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Sample records for serovar typhimurium activates

  1. Intracellular Voyeurism: Examining the Modulation of Host Cell Activities bySalmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Szeto, Jason; Brumell, John H

    2005-11-01

    Salmonella spp. can infect host cells by gaining entry through phagocytosis or by inducing host cell membrane ruffling that facilitates bacterial uptake. With its wide host range, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium has proven to be an important model organism for studying intracellular bacterial pathogenesis. Upon entry into host cells, serovar Typhimurium typically resides within a membrane-bound compartment termed the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV). From the SCV, serovar Typhimurium can inject several effector proteins that subvert many normal host cell systems, including endocytic trafficking, cytoskeletal rearrangements, lipid signaling and distribution, and innate and adaptive host defenses. The study of these intracellular events has been made possible through the use of various imaging techniques, ranging from classic methods of transmission electron microscopy to advanced livecell fluorescence confocal microscopy. In addition, DNA microarrays have now been used to provide a "snapshot" of global gene expression in serovar Typhimurium residing within the infected host cell. This review describes key aspects of Salmonella-induced subversion of host cell activities, providing examples of imaging that have been used to elucidate these events. Serovar Typhimurium engages specific host cell machinery from initial contact with the host cell to replication within the SCV. This continuous interaction with the host cell has likely contributed to the extensive arsenal that serovar Typhimurium now possesses, including two type III secretion systems, a range of ammunition in the form of TTSS effectors, and a complex genetic regulatory network that coordinates the expression of hundreds of virulence factors.

  2. Proteolytic Inhibition of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium-Induced Activation of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases ERK and JNK in Cultured Human Intestinal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mynott, Tracey L.; Crossett, Ben; Prathalingam, S. Radhika

    2002-01-01

    Bromelain, a mixture of cysteine proteases from pineapple stems, blocks signaling by the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases extracellular regulated kinase 1 (ERK-1) and ERK-2, inhibits inflammation, and protects against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection. In this study, we examined the effect of bromelain on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, since an important feature of its pathogenesis is its ability to induce activation of ERK-1 and ERK-2, which leads to internalization of bacteria and induction of inflammatory responses. Our results show that bromelain dose dependently blocks serovar Typhimurium-induced ERK-1, ERK-2, and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in Caco-2 cells. Bromelain also blocked signaling induced by carbachol and anisomycin, pharmacological MAP kinase agonists. Despite bromelain inhibition of serovar Typhimurium-induced MAP kinase signaling, it did not prevent subsequent invasion of the Caco-2 cells by serovar Typhimurium or alter serovar Typhimurium -induced decreases in resistance across Caco-2 monolayers. Surprisingly, bromelain also did not block serovar Typhimurium-induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion but synergized with serovar Typhimurium to enhance IL-8 production. We also found that serovar Typhimurium does not induce ERK phosphorylation in Caco-2 cells in the absence of serum but that serovar Typhimurium-induced invasion and decreases in monolayer resistance are unaffected. Collectively, these data indicate that serovar Typhimurium-induced invasion of Caco-2 cells, changes in the resistance of epithelial cell monolayers, and IL-8 production can occur independently of the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. Data also confirm that bromelain is a novel inhibitor of MAP kinase signaling pathways and suggest a novel role for proteases as inhibitors of signal transduction pathways in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:11748167

  3. Proteolytic inhibition of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK and JNK in cultured human intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Mynott, Tracey L; Crossett, Ben; Prathalingam, S Radhika

    2002-01-01

    Bromelain, a mixture of cysteine proteases from pineapple stems, blocks signaling by the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases extracellular regulated kinase 1 (ERK-1) and ERK-2, inhibits inflammation, and protects against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection. In this study, we examined the effect of bromelain on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, since an important feature of its pathogenesis is its ability to induce activation of ERK-1 and ERK-2, which leads to internalization of bacteria and induction of inflammatory responses. Our results show that bromelain dose dependently blocks serovar Typhimurium-induced ERK-1, ERK-2, and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in Caco-2 cells. Bromelain also blocked signaling induced by carbachol and anisomycin, pharmacological MAP kinase agonists. Despite bromelain inhibition of serovar Typhimurium-induced MAP kinase signaling, it did not prevent subsequent invasion of the Caco-2 cells by serovar Typhimurium or alter serovar Typhimurium -induced decreases in resistance across Caco-2 monolayers. Surprisingly, bromelain also did not block serovar Typhimurium-induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion but synergized with serovar Typhimurium to enhance IL-8 production. We also found that serovar Typhimurium does not induce ERK phosphorylation in Caco-2 cells in the absence of serum but that serovar Typhimurium-induced invasion and decreases in monolayer resistance are unaffected. Collectively, these data indicate that serovar Typhimurium-induced invasion of Caco-2 cells, changes in the resistance of epithelial cell monolayers, and IL-8 production can occur independently of the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. Data also confirm that bromelain is a novel inhibitor of MAP kinase signaling pathways and suggest a novel role for proteases as inhibitors of signal transduction pathways in intestinal epithelial cells.

  4. Direct ROS Scavenging Activity of CueP from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Bo-Young; Yeom, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Sik; Um, Si-Hyeon; Jo, Inseong; Lee, Kangseok; Kim, Yong-Hak; Ha, Nam-Chul

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is an intracellular pathogen that has evolved to survive in the phagosome of macrophages. The periplasmic copper-binding protein CueP was initially known to confer copper resistance to S. Typhimurium. Crystal structure and biochemical studies on CueP revealed a putative copper binding site surrounded by the conserved cysteine and histidine residues. A recent study reported that CueP supplies copper ions to periplasmic Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (SodCII) at a low copper concentration and thus enables the sustained SodCII activity in the periplasm. In this study, we investigated the role of CueP in copper resistance at a high copper concentration. We observed that the survival of a cueP-deleted strain of Salmonella in macrophage phagosome was significantly reduced. Subsequent biochemical experiments revealed that CueP specifically mediates the reduction of copper ion using electrons released during the formation of the disulfide bond. We observed that the copper ion-mediated Fenton reaction in the presence of hydrogen peroxide was blocked by CueP. This study provides insight into how CueP confers copper resistance to S. Typhimurium in copper-rich environments such as the phagosome of macrophages. PMID:24598994

  5. Aspartic Peptide Hydrolases in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Rachel A.; Knox, Tina M.; Miller, Charles G.

    2001-01-01

    Two well-characterized enzymes in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli are able to hydrolyze N-terminal aspartyl (Asp) dipeptides: peptidase B, a broad-specificity aminopeptidase, and peptidase E, an Asp-specific dipeptidase. A serovar Typhimurium strain lacking both of these enzymes, however, can still utilize most N-terminal Asp dipeptides as sources of amino acids, and extracts of such a strain contain additional enzymatic activities able to hydrolyze Asp dipeptides. Here we report two such activities from extracts of pepB pepE mutant strains of serovar Typhimurium identified by their ability to hydrolyze Asp-Leu. Although each of these activities hydrolyzes Asp-Leu at a measurable rate, the preferred substrates for both are N-terminal isoAsp peptides. One of the activities is a previously characterized isoAsp dipeptidase from E. coli, the product of the iadA gene. The other is the product of the serovar Typhimurium homolog of E. coli ybiK, a gene of previously unknown function. This gene product is a member of the N-terminal nucleophile structural family of amidohydrolases. Like most other members of this family, the mature enzyme is generated from a precursor protein by proteolytic cleavage and the active enzyme is a heterotetramer. Based on its ability to hydrolyze an N-terminal isoAsp tripeptide as well as isoAsp dipeptides, the enzyme appears to be an isoAsp aminopeptidase, and we propose that the gene encoding it be designated iaaA (isoAsp aminopeptidase). A strain lacking both IadA and IaaA in addition to peptidase B and peptidase E has been constructed. This strain utilizes Asp-Leu as a leucine source, and extracts of this strain contain at least one additional, as-yet-uncharacterized, peptidase able to cleave Asp dipeptides. PMID:11325937

  6. Aspartic peptide hydrolases in Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Larsen, R A; Knox, T M; Miller, C G

    2001-05-01

    Two well-characterized enzymes in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli are able to hydrolyze N-terminal aspartyl (Asp) dipeptides: peptidase B, a broad-specificity aminopeptidase, and peptidase E, an Asp-specific dipeptidase. A serovar Typhimurium strain lacking both of these enzymes, however, can still utilize most N-terminal Asp dipeptides as sources of amino acids, and extracts of such a strain contain additional enzymatic activities able to hydrolyze Asp dipeptides. Here we report two such activities from extracts of pepB pepE mutant strains of serovar Typhimurium identified by their ability to hydrolyze Asp-Leu. Although each of these activities hydrolyzes Asp-Leu at a measurable rate, the preferred substrates for both are N-terminal isoAsp peptides. One of the activities is a previously characterized isoAsp dipeptidase from E. coli, the product of the iadA gene. The other is the product of the serovar Typhimurium homolog of E. coli ybiK, a gene of previously unknown function. This gene product is a member of the N-terminal nucleophile structural family of amidohydrolases. Like most other members of this family, the mature enzyme is generated from a precursor protein by proteolytic cleavage and the active enzyme is a heterotetramer. Based on its ability to hydrolyze an N-terminal isoAsp tripeptide as well as isoAsp dipeptides, the enzyme appears to be an isoAsp aminopeptidase, and we propose that the gene encoding it be designated iaaA (isoAsp aminopeptidase). A strain lacking both IadA and IaaA in addition to peptidase B and peptidase E has been constructed. This strain utilizes Asp-Leu as a leucine source, and extracts of this strain contain at least one additional, as-yet-uncharacterized, peptidase able to cleave Asp dipeptides.

  7. Overexpression of the Multidrug Efflux Operon acrEF by Insertional Activation with IS1 or IS10 Elements in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT204 acrB Mutants Selected with Fluoroquinolones

    PubMed Central

    Olliver, Anne; Vallé, Michel; Chaslus-Dancla, Elisabeth; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2005-01-01

    High-level fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium phage type DT204 has been previously shown to be essentially due to both multiple target gene mutations and active efflux by the AcrAB-TolC efflux system. In this study we show that in intermediatly resistant acrB-inactivated serovar Typhimurium DT204 mutants, high-level resistance to FQs can be restored on in vitro selection with FQs. In each FQ- resistant mutant selected from serovar Typhimurium DT204 acrB mutant strains, an insertion sequence (IS1 or IS10) was found integrated upstream of the acrEF operon, coding for AcrEF, an efflux pump highly homologous to AcrAB. In one of the strains, transposition of IS1 caused partial deletion of acrS, the putative local repressor gene of the acrEF operon. Sequence analysis showed that both IS1 and IS10 elements contain putative promoter sequences that might alter the expression of adjacent acrEF genes. Indeed, reverse transcription-PCR experiments showed an 8- to 10-fold increase in expression of acrF in these insertional mutants, relative to their respective parental strain, which correlated well with the resistance levels observed to FQs and other unrelated drugs. It is noteworthy that AcrEF did not contribute to the intrinsic drug resistance of serovar Typhimurium, since acrF deletion in wild-type strains did not result in any increase in drug susceptibility. Moreover, deletion of acrS did not cause any acrF overexpression or any decrease in drug susceptibility, suggesting that acrEF overexpression is mediated solely by the IS1 and IS10 promoter sequences and not by inactivity of AcrS. Southern blot experiments showed that the number of chromosomal IS1 and IS10 elements in the serovar Typhimurium DT204 genome was about 5 and 15 respectively. None were detected in epidemic serovar Typhimurium DT104 strains or in the serovar Typhimurium reference strain LT2. Carrying IS1 and/or IS10 elements in their chromosome may thus be a selective

  8. Characterization of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium aconitase A.

    PubMed

    Baothman, Othman A S; Rolfe, Matthew D; Green, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    Aconitases (Acn) are iron-sulfur proteins that catalyse the reversible isomerization of citrate and isocitrate via the intermediate cis-aconitate in the Krebs cycle. Some Acn proteins are bi-functional and under conditions of iron starvation and oxidative stress lose their iron-sulfur clusters and become post-transcriptional regulators by binding specific mRNA targets. Many bacterial species possess two genetically distinct aconitase proteins, AcnA and AcnB. Current understanding of the regulation and functions of AcnA and AcnB in dual Acn bacteria is based on a model developed in Escherichia coli. Thus, AcnB is the major Krebs cycle enzyme expressed during exponential growth, whereas AcnA is a more stable, stationary phase and stress-induced enzyme, and both E. coli Acns are bi-functional. Here a second dual Acn bacterium, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), has been analysed. Phenotypic traits of S. Typhimurium acn mutants were consistent with AcnB acting as the major Acn protein. Promoter fusion experiments indicated that acnB transcription was ~10-fold greater than that of acnA and that acnA expression was regulated by the cyclic-AMP receptor protein (CRP, glucose starvation), the fumarate nitrate reduction regulator (FNR, oxygen starvation), the ferric uptake regulator (Fur, iron starvation) and the superoxide response protein (SoxR, oxidative stress). In contrast to E. coli, S. Typhimurium acnA was not induced in the stationary phase. Furthermore, acnA expression was enhanced in an acnB mutant, presumably to partially compensate for the lack of AcnB activity. Isolated S. Typhimurium AcnA protein had kinetic and mRNA-binding properties similar to those described for E. coli AcnA. Thus, the work reported here provides a second example of the regulation and function of AcnA and AcnB proteins in a dual Acn bacterium.

  9. Shifts from glucose to certain secondary carbon-sources result in activation of the extracytoplasmic function sigma factor sigmaE in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, William J; Thomas, Sheena M; Johnson, Erin; Pallen, Mark J; Spector, Michael P

    2005-07-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) elicits the starvation-stress response (SSR) due to starvation for an essential nutrient, e.g. a carbon/energy source (C-source). As part of the SSR, the alternative sigma factor sigma(E) is activated and induced. The authors suspect that this activation is, in part, triggered by changes in the S. Typhimurium cell envelope occurring during the adaptation from growth to carbon/energy starvation (C-starvation), and resulting in an increased need for sigma(E)-regulated factors involved in the proper folding and assembly of newly synthesized proteins destined for this extracytoplasmic compartment. This led to the hypothesis that a sigma(E) activation signal might arise during C-source shifts that cause the induction of proteins localized to the extracytoplasmic compartment, i.e. the outer membrane or periplasm, of the cell. To test this hypothesis, cultures were grown in minimal medium containing enough glucose to reach mid-exponential-phase, plus a non-limiting amount of a secondary 'less-preferred' but utilizable carbon/energy source. The sigma(E) activity was then monitored using plasmids carrying rpoEP1- and rpoEP2-lacZ transcriptional fusions, which exhibit sigma(E)-independent and -dependent lacZ expression, respectively. The secondary C-sources maltose, succinate and citrate, which have extracytoplasmic components involved in their utilization (e.g. LamB), resulted in a discernible diauxic lag period and a sustained increase in sigma(E) activity. Growth transition from glucose to other utilizable phosphotransferase (PTS) and non-PTS C-sources, such as trehalose, mannose, mannitol, fructose, glycerol, d-galactose or l-arabinose, did not cause a discernible diauxic lag period or a sustained increase in sigma(E) activity. Interestingly, a shift from glucose to melibiose, which does not use an extracytoplasmic-localized protein for uptake, did cause an observable diauxic lag period but did not result in a

  10. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium on fresh produce by cold atmospheric gas plasma technology.

    PubMed

    Fernández, A; Noriega, E; Thompson, A

    2013-02-01

    Cold atmospheric gas plasma treatment (CAP) is an alternative approach for the decontamination of fresh and minimally processed food. In this study, the effects of growth phase, growth temperature and chemical treatment regime on the inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) by Nitrogen CAP were examined. Furthermore, the efficacy of CAP treatment for decontaminating lettuce and strawberry surfaces and potato tissue inoculated with S. Typhimurium was evaluated. It was found that the rate of inactivation of S. Typhimurium was independent of the growth phase, growth temperature and chemical treatment regime. Under optimal conditions, a 2 min treatment resulted in a 2.71 log-reduction of S. Typhimurium viability on membrane filters whereas a 15 min treatment was necessary to achieve 2.72, 1.76 and 0.94 log-reductions of viability on lettuce, strawberry and potato, respectively. We suggest that the differing efficiency of CAP treatment on the inactivation of S. Typhimurium on these different types of fresh foods is a consequence of their surface features. Scanning electron microscopy of the surface structures of contaminated samples of lettuce, strawberry and potato revealed topographical features whereby S. Typhimurium cells could be protected from the active species generated by plasma.

  11. Activation of pro-matrix metalloproteinase-9 and degradation of gelatin by the surface protease PgtE of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Ramu, Päivi; Lobo, Leandro Araujo; Kukkonen, Maini; Bjur, Eva; Suomalainen, Marjo; Raukola, Hanna; Miettinen, Minja; Julkunen, Ilkka; Holst, Otto; Rhen, Mikael; Korhonen, Timo K; Lähteenmäki, Kaarina

    2008-04-01

    Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) degrade collagen networks in extracellular matrices by cleaving collagen and its denatured form gelatin, and thus enhance migration of mammalian cells. The gastrointestinal pathogen Salmonella enterica survives and grows within host macrophages and dendritic cells, and can disseminate in the host by travelling within infected host cells. Here, we report that S. enterica serovar Typhimurium activates proMMP-9 (gelatinase B) secreted by human primary macrophages, and degrades gelatin after growth within J774A.1 murine macrophage-like cells. Both proMMP-9 activation and gelatin degradation were due to expression of the Salmonella surface protease PgtE. Following intraperitoneal infection in BALB/c mice, the amount of a pgtE deletion derivative was nearly ten-fold lower in the livers and spleens of mice than the amount of wild-type S. enterica, suggesting that PgtE contributes to dissemination of Salmonella in the host. PgtE belongs to the omptin family of bacterial beta-barrel transmembrane proteases. The ortholog of PgtE in Yersinia pestis, Pla, which is central for bacterial virulence in plague, was poor in proMMP-9 activation and in gelatin degradation. To model the evolution of these activities in the omptin barrel, we performed a substitution analysis in Pla and genetically modified it into a PgtE-like gelatinase. Our results indicate that PgtE and Pla have diverged in substrate specificity, and suggest that Salmonella PgtE has evolved to functionally mimic mammalian MMPs.

  12. Anti-infective mechanisms induced by a probiotic Lactobacillus strain against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    de LeBlanc, Alejandra de Moreno; Castillo, Natalia A; Perdigon, Gabriela

    2010-04-15

    The prevention of pathogen infections is one of the most extensively studied effects of probiotics. L. casei CRL 431 is a probiotic bacterium and its effects on the gut immune cells have been extensively studied. The aim of the present study was to determine, using a mouse model, the preventive and therapeutic effect of L. casei CRL 431 to achieve protection against Salmonella enteritidis serovar Typhimurium infection. In both previous and continuous (previous and post-infection) probiotic administration, the mechanisms induced by this lactic acid bacteria on the first line of intestinal defense (non-specific barrier and the innate immune cells associated to the gut), as a way to understand some of the mechanisms involved in the protection against Salmonella enteritidis serovar Typhimurium, were analyzed. The results obtained demonstrated that 7 days L. casei CRL 431 administration before infection decreased the severity of the infection with Salmonella enteritidis serovar Typhimurium, demonstrating that the continuous administration (even after infection) had the best effect. This continuous administration diminished the counts of the pathogen in the intestine as well as its spread outside this organ. Several mechanisms and cells are involved in this protective effect against Salmonella enteritidis serovar Typhimurium. L. casei CRL 431 acted on cells of the innate and adaptive immune response. The probiotic administration decreased the neutrophil infiltration with the consequent diminution of intestinal inflammation; activated the macrophage phagocytic activity in different sites such as Peyer's patches, spleen and peritoneum; and increased the number of IgA+cells in the lamina propria of the small intestine which was correlated with increased release of s-IgA specific against the pathogen in the intestinal fluids. The mechanism of the inhibition of cellular apoptosis was not involved.

  13. Polyamines Are Required for Virulence in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Thomsen, Line Elnif; Wallrodt, Inke; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2012-01-01

    Sensing and responding to environmental cues is a fundamental characteristic of bacterial physiology and virulence. Here we identify polyamines as novel environmental signals essential for virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a major intracellular pathogen and a model organism for studying typhoid fever. Central to its virulence are two major virulence loci Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 and 2 (SPI1 and SPI2). SPI1 promotes invasion of epithelial cells, whereas SPI2 enables S. Typhimurium to survive and proliferate within specialized compartments inside host cells. In this study, we show that an S. Typhimurium polyamine mutant is defective for invasion, intracellular survival, killing of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and systemic infection of the mouse model of typhoid fever. Virulence of the mutant could be restored by genetic complementation, and invasion and intracellular survival could, as well, be complemented by the addition of exogenous putrescine and spermidine to the bacterial cultures prior to infection. Interestingly, intracellular survival of the polyamine mutant was significantly enhanced above the wild type level by the addition of exogenous putrescine and spermidine to the bacterial cultures prior to infection, indicating that these polyamines function as an environmental signal that primes S. Typhimurium for intracellular survival. Accordingly, experiments addressed at elucidating the roles of these polyamines in infection revealed that expression of genes from both of the major virulence loci SPI1 and SPI2 responded to exogenous polyamines and was reduced in the polyamine mutant. Together our data demonstrate that putrescine and spermidine play a critical role in controlling virulence in S. Typhimurium most likely through stimulation of expression of essential virulence loci. Moreover, our data implicate these polyamines as key signals in S. Typhimurium virulence. PMID:22558361

  14. The inositol phosphatase SHIP controls Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Jennifer L; Sly, Laura M; Krystal, Gerald; Finlay, B Brett

    2008-07-01

    The SH2 domain-containing inositol 5'-phosphatase, SHIP, negatively regulates various hematopoietic cell functions and is critical for maintaining immune homeostasis. However, whether SHIP plays a role in controlling bacterial infections in vivo remains unknown. Salmonella enterica causes human salmonellosis, a disease that ranges in severity from mild gastroenteritis to severe systemic illness, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. The susceptibility of ship(+/+) and ship(-/-) mice and bone marrow-derived macrophages to S. enterica serovar Typhimurium infection was compared. ship(-/-) mice displayed an increased susceptibility to both oral and intraperitoneal serovar Typhimurium infection and had significantly higher bacterial loads in intestinal and systemic sites than ship(+/+) mice, indicating a role for SHIP in the gut-associated and systemic pathogenesis of serovar Typhimurium in vivo. Cytokine analysis of serum from orally infected mice showed that ship(-/-) mice produce lower levels of Th1 cytokines than do ship(+/+) animals at 2 days postinfection, and in vitro analysis of supernatants taken from infected bone marrow-derived macrophages derived to mimic the in vivo ship(-/-) alternatively activated (M2) macrophage phenotype correlated with these data. M2 macrophages were the predominant population in vivo in both oral and intraperitoneal infections, since tissue macrophages within the small intestine and peritoneal macrophages from ship(-/-) mice showed elevated levels of the M2 macrophage markers Ym1 and Arginase 1 compared to ship(+/+) cells. Based on these data, we propose that M2 macrophage skewing in ship(-/-) mice contributes to ineffective clearance of Salmonella in vivo.

  15. Toll-Like Receptor Activation by Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens from Lipid A Mutants of Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Omar; Caboni, Mariaelena; Negrea, Aurel; Necchi, Francesca; Alfini, Renzo; Micoli, Francesca; Saul, Allan; MacLennan, Calman A.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease is a neglected disease with high mortality in children and HIV-positive individuals in sub-Saharan Africa, caused primarily by Africa-specific strains of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. A vaccine using GMMA (generalized modules for membrane antigens) from S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis containing lipid A modifications to reduce potential in vivo reactogenicity is under development. GMMA with penta-acylated lipid A showed the greatest reduction in the level of cytokine release from human peripheral blood monocytes from that for GMMA with wild-type lipid A. Deletion of the lipid A modification genes msbB and pagP was required to achieve pure penta-acylation. Interestingly, ΔmsbB ΔpagP GMMA from S. Enteritidis had a slightly higher stimulatory potential than those from S. Typhimurium, a finding consistent with the higher lipopolysaccharide (LPS) content and Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) stimulatory potential of the former. Also, TLR5 ligand flagellin was found in Salmonella GMMA. No relevant contribution to the stimulatory potential of GMMA was detected even when the flagellin protein FliC from S. Typhimurium was added at a concentration as high as 10% of total protein, suggesting that flagellin impurities are not a major factor for GMMA-mediated immune stimulation. Overall, the stimulatory potential of S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis ΔmsbB ΔpagP GMMA was close to that of Shigella sonnei GMMA, which are currently in phase I clinical trials. PMID:26865597

  16. Flagella-independent surface motility in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun-Yang; Pontes, Mauricio H.; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Flagella are multiprotein complexes necessary for swimming and swarming motility. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, flagella-mediated motility is repressed by the PhoP/PhoQ regulatory system. We now report that Salmonella can move on 0.3% agarose media in a flagella-independent manner when experiencing the PhoP/PhoQ-inducing signal low Mg2+. This motility requires the PhoP-activated mgtA, mgtC, and pagM genes, which specify a Mg2+ transporter, an inhibitor of Salmonella’s own F1Fo ATPase, and a small protein of unknown function, respectively. The MgtA and MgtC proteins are necessary for pagM expression because pagM mRNA levels were lower in mgtA and mgtC mutants than in wild-type Salmonella, and also because pagM expression from a heterologous promoter rescued motility in mgtA and mgtC mutants. PagM promotes group motility by a surface protein(s), as a pagM-expressing strain conferred motility upon a pagM null mutant, and proteinase K treatment eliminated motility. The pagM gene is rarely found outside subspecies I of S. enterica and often present in nonfunctional allelic forms in organisms lacking the identified motility. Deletion of the pagM gene reduced bacterial replication on 0.3% agarose low Mg2+ media but not in low Mg2+ liquid media. Our findings define a form of motility that allows Salmonella to scavenge nutrients and to escape toxic compounds in low Mg2+ semisolid environments. PMID:25624475

  17. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and quality maintenance of cherry tomatoes treated with gaseous essential oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antimicrobial activity of the essential oils (EOs) from cinnamon bark, oregano, mustard and of their major components cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol, and allyl isothiocyanate (AIT) were evaluated as a gaseous treatment to reduce Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in vitro and on tomatoes. In dif...

  18. Specificity of Salmonella Typhimurium strain (ATCC 14028) growth responses to Salmonella serovar-generated spent media.

    PubMed

    Calo, Juliany Rivera; Park, Si Hong; Baker, Christopher A; Ricke, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is one of the most prevalent pathogens responsible for foodborne illness worldwide. Numerous Salmonella serovars have been associated with the consumption of a variety of products, and limiting food-borne illness due to Salmonella serovars is a continuing problem for food producers and public health. The emergence and prevalence of Salmonella serovars has been studied but the predominant serovars have varied somewhat over the years. The aims of this research were to compare the aerobic growth responses of selected predominant foodborne Salmonella serovars, and evaluate how the spent media from different serovars affects the growth of a well-characterized Salmonella Typhimurium strain. Growth responses were similar for most strains in spent media except for S. Typhimurium (ATCC 14028), which exhibited a decrease in growth in the presence of Salmonella Heidelberg (ARI-14) spent media. This research will provide a better understanding of the growth differences among several Salmonella serovars in nutrient limited spent media.

  19. Draft Genome Sequences of 40 Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strains Isolated from Humans and Food in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Fernanda; Medeiros, Marta Inês Cazentini; Rodrigues, Dália Prazeres; Payne, Justin; Timme, Ruth E.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonellosis is an important health problem worldwide and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is one of the most common isolated serovars. Here, we reported the draft genomes of 40 S. Typhimurium strains isolated from humans and food in Brazil. These draft genomes will improve phylogenetic analysis and will help enhance our understanding of strains of this serovar isolated in Brazil. PMID:27660768

  20. Draft Genome Sequences of 40 Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strains Isolated from Humans and Food in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Fernanda; Medeiros, Marta Inês Cazentini; Rodrigues, Dália Prazeres; Payne, Justin; Timme, Ruth E; Allard, Marc W; Falcão, Juliana Pfrimer

    2016-09-22

    Salmonellosis is an important health problem worldwide and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is one of the most common isolated serovars. Here, we reported the draft genomes of 40 S Typhimurium strains isolated from humans and food in Brazil. These draft genomes will improve phylogenetic analysis and will help enhance our understanding of strains of this serovar isolated in Brazil.

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovars Typhimurium and Nottingham Isolated from Food Products

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Ayers, Sherry; Melka, David C.; Curry, Phillip E.; Payne, Justin S.; Laasri, Anna; Wang, Charles; Hammack, Thomas S.; Brown, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) designed to detect Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis, targeting the sdf gene, generated positive results for S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (CFSAN033950) and S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Nottingham (CFSAN006803) isolated from food samples. Both strains show pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns distinct from those of S. Enteritidis. Here, we report the genome sequences of these two strains. PMID:27445384

  2. Natural surface coating to inactivate Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and maintain quality of cherry tomatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate the effectiveness of zein-based coatings in reducing populations of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and preserving quality of cherry tomatoes. Tomatoes were inoculated with a cocktail of S. Typhimurium LT2 plus three mutants on the smoo...

