmune diseases, including uveitis. Herein, we discuss the basic biology of IL-6 and its role in development of autoimmune conditions, focusing particularly on non-infectious uveitis. It also provides an overview of efficacy and safety of tocilizumab therapy for ocular inflammatory diseases. PMID:24528300

  17. Prolonged sensory-selective nerve blockade

    PubMed Central

    Sagie, Itay; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    Sensory-selective local anesthesia has long been a key goal in local anesthetic development. For example, it allows women to be pain-free during labor without compromising their ability to push. Here we show that prolonged sensory-selective nerve block can be produced by specific concentrations of surfactants—such as are used to enhance drug flux across skin—in combination with QX-314, a lidocaine derivative that has relative difficulty penetrating nerves. For example, injection of 25 mM QX-314 in 30 mM octyltrimethylammonium bromide (OTAB) lasted up to 7 h. Sensory selectivity was imparted to varying degrees by cationic, neutral, and anionic surfactants, and also was achieved with another lidocaine derivative, QX-222. Simultaneous injection of OTAB at a s.c. injection site remote from the sciatic nerve did not result in prolonged sensory-specific nerve blockade from QX-314, suggesting that the observed effect is due to a local interaction between the surfactant and the lidocaine derivative, not a systemic effect. PMID:20133669

  18. Costimulation Blockade in Kidney Transplantation: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Malvezzi, Paolo; Jouve, Thomas; Rostaing, Lionel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the setting of solid-organ transplantation, calcineurin inhibitor (CNI)-based therapy remains the cornerstone of immunosuppression. However, long-term use of CNIs is associated with some degree of nephrotoxicity. This has led to exploring the blockade of some costimulation pathways as an efficient immunosuppressive tool instead of using CNIs. The only agent already in clinical use and approved by the health authorities for kidney transplant patients is belatacept (Nulojix), a fusion protein that interferes with cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4. Belatacept has been demonstrated to be as efficient as cyclosporine-based immunosuppression and is associated with significantly better renal function, that is, no nephrotoxicity. However, in the immediate posttransplant period, significantly more mild/moderate episodes of acute rejection have been reported, favored by the fact that cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein pathway has an inhibitory effect on the alloimmune response; thereby its inhibition is detrimental in this regard. This has led to the development of antibodies that target CD28. The most advanced is FR104, it has shown promise in nonhuman primate models of autoimmune diseases and allotransplantation. In addition, research into blocking the CD40-CD154 pathway is underway. A phase II study testing ASK1240, that is, anti-CD40 antibody has been completed, and the results are pending. PMID:27472094

  19. Fatal serotonin syndrome precipitated by oxcarbazepine in a patient using an selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Dardis, Christopher; Omoregie, Eghosa; Ly, Vanthanh

    2012-07-01

    Oxcarbazepine, a metabolite of carbamazepine, is used as an antiepileptic, analgesic for neuropathic pain and in the treatment of affective disorders. It has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for partial seizures in adults as both adjunctive and monotherapy, and as adjunctive therapy in children aged from 2 to 16 years (http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/ac/06/briefing/2006-4254b_07_05_KP%20OxcarbazepineFDAlabel102005.pdf). We present a case of serotonin syndrome, which was precipitated by this medicine in a patient who had been predisposed by long-term treatment with sertraline, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. This is the first reported fatality due to this drug interaction and only the second case of serotonin syndrome reported with oxcarbazepine. Physicians should consider this risk when prescribing the above combination.

  20. Orbital excitation blockade and algorithmic cooling in quantum gases.

    PubMed

    Bakr, Waseem S; Preiss, Philipp M; Tai, M Eric; Ma, Ruichao; Simon, Jonathan; Greiner, Markus

    2011-12-21

    Interaction blockade occurs when strong interactions in a confined, few-body system prevent a particle from occupying an otherwise accessible quantum state. Blockade phenomena reveal the underlying granular nature of quantum systems and allow for the detection and manipulation of the constituent particles, be they electrons, spins, atoms or photons. Applications include single-electron transistors based on electronic Coulomb blockade and quantum logic gates in Rydberg atoms. Here we report a form of interaction blockade that occurs when transferring ultracold atoms between orbitals in an optical lattice. We call this orbital excitation blockade (OEB). In this system, atoms at the same lattice site undergo coherent collisions described by a contact interaction whose strength depends strongly on the orbital wavefunctions of the atoms. We induce coherent orbital excitations by modulating the lattice depth, and observe staircase-like excitation behaviour as we cross the interaction-split resonances by tuning the modulation frequency. As an application of OEB, we demonstrate algorithmic cooling of quantum gases: a sequence of reversible OEB-based quantum operations isolates the entropy in one part of the system and then an irreversible step removes the entropy from the gas. This technique may make it possible to cool quantum gases to have the ultralow entropies required for quantum simulation of strongly correlated electron systems. In addition, the close analogy between OEB and dipole blockade in Rydberg atoms provides a plan for the implementation of two-quantum-bit gates in a quantum computing architecture with natural scalability.

  1. Methylene Blue Causing Serotonin Syndrome Following Cystocele Repair.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Kailash; Cheung, Felix; Lee, Wai; Thalappillil, Richard; Florence, F Barry; Kim, Jason

    2016-11-01

    Methylene blue is an intravenously administered agent that may potentiate serotonin syndrome. The usage of methylene blue to evaluate ureters for injuries and patency during urological surgeries is recognized as common practice. However, there is no mention of serotonin syndrome caused by methylene blue in urological literature or for urological surgery. We report the first urological case in order to raise awareness of the risk for serotonin toxicity with utilizing methylene blue.

  2. Metabolomics Approach Reveals Integrated Metabolic Network Associated with Serotonin Deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Tian, Yonglu; Burton, Casey; Xu, Xinyuan; Liu, Yi; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-07-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that broadly participates in various biological processes. While serotonin deficiency has been associated with multiple pathological conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the serotonin-dependent mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel biomarkers and metabolic pathways perturbed by serotonin deficiency using metabolomics approach in order to gain new metabolic insights into the serotonin deficiency-related molecular mechanisms. Serotonin deficiency was achieved through pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) using p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) or genetic knockout of the neuronal specific Tph2 isoform. This dual approach improved specificity for the serotonin deficiency-associated biomarkers while minimizing nonspecific effects of pCPA treatment or Tph2 knockout (Tph2-/-). Non-targeted metabolic profiling and a targeted pCPA dose-response study identified 21 biomarkers in the pCPA-treated mice while 17 metabolites in the Tph2-/- mice were found to be significantly altered compared with the control mice. These newly identified biomarkers were associated with amino acid, energy, purine, lipid and gut microflora metabolisms. Oxidative stress was also found to be significantly increased in the serotonin deficient mice. These new biomarkers and the overall metabolic pathways may provide new understanding for the serotonin deficiency-associated mechanisms under multiple pathological states.

  3. SEROTONIN AND OTHER VASOACTIVE AGENTS IN EXPERIMENTAL DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SEROTONIN, DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS), (*VASOACTIVE AGENTS, DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS), RATS, EXERCISE(PHYSIOLOGY), DOSAGE, CHEMOTHERAPEUTIC AGENTS, BLOOD ANALYSIS, TOXICITY, BLOOD CIRCULATION, MORTALITY RATES , CANADA

  4. Molecular imaging of serotonin degeneration in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gwenn S; Barrett, Frederick S; Joo, Jin Hui; Nassery, Najlla; Savonenko, Alena; Sodums, Devin J; Marano, Christopher M; Munro, Cynthia A; Brandt, Jason; Kraut, Michael A; Zhou, Yun; Wong, Dean F; Workman, Clifford I

    2017-09-01

    Neuropathological and neuroimaging studies have consistently demonstrated degeneration of monoamine systems, especially the serotonin system, in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease. The evidence for degeneration of the serotonin system in mild cognitive impairment is limited. Thus, the goal of the present study was to measure the serotonin transporter in vivo in mild cognitive impairment and healthy controls. The serotonin transporter is a selective marker of serotonin terminals and of the integrity of serotonin projections to cortical, subcortical and limbic regions and is found in high concentrations in the serotonergic cell bodies of origin of these projections (raphe nuclei). Twenty-eight participants with mild cognitive impairment (age 66.6±6.9, 16 males) and 28 healthy, cognitively normal, demographically matched controls (age 66.2±7.1, 15 males) underwent magnetic resonance imaging for measurement of grey matter volumes and high-resolution positron emission tomography with well-established radiotracers for the serotonin transporter and regional cerebral blood flow. Beta-amyloid imaging was performed to evaluate, in combination with the neuropsychological testing, the likelihood of subsequent cognitive decline in the participants with mild cognitive impairment. The following hypotheses were tested: 1) the serotonin transporter would be lower in mild cognitive impairment compared to controls in cortical and limbic regions, 2) in mild cognitive impairment relative to controls, the serotonin transporter would be lower to a greater extent and observed in a more widespread pattern than lower grey matter volumes or lower regional cerebral blood flow and 3) lower cortical and limbic serotonin transporters would be correlated with greater deficits in auditory-verbal and visual-spatial memory in mild cognitive impairment, not in controls. Reduced serotonin transporter availability was observed in mild cognitive impairment compared to controls in cortical and limbic

  5. Metabolomics Approach Reveals Integrated Metabolic Network Associated with Serotonin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Tian, Yonglu; Burton, Casey; Xu, Xinyuan; Liu, Yi; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that broadly participates in various biological processes. While serotonin deficiency has been associated with multiple pathological conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the serotonin-dependent mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel biomarkers and metabolic pathways perturbed by serotonin deficiency using metabolomics approach in order to gain new metabolic insights into the serotonin deficiency-related molecular mechanisms. Serotonin deficiency was achieved through pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) using p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) or genetic knockout of the neuronal specific Tph2 isoform. This dual approach improved specificity for the serotonin deficiency-associated biomarkers while minimizing nonspecific effects of pCPA treatment or Tph2 knockout (Tph2-/-). Non-targeted metabolic profiling and a targeted pCPA dose-response study identified 21 biomarkers in the pCPA-treated mice while 17 metabolites in the Tph2-/- mice were found to be significantly altered compared with the control mice. These newly identified biomarkers were associated with amino acid, energy, purine, lipid and gut microflora metabolisms. Oxidative stress was also found to be significantly increased in the serotonin deficient mice. These new biomarkers and the overall metabolic pathways may provide new understanding for the serotonin deficiency-associated mechanisms under multiple pathological states. PMID:26154191

  6. Serotonin and conditioning: focus on Pavlovian psychostimulant drug conditioning.

    PubMed

    Carey, Robert J; Damianopoulos, Ernest N

    2015-04-01

    Serotonin containing neurons are located in nuclei deep in the brainstem and send axons throughout the central nervous system from the spinal cord to the cerebral cortex. The vast scope of these connections and interactions enable serotonin and serotonin analogs to have profound effects upon sensory/motor processes. In that conditioning represents a neuroplastic process that leads to new sensory/motor connections, it is apparent that the serotonin system has the potential for a critical role in conditioning. In this article we review the basics of conditioning as well as the serotonergic system and point up the number of non-associative ways in which manipulations of serotonin neurotransmission have an impact upon conditioning. We focus upon psychostimulant drug conditioning and review the contribution of drug stimuli in the use of serotonin drugs to investigate drug conditioning and the important impact drug stimuli can have on conditioning by introducing new sensory stimuli that can create or mask a CS. We also review the ways in which experimental manipulations of serotonin can disrupt conditioned behavioral effects but not the associative processes in conditioning. In addition, we propose the use of the recently developed memory re-consolidation model of conditioning as an approach to assess the possible role of serotonin in associative processes without the complexities of performance effects related to serotonin treatment induced alterations in sensory/motor systems.

  7. Serotonin modulates glutamatergic transmission to neurons in the lateral habenula

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guiqin; Zuo, Wanhong; Wu, Liangzhi; Li, Wenting; Wu, Wei; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is bilaterally connected with serotoninergic raphe nuclei, and expresses high density of serotonin receptors. However, actions of serotonin on the excitatory synaptic transmission to LHb neurons have not been thoroughly investigated. The LHb contains two anatomically and functionally distinct regions: lateral (LHbl) and medial (LHbm) divisions. We compared serotonin’s effects on glutamatergic transmission across the LHb in rat brains. Serotonin bi-directionally and differentially modulated glutamatergic transmission. Serotonin inhibited glutamatergic transmission in higher percentage of LHbl neurons but potentiated in higher percentage of LHbm neurons. Magnitude of potentiation was greater in LHbm than in LHbl. Type 2 and 3 serotonin receptor antagonists attenuated serotonin’s potentiation. The serotonin reuptake blocker, and the type 2 and 3 receptor agonists facilitated glutamatergic transmission in both LHbl and LHbm neurons. Thus, serotonin via activating its type 2, 3 receptors, increased glutamate release at nerve terminals in some LHb neurons. Our data demonstrated that serotonin affects both LHbm and LHbl. Serotonin might play an important role in processing information between the LHb and its downstream-targeted structures during decision-making. It may also contribute to a homeostatic balance underlying the neural circuitry between the LHb and raphe nuclei. PMID:27033153

  8. Stimulation of aortic smooth muscle cell mitogenesis by serotonin

    SciTech Connect

    Nemecek, G.M.; Coughlin, S.R.; Handley, D.A.; Moskowitz, M.A.

    1986-02-01

    Bovine aortic smooth muscle cells in vitro responded to 1 nM to 10 ..mu..M serotonin with increased incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA. The mitogenic effect of serotonin was half-maximal at 80 nM and maximal above 1 ..mu..M. At a concentration of 1 ..mu..M, serotonin stimulated smooth muscle cell mitogenesis to the same extent as human platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) at 12 ng/ml. Tryptamine was approx. = 1/10th as potent as serotonin as a mitogen for smooth muscle cells. Other indoles that are structurally related to serotonin (D- and L-tryptophan, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, melatonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptophol) and quipazine were inactive. The stimulatory effect of serotonin on smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis required prolonged (20-24 hr) exposure to the agonist and was attenuated in the presence of serotonin D receptor antagonists. When smooth muscle cells were incubated with submaximal concentrations of serotonin and PDGF, synergistic rather than additive mitogenic responses were observed. These data indicate that serotonin has a significant mitogenic effect on smooth muscle cells in vitro, which appears to be mediated by specific plasma membrane receptors.