  3. The Arf GTPase-Activating Protein Family Is Exploited by Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium To Invade Nonphagocytic Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Anthony C.; Humphreys, Daniel; Brooks, Andrew B. E.; Hume, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To establish intracellular infections, Salmonella bacteria trigger host cell membrane ruffling and invasion by subverting cellular Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that activate Arf1 and Arf6 GTPases by promoting GTP binding. A family of cellular Arf GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) can downregulate Arf signaling by stimulating GTP hydrolysis, but whether they do this during infection is unknown. Here, we uncovered a remarkable role for distinct Arf GAP family members in Salmonella invasion. The Arf6 GAPs ACAP1 and ADAP1 and the Arf1 GAP ASAP1 localized at Salmonella-induced ruffles, which was not the case for the plasma membrane-localized Arf6 GAPs ARAP3 and GIT1 or the Golgi-associated Arf1 GAP1. Surprisingly, we found that loss of ACAP1, ADAP1, or ASAP1 impaired Salmonella invasion, revealing that GAPs cannot be considered mere terminators of cytoskeleton remodeling. Salmonella invasion was restored in Arf GAP-depleted cells by expressing fast-cycling Arf derivatives, demonstrating that Arf GTP/GDP cycles facilitate Salmonella invasion. Consistent with this view, both constitutively active and dominant-negative Arf derivatives that cannot undergo GTP/GDP cycles inhibited invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Arf GEFs and GAPs colocalize at invading Salmonella and collaborate to drive Arf1-dependent pathogen invasion. This study revealed that Salmonella bacteria exploit a remarkable interplay between Arf GEFs and GAPs to direct cycles of Arf GTPase activation and inactivation. These cycles drive Salmonella cytoskeleton remodeling and enable intracellular infections. PMID:25670778

  4. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104

    DOE PAGES

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Le Hello, Simon; ...

    2016-03-04

    It has been 30 years since the initial emergence and subsequent rapid global spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 (MDR DT104). Nonetheless, its origin and transmission route have never been revealed. In this paper, we used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and temporally structured sequence analysis within a Bayesian framework to reconstruct temporal and spatial phylogenetic trees and estimate the rates of mutation and divergence times of 315 S. Typhimurium DT104 isolates sampled from 1969 to 2012 from 21 countries on six continents. DT104 was estimated to have emerged initially as antimicrobial susceptible in ~1948 (95% credible interval [CI], 1934more » to 1962) and later became MDR DT104 in ~1972 (95% CI, 1972 to 1988) through horizontal transfer of the 13-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) MDR region into susceptible strains already containing SGI1. This was followed by multiple transmission events, initially from central Europe and later between several European countries. An independent transmission to the United States and another to Japan occurred, and from there MDR DT104 was probably transmitted to Taiwan and Canada. An independent acquisition of resistance genes took place in Thailand in ~1975 (95% CI, 1975 to 1990). In Denmark, WGS analysis provided evidence for transmission of the organism between herds of animals. Interestingly, the demographic history of Danish MDR DT104 provided evidence for the success of the program to eradicate Salmonella from pig herds in Denmark from 1996 to 2000. Finally, the results from this study refute several hypotheses on the evolution of DT104 and suggest that WGS may be useful in monitoring emerging clones and devising strategies for prevention of Salmonella infections.« less

  5. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104

    SciTech Connect

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Jun, Se-Ran; Ussery, David W.; Lund, Ole; Crook, Derrick W.; Wilson, Daniel J.; Aarestrup, Frank M.

    2016-03-04

    It has been 30 years since the initial emergence and subsequent rapid global spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 (MDR DT104). Nonetheless, its origin and transmission route have never been revealed. In this paper, we used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and temporally structured sequence analysis within a Bayesian framework to reconstruct temporal and spatial phylogenetic trees and estimate the rates of mutation and divergence times of 315 S. Typhimurium DT104 isolates sampled from 1969 to 2012 from 21 countries on six continents. DT104 was estimated to have emerged initially as antimicrobial susceptible in ~1948 (95% credible interval [CI], 1934 to 1962) and later became MDR DT104 in ~1972 (95% CI, 1972 to 1988) through horizontal transfer of the 13-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) MDR region into susceptible strains already containing SGI1. This was followed by multiple transmission events, initially from central Europe and later between several European countries. An independent transmission to the United States and another to Japan occurred, and from there MDR DT104 was probably transmitted to Taiwan and Canada. An independent acquisition of resistance genes took place in Thailand in ~1975 (95% CI, 1975 to 1990). In Denmark, WGS analysis provided evidence for transmission of the organism between herds of animals. Interestingly, the demographic history of Danish MDR DT104 provided evidence for the success of the program to eradicate Salmonella from pig herds in Denmark from 1996 to 2000. Finally, the results from this study refute several hypotheses on the evolution of DT104 and suggest that WGS may be useful in monitoring emerging clones and devising strategies for prevention of Salmonella infections.

  6. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Rene S.; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Jun, Se-Ran; Lund, Ole; Crook, Derrick W.; Wilson, Daniel J.; Aarestrup, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    It has been 30 years since the initial emergence and subsequent rapid global spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 (MDR DT104). Nonetheless, its origin and transmission route have never been revealed. We used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and temporally structured sequence analysis within a Bayesian framework to reconstruct temporal and spatial phylogenetic trees and estimate the rates of mutation and divergence times of 315 S. Typhimurium DT104 isolates sampled from 1969 to 2012 from 21 countries on six continents. DT104 was estimated to have emerged initially as antimicrobial susceptible in ∼1948 (95% credible interval [CI], 1934 to 1962) and later became MDR DT104 in ∼1972 (95% CI, 1972 to 1988) through horizontal transfer of the 13-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) MDR region into susceptible strains already containing SGI1. This was followed by multiple transmission events, initially from central Europe and later between several European countries. An independent transmission to the United States and another to Japan occurred, and from there MDR DT104 was probably transmitted to Taiwan and Canada. An independent acquisition of resistance genes took place in Thailand in ∼1975 (95% CI, 1975 to 1990). In Denmark, WGS analysis provided evidence for transmission of the organism between herds of animals. Interestingly, the demographic history of Danish MDR DT104 provided evidence for the success of the program to eradicate Salmonella from pig herds in Denmark from 1996 to 2000. The results from this study refute several hypotheses on the evolution of DT104 and suggest that WGS may be useful in monitoring emerging clones and devising strategies for prevention of Salmonella infections. PMID:26944846

  7. Antimicrobial Resistance of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinyan; Li, Yongrui; Xu, Xuebin; Liang, Beibei; Wu, Fuli; Yang, Xiaoxia; Ma, Qiuxia; Yang, Chaojie; Hu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Hongbo; Li, Hao; Sheng, Chunyu; Xie, Jing; Du, Xinying; Hao, Rongzhang; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to analyze the antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to cephalosporins, ciprofloxacin, and azithromycin in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates identified from patients with diarrhea in Shanghai. The isolates showed high rates of resistance to traditional antimicrobials, and 20.6, 12.7, and 5.5% of them exhibited decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins, ciprofloxacin, and azithromycin, respectively. Notably, 473 (84.6%) isolates exhibited multidrug resistance (MDR), including 161 (28.8%) isolates that showed an ACSSuT profile. Twenty-two MDR isolates concurrently exhibited decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins and ciprofloxacin, and six of them were co-resistant to azithromycin. Of all the 71 isolates with decreased susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, 65 showed at least one mutation (D87Y, D87N, or D87G) in gyrA, among which seven isolates simultaneously had mutations of parC (S80R) (n = 6) or parC (T57S/S80R) (n = 1), while 49 isolates with either zero or one mutation in gyrA contained plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes including qnrB, qnrS, and aac(6′)-Ib-cr. Among the 115 cephalosporin-resistant isolates, the most common ESBL gene was blaCTX-M, followed by blaTEM-1, blaOXA-1, and blaSHV -12. Eight subtypes of blaCTX-M were identified and blaCTX-M-14 (n = 22) and blaCTX-M-55 (n = 31) were found to be dominant. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence of blaCTX-M-123 and blaCTX-M-125 in S. Typhimurium. Besides, mphA gene was identified in 15 of the 31 azithromycin-resistant isolates. Among the 22 isolates with reduced susceptibility to cephalosporins and ciprofloxacin, 15 contained ESBL and PMQR genes. Coexistence of these genes lead to the emergence of MDR and the transmission of them will pose great difficulties in S. Typhimurium treatments. Therefore, surveillance for these MDR isolates should be enhanced.

  8. Biofilm formation ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium acrAB mutants.

    PubMed

    Schlisselberg, Dov B; Kler, Edna; Kisluk, Guy; Shachar, Dina; Yaron, Sima

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies offer contradictory findings about the role of multidrug efflux pumps in bacterial biofilm development. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the AcrAB efflux pump in biofilm formation by investigating the ability of AcrB and AcrAB null mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to produce biofilms. Three models were used to compare the ability of S. Typhimurium wild-type and its mutants to form biofilms: formation of biofilm on polystyrene surfaces; production of biofilm (mat model) on the air/liquid interface; and expression of curli and cellulose on Congo red-supplemented agar plates. All three investigated genotypes formed biofilms with similar characteristics. However, upon exposure to chloramphenicol, formation of biofilms on solid surfaces as well as the production of curli were either reduced or were delayed more significantly in both mutants, whilst there was no visible effect on pellicle formation. It can be concluded that when no selective pressure is applied, S. Typhimurium is able to produce biofilms even when the AcrAB efflux pumps are inactivated, implying that the use of efflux pump inhibitors to prevent biofilm formation is not a general solution and that combined treatments might be more efficient. Other factors that affect the ability to produce biofilms depending on efflux pump activity are yet to be identified.

  9. Refined live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Enteritidis vaccines mediate homologous and heterologous serogroup protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; Schmidlein, Patrick; Simon, Raphael; Pasetti, Marcela F; Galen, James E; Levine, Myron M

    2015-12-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections constitute a major health problem among infants and toddlers in sub-Saharan Africa; these infections also occur in infants and the elderly in developed countries. We genetically engineered a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain of multilocus sequence type 313, the predominant genotype circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluated the capacities of S. Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ΔguaBA ΔclpX live oral vaccines to protect mice against a highly lethal challenge dose of the homologous serovar and determined protection against other group B and D serovars circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. The vaccines S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 were immunogenic and protected BALB/c mice against 10,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis, respectively. S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 protected mice against the group B serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Stanleyville (91% vaccine efficacy), and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 protected mice against the group D serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (85% vaccine efficacy). High rates of survival were observed when mice were infected 12 weeks postimmunization, indicating that the vaccines elicited long-lived protective immunity. Whereas CVD 1931 did not protect against S. Enteritidis R11, CVD 1944 did mediate protection against S. Typhimurium D65 (81% efficacy). These findings suggest that a bivalent (S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis) vaccine would provide broad protection against the majority of invasive NTS infections in sub-Saharan Africa.

  10. Refined Live Attenuated Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Enteritidis Vaccines Mediate Homologous and Heterologous Serogroup Protection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schmidlein, Patrick; Simon, Raphael; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections constitute a major health problem among infants and toddlers in sub-Saharan Africa; these infections also occur in infants and the elderly in developed countries. We genetically engineered a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain of multilocus sequence type 313, the predominant genotype circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluated the capacities of S. Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ΔguaBA ΔclpX live oral vaccines to protect mice against a highly lethal challenge dose of the homologous serovar and determined protection against other group B and D serovars circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. The vaccines S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 were immunogenic and protected BALB/c mice against 10,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis, respectively. S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 protected mice against the group B serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Stanleyville (91% vaccine efficacy), and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 protected mice against the group D serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (85% vaccine efficacy). High rates of survival were observed when mice were infected 12 weeks postimmunization, indicating that the vaccines elicited long-lived protective immunity. Whereas CVD 1931 did not protect against S. Enteritidis R11, CVD 1944 did mediate protection against S. Typhimurium D65 (81% efficacy). These findings suggest that a bivalent (S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis) vaccine would provide broad protection against the majority of invasive NTS infections in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:26351285

  11. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium BaeSR two-component system positively regulates sodA in response to ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, P; Collao, B; Álvarez, R; Salinas, H; Morales, E H; Calderón, I L; Saavedra, C P; Gil, F

    2013-10-01

    In response to antibiotics, bacteria activate regulatory systems that control the expression of genes that participate in detoxifying these compounds, like multidrug efflux systems. We previously demonstrated that the BaeSR two-component system from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) participates in the detection of ciprofloxacin, a bactericidal antibiotic, and in the positive regulation of mdtA, an efflux pump implicated in antibiotic resistance. In the present work, we provide further evidence for a role of the S. Typhimurium BaeSR two-component system in response to ciprofloxacin treatment and show that it regulates sodA expression. We demonstrate that, in the absence of BaeSR, the transcript levels of sodA and the activity of its gene product are lower. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and transcriptional fusions, we demonstrate that BaeR regulates sodA by a direct interaction with the promoter region.

  12. Swarm and swim motilities of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and role of osmoregulated periplasmic glucans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains synthesize osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs) under low osmolarity conditions (< 70 mos mol l-1). OPG synthesis is not observed when cells are grown in iso- or hyper-osmotic media (> 400 mos mol l-1). Mutation in OPG structural gene...

  13. Antibiotics induce the expression of attachment genes in specific isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than 27 percent of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates from humans in the United States are resistant to three or more antibiotics. This presents an important food safety concern as multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella is associated with increased morbidity in humans. It has been...

  14. Polynucleotide phosphorlyase (PNPase) is required for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium colonization in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pnp gene encodes polynucleotide phosphorylase, an exoribonuclease involved in RNA degradation. A mutation in the pnp gene was previously identified by our group in a signature-tagged mutagenesis screen designed to search for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genes required for survival in...

  15. Tetracycline promotes the expression of ten fimbrial operons in specific Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella is associated with increased morbidity in humans and presents an important food safety concern. Antibiotic resistance among isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium has become especially prevalent as over 27 per cent of isolates from humans in the Unit...

  16. Hydrogen-Stimulated carbon acquisition and conservation in salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium can utilize molecular hydrogen for growth and amino acid transport during anaerobic growth. Via microarray we identified H2 gas-affected gene expression changes in Salmonella. Addition of H2 caused altered expression of 965 genes; 176 genes were H2-up-regulate...

  17. Genomic heterogeneity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium bacteriuria from chronic infection.

    PubMed

    Octavia, Sophie; Wang, Qinning; Tanaka, Mark M; Sintchenko, Vitali; Lan, Ruiting

    2017-03-07

    We sequenced the genomes of 14 sequential Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates obtained over a five year period from a patient with persistent Salmonella bacteriuria. The isolates formed five distinct lineages; two of which co-existed over four years. We inferred that the observed within-patient variation resulted from mutation events.

  18. A live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine provides cross-protection against Salmonella serovars to reduce disease severity and pathogen transmission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine was developed to confer broad protection against multiple Salmonella serovars to prevent disease and reduce pathogen colonization and shedding. Two vaccine trials were performed in swine to determine the protection afforded by the vac...

  19. A comparison of dense transposon insertion libraries in the Salmonella serovars Typhi and Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Barquist, Lars; Langridge, Gemma C.; Turner, Daniel J.; Phan, Minh-Duy; Turner, A. Keith; Bateman, Alex; Parkhill, Julian; Wain, John; Gardner, Paul P.

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella Typhi and Typhimurium diverged only ∼50 000 years ago, yet have very different host ranges and pathogenicity. Despite the availability of multiple whole-genome sequences, the genetic differences that have driven these changes in phenotype are only beginning to be understood. In this study, we use transposon-directed insertion-site sequencing to probe differences in gene requirements for competitive growth in rich media between these two closely related serovars. We identify a conserved core of 281 genes that are required for growth in both serovars, 228 of which are essential in Escherichia coli. We are able to identify active prophage elements through the requirement for their repressors. We also find distinct differences in requirements for genes involved in cell surface structure biogenesis and iron utilization. Finally, we demonstrate that transposon-directed insertion-site sequencing is not only applicable to the protein-coding content of the cell but also has sufficient resolution to generate hypotheses regarding the functions of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) as well. We are able to assign probable functions to a number of cis-regulatory ncRNA elements, as well as to infer likely differences in trans-acting ncRNA regulatory networks. PMID:23470992

  20. Interaction of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium and mung bean (Phaseolus aureus) plants.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhoj Raj; Chandra, Mudit; Agarwal, Ravikant

    2005-03-01

    The effect of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium, a zoonotic serovar, on mung bean (Phaseolus aureus) cultivar Pant Mung-3 plants was studied. Inoculation of mung bean seeds with Salmonella Typhimurium (7.2 x 10(5) CFU/ml) reduced sprouting rate (P < 0.07). This effect was more pronounced at higher levels of contamination. In the soil inoculated with Salmonella Typhimurium (7.2 x 10(6) CFU/g), germination was retarded and the number of defective sprouts was also significantly higher (P < 0.002). Salmonella Typhimurium grew inside germinating seeds and plant tissues and persisted in seedlings, adult plants, and harvested seedlings dried and stored at room temperature (30 degrees C) up to 45 days. Phaseolus aureus plants grown in sterile soil was resistant to Salmonella Typhimurium infection at 15 days of age and cleared Salmonella from all the aerial parts within 3 h of infection. However, Salmonella Typhimurium could be reisolated from the basal area of the stem and from soil even after 45 days of exposure to the pathogen.

  1. Innate immune control of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium: mechanisms contributing to combating systemic Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Wick, Mary Jo

    2011-01-01

    Infections with Salmonella enterica serovars remain a serious problem worldwide. While serovar Typhi causes significant morbidity and mortality that is restricted to humans, serovar Typhimurium causes gastroenteritidis in humans and can also infect other animals. As mice with the susceptible Nramp1 locus get systemic infection with serovar Typhimurium, murine infection models using this serovar have been widely used to decipher the immune mechanisms required to survive systemic Salmonella infection. This review summarizes recent studies in murine infection models that have advanced our understanding of the events that occur during the first days after oral Salmonella infection. The pathways of bacterial penetration across the intestinal epithelium, bacterial spread to draining (mesenteric) lymph nodes and dissemination to systemic tissues is discussed. The response of myeloid cell populations, including dendritic cells, inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils, during the early stage of infection is also discussed. Finally, the mechanisms driving recruitment of myeloid cells to infected intestinal lymphoid tissues and what is known about Toll-like receptor signaling pathways in innate immunity to Salmonella infection is also discussed.

  2. Epidemiology of a Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain associated with a songbird outbreak.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Sonia M; Keel, Kevin; Sanchez, Susan; Trees, Eija; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Adams, Jennifer K; Cheng, Ying; Ray, Al; Martin, Gordon; Presotto, Andrea; Ruder, Mark G; Brown, Justin; Blehert, David S; Cottrell, Walter; Maurer, John J

    2012-10-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium is responsible for the majority of salmonellosis cases worldwide. This Salmonella serovar is also responsible for die-offs in songbird populations. In 2009, there was an S. Typhimurium epizootic reported in pine siskins in the eastern United States. At the time, there was also a human outbreak with this serovar that was associated with contaminated peanuts. As peanuts are also used in wild-bird food, it was hypothesized that the pine siskin epizootic was related to this human outbreak. A comparison of songbird and human S. Typhimurium pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns revealed that the epizootic was attributed not to the peanut-associated strain but, rather, to a songbird strain first characterized from an American goldfinch in 1998. This same S. Typhimurium strain (PFGE type A3) was also identified in the PulseNet USA database, accounting for 137 of 77,941 total S. Typhimurium PFGE entries. A second molecular typing method, multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), confirmed that the same strain was responsible for the pine siskin epizootic in the eastern United States but was distinct from a genetically related strain isolated from pine siskins in Minnesota. The pine siskin A3 strain was first encountered in May 2008 in an American goldfinch and later in a northern cardinal at the start of the pine siskin epizootic. MLVA also confirmed the clonal nature of S. Typhimurium in songbirds and established that the pine siskin epizootic strain was unique to the finch family. For 2009, the distribution of PFGE type A3 in passerines and humans mirrored the highest population density of pine siskins for the East Coast.

  3. Epidemiology of a Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strain Associated with a Songbird Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Sonia M.; Keel, Kevin; Sanchez, Susan; Trees, Eija; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Adams, Jennifer K.; Cheng, Ying; Ray, Al; Martin, Gordon; Presotto, Andrea; Ruder, Mark G.; Brown, Justin; Blehert, David S.; Cottrell, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium is responsible for the majority of salmonellosis cases worldwide. This Salmonella serovar is also responsible for die-offs in songbird populations. In 2009, there was an S. Typhimurium epizootic reported in pine siskins in the eastern United States. At the time, there was also a human outbreak with this serovar that was associated with contaminated peanuts. As peanuts are also used in wild-bird food, it was hypothesized that the pine siskin epizootic was related to this human outbreak. A comparison of songbird and human S. Typhimurium pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns revealed that the epizootic was attributed not to the peanut-associated strain but, rather, to a songbird strain first characterized from an American goldfinch in 1998. This same S. Typhimurium strain (PFGE type A3) was also identified in the PulseNet USA database, accounting for 137 of 77,941 total S. Typhimurium PFGE entries. A second molecular typing method, multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), confirmed that the same strain was responsible for the pine siskin epizootic in the eastern United States but was distinct from a genetically related strain isolated from pine siskins in Minnesota. The pine siskin A3 strain was first encountered in May 2008 in an American goldfinch and later in a northern cardinal at the start of the pine siskin epizootic. MLVA also confirmed the clonal nature of S. Typhimurium in songbirds and established that the pine siskin epizootic strain was unique to the finch family. For 2009, the distribution of PFGE type A3 in passerines and humans mirrored the highest population density of pine siskins for the East Coast. PMID:22885752

  4. Epidemiology of a Salmonella enterica subsp. Enterica serovar Typhimurium strain associated with a songbird outbreak.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blehert, David S.; Hernandez, Sonia M.; Keel, Kevin; Sanchez, Susan; Trees, Eija; ,

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium is responsible for the majority of salmonellosis cases worldwide. This Salmonella serovar is also responsible for die-offs in songbird populations. In 2009, there was an S. Typhimurium epizootic reported in pine siskins in the eastern United States. At the time, there was also a human outbreak with this serovar that was associated with contaminated peanuts. As peanuts are also used in wild-bird food, it was hypothesized that the pine siskin epizootic was related to this human outbreak. A comparison of songbird and human S. Typhimurium pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns revealed that the epizootic was attributed not to the peanut-associated strain but, rather, to a songbird strain first characterized from an American goldfinch in 1998. This same S. Typhimurium strain (PFGE type A3) was also identified in the PulseNet USA database, accounting for 137 of 77,941 total S. Typhimurium PFGE entries. A second molecular typing method, multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), confirmed that the same strain was responsible for the pine siskin epizootic in the eastern United States but was distinct from a genetically related strain isolated from pine siskins in Minnesota. The pine siskin A3 strain was first encountered in May 2008 in an American goldfinch and later in a northern cardinal at the start of the pine siskin epizootic. MLVA also confirmed the clonal nature of S. Typhimurium in songbirds and established that the pine siskin epizootic strain was unique to the finch family. For 2009, the distribution of PFGE type A3 in passerines and humans mirrored the highest population density of pine siskins for the East Coast.

  5. Assessment of antibiotic resistance phenotype and integrons in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolated from swine.

    PubMed

    Rayamajhi, Nabin; Kang, Sang Gyun; Kang, Mi Lan; Lee, Hee Soo; Park, Kyung Yoon; Yoo, Han Sang

    2008-10-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) isolated and identified from swine were subjected for the analysis of antibiotic resistance pattern and clinically important class 1 and 2 integrons. In addition, S. Typhimurium isolates exhibiting ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline and florfenicol (ACSSuTF) resistance pattern as described in most Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium definitive type 104 (DT104) were characterized by polymerase chain reaction. All the isolates were resistant to more than four antibiotics and showed the highest resistance to streptomycin (94.1%), followed by tetracycline (90.1%), ampicillin (64.7%), chloramphenicol (56.8%) and gentamicin (54.9%). MIC value for the ten isolates ranged between 0.125-2 mug/ml for ciprofloxacin. Among the beta-lactams used, only one of the isolate exhibited resistance to ceftiofur (MIC 8 microg/ml). Sixty eight percent of these multi drug resistance (MDR) S. Typhimurium isolates carried clinically important class 1 integron with 1kb (aadA) and/or 2kb (dhfrXII-orfF-aadA2) resistance gene cassettes. This study reports the increasing trend of multi drug resistance (MDR) S. Typhimurium with clinically important class 1 integron in pigs. In addition, emergence of the ACSSuTF-type resistance in S. Typhimurium PT other than DT104 may limit the use of resistance gene markers in its detection methods by PCR.

  6. Protective immunity conferred by a DNA adenine methylase deficient Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine when delivered in-water to sheep challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Mohler, V L; Heithoff, D M; Mahan, M J; Walker, K H; Hornitzky, M A; Gabor, L; Thomson, P C; Thompson, A; House, J K

    2011-04-27

    Stimulation of acquired immunity to Salmonella in livestock is not feasible in neonates (which can be infected within 24h of birth) and is challenging in feedlots, which typically source animals from diverse locations and vendors. Induction of innate immune mechanisms through mass vaccination of animals upon arrival to feedlots is an alternative approach. Transport, environmental conditions, changes in social grouping, and further handling during feedlot assembly are significant stressors. These factors, as well as concurrent exposure to a diversity of pathogens, contribute to the risk of disease. We have shown that oral immunization of calves with a modified live Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine strain, which lacks the DNA adenine methylase gene (S. Typhimurium dam), attenuates the severity of clinical disease, reduces fecal shedding, and promotes clearance of salmonellae following virulent homologous and heterologous challenge. This study examines the safety and efficacy of a S. Typhimurium dam vaccine in sheep via oral delivery in drinking water (ad libitum), as a means to effectively vaccinate large groups of animals. Adult merino sheep were vaccinated in drinking water -28 days, -7 days and 24h pre and 24h post-virulent Salmonella Typhimurium challenge which was administered via the oral route. Significant attenuation of clinical disease (temperature, appetite, and attitude) and reduction in mortality and virulent Salmonella Typhimurium fecal shedding and tissue colonization was observed in animals that received the vaccine 28 and 7 days pre-challenge. Further, vaccination did not pose a risk to stock previously infected with virulent salmonellae as mortalities and clinical disease in sheep vaccinated prior to or following virulent challenge did not differ significantly from the non-vaccinated controls. The capacity of S. Typhimurium dam vaccines delivered in drinking water to protect livestock from virulent Salmonella challenge offers an

  7. Differences in the motility phenotype of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium exposed to various antibiotics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is one of the most prevalent foodborne-associated bacteria in humans and livestock, and over 35 per cent of these isolates are resistant to three or more antibiotics. This is a concern as multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella has been associat...

  8. Complete, Closed Genome Sequences of 10 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strains Isolated from Human and Bovine Sources

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Scott V.; Bono, James L.; Smith, Timothy P. L.; Fields, Patricia I.; Dinsmore, Blake A.; Santovenia, Monica; Kelley, Christy M.; Wang, Rong; Bosilevac, Joseph M.; Harhay, Gregory P.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a leading cause of enterocolitis for humans and animals. S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium infects a broad range of hosts. To facilitate genomic comparisons among isolates from different sources, we present the complete genome sequences of 10 S. Typhimurium strains, 5 each isolated from human and bovine sources. PMID:27811097

  9. Complete, closed genome sequences of 10 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strains isolated from human and bovine sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica are a leading cause of enterocolitis for humans and animals. S. enterica serovar Typhimurium infects a broad range of hosts. To facilitate genomic comparisons among isolates from different sources, we present the complete genome sequences of ten S. Typhimurium strains, five each...

  10. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli Contamination of Root and Leaf Vegetables Grown in Soils with Incorporated Bovine Manure

    PubMed Central

    Natvig, Erin E.; Ingham, Steven C.; Ingham, Barbara H.; Cooperband, Leslie R.; Roper, Teryl R.

    2002-01-01

    Bovine manure, with or without added Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (three strains), was incorporated into silty clay loam (SCL) and loamy sand (LS) soil beds (53- by 114-cm surface area, 17.5 cm deep) and maintained in two controlled-environment chambers. The S. enterica serovar Typhimurium inoculum was 4 to 5 log CFU/g in manure-fertilized soil. The conditions in the two environmental chambers, each containing inoculated and uninoculated beds of manure-fertilized soil, simulated daily average Madison, Wis., weather conditions (hourly temperatures, rainfall, daylight, and humidity) for a 1 March or a 1 June manure application and subsequent vegetable growing seasons ending 9 August or 28 September, respectively. Core soil samples were taken biweekly from both inoculated and uninoculated soil beds in each chamber. Radishes, arugula, and carrots were planted in soil beds, thinned, and harvested. Soils, thinned vegetables, and harvested vegetables were analyzed for S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli (indigenous in manure). After the 1 March manure application, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium was detected at low levels in both soils on 31 May, but not on vegetables planted 1 May and harvested 12 July from either soil. After the 1 June manure application, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium was detected in SCL soil on 7 September and on radishes and arugula planted in SCL soil on 15 August and harvested on 27 September. In LS soil, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium died at a similar rate (P ≥ 0.05) after the 1 June manure application and was less often detected on arugula and radishes harvested from this soil compared to the SCL soil. Pathogen levels on vegetables were decreased by washing. Manure application in cool (daily average maximum temperature of <10°C) spring conditions is recommended to ensure that harvested vegetables are not contaminated with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Manure application under warmer (daily average maximum

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of the Tumor-Targeting Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strain SL7207

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Síle A.; Ormsby, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL7207 is a genetically modified derivative of strain SL1344, which preferentially accumulates in tumors and can be used as a vehicle for tissue-specific gene delivery in vivo. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of SL7207, confirming a purported aroA deletion and four single-nucleotide polymorphisms compared to SL1344. PMID:28153911

  12. Induction and Resuscitation of Viable but Nonculturable Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104†

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, A. R.; de Rezende, C. L. E.; Joseph, S. W.

    2003-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 11601was tested for its ability to maintain viability in minimal, chemically defined solutions. Periodic monitoring of growth and survival in microcosms of different ion concentrations, maintained at various temperatures, showed a gradual decline in culturable organisms (∼235 days) at 5°C. Organisms maintained at a higher temperature (21°C) showed continuous, equivalent CFU per milliliter (∼106) up to 400 days after inoculation. Fluorescence microscopy with Baclight revealed that nonculturable cells were actually viable, while observations with scanning electron microscopy showed that the cells had retained their structural integrity. Temperature upshift (56°C ± 0.5, 15 s) of the nonculturable organisms (5°C) in Trypticase soy broth followed by immediate inoculation onto Trypticase soy agar (TSA) gave evidence of resuscitation. Interestingly, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 from the microcosms at either 5°C (1 to 200 days) or 21°C (1 to 250 days) did not show enhanced growth after intermittent inoculation onto catalase-supplemented TSA. Furthermore, cells from 21°C microcosms exposed to oxidative and osmotic stress showed greater resistance to stresses over increasing times of exposure than did recently grown cells. It is possible that the exceptional survivability and resilience of this particular strain may in part reflect the growing importance of this multidrug-resistant organism, in general, as a cause of intestinal disease in humans. The fact that S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 11601 is capable of modifying its physiological characteristics, including entry into and recovery from the viable but nonculturable state, suggests the overall possibility that S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 may be able to respond uniquely to various adverse environmental conditions. PMID:14602627

  13. mcr-1−Harboring Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Sequence Type 34 in Pigs, China

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Linxian; Wang, Jing; Gao, Yanling; Liu, Yiyun; Doi, Yohei; Wu, Renjie; Zeng, Zhenling; Liang, Zisen

    2017-01-01

    We detected the mcr-1 gene in 21 (14.8%) Salmonella isolates from pigs at slaughter; 19 were serovar Typhimurium sequence type 34. The gene was located on IncHI2-like plasmids that also harbored IncF replicons and lacked a conjugative transfer region. These findings highlight the need to prevent further spread of colistin resistance in animals and humans. PMID:28098547

  14. Characterization of a Monoclonal Antibody Directed against Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Serovar [4,5,12:i:−] ▿

    PubMed Central

    Rementeria, A.; Vivanco, A. B.; Ramirez, A.; Hernando, F. L.; Bikandi, J.; Herrera-León, S.; Echeita, A.; Garaizar, J.

    2009-01-01

    Flagellar extracts of Salmonella enterica serovars expressing phase 2 H1 antigenic complex (H:1,2, H:1,5, H:1,6, and H:1,7) and a mutant flagellin obtained by site-directed mutagenesis of the fljB gene from serovar Typhimurium at codon 218, transforming threonine to alanine, expressed in Escherichia coli (fljB218A) were used to analyze the H1 antigenic complex. Cross-reactions were detected by Western blotting and dot blotting using commercial polyclonal antibodies against the different wild-type extracts and mutant FljB218A. Therefore, we produced a monoclonal antibody (MAb), 23D4, isotyped as immunoglobulin M, against H:1,2 S. enterica serovar Typhimurium flagellin. The mutant flagellin was not recognized by this MAb. When a large number of phase 1 and phase 2 flagellin antigens of different serovars were used to characterize the 23D4 MAb, only extracts of serovars Typhimurium and [4,5,12:i:−] reacted. The protein composition of phase 1 and phase 2 extracts and highly purified H:1,2 flagellin from serovar Typhimurium strain LT2 and extract of strain 286 (serovar [4,5,12:i:−]), which reacted with the MAb, was studied. Phase 2 flagellin (FljBH:1,2) was detected in phase 1 and phase 2 flagellar heat extracts of serovar Typhimurium and was the single protein identified in all spots of purified H:1,2 flagellin. FliC, FlgK, and other proteins were detected in some immunoreactive spots and in the flagellar extract of serovar [4,5,12:i:−]. Immunoelectron microscopy of complete bacteria with 23D4 showed MAb attachment at the base of flagella, although the MAb failed to recognize the filament of flagella. Nevertheless, the results obtained by the other immunological tests (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blotting, and dot blotting) indicate a reaction against flagellins. The epitopes could also be shared by other proteins on spots where FljB is not present, such as aminopeptidase B, isocitrate lyase, InvE, EF-TuA, enolase, DnaK, and others. In conclusion

  15. Requirement for cobalamin by Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium, Pullorum, Gallinarum and Enteritidis during infection in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Jacqueline Boldrin; Penha Filho, Rafael Antonio Casarin; Junior, Angelo Berchieri; Lemos, Manoel Victor Franco

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium synthesizes cobalamin (vitamin B12) only during anaerobiosis. Two percent of the S. Typhimurium genome is devoted to the synthesis and uptake of vitamin B12 and to B12-dependent reactions. To understand the requirement for cobalamin synthesis better, we constructed mutants of Salmonella serovars Enteritidis and Pullorum that are double-defective in cobalamin biosynthesis (ΔcobSΔcbiA). We compared the virulence of these mutants to that of their respective wild type strains and found no impairment in their ability to cause disease in chickens. We then assessed B12 production in these mutants and their respective wild type strains, as well as in S. Typhimurium ΔcobSΔcbiA, Salmonella Gallinarum ΔcobSΔcbiA, and their respective wild type strains. None of the mutants was able to produce detectable B12. B12 was detectable in S. Enteritidis, S. Pullorum and S. Typhimurium wild type strains but not in S. Gallinarum. In conclusion, the production of vitamin B12in vitro differed across the tested Salmonella serotypes and the deletion of the cbiA and cobS genes resulted in different levels of alteration in the host parasite interaction according to Salmonella serotype tested. PMID:24031771

  16. Regulation of fucose and 1,2-propanediol utilization by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Staib, Lena; Fuchs, Thilo M

    2015-01-01

    After ingestion, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) encounters a densely populated, competitive environment in the gastrointestinal tract. To escape nutrient limitation caused by the intestinal microbiota, this pathogen has acquired specific metabolic traits to use compounds that are not metabolized by the commensal bacteria. For example, the utilization of 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD), a product of the fermentation of L-fucose, which is present in foods of herbal origin and is also a terminal sugar of gut mucins. Under anaerobic conditions and in the presence of tetrathionate, 1,2-PD can serve as an energy source for S. Typhimurium. Comprehensive database analysis revealed that the 1,2-PD and fucose utilization operons are present in all S. enterica serovars sequenced thus far. The operon, consisting of 21 genes, is expressed as a single polycistronic mRNA. As demonstrated here, 1,2-PD was formed and further used when S. Typhimurium strain 14028 was grown with L-fucose, and the gene fucA encoding L-fuculose-1-phosphate aldolase was required for this growth. Using promoter fusions, we monitored the expression of the propanediol utilization operon that was induced at very low concentrations of 1,2-PD and was inhibited by the presence of D-glucose.

  17. Genomic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium from Wild Passerines in England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Mather, Alison E; Lawson, Becki; de Pinna, Elizabeth; Wigley, Paul; Parkhill, Julian; Thomson, Nicholas R; Page, Andrew J; Holmes, Mark A; Paterson, Gavin K

    2016-11-15

    Passerine salmonellosis is a well-recognized disease of birds in the order Passeriformes, which includes common songbirds such as finches and sparrows, caused by infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Previous research has suggested that some subtypes of S Typhimurium-definitive phage types (DTs) 40, 56 variant, and 160-are host adapted to passerines and that these birds may represent a reservoir of infection for humans and other animals. Here, we have used the whole-genome sequences of 11 isolates from British passerines, five isolates of similar DTs from humans and a domestic cat, and previously published S Typhimurium genomes that include similar DTs from other hosts to investigate the phylogenetic relatedness of passerine salmonellae to other S Typhimurium isolates and investigate possible genetic features of the distinct disease pathogenesis of S Typhimurium in passerines. Our results demonstrate that the 11 passerine isolates and 13 other isolates, including those from nonpasserine hosts, were genetically closely related, with a median pairwise single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) difference of 130 SNPs. These 24 isolates did not carry antimicrobial resistance genetic determinants or the S Typhimurium virulence plasmid. Although our study does not provide evidence of Salmonella transmission from passerines to other hosts, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that wild birds represent a potential reservoir of these Salmonella subtypes, and thus, sensible personal hygiene precautions should be taken when feeding or handling garden birds.

  18. Genomic Variability of Serial Human Isolates of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Associated with Prolonged Carriage.

    PubMed

    Octavia, Sophie; Wang, Qinning; Tanaka, Mark M; Sintchenko, Vitali; Lan, Ruiting

    2015-11-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an important foodborne human pathogen that often causes self-limiting but severe gastroenteritis. Prolonged excretion of S. Typhimurium after the infection can lead to secondary transmissions. However, little is known about within-host genomic variation in bacteria associated with asymptomatic shedding. Genomes of 35 longitudinal isolates of S. Typhimurium recovered from 11 patients (children and adults) with culture-confirmed gastroenteritis were sequenced. There were three or four isolates obtained from each patient. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were analyzed in these isolates, which were recovered between 1 and 279 days after the initial diagnosis. Limited genomic variation (5 SNPs or fewer) was associated with short- and long-term carriage of S. Typhimurium. None of the isolates was shown to be due to reinfection. SNPs occurred randomly, and the majority of the SNPs were nonsynonymous. Two nonsense mutations were observed. A nonsense mutation in flhC rendered the isolate nonmotile, whereas the significance of a nonsense mutation in yihV is unknown. The estimated mutation rate is 1.49 × 10(-6) substitution per site per year. S. Typhimurium isolates excreted in stools following acute gastroenteritis in children and adults demonstrated limited genomic variability over time, regardless of the duration of carriage. These findings have important implications for the detection of possible transmission events suspected by public health genomic surveillance of S. Typhimurium infections.

  19. Interaction of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium with Intestinal Organoids Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Forbester, Jessica L; Goulding, David; Vallier, Ludovic; Hannan, Nicholas; Hale, Christine; Pickard, Derek; Mukhopadhyay, Subhankar; Dougan, Gordon

    2015-07-01

    The intestinal mucosa forms the first line of defense against infections mediated by enteric pathogens such as salmonellae. Here we exploited intestinal "organoids" (iHOs) generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPSCs) to explore the interaction of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium with iHOs. Imaging and RNA sequencing were used to analyze these interactions, and clear changes in transcriptional signatures were detected, including altered patterns of cytokine expression after the exposure of iHOs to bacteria. S. Typhimurium microinjected into the lumen of iHOs was able to invade the epithelial barrier, with many bacteria residing within Salmonella-containing vacuoles. An S. Typhimurium invA mutant defective in the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 invasion apparatus was less capable of invading the iHO epithelium. Hence, we provide evidence that hIPSC-derived organoids are a promising model of the intestinal epithelium for assessing interactions with enteric pathogens.

  20. Expression of cspH, encoding the cold shock protein in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium UK-1.

    PubMed

    Kim, B H; Bang, I S; Lee, S Y; Hong, S K; Bang, S H; Lee, I S; Park, Y K

    2001-10-01

    Both Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli contain the cspH gene encoding CspH, one of the cold shock proteins (CSPs). In this study, we investigated the expression of cspH in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and found that it was induced in response to a temperature downshift during exponential phase. The cspH promoter was activated at 37 degrees C, and its mRNA was more stable than the other csp mRNAs at 37 degrees C. Moreover, lacZ expression of the translational cspH-lacZ fusion was induced at that temperature. Interestingly, the cspH mRNA had a much shorter 5'-untranslated region than those in the other cold-shock-inducible genes, and the promoter sequence, which was only 55 bp, was sufficient for cspH expression. The 14-base downstream box located 12 bases downstream of the initiation codon of cspH mRNA was essential for its cold shock activation.

  1. Identification and functional analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium PmrA-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Rita; Prouty, Angela M; Gunn, John S

    2005-02-01

    The PmrA-PmrB two-component regulatory system of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is activated in vivo and plays an important role in resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides. Resistance is partly mediated by modifications to the lipopolysaccharide. To identify new PmrA-regulated genes, microarray analysis was undertaken comparing cDNA derived from PmrA-constitutive and PmrA-null strains. A combination of RT-PCR and transcriptional analysis confirmed the inclusion of six new loci in the PmrA-PmrB regulon: STM1253, STM1269, STM4118, STM0459, STM3968 and STM4568. These loci did not affect the ability to grow in high iron conditions, the ability to modify lipid A with aminoarabinose, or virulence. STM4118, a putative phosphoethanolamine phosphotransferase, had a minor effect on polymyxin resistance, whereas the remaining genes had no role in polymyxin resistance. Although several of the identified loci lacked the consensus PmrA binding site, PmrA was demonstrated to bind the promoter of a PmrA-activated gene lacking the consensus site. A more complete definition of the PmrA-PmrB regulon will provide a better understanding of its role in host and non-host environments.

  2. Effects of indole on drug resistance and virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium revealed by genome-wide analyses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria produce large quantities of indole as an intercellular signal in microbial communities. Indole demonstrated to affect gene expression in Escherichia coli as an intra-species signaling molecule. In contrast to E. coli, Salmonella does not produce indole because it does not harbor tnaA, which encodes the enzyme responsible for tryptophan metabolism. Our previous study demonstrated that E. coli-conditioned medium and indole induce expression of the AcrAB multidrug efflux pump in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium for inter-species communication; however, the global effect of indole on genes in Salmonella remains unknown. Results To understand the complete picture of genes regulated by indole, we performed DNA microarray analysis of genes in the S. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain ATCC 14028s affected by indole. Predicted Salmonella phenotypes affected by indole based on the microarray data were also examined in this study. Indole induced expression of genes related to efflux-mediated multidrug resistance, including ramA and acrAB, and repressed those related to host cell invasion encoded in the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1, and flagella production. Reduction of invasive activity and motility of Salmonella by indole was also observed phenotypically. Conclusion Our results suggest that indole is an important signaling molecule for inter-species communication to control drug resistance and virulence of S. enterica. PMID:22632036

  3. aroA-Deficient Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Is More Than a Metabolically Attenuated Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Frahm, Michael; Kocijancic, Dino; Rohde, Manfred; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Bielecka, Agata; Bueno, Emilio; Cava, Felipe; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer; Curtiss, Roy; Häussler, Susanne; Erhardt, Marc; Weiss, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recombinant attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains are believed to act as powerful live vaccine carriers that are able to elicit protection against various pathogens. Auxotrophic mutations, such as a deletion of aroA, are commonly introduced into such bacteria for attenuation without incapacitating immunostimulation. In this study, we describe the surprising finding that deletion of aroA dramatically increased the virulence of attenuated Salmonella in mouse models. Mutant bacteria lacking aroA elicited increased levels of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) after systemic application. A detailed genetic and phenotypic characterization in combination with transcriptomic and metabolic profiling demonstrated that ΔaroA mutants display pleiotropic alterations in cellular physiology and lipid and amino acid metabolism, as well as increased sensitivity to penicillin, complement, and phagocytic uptake. In concert with other immunomodulating mutations, deletion of aroA affected flagellin phase variation and gene expression of the virulence-associated genes arnT and ansB. Finally, ΔaroA strains displayed significantly improved tumor therapeutic activity. These results highlight the importance of a functional shikimate pathway to control homeostatic bacterial physiology. They further highlight the great potential of ΔaroA-attenuated Salmonella for the development of vaccines and cancer therapies with important implications for host-pathogen interactions and translational medicine. PMID:27601574

  4. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Exploits Inflammation to Modify Swine Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Drumo, Rosanna; Pesciaroli, Michele; Ruggeri, Jessica; Tarantino, Michela; Chirullo, Barbara; Pistoia, Claudia; Petrucci, Paola; Martinelli, Nicola; Moscati, Livia; Manuali, Elisabetta; Pavone, Silvia; Picciolini, Matteo; Ammendola, Serena; Gabai, Gianfranco; Battistoni, Andrea; Pezzotti, Giovanni; Alborali, Giovanni L.; Napolioni, Valerio; Pasquali, Paolo; Magistrali, Chiara F.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an important zoonotic gastrointestinal pathogen responsible for foodborne disease worldwide. It is a successful enteric pathogen because it has developed virulence strategies allowing it to survive in a highly inflamed intestinal environment exploiting inflammation to overcome colonization resistance provided by intestinal microbiota. In this study, we used piglets featuring an intact microbiota, which naturally develop gastroenteritis, as model for salmonellosis. We compared the effects on the intestinal microbiota induced by a wild type and an attenuated S. Typhimurium in order to evaluate whether the modifications are correlated with the virulence of the strain. This study showed that Salmonella alters microbiota in a virulence-dependent manner. We found that the wild type S. Typhimurium induced inflammation and a reduction of specific protecting microbiota species (SCFA-producing bacteria) normally involved in providing a barrier against pathogens. Both these effects could contribute to impair colonization resistance, increasing the host susceptibility to wild type S. Typhimurium colonization. In contrast, the attenuated S. Typhimurium, which is characterized by a reduced ability to colonize the intestine, and by a very mild inflammatory response, was unable to successfully sustain competition with the microbiota. PMID:26835435

  5. Chloramphenicol and tetracycline decrease motility and increase invasion and attachment gene expression in specific isolates of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is one of the most common serovars isolated from humans and livestock, and over 35 percent of these isolates are resistant to three or more antibiotics. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella is a public health concern as it is associated with i...

  6. Expression of STM4467-encoded arginine deiminase controlled by the STM4463 regulator contributes to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium virulence.

    PubMed

    Choi, Younho; Choi, Jeongjoon; Groisman, Eduardo A; Kang, Dong-Hyun; Shin, Dongwoo; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2012-12-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI), carbamate kinase (CK), and ornithine transcarbamoylase (OTC) constitute the ADI system. In addition to metabolic functions, the ADI system has been implicated in the virulence of certain pathogens. The pathogenic intracellular bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium possesses the STM4467, STM4466, and STM4465 genes, which are predicted to encode ADI, CK, and OTC, respectively. Here we report that the STM4467 gene encodes an ADI and that ADI activity plays a role in the successful infection of a mammalian host by S. Typhimurium. An STM4467 deletion mutant was defective for replication inside murine macrophages and was attenuated for virulence in mice. We determined that a regulatory protein encoded by the STM4463 gene functions as an activator for STM4467 expression. The expression of the ADI pathway genes was enhanced inside macrophages in a process that required STM4463. Lack of STM4463 impaired the ability of S. Typhimurium to replicate within macrophages. A mutant defective in STM4467-encoded ADI displayed normal production of nitric oxide by macrophages.

  7. Expression of STM4467-Encoded Arginine Deiminase Controlled by the STM4463 Regulator Contributes to Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Younho; Choi, Jeongjoon; Groisman, Eduardo A.; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI), carbamate kinase (CK), and ornithine transcarbamoylase (OTC) constitute the ADI system. In addition to metabolic functions, the ADI system has been implicated in the virulence of certain pathogens. The pathogenic intracellular bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium possesses the STM4467, STM4466, and STM4465 genes, which are predicted to encode ADI, CK, and OTC, respectively. Here we report that the STM4467 gene encodes an ADI and that ADI activity plays a role in the successful infection of a mammalian host by S. Typhimurium. An STM4467 deletion mutant was defective for replication inside murine macrophages and was attenuated for virulence in mice. We determined that a regulatory protein encoded by the STM4463 gene functions as an activator for STM4467 expression. The expression of the ADI pathway genes was enhanced inside macrophages in a process that required STM4463. Lack of STM4463 impaired the ability of S. Typhimurium to replicate within macrophages. A mutant defective in STM4467-encoded ADI displayed normal production of nitric oxide by macrophages. PMID:23006851

  8. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104.

    PubMed

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Hendriksen, Rene S; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Jun, Se-Ran; Ussery, David W; Lund, Ole; Crook, Derrick W; Wilson, Daniel J; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2016-04-01

    It has been 30 years since the initial emergence and subsequent rapid global spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella entericaserovar Typhimurium DT104 (MDR DT104). Nonetheless, its origin and transmission route have never been revealed. We used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and temporally structured sequence analysis within a Bayesian framework to reconstruct temporal and spatial phylogenetic trees and estimate the rates of mutation and divergence times of 315S Typhimurium DT104 isolates sampled from 1969 to 2012 from 21 countries on six continents. DT104 was estimated to have emerged initially as antimicrobial susceptible in ∼1948 (95% credible interval [CI], 1934 to 1962) and later became MDR DT104 in ∼1972 (95% CI, 1972 to 1988) through horizontal transfer of the 13-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) MDR region into susceptible strains already containing SGI1. This was followed by multiple transmission events, initially from central Europe and later between several European countries. An independent transmission to the United States and another to Japan occurred, and from there MDR DT104 was probably transmitted to Taiwan and Canada. An independent acquisition of resistance genes took place in Thailand in ∼1975 (95% CI, 1975 to 1990). In Denmark, WGS analysis provided evidence for transmission of the organism between herds of animals. Interestingly, the demographic history of Danish MDR DT104 provided evidence for the success of the program to eradicate Salmonellafrom pig herds in Denmark from 1996 to 2000. The results from this study refute several hypotheses on the evolution of DT104 and suggest that WGS may be useful in monitoring emerging clones and devising strategies for prevention of Salmonella infections.

  9. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ΔmsbB Triggers Exacerbated Inflammation in Nod2 Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Claes, Anne-Kathrin; Steck, Natalie; Schultz, Dorothee; Zähringer, Ulrich; Lipinski, Simone; Rosenstiel, Philip; Geddes, Kaoru; Philpott, Dana J.; Heine, Holger; Grassl, Guntram A.

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes intestinal inflammation characterized by edema, neutrophil influx and increased pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. A major bacterial factor inducing pro-inflammatory host responses is lipopolysaccharide (LPS). S. Typhimurium ΔmsbB possesses a modified lipid A, has reduced virulence in mice, and is being considered as a potential anti-cancer vaccine strain. The lack of a late myristoyl transferase, encoded by MsbB leads to attenuated TLR4 stimulation. However, whether other host receptor pathways are also altered remains unclear. Nod1 and Nod2 are cytosolic pattern recognition receptors recognizing bacterial peptidoglycan. They play important roles in the host's immune response to enteric pathogens and in immune homeostasis. Here, we investigated how deletion of msbB affects Salmonella's interaction with Nod1 and Nod2. S. Typhimurium Δ msbB-induced inflammation was significantly exacerbated in Nod2−/− mice compared to C57Bl/6 mice. In addition, S. Typhimurium ΔmsbB maintained robust intestinal colonization in Nod2−/− mice from day 2 to day 7 p.i., whereas colonization levels significantly decreased in C57Bl/6 mice during this time. Similarly, infection of Nod1−/− and Nod1/Nod2 double-knockout mice revealed that both Nod1 and Nod2 play a protective role in S. Typhimurium ΔmsbB-induced colitis. To elucidate why S. Typhimurium ΔmsbB, but not wild-type S. Typhimurium, induced an exacerbated inflammatory response in Nod2−/− mice, we used HEK293 cells which were transiently transfected with pathogen recognition receptors. Stimulation of TLR2-transfected cells with S. Typhimurium ΔmsbB resulted in increased IL-8 production compared to wild-type S. Typhimurium. Our results indicate that S. Typhimurium ΔmsbB triggers exacerbated colitis in the absence of Nod1 and/or Nod2, which is likely due to increased TLR2 stimulation. How bacteria with “genetically detoxified” LPS

  10. Increased efficacy of inactivated vaccine candidates prepared with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains of predominant genotypes in ducks.

    PubMed

    Youn, S Y; Kwon, Y K; Song, C S; Lee, H J; Jeong, O M; Choi, B K; Jung, S C; Kang, M S

    2016-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium has been a major causative agent of food-borne human disease, mainly due to consumption of contaminated food animal products. In particular, ducks serve as a reservoir of serovar Typhimurium, and are one of the common sources of human infection. To prevent infection of ducks, and therefore minimize human infection, it is critical to control the persistent epidemic strains in ducks. Here, we analyzed the genetic diversity and virulence of serovar Typhimurium isolates from ducks in Korea to identify the predominant strains that might be used as efficient vaccine candidates for ducks. Among the isolates, 2 representative isolates (ST26 and ST76) of predominant genotypes were selected as vaccine strains on the basis of genotypic analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and DNA microarrays. Two-week-old ducks were then injected intramuscularly with inactivated vaccine candidates prepared using ST26 or ST76 (10(8) cfu/0.5 mL/duck or 10(9) cfu/0.5 mL/duck), and oral challenge with a highly virulent serovar Typhimurium strain (10(9) cfu/0.5 mL/duck) was carried out 2 wk later. Shedding of the challenge strain was significantly decreased in group 2 after vaccination. The antibody levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in all vaccinated groups were enhanced significantly (P < 0.05) compared to the unvaccinated control group. Overall, vaccination with ST26 or ST76 reduced bacterial shedding and colonization in internal organs, and induced elevated antibody response. In particular, serovar Typhimurium ST26 (10(8) cfu/0.5 mL/duck) was the most effective vaccine candidate, which can provide efficient protection against serovar Typhimurium in ducks with higher effectiveness compared to a commercial vaccine currently used worldwide.

  11. Complete Genome and Methylome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovars Typhimurium, Saintpaul, and Stanleyville from the SARA/SARB Collection

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Kuan; Roberts, Richard J.; Allard, Marc W.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this announcement, we report the complete genome and methylome sequences of three Salmonella enterica strains from the SARA and SARB collection: S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (SARA13), S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Saintpaul (SARA26), and S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Stanleyville (SARB61). PMID:28302778

  12. An rfaH mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium is attenuated in swine and reduces intestinal colonization, fecal shedding, and disease severity due to virulent Salmonella Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine are often asymptomatic carriers of Salmonella spp., and interventions are needed to limit colonization of swine to enhance food safety and reduce environmental contamination. We evaluated the attenuation and potential vaccine use in pigs of a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutant of r...

  13. Infection of Mice by Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Involves Additional Genes That Are Absent in the Genome of Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Cecilia A.; Blondel, Carlos J.; Quezada, Carolina P.; Porwollik, Steffen; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L.; Toro, Cecilia S.; Zaldívar, Mercedes; Contreras, Inés

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis causes a systemic, typhoid-like infection in newly hatched poultry and mice. In the present study, a library of 54,000 transposon mutants of S. Enteritidis phage type 4 (PT4) strain P125109 was screened for mutants deficient in the in vivo colonization of the BALB/c mouse model using a microarray-based negative-selection screening. Mutants in genes known to contribute to systemic infection (e.g., Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 [SPI-2], aro, rfa, rfb, phoP, and phoQ) and enteric infection (e.g., SPI-1 and SPI-5) in this and other Salmonella serovars displayed colonization defects in our assay. In addition, a strong attenuation was observed for mutants in genes and genomic islands that are not present in S. Typhimurium or in most other Salmonella serovars. These genes include a type I restriction/modification system (SEN4290 to SEN4292), the peg fimbrial operon (SEN2144A to SEN2145B), a putative pathogenicity island (SEN1970 to SEN1999), and a type VI secretion system remnant SEN1001, encoding a hypothetical protein containing a lysin motif (LysM) domain associated with peptidoglycan binding. Proliferation defects for mutants in these individual genes and in exemplar genes for each of these clusters were confirmed in competitive infections with wild-type S. Enteritidis. A ΔSEN1001 mutant was defective for survival within RAW264.7 murine macrophages in vitro. Complementation assays directly linked the SEN1001 gene to phenotypes observed in vivo and in vitro. The genes identified here may perform novel virulence functions not characterized in previous Salmonella models. PMID:22083712

  14. Beneficial Effects of Sodium Phenylbutyrate Administration during Infection with Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Jellbauer, Stefan; Perez Lopez, Araceli; Behnsen, Judith; Gao, Nina; Nguyen, Thao; Murphy, Clodagh; Edwards, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Sodium phenylbutyrate (PBA) is a derivative of the short-chain fatty acid butyrate and is approved for treatment of urea cycle disorders and progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 2. Previously known functions include histone deacetylase inhibitor, endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitor, ammonia sink, and chemical chaperone. Here, we show that PBA has a previously undiscovered protective role in host mucosal defense during infection. Administration of PBA to Taconic mice resulted in the increase of intestinal Lactobacillales and segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB), as well as an increase of interleukin 17 (IL-17) production by intestinal cells. This effect was not observed in Jackson Laboratory mice, which are not colonized with SFB. Because previous studies showed that IL-17 plays a protective role during infection with mucosal pathogens, we hypothesized that Taconic mice treated with PBA would be more resistant to infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). By using the streptomycin-treated mouse model, we found that Taconic mice treated with PBA exhibited significantly lower S. Typhimurium intestinal colonization and dissemination to the reticuloendothelial system, as well as lower levels of inflammation. The lower levels of S. Typhimurium gut colonization and intestinal inflammation were not observed in Jackson Laboratory mice. Although PBA had no direct effect on bacterial replication, its administration reduced S. Typhimurium epithelial cell invasion and lowered the induction of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-23 in macrophage-like cells. These effects likely contributed to the better outcome of infection in PBA-treated mice. Overall, our results suggest that PBA induces changes in the microbiota and in the mucosal immune response that can be beneficial to the host during infection with S. Typhimurium and possibly other enteric pathogens. PMID:27382022

  15. Genome Sequence of Bacteriophage GG32, Which Can Infect both Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Su-Jin; Kwon, Taesoo; Lee, Sunjin; Kang, Yeon Ho; Chung, Gyung Tae

    2016-01-01

    We report here a new virulent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) bacteriophage, GG32, which was isolated from the Guem River in the Republic of Korea. The strain can infect both S. Typhimurium and Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 and may be a good candidate for a bio-control agent. PMID:27932635

  16. In Vitro Development of Ciprofloxacin Resistance of Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhimurium, Enteritidis, and Indiana Isolates from Food Animals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Chuan-Zhen; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Gu, Xi-Xi; Li, Wan; Yang, Ling; Liu, Ya-Hong; Zeng, Zhen-Ling; Jiang, Hong-Xia

    2017-01-13

    Difference in the development of resistance may be associated with the epidemiological spread and drug resistance of different Salmonella enterica serovar strains. In the present study, three susceptible S. enterica serovars, Typhimurium (ST), Enteritidis (SE), and Indiana (SI) strains, were subjected to stepwise selection with increasing ciprofloxacin concentrations. The results indicated that the mutation frequencies of the SI group were 10(1)-10(4) higher and developed resistance to ciprofloxacin more rapidly compared with the ST and SE groups. Ciprofloxacin accumulation in the SI strain was also higher than the other two strains in the presence of an efflux pump inhibitor. The development of ciprofloxacin resistance was quite different among the three serovar strains. In SI, increasing AcrAB-TolC efflux pump expression and single or double mutations in gyrA with or without a single parC mutation (T57S) were found in the development of ciprofloxacin resistance. In SE, an increase in the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump regulatory gene ramA gradually decreased as resistant bacteria developed; then resistance resulted from gyrA D87G and gyrB E466D mutations and/or in other active efflux pumps besides AcrAB-TolC. For ST, ramA expression increased rapidly along with gyrA D87 N and/or gyrB S464F mutations. In conclusion, persistent use of ciprofloxacin may aggravate the resistance of different S. enterica serovars and prudent use of the fluoroquinolones is needed. The quicker resistance and higher mutation frequency of the SI isolates present a potential public health threat.