  9. Regulation of Serotonin-Induced Trafficking and Migration of Eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Bit Na; Ha, Sung Gil; Bahaie, Nooshin S.; Hosseinkhani, M. Reza; Ge, Xiao Na; Blumenthal, Malcolm N.; Rao, Savita P.; Sriramarao, P.

    2013-01-01

    Association of the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) with the pathogenesis of allergic asthma is well recognized and its role as a chemoattractant for eosinophils (Eos) in vitro and in vivo has been previously demonstrated. Here we have examined the regulation of 5-HT-induced human and murine Eos trafficking and migration at a cellular and molecular level. Eos from allergic donors and bone marrow-derived murine Eos (BM-Eos) were found to predominantly express the 5-HT2A receptor. Exposure to 5-HT or 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI), a 5-HT2A/C selective agonist, induced rolling of human Eos and AML14.3D10 human Eos-like cells on vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 under conditions of flow in vitro coupled with distinct cytoskeletal and cell shape changes as well as phosphorylation of MAPK. Blockade of 5-HT2A or of ROCK MAPK, PI3K, PKC and calmodulin, but not Gαi-proteins, with specific inhibitors inhibited DOI-induced rolling, actin polymerization and changes in morphology of VCAM-1-adherent AML14.3D10 cells. More extensive studies with murine BM-Eos demonstrated the role of 5-HT in promoting rolling in vivo within inflamed post-capillary venules of the mouse cremaster microcirculation and confirmed that down-stream signaling of 5-HT2A activation involves ROCK, MAPK, PI3K, PKC and calmodulin similar to AML14.3D10 cells. DOI-induced migration of BM-Eos is also dependent on these signaling molecules and requires Ca2+. Further, activation of 5-HT2A with DOI led to an increase in intracellular Ca2+ levels in murine BM-Eos. Overall, these data demonstrate that 5-HT (or DOI)/5-HT2A interaction regulates Eos trafficking and migration by promoting actin polymerization associated with changes in cell shape/morphology that favor cellular trafficking and recruitment via activation of specific intracellular signaling molecules (ROCK, MAPK, PI3K and the PKC-calmodulin pathway). PMID:23372779

  10. Effect of beta-adrenoceptor blockade on postexercise oxygen consumption and triglyceride/fatty acid cycling.

    PubMed

    Børsheim, E; Bahr, R; Høstmark, A T; Knardahl, S

    1998-04-01

    In the recovery period after strenuous exercise, there is increased O2 uptake, termed the excess postexercise O2 consumption (EPOC). One of the mechanisms suggested to explain EPOC is activation of the triglyceride/fatty acid (TG/FA) cycle by catecholamines. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of selective beta1- and nonselective beta-adrenoceptor blockade on EPOC and the TG/FA cycle. Seven healthy young men each participated in three control and three exercise experiments in a randomized and balanced sequence. In the exercise experiments, subjects exercised for 90 minutes at 58% +/- 2% (mean +/- SD) of maximal O2 uptake on a cycle ergometer, followed by a 4.5-hour bedrest. The control experiments followed the same protocol, but without exercise. In one control and one exercise experiment, the selective beta1-adrenoceptor antagonist atenolol (0.062 mg.kg(-1) body weight) was administered intravenously immediately after the exercise (EXAT) and at the corresponding time in the rest-control experiment (REAT). In a second set of control and exercise experiments, the nonselective beta-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol (0.15 mg.kg(-1) body weight) was administered (REPRO and EXPRO). In a third set of rest and exercise experiments, an injection of saline was given instead of beta-antagonist (RE and EX). TG/FA cycling was calculated by combining results obtained with a two-stage glycerol infusion and indirect calorimetry. O2 uptake was significantly increased above control levels throughout the recovery period after exercise with the nonselective beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, beta1-adrenoceptor antagonist, and saline. However, there was no difference between the time course or magnitude of EPOC in the three situations. After 4.5 hours of bedrest, the mean increase in O2 uptake was 8% to 9% in all three conditions. TG/FA cycling was increased after exercise, but no effects of beta-antagonists were observed. We conclude that EPOC and the rate of TG

  11. A quantitative description of QX222 blockade of sodium channels in squid axons.

    PubMed Central

    Starmer, C. F.; Yeh, J. Z.; Tanguy, J.

    1986-01-01

    The interaction of QX222, a quaternary ammonium derivative of lidocaine, with the Na channel was studied in internally perfused squid axons under voltage-clamped conditions. A use-dependent block was observed in response to repetitive depolarizing pulses. The time constant for block development and the steady state level of the block were increased with increasing frequency of stimulation from 0.1 to 10 Hz. Use-dependent block can be viewed as a net increase in the drug incorporation into Na channels with successive pulses. That is, net drug uptake by Na channels occurs during the depolarizing phase and net drug release occurs during the interpulse interval. The observed uptake rate of use-dependent block is shown to be a linear combination of the uptake rates associated with the depolarizing and resting potentials. Also, the steady state fraction of blocked channels is shown to be a linear combination of the state-dependent blockade equilibria. Drug-channel interactions are assumed to be dependent on gated control of the diffusion path between drug pool and the interior channel binding site. Drug ingress to the binding site can be inhibited by the channel gates (receptor guarding), while drug bound to the channel may become trapped by closure of the channel gates (trapping). On the basis of these assumptions, a simple procedure is proposed for estimating apparent rate constants governing the drug-channel binding reactions for two cases of channel blockade. The estimated forward (k) and backward (1) rate constants are: 2.45 x I05 M-1 s- and 0.23 x 103 s-1, respectively, for k and I for the case when the drug is trapped by both activation and inactivation gates, and 3.58 x 105 M-l s-l and 4.15 x 10-3 S-l for the case when the drug is not trapped. While these two schemes make a similar prediction with respect to the resulting uptake rates, their prediction of the steady state level of block differs. The observed steady state level of block could quantitatively be

  12. Generation of 2,000 breast cancer metabolic landscapes reveals a poor prognosis group with active serotonin production

    PubMed Central

    Leoncikas, Vytautas; Wu, Huihai; Ward, Lara T.; Kierzek, Andrzej M.; Plant, Nick J.

    2016-01-01

    A major roadblock in the effective treatment of cancers is their heterogeneity, whereby multiple molecular landscapes are classified as a single disease. To explore the contribution of cellular metabolism to cancer heterogeneity, we analyse the Metabric dataset, a landmark genomic and transcriptomic study of 2,000 individual breast tumours, in the context of the human genome-scale metabolic network. We create personalized metabolic landscapes for each tumour by exploring sets of active reactions that satisfy constraints derived from human biochemistry and maximize congruency with the Metabric transcriptome data. Classification of the personalized landscapes derived from 997 tumour samples within the Metabric discovery dataset reveals a novel poor prognosis cluster, reproducible in the 995-sample validation dataset. We experimentally follow mechanistic hypotheses resulting from the computational study and establish that active serotonin production is a major metabolic feature of the poor prognosis group. These data support the reconsideration of concomitant serotonin-specific uptake inhibitors treatment during breast cancer chemotherapy. PMID:26813959

  13. Inhibition of the Serotonin Transporter Is Altered by Metabolites of Selective Serotonin and Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors and Represents a Caution to Acute or Chronic Treatment Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Krout, Danielle; Rodriquez, Meghan; Brose, Stephen A; Golovko, Mikhail Y; Henry, L Keith; Thompson, Brent J

    2016-12-28

    Previous studies of transgenic mice carrying a single isoleucine to methionine substitution (I172M) in the serotonin transporter (SERT) demonstrated a loss of sensitivity to multiple antidepressants (ADs) at SERT. However, the ability of AD metabolites to antagonize SERT was not assessed. Here, we evaluated the selectivity and potency of these metabolites for inhibition of SERT in mouse brain-derived synaptosomes and blood platelets from wild-type (I172 mSERT) and the antidepressant-insensitive mouse M172 mSERT. The metabolites norfluoxetine and desmethylsertraline lost the selectivity demonstrated by the parent compounds for inhibition of wild-type mSERT over M172 mSERT, whereas desvenlafaxine and desmethylcitalopram retained selectivity. Furthermore, we show that the metabolite desmethylcitalopram accumulates in the brain and that the metabolites desmethylcitalopram, norfluoxetine, and desvenlafaxine inhibit serotonin uptake in wild-type mSERT at potencies similar to those of their parent compounds, suggesting that metabolites may play a role in effects observed following AD administration in wild-type and M172 mice.

  14. Linezolid-induced serotonin toxicity in a patient not taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors or serotonin receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Jacob; Stroup, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Linezolid is an oxazolidinone antibiotic with weak monoamine oxidase (MAO) type A and MAO type B inhibitory effects. Linezolid has been associated with serotonin toxicity when used concomitantly with multiple medications that are known to increase serotonin concentrations. We report the case of a 65-year-old woman with signs and symptoms of serotonin toxicity following administration of linezolid for treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia. PMID:27034576

  15. Effects of beta-blockade on exercise capacity of trained and untrained men: a hemodynamic comparison.

    PubMed

    Joyner, M J; Freund, B J; Jilka, S M; Hetrick, G A; Martinez, E; Ewy, G A; Wilmore, J H

    1986-04-01

    To study the effects of cardiovascular fitness on hemodynamic responses to exercise during beta-adrenergic blockade (BAB), submaximal [60% of maximum O2 uptake (VO2max)] and maximal treadmill exercise data were collected in 11 trained (T, VO2max 63.3 ml X kg-1 X min-1, 26.8 yr) and 11 untrained (UT, VO2max 44.5 ml X kg-1 X min-1, 25.0 yr) male subjects. Subjects completed two maximal control tests followed by a randomized, double-blind series of maximal tests after 1-wk treatments with placebo (PLAC), propranolol (PROP, 160 mg/day, beta 1- and beta 2-blockade), and atenolol (ATEN, 100 mg/day, beta 1-blockade). Treatments were separated by 1-wk washout periods. At 60% of control VO2max T and UT subjects experienced no reductions in O2 uptake (VO2) with either drug. Submaximal heart rate (HR, beats/min) was 134.8 PLAC, 107.0 PROP, 107.9 ATEN (P less than 0.05 both drugs vs. PLAC) in T subjects and 141.1 PLAC, 106.1 PROP, and 105.0 ATEN (P less than 0.05 both drugs vs. PLAC) in UT subjects. Cardiac output (1/min) for T was 17.3 PLAC, 16.9 PROP, 16.5 ATEN (P less than 0.05 ATEN vs. PLAC in T only) and for UT it was 12.2 (PLAC), 11.7 (PROP), 11.5 (ATEN) (P less than 0.05 both drugs vs. PLAC in UT). Stroke volume increased from 129.8 ml (PLAC) to 158.6 (PROP) and 156.2 (ATEN) in T (P less than 0.05 both drugs vs. PLAC) and from 86.8 (PLAC) to 110.0 (PROP) and 109.8 (ATEN) (P less than 0.05 both drugs vs. PLAC) in UT. The increases in stroke volume (SV) were similar in both groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Serotonin 5-HT2 Receptors Induce a Long-Lasting Facilitation of Spinal Reflexes Independent of Ionotropic Receptor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Shay, Barbara L.; Sawchuk, Michael; Machacek, David W.; Hochman, Shawn

    2009-01-01

    Dorsal root-evoked stimulation of sensory afferents in the hemisected in vitro rat spinal cord produces reflex output, recorded on the ventral roots. Transient spinal 5-HT2C receptor activation induces a long-lasting facilitation of these reflexes (LLFR) by largely unknown mechanisms. Two Sprague-Dawley substrains were used to characterize network properties involved in this serotonin (5-HT) receptor-mediated reflex plasticity. Serotonin more easily produced LLFR in one substrain and a long-lasting depression of reflexes (LLDR) in the other. Interestingly, LLFR and LLDR were bidirectionally interconvertible using 5-HT2A/2C and 5-HT1A receptor agonists, respectively, regardless of substrain. LLFR was predominantly Aβ afferent fiber mediated, consistent with prominent 5-HT2C receptor expression in the Aβ fiber projection territories (deeper spinal laminae). Reflex facilitation involved an unmasking of polysynaptic pathways and an increased receptive field size. LLFR emerged even when reflexes were evoked three to five times/h, indicating an activity independent induction. Both the NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated components of the reflex could be facilitated, and facilitation was dependent on 5-HT receptor activation alone, not on coincident reflex activation in the presence of 5-HT. Selective blockade of GABAA and/or glycine receptors also did not prevent reflex amplification and so are not required for LLFR. Indeed, a more robust response was seen after blockade of spinal inhibition, indicating that inhibitory processes serve to limit reflex amplification. Overall we demonstrate that the serotonergic system has the capacity to induce long-lasting bidirectional changes in reflex strength in a manner that is nonassociative and independent of evoked activity or activation of ionotropic excitatory and inhibitory receptors. PMID:16033939

  17. Serotonin 5-HT2 receptors induce a long-lasting facilitation of spinal reflexes independent of ionotropic receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Shay, Barbara L; Sawchuk, Michael; Machacek, David W; Hochman, Shawn

    2005-10-01

    Dorsal root-evoked stimulation of sensory afferents in the hemisected in vitro rat spinal cord produces reflex output, recorded on the ventral roots. Transient spinal 5-HT(2C) receptor activation induces a long-lasting facilitation of these reflexes (LLFR) by largely unknown mechanisms. Two Sprague-Dawley substrains were used to characterize network properties involved in this serotonin (5-HT) receptor-mediated reflex plasticity. Serotonin more easily produced LLFR in one substrain and a long-lasting depression of reflexes (LLDR) in the other. Interestingly, LLFR and LLDR were bidirectionally interconvertible using 5-HT(2A/2C) and 5-HT(1A) receptor agonists, respectively, regardless of substrain. LLFR was predominantly Abeta afferent fiber mediated, consistent with prominent 5-HT(2C) receptor expression in the Abeta fiber projection territories (deeper spinal laminae). Reflex facilitation involved an unmasking of polysynaptic pathways and an increased receptive field size. LLFR emerged even when reflexes were evoked three to five times/h, indicating an activity independent induction. Both the NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated components of the reflex could be facilitated, and facilitation was dependent on 5-HT receptor activation alone, not on coincident reflex activation in the presence of 5-HT. Selective blockade of GABA(A) and/or glycine receptors also did not prevent reflex amplification and so are not required for LLFR. Indeed, a more robust response was seen after blockade of spinal inhibition, indicating that inhibitory processes serve to limit reflex amplification. Overall we demonstrate that the serotonergic system has the capacity to induce long-lasting bidirectional changes in reflex strength in a manner that is nonassociative and independent of evoked activity or activation of ionotropic excitatory and inhibitory receptors.