  17. Interaction between Host Cells and Septicemic Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Isolates from Pigs ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Nadia; Corriveau, Jonathan; Letellier, Ann; Daigle, France; Lessard, Louise; Quessy, Sylvain

    2009-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an important pathogen in swine and is also a frequently reported zoonotic agent. The objective of this study was to characterize isolates of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium associated with septicemia in swine and to compare them to isolates recovered from clinically healthy pigs. We were particularly interested in comparing the two groups of isolates for their ability to adhere to and invade host cells, to be phagocytized and survive in monocyte cells, to induce apoptosis, and to adhere to intestinal mucus. Their surface properties were also evaluated by interactions with solvents. The isolates recovered from diseased animals were shown to invade intestinal epithelial cell lines at a higher rate (P = 0.003) than isolates from healthy pigs. Septicemic isolates were phagocytized by human monocytes at a higher rate than isolates from healthy pigs (P = 0.009). The mean percentages of phagocytosis were significantly lower for human monocytes than for porcine monocytes (P = 0.02 and P = 0.008, respectively) for isolates from both diseased and healthy animals. Healthy animal isolates were phagocytized more by porcine monocytes at 15 min (P = 0.02) than septicemic isolates. No difference between isolates from septicemic pigs and isolates from healthy pigs was detected for other tested parameters. These results suggest that septicemic isolates have a particular pattern of invasion. PMID:19710281

  18. Iron-induced virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium at the intestinal epithelial interface can be suppressed by carvacrol.

    PubMed

    Kortman, Guus A M; Roelofs, Rian W H M; Swinkels, Dorine W; de Jonge, Marien I; Burt, Sara A; Tjalsma, Harold

    2014-01-01

    Oral iron therapy can increase the abundance of bacterial pathogens, e.g., Salmonella spp., in the large intestine of African children. Carvacrol is a natural compound with antimicrobial activity against various intestinal bacterial pathogens, among which is the highly prevalent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. This study aimed to explore a presumed interaction between carvacrol and bacterial iron handling and to assess the potential of carvacrol in preventing the increase of bacterial pathogenicity during high iron availability. S. Typhimurium was cultured with increasing concentrations of iron and carvacrol to study the effects of these combined interventions on growth, adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells, and iron uptake/influx in both bacterial and epithelial cells. In addition, the ability of carvacrol to remove iron from the high-affinity ligand transferrin and an Fe-dye complex was examined. Carvacrol retarded growth of S. Typhimurium at all iron conditions. Furthermore, iron-induced epithelial adhesion was effectively reduced by carvacrol at high iron concentrations. The reduction of growth and virulence by carvacrol was not paralleled by a change in iron uptake or influx into S. Typhimurium. In contrast, bioavailability of iron for epithelial cells was moderately decreased under these conditions. Further, carvacrol was shown to lack the properties of an iron binding molecule; however, it was able to weaken iron-ligand interactions by which it may possibly interfere with bacterial virulence. In conclusion, our in vitro data suggest that carvacrol has the potential to serve as a novel dietary supplement to prevent pathogenic overgrowth and colonization in the large intestine during oral iron therapy.

  19. Molecular and Functional Characterization of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium poxA Gene: Effect on Attenuation of Virulence and Protection

    PubMed Central

    Kaniga, Koné; Compton, Melissa S.; Curtiss, Roy; Sundaram, Preeti

    1998-01-01

    Salmonella enterica poxA mutants exhibit a pleiotropic phenotype, including reduced pyruvate oxidase activity; reduced growth rate; and hypersensitivity to the herbicide sulfometuron methyl, α-ketobutyrate, and amino acid analogs. These mutants also failed to grow in the presence of the host antimicrobial peptide, protamine. In this study, PoxA− mutants of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) were found to be 10,000-fold attenuated in orally inoculated BALB/c mice and 1,000-fold attenuated in intraperitoneally inoculated BALB/c mice, compared to wild-type S. typhimurium UK-1. In addition, poxA mutants were found to be capable of colonizing the spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes, and Peyer’s patches; to induce strong humoral immune responses; and to protect mice against a lethal wild-type Salmonella challenge. A 2-kb DNA fragment was isolated from wild-type S. typhimurium UK-1 based on its ability to complement an isogenic poxA mutant. The nucleotide sequence of this DNA fragment revealed an open reading frame of 325 amino acids capable of encoding a polypeptide of 36.8 kDa that was confirmed in the bacteriophage T7 expression system. Comparison of the translated sequence to the available databases indicated high homology to a family of lysyl-tRNA synthetases. Our results indicate that a mutation of poxA has an attenuating effect on Salmonella virulence. Further, poxA mutants are immunogenic and could be useful in designing live vaccines with a variety of bacterial species. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the effect of poxA mutation on bacterial virulence. PMID:9826331

  20. Iron-Induced Virulence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium at the Intestinal Epithelial Interface Can Be Suppressed by Carvacrol

    PubMed Central

    Kortman, Guus A. M.; Roelofs, Rian W. H. M.; Swinkels, Dorine W.; de Jonge, Marien I.; Burt, Sara A.

    2014-01-01

    Oral iron therapy can increase the abundance of bacterial pathogens, e.g., Salmonella spp., in the large intestine of African children. Carvacrol is a natural compound with antimicrobial activity against various intestinal bacterial pathogens, among which is the highly prevalent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. This study aimed to explore a presumed interaction between carvacrol and bacterial iron handling and to assess the potential of carvacrol in preventing the increase of bacterial pathogenicity during high iron availability. S. Typhimurium was cultured with increasing concentrations of iron and carvacrol to study the effects of these combined interventions on growth, adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells, and iron uptake/influx in both bacterial and epithelial cells. In addition, the ability of carvacrol to remove iron from the high-affinity ligand transferrin and an Fe-dye complex was examined. Carvacrol retarded growth of S. Typhimurium at all iron conditions. Furthermore, iron-induced epithelial adhesion was effectively reduced by carvacrol at high iron concentrations. The reduction of growth and virulence by carvacrol was not paralleled by a change in iron uptake or influx into S. Typhimurium. In contrast, bioavailability of iron for epithelial cells was moderately decreased under these conditions. Further, carvacrol was shown to lack the properties of an iron binding molecule; however, it was able to weaken iron-ligand interactions by which it may possibly interfere with bacterial virulence. In conclusion, our in vitro data suggest that carvacrol has the potential to serve as a novel dietary supplement to prevent pathogenic overgrowth and colonization in the large intestine during oral iron therapy. PMID:24379194

  1. Hydrogen-Stimulated Carbon Acquisition and Conservation in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium ▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Lamichhane-Khadka, Reena; Frye, Jonathan G.; Porwollik, Steffen; McClelland, Michael; Maier, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium can utilize molecular hydrogen for growth and amino acid transport during anaerobic growth. Via microarray we identified H2 gas-affected gene expression changes in Salmonella. The addition of H2 caused altered expression of 597 genes, of which 176 genes were upregulated and 421 were downregulated. The significantly H2-upregulated genes include those that encode proteins involved in the transport of iron, manganese, amino acids, nucleosides, and sugars. Genes encoding isocitrate lyase (aceA) and malate synthase (aceB), both involved in the carbon conserving glyoxylate pathway, and genes encoding the enzymes of the d-glucarate and d-glycerate pathways (gudT, gudD, garR, garL, garK) are significantly upregulated by H2. Cells grown with H2 showed markedly increased AceA enzyme activity compared to cells without H2. Mutant strains with deletion of either aceA or aceB had reduced H2-dependent growth rates. Genes encoding the glutamine-specific transporters (glnH, glnP, glnQ) were upregulated by H2, and cells grown with H2 showed increased [14C]glutamine uptake. Similarly, the mannose uptake system genes (manX, manY) were upregulated by H2, and cells grown with H2 showed about 2.0-fold-increased [14C]d-mannose uptake compared to the cells grown without H2. Hydrogen stimulates the expression of genes involved in nutrient and carbon acquisition and carbon-conserving pathways, linking carbon and energy metabolism to sustain H2-dependent growth. PMID:21856852

  2. Natural surface coating to inactivate Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and maintain quality of cherry tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Yun, Juan; Fan, Xuetong; Li, Xihong; Jin, Tony Z; Jia, Xiaoyu; Mattheis, James P

    2015-01-16

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of zein-based coatings in reducing populations of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and preserving quality of cherry tomatoes. Tomatoes were inoculated with a cocktail of S. Typhimurium LT2 plus three attenuated strains on the smooth skin surface and stem scar area. The zein-based coatings with and without cinnamon (up to 20%) and mustard essential oil or a commercial wax formulation were applied onto tomatoes and the treated fruits were stored at 10 °C for up to 3 weeks. Populations of S. Typhimurium decreased with increased essential oil concentration and storage duration. S. Typhimurium populations on the smooth skin surface were reduced by 4.6 and 2.8 log colony forming units(CFU)/g by the zein coatings with 20% cinnamon and 20% mustard oil, respectively, 5h after coating. The same coating reduced populations of S. Typhimurium to levels below detection limit (1.0 log CFU/g) on the stem scar area of tomato during 7 days of storage at 10 °C. Salmonella populations were not reduced on fruit coated with the commercial wax. All of the coatings resulted in reduced weight loss compared with uncoated control. Compared with the control, loss of firmness and ascorbic acid during storage was prevented by all of the coatings except the zein coating with 20% mustard oil which enhanced softening. Color was not consistently affected by any of the coating treatments during 21 days of storage at 10°C. The results suggest that the zein-based coating containing cinnamon oil might be used to enhance microbial safety and quality of tomato.

  3. Tetracycline accelerates the temporally-regulated invasion response in specific isolates of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella is associated with increased morbidity compared to antibiotic-sensitive strains and is an important health and safety concern in both humans and animals. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a prevalent cause of foodborne disease, and a consider...

  4. Molecular profiling: Catecholamine modulation of gene expression in Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Investigations of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium have demonstrated that these bacterial pathogens can respond to the presence of catecholamines including norepinephrine and/or epinephrine in their environment by modulating gene expression and exhibiting various ...

  5. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Strains of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Displaying Different Virulence in an Experimental Chicken Model

    PubMed Central

    Blais, Burton; Huang, Hongsheng; Wang, Linru; Elmufti, Mohamed; Allain, Ray; Hazelwood, Jennifer; Grenier, Chris; Amoako, Kingsley; Savic, Mirjana; Fattahi Ghazi, Nashmil

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains 22495 and 22792, obtained from wild birds, were found to display different virulence attributes in an experimental chicken model. Closed genome sequences were assembled after sequencing with the Roche 454 and Illumina MiSeq platforms. An additional plasmid was present in the more virulent strain 22495. PMID:28183752

  6. Correlating Blood Immune Parameters and a CCT7 Genetic Variant with the Shedding of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the current study, 40 crossbred pigs were intranasally inoculated with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and monitored for Salmonella fecal shedding and blood immune parameters at 2, 7, 14 and 20 days post-inoculation (dpi). Using a multivariate permutation test, a positive correlation was...

  7. Emergence of Clinical Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Isolates with Concurrent Resistance to Ciprofloxacin, Ceftriaxone, and Azithromycin

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Marcus Ho Yin; Yan, Meiying; Chan, Edward Wai Chi; Biao, Kan

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella infection is an important public health issue for which the needs of antimicrobial treatment are increasing. A total of 546 human clinical S. enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates were recovered from patients in hospitals in China during the period of 2005 to ∼2011. Twenty percent of the isolates exhibited resistance to ciprofloxacin, and 4% were resistant to ceftriaxone. Importantly, for the first time, 12 (2%) S. Typhimurium isolates resistant to both ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone were recovered; among these 12 isolates, two were also resistant to azithromycin, and one was resistant to all other drugs tested. The combined effects of various transferrable extended-spectrum β-lactamase determinants and a novel efflux-based ciprofloxacin resistance mechanism encoded by the mobile efflux gene oqxAB were responsible for the emergence of these extremely (highly) drug-resistant (XDR) S. Typhimurium isolates. The dissemination of resistance genes, such as those encoding ESBLs and the OqxAB pump, among Salmonella organisms will speed up the selection of XDR Salmonella, posing a huge threat to public health and Salmonella infection control. PMID:24752251

  8. Structural and Functional Characterization of Three DsbA Paralogues from Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium*

    PubMed Central

    Heras, Begoña; Totsika, Makrina; Jarrott, Russell; Shouldice, Stephen R.; Gunčar, Gregor; Achard, Maud E. S.; Wells, Timothy J.; Argente, M. Pilar; McEwan, Alastair G.; Schembri, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    In prototypic Escherichia coli K-12 the introduction of disulfide bonds into folding proteins is mediated by the Dsb family of enzymes, primarily through the actions of the highly oxidizing protein EcDsbA. Homologues of the Dsb catalysts are found in most bacteria. Interestingly, pathogens have developed distinct Dsb machineries that play a pivotal role in the biogenesis of virulence factors, hence contributing to their pathogenicity. Salmonella enterica serovar (sv.) Typhimurium encodes an extended number of sulfhydryl oxidases, namely SeDsbA, SeDsbL, and SeSrgA. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of the sv. Typhimurium thiol oxidative system through the structural and functional characterization of the three Salmonella DsbA paralogues. The three proteins share low sequence identity, which results in several unique three-dimensional characteristics, principally in areas involved in substrate binding and disulfide catalysis. Furthermore, the Salmonella DsbA-like proteins also have different redox properties. Whereas functional characterization revealed some degree of redundancy, the properties of SeDsbA, SeDsbL, and SeSrgA and their expression pattern in sv. Typhimurium indicate a diverse role for these enzymes in virulence. PMID:20233716

  9. Curcumin increases the pathogenicity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in murine model.

    PubMed

    Marathe, Sandhya A; Ray, Seemun; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2010-07-09

    Curcumin has gained immense importance for its vast therapeutic and prophylactic applications. Contrary to this, our study reveals that it regulates the defense pathways of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) to enhance its pathogenicity. In a murine model of typhoid fever, we observed higher bacterial load in Peyer's patches, mesenteric lymph node, spleen and liver, when infected with curcumin-treated Salmonella. Curcumin increased the resistance of S. Typhimurium against antimicrobial agents like antimicrobial peptides, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. This increased tolerance might be attributed to the up-regulation of genes involved in resistance against antimicrobial peptides--pmrD and pmrHFIJKLM and genes with antioxidant function--mntH, sodA and sitA. We implicate that iron chelation property of curcumin have a role in regulating mntH and sitA. Interestingly, we see that the curcumin-mediated modulation of pmr genes is through the PhoPQ regulatory system. Curcumin downregulates SPI1 genes, required for entry into epithelial cells and upregulates SPI2 genes required to intracellular survival. Since it is known that the SPI1 and SPI2 system can be regulated by the PhoPQ system, this common regulator could explain curcumin's mode of action. This data urges us to rethink the indiscriminate use of curcumin especially during Salmonella outbreaks.

  10. Spatial Segregation of Virulence Gene Expression during Acute Enteric Infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Richard C.; Knodler, Leigh A.; Barhoumi, Roula; Payne, H. Ross; Wu, Jing; Gomez, Gabriel; Pugh, Roberta; Lawhon, Sara D.; Bäumler, Andreas J.; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia; Adams, L. Garry

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To establish a replicative niche during its infectious cycle between the intestinal lumen and tissue, the enteric pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium requires numerous virulence genes, including genes for two type III secretion systems (T3SS) and their cognate effectors. To better understand the host-pathogen relationship, including early infection dynamics and induction kinetics of the bacterial virulence program in the context of a natural host, we monitored the subcellular localization and temporal expression of T3SS-1 and T3SS-2 using fluorescent single-cell reporters in a bovine, ligated ileal loop model of infection. We observed that the majority of bacteria at 2 h postinfection are flagellated, express T3SS-1 but not T3SS-2, and are associated with the epithelium or with extruding enterocytes. In epithelial cells, S. Typhimurium cells were surrounded by intact vacuolar membranes or present within membrane-compromised vacuoles that typically contained numerous vesicular structures. By 8 h postinfection, T3SS-2-expressing bacteria were detected in the lamina propria and in the underlying mucosa, while T3SS-1-expressing bacteria were in the lumen. Our work identifies for the first time the temporal and spatial regulation of T3SS-1 and -2 expression during an enteric infection in a natural host and provides further support for the concept of cytosolic S. Typhimurium in extruding epithelium as a mechanism for reseeding the lumen. PMID:24496791

  11. Characterization of the yehUT two-component regulatory system of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi and Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Wong, Vanessa K; Pickard, Derek J; Barquist, Lars; Sivaraman, Karthikeyan; Page, Andrew J; Hart, Peter J; Arends, Mark J; Holt, Kathryn E; Kane, Leanne; Mottram, Lynda F; Ellison, Louise; Bautista, Ruben; McGee, Chris J; Kay, Sally J; Wileman, Thomas M; Kenney, Linda J; MacLennan, Calman A; Kingsley, Robert A; Dougan, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Proteins exhibiting hyper-variable sequences within a bacterial pathogen may be associated with host adaptation. Several lineages of the monophyletic pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) have accumulated non-synonymous mutations in the putative two-component regulatory system yehUT. Consequently we evaluated the function of yehUT in S. Typhi BRD948 and S. Typhimurium ST4/74. Transcriptome analysis identified the cstA gene, encoding a carbon starvation protein as the predominantly yehUT regulated gene in both these serovars. Deletion of yehUT had no detectable effect on the ability of these mutant Salmonella to invade cultured epithelial cells (S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium) or induce colitis in a murine model (S. Typhimurium only). Growth, metabolic and antimicrobial susceptibility tests identified no obvious influences of yehUT on these phenotypes.

  12. Mapping the Regulatory Network for Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Carol; Stringer, Anne M.; Mao, Chunhong; Palumbo, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) encodes proteins required for invasion of gut epithelial cells. The timing of invasion is tightly controlled by a complex regulatory network. The transcription factor (TF) HilD is the master regulator of this process and senses environmental signals associated with invasion. HilD activates transcription of genes within and outside SPI-1, including six other TFs. Thus, the transcriptional program associated with host cell invasion is controlled by at least 7 TFs. However, very few of the regulatory targets are known for these TFs, and the extent of the regulatory network is unclear. In this study, we used complementary genomic approaches to map the direct regulatory targets of all 7 TFs. Our data reveal a highly complex and interconnected network that includes many previously undescribed regulatory targets. Moreover, the network extends well beyond the 7 TFs, due to the inclusion of many additional TFs and noncoding RNAs. By comparing gene expression profiles of regulatory targets for the 7 TFs, we identified many uncharacterized genes that are likely to play direct roles in invasion. We also uncovered cross talk between SPI-1 regulation and other regulatory pathways, which, in turn, identified gene clusters that likely share related functions. Our data are freely available through an intuitive online browser and represent a valuable resource for the bacterial research community. PMID:27601571

  13. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contaminated eggs produced by infected commercial laying flocks are often implicated as sources of human infections with Salmonella Enteritidis, but Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium have also been significantly associated with egg-transmitted illness. Contamination of the edible conten...

  14. Microgravity as a novel environmental signal affecting Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium virulence.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, C A; Ott, C M; Mister, S J; Morrow, B J; Burns-Keliher, L; Pierson, D L

    2000-06-01

    The effects of spaceflight on the infectious disease process have only been studied at the level of the host immune response and indicate a blunting of the immune mechanism in humans and animals. Accordingly, it is necessary to assess potential changes in microbial virulence associated with spaceflight which may impact the probability of in-flight infectious disease. In this study, we investigated the effect of altered gravitational vectors on Salmonella virulence in mice. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium grown under modeled microgravity (MMG) were more virulent and were recovered in higher numbers from the murine spleen and liver following oral infection compared to organisms grown under normal gravity. Furthermore, MMG-grown salmonellae were more resistant to acid stress and macrophage killing and exhibited significant differences in protein synthesis than did normal-gravity-grown cells. Our results indicate that the environment created by simulated microgravity represents a novel environmental regulatory factor of Salmonella virulence.

  15. Microgravity as a novel environmental signal affecting Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium virulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickerson, C. A.; Ott, C. M.; Mister, S. J.; Morrow, B. J.; Burns-Keliher, L.; Pierson, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight on the infectious disease process have only been studied at the level of the host immune response and indicate a blunting of the immune mechanism in humans and animals. Accordingly, it is necessary to assess potential changes in microbial virulence associated with spaceflight which may impact the probability of in-flight infectious disease. In this study, we investigated the effect of altered gravitational vectors on Salmonella virulence in mice. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium grown under modeled microgravity (MMG) were more virulent and were recovered in higher numbers from the murine spleen and liver following oral infection compared to organisms grown under normal gravity. Furthermore, MMG-grown salmonellae were more resistant to acid stress and macrophage killing and exhibited significant differences in protein synthesis than did normal-gravity-grown cells. Our results indicate that the environment created by simulated microgravity represents a novel environmental regulatory factor of Salmonella virulence.

  16. Effect of EDTA on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium involves a component not assignable to lipopolysaccharide release.

    PubMed

    Alakomi, H-L; Saarela, M; Helander, I M

    2003-08-01

    The effect of EDTA on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was studied in different growth phases with cells grown with or without Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) supplementation. EDTA affected the outer membrane much more strongly in the early exponential phase than in the mid- or late exponential phase, as indicated by uptake of 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (a nonpolar hydrophobic probe, M(r) 219), and detergent (SDS) susceptibility. This effect was, however, not paralleled by LPS release (determined by measuring LPS-specific fatty acids or 14C-labelled LPS in cell-free supernatants, per a standardized cell density), which remained unchanged as a function of the growth curve. The conclusion from these results is that in the early exponential phase the effect of EDTA in S. enterica involves a component that is independent of LPS release.

  17. The role of flagella and chemotaxis genes in host pathogen interaction of the host adapted Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin compared to the broad host range serovar S. Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of flagella and chemotaxis genes in host pathogen interaction in Salmonella enterica is mainly based on studies of the broad host range serovar, S. Typhimurium, while little is known on the importance in host specific and host adapted serovars, such as S. Dublin. In the current study we have used previously characterized insertion mutants in flagella and chemotaxis genes to investigate this and possible differences in the importance between the two serovars. Results fliC (encoding the structural protein of the flagella) was essential for adhesion and fliC and cheB (CheB restores the chemotaxis system to pre-stimulus conformation) were essential for invasion of S. Dublin into epithelial Int407 cells. In S. Typhimurium, both lack of flagella (fliC/fljB double mutant) and cheB influenced adhesion, and invasion was influenced by lack of both cheA (the histidine-kinase of the chemotaxis system), fliC/fljB and cheB mutation. Uptake in J774A.1 macrophage cells was significantly reduced in cheA, cheB and fliC mutants of S. Dublin, while cheA was dispensable in S. Typhimurium. Removal of flagella in both serotypes caused an increased ability to propagate intracellular in J774 macrophage cells and decreased cytotoxicity toward these cells. Flagella and chemotaxis genes were found not to influence the oxidative response. The induction of IL-6 from J774A-1 cells depended on the presence of flagella in S. Typhimurium, whilst this was not the case following challenge with S. Dublin. Addition of fliC from S. Typhimurium in trans to a fliC mutant of S. Dublin increased cytotoxicity but it did not increase the IL-6 production. Flagella were demonstrated to contribute to the outcome of infection following oral challenge of mice in S. Dublin, while an S. Typhimurium fliC/fljB mutant showed increased virulence following intra peritoneal challenge. Conclusions The results showed that flagella and chemotaxis genes differed in their role in host pathogen

  18. Hydrosol of Thymbra capitata Is a Highly Efficient Biocide against Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Karampoula, Foteini; Deschamps, Julien; Doulgeraki, Agapi I.; Nychas, George-John E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella is recognized as one of the most significant enteric foodborne bacterial pathogens. In recent years, the resistance of pathogens to biocides and other environmental stresses, especially when they are embedded in biofilm structures, has led to the search for and development of novel antimicrobial strategies capable of displaying both high efficiency and safety. In this direction, the aims of the present work were to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of hydrosol of the Mediterranean spice Thymbra capitata against both planktonic and biofilm cells of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and to compare its action with that of benzalkonium chloride (BC), a commonly used industrial biocide. In order to achieve this, the disinfectant activity following 6-min treatments was comparatively evaluated for both disinfectants by calculating the concentrations needed to achieve the same log reductions against both types of cells. Their bactericidal effect against biofilm cells was also comparatively determined by in situ and real-time visualization of cell inactivation through the use of time-lapse confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Interestingly, results revealed that hydrosol was almost equally effective against biofilms and planktonic cells, whereas a 200-times-higher concentration of BC was needed to achieve the same effect against biofilm compared to planktonic cells. Similarly, time-lapse CLSM revealed the significant advantage of the hydrosol to easily penetrate within the biofilm structure and quickly kill the cells, despite the three-dimensional (3D) structure of Salmonella biofilm. IMPORTANCE The results of this paper highlight the significant antimicrobial action of a natural compound, hydrosol of Thymbra capitata, against both planktonic and biofilm cells of a common foodborne pathogen. Hydrosol has numerous advantages as a disinfectant of food-contact surfaces. It is an aqueous solution which can easily be rinsed out from surfaces, it

  19. Rescuing chemotaxis of the anticancer agent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium VNP20009.

    PubMed

    Broadway, Katherine M; Denson, Elizabeth A P; Jensen, Roderick V; Scharf, Birgit E

    2015-10-10

    The role of chemotaxis and motility in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium tumor colonization remains unclear. We determined through swim plate assays that the well-established anticancer agent S. Typhimurium VNP20009 is deficient in chemotaxis, and that this phenotype is suppressible. Through genome sequencing, we revealed that VNP20009 and four selected suppressor mutants had a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in cheY causing a mutation in the conserved proline residue at position 110. CheY is the response regulator that interacts with the flagellar motor-switch complex and modulates rotational bias. The four suppressor mutants additionally carried non-synonymous SNPs in fliM encoding a flagellar switch protein. The CheY-P110S mutation in VNP20009 likely rendered the protein unable to interact with FliM, a phenotype that could be suppressed by mutations in FliM. We replaced the mutated cheY in VNP20009 with the wild-type copy and chemotaxis was partially restored. The swim ring of the rescued strain, VNP20009 cheY(+), was 46% the size of the parental strain 14028 swim ring. When tested in capillary assays, VNP20009 cheY(+) was 69% efficient in chemotaxis towards the attractant aspartate as compared to 14028. Potential reasons for the lack of complete restoration and implications for bacterial tumor colonization will be discussed.

  20. Molecular characterization of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT1 isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, N.; Heinikainen, S.; Siitonen, A.; Pelkonen, S.

    2004-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium DT1 is endemic to Finland and has caused human outbreaks since the 1960s. Domestic DT1 isolates (n=235) from 1972 to 1999 from human cases, animals and other sources, as well as foreign DT1 isolates from human cases (n=20) were analysed by molecular methods. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) yielded 38 XbaI profiles. Of these, XbaI profile 10 was seen in 49% (125/255) of the isolates. Twelve IS200 profiles were obtained; the most common IS200 profile D was seen in 64% (33/52) of the isolates. Two clusters were formed by compilation of the XhaI-, BlnI- and SpeI-PFGE and IS200 profiles and possession of the serovar-specific virulence plasmid. The major cluster contained eight IS200 profiles, including IS200 profile D and XhaI profile 10, and had no virulence plasmid, and can be regarded as typical of the endemic Typhimurium DT1 infection. PMID:15061501

  1. Stress-induced prophage DNA replication in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Russell, Nathalie; Elrod, Brandon; Dominguez, Katrina

    2009-09-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium, a foodborne pathogen, is the cause of new outbreaks every year. The virulence of new pathogens is determined by their virulence genes, many of them carried on transferable elements, such as prophages. In bacteria harboring multiple prophages such as Salmonella, the reassortment of these genes plays a major role in the emergence of new pathogens and consequently new epidemics. This gene transfer depends on prophage induction and the initiation of the phage lytic cycle. In the present study we have tested the effects of bacterial extracytoplasmic stress on prophage induction. We developed a quantitative real-time PCR assay to quantify variations in phage genes copy number, representative of phage DNA replication associated with the initiation of the lytic cycle. The induction of the four Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 prophages (Fels-1, Fels-2, Gifsy-1 and Gifsy-2) was measured during exponential growth, stationary phase, starvation, as well as after treatment with Mitomycin C, Ampicillin or heat. Our results show that the four prophages respond differently to each treatment. Gifsy-2 showed constant low level of induction independently of the extracytoplasmic stress, Fels-1 was strongly induced after DNA damage, Fels-2 showed spontaneous induction only during optimal bacterial growth, and Gifsy-1 was repressed in all conditions. These findings show that the transfer of virulence genes can respond to and depend on variations of the bacterial surrounding conditions, and help to explain the appearance of new Salmonella outbreaks.

  2. Epidemiology of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium isolates from food-producing animals in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A total of 225 isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium from food-producing animals collected between 2003 and 2007 were examined for the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants, namely qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS, qepA and aac(6')Ib-cr, in Japan. Two isolates (0.8%) of S. Typhimurium DT104 from different dairy cows on a single farm in 2006 and 2007 were found to have qnrS1 on a plasmid of approximately 9.6-kbp. None of the S. Typhimurium isolates had qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qepA and acc(6')-Ib-cr. Currently in Japan, the prevalence of the PMQR genes among S. Typhimurium isolates from food animals may remain low or restricted. The PFGE profile of two S. Typhimurium DT104 isolates without qnrS1 on the farm in 2005 had an identical PFGE profile to those of two S. Typhimurium DT104 isolates with qnrS1. The PFGE analysis suggested that the already existing S. Typhimurium DT104 on the farm fortuitously acquired the qnrS1 plasmid. PMID:21138594

  3. A Mutation in the PoxA Gene of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Results in Altered Protein Production, Elevated Susceptibility to Environmental Challenges, and Decreased Swine Colonization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using signature-tagged mutagenesis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), a mutation in the poxA gene (STM4344; yjeA; poxR), encoding a putative lysyl-tRNA synthetase, was previously identified by our research group which caused decreased survival in an ex vivo swine stomach co...

  4. Iron regulated genes of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in response to norepinephrine and the requirement of fepCDG for norepinephrine-enhanced growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of catecholamines in vivo may stimulate enteric bacteria including the foodborne pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by two mechanisms, acting as a quorum sensing signal and providing iron in the presence of serum. To identify genes of Salmonella Typhimurium that participa...

  5. The Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium QseB Response Regulator Negatively Regulates Bacterial Motility and Swine Colonization in the Absence of the QseC Sensor Kinase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) responds to the catecholamine, norepinephrine by increasing bacterial growth and enhancing motility. In this study, iron with or without the siderophore, ferrioxamine E also enhanced bacterial motility. Iron-enhanced motility was growth-rate ...

  6. Exposure of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium to Three Humectants Used in the Food Industry Induces Different Osmoadaptation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Sarah; Rogers, Lisa; Händler, Kristian; McClure, Peter; Amézquita, Alejandro; Hinton, Jay C. D.

    2015-01-01

    Common salt (NaCl) is frequently used by the food industry to add flavor and to act as a humectant in order to reduce the water content of a food product. The improved health awareness of consumers is leading to a demand for food products with reduced salt content; thus, manufacturers require alternative water activity-reducing agents which elicit the same general effects as NaCl. Two examples include KCl and glycerol. These agents lower the water activity of a food matrix and also contribute to limit the growth of the microbiota, including foodborne pathogens. Little is currently known about how foodborne pathogens respond to these water activity-lowering agents. Here we examined the response of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium 4/74 to NaCl, KCl, and glycerol at three time points, using a constant water activity level, compared with the response of a control inoculum. All conditions induced the upregulation of gluconate metabolic genes after 6 h of exposure. Bacteria exposed to NaCl and KCl demonstrated the upregulation of the osmoprotective transporter mechanisms encoded by the proP, proU, and osmU (STM1491 to STM1494) genes. Glycerol exposure elicited the downregulation of these osmoadaptive mechanisms but stimulated an increase in lipopolysaccharide and membrane protein-associated genes after 1 h. The most extensive changes in gene expression occurred following exposure to KCl. Because many of these genes were of unknown function, further characterization may identify KCl-specific adaptive processes that are not stimulated by NaCl. This study shows that the response of S. Typhimurium to different humectants does not simply reflect reduced water activity and likely involves systems that are linked to specific humectants. PMID:26209672

  7. Contribution of Target Gene Mutations and Efflux to Decreased Susceptibility of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium to Fluoroquinolones and Other Antimicrobials▿

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng; Cui, Shenghui; McDermott, Patrick F.; Zhao, Shaohua; White, David G.; Paulsen, Ian; Meng, Jianghong

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in fluoroquinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica include target alterations and overexpression of efflux pumps. The present study evaluated the role of known and putative multidrug resistance efflux pumps and mutations in topoisomerase genes among laboratory-selected and naturally occurring fluoroquinolone-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains. Strains with ciprofloxacin MICs of 0.25, 4, 32, and 256 μg/ml were derived in vitro using serovar Typhimurium S21. These mutants also showed decreased susceptibility or resistance to many nonfluoroquinolone antimicrobials, including tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and several β-lactams. The expression of efflux pump genes acrA, acrB, acrE, acrF, emrB, emrD, and mdlB were substantially increased (≥2-fold) among the fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants. Increased expression was also observed, but to a lesser extent, with three other putative efflux pumps: mdtB (yegN), mdtC (yegO), and emrA among mutants with ciprofloxacin MICs of ≥32 μg/ml. Deletion of acrAB or tolC in S21 and its fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants resulted in increased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and other tested antimicrobials. In naturally occurring fluoroquinolone-resistant serovar Typhimurium strains, deletion of acrAB or tolC increased fluoroquinolone susceptibility 4-fold, whereas replacement of gyrA double mutations (S83F D87N) with wild-type gyrA increased susceptibility >500-fold. These results indicate that a combination of topoisomerase gene mutations, as well as enhanced antimicrobial efflux, plays a critical role in the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in both laboratory-derived and naturally occurring quinolone-resistant serovar Typhimurium strains. PMID:17043131

  8. Enhancement of Host Immune Responses by Oral Vaccination to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Harboring Both FliC and FljB Flagella

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Jeong Seon; Seok Kim, Jin; Im Jang, Jung; Kim, Bae-Hoon; Young Yoo, So; Hyeon Choi, Ji; Bang, Iel-Soo; Lee, In Soo; Keun Park, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Flagellin, the structural component of the flagellar filament in various motile bacteria, can contribute to the activation of NF-κB and proinflammatory cytokine expression during the innate immune response in host cells. Thus, flagellin proteins represent a particularly attractive target for the development of vaccine candidates. In this study, we investigated the immune response by increasing the flagella number in the iacP mutant strain and the adjuvant activity of the flagellin component FljB of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. We found that the iacP mutant strain expresses two flagellin proteins (FliC and FljB), which result in increased NF-κB-dependent gene expression in bone marrow derived macrophages. Using an oral immunization mouse model, we observed that the administration of a live attenuated S. typhimurium BRD509 strain expressing the FliC and FljB flagellins induced significantly enhanced flagellin-specific IgG responses in the systemic compartment. The mice immunized with the recombinant attenuated S. typhimurium strain that has two types of flagella were protected from lethal challenge with the Salmonella SL1344 strain. These results indicate that overexpression of flagella in the iacP mutant strain enhance the induction of an antigen-specific immune responses in macrophage cell, and both the FliC and FljB flagellar filament proteins-producing S. typhimurium can induce protective immune responses against salmonellosis. PMID:24069357

  9. Enhancement of host immune responses by oral vaccination to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium harboring both FliC and FljB flagella.

    PubMed

    Eom, Jeong Seon; Seok Kim, Jin; Im Jang, Jung; Kim, Bae-Hoon; Young Yoo, So; Hyeon Choi, Ji; Bang, Iel-Soo; Lee, In Soo; Keun Park, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Flagellin, the structural component of the flagellar filament in various motile bacteria, can contribute to the activation of NF-κB and proinflammatory cytokine expression during the innate immune response in host cells. Thus, flagellin proteins represent a particularly attractive target for the development of vaccine candidates. In this study, we investigated the immune response by increasing the flagella number in the iacP mutant strain and the adjuvant activity of the flagellin component FljB of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. We found that the iacP mutant strain expresses two flagellin proteins (FliC and FljB), which result in increased NF-κB-dependent gene expression in bone marrow derived macrophages. Using an oral immunization mouse model, we observed that the administration of a live attenuated S. typhimurium BRD509 strain expressing the FliC and FljB flagellins induced significantly enhanced flagellin-specific IgG responses in the systemic compartment. The mice immunized with the recombinant attenuated S. typhimurium strain that has two types of flagella were protected from lethal challenge with the Salmonella SL1344 strain. These results indicate that overexpression of flagella in the iacP mutant strain enhance the induction of an antigen-specific immune responses in macrophage cell, and both the FliC and FljB flagellar filament proteins-producing S. typhimurium can induce protective immune responses against salmonellosis.

  10. Genomic diversity and adaptation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium from analysis of six genomes of different phage types

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (or simply Typhimurium) is the most common serovar in both human infections and farm animals in Australia and many other countries. Typhimurium is a broad host range serovar but has also evolved into host-adapted variants (i.e. isolated from a particular host such as pigeons). Six Typhimurium strains of different phage types (defined by patterns of susceptibility to lysis by a set of bacteriophages) were analysed using Illumina high-throughput genome sequencing. Results Variations between strains were mainly due to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with an average of 611 SNPs per strain, ranging from 391 SNPs to 922 SNPs. There were seven insertions/deletions (indels) involving whole or partial gene deletions, four inactivation events due to IS200 insertion and 15 pseudogenes due to early termination. Four of these inactivated or deleted genes may be virulence related. Nine prophage or prophage remnants were identified in the six strains. Gifsy-1, Gifsy-2 and the sopE2 and sspH2 phage remnants were present in all six genomes while Fels-1, Fels-2, ST64B, ST104 and CP4-57 were variably present. Four strains carried the 90-kb plasmid pSLT which contains several known virulence genes. However, two strains were found to lack the plasmid. In addition, one strain had a novel plasmid similar to Typhi strain CT18 plasmid pHCM2. Conclusion The genome data suggest that variations between strains were mainly due to accumulation of SNPs, some of which resulted in gene inactivation. Unique genetic elements that were common between host-adapted phage types were not found. This study advanced our understanding on the evolution and adaptation of Typhimurium at genomic level. PMID:24138507

  11. Gamma radiation used as hygienization technique for foods does not induce viable but non-culturable state (VBNC) in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Saroj, Sunil; Shashidhar, R; Bandekar, Jayant

    2009-10-01

    Gamma radiation has been widely used for hygienization of food products. Whether gamma radiation stress induces VBNC state in Salmonella is of great concern. Therefore, the study was carried out to determine whether gamma radiation exposure induces VBNC state in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium). The parameters tested were culturability on agar medium, transcriptional activity by RT-PCR, cytoplasmic membrane integrity, and direct viable count using LIVE/DEAD BacLight bacterial viability kit. The LIVE/DEAD BacLight counts for S. typhimurium cells treated with 0.5 and 1.0 kGy radiation dose were 0.8 and 0.1% of the control, respectively. Plate counts for S. typhimurium cells treated with 0.5 and 1.0 kGy radiation dose were 0.7 and 0.05% of the control, respectively. No viable cells of S. typhimurium were detected by both plate count and LIVE/DEAD BacLight after radiation treatment with 2 kGy. No transcriptional activity was detected in cells treated with 2 kGy radiation dose. If there were VBNC cells present, then significant differences in the counts between the LIVE/DEAD BacLight microscopic counts and plate agar counts must be observed. No significant difference (P > 0.05) in the counts were observed. Thus, it can be concluded that treatment with 2 kGy results in complete killing and does not induce VBNC state in S. typhimurium.

  12. A murine model to study the antibacterial effect of copper on infectivity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Riti; Chhibber, Sanjay; Reed, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of copper as an antibacterial agent on the infectivity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Mice were infected orally with a standardized dose of unstressed Salmonella Typhimurium and copper-stressed cells of Salmonella Typhimurium. Bacterial counts in ileum, blood, liver and spleen were observed up to 168 h under normal aerobic conditions. Serum sensitivity, phagocytosis, malondialdehyde levels and histopathology were studied for both set of animals. A decreased bacterial count in the organs with mild symptoms of infection and a complete recovery by 48 h was observed in mice infected with copper-stressed bacteria. Histopathological examination of ileum tissue demonstrated regeneration of damaged tissue post-infection with copper-stressed bacteria and no malondialdehyde levels were detected after 24 h in ileum, spleen and liver. Exposure to copper sensitized Salmonella Typhimurium to the lytic action of serum and intracellular killing by peritoneal macrophages. It can be concluded that copper stress confers a decrease in the infectivity of healthy Salmonella Typhimurium in normal mice. This study highlights the significance of use of copper as an antibacterial agent against Salmonella Typhimurium in reducing the risk of incidence of Salmonella infections from contaminated water.

  13. Toll-like receptor 4 signalling through MyD88 is essential to control Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium infection, but not for the initiation of bacterial clearance.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Suzanne; Tötemeyer, Sabine; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Akira, Shizuo; Hughes, Katherine; Gray, David; Barr, Tom; Mastroeni, Pietro; Maskell, Duncan J; Bryant, Clare E

    2009-12-01

    Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) is important in protection against lethal Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) infection. Control of the early stages of sublethal S. Typhimurium infection in mice depends on TLR4-dependent activation of macrophages and natural killer (NK) cells to drive an inflammatory response. TLR4 signals through the adapter proteins Mal/MyD88 and TRIF-related adaptor molecule (TRAM)/TIR-domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon-b (TRIF). In the mouse typhoid model we showed that TLR4 and MyD88, but not Mal or TRIF, are essential for the control of exponential S. Typhimurium growth. TRIF(-/-) mice have a higher bacterial load in comparison with wild-type mice during a sublethal infection because TRIF is important for bacterial killing during the first day of systemic disease. Minimal pro-inflammatory responses were induced by S. Typhimurium infection of macrophages from TLR4(-/-), MyD88(-/-) and TRIF(-/-) mice in vitro. Pro-inflammatory responses from Mal(-/-) macrophages were similar to those from wild-type cells. The pro-inflammatory responses of TRIF(-/-) macrophages were partially restored by the addition of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), and TRIF(-/-) mice produced markedly enhanced IFN-gamma levels, in comparison to wild-type mice, probably explaining why bacterial growth can be controlled in these mice. TLR4(-/-), MyD88(-/-), TRIF(-/-) and Mal(-/-) mice all initiated clearance of S. Typhimurium, suggesting that TLR4 signalling is not important in driving bacterial clearance in comparison to its critical role in controlling early bacterial growth in mouse typhoid.

  14. Efflux Pump Overexpression Contributes to Tigecycline Heteroresistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Hu, Daxing; Zhang, Qijing; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ya-Hong; Sun, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial heteroresistance has been identified in several combinations of bacteria and antibiotics, and it complicated the therapeutic strategies. Tigecycline is being used as one of the optimal options for the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant Salmonella. This study investigated whether heterorresistance to tigecycline exists in a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain harboring the oqxAB-bearing IncHI2 plasmid pHXY0908. MIC and population analyses were performed to evaluate population-wide susceptibility to tigecycline. The effects of efflux pumps on MIC levels were assessed using the efflux pump inhibitor Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide, measuring intracellular tigecycline accumulation as well as mRNA levels of regulatory and efflux pump genes. DNA sequencing of regulatory regions were performed and plasmid curing from a resistant strain provided an appropriate control. Results showed that MICs of a parental strain with and without pHXY0908 as well as a plasmid-cured strain 14028/Δp52 were 0.5, 1, and 1 μg/mL, respectively. Population analysis profiling (PAP) illustrated that only the pHXY0908-containg strain was heteroresistant to tigecycline. A fraction of colonies exhibited stable profiles with 4- to 8-fold increases in MIC. The frequencies of emergence of these isolates were higher in the plasmid-containing strain pHXY0908 than either the parental or the 14028/Δp52 strain. Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide addition restored tigecycline susceptibility of these isolates and intracellular tigecycline accumulation was reduced. Heteroresistant isolates of the strain containing pHXY0908 also had elevated expression of acrB, ramA, and oqxB. DNA sequencing identified numerous mutations in RamR that have been shown to lead to ramA overexpression. In conclusions, heteroresistance to tigecycline in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was manifested in a plasmid-bearing strain. Our results suggest that this phenotype was associated with overexpression

  15. Efflux Pump Overexpression Contributes to Tigecycline Heteroresistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Hu, Daxing; Zhang, Qijing; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ya-Hong; Sun, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial heteroresistance has been identified in several combinations of bacteria and antibiotics, and it complicated the therapeutic strategies. Tigecycline is being used as one of the optimal options for the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant Salmonella. This study investigated whether heterorresistance to tigecycline exists in a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain harboring the oqxAB-bearing IncHI2 plasmid pHXY0908. MIC and population analyses were performed to evaluate population-wide susceptibility to tigecycline. The effects of efflux pumps on MIC levels were assessed using the efflux pump inhibitor Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide, measuring intracellular tigecycline accumulation as well as mRNA levels of regulatory and efflux pump genes. DNA sequencing of regulatory regions were performed and plasmid curing from a resistant strain provided an appropriate control. Results showed that MICs of a parental strain with and without pHXY0908 as well as a plasmid-cured strain 14028/Δp52 were 0.5, 1, and 1 μg/mL, respectively. Population analysis profiling (PAP) illustrated that only the pHXY0908-containg strain was heteroresistant to tigecycline. A fraction of colonies exhibited stable profiles with 4- to 8-fold increases in MIC. The frequencies of emergence of these isolates were higher in the plasmid-containing strain pHXY0908 than either the parental or the 14028/Δp52 strain. Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide addition restored tigecycline susceptibility of these isolates and intracellular tigecycline accumulation was reduced. Heteroresistant isolates of the strain containing pHXY0908 also had elevated expression of acrB, ramA, and oqxB. DNA sequencing identified numerous mutations in RamR that have been shown to lead to ramA overexpression. In conclusions, heteroresistance to tigecycline in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was manifested in a plasmid-bearing strain. Our results suggest that this phenotype was associated with overexpression

  16. Genetic Characterization of the Galactitol Utilization Pathway of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Nolle, Nicoletta; Felsl, Angela; Heermann, Ralf; Fuchs, Thilo M

    2017-02-15

    Galactitol degradation by salmonellae remains underinvestigated, although this metabolic capability contributes to growth in animals (R. R. Chaudhuri et al., PLoS Genet 9:e1003456, 2013, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1003456). The genes responsible for this metabolic capability are part of a 9.6-kb gene cluster that spans from gatY to gatR (STM3253 to STM3262) and encodes a phosphotransferase system, four enzymes, and a transporter of the major facilitator superfamily. Genome comparison revealed the presence of this genetic determinant in nearly all Salmonella strains. The generation time of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain ST4/74 was higher in minimal medium with galactitol than with glucose. Knockout of STM3254 and gatC resulted in a growth-deficient phenotype of S Typhimurium, with galactitol as the sole carbon source. Partial deletion of gatR strongly reduced the lag phase of growth with galactitol, whereas strains overproducing GatR exhibited a near-zero growth phenotype. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated strong induction of the gatY and gatZ promoters, which control all genes of this cluster except gatR, in the presence of galactitol but not glucose. Purified GatR bound to these two main gat gene cluster promoters as well as to its own promoter, demonstrating that this autoregulated repressor controls galactitol degradation. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy revealed distinct binding properties of GatR toward the three promoters, resulting in a model of differential gat gene expression. The cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) bound these promoters with similarly high affinities, and a mutant lacking crp showed severe growth attenuation, demonstrating that galactitol utilization is subject to catabolite repression. Here, we provide the first genetic characterization of galactitol degradation in Salmonella, revealing novel insights into the regulation of this dissimilatory pathway.

  17. The Hyb Hydrogenase Permits Hydrogen-Dependent Respiratory Growth of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Lamichhane-Khadka, Reena; Kwiatkowski, Andrea; Maier, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium contains three distinct respiratory hydrogenases, all of which contribute to virulence. Addition of H2 significantly enhanced the growth rate and yield of S. Typhimurium in an amino acid-containing medium; this occurred with three different terminal respiratory electron acceptors. Based on studies with site-specific double-hydrogenase mutant strains, most of this H2-dependent growth increase was attributed to the Hyb hydrogenase, rather than to the Hya or Hyd respiratory H2-oxidizing enzymes. The wild type strain with H2 had 4.0-fold greater uptake of 14C-labeled amino acids over a period of minutes than did cells incubated without H2. The double-uptake hydrogenase mutant containing only the Hyb hydrogenase transported amino acids H2 dependently like the wild type. The Hyb-only-containing strain produced a membrane potential comparable to that of the wild type. The H2-stimulated amino acid uptake of the wild type and the Hyb-only strain was inhibited by the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone but was less affected by the ATP synthase inhibitor sodium orthovanadate. In the wild type, proteins TonB and ExbD, which are known to couple proton motive force (PMF) to transport processes, were induced by H2 exposure, as were the genes corresponding to these periplasmic PMF-coupling factors. However, studies on tonB and exbD single mutant strains could not confirm a major role for these proteins in amino acid transport. The results link H2 oxidation via the Hyb enzyme to growth, amino acid transport, and expression of periplasmic proteins that facilitate PMF-mediated transport across the outer membrane. PMID:21157514

  18. The ferric enterobactin transporter Fep is required for persistent Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Toni A; Moreland, Sarah M; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene; Detweiler, Corrella S

    2013-11-01

    Most bacterial pathogens require iron to grow and colonize host tissues. The Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes a natural systemic infection of mice that models acute and chronic human typhoid fever. S. Typhimurium resides in tissues within cells of the monocyte lineage, which limit pathogen access to iron, a mechanism of nutritional immunity. The primary ferric iron import system encoded by Salmonella is the siderophore ABC transporter FepBDGC. The Fep system has a known role in acute infection, but it is unclear whether ferric iron uptake or the ferric iron binding siderophores enterobactin and salmochelin are required for persistent infection. We defined the role of the Fep iron transporter and siderophores in the replication of Salmonella in macrophages and in mice that develop acute followed by persistent infections. Replication of wild-type and iron transporter mutant Salmonella strains was quantified in cultured macrophages, fecal pellets, and host tissues in mixed- and single-infection experiments. We show that deletion of fepB attenuated Salmonella replication and colonization within macrophages and mice. Additionally, the genes required to produce and transport enterobactin and salmochelin across the outer membrane receptors, fepA and iroN, are needed for colonization of all tissues examined. However, salmochelin appears to be more important than enterobactin in the colonization of the spleen and liver, both sites of dissemination. Thus, the FepBDGC ferric iron transporter and the siderophores enterobactin and salmochelin are required by Salmonella to evade nutritional immunity in macrophages and cause persistent infection in mice.

  19. Structural and Functional Characterization of ScsC, a Periplasmic Thioredoxin-Like Protein from Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Mark; Heras, Begoña; Achard, Maud E. S.; King, Gordon J.; Argente, M. Pilar; Kurth, Fabian; Taylor, Samantha L.; Howard, Mark J.; King, Nathan P.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The prototypical protein disulfide bond (Dsb) formation and protein refolding pathways in the bacterial periplasm involving Dsb proteins have been most comprehensively defined in Escherichia coli. However, genomic analysis has revealed several distinct Dsb-like systems in bacteria, including the pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. This includes the scsABCD locus, which encodes a system that has been shown via genetic analysis to confer copper tolerance, but whose biochemical properties at the protein level are not defined. The aim of this study was to provide functional insights into the soluble ScsC protein through structural, biochemical, and genetic analyses. Results: Here we describe the structural and biochemical characterization of ScsC, the soluble DsbA-like component of this system. Our crystal structure of ScsC reveals a similar overall fold to DsbA, although the topology of β-sheets and α-helices in the thioredoxin domains differ. The midpoint reduction potential of the CXXC active site in ScsC was determined to be −132 mV versus normal hydrogen electrode. The reactive site cysteine has a low pKa, typical of the nucleophilic cysteines found in DsbA-like proteins. Deletion of scsC from S. Typhimurium elicits sensitivity to copper (II) ions, suggesting a potential involvement for ScsC in disulfide folding under conditions of copper stress. Innovation and Conclusion: ScsC is a novel disulfide oxidoreductase involved in protection against copper ion toxicity. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1494–1506. PMID:23642141

  20. Coptidis rhizome and Si Jun Zi Tang can prevent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chiung-Hung; Yu, Bi; Su, Chiu-Hsian; Chen, Daniel S; Hou, Yu-Chi; Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Hsu, Yuan-Man

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella, a common zoonotic pathogen, causes gastroenteritis in both humans and animals. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has been used to improve gastrointestinal dysfunction and to modify the immune response to inflammation for centuries. This study used six herbal plants and four TCM formulae to rate their efficacy in preventing S. Typhimurium infection via mouse model. Minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of Coptidis rhizome (CR) against the reference strain tallied 12.5 mg/ml and against clinical isolate ST21 was 25 mg/ml. MBCs of other herbal extracts and formulae on Salmonella Typhimurium strains were above 50 mg/ml. In the mice model, CR and Si Jun Zi Tang (SJZT) could significantly decrease the bacterial load in organs and blood after being challenged, along with body weight loss due to the infection. CR and SJZT alleviated infection-induced interferon-gamma levels in the serum and tissues, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels in intestinal tissues. CR and SJZT serum metabolites could suppress S. Typhimurium invasion and TNF-α expression in RAW264.7 cells. The therapeutic activity of CR and SJZT may involve berberine, ginsenoside Rb1, and glycyrrhizin, interfering with Salmonella when invading macrophages. CR and SJZT has shown potential in preventing S. Typhimurium infection through the regulation of the immune response.

  1. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in Mauritius linked to consumption of marlin mousse.

    PubMed

    Issack, Mohammad I; Hendriksen, Rene S; Lun, Phimy Lan Keng; Lutchun, Ram K S; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2009-01-01

    We report the first outbreak of salmonellosis caused by consumption of contaminated marlin mousse. Between 29 October and 5 November 2008, at least 53 persons developed diarrheal illness, all with a history of eating marlin mousse. Salmonella spp. that did not produce gas from glucose was isolated from stools of 26 affected patients and blood culture from one patient. Salmonella sp. isolates with the same phenotype were isolated in three samples of marlin mousse manufactured on 27 October 2008. The constituents of the mousse were smoked marlin, raw eggs, bovine gelatin, oil, and cream. A laboratory investigation of one sample of marlin mousse manufactured 3 days later, and the individual ingredients sampled a week after production of the contaminated batch were all negative for Salmonella. Serotyping and minimum inhibitory concentration determination were performed on 12 patient isolates related to the outbreak and two mousse isolates. All isolates belonged to Salmonella serovar Typhimurium and were pansusceptible to all antimicrobials tested. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that all the isolates were indistinguishable, thus implicating the mousse as the vehicle of the outbreak.

  2. Salmonella Enterica Serovar Typhimurium BipA Exhibits Two Distinct Ribosome Binding Modes

    SciTech Connect

    deLivron, M.; Robinson, V

    2008-01-01

    BipA is a highly conserved prokaryotic GTPase that functions to influence numerous cellular processes in bacteria. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, BipA has been implicated in controlling bacterial motility, modulating attachment and effacement processes, and upregulating the expression of virulence genes and is also responsible for avoidance of host defense mechanisms. In addition, BipA is thought to be involved in bacterial stress responses, such as those associated with virulence, temperature, and symbiosis. Thus, BipA is necessary for securing bacterial survival and successful invasion of the host. Steady-state kinetic analysis and pelleting assays were used to assess the GTPase and ribosome-binding properties of S. enterica BipA. Under normal bacterial growth, BipA associates with the ribosome in the GTP-bound state. However, using sucrose density gradients, we demonstrate that the association of BipA and the ribosome is altered under stress conditions in bacteria similar to those experienced during virulence. The data show that this differential binding is brought about by the presence of ppGpp, an alarmone that signals the onset of stress-related events in bacteria.

  3. Mechanism and Fitness Costs of PR-39 Resistance in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium LT2 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Pränting, Maria; Negrea, Aurel; Rhen, Mikael; Andersson, Dan I.

    2008-01-01

    PR-39 is a porcine antimicrobial peptide that kills bacteria with a mechanism that does not involve cell lysis. Here, we demonstrate that Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium can rapidly acquire mutations that reduce susceptibility to PR-39. Resistant mutants appeared at a rate of 0.4 × 10−6 per cell per generation. These mutants were about four times more resistant than the wild type and showed a greatly reduced rate of killing. Genetic analysis revealed mutations in the putative transport protein SbmA as being responsible for the observed resistance. These sbmA mutants were as fit as the wild-type parental strain as measured by growth rates in culture medium and mice and by long-term survival in stationary phase. These results suggest that resistance to certain antimicrobial peptides can rapidly develop without an obvious fitness cost for the bacteria and that resistance development could become a threat to the efficacy of antimicrobial peptides if used in a clinical setting. PMID:18519732

  4. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Skills To Succeed in the Host: Virulence and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Fàbrega, Anna

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a primary enteric pathogen infecting both humans and animals. Infection begins with the ingestion of contaminated food or water so that salmonellae reach the intestinal epithelium and trigger gastrointestinal disease. In some patients the infection spreads upon invasion of the intestinal epithelium, internalization within phagocytes, and subsequent dissemination. In that case, antimicrobial therapy, based on fluoroquinolones and expanded-spectrum cephalosporins as the current drugs of choice, is indicated. To accomplish the pathogenic process, the Salmonella chromosome comprises several virulence mechanisms. The most important virulence genes are those located within the so-called Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs). Thus far, five SPIs have been reported to have a major contribution to pathogenesis. Nonetheless, further virulence traits, such as the pSLT virulence plasmid, adhesins, flagella, and biofilm-related proteins, also contribute to success within the host. Several regulatory mechanisms which synchronize all these elements in order to guarantee bacterial survival have been described. These mechanisms govern the transitions from the different pathogenic stages and drive the pathogen to achieve maximal efficiency inside the host. This review focuses primarily on the virulence armamentarium of this pathogen and the extremely complicated regulatory network controlling its success. PMID:23554419

  5. Influence of a probiotic strain of Enterococcus faecium on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 infection in a porcine animal infection model.