  18. Comparison of desmethylsertraline with sertraline as a monoamine uptake inhibitor in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fuller, R W; Hemrick-Luecke, S K; Littlefield, E S; Audia, J E

    1995-01-01

    1. Desmethylsertraline, a metabolite of the antidepressant drug sertraline, was compared with sertraline for its ability to produce effects characteristic of inhibitors of the serotonin transporter in vivo. Desmethylsertraline antagonized brain serotonin depletion by p-chloroamphetamine, a depletion dependent upon the serotonin transporter, being less potent than sertraline in rats but almost as potent as sertraline in mice. Desmethylsertraline was a weak antagonist of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced depletion of heart norepinephrine in mice; sertraline had no effect at the doses studied. 2. Desmethylsertraline decreased brain concentrations of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5HIAA) in rats as did sertraline, the duration of the effect after both drugs being at least 24 hrs but less than 48 hrs. 3. After sertraline injection, desmethylsertraline was present in rat brain at higher concentrations than the parent drug at 8 hrs and thereafter. 4. In rats, repeated injections of sertraline, at doses previously shown to diminish beta-adrenergic receptor-mediated responses, led to marked accumulation of desmethylsertraline in brain and to inhibition of the catecholamine transporters. 5. In mice, brain concentrations of desmethylsertraline were higher than those of parent drug within 7 hrs after sertraline injection and probably contributed importantly to the antagonism of p-chloroamphetamine effects. 6. These data show that desmethylsertraline is less potent than sertraline as a serotonin uptake inhibitor in vivo, as the in vitro data would have predicted, but that desmethylsertraline may nonetheless contribute to the prolonged inhibition of the serotonin transporter after sertraline administration, perhaps more in mice than in rats.

  19. Regulation of serotonin release from enterochromaffin cells of rat cecum mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, C.; Ternaux, J.P. )

    1990-05-01

    The release of endogenous serotonin or previously taken up tritiated serotonin from isolated strips of rat cecum mucosa containing enterochromaffin cells was studied in vitro. Release of tritiated serotonin was increased by potassium depolarization and was decreased by tetrodotoxin, veratridine and the absence of calcium. Endogenous serotonin was released at a lower rate than tritiated serotonin; endogenous serotonin release was stimulated by potassium depolarization but was unaffected by tetrodotoxin, veratridine or the absence of calcium. Carbachol, norepinephrine, clonidine and isoproterenol decreased release of tritiated serotonin but had less or reverse effect on release of endogenous serotonin. The results suggest two different serotoninergic pools within the enterochromaffin cell population.

  20. Serotonin-S2 and dopamine-D2 receptors are the same size in membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Brann, M.R.

    1985-12-31

    Target size analysis was used to compare the sizes of serotonin-S2 and dopamine-D2 receptors in rat brain membranes. The sizes of these receptors were standardized by comparison with the muscarinic receptor, a receptor of known size. The number of serotonin-S2 receptors labeled with (3H)ketanserin or (3H)spiperone in frontal cortex decreased as an exponential function of radiation dose, and receptor affinity was not affected. The number of dopamine-D2 receptors labeled with (3H)spiperone in striatum also decreased as an exponential function of radiation dose, and D2 and S2 receptors were equally sensitive to radiation. In both striatum and frontal cortex, the number of muscarinic receptors labeled with (3H)QNB decreased as an exponential function of radiation dose, and were much less sensitive to radiation than S2 and D2 receptors. These data indicate that in rat brain membranes, S2 and D2 receptors are of similar size, and both molecules are much larger than the muscarinic receptor.

  1. Anteroventral Third Ventricle Lesions Attenuate Pressor Responses to Serotonin in Anesthetized Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muntzel, Martin S.; Lewis, Stephen J.; Johnson, Alan Kim

    1996-01-01

    When administered intravenously, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) evokes a triphasic blood pressure response, consisting of the Bezold-Jarisch-associated depressor response, a pressor action, and long-lasting depressor response. Because the pressor response may, in part, be caused by central nervous system (CNS) activation by 5-HT, we predicted that destruction of the anteroventral third ventricle (AV3V) region, an area rich in 5-HT receptors, would attenuate increases in blood pressure to intravenous 5-HT. In anesthetized sham-lesioned and AV3V-lesioned Sprague-Dawley rats. we measured mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) to increasing bolus doses of intravenous 5-HT (1, 2.5, 5, 10, 25 microg/kg), before and after blockade of bradycardia using methylatropine (200 microg/kg). In all rats, bolus injections of 5-HT elicited bradycardia accompanied by a fall in lumbar SNA and an initial hypotension followed by a pressor response and a longer lasting hypotensive response. The bradycardia, reduction in lumbar SNA, and both depressor responses were equivalent in sham-lesioned and AV3V-lesioned groups. Importantly, AV3V lesions attenuated pressor responses to increasing doses of 5-HT (3 +/- 1, 6 +/- 4, 6 +/- 4, 17 +/- 4, 35 +/- 3 mmHg) compared to sham-lesioned controls (6 +/- 3, 16 +/- 7, 33 +/- 5, 54 +/- 4, 51 +/- 6 mmHg; P < 0.0001). This attenuation was conserved following blockade of bradycardia with methylatropine (P < 0.01). In summary, pressor responses to intravenous 5-HT are diminished by AV3V lesions. These data indicate that the pressor component of the blood pressure response to intravenous 5-HT is partly dependent upon interaction with the CNS.

  2. Dual Role of Endogenous Serotonin in 2,4,6-Trinitrobenzene Sulfonic Acid-Induced Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Rapalli, Alberto; Bertoni, Simona; Arcaro, Valentina; Saccani, Francesca; Grandi, Andrea; Vivo, Valentina; Cantoni, Anna M.; Barocelli, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Changes in gut serotonin (5-HT) content have been described in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and in different experimental models of colitis: the critical role of this monoamine in the pathogenesis of chronic gastrointestinal inflammation is gradually emerging. Aim of the present study was to evaluate the contribution of endogenous 5-HT through the activation of its specific receptor subtypes to the local and systemic inflammatory responses in an experimental model of IBD. Materials and Methods: Colitis was induced by intrarectal 2,4,6-TriNitroBenzene Sulfonic acid in mice subacutely treated with selective antagonists of 5-HT1A (WAY100135), 5-HT2A (Ketanserin), 5-HT3 (Ondansetron), 5-HT4 (GR125487), 5-HT7 (SB269970) receptors and with 5-HT1A agonist 8-Hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin. Results: Blockade of 5-HT1A receptors worsened TNBS-induced local and systemic neutrophil recruitment while 5-HT1A agonist delayed and mitigated the severity of colitis, counteracting the increase in colonic 5-HT content. On the contrary, blockade of 5-HT2A receptors improved global health conditions, reduced colonic morphological alterations, down-regulated neutrophil recruitment, inflammatory cytokines levels and colonic apoptosis. Antagonism of 5-HT3, 5-HT4, and 5-HT7 receptor sites did not remarkably affect the progression and outcome of the pathology or only slightly improved it. Conclusion: The prevailing deleterious contribution given by endogenous 5-HT to inflammation in TNBS-induced colitis is seemingly mediated by 5-HT2A and, to a lesser extent, by 5-HT4 receptors and coexists with the weak beneficial effect elicited by 5-HT1A stimulation. These findings suggest how only a selective interference with 5-HT pro-inflammatory actions may represent an additional potential therapeutic option for intestinal inflammatory disorders. PMID:27047383

  3. Anteroventral Third Ventricle Lesions Attenuate Pressor Responses to Serotonin in Anesthetized Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muntzel, Martin S.; Lewis, Stephen J.; Johnson, Alan Kim

    1996-01-01

    When administered intravenously, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) evokes a triphasic blood pressure response, consisting of the Bezold-Jarisch-associated depressor response, a pressor action, and long-lasting depressor response. Because the pressor response may, in part, be caused by central nervous system (CNS) activation by 5-HT, we predicted that destruction of the anteroventral third ventricle (AV3V) region, an area rich in 5-HT receptors, would attenuate increases in blood pressure to intravenous 5-HT. In anesthetized sham-lesioned and AV3V-lesioned Sprague-Dawley rats. we measured mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) to increasing bolus doses of intravenous 5-HT (1, 2.5, 5, 10, 25 microg/kg), before and after blockade of bradycardia using methylatropine (200 microg/kg). In all rats, bolus injections of 5-HT elicited bradycardia accompanied by a fall in lumbar SNA and an initial hypotension followed by a pressor response and a longer lasting hypotensive response. The bradycardia, reduction in lumbar SNA, and both depressor responses were equivalent in sham-lesioned and AV3V-lesioned groups. Importantly, AV3V lesions attenuated pressor responses to increasing doses of 5-HT (3 +/- 1, 6 +/- 4, 6 +/- 4, 17 +/- 4, 35 +/- 3 mmHg) compared to sham-lesioned controls (6 +/- 3, 16 +/- 7, 33 +/- 5, 54 +/- 4, 51 +/- 6 mmHg; P < 0.0001). This attenuation was conserved following blockade of bradycardia with methylatropine (P < 0.01). In summary, pressor responses to intravenous 5-HT are diminished by AV3V lesions. These data indicate that the pressor component of the blood pressure response to intravenous 5-HT is partly dependent upon interaction with the CNS.

  4. Blocking effect of serotonin on inhibitory dopamine receptor activity of Aplysia ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Shozushima, M

    1984-01-01

    The abdominal ganglion of Aplysia includes neurons with a characteristic dopamine (DA) receptor, the activation of which induces a marked hyperpolarization with a specific increase in the permeability of the membrane to K+. The DA receptor of this type is called the "HK-type." A 2-min exposure to 1 microM serotonin (5-HT) had little effect on the resting membranes with the receptor of HK-type, but significantly depressed the responses to 10 microM DA. The depressing effect of 5-HT on this type of response was completely reversible after a 15-min washing with normal artificial Aplysia blood. Lineweaver-Burke type plotting of the DA-induced responses showed a systematic shift of the straight lines when the concentration of 5-HT was increased; the slope of the line became steeper but the intercept on the ordinate remained unchanged. The dose-inhibition curves, in which relative responses to a given [DA] were plotted against log [5-HT], showed a parallel shift toward the right when the concentration of DA increased. These findings suggest that 5-HT competes with DA for common binding sites at the DA receptor of HK-type, and that the blockade is not due to the interaction of 5-HT with K+-channels in the receptor membrane. The effect of other indole derivatives suggests that the DA receptor of HK-type includes anionic and cationic sites to which the NH2 group and 5-HO group of 5-HT could specifically bind, thus exhibiting competitive blockade.

  5. Stereoselective effects of MDMA on inhibition of monoamine uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, T.D.; Nichols, D.E.; Yim, G.K.W.

    1986-03-05

    The R(-)-isomers of hallucinogenic phenylisopropylamines are most active, whereas the S(+)-enantiomers of amphetamine (AMPH) and methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) are more potent centrally. To determine if MDMA exhibits stereoselective effects at the biochemical level that resemble either those of amphetamine or the potent hallucinogen 2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine (DOM), the ability of the isomers of MDMA, AMPH and DOM to inhibit uptake of radiolabelled monoamines into synaptosomes was measured. AMPH was more potent than MDMA in inhibiting uptake of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine (NE) into hypothalamic synaptosomes and /sup 3/H-dopamine (DA) into striatal synaptosomes. The S(+)-isomer was more active in each case. MDMA was more potent than AMPH in inhibiting uptake of /sup 3/H-serotonin (5-HT) into hippocampal synaptosomes and exhibited a high degree of stereoselectivity, in favor of the S(+)-isomer. DOM showed only minimal activity in inhibiting uptake of any monoamine (IC/sub 50/ > 10/sup -5/M). These results suggest that MDMA exhibits stereoselective effects similar to those of amphetamine on monoamine uptake inhibition, a parameter that is unrelated to the mechanism of action of the hallucinogen DOM.

  6. Brain serotonin and pituitary-adrenal functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Berger, P.; Barchas, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    It had been concluded by Scapagnini et al. (1971) that brain serotonin (5-HT) was involved in the regulation of the diurnal rhythm of the pituitary-adrenal system but not in the stress response. A study was conducted to investigate these findings further by evaluating the effects of altering brain 5-HT levels on the daily fluctuation of plasma corticosterone and on the response of the pituitary-adrenal system to a stressful or noxious stimulus in the rat. In a number of experiments brain 5-HT synthesis was inhibited with parachlorophenylalanine. In other tests it was tried to raise the level of brain 5-HT with precursors.

  7. Serotonin involvement in pituitary-adrenal function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Kellar, K. J.; Kent, D.; Gonzales, C.; Berger, P. A.; Barchas, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments clarifying the effects of serotonin (5-HT) in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system are surveyed. Lesion experiments which seek to determine functional maps of serotonergic input to areas involved in regulation are reported. Investigations of the effects of 5-HT levels on the plasma ACTH response to stress and the diurnal variation in basal plasma corticosterone are summarized, and the question of whether serotonergic transmission is involved in the regulation of all aspects of pituitary-adrenal function is considered with attention to the stimulatory and inhibitory action of 5-HT.

  8. Postmortem evidence for serotonin's role in suicide.

    PubMed

    Stanley, M; Stanley, B

    1990-04-01

    Despite major advances in psychiatry in the past three decades, the rate of suicide has not declined. In an effort to better understand suicide, recent research has examined the importance of biochemical factors in this behavior. Biochemical studies of suicide victims and attempters have indicated that either serotonin (5-HT) or its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) is reduced in this population when compared with individuals who do not exhibit suicidal behavior. Also, alterations in 5-HT receptors have been observed in suicide victims. While the biochemical findings are promising, it appears that an approach that combines psychosocial and biochemical factors offers the greatest promise for improved identification of suicide risk.