    PubMed

    Szabó, István; Wieler, Lothar H; Tedin, Karsten; Scharek-Tedin, Lydia; Taras, David; Hensel, Andreas; Appel, Bernd; Nöckler, Karsten

    2009-05-01

    The beneficial effects of probiotic Enterococcus spp. in different hosts, such as mice and humans, have previously been reported in several studies. However, studies of large domestic animals, as well as challenge studies with pathogenic microorganisms, are very rare. Here, we investigated the influence of oral treatment of pigs with the probiotic bacterium Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 infections in weaning piglets. Clinical symptoms, fecal excretion, the organ distribution of Salmonella, and the humoral immune response (immunoglobulin G [IgG], IgM, and IgA levels) in serum were examined. A pool of 89 piglets was randomly divided into probiotic and control groups. The probiotic group received a feed supplement containing E. faecium starting on day 14 postpartum prior to challenge with Salmonella serovar Typhimurium DT104 at 28 days postpartum. After challenge with Salmonella serovar Typhimurium DT104, piglets in both groups showed no severe clinical signs of salmonellosis. However, fecal excretion and colonization of Salmonella in organs were significantly greater in piglets fed E. faecium. Likewise, the humoral immune response against Salmonella (serum IgM and IgA levels) was significantly greater in the probiotic group animals than in control animals. The results of this study suggest that E. faecium NCIMB 10415 treatment enhanced the course of infection in weaning piglets challenged with Salmonella serovar Typhimurium DT104. However, the probiotic treatment also appeared to result in greater production of specific antibodies against Salmonella serovar Typhimurium DT104.

  6. Influence of a Probiotic Strain of Enterococcus faecium on Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104 Infection in a Porcine Animal Infection Model▿

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, István; Wieler, Lothar H.; Tedin, Karsten; Scharek-Tedin, Lydia; Taras, David; Hensel, Andreas; Appel, Bernd; Nöckler, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    The beneficial effects of probiotic Enterococcus spp. in different hosts, such as mice and humans, have previously been reported in several studies. However, studies of large domestic animals, as well as challenge studies with pathogenic microorganisms, are very rare. Here, we investigated the influence of oral treatment of pigs with the probiotic bacterium Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 infections in weaning piglets. Clinical symptoms, fecal excretion, the organ distribution of Salmonella, and the humoral immune response (immunoglobulin G [IgG], IgM, and IgA levels) in serum were examined. A pool of 89 piglets was randomly divided into probiotic and control groups. The probiotic group received a feed supplement containing E. faecium starting on day 14 postpartum prior to challenge with Salmonella serovar Typhimurium DT104 at 28 days postpartum. After challenge with Salmonella serovar Typhimurium DT104, piglets in both groups showed no severe clinical signs of salmonellosis. However, fecal excretion and colonization of Salmonella in organs were significantly greater in piglets fed E. faecium. Likewise, the humoral immune response against Salmonella (serum IgM and IgA levels) was significantly greater in the probiotic group animals than in control animals. The results of this study suggest that E. faecium NCIMB 10415 treatment enhanced the course of infection in weaning piglets challenged with Salmonella serovar Typhimurium DT104. However, the probiotic treatment also appeared to result in greater production of specific antibodies against Salmonella serovar Typhimurium DT104. PMID:19270131

  7. The Bacterial iprA Gene Is Conserved across Enterobacteriaceae, Is Involved in Oxidative Stress Resistance, and Influences Gene Expression in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Allison; Serfecz, Jacquelyn; Kinnally, Alexandra; Crosby, Kathleen; Youngman, Matthew; Wykoff, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The iprA gene (formerly known as yaiV or STM0374) is located in a two-gene operon in the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genome and is associated with altered expression during spaceflight and rotating-wall-vessel culture conditions that increase virulence. However, iprA is uncharacterized in the literature. In this report, we present the first targeted characterization of this gene, which revealed that iprA is highly conserved across Enterobacteriaceae. We found that S. Typhimurium, Escherichia coli, and Enterobacter cloacae ΔiprA mutant strains display a multi-log-fold increase in oxidative stress resistance that is complemented using a plasmid-borne wild-type (WT) copy of the S. Typhimurium iprA gene. This observation was also associated with increased catalase activity, increased S. Typhimurium survival in macrophages, and partial dependence on the katE gene and full dependence on the rpoS gene. Our results indicate that IprA protein activity is sensitive to deletion of the N- and C-terminal 10 amino acids, while a region that includes amino acids 56 to 80 is dispensable for activity. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis revealed several genes altered in expression in the S. Typhimurium ΔiprA mutant strain compared to the WT, including those involved in fimbria formation, spvABCD-mediated virulence, ethanolamine utilization, the phosphotransferase system (PTS) transport, and flagellin phase switching from FlgB to FliC (likely a stochastic event) and several genes of hypothetical or putative function. IMPORTANCE Overall, this work reveals that the conserved iprA gene measurably influences bacterial biology and highlights the pool of currently uncharacterized genes that are conserved across bacterial genomes. These genes represent potentially useful targets for bacterial engineering, vaccine design, and other possible applications. PMID:27246569

  8. A comparative study of thermal and acid inactivation kinetics in fruit juices of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg grown at acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Fernández, Ana; Bernardo, Ana; López, Mercedes

    2009-11-01

    Acid and heat inactivation in orange and apple juices of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Colección Española de Cultivos Tipo (i.e., Spanish Type Culture Collection) 443 (CECT 443) (Salmonella Typhimurium) and S. enterica serovar Senftenberg CECT 4384 (Salmonella Senftenberg) grown in buffered brain heart infusion (pH 7.0) and acidified brain heart infusion up to pH 4.5 with acetic, citric, lactic, and hydrochloric acids was evaluated. Acid adaptation induced an adaptive response that increased the subsequent resistance to extreme pH conditions (pH 2.5) and to heat, although the magnitude of these responses differed between the two isolates and fruit juices. The acid resistance in orange juice for acid-adapted cells (D-values of 28.3-34.5 min for Salmonella Senftenberg and 30.0-39.2 min for Salmonella Typhimurium) resulted to be about two to three times higher than that corresponding to non-acid-adapted cells. In apple juice, acid-adapted Salmonella Senftenberg cells survived better than those of Salmonella Typhimurium, obtaining mean D-values of 114.8 +/- 12.3 and 41.9 +/- 2.5 min, respectively. The thermotolerance of non-acid-adapted Salmonella Typhimurium in orange (D(58)-value: 0.028 min) and apple juices (D(58)-value: 0.10 min) was approximately double for acid-adapted cells. This cross-protection to heat was more strongly expressed in Salmonella Senftenberg. D(58)-values obtained for non-acid-adapted cells in orange (0.11 min) and apple juices (0.19 min) increased approximately 10 and 5 times, respectively, after their growth in acidified media. The conditions prevailing during bacterial growth and heat treatment did not significantly influence the z-values observed (6.0 +/- 0.3 degrees C for Salmonella Typhimurium and 7.0 +/- 0.3 degrees C for Salmonella Senftenberg). The enhanced acid resistance found for both isolates could enable them to survive for prolonged time periods in the gastrointestinal tract, increasing the risk of illness. Further, it

  9. The Lipopolysaccharide Structures of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Neisseria gonorrhoeae Determine the Attachment of Human Mannose-Binding Lectin to Intact Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Devyatyarova-Johnson, Marina; Rees, Ian H.; Robertson, Brian D.; Turner, Malcolm W.; Klein, Nigel J.; Jack, Dominic L.

    2000-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is an important component of the innate immune system. It binds to the arrays of sugars commonly presented by microorganisms and activates the complement system independently of antibody. Despite detailed knowledge of the stereochemical basis of MBL binding, relatively little is known about how bacterial surface structures influence binding of the lectin. Using flow cytometry, we have measured the binding of MBL to a range of mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Neisseria gonorrhoeae which differ in the structure of expressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS). For both organisms, the possession of core LPS structures led to avid binding of MBL, which was abrogated by the addition of O antigen (Salmonella serovar Typhimurium) or sialic acid (N. gonorrhoeae). Truncation of the LPS within the core led to lower levels of MBL binding. It was not possible to predict the magnitude of MBL binding from the identity of the LPS terminal sugar alone, indicating that the three-dimensional disposition of LPS molecules is probably also of importance in determining MBL attachment. These results further support the hypothesis that LPS structure is a major determinant of MBL binding. PMID:10858200

  10. Human milk mucin 1 and mucin 4 inhibit Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Yu, Zhuoteng; Chen, Ceng; Kling, David E; Newburg, David S

    2012-08-01

    Many human milk glycans inhibit pathogen binding to host receptors and their consumption by infants is associated with reduced risk of disease. Salmonella infection is more frequent among infants than among the general population, but the incidence is lower in breast-fed babies, suggesting that human milk could contain components that inhibit Salmonella. This study aimed to test whether human milk per se inhibits Salmonella invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and, if so, to identify the milk components responsible for inhibition. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL1344 (SL1344) invasion of FHs 74 Int and Caco-2 cells were the models of human intestinal epithelium infection. Internalization of fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate-labeled SL1344 into intestinal cells was measured by flow cytometry to quantify infection. Human milk and its fractions inhibited infection; the inhibitory activity localized to the high molecular weight glycans. Mucin 1 and mucin 4 were isolated to homogeneity. At 150 μg/L, a typical concentration in milk, human milk mucin 1 and mucin 4 inhibited SL1344 invasion of both target cell types. These mucins inhibited SL1344 invasion of epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, mucins may prove useful as a basis for developing novel oral prophylactic and therapeutic agents that inhibit infant diseases caused by Salmonella and related pathogens.

  11. Corrected Genome Annotations Reveal Gene Loss and Antibiotic Resistance as Drivers in the Fitness Evolution of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sandip; Sokurenko, Evgeni V; Chattopadhyay, Sujay

    2016-12-01

    Horizontal acquisition of novel chromosomal genes is considered to be a key process in the evolution of bacterial pathogens. However, the identification of gene presence or absence could be hindered by the inconsistencies in bacterial genome annotations. Here, we performed a cross-annotation of omnipresent core and mosaic accessory genes in the chromosome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium across a total of 20 fully assembled genomes deposited into GenBank. Cross-annotation resulted in a 32% increase in the number of core genes and a 3-fold decrease in the number of genes identified as mosaic genes (i.e., genes present in some strains only) by the original annotation. Of the remaining noncore genes, the vast majority were prophage genes, and 255 of the nonphage genes were actually of core origin but lost in some strains upon the emergence of the S Typhimurium serovar, suggesting that the chromosomal portion of the S Typhimurium genome acquired a very limited number of novel genes other than prophages. Only horizontally acquired nonphage genes related to bacterial fitness or virulence were found in four recently sequenced isolates, all located on three different genomic islands that harbor multidrug resistance determinants. Thus, the extensive use of antimicrobials could be the main selection force behind the new fitness gene acquisition and the emergence of novel Salmonella pathotypes.

  12. Novel Approach of a Phage-Based Magnetoelastic Biosensor for the Detection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in Soil.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi-Kyung; Chin, Bryan A

    2016-12-28

    To date, there has been no employment of a magnetoelastic (ME) biosensor method to detect Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in soil. The ME biosensor method needs to be investigated and modified for its successful performance. The filtration method, cation-exchange resin method, and combinations of both methods were employed for the extraction of S. Typhimurium from soil. The number of S. Typhimurium and the resonant frequency shift of the ME sensor were then compared using a brilliant green sulfa agar plate and an HP 8751A network analyzer. A blocking study was performed using bovine serum albumin (BSA), polyethylene glycol (PEG), and casein powder suspension. Finally, the modified ME biosensor method was performed to detect S. Typhimurium in soil. The number of S. Typhimurium was significantly decreased from 7.10 log CFU/soil to 4.45-4.72 log CFU/soil after introduction of the cation-exchange resin method. The greatest resonant frequency shift of the measurement sensor was found when employing centrifugation and filtration procedures. The resonant frequency shift of the PEG-blocked measurement sensor was 3,219 ± 755 Hz, which was significantly greater than those of the BSA- and casein-blocked ME sensor. The optimum concentration of PEG was determined to be 1.0 mg/ml after considering the resonant shift and economic issue. Finally, the modified ME biosensor method was able to detect S. Typhimurium in soil in a dose-response manner. Although these modifications of the ME biosensor method sacrificed some advantages, such as cost, time effectiveness, and operator friendliness, this study demonstrated a novel approach of the ME biosensor method to detect S. Typhimurium in soil.

  13. Detection of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Phage Types DT102, DT104, and U302 by Multiplex PCR

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Su, Lin-Hui; Chu, Chi-Hong; Wang, Mei-Hwei; Yeh, Chia-Ming; Weill, Francois-Xavier; Chu, Chishih

    2006-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a common cause of nontyphoidal salmonellosis in humans and animals. Multidrug-resistant serovar Typhimurium phage type DT104, which emerged in the 1990s, has become widely distributed in many countries. A total of 104 clinical isolates of Salmonella serogroup B were collected from three major hospitals in Taiwan during 1997 to 2003 and were examined by a multiplex PCR targeting the resistance genes and the spv gene of the virulence plasmid. A total of 51 isolates (49%) were resistant to all drugs (ACSSuT [resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamide, and tetracycline]), and all contained a 1.25-kb PCR fragment of integron that is part of the 43-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1). The second group was resistant to SSu (28%), and the third was susceptible to all five drugs (13%). Fifty-nine isolates were serotyped to be serovar Typhimurium by the tube agglutination method using H antisera. The virulence plasmid was found in 54 (91.5%) of the 59 serovar Typhimurium isolates. A majority (94.1%) of the Salmonella serogroup B isolates with the ACSSuT resistance pattern harbored a virulence plasmid. Phage typing identified three major phage types: DT104, DT120, and U302. Analysis of the isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed six genotypes. We found two genotypes in DT104 strains, two in DT120, and the other two in U302. The presence of a monophasic serovar (4,5,12:i:−) has added difficulty in the determination of the serovars of multidrug-resistant Salmonella serogroup B isolates. Nevertheless, the multiplex PCR devised in the present study appears to be efficient and useful in the rapid identification of ACSSuT-type serovar Typhimurium with SGI1, irrespective of their phage types. PMID:16825349

  14. Mutational analysis of the residue at position 48 in the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium PhoQ sensor kinase.

    PubMed

    Sanowar, Sarah; Martel, Alexandre; Moual, Hervé Le

    2003-03-01

    The PhoP/PhoQ two-component regulatory system of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium plays an essential role in controlling virulence by mediating the adaptation to Mg(2+) depletion. The pho-24 allele of phoQ harbors a single amino acid substitution (T48I) in the periplasmic domain of the PhoQ histidine kinase sensor. This mutation has been shown to increase net phosphorylation of the PhoP response regulator. We analyzed the effect on signaling by PhoP/PhoQ of various amino acid substitutions at this position (PhoQ-T48X [X = A, S, V, I, or L]). Mutations T48V, T48I, and T48L were found to affect signaling by PhoP/PhoQ both in vivo and in vitro. Mutations PhoQ-T48V and PhoQ-T48I increased both the expression of the mgtA::lacZ transcriptional fusion and the net phosphorylation of PhoP, conferring to cells a PhoP constitutively active phenotype. In contrast, mutation PhoQ-T48L barely responded to changes in the concentration of external Mg(2+), in vivo and in vitro, conferring to cells a PhoP constitutively inactive phenotype. By analyzing in vitro the individual catalytic activities of the PhoQ-T48X sensors, we found that the PhoP constitutively active phenotype observed for the PhoQ-T48V and PhoQ-T48I proteins is solely due to decreased phosphatase activity. In contrast, the PhoP constitutively inactive phenotype observed for the PhoQ-T48L mutant resulted from both decreased autokinase activity and increased phosphatase activity. Our data are consistent with a model in which the residue at position 48 of PhoQ contributes to a conformational switch between kinase- and phosphatase-dominant states.

  15. The Tricarballylate utilization (tcuRABC) genes of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jeffrey A; Horswill, Alexander R; Schwem, Brian E; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C

    2004-03-01

    The genes of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 encoding functions needed for the utilization of tricarballylate as a carbon and energy source were identified and their locations in the chromosome were established. Three of the tricarballylate utilization (tcu) genes, tcuABC, are organized as an operon; a fourth gene, tcuR, is located immediately 5' to the tcuABC operon. The tcuABC operon and tcuR gene share the same direction of transcription but are independently transcribed. The tcuRABC genes are missing in the Escherichia coli K-12 chromosome. The tcuR gene is proposed to encode a regulatory protein needed for the expression of tcuABC. The tcuC gene is proposed to encode an integral membrane protein whose role is to transport tricarballylate across the cell membrane. tcuC function was sufficient to allow E. coli K-12 to grow on citrate (a tricarballylate analog) but not to allow growth of this bacterium on tricarballylate. E. coli K-12 carrying a plasmid with wild-type alleles of tcuABC grew on tricarballylate, suggesting that the functions of the TcuABC proteins were the only ones unique to S. enterica needed to catabolize tricarballylate. Analyses of the predicted amino acid sequences of the TcuAB proteins suggest that TcuA is a flavoprotein, and TcuB is likely anchored to the cell membrane and probably contains one or more Fe-S centers. The TcuB protein is proposed to work in concert with TcuA to oxidize tricarballylate to cis-aconitate, which is further catabolized via the Krebs cycle. The glyoxylate shunt is not required for growth of S. enterica on tricarballylate. A model for tricarballylate catabolism in S. enterica is proposed.

  16. Selection of Small-Colony Variants of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Nonphagocytic Eucaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cano, David A.; Pucciarelli, M. Graciela; Martínez-Moya, Marina; Casadesús, Josep; García-del Portillo, Francisco

    2003-01-01

    Salmonella enterica strains are enteropathogenic bacteria that survive and proliferate within vacuolar compartments of epithelial and phagocytic cells. Recently, it has been reported that fibroblast cells are capable of restricting S. enterica serovar Typhimurium intracellular growth. Here, we show that prolonged residence of bacteria in the intracellular environment of fibroblasts results in the appearance of genetically stable small-colony variants (SCV). A total of 103 SCV isolates, obtained from four independent infections, were subjected to phenotypic analysis. The following phenotypes were observed: (i) δ-aminolevulinic acid auxotrophy; (ii) requirement for acetate or succinate for growth in glucose minimal medium; (iii) auxotrophy for aromatic amino acids; and (iv) reduced growth rate under aerobic conditions not linked to nutrient auxotrophy. The exact mutations responsible for the SCV phenotype in three representative isolates were mapped in the lpd, hemL, and aroD genes, which code for dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, glutamate-1-semyaldehyde aminotransferase, and 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase, respectively. The lpd, hemL, and aroD mutants had intracellular persistence rates in fibroblasts that were 3 to 4 logs higher than that of the parental strain and decreased susceptibility to aminoglycoside antibiotics. All three of these SCV isolates were attenuated in the BALB/c murine typhoid model. Complementation with lpd+, hem+, and aroD+ genes restored the levels of intracellular persistence and antibiotic susceptibility to levels of the wild-type strain. However, virulence was not exhibited by any of the complemented strains. Altogether, our data demonstrate that similar to what it has been reported for SCV isolates of other pathogens, S. enterica SCV display enhanced intracellular persistence in eucaryotic cells and are impaired in the ability to cause overt disease. In addition, they also suggest that S. enterica SCV may be favored in vivo. PMID:12819049

  17. The Tricarballylate Utilization (tcuRABC) Genes of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium LT2

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jeffrey A.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Schwem, Brian E.; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.

    2004-01-01

    The genes of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 encoding functions needed for the utilization of tricarballylate as a carbon and energy source were identified and their locations in the chromosome were established. Three of the tricarballylate utilization (tcu) genes, tcuABC, are organized as an operon; a fourth gene, tcuR, is located immediately 5′ to the tcuABC operon. The tcuABC operon and tcuR gene share the same direction of transcription but are independently transcribed. The tcuRABC genes are missing in the Escherichia coli K-12 chromosome. The tcuR gene is proposed to encode a regulatory protein needed for the expression of tcuABC. The tcuC gene is proposed to encode an integral membrane protein whose role is to transport tricarballylate across the cell membrane. tcuC function was sufficient to allow E. coli K-12 to grow on citrate (a tricarballylate analog) but not to allow growth of this bacterium on tricarballylate. E. coli K-12 carrying a plasmid with wild-type alleles of tcuABC grew on tricarballylate, suggesting that the functions of the TcuABC proteins were the only ones unique to S. enterica needed to catabolize tricarballylate. Analyses of the predicted amino acid sequences of the TcuAB proteins suggest that TcuA is a flavoprotein, and TcuB is likely anchored to the cell membrane and probably contains one or more Fe-S centers. The TcuB protein is proposed to work in concert with TcuA to oxidize tricarballylate to cis-aconitate, which is further catabolized via the Krebs cycle. The glyoxylate shunt is not required for growth of S. enterica on tricarballylate. A model for tricarballylate catabolism in S. enterica is proposed. PMID:14996793

  18. Three-dimensional tissue assemblies: novel models for the study of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium pathogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickerson, C. A.; Goodwin, T. J.; Terlonge, J.; Ott, C. M.; Buchanan, K. L.; Uicker, W. C.; Emami, K.; LeBlanc, C. L.; Ramamurthy, R.; Clarke, M. S.; Vanderburg, C. R.; Hammond, T.; Pierson, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    The lack of readily available experimental systems has limited knowledge pertaining to the development of Salmonella-induced gastroenteritis and diarrheal disease in humans. We used a novel low-shear stress cell culture system developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in conjunction with cultivation of three-dimensional (3-D) aggregates of human intestinal tissue to study the infectivity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium for human intestinal epithelium. Immunohistochemical characterization and microscopic analysis of 3-D aggregates of the human intestinal epithelial cell line Int-407 revealed that the 3-D cells more accurately modeled human in vivo differentiated tissues than did conventional monolayer cultures of the same cells. Results from infectivity studies showed that Salmonella established infection of the 3-D cells in a much different manner than that observed for monolayers. Following the same time course of infection with Salmonella, 3-D Int-407 cells displayed minimal loss of structural integrity compared to that of Int-407 monolayers. Furthermore, Salmonella exhibited significantly lower abilities to adhere to, invade, and induce apoptosis of 3-D Int-407 cells than it did for infected Int-407 monolayers. Analysis of cytokine expression profiles of 3-D Int-407 cells and monolayers following infection with Salmonella revealed significant differences in expression of interleukin 1alpha (IL-1alpha), IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-1Ra, and tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNAs between the two cultures. In addition, uninfected 3-D Int-407 cells constitutively expressed higher levels of transforming growth factor beta1 mRNA and prostaglandin E2 than did uninfected Int-407 monolayers. By more accurately modeling many aspects of human in vivo tissues, the 3-D intestinal cell model generated in this study offers a novel approach for studying microbial infectivity from the perspective of the host-pathogen interaction.

  19. Fermented rapeseed meal is effective in controlling Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection and improving growth performance in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Ashayerizadeh, Amin; Dastar, Behrouz; Shams Shargh, Mahmoud; Sadeghi Mahoonak, Alireza; Zerehdaran, Saeed

    2017-03-01

    The aim of present experiment was to assess the effects of fermented rapeseed meal (FRSM) on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) colonization and growth performance in broiler chicks. Two hundred forty day-old male Cobb 500 broiler chicks were divided into six experimental treatments with four replicates and 10 birds per each. The treatments were including two positive and negative controls which birds received a basal corn-soybean diet as well as four others which birds received the diets that rapeseed meal (RSM) or FRSM was replaced with soybean meal at 50 and 100% levels. All chicks except the negative control birds were challenged orally with 10(5) CFU of S. Typhimurium at 3days of age. Results showed that birds were fed FRSM had significantly greater lactic acid bacteria populations and lesser S. Typhimurium colonization in ileal and cecal sections compared to others (P<0.05). The less percentage of liver and bursa of fabricius was belonged to negative control group. At 10day, feeding chicks with diet containing FRSM, but not RSM, significantly decreased the organ invasion by S. Typhimurium (P<0.05). Heterophil to lymphocyte ratio was significantly lesser in chicks were fed FRSM compared to those fed RSM or positive control (P<0.05). Birds were fed FRSM had significantly higher weight gain and better feed conversion ratio compared to those birds were fed RSM (P<0.05). The findings of present experiment concerning positive effects of feeding FRSM on reducing S. Typhimurium and improving growth performance show that this processed protein source can be considered as a nutritional effective strategy to control Salmonella contamination in broiler chicks.

  20. Effect of the Escherichia coli EMO strain on experimental infection by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Lima-Filho, J V M; Vieira, L Q; Arantes, R M E; Nicoli, J R

    2004-07-01

    An experimental infection with Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium was evaluated in gnotobiotic mice previously exposed to a plasmid-free non-pathogenic Escherichia coli (EMO strain). Mice were exposed to EMO (experimental) or not (control) 10 days before challenge with Salmonella Typhimurium (10(2) colony forming units (CFU)/mouse). Survival after challenge was higher (P < 0.05) in the experimental group (16%) than in the control animals (0%). Histopathological examination of the colon and ileum mucosa of the experimental group showed less extensive lesions such as edema, cell inflammatory infiltration and hyperemia. The epithelial cells of the mucosal surface and the production of the mucous layer were also better preserved in the experimental group. The population levels of Salmonella Typhimurium in the feces were initially 10-fold lower (P < 0.05) in the experimental groups. However, 3 days after challenge both experimental and control groups showed similar population levels ranging from 10(8) to 10(9) CFU/g of feces. The intestinal contents of total and anti-Salmonella Typhimurium sIgA were higher in the experimental groups 10 days after inoculation of E. coli EMO strain. Translocation of Salmonella Typhimurium to the spleen was 10-fold lower (P < 0.05) in the experimental group only on day 3 after infection. This was not related to an increase in the bacterial blood clearance of the animals, as shown by experimental venous challenge with E. coli B41. In conclusion, treatment of mice with E. coli EMO strain promoted a relative protection against experimental infection with Salmonella Typhimurium. This protection was not due to the reduction of the population of pathogens in the intestine but was probably related to stimulation of the immune response.

  1. Bidirectional Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium transfer between bare/glove hands and green bell pepper and its interruption.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Maribel; Siller, Jorge H; Valdez, Jose B; Carrillo, Armando; Chaidez, Cristobal

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the amount of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium transferred from volunteers' hands (bare or gloved) to green bell peppers and vice versa; and to assess the effectiveness of hand hygiene techniques. The highest and lowest percentages of bacterial transfer were achieve from green bell peppers to gloved hands (46.56%) and from bare hands to green bell peppers (0.21%), respectively. The highest and lowest Log10 reductions of S. Typhimurium were achieved by the combination of hand washing and alcohol-based gel (4.38 Log10) and iodine solution (2.08 Log10), respectively. This study provides important information concerning the transfer's efficiency of S. Typhimurium from hands to fresh produce and from fresh produce to hands. The study also showed that gloved hands, could be a mean of transfer of S. Typhimurium between green peppers and hands, and the best hand hygiene technique was the combination of hand washing and alcohol-based gel.

  2. Proteomic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Isolated from RAW 264.7 Macrophages: identification of a novel protein that contributes to the replication of serovar Typhimurium inside macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Adkins, Joshua N.; Coleman, James R.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mottaz, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Manes, Nathan P.; Smallwood, Heather S.; Wang, Haixing H.; Forbes, John; Gros, Philippe; Uzzau, Sergio; Rodland, Karin D.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-09-01

    ABSTRACT: To evade host resistance mechanisms, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (STM), a facultative intracellular pathogen, must alter its proteome following macrophage infection. To identify new colonization and virulence factors that mediate STM pathogenesis, we have isolated STM cells from RAW 264.7 macrophages at various time-points following infection and used a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based proteomic approach to detect the changes in STM protein abundances. Because host resistance to STM infection is strongly modulated by the expression of a functional host resistant regulator, i.e., natural resistance associated macrophage protein 1 (Nramp1, also called Slc11a1), we have also examined the effects of Nramp1 activity on the changes of STM protein abundances. A total of 315 STM proteins have been identified from isolated STM cells, which are largely house-keeping proteins whose abundances remain relatively constant during the time-course of infection. However, 39 STM proteins are strongly induced after infection, suggesting their involvement in modulating colonization and infection. Of the 39 induced proteins, 6 proteins are specifically modulated by Nramp1 activity, including STM3117, as well as STM3118-3119 whose time-dependent abundance changes were confirmed using Western blot analysis. Deletion of the gene encoding STM3117 resulted in a dramatic reduction in the ability of STM to colonize wild-type RAW 264.7 macrophages, demonstrating a critical involvement of STM3117 in promoting the replication of STM inside macrophages. The predicted function common for STM3117-3119 is biosynthesis and modification of the peptidoglycan layer of STM cell wall, emphasizing their important roles in the colonization of macrophages by Salmonella.

  3. Genomic Comparison of Non-Typhoidal Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Heidelberg, Hadar and Kentucky Isolates from Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Dhanani, Akhilesh S.; Block, Glenn; Dewar, Ken; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Topp, Edward; Beiko, Robert G.; Diarra, Moussa S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars, associated with different foods including poultry products, are important causes of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. The colonization of the chicken gut by S. enterica could result in the contamination of the environment and food chain. The aim of this study was to compare the genomes of 25 S. enterica serovars isolated from broiler chicken farms to assess their intra- and inter-genetic variability, with a focus on virulence and antibiotic resistance characteristics. Methodology/Principal Finding The genomes of 25 S. enterica isolates covering five serovars (ten Typhimurium including three monophasic 4,[5],12:i:, four Enteritidis, three Hadar, four Heidelberg and four Kentucky) were sequenced. Most serovars were clustered in strongly supported phylogenetic clades, except for isolates of serovar Enteritidis that were scattered throughout the tree. Plasmids of varying sizes were detected in several isolates independently of serovars. Genes associated with the IncF plasmid and the IncI1 plasmid were identified in twelve and four isolates, respectively, while genes associated with the IncQ plasmid were found in one isolate. The presence of numerous genes associated with Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs) was also confirmed. Components of the type III and IV secretion systems (T3SS and T4SS) varied in different isolates, which could explain in part, differences of their pathogenicity in humans and/or persistence in broilers. Conserved clusters of genes in the T3SS were detected that could be used in designing effective strategies (diagnostic, vaccination or treatments) to combat Salmonella. Antibiotic resistance genes (CMY, aadA, ampC, florR, sul1, sulI, tetAB, and srtA) and class I integrons were detected in resistant isolates while all isolates carried multidrug efflux pump systems regardless of their antibiotic susceptibility profile. Conclusions/Significance This study showed that the predominant

  4. The effect of recombinant human lactoferrin from the milk of transgenic cows on Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinghuan; Hu, Yujie; Du, Chunming; Piao, Jianhua; Yang, Lichen; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2016-01-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a multifunctional protein with antibacterial and immunomodulatory activities. Given this beneficial effect, transgenic approaches have been used to produce lactoferrin. The aim of the current study was to investigate the in vivo effect of recombinant human lactoferrin (rhLF) from the milk of transgenic cows on Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium (ST) infection in mice. Two hours before the infection with 0.3 ml at 2 × 10(5) CFU ml(-1) of ST, each animal in the ST + rhLF group received 0.3 ml of rhLF with 20 mg ml(-1) concentration while the ST group received PBS as placebos with the same volume through oral gavage. The mice were infected with ST once only on the first day. After the infection, the mice received 0.3 ml of rhLF with 20 mg ml(-1) (6 mg d(-1)) concentration or PBS, respectively, for 7 days. Mortality and weight were monitored daily. Bacterial enumeration in the blood, liver, and spleen and histopathological analysis of the liver, spleen, kidney and intestine were conducted. The results showed that rhLF decreased the bacterial load in the liver and spleen of mice, reduced the degree of mice hepatomegaly and splenomegaly, and attenuated infectious inflammation with less histopathological abnormalities in the liver, spleen and kidney of mice in the ST infection. This study showed that rhLF with 6 mg per day had antibacterial activity of alleviating the infection caused by ST bacteria, which indicated that rhLF could be used as a supplement in special products.

  5. A proteomic approach to study Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium putative transporter YjeH associated with ceftriaxone resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Wensi S. Lin, Y.-H.; Shih, C.-C.

    2007-09-28

    Mutant 6B7 of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium has a transposon inserted in the putative transporter gene yjeH and shows a more-than-fourfold reduction in resistance to ceftriaxone. In this report we have used proteomic analysis to compare outer membrane protein profiles between this mutant and its parental strain R200. Five identified proteins were found to be altered. Of these proteins, the level of expression of the porin OmpD was increased and those of the putative outer membrane proteins STM1530 and STM3031, a subunit of the proton-pumping oxidoreductase NuoB and the heat shock protein MopA were decreased in 6B7 strain. Although the function of the yjeH gene remains unknown, a complementation assay suggested that the OmpD, STM1530, STM3031, NuoB, and MopA proteins are associated with ceftriaxone resistance and the expression of these proteins is influenced by the putative transporter gene yjeH in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium.

  6. Gene expression values of pattern-recognition receptors in porcine leukocytes and their response to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    Osvaldova, Alena; Stepanova, Hana; Faldyna, Martin; Matiasovic, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns and play an important role in triggering innate immune responses. PRRs distribution and function is well documented in mice and humans, but studies in pigs are scarce. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is common pathogen found in pigs and was used as a model for interaction with PRRs. This study investigated expression of PRRs in porcine leukocyte subpopulations at the mRNA level. Eight subpopulations of leukocytes comprising NK cells, Th, Tc, double positive T cells and γδ T cells, B cells, monocytes and neutrophils were sorted, and the expression of 12 PRRs was measured, including selected Toll-like receptors and their co-receptors, NOD-like receptor NOD2, RP-105, CD14, and dectin. The highest expression rates of most PRRs were observed in monocytes and neutrophils. The B cells expressed high levels of TLR1, TLR6, TLR9, TLR10, and RP-105. Only monocytes and γδ T cells were found to respond to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection by intensification of PRRs expression. In Th and B cells, PRRs mRNA down-regulation was detected after infection.

  7. Genome Expression Analysis of Nonproliferating Intracellular Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Unravels an Acid pH-Dependent PhoP-PhoQ Response Essential for Dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Núñez-Hernández, Cristina; Tierrez, Alberto; Ortega, Álvaro D.; Pucciarelli, M. Graciela; Godoy, Marta; Eisman, Blanca; Casadesús, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide expression analyses have provided clues on how Salmonella proliferates inside cultured macrophages and epithelial cells. However, in vivo studies show that Salmonella does not replicate massively within host cells, leaving the underlying mechanisms of such growth control largely undefined. In vitro infection models based on fibroblasts or dendritic cells reveal limited proliferation of the pathogen, but it is presently unknown whether these phenomena reflect events occurring in vivo. Fibroblasts are distinctive, since they represent a nonphagocytic cell type in which S. enterica serovar Typhimurium actively attenuates intracellular growth. Here, we show in the mouse model that S. Typhimurium restrains intracellular growth within nonphagocytic cells positioned in the intestinal lamina propria. This response requires a functional PhoP-PhoQ system and is reproduced in primary fibroblasts isolated from the mouse intestine. The fibroblast infection model was exploited to generate transcriptome data, which revealed that ∼2% (98 genes) of the S. Typhimurium genome is differentially expressed in nongrowing intracellular bacteria. Changes include metabolic reprogramming to microaerophilic conditions, induction of virulence plasmid genes, upregulation of the pathogenicity islands SPI-1 and SPI-2, and shutdown of flagella production and chemotaxis. Comparison of relative protein levels of several PhoP-PhoQ-regulated functions (PagN, PagP, and VirK) in nongrowing intracellular bacteria and extracellular bacteria exposed to diverse PhoP-PhoQ-inducing signals denoted a regulation responding to acidic pH. These data demonstrate that S. Typhimurium restrains intracellular growth in vivo and support a model in which dormant intracellular bacteria could sense vacuolar acidification to stimulate the PhoP-PhoQ system for preventing intracellular overgrowth. PMID:23090959

  8. An rfaH Mutant of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium is Attenuated in Swine and Reduces Intestinal Colonization, Fecal Shedding, and Disease Severity Due to Virulent Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Bearson, Bradley L.; Bearson, Shawn M. D.; Kich, Jalusa D.; Lee, In Soo

    2014-01-01

    Swine are often asymptomatic carriers of Salmonella spp., and interventions are needed to limit colonization of swine to enhance food safety and reduce environmental contamination. We evaluated the attenuation and potential vaccine use in pigs of a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutant of rfaH, the gene encoding the RfaH antiterminator that prevents premature termination of long mRNA transcripts. Pigs inoculated with wild-type S. Typhimurium exhibited a significant elevation in average body temperature (fever) at 1 and 2 days post-inoculation; rfaH-inoculated pigs did not (n = 5/group). During the 7-day trial, a significant reduction of Salmonella in the feces, tonsils, and cecum were observed in the rfaH-inoculated pigs compared to wild-type inoculated pigs. To determine whether vaccination with the rfaH mutant could provide protection against wild-type S. Typhimurium challenge, two groups of pigs (n = 14/group) were intranasally inoculated with either the rfaH mutant or a PBS placebo at 6 and 8 weeks of age and challenged with the parental, wild-type S. Typhimurium at 11 weeks of age. The average body temperature was significantly elevated in the mock-vaccinated pigs at 1 and 2 days post-challenge, but not in the rfaH-vaccinated pigs. Fecal shedding at 2 and 3 days post-challenge and colonization of intestinal tract tissues at 7 days post-challenge by wild-type S. Typhimurium was significantly reduced in the rfaH-vaccinated pigs compared to mock-vaccinated pigs. Serological analysis using the IDEXX HerdChek Swine Salmonella Test Kit indicated that vaccination with the rfaH mutant did not stimulate an immune response against LPS. These results indicate that vaccination of swine with the attenuated rfaH mutant confers protection against challenge with virulent S. Typhimurium but does not interfere with herd level monitoring for Salmonella spp., thereby allowing for differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). PMID

  9. Novel small RNA (sRNA) landscape of the starvation-stress response transcriptome of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Amin, Shivam V; Roberts, Justin T; Patterson, Dillon G; Coley, Alexander B; Allred, Jonathan A; Denner, Jason M; Johnson, Justin P; Mullen, Genevieve E; O'Neal, Trenton K; Smith, Jason T; Cardin, Sara E; Carr, Hank T; Carr, Stacie L; Cowart, Holly E; DaCosta, David H; Herring, Brendon R; King, Valeria M; Polska, Caroline J; Ward, Erin E; Wise, Alice A; McAllister, Kathleen N; Chevalier, David; Spector, Michael P; Borchert, Glen M

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) are short (∼50-200 nucleotides) noncoding RNAs that regulate cellular activities across bacteria. Salmonella enterica starved of a carbon-energy (C) source experience a host of genetic and physiological changes broadly referred to as the starvation-stress response (SSR). In an attempt to identify novel sRNAs contributing to SSR control, we grew log-phase, 5-h C-starved and 24-h C-starved cultures of the virulent Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344 and comprehensively sequenced their small RNA transcriptomes. Strikingly, after employing a novel strategy for sRNA discovery based on identifying dynamic transcripts arising from "gene-empty" regions, we identify 58 wholly undescribed Salmonella sRNA genes potentially regulating SSR averaging an ∼1,000-fold change in expression between log-phase and C-starved cells. Importantly, the expressions of individual sRNA loci were confirmed by both comprehensive transcriptome analyses and northern blotting of select candidates. Of note, we find 43 candidate sRNAs share significant sequence identity to characterized sRNAs in other bacteria, and ∼70% of our sRNAs likely assume characteristic sRNA structural conformations. In addition, we find 53 of our 58 candidate sRNAs either overlap neighboring mRNA loci or share significant sequence complementarity to mRNAs transcribed elsewhere in the SL1344 genome strongly suggesting they regulate the expression of transcripts via antisense base-pairing. Finally, in addition to this work resulting in the identification of 58 entirely novel Salmonella enterica genes likely participating in the SSR, we also find evidence suggesting that sRNAs are significantly more prevalent than currently appreciated and that Salmonella sRNAs may actually number in the thousands.

  10. Novel small RNA (sRNA) landscape of the starvation-stress response transcriptome of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Shivam V.; Roberts, Justin T.; Patterson, Dillon G.; Coley, Alexander B.; Allred, Jonathan A.; Denner, Jason M.; Johnson, Justin P.; Mullen, Genevieve E.; O'Neal, Trenton K.; Smith, Jason T.; Cardin, Sara E.; Carr, Hank T.; Carr, Stacie L.; Cowart, Holly E.; DaCosta, David H.; Herring, Brendon R.; King, Valeria M.; Polska, Caroline J.; Ward, Erin E.; Wise, Alice A.; McAllister, Kathleen N.; Chevalier, David; Spector, Michael P.; Borchert, Glen M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Small RNAs (sRNAs) are short (∼50–200 nucleotides) noncoding RNAs that regulate cellular activities across bacteria. Salmonella enterica starved of a carbon-energy (C) source experience a host of genetic and physiological changes broadly referred to as the starvation-stress response (SSR). In an attempt to identify novel sRNAs contributing to SSR control, we grew log-phase, 5-h C-starved and 24-h C-starved cultures of the virulent Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344 and comprehensively sequenced their small RNA transcriptomes. Strikingly, after employing a novel strategy for sRNA discovery based on identifying dynamic transcripts arising from “gene-empty” regions, we identify 58 wholly undescribed Salmonella sRNA genes potentially regulating SSR averaging an ∼1,000-fold change in expression between log-phase and C-starved cells. Importantly, the expressions of individual sRNA loci were confirmed by both comprehensive transcriptome analyses and northern blotting of select candidates. Of note, we find 43 candidate sRNAs share significant sequence identity to characterized sRNAs in other bacteria, and ∼70% of our sRNAs likely assume characteristic sRNA structural conformations. In addition, we find 53 of our 58 candidate sRNAs either overlap neighboring mRNA loci or share significant sequence complementarity to mRNAs transcribed elsewhere in the SL1344 genome strongly suggesting they regulate the expression of transcripts via antisense base-pairing. Finally, in addition to this work resulting in the identification of 58 entirely novel Salmonella enterica genes likely participating in the SSR, we also find evidence suggesting that sRNAs are significantly more prevalent than currently appreciated and that Salmonella sRNAs may actually number in the thousands. PMID:26853797

  11. Dormant Intracellular Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Discriminates among Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 Effectors To Persist inside Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Núñez-Hernández, Cristina; Alonso, Ana; Pucciarelli, M. Graciela; Casadesús, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica uses effector proteins delivered by type III secretion systems (TTSS) to colonize eukaryotic cells. Recent in vivo studies have shown that intracellular bacteria activate the TTSS encoded by Salmonella pathogenicity island-2 (SPI-2) to restrain growth inside phagocytes. Growth attenuation is also observed in vivo in bacteria colonizing nonphagocytic stromal cells of the intestinal lamina propria and in cultured fibroblasts. SPI-2 is required for survival of nongrowing bacteria persisting inside fibroblasts, but its induction mode and the effectors involved remain unknown. Here, we show that nongrowing dormant intracellular bacteria use the two-component system OmpR-EnvZ to induce SPI-2 expression and the PhoP-PhoQ system to regulate the time at which induction takes place, 2 h postentry. Dormant bacteria were shown to discriminate the usage of SPI-2 effectors. Among the effectors tested, SseF, SseG, and SseJ were required for survival, while others, such as SifA and SifB, were not. SifA and SifB dispensability correlated with the inability of intracellular bacteria to secrete these effectors even when overexpressed. Conversely, SseJ overproduction resulted in augmented secretion and exacerbated bacterial growth. Dormant bacteria produced other effectors, such as PipB and PipB2, that, unlike what was reported for epithelial cells, did not to traffic outside the phagosomal compartment. Therefore, permissiveness for secreting only a subset of SPI-2 effectors may be instrumental for dormancy. We propose that the S. enterica serovar Typhimurium nonproliferative intracellular lifestyle is sustained by selection of SPI-2 effectors that are produced in tightly defined amounts and delivered to phagosome-confined locations. PMID:24144726

  12. Osmoregulated periplasmic glucans are needed for competitive growth and biofilm formation by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in leafy-green vegetable wash-waters and colonization in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs) are major periplasmic constituents of Gram negative bacteria. The role of OPGs has been postulated in symbiotic as well as pathogenic host-microbe interactions. Here we report the role of OPGs from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium during growth and b...

  13. Mixed biofilm formation by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium enhanced bacterial resistance to sanitization due to extracellular polymeric substances

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium are important foodborne pathogens capable of forming single-species biofilms or coexisting in multispecies biofilm communities. Bacterial biofilm cells are usually more resistant to sanitization than their pla...

  14. Differences in Pathogenesis for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the Mouse Versus the Swine Model Identify Bacterial Gene Products Required for Systemic but not Gastrointestinal Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the last several decades, the mouse model of Typhoid fever has been an extremely productive model to investigate Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium pathogenesis. The mouse is the paradigm for investigating systemic disease due to infection by Salmonella; however, the swine model of gastro...

  15. Characterization of Small ColE1-Like Plasmids Conferring Kanamycin Resistance in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovars Typhimurium and Newport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multi-antibiotic resistant (MR) Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Newport are an increasing concern in human and animal health. Many strains are known to carry antibiotic resistance determinants on multiple plasmids, yet detailed information is scarce. Three plasmids conferring kanamycin...

  16. Evidence for Lack of Acquisition of Tolerance in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium ATCC 14028 after Exposure to Subinhibitory Amounts of Origanum vulgare L. Essential Oil and Carvacrol

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Isabelle da Silva; Gomes Neto, Nelson Justino; Tavares, Adassa Gama; Nunes, Pollyana Campos; Magnani, Marciane

    2012-01-01

    Overnight exposure of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to sublethal amounts of Origanum vulgare essential oil (OV) and carvacrol (CAR) did not result in direct and cross-bacterial protection. Cells subcultured with increasing amounts of OV or CAR survived up to the MIC of either compound, revealing few significant changes in bacterial susceptibility. PMID:22544235

  17. Complete genome sequencing of a multidrug-resistant and human-invasive Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain of the emerging sequence type 213 genotype

    DOE PAGES

    Calva, Edmundo; Silva, Claudia; Zaidi, Mussaret B.; ...

    2015-06-18

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain YU39 was isolated in 2005 in the state of Yucatán, Mexico, from a human systemic infection. The YU39 strain is representative of the multidrug-resistant emergent sequence type 213 (ST213) genotype. The YU39 complete genome is composed of a chromosome and seven plasmids.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strain SO3 (Sequence Type 302) Isolated from a Baby with Meningitis in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Puente, José L.; Calva, Edmundo; Zaidi, Mussaret B.

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SO3 (sequence type 302), isolated from a fatal meningitis infection in Mexico, was determined using PacBio technology. The chromosome hosts six complete prophages and is predicted to harbor 51 genomic islands, including 13 pathogenicity islands (SPIs). It carries the Salmonella virulence plasmid (pSTV). PMID:27103717

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strain YU15 (Sequence Type 19) Harboring the Salmonella Genomic Island 1 and Virulence Plasmid pSTV

    PubMed Central

    Calva, Edmundo; Puente, José L.; Zaidi, Mussaret B.

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium sequence type 19 (ST19) strain YU15, isolated in Yucatán, Mexico, from a human baby stool culture, was determined using PacBio technology. The chromosome contains five intact prophages and the Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1). This strain carries the Salmonella virulence plasmid pSTV. PMID:27081132

  20. Complete Genome Sequencing of a Multidrug-Resistant and Human-Invasive Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strain of the Emerging Sequence Type 213 Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Calva, Edmundo; Zaidi, Mussaret B.; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Estrada, Karel; Silva, Genivaldo G. Z.; Soto-Jiménez, Luz M.; Wiesner, Magdalena; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Edwards, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain YU39 was isolated in 2005 in the state of Yucatán, Mexico, from a human systemic infection. The YU39 strain is representative of the multidrug-resistant emergent sequence type 213 (ST213) genotype. The YU39 complete genome is composed of a chromosome and seven plasmids. PMID:26089426

  1. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contaminated eggs produced by infected commercial laying flocks are often implicated as sources of human infections with Salmonella Enteritidis, but Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium have also been associated with egg-transmitted illness. Contamination of the edible contents of eggs is ...

  2. Adjuvant effect of a probiotic fermented milk in the protection against Salmonella enteritidis serovar typhimurium infection: mechanisms involved.

    PubMed

    De Moreno De Leblanc, A; Maldonado Galdeano, C; Dogi, C A; Carmuega, E; Weill, R; Perdigón, G

    2010-01-01

    Probiotics may offer protection against Salmonella enteritidis serovar Typhimurium infection via different mechanisms. The aim of this study is to investigate, using mouse models, the effect of the administration of fermented milk containing the probiotic bacteria L. casei DN-114 001 in the protection against Salmonella enteritidis serovar Typhimurium when this product is administered continuously before and after infection or only post-infection. The adjuvant effect of this probiotic fermented milk (PFM) against S. Typhimurium was also evaluated in newborn mice, whose mothers received the PFM during the suckling period or their offspring after weaning. The results obtained showed that PFM administration after salmonella infection was useful to decrease the severity of the infection. The best effect was obtained with continuous PFM administration. In the newborn mice model, PFM administration to the newborn mice after weaning showed the best effect against the pathogen. PFM administration to the mother during the suckling period was beneficial against this enterophatogen when their offspring did not receive probiotics after weaning. Continuous PFM administration to adult mice (before and after infection) was important to maintain the intestinal barrier and the immune surveillance in optimal conditions to diminish the pathway of entrance of salmonella and the spread of this pathogen to deeper tissues. In the newborn mice model, it was observed that PFM administration to the offspring after weaning or their mother during the suckling period had a protective effect against salmonella infection, however, in the mice from mothers that received PFM during nursing which were fed with PFM after weaning, we found a down regulated immune maturity that was not protective against this infection.

  3. Active Suppression of Early Immune Response in Tobacco by the Human Pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Shirron, Natali; Yaron, Sima

    2011-01-01

    The persistence of enteric pathogens on plants has been studied extensively, mainly due to the potential hazard of human pathogens such as Salmonella enterica being able to invade and survive in/on plants. Factors involved in the interactions between enteric bacteria and plants have been identified and consequently it was hypothesized that plants may be vectors or alternative hosts for enteric pathogens. To survive, endophytic bacteria have to escape the plant immune systems, which function at different levels through the plant-bacteria interactions. To understand how S. enterica survives endophyticaly we conducted a detailed analysis on its ability to elicit or evade the plant immune response. The models of this study were Nicotiana tabacum plants and cells suspension exposed to S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. The plant immune response was analyzed by looking at tissue damage and by testing oxidative burst and pH changes. It was found that S. Typhimurium did not promote disease symptoms in the contaminated plants. Live S. Typhimurium did not trigger the production of an oxidative burst and pH changes by the plant cells, while heat killed or chloramphenicol treated S. Typhimurium and purified LPS of Salmonella were significant elicitors, indicating that S. Typhimurium actively suppress the plant response. By looking at the plant response to mutants defective in virulence factors we showed that the suppression depends on secreted factors. Deletion of invA reduced the ability of S. Typhimurium to suppress oxidative burst and pH changes, indicating that a functional SPI1 TTSS is required for the suppression. This study demonstrates that plant colonization by S. Typhimurium is indeed an active process. S. Typhimurium utilizes adaptive strategies of altering innate plant perception systems to improve its fitness in the plant habitat. All together these results suggest a complex mechanism for perception of S. Typhimurium by plants. PMID:21541320

  4. No beneficial effects evident for Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 in weaned pigs infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Susanne; Janczyk, Pawel; Assmus, Jens; Schmidt, Michael F G; Brockmann, Gudrun A; Nöckler, Karsten

    2012-07-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT 104 is the major pathogen for salmonellosis outbreaks in Europe. We tested if the probiotic bacterium Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 can prevent or alleviate salmonellosis. Therefore, piglets of the German Landrace breed that were treated with E. faecium (n = 16) as a feed additive and untreated controls (n = 16) were challenged with S. Typhimurium 10 days after weaning. The presence of salmonellae in feces and selected organs, as well as the immune response, were investigated. Piglets treated with E. faecium gained less weight than control piglets (P = 0.05). The feeding of E. faecium had no effect on the fecal shedding of salmonellae and resulted in a higher abundance of the pathogen in tonsils of all challenged animals. The specific (anti-Salmonella IgG) and nonspecific (haptoglobin) humoral immune responses as well as the cellular immune response (T helper cells, cytotoxic T cells, regulatory T cells, γδ T cells, and B cells) in the lymph nodes, Peyer's patches of different segments of the intestine (jejunal and ileocecal), the ileal papilla, and in the blood were affected in the course of time after infection (P < 0.05) but not by the E. faecium treatment. These results led to the conclusion that E. faecium may not have beneficial effects on the performance of weaned piglets in the case of S. Typhimurium infection. Therefore, we suggest a critical discussion and reconsideration of E. faecium NCIMB 10415 administration as a probiotic for pigs.

  5. No Beneficial Effects Evident for Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 in Weaned Pigs Infected with Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104

    PubMed Central

    Kreuzer, Susanne; Aßmus, Jens; Schmidt, Michael F. G.; Brockmann, Gudrun A.; Nöckler, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT 104 is the major pathogen for salmonellosis outbreaks in Europe. We tested if the probiotic bacterium Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 can prevent or alleviate salmonellosis. Therefore, piglets of the German Landrace breed that were treated with E. faecium (n = 16) as a feed additive and untreated controls (n = 16) were challenged with S. Typhimurium 10 days after weaning. The presence of salmonellae in feces and selected organs, as well as the immune response, were investigated. Piglets treated with E. faecium gained less weight than control piglets (P = 0.05). The feeding of E. faecium had no effect on the fecal shedding of salmonellae and resulted in a higher abundance of the pathogen in tonsils of all challenged animals. The specific (anti-Salmonella IgG) and nonspecific (haptoglobin) humoral immune responses as well as the cellular immune response (T helper cells, cytotoxic T cells, regulatory T cells, γδ T cells, and B cells) in the lymph nodes, Peyer's patches of different segments of the intestine (jejunal and ileocecal), the ileal papilla, and in the blood were affected in the course of time after infection (P < 0.05) but not by the E. faecium treatment. These results led to the conclusion that E. faecium may not have beneficial effects on the performance of weaned piglets in the case of S. Typhimurium infection. Therefore, we suggest a critical discussion and reconsideration of E. faecium NCIMB 10415 administration as a probiotic for pigs. PMID:22544257

  6. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium utilizes the ClpPX and Lon proteases for optimal fitness in the ceca of chickens

    PubMed Central

    Troxell, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a leading cause of salmonellosis. Poultry and poultry products are implicated in transmission of Salmonella to humans. In 2013, an outbreak of S. Typhimurium occurred that comprised 39 states within the United States and was associated with backyard flocks of chickens. Colonization of the avian host by S. Typhimurium requires numerous genetic factors encoded within the bacterium. Of particular interest are genetic factors induced by alternative sigma factors within S. Typhimurium since these genetic elements are important for adaptation to different environmental stresses. The heat shock response is a dedicated change in gene regulation within bacteria in response to several stresses, specifically growth at 42°C. Because chickens have a higher body temperature than other animals (42°C) the hypothesis was tested that components of the heat shock response are important for optimal fitness within the chicken. To this end, deletion of the heat shock proteases clpPX (BTNC0022) or lon (BTNC0021) was accomplished and the bacterial fitness in vivo was compared to the “wild-type” strain (NC1040) using a competition assay. One-day-old chicks were orally gavaged with an equal mixture of NC1040 and either BTNC0022 or BTNC0021. Quantification of viable bacteria over time by using plate counts indicated that deletion of either heat shock protease resulted in significantly reduced colonization of the chicken ceca compared to the wild-type strain. To satisfy the molecular Koch's postulates, clpPX and lon mutants were complemented in trans using a low-copy number plasmid for additional in vivo experiments. Complementation studies confirmed the importance of either heat shock protease to colonization of the chicken ceca. This report demonstrated that both ClpPX and Lon were important for optimal fitness within chickens. Moreover, these results suggested that components of the heat shock may be critical factors used

  7. Improvement of bacterial clearance and relief of clinical signs of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection in pigs through upregulation of Th 1-specific responses by administration of a combination of two silicate minerals, biotite and bentonite.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-A; Jung, Bock-Gie; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Yun-Mi; Koh, Hong-Bum; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2015-09-01

    Biotite and bentonite are phyllosilicate minerals that were originally used in industrial applications. Several beneficial activities of them have recently been reported, especially regulation of the immune system and antimicrobial effects. Therefore, we investigated the immune-enhancing and bacterial clearance effects of a biotite and bentonite mixture (BBM) on experimental infection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) to determine whether the BBM could be used as an alternative antibiotic. We administered 1% or 2% BBM as a feed supplement. We then evaluated the bacterial clearance effects of the BBM against S. Typhimurium. We also evaluated the immune-enhancing effect of the BBM through several immunological experiments that included examination of the lysozyme activity, CD4(+)/CD8(+) T lymphocyte ratio and the T-helper type 1 (Th 1) cytokine profile. The clinical signs of S. Typhimurium and the number of viable bacteria in feces and tissues were significantly decreased in both BBM groups, especially in the 2% BBM group. The BBM also markedly enhanced the lysozyme activity, CD4(+)/CD8(+) T lymphocyte ratio and expression levels of IFN-γ and IL-12 in S. Typhimurium-challenged pigs. Therefore, the BBM could be a good candidate as an alternative antibiotic that improves Th 1-specific immune responses and the bacterial clearance effect.