  9. [Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Fétique-Will, Anne-Catherine; Chevalley, Thierry; Rizzoli, René

    2011-06-15

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) represent the first-line treatment of depression. Several studies demonstrate that use of therapeutical doses of SSRI is associated with a decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and an increased risk of fracture. Mechanisms of action of SSRI on bone tissue are not totally clarified. These treatments would be associated with an increased risk of falls and would also have a direct effect on bone metabolism. Regarding proofs existing of the implication of SSRI on osteoporosis, while waiting for larger-scale prospective studies, it appears reasonable that practitioners assess bone loss within risk groups of patients treated with SSRI.

  10. Brain serotonin and pituitary-adrenal functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Berger, P.; Barchas, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    It had been concluded by Scapagnini et al. (1971) that brain serotonin (5-HT) was involved in the regulation of the diurnal rhythm of the pituitary-adrenal system but not in the stress response. A study was conducted to investigate these findings further by evaluating the effects of altering brain 5-HT levels on the daily fluctuation of plasma corticosterone and on the response of the pituitary-adrenal system to a stressful or noxious stimulus in the rat. In a number of experiments brain 5-HT synthesis was inhibited with parachlorophenylalanine. In other tests it was tried to raise the level of brain 5-HT with precursors.

  11. Ozone Exposure Alters Serotonin and Serotonin Receptor Expression in the Developing Lung

    PubMed Central

    Van Winkle, Laura S.

    2013-01-01

    Ozone, a pervasive environmental pollutant, adversely affects functional lung growth in children. Animal studies demonstrate that altered lung development is associated with modified signaling within the airway epithelial mesenchymal trophic unit, including mediators that can change nerve growth. We hypothesized that ozone exposure alters the normal pattern of serotonin, its transporter (5-HTT), and two key receptors (5-HT2A and 5-HT4), a pathway involved in postnatal airway neural, epithelial, and immune processes. We exposed monkeys to acute or episodic ozone during the first 2 or 6 months of life. There were three exposure groups/age: (1) filtered air, (2) acute ozone challenge, and (3) episodic ozone + acute ozone challenge. Lungs were prepared for compartment-specific qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and stereology. Airway epithelial serotonin immunopositive staining increased in all exposure groups with the most prominent in 2-month midlevel and 6-month distal airways. Gene expression of 5-HTT, 5-HT2AR, and 5-HT4R increased in an age-dependent manner. Overall expression was greater in distal compared with midlevel airways. Ozone exposure disrupted both 5-HT2AR and 5-HT4R protein expression in airways and enhanced immunopositive staining for 5-HT2AR (2 months) and 5-HT4R (6 months) on smooth muscle. Ozone exposure increases serotonin in airway epithelium regardless of airway level, age, and exposure history and changes the spatial pattern of serotonin receptor protein (5-HT2A and 5-HT4) and 5-HTT gene expression depending on compartment, age, and exposure history. Understanding how serotonin modulates components of reversible airway obstruction exacerbated by ozone exposure sets the foundation for developing clinically relevant therapies for airway disease. PMID:23570994

  12. Dietary Precursors of Serotonin and Newborn State Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yogman, Michael W.; Zeisel, Steven

    Although previous research with adult humans and nonhumans has suggested a relationship between sleep behavior and brain serotonin levels, no studies have been made of the relationship of normal children's or infants' sleep patterns to serotonin levels, tryptophan metabolism, or diet. This study investigates the relationship between dietary…

  13. Dietary Precursors of Serotonin and Newborn State Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yogman, Michael W.; Zeisel, Steven

    Although previous research with adult humans and nonhumans has suggested a relationship between sleep behavior and brain serotonin levels, no studies have been made of the relationship of normal children's or infants' sleep patterns to serotonin levels, tryptophan metabolism, or diet. This study investigates the relationship between dietary…

  14. Brain serotonin content - Increase following ingestion of carbohydrate diet.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernstrom, J. D.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    In the rat, the injection of insulin or the consumption of carbohydrate causes sequential increases in the concentrations of tryptophan in the plasma and the brain and of serotonin in the brain. Serotonin-containing neurons may thus participate in systems whereby the rat brain integrates information about the metabolic state in its relation to control of homeostasis and behavior.

  15. Maternal serotonin is crucial for murine embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Francine; Fligny, Cécile; Bayard, Elisa; Launay, Jean-Marie; Gershon, Michael D.; Mallet, Jacques; Vodjdani, Guilan

    2007-01-01

    The early appearance of serotonin and its receptors during prenatal development, together with the many effects serotonin exerts during CNS morphogenesis, strongly suggest that serotonin influences the development and maturation of the mammalian brain before it becomes a neuromodulator/neurotransmitter. Sites of early serotonin biosynthesis, however, have not been detected in mouse embryos or extraembryonic structures, suggesting that the main source of serotonin could be of maternal origin. This hypothesis was tested by using knockout mice lacking the tph1 gene, which is responsible for the synthesis of peripheral serotonin. Genetic crosses were performed to compare the phenotype of pups born from homozygous and heterozygous mothers. Observations provide the first clear evidence that (i) maternal serotonin is involved in the control of morphogenesis during developmental stages that precede the appearance of serotonergic neurons and (ii) serotonin is critical for normal murine development. Most strikingly, the phenotype of tph1−/− embryos depends more on the maternal genotype than on that of the concepti. Consideration of the maternal genotype may thus help to clarify the influence of other genes in complex diseases, such as mental illness. PMID:17182745

  16. Obesity, whole blood serotonin and sex differences in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Stephanie; Bunting, Brendan P; Carr, Edwin; Strain, J J; Stewart-Knox, Barbara J

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a growing problem throughout Europe, where the rate has more than doubled over the past 20 years. Reduced circulating serotonin may contribute to the development of obesity. This study aimed to explore associations between whole blood (WB) serotonin concentrations and anthropometric measures. Healthy adult volunteers (N = 68) gave whole blood samples for measurement of WB serotonin, and underwent BMI waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) assessment as well as DEXA (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry) scans for anthropometric parameters. Student's t-tests determined differences in WB serotonin and anthropometric measures between sexes. Partial Pearson's correlations were carried out on anthropometric measures and WB serotonin. For the whole sample, WB serotonin was significantly negatively correlated with BMI, WC, WHR as well as android, gynoid and total % body fat. Analysis by sex showed significant negative correlations between WB serotonin and android, gynoid as well as total fat in males, but not in females. This dichotomy between the sexes implies that there may be sex differences in the way that serotonin interplays with the development of obesity and body fat distribution.

  17. Meperidine-induced serotonin syndrome in a susceptible patient.

    PubMed

    Guo, S-L; Wu, T-J; Liu, C-C; Ng, C-C; Chien, C-C; Sun, H-L

    2009-09-01

    We present a patient with a history of clomipramine-induced serotonin syndrome 5 yr prior who developed serotonin syndrome after a single dose of meperidine. This report heightens appreciation of population at risk and also recognition of potential toxicity in meperidine.

  18. Brain serotonin content - Increase following ingestion of carbohydrate diet.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernstrom, J. D.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    In the rat, the injection of insulin or the consumption of carbohydrate causes sequential increases in the concentrations of tryptophan in the plasma and the brain and of serotonin in the brain. Serotonin-containing neurons may thus participate in systems whereby the rat brain integrates information about the metabolic state in its relation to control of homeostasis and behavior.

  19. Exploring dipole blockade using high- n strontium Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinyue; Ye, Shuzhen; Dunning, F. Barry; Hiller, Moritz; Yoshida, Shuhei; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    Studies of the production of strongly-polarized quasi-1D high- n, n ~ 300 , strontium `` nF'' Rydberg states in an atomic beam by three-photon excitation in a weak dc field suggest that (in the absence of blockade effects) densities of ~106 cm-3 might be achieved. At such densities the interparticle separation, ~ 100 μm , becomes comparable to that at which dipole blockade effects are expected to become important. Apparatus modifications are underway to allow the exploration of blockade at very high- n and the effects of the high energy level density. Blockade is also being examined through calculations of the energy spectrum for two interaction atoms. Access to the blockade regime promises creation of Rydberg atoms at well-defined separations whose interactions can be coherently controlled using electric field pulses thereby enabling study of the dynamics of strongly-coupled Rydberg systems. Research supported by the NSF, the Robert A. Welch Foundation, and the FWF (Austria).

  20. Theory of spin blockade in a triple quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chang-Yu; Shim, Yun-Pil; Hawrylak, Pawel

    2011-03-01

    We present a theory of electronic properties and spin blockade in a linear triple quantum dots. We use micoroscopic LCHO-CI and double-band Hubbard model to analyze the electronic and spin properties of a triple quantum dots near a symmetrical quadruple point involving the (1,1,1) configuration which is essential for implementing quantum information processing with electron spin. We calculate spectral functions and relate them via the rate equation, including coupling with a phonon bath, to current as a function of applied bias. We show that the spin blockade in a triple quantum dots can serve as a spectroscopic tool to distinguish spin polarized states from spin depolarized states. We also show that a spin blockade is developed only at high bias when an onsite triplet state on the edge quantum dot connected to the source lead becomes accessible in the transport window. In contradiction to the case of double quantum dot molecule, the onsite triplet is not only essential for lifting spin blockade but also important for building up spin polarisation and spin blockade in the system. The authors would like to acknowledge financial support from NSERC, OGS, and QuantumWorks.

  1. Intravenous platelet blockade with cangrelor during PCI.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Deepak L; Lincoff, A Michael; Gibson, C Michael; Stone, Gregg W; McNulty, Steven; Montalescot, Gilles; Kleiman, Neal S; Goodman, Shaun G; White, Harvey D; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Pollack, Charles V; Manoukian, Steven V; Widimsky, Petr; Chew, Derek P; Cura, Fernando; Manukov, Ivan; Tousek, Frantisek; Jafar, M Zubair; Arneja, Jaspal; Skerjanec, Simona; Harrington, Robert A

    2009-12-10

    Intravenous cangrelor, a rapid-acting, reversible adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor antagonist, might reduce ischemic events during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In this double-blind, placebo-controlled study, we randomly assigned 5362 patients who had not been treated with clopidogrel to receive either cangrelor or placebo at the time of PCI, followed by 600 mg of clopidogrel. The primary end point was a composite of death, myocardial infarction, or ischemia-driven revascularization at 48 hours. Enrollment was stopped when an interim analysis concluded that the trial would be unlikely to show superiority for the primary end point. The primary end point occurred in 185 of 2654 patients receiving cangrelor (7.0%) and in 210 of 2641 patients receiving placebo (8.0%) (odds ratio in the cangrelor group, 0.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71 to 1.07; P=0.17) (modified intention-to-treat population adjusted for missing data). In the cangrelor group, as compared with the placebo group, two prespecified secondary end points were significantly reduced at 48 hours: the rate of stent thrombosis, from 0.6% to 0.2% (odds ratio, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.11 to 0.85; P=0.02), and the rate of death from any cause, from 0.7% to 0.2% (odds ratio, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.13 to 0.83; P=0.02). There was no significant difference in the rate of blood transfusion (1.0% in the cangrelor group and 0.6% in the placebo group, P=0.13), though major bleeding on one scale was increased in the cangrelor group, from 3.5% to 5.5% (P<0.001), because of more groin hematomas. The use of periprocedural cangrelor during PCI was not superior to placebo in reducing the primary end point. The prespecified secondary end points of stent thrombosis and death were lower in the cangrelor group, with no significant increase in the rate of transfusion. Further study of intravenous ADP blockade with cangrelor may be warranted. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00385138.) 2009 Massachusetts Medical Society

  2. Serotonin is necessary for place memory in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Sitaraman, Divya; Zars, Melissa; LaFerriere, Holly; Chen, Yin-Chieh; Sable-Smith, Alex; Kitamoto, Toshihiro; Rottinghaus, George E.; Zars, Troy

    2008-01-01

    Biogenic amines, such as serotonin and dopamine, can be important in reinforcing associative learning. This function is evident as changes in memory performance with manipulation of either of these signals. In the insects, evidence begins to argue for a common role of dopamine in negatively reinforced memory. In contrast, the role of the serotonergic system in reinforcing insect associative learning is either unclear or controversial. We investigated the role of both of these signals in operant place learning in Drosophila. By genetically altering serotonin and dopamine levels, manipulating the neurons that make serotonin and dopamine, and pharmacological treatments we provide clear evidence that serotonin, but not dopamine, is necessary for place memory. Thus, serotonin can be critical for memory formation in an insect, and dopamine is not a universal negatively reinforcing signal. PMID:18385379

  3. The roles of peripheral serotonin in metabolic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    El-Merahbi, Rabih; Löffler, Mona; Mayer, Alexander; Sumara, Grzegorz

    2015-07-08

    Metabolic homeostasis in the organism is assured both by the nervous system and by hormones. Among a plethora of hormones regulating metabolism, serotonin presents a number of unique features. Unlike classical hormones serotonin is produced in different anatomical locations. In brain it acts as a neurotransmitter and in the periphery it can act as a hormone, auto- and/or paracrine factor, or intracellular signaling molecule. Serotonin does not cross the blood-brain barrier; therefore the two major pools of this bioamine remain separated. Although 95% of serotonin is produced in the periphery, its functions have been ignored until recently. Here we review the impact of the peripheral serotonin on the regulation of function of the organs involved in glucose and lipid homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Label-Free Ratiometric Imaging of Serotonin in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Anand Kant; Maity, Barun Kumar; Surendran, Dayana; Tripathy, Umakanta; Maiti, Sudipta

    2017-08-24

    Ratiometric imaging can quantitatively measure changes in cellular analyte concentrations using specially designed fluorescent labels. We describe a label-free ratiometric imaging technique for direct detection of changes in intravesicular serotonin concentration in live cells. At higher concentrations, serotonin forms transient oligomers whose ultraviolet emission is shifted to longer wavelengths. We access the ultraviolet/blue emission using relatively benign three-photon excitation and split it into two imaging channels, whose ratio reports the concentration. The technique is sensitive at a physiologically relevant concentration range (10-150 mM serotonin). As a proof of principle, we measure the increase of intravesicular serotonin concentration with the addition of external serotonin. In general, since emission spectra of molecules are often sensitive to concentration, our method may be applicable to other natively fluorescent intracellular molecules which are present at high concentrations.

  5. Serotonin syndrome triggered by a single dose of suboxone.

    PubMed

    Isenberg, Derek; Wong, Stella C; Curtis, John A

    2008-09-01

    Suboxone (buprenorphine/naloxone) is an oral medication used for the treatment of opiate dependence. Because of its mixed properties at the opiate receptors, buprenorphine has a ceiling on its euphoric effects. We report the first case of serotonin syndrome caused by buprenorphine and review other medications implicated in serotonin syndrome. A 54-year-old man on tricyclic antidepressants took an unprescribed dose of buprenorphine/naloxone. He presented to the emergency department with signs and symptoms of severe serotonin syndrome including clonus, agitation, and altered mental status. His agitation was not controlled with benzodiazepines and was electively intubated. At the recommendation of the toxicology service, cyproheptadine, a serotonin receptor antagonist, was administered with improvement in the patient's symptoms. Emergency physicians should be aware of the potential of buprenorphine/naloxone to trigger serotonin syndrome.

  6. A specific role for serotonin in overcoming effort cost.

    PubMed

    Meyniel, Florent; Goodwin, Guy M; Deakin, Jf William; Klinge, Corinna; MacFadyen, Christine; Milligan, Holly; Mullings, Emma; Pessiglione, Mathias; Gaillard, Raphaël

    2016-11-08

    Serotonin is implicated in many aspects of behavioral regulation. Theoretical attempts to unify the multiple roles assigned to serotonin proposed that it regulates the impact of costs, such as delay or punishment, on action selection. Here, we show that serotonin also regulates other types of action costs such as effort. We compared behavioral performance in 58 healthy humans treated during 8 weeks with either placebo or the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitalopram. The task involved trading handgrip force production against monetary benefits. Participants in the escitalopram group produced more effort and thereby achieved a higher payoff. Crucially, our computational analysis showed that this effect was underpinned by a specific reduction of effort cost, and not by any change in the weight of monetary incentives. This specific computational effect sheds new light on the physiological role of serotonin in behavioral regulation and on the clinical effect of drugs for depression.

  7. S100B interacts with the serotonin 5-HT7 receptor to regulate a depressive-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Stroth, Nikolas; Svenningsson, Per

    2015-12-01

    The serotonin 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7) is an emerging target for psychiatric pharmacotherapy. Recent observations in rodent models and humans suggest that its blockade mediates antidepressant efficacy. In the present study, we identify the Ca(2+)-binding protein S100B as an interacting partner of 5-HT7 and show that S100B negatively regulates inducible cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation in transfected HeLa cells and mouse cortical astrocytes. Overexpression of S100B causes brain region-specific dysregulation of the cAMP pathway in vivo, such that concentrations of cAMP in the frontal cortex are higher in S100B transgenic female mice compared to wild-types. Finally, S100B transgenic female mice show depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test (FST) and pharmacological blockade of 5-HT7 with SB269970 normalizes FST behavior. Taken together, our results show that S100B affects behavioral despair in female mice through functional interaction with the 5-HT7 receptor. Furthermore, we identify S100B as a cAMP-regulatory protein in cultured astrocytes and the murine frontal cortex. Future experiments will clarify whether there is a direct link between the 5-HT7-associated and cAMP-regulatory actions of S100B.

  8. A Dualistic Conformational Response to Substrate Binding in the Human Serotonin Transporter Reveals a High Affinity State for Serotonin*

    PubMed Central

    Bjerregaard, Henriette; Severinsen, Kasper; Said, Saida; Wiborg, Ove; Sinning, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission is modulated by the membrane-embedded serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT mediates the reuptake of serotonin into the presynaptic neurons. Conformational changes in SERT occur upon binding of ions and substrate and are crucial for translocation of serotonin across the membrane. Our understanding of these conformational changes is mainly based on crystal structures of a bacterial homolog in various conformations, derived homology models of eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporters, and substituted cysteine accessibility method of SERT. However, the dynamic changes that occur in the human SERT upon binding of ions, the translocation of substrate, and the role of cholesterol in this interplay are not fully elucidated. Here we show that serotonin induces a dualistic conformational response in SERT. We exploited the substituted cysteine scanning method under conditions that were sensitized to detect a more outward-facing conformation of SERT. We found a novel high affinity outward-facing conformational state of the human SERT induced by serotonin. The ionic requirements for this new conformational response to serotonin mirror the ionic requirements for translocation. Furthermore, we found that membrane cholesterol plays a role in the dualistic conformational response in SERT induced by serotonin. Our results indicate the existence of a subpopulation of SERT responding differently to serotonin binding than hitherto believed and that membrane cholesterol plays a role in this subpopulation of SERT. PMID:25614630

  9. A dualistic conformational response to substrate binding in the human serotonin transporter reveals a high affinity state for serotonin.

    PubMed

    Bjerregaard, Henriette; Severinsen, Kasper; Said, Saida; Wiborg, Ove; Sinning, Steffen

    2015-03-20

    Serotonergic neurotransmission is modulated by the membrane-embedded serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT mediates the reuptake of serotonin into the presynaptic neurons. Conformational changes in SERT occur upon binding of ions and substrate and are crucial for translocation of serotonin across the membrane. Our understanding of these conformational changes is mainly based on crystal structures of a bacterial homolog in various conformations, derived homology models of eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporters, and substituted cysteine accessibility method of SERT. However, the dynamic changes that occur in the human SERT upon binding of ions, the translocation of substrate, and the role of cholesterol in this interplay are not fully elucidated. Here we show that serotonin induces a dualistic conformational response in SERT. We exploited the substituted cysteine scanning method under conditions that were sensitized to detect a more outward-facing conformation of SERT. We found a novel high affinity outward-facing conformational state of the human SERT induced by serotonin. The ionic requirements for this new conformational response to serotonin mirror the ionic requirements for translocation. Furthermore, we found that membrane cholesterol plays a role in the dualistic conformational response in SERT induced by serotonin. Our results indicate the existence of a subpopulation of SERT responding differently to serotonin binding than hitherto believed and that membrane cholesterol plays a role in this subpopulation of SERT.

  10. [Inhibition of morphine intake by antibodies to serotonin-modulating anticonsolidation protein in model of self-administration in rats].

    PubMed

    Mekhtiev, A A; Rashidova, A M; Muslimov, I A

    2014-01-01

    The article concerns study of effects of polyclonal antibodies to serotonin-modulating anticonsolidation protein (SMAP) being in direct dependence on serotonin level and providing intracellular transduction of serotonergic signal, on positive reinforcement effect of morphine in rats. The task was formed in Wistar male rats in the model of morphine self-administration as a result of pressing of one of two levers attached to the wall, joined to the pump delivering each time 100 μg of morphine directly into the vena jugularis. In the 1st series of studies brain cingulate cortex and hypothalamus were taken from the rats achieved stable level of morphine intake and SMAP level was measured with indirect immune-enzyme assay. It was shown that in the morphine-self-injected rats SMAP level in the cingulate cortex is significantly upregulated (p = 0.01), while in the hypothalamus it was left unchanged. In the 2nd series of studies the rats with stable level of morphine intake were administered intraperitoneally with anti-SMAP rabbit polyclonal antibodies (experimental group) or non-immune γ-globulins (control group). Soon after antibodies administration the animals of the experimental group demonstrated manifold decrease of morphine intake lasted for 8 days (p < 0.008), whereas it did not change in the controls. SMAP upregulation in the brain cingulate cortex in the rats with stable morphine intake, obviously, indicates to its engagement in positive reinforcement effect of morphine. Blockade of SMAP activity with anti-SMAP antibodies in the nerve cells induced sharp decrease of morphine intake due to disturbances of transduction through intracellular serotonin's signal channels.

  11. Prenatal depression and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany

    2010-03-01

    A review of the literature suggests mixed findings on the effects of prenatal antidepressants. Although the critical question is the relative effects of depression versus antidepressants during pregnancy, randomized control studies do not exist for this comparison. Instead, nondepressed, nontreated control groups have been used for comparisons. Separate studies suggest that both untreated depression and exposure to antidepressants have been associated in some cases with unfavorable outcomes. Studies on long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes for children have also been inconclusive. Another problem for the mother and fetus is the discontinuation of antidepressants. Research on the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) suggests that late pregnancy exposure may have worse effects than first and second trimester exposure, leading to the neonatal abstinence syndrome. Still other data suggest a dual syndrome of abstinence/withdrawal and of serotonergic overstimulation, with symptoms of the two syndromes being very similar. Several confounding factors have contributed to this mixed literature including the already mentioned lack of a depressed, nonantidepressant control group as well as group variability on the types of SSRIs taken and severity of their effects, and limited longitudinal follow-up data. Future research would not only need to correct these problems but also further explore the different trimester effects and the withdrawal versus serotonin activity effects on the infant. In addition, alternative therapies need to be explored for their potential antidepression effects on the pregnant woman, the fetus, and the neonate.

  12. Serotonin and beyond: therapeutics for major depression

    PubMed Central

    Blier, Pierre; El Mansari, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT, 5-hydroxytryptamine) system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder (MDD). The case for its contribution to the therapeutic efficacy of a wide variety of antidepressant treatments is, however, much stronger. All antidepressant strategies have been shown to enhance 5-HT transmission in the brain of laboratory animals. Catecholamines, norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) can also play a pivotal role in the mechanism of action of certain antidepressant strategies. The enhancement of 5-HT transmission by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, which leads to a dampening of the activity of NE and DA neurons, may account in part for the low remission rate achieved with these medications and/or the residuals symptoms after remission is achieved. The functional connectivity between the 5-HT, NE and DA systems can be used to understand the mechanism of action of a wide variety of augmentation strategies in treatment-resistant MDD. Proof-of-concept studies have shown that antidepressant medications with complementary mechanisms of action on monoaminergic systems can double the remission rate achieved in a trial of standard duration. Novel approaches are also being used to treat MDD, which also appear to involve the monoaminergic system(s) to a varying extent. PMID:23440470

  13. Differential regulation of MeCP2 phosphorylation in the CNS by dopamine and serotonin.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Ashley N; Deng, Jie V; Aryal, Dipendra K; Wetsel, William C; West, Anne E

    2012-01-01

    Systemic administration of amphetamine (AMPH) induces phosphorylation of MeCP2 at Ser421 (pMeCP2) in select populations of neurons in the mesolimbocortical brain regions. Because AMPH simultaneously activates multiple monoamine neurotransmitter systems, here we examined the ability of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), and norepinephrine (NE) to induce pMeCP2. Selective blockade of the DA transporter (DAT) or the 5-HT transporter (SERT), but not the NE transporter (NET), was sufficient to induce pMeCP2 in the CNS. DAT blockade induced pMeCP2 in the prelimbic cortex (PLC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc), whereas SERT blockade induced pMeCP2 only in the NAc. Administration of selective DA and 5-HT receptor agonists was also sufficient to induce pMeCP2; however, the specific combination of DA and 5-HT receptors activated determined the regional- and cell-type specificity of pMeCP2 induction. The D(1)-class DA receptor agonist SKF81297 induced pMeCP2 widely; however, coadministration of the D(2)-class agonist quinpirole restricted the induction of pMeCP2 to GABAergic interneurons of the NAc. Intra-striatal injection of the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin was sufficient to induce pMeCP2 in medium-spiny neurons, suggesting that the combinatorial regulation of cAMP by different classes of DA and 5-HT receptors may contribute to the cell-type specificity of pMeCP2 induction. Consistent with the regulation of pMeCP2 by multiple monoamine neurotransmitters, genetic disruption of any single monoamine transporter in DAT-, SERT-, and NET-knockout mice failed to eliminate AMPH-induced pMeCP2 in the NAc. Together, these studies indicate that combinatorial signaling through DA and 5-HT receptors can regulate the brain region- and cell-type specific pMeCP2 in the CNS.

  14. Differential Regulation of MeCP2 Phosphorylation in the CNS by Dopamine and Serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Ashley N; Deng, Jie V; Aryal, Dipendra K; Wetsel, William C; West, Anne E

    2012-01-01

    Systemic administration of amphetamine (AMPH) induces phosphorylation of MeCP2 at Ser421 (pMeCP2) in select populations of neurons in the mesolimbocortical brain regions. Because AMPH simultaneously activates multiple monoamine neurotransmitter systems, here we examined the ability of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), and norepinephrine (NE) to induce pMeCP2. Selective blockade of the DA transporter (DAT) or the 5-HT transporter (SERT), but not the NE transporter (NET), was sufficient to induce pMeCP2 in the CNS. DAT blockade induced pMeCP2 in the prelimbic cortex (PLC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc), whereas SERT blockade induced pMeCP2 only in the NAc. Administration of selective DA and 5-HT receptor agonists was also sufficient to induce pMeCP2; however, the specific combination of DA and 5-HT receptors activated determined the regional- and cell-type specificity of pMeCP2 induction. The D1-class DA receptor agonist SKF81297 induced pMeCP2 widely; however, coadministration of the D2-class agonist quinpirole restricted the induction of pMeCP2 to GABAergic interneurons of the NAc. Intra-striatal injection of the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin was sufficient to induce pMeCP2 in medium-spiny neurons, suggesting that the combinatorial regulation of cAMP by different classes of DA and 5-HT receptors may contribute to the cell-type specificity of pMeCP2 induction. Consistent with the regulation of pMeCP2 by multiple monoamine neurotransmitters, genetic disruption of any single monoamine transporter in DAT-, SERT-, and NET-knockout mice failed to eliminate AMPH-induced pMeCP2 in the NAc. Together, these studies indicate that combinatorial signaling through DA and 5-HT receptors can regulate the brain region- and cell-type specific pMeCP2 in the CNS. PMID:21956448

  15. Recent changes in the landscape of combination RAS blockade.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Benjamin J; Smith, Steven M; Choksi, Rushab

    2009-11-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a prime target for cardiovascular drug therapy. Inhibition of the RAS lowers blood pressure and confers protection against cardiovascular and renal events. These latter benefits cannot be entirely attributed to blood pressure lowering. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have been studied extensively and, while there is irrefutable evidence that these agents mitigate the risk for cardiovascular and renal events, their protection is incomplete. In outcomes studies that have employed ACE-inhibitors or ARBs there has been a relatively high residual event rate in the treatment arm and this has been ascribed, by some, to the fact that neither ACE-inhibitors nor ARBs completely repress RAS. For this reason, combined RAS blockade with an ACE-inhibitor and ARB has emerged as a therapeutic option. In hypertension, combined RAS blockade elicits only a marginal incremental drop in blood pressure and it does not further lower the risk for cardiovascular events. In chronic heart failure and proteinuric renal disease, combining these agents in carefully selected patients is associated with a reduction in clinical events. Irrespective of the setting, dual RAS blockade is associated with an increase in the risk for adverse events, primarily hyperkalemia and worsening renal function. The emergence of the direct renin inhibitor, aliskiren, has afforded clinicians a new strategy for RAS blockade. Renin system blockade with aliskiren plus another RAS agent is the subject of ongoing large-scale clinical trials and early studies suggest promise for this strategy. Currently, combined RAS blockade with an ACE-inhibitor and an ARB should not be routinely employed for hypertension; however, the combination of an ACE-inhibitor or ARB with aliskiren might be considered in some patients given the more formidable blood pressure-lowering profile of this regimen. In carefully selected patients with heart

  16. Dexamethasone added to lidocaine prolongs axillary brachial plexus blockade.

    PubMed

    Movafegh, Ali; Razazian, Mehran; Hajimaohamadi, Fatemeh; Meysamie, Alipasha

    2006-01-01

    Different additives have been used to prolong regional blockade. We designed a prospective, randomized, double-blind study to evaluate the effect of dexamethasone added to lidocaine on the onset and duration of axillary brachial plexus block. Sixty patients scheduled for elective hand and forearm surgery under axillary brachial plexus block were randomly allocated to receive either 34 mL lidocaine 1.5% with 2 mL of isotonic saline chloride (control group, n = 30) or 34 mL lidocaine 1.5% with 2 mL of dexamethasone (8 mg) (dexamethasone group, n = 30). Neither epinephrine nor bicarbonate was added to the treatment mixture. We used a nerve stimulator and multiple stimulations technique in all of the patients. After performance of the block, sensory and motor blockade of radial, median, musculocutaneous, and ulnar nerves were recorded at 5, 15, and 30 min. The onset time of the sensory and motor blockade was defined as the time between last injection and the total abolition of the pinprick response and complete paralysis. The duration of sensory and motor blocks were considered as the time interval between the administration of the local anesthetic and the first postoperative pain and complete recovery of motor functions. Sixteen patients were excluded because of unsuccessful blockade. The duration of surgery and the onset times of sensory and motor block were similar in the two groups. The duration of sensory (242 +/- 76 versus 98 +/- 33 min) and motor (310 +/- 81 versus 130 +/- 31 min) blockade were significantly longer in the dexamethasone than in the control group (P < 0.01). We conclude that the addition of dexamethasone to lidocaine 1.5% solution in axillary brachial plexus block prolongs the duration of sensory and motor blockade.

  17. [Interaction effect of serotonin transporter gene and brain-derived neurotrophic factor on the platelet serotonin content in stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Golimbet, V E; Brusov, O S; Factor, M I; Zlobina, G P; Lezheĭko, T V; Lavrushina, O M; Petrova, E A; Savina, M A; Skvortsova, V I

    2010-01-01

    Platelet serotonin content in patients in the acute period of stroke is an important index of clinical changes during the post stroke period as well as a predictor of development of mental disorders. We studied the association between two polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR and Val66Met BDNF) and the platelet serotonin content in 47 patients with stroke. We also investigated the moderating effect of genetic variants on the association between platelet serotonin content and development of affective and anxiety disorders in stroke patients in the acute period of stroke. The interaction effect of two polymorphisms on levels of platelet serotonin was found. The lowest level was observed in patients with the diplotype LL*ValVal, the highest level--in the group of patients with the LL genotype and genotypes containing at least one copy of a Met allele. No moderating effect of genetic variants on the relationship between serotonin content and affective or anxiety disorder was found.

  18. Plasma anti-serotonin and serotonin anti-idiotypic antibodies are elevated in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Coplan, J D; Tamir, H; Calaprice, D; DeJesus, M; de la Nuez, M; Pine, D; Papp, L A; Klein, D F; Gorman, J M

    1999-04-01

    The psychoneuroimmunology of panic disorder is relatively unexplored. Alterations within brain stress systems that secondarily influence the immune system have been documented. A recent report indicated elevations of serotonin (5-HT) and ganglioside antibodies in patients with primary fibromyalgia, a condition with documented associations with panic disorder. In line with our interest in dysregulated 5-HT systems in panic disorder (PD), we wished to assess if antibodies directed at the 5-HT system were elevated in patients with PD in comparison to healthy volunteers. Sixty-three patients with panic disorder and 26 healthy volunteers were diagnosed by the SCID. Employing ELISA, we measured anti-5-HT and 5-HT anti-idiotypic antibodies (which are directed at 5-HT receptors). To include all subjects in one experiment, three different batches were run during the ELISA. Plasma serotonin anti-idiotypic antibodies: there was a significant group effect [patients > controls (p = .007)] and batch effect but no interaction. The mean effect size for the three batches was .76. Following Z-score transformation of each separate batch and then combining all scores, patients demonstrated significantly elevated levels of plasma serotonin anti-idiotypic antibodies. Neither sex nor age as covariates affected the significance of the results. There was a strong correlation between anti-serotonin antibody and serotonin anti-idiotypic antibody measures. Plasma anti-serotonin antibodies: there was a significant diagnosis effect [patients > controls (p = .037)]. Mean effect size for the three batches was .52. Upon Z-score transformation, there was a diagnosis effect with antibody elevations in patients. Covaried for sex and age, the result falls below significance to trend levels. The data raise the possibility that psychoimmune dysfunction, specifically related to the 5-HT system, may be present in PD. Potential interruption of 5-HT neurotransmission through autoimmune mechanisms may be of

  19. Anisotropic blockade using pendular long-range Rydberg molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiles, Matthew T.; Lee, Hyunwoo; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Greene, Chris H.

    2017-05-01

    We propose an experiment to demonstrate a blockade mechanism caused by long-range anisotropic interactions in an ultracold dipolar gas composed of the recently observed "butterfly" Rydberg molecules. At the blockade radius, the strong intermolecular interaction between two adjacent molecules shifts their molecular states out of resonance with the photoassociation laser, preventing their simultaneous excitation. When the molecules are prepared in a quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) trap, the interaction's strength can be tuned via a weak external field. The molecular density thus depends strongly on the angle between the trap axis and the field. The available Rydberg and internal molecular states provide a wide range of tunability.

  20. Anisotropic blockade using pendular long-range Rydberg molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiles, M. T.; Lee, H.; Pérez-Ríos, J.; Greene, C. H.

    2017-07-01

    We propose an experiment to demonstrate a novel blockade mechanism caused by long-range anisotropic interactions in an ultracold dipolar gas composed of the recently observed "butterfly" Rydberg molecules. At the blockade radius, the strong intermolecular interaction between two adjacent molecules shifts their molecular states out of resonance with the photoassociation laser, preventing their simultaneous excitation. When the molecules are prepared in a quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) trap, the interaction's strength can be tuned via a weak external field. The molecular density thus depends strongly on the angle between the trap axis and the field. The available Rydberg and molecular states provide a wide range of tunability.

  1. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    MedlinePlus

    ... procedures within the last two months that used iodine-based contrast material. Your doctor will instruct you ... a type of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) is also known as a ...

  2. Thermostabilization of the Human Serotonin Transporter in an Antidepressant-Bound Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Green, Evan M.; Coleman, Jonathan A.; Gouaux, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin is a ubiquitous chemical transmitter with particularly important roles in the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Modulation of serotonergic signaling occurs, in part, by uptake of the transmitter by the serotonin transporter (SERT). In the brain, SERT is the target for numerous antidepressants including tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Despite the importance of SERT in human physiology, biochemical, biophysical and high-resolution structural studies have been hampered due to the instability of SERT in detergent micelles. To identify a human SERT (hSERT) construct suitable for detailed biochemical and structural studies, we developed an efficient thermostability screening protocol and rapidly screened 219 mutations for thermostabilization of hSERT in complex with the SSRI paroxetine. We discovered three mutations—Y110A, I291A and T439S –that, when combined into a single construct, deemed TS3, yielded a hSERT variant with an apparent melting temperature (Tm) 19°C greater than that of the wild-type transporter, albeit with a loss of transport activity. Further investigation yielded a double mutant—I291A and T439S—defined as TS2, with a 12°C increase in Tm and retention of robust transport activity. Both TS2 and TS3 were more stable in short-chain detergents in comparison to the wild-type transporter. This thermostability screening protocol, as well as the specific hSERT variants, will prove useful in studies of other integral membrane receptors and transporters and in the investigation of structure and function relationships in hSERT. PMID:26695939

  3. In Vivo Investigation of Escitalopram’s Allosteric Site on the Serotonin Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Karen E.; Ressler, Kerry J.; Owens, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Escitalopram is a commonly prescribed antidepressant of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class. Clinical evidence and mapping of the serotonin transporter (SERT) identified that escitalopram, in addition to its binding to a primary uptake-blocking site, is capable of binding to the SERT via an allosteric site that is hypothesized to alter escitalopram’s kinetics at the SERT. The studies reported here examined the in vivo role of the SERT allosteric site in escitalopram action. A knockin mouse model that possesses an allosteric-null SERT was developed. Autoradiographic studies indicated that the knockin protein was expressed at a lower density than endogenous mouse SERT (approximately 10–30% of endogenous mouse SERT), but the knockin mice are a viable tool to study the allosteric site. Microdialysis studies in the ventral hippocampus found no measurable decrease in extracellular serotonin response after local escitalopram challenge in mice without the allosteric site compared to mice with the site (p = 0.297). In marble burying assays there was a modest effect of the absence of the allosteric site, with a larger systemic dose of escitalopram (10-fold) necessary for the same effect as in mice with intact SERT (p = 0.023). However, there was no effect of the allosteric site in the tail suspension test. Together these data suggest that there may be a regional specificity in the role of the allosteric site. The lack of a robust effect overall suggests that the role of the allosteric site for escitalopram on the SERT may not produce meaningful in vivo effects. PMID:26621784

  4. Fluoxetine at anorectic doses does not have properties of a dopamine uptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Fuller, R W; Hemrick-Luecke, S K; Snoddy, H D

    1994-01-01

    Although fluoxetine is a highly selective inhibitor of serotonin uptake in vitro and in vivo, some investigators have suggested that dopamine uptake inhibition may contribute to anorectic actions of fluoxetine. The present experiments were done to determine fluoxetine's effects in some animal protocols in which dopamine uptake inhibitors have characteristic actions. Mazindol prevented the depletion of striatal dopamine and its metabolites by amphetamine in iprindole-pretreated rats, but fluoxetine had no effect. Mazindol prevented the depletion of striatal dopamine and its metabolites by 6-hydroxydopamine injected intracerebroventricularly into rats, but fluoxetine had no effect. Mazindol enhanced the elevation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid concentration in rat brain after spiperone injection, but fluoxetine did not cause that effect. Fluoxetine did not mimic amfonelic acid in antagonizing the retention of alpha-methyl-m-tyramine invant striatum after the injection of alpha-methyl-m-tyrosine. These results show that fluoxetine, at doses that are effective in blocking the serotonin uptake carrier and causing anorexia, does not block the dopamine uptake carrier.

  5. Serotonin 2c receptors in pro-opiomelanocortin neurons regulate energy and glucose homeostasis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Energy and glucose homeostasis are regulated by central serotonin 2C receptors. These receptors are attractive pharmacological targets for the treatment of obesity; however, the identity of the serotonin 2C receptor-expressing neurons that mediate the effects of serotonin and serotonin 2C receptor a...

  6. Sources of activator calcium for potassium- and serotonin-induced constriction of isolated bovine cerebral arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    Previous in vitro studies with the calcium channel blockers (CCB) indirectly suggest that K/sup +/ and serotonin (5HT) constrict bovine middle cerebral arteries (BMCA) by promoting the influx of extracellular calcium (Ca) through CCB-sensitive channels. In this study, the authors directly determined the sources of activator Ca for K/sup +/- and 5HT-induced constriction of BMCA, using radiolabelled /sup 4/)2%Ca and /sup 3/H-sorbitol. EGTA-resistant Ca uptake, an estimate of Ca influx into vascular smooth muscle, was determined by exposure to Ca-deficient 2 mM EGTA solutions at 1/sup 0/C. The total Ca content of BMCA was 4.4 nmole/mg (wet wt.) after equilibration at 37/sup 0/C. The total exchangeable Ca content was 1.64 nmole/mg after 1 hr of /sup 45/Ca loading; the Ca content of the extracellular water was 0.30 nmole/mg, as estimated from the /sup 3/H-sorbitol space (0.25 ul/mg). The EGTA-resistant Ca uptake at 1 hr was 134 pmole/mg. K/sup +/ and 5HT significantly increased EGTA-resistant Ca uptake during 5 min of /sup 45/Ca loading; for K/sup +/, Ca uptake increased from 71 to 202 pmole/mg, and for 5HT, from 65 to 102 pmole/mg. Verapamil (10/sup -5/ M) or nifedipine (3.3 x 10/sup -7/ M) significantly blocked the increase in EGTA-resistant Ca uptake induced by K/sup +/ or 5HT. These results provide direct evidence that K/sup +/ or 5HT may constrict BMCA by promoting the influx of extracellular Ca through CCB-sensitive channels.

  7. Serotonin and suicidality: the impact of acute fluoxetine administration. I: Serotonin and suicide.

    PubMed

    King, R A; Segman, R H; Anderson, G M

    1994-01-01

    The general enhancement of central serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission following long-term administration of serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) appears to play an important role in these drugs' anti-depressant efficacy. Because suicide and/or aggression appear linked to diminished levels of brain 5-HT and its metabolites, it has been suggested that SSRIs may be particularly effective in reducing suicidality. Case reports of increased or new suicidal ideation following administration of fluoxetine and other SSRIs, however, raise questions about how these potential side effects may relate to the SSRI's acute effects on 5-HT transmission. Part I of this review examines fluoxetine's effects on suicidality and related behaviors and reviews the relationship of suicidality to serotonergic dysregulation.

  8. Down-regulation of the rat serotonin transporter upon exposure to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Horschitz, S; Hummerich, R; Schloss, P

    2001-07-20

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) terminates serotonergic neurotransmission by rapid reuptake of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) into the nerve terminal or axonal varicosities. SERT represents the target of various antidepressants which inhibit 5-HT transport and are widely used for the pharmacotherapy of depression. Here, we have analyzed the function of SERT stably expressed in HEK 293 cells upon exposure to citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), with respect to 5-HT transport activity and protein expression as estimated by ligand binding experiments. Our results show that long-term exposure to an SSRI causes a down-regulation of transport activity as revealed by a reduction of the maximal transport rate, without affecting substrate affinity, accompanied by a decrease in ligand binding sites.

  9. Serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms: Relation with platelet serotonin level in patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Markeljevic, J; Sarac, H; Bozina, N; Henigsberg, N; Simic, M; Cicin Sain, L

    2015-05-15

    Significantly lower platelet serotonin level (PSL) in patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome (pSS) than in healthy controls has been reported in our prior studies. In the present report, we demonstrated effect of functional polymorphisms in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT) on PSL. We describe a group of 61 pSS patients and 100 healthy individuals subjects, who received PSL measurement in our prior study. All subjects were genotyped for the promoter 5-HTTLPR (L/S), rs25531 (A/G) and intronic 5-HTTVNTRin2 (l/s) polymorphisms. Overall, the presence of 5-HTTVNTRin2 ss genotype was associated with significantly lower PSL in pSS patients, not in healthy controls. Reduced PSL in pSS patients is in line with hypothesis of association between chronic immunoinflammation and 5-HT system dysregulation, identifying additional mechanisms such as altered 5-HT transport as potential genetic factor contributing to PSL depletion.

  10. Serotonin and the regulation of mammalian energy balance

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Michael H.; Tecott, Laurence H.

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of energy balance requires regulation of the amount and timing of food intake. Decades of experiments utilizing pharmacological and later genetic manipulations have demonstrated the importance of serotonin signaling in this regulation. Much progress has been made in recent years in understanding how central nervous system (CNS) serotonin systems acting through a diverse array of serotonin receptors impact feeding behavior and metabolism. Particular attention has been paid to mechanisms through which serotonin impacts energy balance pathways within the hypothalamus. How upstream factors relevant to energy balance regulate the release of hypothalamic serotonin is less clear, but work addressing this issue is underway. Generally, investigation into the central serotonergic regulation of energy balance has had a predominantly “hypothalamocentric” focus, yet non-hypothalamic structures that have been implicated in energy balance regulation also receive serotonergic innervation and express multiple subtypes of serotonin receptors. Moreover, there is a growing appreciation of the diverse mechanisms through which peripheral serotonin impacts energy balance regulation. Clearly, the serotonergic regulation of energy balance is a field characterized by both rapid advances and by an extensive and diverse set of central and peripheral mechanisms yet to be delineated. PMID:23543912

  11. Association between salivary serotonin and the social sharing of happiness.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Ishii, Keiko; Ohtsubo, Yohsuke; Noguchi, Yasuki; Ochi, Misaki; Yamasue, Hidenori

    2017-01-01

    Although human saliva contains the monoamine serotonin, which plays a key role in the modulation of emotional states, the association between salivary serotonin and empathic ability remains unclear. In order to elucidate the associations between salivary serotonin levels, trait empathy, and the sharing effect of emotions (i.e., sharing emotional experiences with others), we performed a vignette-based study. Participants were asked to evaluate their happiness when they experience several hypothetical life events, whereby we manipulated the valence of the imagined event (positive, neutral, or negative), as well as the presence of a friend (absent, positive, or negative). Results indicated that the presence of a happy friend significantly enhanced participants' happiness. Correlation analysis demonstrated that salivary serotonin levels were negatively correlated with happiness when both the self and friend conditions were positive. Correlation analysis also indicated a negative relationship between salivary serotonin levels and trait empathy (particularly in perspective taking), which was measured by the Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Furthermore, an exploratory multiple regression analysis suggested that mothers' attention during childhood predicted salivary serotonin levels. Our findings indicate that empathic abilities and the social sharing of happiness decreases as a function of salivary serotonin levels.

  12. Serotonin syndrome following methylene blue administration during cardiothoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christina J; Wang, Dorothy; Sgambelluri, Anna; Kramer, Robert S; Gagnon, David J

    2015-04-01

    Despite its favorable safety profile, there have been reports of methylene blue-induced encephalopathy and serotonin syndrome in patients undergoing parathyroidectomy. We report a case of serotonin syndrome following methylene blue administration in a cardiothoracic surgery patient. A 59-year-old woman taking preoperative venlafaxine and trazodone was given a single dose of 2 mg/kg methylene blue (167 mg) during a planned coronary artery bypass and mitral valve repair. Postoperatively, she was febrile to 38.7°C and developed full-body tremors, rhythmic twitching of the perioral muscles, slow conjugate roving eye movements, and spontaneous movements of the upper extremities. Electroencephalography revealed generalized diffuse slowing consistent with toxic encephalopathy, and a computed tomography scan showed no acute process. The patient's symptoms were most consistent with a methylene blue-induced serotonin syndrome. Her motor symptoms resolved within 48 hours and she was eventually discharged home. Only 2 cases of methylene blue-induced serotonin syndrome during cardiothoracic surgery have been described in the literature, with this report representing the third case. Methylene blue and its metabolite, azure B, are potent, reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase A which is responsible for serotonin metabolism. Concomitant administration of methylene blue with serotonin-modulating agents may precipitate serotonin syndrome. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Platelet serotonin concentration and depressive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Peitl, Vjekoslav; Vidrih, Branka; Karlović, Zoran; Getaldić, Biserka; Peitl, Milena; Karlović, Dalibor

    2016-05-30

    Depressive symptoms seem to be frequent in schizophrenia, but so far they have received less attention than other symptom domains. Impaired serotonergic neurotransmission has been implicated in the pathogenesis of depression and schizophrenia. The objectives of this study were to investigate platelet serotonin concentrations in schizophrenic patients with and without depressive symptoms, and to investigate the association between platelet serotonin concentrations and symptoms of schizophrenia, mostly depressive symptoms. A total of 364 patients were included in the study, 237 of which had significant depressive symptoms. Significant depressive symptoms were defined by the cut-off score of 7 or more on Calgary Depression Rating Scale (CDSS). Platelet serotonin concentrations were assessed by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Prevalence of depression in patients with schizophrenia was 65.1%. Schizophrenic patients with depressive symptoms showed lower platelet serotonin concentrations (mean±SD; 490.6±401.2) compared to schizophrenic patients without depressive symptoms (mean±SD; 660.9±471.5). An inverse correlation was established between platelet serotonin concentration and depressive symptoms, with more severe symptoms being associated with lower platelet serotonin concentrations. Depressive symptoms in schizophrenic patients may be associated with reduced concentrations of platelet serotonin.

  14. Food choice in hyperthyroidism: potential influence of the autonomic nervous system and brain serotonin precursor availability.

    PubMed

    Pijl, H; de Meijer, P H; Langius, J; Coenegracht, C I; van den Berk, A H; Chandie Shaw, P K; Boom, H; Schoemaker, R C; Cohen, A F; Burggraaf, J; Meinders, A E

    2001-12-01

    We explored energy and macronutrient intake in patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism. We specifically hypothesized that hyperthyroidism is associated with increased appetite for carbohydrates, because of enhanced sympathetic tone and diminished serotonin mediated neurotransmission in the brain. To test this hypothesis, we measured food intake by dietary history and food selected for lunch in the laboratory in 14 patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism. Twenty-four-hour catecholamine excretion was used as a measure of activity of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the plasma [Trp]/[NAA] ratio was measured to estimate (rate limiting) precursor availability for brain 5-hydroxytryptamine synthesis. All measurements were repeated after the subjects had been treated to establish euthyroidism. In addition, the effects of nonselective beta-adrenoceptor blockade upon these parameters were studied to evaluate the influence of beta-adrenergic hyperactivity on food intake. Hyperthyroidism was marked by increased SNS activity and reduced plasma [Trp]/[NAA] ratio. Accordingly, energy intake was considerably and significantly increased in hyper vs. euthyroidism, which was fully attributable to enhanced carbohydrate consumption, as protein and fat intake were not affected. These results suggest that hyperthyroidism alters the neurophysiology of food intake regulation. Increased SNS activity and reduced Trp precursor availability for 5-hydroxytryptamine synthesis in the brain may drive the marked hyperphagia and craving for carbohydrates that appears to characterize hyperthyroid patients. Because propranolol did not affect food intake in hyperthyroidism, the potential effect of catecholamines on food intake might be mediated by alpha-adrenoceptors.

  15. Mice Lacking Serotonin 2C Receptors Have increased Affective Responses to Aversive Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Bonasera, Stephen J.; Schenk, A. Katrin; Luxenberg, Evan J.; Wang, Xidao; Basbaum, Allan; Tecott, Laurence H.

    2015-01-01

    Although central serotonergic systems are known to influence responses to noxious stimuli, mechanisms underlying serotonergic modulation of pain responses are unclear. We proposed that serotonin 2C receptors (5-HT2CRs), which are expressed within brain regions implicated in sensory and affective responses to pain, contribute to the serotonergic modulation of pain responses. In mice constitutively lacking 5-HT2CRs (2CKO mice) we found normal baseline sensory responses to noxious thermal, mechanical and chemical stimuli. In contrast, 2CKO mice exhibited a selective enhancement of affect-related ultrasonic afterdischarge vocalizations in response to footshock. Enhanced affect-related responses to noxious stimuli were also exhibited by 2CKO mice in a fear-sensitized startle assay. The extent to which a brief series of unconditioned footshocks produced enhancement of acoustic startle responses was markedly increased in 2CKO mice. As mesolimbic dopamine pathways influence affective responses to noxious stimuli, and these pathways are disinhibited in 2CKO mice, we examined the sensitivity of footshock-induced enhancement of startle to dopamine receptor blockade. Systemic administration of the dopamine D2/D3 receptor antagonist raclopride selectively reduced footshock-induced enhancement of startle without influencing baseline acoustic startle responses. We propose that 5-HT2CRs regulate affective behavioral responses to unconditioned aversive stimuli through mechanisms involving the disinhibition of ascending dopaminergic pathways. PMID:26630489

  16. Modulation of serotonin transporter function by kappa-opioid receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Sundaramurthy, Santhanalakshmi; Annamalai, Balasubramaniam; Samuvel, Devadoss J; Shippenberg, Toni S; Jayanthi, Lankupalle D; Ramamoorthy, Sammanda

    2017-02-01

    Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonists produce dysphoria and psychotomimesis. While KOR agonists produce pro-depressant-like effects, KOR antagonists produce anti-depressant-like effects in rodent models. The cellular mechanisms and downstream effector(s) by which KOR ligands produce these effects are not clear. KOR agonists modulate serotonin (5-HT) transmission in the brain regions implicated in mood and motivation regulation. Presynaptic serotonin transporter (SERT) activity is critical in the modulation of synaptic 5-HT and, subsequently, in mood disorders. Detailing the molecular events of KOR-linked SERT regulation is important for examining the postulated role of this protein in mood disorders. In this study, we used heterologous expression systems and native tissue preparations to determine the cellular signaling cascades linked to KOR-mediated SERT regulation. KOR agonists U69,593 and U50,488 produced a time and concentration dependent KOR antagonist-reversible decrease in SERT function. KOR-mediated functional down-regulation of SERT is sensitive to CaMKII and Akt inhibition. The U69,593-evoked decrease in SERT activity is associated with a decreased transport Vmax, reduced SERT cell surface expression, and increased SERT phosphorylation. Furthermore, KOR activation enhanced SERT internalization and decreased SERT delivery to the membrane. These data demonstrate that KOR activation decreases 5-HT uptake by altering SERT trafficking mechanisms and phosphorylation status to reduce the functional availability of surface SERT.

  17. Serotonin regulates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Kim, Hail; Yoshida, Masashi; Fujiwara, Tomonori; Aoyagi, Kyota; Toyofuku, Yukiko; Nakamichi, Yoko; Nishiwaki, Chiyono; Okamura, Tadashi; Uchida, Toyoyoshi; Fujitani, Yoshio; Akagawa, Kimio; Kakei, Masafumi; Watada, Hirotaka; German, Michael S.; Nagamatsu, Shinya

    2013-01-01

    In preparation for the metabolic demands of pregnancy, β cells in the maternal pancreatic islets increase both in number and in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) per cell. Mechanisms have been proposed for the increased β cell mass, but not for the increased GSIS. Because serotonin production increases dramatically during pregnancy, we tested whether flux through the ionotropic 5-HT3 receptor (Htr3) affects GSIS during pregnancy. Pregnant Htr3a−/− mice exhibited impaired glucose tolerance despite normally increased β cell mass, and their islets lacked the increase in GSIS seen in islets from pregnant wild-type mice. Electrophysiological studies showed that activation of Htr3 decreased the resting membrane potential in β cells, which increased Ca2+ uptake and insulin exocytosis in response to glucose. Thus, our data indicate that serotonin, acting in a paracrine/autocrine manner through Htr3, lowers the β cell threshold for glucose and plays an essential role in the increased GSIS of pregnancy. PMID:24218571

  18. Antidepressant Specificity of Serotonin Transporter Suggested by Three LeuT-SSRI Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Z.; Zhen, J; Karpowich, N; Law, C; Reith, M; Wang, D

    2009-01-01

    Sertraline and fluoxetine are selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) that are widely prescribed to treat depression. They exert their effects by inhibiting the presynaptic plasma membrane serotonin transporter (SERT). All SSRIs possess halogen atoms at specific positions, which are key determinants for the drugs' specificity for SERT. For the SERT protein, however, the structural basis of its specificity for SSRIs is poorly understood. Here we report the crystal structures of LeuT, a bacterial SERT homolog, in complex with sertraline, R-fluoxetine or S-fluoxetine. The SSRI halogens all bind to exactly the same pocket within LeuT. Mutation at this halogen-binding pocket (HBP) in SERT markedly reduces the transporter's affinity for SSRIs but not for tricyclic antidepressants. Conversely, when the only nonconserved HBP residue in both norepinephrine and dopamine transporters is mutated into that found in SERT, their affinities for all the three SSRIs increase uniformly. Thus, the specificity of SERT for SSRIs is dependent largely on interaction of the drug halogens with the protein's HBP.

  19. Antidepressant specificity of serotonin transporter suggested by three LeuT-SSRI structures.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zheng; Zhen, Juan; Karpowich, Nathan K; Law, Christopher J; Reith, Maarten E A; Wang, Da-Neng

    2009-06-01

    Sertraline and fluoxetine are selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) that are widely prescribed to treat depression. They exert their effects by inhibiting the presynaptic plasma membrane serotonin transporter (SERT). All SSRIs possess halogen atoms at specific positions, which are key determinants for the drugs' specificity for SERT. For the SERT protein, however, the structural basis of its specificity for SSRIs is poorly understood. Here we report the crystal structures of LeuT, a bacterial SERT homolog, in complex with sertraline, R-fluoxetine or S-fluoxetine. The SSRI halogens all bind to exactly the same pocket within LeuT. Mutation at this halogen-binding pocket (HBP) in SERT markedly reduces the transporter's affinity for SSRIs but not for tricyclic antidepressants. Conversely, when the only nonconserved HBP residue in both norepinephrine and dopamine transporters is mutated into that found in SERT, their affinities for all the three SSRIs increase uniformly. Thus, the specificity of SERT for SSRIs is dependent largely on interaction of the drug halogens with the protein's HBP.

  20. The inhibitory effect of combination treatment with leptin and cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist on food intake and body weight gain is mediated by serotonin 1B and 2C receptors.

    PubMed

    Wierucka-Rybak, M; Wolak, M; Juszczak, M; Drobnik, J; Bojanowska, E

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies reported that the co-injection of leptin and cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists reduces food intake and body weight in rats, and this effect is more profound than that induced by these compounds individually. Additionally, serotonin mediates the effects of numerous anorectic drugs. To investigate whether serotonin interacts with leptin and endocannabinoids to affect food intake and body weight, we administered 5-hydroxytryptamine(HT)1B and 5-hydroxytryptamine(HT)2C serotonin receptor antagonists (3 mg/kg GR 127935 and 0.5 mg/kg SB 242084, respectively) to male Wistar rats treated simultaneously with leptin (100 μg/kg) and the CB1 receptor inverse agonist AM 251 (1 mg/kg) for 3 days. In accordance with previous findings, the co-injection of leptin and AM 251, but not the individual injection of each drug, resulted in a significant decrease in food intake and body weight gain. Blockade of the 5-HT1B and 5-HT2C receptors completely abolished the leptin- and AM 251-induced anorectic and body-weight-reducing effects. These results suggest that serotonin mediates the leptin- and AM 251-dependent regulation of feeding behavior in rats via the 5-HT1B and 5-HT2C receptors.

  1. 5-HT2CR blockade in the amygdala conveys analgesic efficacy to SSRIs in a rat model of arthritis pain.

    PubMed

    Grégoire, Stéphanie; Neugebauer, Volker

    2013-08-12

    Pain, including arthritic pain, has a negative affective component and is often associated with anxiety and depression. However, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SSRIs) show limited effectiveness in pain. The amygdala plays a key role in the emotional-affective component of pain, pain modulation and affective disorders. Neuroplasticity in the basolateral and central amygdala (BLA and CeA, respectively) correlate positively with pain behaviors. Evidence suggests that serotonin receptor subtype 5-HT2CR in the amygdala contributes critically to anxiogenic behavior and anxiety disorders. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that 5-HT2CR in the amygdala accounts for the limited effectiveness of SSRIs in reducing pain behaviors and that 5-HT2CR blockade in the amygdala renders SSRIs effective. Nocifensive reflexes, vocalizations and anxiety-like behavior were measured in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Behavioral experiments were done in sham controls and in rats with arthritis induced by kaolin/carrageenan injections into one knee joint. Rats received a systemic (i.p.) administration of an SSRI (fluvoxamine, 30 mg/kg) or vehicle (sterile saline) and stereotaxic application of a selective 5-HT2CR antagonist (SB242084, 10 μM) or vehicle (ACSF) into BLA or CeA by microdialysis. Compared to shams, arthritic rats showed decreased hindlimb withdrawal thresholds (increased reflexes), increased duration of audible and ultrasonic vocalizations, and decreased open-arm choices in the elevated plus maze test suggesting anxiety-like behavior. Fluvoxamine (i.p.) or SB242084 (intra-BLA) alone had no significant effect, but their combination inhibited the pain-related increase of vocalizations and anxiety-like behavior without affecting spinal reflexes. SB242084 applied into the CeA in combination with systemic fluvoxamine had no effect on vocalizations and spinal reflexes. The data suggest that 5-HT2CR in the amygdala, especially in the BLA, limits the

  2. Rotavirus and Serotonin Cross-Talk in Diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Nordgren, Johan; Karlsson, Thommie; Sharma, Sumit; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Svensson, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) has been shown to infect and stimulate secretion of serotonin from human enterochromaffin (EC) cells and to infect EC cells in the small intestine of mice. It remains to identify which intracellularly expressed viral protein(s) is responsible for this novel property and to further establish the clinical role of serotonin in RV infection. First, we found that siRNA specifically silencing NSP4 (siRNANSP4) significantly attenuated secretion of serotonin from Rhesus rotavirus (RRV) infected EC tumor cells compared to siRNAVP4, siRNAVP6 and siRNAVP7. Second, intracellular calcium mobilization and diarrhoeal capacity from virulent and avirulent porcine viruses correlated with the capacity to release serotonin from EC tumor cells. Third, following administration of serotonin, all (10/10) infants, but no (0/8) adult mice, responded with diarrhoea. Finally, blocking of serotonin receptors using Ondansetron significantly attenuated murine RV (strain EDIM) diarrhoea in infant mice (2.9 vs 4.5 days). Ondansetron-treated mice (n = 11) had significantly (p < 0.05) less diarrhoea, lower diarrhoea severity score and lower total diarrhoea output as compared to mock-treated mice (n = 9). Similarly, Ondansetron-treated mice had better weight gain than mock-treated animals (p < 0.05). A most surprising finding was that the serotonin receptor antagonist significantly (p < 0.05) also attenuated total viral shedding. In summary, we show that intracellularly expressed NSP4 stimulates release of serotonin from human EC tumor cells and that serotonin participates in RV diarrhoea, which can be attenuated by Ondansetron. PMID:27459372

  3. Modulation of anxiety by cortical serotonin 1A receptors

    PubMed Central

    Piszczek, Lukasz; Piszczek, Agnieszka; Kuczmanska, Joanna; Audero, Enrica; Gross, Cornelius T.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) plays an important role in the modulation of behavior across animal species. The serotonin 1A receptor (Htr1a) is an inhibitory G-protein coupled receptor that is expressed both on serotonin and non-serotonin neurons in mammals. Mice lacking Htr1a show increased anxiety behavior suggesting that its activation by serotonin has an anxiolytic effect. This outcome can be mediated by either Htr1a population present on serotonin (auto-receptor) or non-serotonin neurons (hetero-receptor), or both. In addition, both transgenic and pharmacological studies have shown that serotonin acts on Htr1a during development to modulate anxiety in adulthood, demonstrating a function for this receptor in the maturation of anxiety circuits in the brain. However, previous studies have been equivocal about which Htr1a population modulates anxiety behavior, with some studies showing a role of Htr1a hetero-receptor and others implicating the auto-receptor. In particular, cell-type specific rescue and suppression of Htr1a expression in either forebrain principal neurons or brainstem serotonin neurons reached opposite conclusions about the role of the two populations in the anxiety phenotype of the knockout. One interpretation of these apparently contradictory findings is that the modulating role of these two populations depends on each other. Here we use a novel Cre-dependent inducible allele of Htr1a in mice to show that expression of Htr1a in cortical principal neurons is sufficient to modulate anxiety. Together with previous findings, these results support a hetero/auto-receptor interaction model for Htr1a function in anxiety. PMID:25759645

  4. Rotavirus and Serotonin Cross-Talk in Diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Bialowas, Sonja; Hagbom, Marie; Nordgren, Johan; Karlsson, Thommie; Sharma, Sumit; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Svensson, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) has been shown to infect and stimulate secretion of serotonin from human enterochromaffin (EC) cells and to infect EC cells in the small intestine of mice. It remains to identify which intracellularly expressed viral protein(s) is responsible for this novel property and to further establish the clinical role of serotonin in RV infection. First, we found that siRNA specifically silencing NSP4 (siRNANSP4) significantly attenuated secretion of serotonin from Rhesus rotavirus (RRV) infected EC tumor cells compared to siRNAVP4, siRNAVP6 and siRNAVP7. Second, intracellular calcium mobilization and diarrhoeal capacity from virulent and avirulent porcine viruses correlated with the capacity to release serotonin from EC tumor cells. Third, following administration of serotonin, all (10/10) infants, but no (0/8) adult mice, responded with diarrhoea. Finally, blocking of serotonin receptors using Ondansetron significantly attenuated murine RV (strain EDIM) diarrhoea in infant mice (2.9 vs 4.5 days). Ondansetron-treated mice (n = 11) had significantly (p < 0.05) less diarrhoea, lower diarrhoea severity score and lower total diarrhoea output as compared to mock-treated mice (n = 9). Similarly, Ondansetron-treated mice had better weight gain than mock-treated animals (p < 0.05). A most surprising finding was that the serotonin receptor antagonist significantly (p < 0.05) also attenuated total viral shedding. In summary, we show that intracellularly expressed NSP4 stimulates release of serotonin from human EC tumor cells and that serotonin participates in RV diarrhoea, which can be attenuated by Ondansetron.

  5. Blockade of 5-Ht3 receptors in the septal area increases Fos expression in selected brain areas.

    PubMed

    Urzedo-Rodrigues, Lilia S; Ferreira, Hilda S; Santana, Rejane Conceição; Luz, Carla Patrícia; Perrone, Camila F; Fregoneze, Josmara B

    2014-04-01

    Serotonin is widely distributed throughout the brain and is involved in a multiplicity of visceral, cognitive and behavioral responses. It has been previously shown that injections of different doses of ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, into the medial septum/vertical limb of the diagonal band complex (MS/vDB) induce a hypertensive response in rats. On the other hand, administration of m-CPBG, a 5-HT3 agonist, into the MS/vDB inhibits the increase of blood pressure during restraint stress. However, it is unclear which neuronal circuitry is involved in these responses. The present study investigated Fos immunoreactive nuclei (Fos-IR) in different brain areas following the blockade of 5-HT3 receptors located in the MS/vDB in sham and in sinoaortic denervated (SAD) rats. Ondansetron injection into the MS/vDB increases Fos-IR in different brain areas including the limbic system (central amygdala and ventral part of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis), hypothalamus (medial parvocellular parts of the paraventricular nucleus, anterodorsal preoptic area, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus), mesencephalon (ventrolateral periaqueductal gray region) and rhombencephalon (lateral parabrachial nucleus) in sham rats. Barodenervation results in higher Fos expression at the parvocellular and magnocellular part of the paraventricular nucleus, the lateral parabrachial nucleus, the central nucleus of amygdala, the locus coeruleus, the medial part of the nucleus of the solitary tract, the rostral ventrolateral medulla and the caudal ventrolateral medulla following 5-HT3receptor blockade in the MS/vDB. Based on the present results and previous data showing a hypertensive response to ondansetron injected into the MS/vDB, it is reasonable to suggest that 5-HT3receptors in the MS/vDB exert an inhibitory drive that may oscillate as a functional regulatory part of the complex central neuronal network participating in the control of blood pressure.

  6. Renal vasodilatation by dopexamine and fenoldopam due to alpha 1-adrenoceptor blockade.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, S. W.; Broadley, K. J.

    1995-01-01

    1. The renal vascular responses of the rat isolated perfused kidney to the dopamine D1-receptor agonists, dopexamine and fenoldopam, were examined. 2. Both kidneys were perfused in situ at constant flow rate (11 ml min-1) with Krebs-bicarbonate solution at 37 degrees C. The perfusion pressure was monitored and to enable vasodilator responses to be measured, the resting perfusion pressure was raised by infusing noradrenaline (6 x 10(-9) M). 3. Dose-related vasodilator responses to bolus doses of dopexamine and fenoldopam were obtained. However, these were not antagonized by the D1-receptor antagonist, SCH 23390, indicating that D1-receptors were not involved. 4. Bolus doses of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist, prazosin, caused similar dose-related vasodilator responses indicating the possibility that alpha 1-adrenoceptor blocking properties of dopexamine and fenoldopam were responsible for the vasodilatation. 5. alpha-Adrenoceptor blockade by dopexamine and fenoldopam was confirmed by the parallel displacement of dose-response curves for the vasopressor responses to noradrenaline. pA2 values were determined by Schild analysis for dopexamine, fenoldopam and prazosin antagonism of noradrenaline in the presence of neuronal (cocaine, 10(-5) M) and extraneuronal uptake blockade (metanephrine, 10(-5) M). The values were 6.23, 6.02 and 8.91, respectively. Schild plot slopes of unity were obtained for dopexamine and fenoldopam indicating competitive antagonism. A slope of greater than unity for prazosin may be explained by the lack of equilibrium conditions associated with bolus doses of noradrenaline, the responses of which are affected more by the high affinity antagonist, prazosin, than the two lower affinity antagonists.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7670737

  7. Beta-blockade improves adjacent regional sympathetic innervation during postinfarction remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kramer, C M; Nicol, P D; Rogers, W J; Seibel, P S; Park, C S; Reichek, N

    1999-10-01

    The effect of beta-blockade on left ventricular (LV) remodel