  8. Improvement of bacterial clearance and relief of clinical signs of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection in pigs through upregulation of Th 1-specific responses by administration of a combination of two silicate minerals, biotite and bentonite

    PubMed Central

    LEE, Jin-A; JUNG, Bock-Gie; KIM, Tae-Hoon; KIM, Yun-Mi; KOH, Hong-Bum; LEE, Bong-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Biotite and bentonite are phyllosilicate minerals that were originally used in industrial applications. Several beneficial activities of them have recently been reported, especially regulation of the immune system and antimicrobial effects. Therefore, we investigated the immune-enhancing and bacterial clearance effects of a biotite and bentonite mixture (BBM) on experimental infection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) to determine whether the BBM could be used as an alternative antibiotic. We administered 1% or 2% BBM as a feed supplement. We then evaluated the bacterial clearance effects of the BBM against S. Typhimurium. We also evaluated the immune-enhancing effect of the BBM through several immunological experiments that included examination of the lysozyme activity, CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocyte ratio and the T-helper type 1 (Th 1) cytokine profile. The clinical signs of S. Typhimurium and the number of viable bacteria in feces and tissues were significantly decreased in both BBM groups, especially in the 2% BBM group. The BBM also markedly enhanced the lysozyme activity, CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocyte ratio and expression levels of IFN-γ and IL-12 in S. Typhimurium-challenged pigs. Therefore, the BBM could be a good candidate as an alternative antibiotic that improves Th 1-specific immune responses and the bacterial clearance effect. PMID:25947887

  9. Use of electron beam radiation for the reduction of Salmonella enterica serovars typhimurium and Tennessee in peanut butter.

    PubMed

    Hvizdzak, A L; Beamer, S; Jaczynski, J; Matak, K E

    2010-02-01

    Peanut butter and peanut paste products were implicated as the vehicle of contamination in an outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium, which began in September 2008, and in the November 2006 outbreak of Salmonella Tennessee. Therefore, this study evaluated the effectiveness of electron beam (e-beam) radiation for the reduction of Salmonella serovars Tennessee (ATCC 10722) and Typhimurium (ATCC 14028) in creamy peanut butter. Each strain was studied independently. Peanut butter samples were inoculated with approximately 8.0 log CFU/g of Salmonella, and exposed to e-beam doses ranging from 0 to 3.1 kGy. Doses were confirmed with film dosimetry. Survivors were enumerated by standard spread plating on nonselective tryptic soy agar (TSA) and selective xylose-lysine-desoxycholate agar (XLD) media. Salmonella Tennessee was more susceptible to e-beam radiation, with 5.00- and 6.75-log reduction of cells on TSA and XLD, respectively, at the approximate e-beam dose of 3.0 kGy. Salmonella Typhimurium was reduced by 4.19 and 4.85 log on TSA and XLD, respectively, at the approximate e-beam dose of 3.0 kGy. D(10)-values show that Salmonella Typhimurium was more resistant (0.82 +/- 0.02 and 0.73 +/- 0.01 kGy on TSA and XLD, respectively) than was Salmonella Tennessee (0.72 +/- 0.02 and 0.60 +/- 0.01 kGy on TSA and XLD, respectively) to e-beam radiation (P < 0.05). The recovery on growth and selective media were different (P < 0.05), indicating cell injury. The results of this study demonstrate that e-beam radiation may be an effective processing step for the nonthermal inactivation of Salmonella in peanut butter.

  10. Interactions of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium with gut bacteria.

    PubMed

    Avendaño-Pérez, Gaspar; Nueno-Palop, Carmen; Narbad, Arjan; George, Susan M; Baranyi, József; Pin, Carmen

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the gut microbiota on the growth and survival of S. Typhimurium. This was tested in two-species co-cultures and in mixed cultures with a simplified gut model microbiota. Subsequently, interactions between S. Typhimurium and human faecal bacteria were quantified in both batch and continuous culture systems simulating the human colon. The exponential growth of S. Typhimurium was halted when the population of Escherichia coli reached the maximum population density in a two-compartment co-culture system where the two species were separated by a 0.45 μm pore membrane. Furthermore, the growth of some gut bacteria such as Lactobacillus gasseri and Bifidobacterium bifidum was inhibited by the presence of S. Typhimurium in the other compartment. The survival of S. Typhimurium was severely affected in mixed batch cultures with human faecal samples; a reduction of 10(3)-10(4) cfu/ml in the concentration of S. Typhimurium was observed in these cultures. However, no effect on S. Typhimurium survival was observed in mixed batch cultures with a simplified gut model microbiota under the same conditions. The effect of human faecal samples on S. Typhimurium in a three-stage continuous culture was different to that obtained in batch cultures; its growth rather than survival was affected under these conditions. S. Typhimurium growth was inhibited, and the bacterium was therefore eliminated by the continuous flow of the medium. Depending upon culturing conditions, the gut microbiota caused either growth inhibition, inactivation or did not affect S. Typhimurium.

  11. Protein folding failure sets high-temperature limit on growth of phage P22 in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Pope, Welkin H; Haase-Pettingell, Cameron; King, Jonathan

    2004-08-01

    The high-temperature limit for growth of microorganisms differs greatly depending on their species and habitat. The importance of an organism's ability to manage thermal stress is reflected in the ubiquitous distribution of the heat shock chaperones. Although many chaperones function to reduce protein folding defects, it has been difficult to identify the specific protein folding pathways that set the high-temperature limit of growth for a given microorganism. We have investigated this for a simple system, phage P22 infection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Production of infectious particles exhibited a broad maximum of 150 phage per cell when host cells were grown at between 30 and 39 degrees C in minimal medium. Production of infectious phage declined sharply in the range of 40 to 41 degrees C, and at 42 degrees C, production had fallen to less than 1% of the maximum rate. The host cells maintained optimal division rates at these temperatures. The decrease in phage infectivity was steeper than the loss of physical particles, suggesting that noninfectious particles were formed at higher temperatures. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a decrease in the tailspike adhesins assembled on phage particles purified from cultures incubated at higher temperatures. The infectivity of these particles was restored by in vitro incubation with soluble tailspike trimers. Examination of tailspike folding and assembly in lysates of phage-infected cells confirmed that the fraction of polypeptide chains able to reach the native state in vivo decreased with increasing temperature, indicating a thermal folding defect rather than a particle assembly defect. Thus, we believe that the folding pathway of the tailspike adhesin sets the high-temperature limit for P22 formation in Salmonella serovar Typhimurium.

  12. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities.

    PubMed

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Jones, Deana R; Guard, Jean; Anderson, Kenneth E; Karcher, Darrin M

    2016-10-04

    Contaminated eggs produced by infected commercial laying flocks are often implicated as sources of human infections with Salmonella Enteritidis, but Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium have also been associated with egg-transmitted illness. Contamination of the edible contents of eggs is a consequence of the colonization of reproductive tissues in systemically infected hens. In recent years, the animal welfare implications of diverse poultry housing and management systems have been vigorously debated, but the food safety significance of laying hen housing remains uncertain. The present study evaluated the effects of 2 different bird stocking densities on the invasion of internal organs by Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium in groups of experimentally infected laying hens housed in colony cages enriched with perching and nesting areas. Laying hens were distributed at 2 different stocking densities (648 and 973 cm(2)/bird) into colony cages and (along with a group housed in conventional cages at 648 cm(2)/bird) orally inoculated with doses of 10(7) cfu of 2-strain cocktails of either Salmonella Heidelberg or Salmonella Typhimurium. At 5 to 6 d post-inoculation, hens were euthanized and samples of internal organs (cecum, liver, spleen, ovary, and oviduct) were removed for bacteriologic culturing. The overall frequency of Salmonella isolation from ceca after inoculation with strains of serovar Heidelberg (83.3%) was significantly (P < 0.001) greater than the corresponding value for strains of serovar Typhimurium (53.8%), whereas Salmonella was recovered significantly more often from both livers (85.2% vs. 53.7%; P < 0.0001) and spleens (78.7% vs. 56.5%; P = 0.0008) after inoculation with strains of serovar Typhimurium than strains of serovar Heidelberg. However, there were no significant differences (P > 0.05) between stocking densities or cage systems in the frequencies of isolation of either Salmonella serovar from any of the five sampled

  13. Survival of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium within late endosomal-lysosomal compartments of B lymphocytes is associated with the inability to use the vacuolar alternative major histocompatibility complex class I antigen-processing pathway.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Reyes, Roberto; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ramírez-Aguilar, María de la Luz; Castro-Eguiluz, Angel Denisse; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2005-07-01

    Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-activated macrophages use an alternative processing mechanism to present Salmonella antigens to CD8(+) T lymphocytes. This pathway involves processing of antigen in a vacuolar compartment followed by secretion and loading of antigenic peptides to major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules on macrophage cell surface and bystander cells. In this study, we have shown that B lymphocytes are not able to process Salmonella antigens using this alternative pathway. This is due to differences in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium-containing vacuoles (SCV) when comparing late endosomal-lysosomal processing compartments in B lymphocytes to those in macrophages. The IFN-gamma-activated IC21 macrophage cell line and A-20 B-cell line were infected with live or dead Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The SCV in B cells were in a late endosomal-lysosomal compartment, whereas SCV in macrophages were remodeled to a non-characteristic late endosomal-lysosomal compartment over time. Despite the difference in SCV within macrophages and B lymphocytes, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium survives more efficiently within the IFN-gamma-activated B cells than in activated macrophage cell lines. Similar results were found during in vivo acute infection. We determined that a lack of remodeling of late endosomal-lysosomal compartments by live Salmonella infection in B lymphocytes is associated with the inability to use the alternative MHC-I antigen-processing pathway, providing a survival advantage to the bacterium. Our data also suggest that the B lymphocyte late endosome-lysosome environment allows the expression of Salmonella virulence mechanisms favoring B lymphocytes in addition to macrophages and dendritic cells as a reservoir during in vivo infection.

  14. The transcriptional programme of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium reveals a key role for tryptophan metabolism in biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Biofilm formation enhances the capacity of pathogenic Salmonella bacteria to survive stresses that are commonly encountered within food processing and during host infection. The persistence of Salmonella within the food chain has become a major health concern, as biofilms can serve as a reservoir for the contamination of food products. While the molecular mechanisms required for the survival of bacteria on surfaces are not fully understood, transcriptional studies of other bacteria have demonstrated that biofilm growth triggers the expression of specific sets of genes, compared with planktonic cells. Until now, most gene expression studies of Salmonella have focused on the effect of infection-relevant stressors on virulence or the comparison of mutant and wild-type bacteria. However little is known about the physiological responses taking place inside a Salmonella biofilm. Results We have determined the transcriptomic and proteomic profiles of biofilms of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. We discovered that 124 detectable proteins were differentially expressed in the biofilm compared with planktonic cells, and that 10% of the S. Typhimurium genome (433 genes) showed a 2-fold or more change in the biofilm compared with planktonic cells. The genes that were significantly up-regulated implicated certain cellular processes in biofilm development including amino acid metabolism, cell motility, global regulation and tolerance to stress. We found that the most highly down-regulated genes in the biofilm were located on Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 (SPI2), and that a functional SPI2 secretion system regulator (ssrA) was required for S. Typhimurium biofilm formation. We identified STM0341 as a gene of unknown function that was needed for biofilm growth. Genes involved in tryptophan (trp) biosynthesis and transport were up-regulated in the biofilm. Deletion of trpE led to decreased bacterial attachment and this biofilm defect was restored by exogenous

  15. Integrative analysis of Salmonellosis in Israel reveals association of Salmonella enterica Serovar 9,12:l,v:- with extraintestinal infections, dissemination of endemic S. enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104 biotypes, and severe underreporting of outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Marzel, Alex; Desai, Prerak T; Nissan, Israel; Schorr, Yosef Ilan; Suez, Jotham; Valinsky, Lea; Reisfeld, Abraham; Agmon, Vered; Guard, Jean; McClelland, Michael; Rahav, Galia; Gal-Mor, Ohad

    2014-06-01

    Salmonella enterica is the leading etiologic agent of bacterial food-borne outbreaks worldwide. This ubiquitous species contains more than 2,600 serovars that may differ in their host specificity, clinical manifestations, and epidemiology. To characterize salmonellosis epidemiology in Israel and to study the association of nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars with invasive infections, 48,345 Salmonella cases reported and serotyped at the National Salmonella Reference Center between 1995 and 2012 were analyzed. A quasi-Poisson regression was used to identify irregular clusters of illness, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis in conjunction with whole-genome sequencing was applied to molecularly characterize strains of interest. Three hundred twenty-nine human salmonellosis clusters were identified, representing an annual average of 23 (95% confidence interval [CI], 20 to 26) potential outbreaks. We show that the previously unsequenced S. enterica serovar 9,12:l,v:- belongs to the B clade of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica, and we show its frequent association with extraintestinal infections, compared to other NTS serovars. Furthermore, we identified the dissemination of two prevalent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 clones in Israel, which are genetically distinct from other global DT104 isolates. Accumulatively, these findings indicate a severe underreporting of Salmonella outbreaks in Israel and provide insights into the epidemiology and genomics of prevalent serovars, responsible for recurring illness.

  16. Genome-wide analysis of the PreA/PreB (QseB/QseC) regulon of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The Salmonella PreA/PreB two-component system (TCS) is an ortholog of the QseBC TCS of Escherichia coli. In both Salmonella and E. coli, this system has been shown to affect motility and virulence in response to quorum-sensing and hormonal signals, and to affect the transcription of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) pmrAB operon, which encodes an important virulence-associated TCS. Results To determine the PreA/PreB regulon in S. Typhimurium, we performed DNA microarrays comparing the wild type strain and various preA and/or preB mutants in the presence of ectopically expressed preA (qseB). These data confirmed our previous findings of the negative effect of PreB on PreA gene regulation and identified candidate PreA-regulated genes. A proportion of the activated loci were previously identified as PmrA-activated genes (yibD, pmrAB, cptA, etc.) or were genes located in the local region around preA, including the preAB operon. The transcriptional units were defined in this local region by RT-PCR, suggesting three PreA activated operons composed of preA-preB, mdaB-ygiN, and ygiW-STM3175. Several putative virulence-related phenotypes were examined for preAB mutants, resulting in the observation of a host cell invasion and slight virulence defect of a preAB mutant. Contrary to previous reports on this TCS, we were unable to show a PreA/PreB-dependent effect of the quorum-sensing signal AI-2 or of epinephrine on S. Typhimurium with regard to bacterial motility. Conclusion This work further characterizes this unorthadox OmpR/EnvZ class TCS and provides novel candidate regulated genes for further study. This first in-depth study of the PreA/PreB regulatory system phenotypes and regulation suggests significant comparative differences to the reported function of the orthologous QseB/QseC in E. coli. PMID:19236707

  17. First Complete Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strain ATCC 13311 (NCTC 74), a Reference Strain of Multidrug Resistance, as Achieved by Use of PacBio Single-Molecule Real-Time Technology

    PubMed Central

    Juan, Ayaka; Tamotsu, Hinako; Ashimine, Noriko; Nakano, Kazuma; Shimoji, Makiko; Shiroma, Akino; Teruya, Kuniko; Satou, Kazuhito; Hirano, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    We report the first complete genomic sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain ATCC 13311, the leading food-borne pathogen and a reference strain used in drug resistance studies. De novo assembly with PacBio sequencing completed its chromosome and one plasmid. They will accelerate the investigation into multidrug resistance in Salmonella Typhimurium. PMID:25278532

  18. Characterization of a laboratory-derived, high-level ampicillin-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain that caused meningitis in an infant.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Chu, Chishih; Su, Lin-Hui; Wu, Wan-Yu; Wu, Tsu-Lan

    2002-05-01

    A Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain that harbored a plasmid carrying a TEM-1-type beta-lactamase gene was isolated from the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of an infant with meningitis. This 3.2-kb plasmid was further characterized to be a nonconjugative pGEM series cloning vector containing a foreign insert. The strain was likely laboratory derived and contaminated the environment before it caused the infection.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strain SO2 (Sequence Type 302) Isolated from an Asymptomatic Child in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Calva, Edmundo; Puente, José L.; Zaidi, Mussaret B.

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SO2, isolated from an asymptomatic child in Mexico, was determined using PacBio single-molecule real-time technology. Strain SO2 has six complete chromosomal prophages, namely, ST104, Gifsy-2, ST64B, Gifsy-1, ELPhiS, and FSL SP-004, and carries a Salmonella virulence plasmid. PMID:27081133

  20. Complete genome sequencing of a multidrug-resistant and human-invasive Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain of the emerging sequence type 213 genotype

    SciTech Connect

    Calva, Edmundo; Silva, Claudia; Zaidi, Mussaret B.; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Estrada, Karel; Silva, Genivaldo G. Z.; Soto-Jiménez, Luz M.; Wiesner, Magdalena; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Edwards, Robert A.; Vinuesa, Pablo

    2015-06-18

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain YU39 was isolated in 2005 in the state of Yucatán, Mexico, from a human systemic infection. The YU39 strain is representative of the multidrug-resistant emergent sequence type 213 (ST213) genotype. The YU39 complete genome is composed of a chromosome and seven plasmids.

  1. Molecular Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Isolates Determined by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis: Comparison of Isolates from Avian Wildlife, Domestic Animals, and the Environment in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Refsum, Thorbjørn; Heir, Even; Kapperud, Georg; Vardund, Traute; Holstad, Gudmund

    2002-01-01

    The molecular epidemiology of 142 isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium from avian wildlife, domestic animals, and the environment in Norway was investigated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and computerized numerical analysis of the data. The bacterial isolates comprised 79 isolates from wild-living birds, including 46 small passerines and 26 gulls, and 63 isolates of nonavian origin, including 50 domestic animals and 13 environmental samples. Thirteen main clusters were discernible at the 90% similarity level. Most of the isolates (83%) were grouped into three main clusters. These were further divided into 20 subclusters at the 95% similarity level. Isolates from passerines, gulls, and pigeons dominated within five subclusters, whereas isolates from domestic animals and the environment belonged to many different subclusters with no predominance. The results support earlier results that passerines constitute an important source of infection to humans in Norway, whereas it is suggested that gulls and pigeons, based on PFGE analysis, represent only a minor source of human serovar Typhimurium infections. Passerines, gulls, and pigeons may also constitute a source of infection of domestic animals and feed plants or vice versa. Three isolates from cattle and a grain source, of which two were multiresistant, were confirmed as serovar Typhimurium phage type DT 104. These represent the first reported phage type DT 104 isolates from other sources than humans in Norway. PMID:12406755

  2. Isolation of QseC-regulated genes in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by transposon mutgagenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella, a leading cause of U.S. foodborne disease and food-related deaths, often asymptomatically colonizes food-producing animals. In fact, >50% of U.S. swine production facilities test positive for Salmonella. The multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 NCTC13348 c...

  3. Gene regulation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as influenced by LuxS/AI-2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quorum sensing is mediated by small signaling molecules, autoinducer molecules. The luxS gene which is conserved in several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is involved in the synthesis of the autoinducer molecule-2 (AI-2). Genes controlled by luxS in S. Typhimurium were identified using mic...

  4. Fur negatively regulates hns and is required for the expression of HilA and virulence in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Troxell, Bryan; Sikes, Michael L; Fink, Ryan C; Vazquez-Torres, Andres; Jones-Carson, Jessica; Hassan, Hosni M

    2011-01-01

    Iron is an essential element for the survival of living cells. However, excess iron is toxic, and its uptake is exquisitely regulated by the ferric uptake regulator, Fur. In Salmonella, the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) encodes a type three secretion system, which is required for invasion of host epithelial cells in the small intestine. A major activator of SPI-1 is HilA, which is encoded within SPI-1. One known regulator of hilA is Fur. The mechanism of hilA regulation by Fur is unknown. We report here that Fur is required for virulence in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and that Fur is required for the activation of hilA, as well as of other HilA-dependent genes, invF and sipC. The Fur-dependent regulation of hilA was independent of PhoP, a known repressor of hilA. Instead, the expression of the gene coding for the histone-like protein, hns, was significantly derepressed in the fur mutant. Indeed, the activation of hilA by Fur was dependent on 28 nucleotides located upstream of hns. Moreover, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation to show that Fur bound, in vivo, to the upstream region of hns in a metal-dependent fashion. Finally, deletion of fur in an hns mutant resulted in Fur-independent activation of hilA. In conclusion, Fur activates hilA by repressing the expression of hns.

  5. Regulation of marA, soxS, rob, acrAB and micF in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Efrat; Ben-Shalom, Lior; Shachar, Dina; Matthews, Karl R; Yaron, Sima

    2008-12-01

    Importance of the overexpression of AcrAB efflux pumps in the low-level resistance of pathogens to antimicrobials requires a better understanding of the AcrAB regulation. The goal of the present research was to study the transcription of acrAB, as well as the genes that play a role in its regulation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. We monitored the transcription of these genes during growth at 30 degrees C and 37 degrees C, and thoroughly studied the effect of salicylate, paraquat and decanoate. The strengths of the promoters' activities were ordered from strong to weak as micF > rob > acrAB > soxS, marRAB. At both temperatures, marRAB was mainly upregulated by salicylate and decanoate, soxS by paraquat and acrAB and micF by all three compounds. rob was always downregulated. Transcription rates of all promoters were at the greatest level at the beginning of the stationary phase and, except for soxS, levels of transcription and induction were greater at 37 degrees C. Results show that despite the promoters' similar activity and the sequence homology between Escherichia coli and S. typhimurium, regulation of the investigated genes of both strains differed in the response to temperature. This difference was found to be dependent on the promoters' sequence, as the marRAB and acrAB promoters maintained their original dependence on temperature when they were analyzed in the other strain. Hence, it is most likely that the nutrient-limited environment at 37 degrees C in the human body will lead to increased transcription of marA, acrAB and micF in Salmonella, enhancing the resistance properties of the bacteria.

  6. Adhesion and growth inhibitory effect of chicken egg yolk antibody (IgY) on Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chalghoumi, Raja; Théwis, André; Beckers, Yves; Marcq, Christopher; Portetelle, Daniel; Schneider, Yves-Jacques

    2009-06-01

    The protective effects of powder preparation of egg yolk immunoglobulin Y (IgY), specific to Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium outer membrane proteins (OMP), against these two Salmonella sp. serovars were investigated in vitro in two different assays: adhesion-prevention and growth-inhibition. The adhesion-prevention assay was conducted using polarized monolayers of the human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cell line. First, the conditions of Salmonella adherence to Caco-2 cells were optimized, and interferences of bacteria with the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) of fully differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayers and the lactate dehydrogenase release upon exposure of the cells to Salmonella were evaluated. Both Salmonella sp. serovars were able to adhere to Caco-2 cells and decreased TER. Results from the adhesion-prevention assay demonstrated that specific IgY reduced the decrease in TER of the infected Caco-2 cell monolayers and blocked the Salmonella sp. adhesion in a concentration-dependent manner (p < 0.05). Nonspecific IgY also exhibited an inhibitory effect on these two parameters, but to a lesser extent than that of the specific IgY (p < 0.05). The protective effect of nonspecific IgY could be attributed to the low-density lipoprotein component of the water-soluble fraction of egg yolks that may not have been eliminated during ultrafiltration. The growth-inhibition assay revealed that specific IgY had an inhibitory effect on the bacterial growth, markedly during the late exponential phase, whereas nonspecific IgY failed to do so. Taken together, these results suggest that the in vitro growth inhibitory effect of specific IgY on Salmonella spp. resulted from the specific binding activity of these IgY to Salmonella sp. OMP. Passive immunization with Salmonella sp. OMP-specific IgY could thus be useful to prevent Salmonella colonization in broiler chickens and the subsequent carcass contamination during processing.

  7. Effect of chlorate, molybdate, and shikimic acid on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in aerobic and anaerobic cultures.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Christy E; Beier, Ross C; Hume, Michael E; Horrocks, Shane M; Casey, Thomas A; Caton, Joel S; Nisbet, David J; Smith, David J; Krueger, Nathan A; Anderson, Robin C

    2010-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine factors that affect sensitivity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to sodium chlorate (5mM). In our first experiment, cultures grown without chlorate grew more rapidly than those with chlorate. An extended lag before logarithmic growth was observed in anaerobic but not aerobic cultures containing chlorate. Chlorate inhibition of growth during aerobic culture began later than that observed in anaerobic cultures but persisted once inhibition was apparent. Conversely, anaerobic cultures appeared to adapt to chlorate after approximately 10h of incubation, exhibiting rapid compensatory growth. In anaerobic chlorate-containing cultures, 20% of total viable counts were resistant to chlorate by 6h and had propagated to 100% resistance (>10(9)CFU mL(-1)) by 24h. In the aerobic chlorate-containing cultures, 12.9% of colonies had detectable resistance to chlorate by 6h, but only 1% retained detectable resistance at 24h, likely because these cultures had opportunity to respire on oxygen and were thus not enriched via the selective pressure of chlorate. In another study, treatment with shikimic acid (0.34 mM), molybdate (1mM) or their combination had little effect on aerobic or anaerobic growth of Salmonella in the absence of added chlorate. As observed in our earlier study, chlorate resistance was not detected in any cultures without added chlorate. Chlorate resistant Salmonella were recovered at equivalent numbers regardless of treatment after 8h of aerobic or anaerobic culture with added chlorate; however, by 24h incubation chlorate sensitivity was completely restored to aerobic but not anaerobic cultures treated with shikimic acid or molybdate but not their combination. Results indicate that anaerobic adaptation of S. Typhimurium to sodium chlorate during pure culture is likely due to the selective propagation of low numbers of cells exhibiting spontaneous resistance to chlorate and this resistance is not reversible by

  8. Dissemination of clonal Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates causing salmonellosis in Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Issack, Mohammad I; Garcia-Migura, Lourdes; Ramsamy, Veemala D; Svendsen, Christina A; Pornruangwong, Srirat; Pulsrikarn, Chaiwat; Hendriksen, Rene S

    2013-07-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium is one of the leading causes of salmonellosis in Mauritius, where it has also been associated with outbreaks of foodborne illness. However, little is known about its molecular epidemiology in the country. This study was therefore undertaken to investigate the clonality and source of Salmonella Typhimurium in Mauritius by studying human, food, and poultry isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and antibiotic minimum inhibitory concentration determination. Forty-nine isolates collected between 2008 and 2011 were analyzed, including 25 stool isolates from foodborne illness outbreaks and sporadic gastroenteritis cases, four blood isolates, one postmortem colon isolate, 14 food isolates, and five poultry isolates. All isolates were pansusceptible to the 16 antibiotics tested, except for two isolates that were resistant to sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. Overall characterization of the isolates by PFGE digested with XbaI and BlnI resulted in eight different patterns. The largest of the clusters in the composite dataset consisted of 20 isolates, including two raw chicken isolates, four poultry isolates, and nine human stool isolates from two outbreaks. A second cluster consisted of 18 isolates, of which 12 originated from human blood and stool samples from both sporadic and outbreak cases. Six food isolates were also found in this cluster, including isolates from raw and grilled chicken, marlin mousse, and cooked pork. One poultry isolate had a closely related PFGE pattern. The results indicate that one clone of Salmonella Typhimurium found in poultry has been causing outbreaks of foodborne illness in Mauritius and another clone that has caused many cases of gastrointestinal illness and bacteremia in humans could also be linked to poultry. Thus, poultry appears to be a major reservoir for Salmonella Typhimurium in Mauritius. Initiating on-farm control strategies and measures against future dissemination may

  9. No protective effects of high-dosage dietary zinc oxide on weaned pigs infected with Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium DT104.

    PubMed

    Janczyk, Pawel; Kreuzer, Susanne; Assmus, Jens; Nöckler, Karsten; Brockmann, Gudrun A

    2013-05-01

    Twenty-eight-day-old weaned pigs were fed diets with a low (LZn), medium (MZn), or high (MZn) Zn concentration (50 to 80, 150, or 2,500 mg Zn/kg of diet, respectively) provided as zinc oxide (ZnO)(24 pigs per group). They were infected orally with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 on day 32. Salmonellae were cultivated from feces (up to 42 days postinfection [dpi]) and organs (2 and 42 dpi). Activation of the adaptive systemic and mucosal immune systems was investigated by recording anti-Salmonella IgG levels and levels of B and T lymphocyte subpopulations in blood and gut-associated lymphatic tissue. Growth performance was recorded as well. Salmonellae were shed at higher levels and for longer periods in the HZn group (P < 0.05), with no differences in the tissues. At 2 dpi, the relative percentages of CD4(+) T helper cells (P < 0.01) and of CD2(+) T and NK cells (P < 0.01) in blood were reduced from the relative cell counts obtained at 0 dpi, irrespective of the Zn group. The lowest percentage of cytotoxic T cells was found 14 dpi in the HZn group relative to the MZn (P < 0.05) and LZn (P < 0.01) groups. Supplementation of the feed with 2,500 mg Zn/kg of diet immediately after weaning could positively affect the immune responses of piglets infected with Salmonella Typhimurium, but for a short period only. After 2 weeks, all positive effects disappeared, and rather negative effects, such as higher shedding of salmonellae, lower T cell frequencies, and worse performance, occurred. Thus, supplementation with ZnO at high levels in the pig industry should be limited to 2 to 3 weeks.

  10. Effects of nitrate or nitro supplementation, with or without added chlorate, on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli in swine feces.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robin C; Jung, Yong S; Oliver, Christy E; Horrocks, Shane M; Genovese, Kenneth J; Harvey, Roger B; Callaway, Todd R; Edrington, Thomas S; Nisbet, David J

    2007-02-01

    The effects of coincubating the active agent of an experimental chlorate product with nitrate or select nitro compounds, possible inducers and competing substrates for the targeted respiratory nitrate reductase, on concentrations of experimentally inoculated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and indigenous Escherichia coli were determined. Studies were completed in swine fecal suspensions as a prelude to the administration of these inhibitors to pigs. Results confirmed the bactericidal effect of chlorate (5 to 10 mM) against these fecal enterobacteria, reducing (P < 0.05) concentrations by > 2 log CFU ml(-1) after 3 to 6 h of incubation. An effect (P < 0.05) of pH was observed, with considerable regrowth of Salmonella and E. coli occurring after 24 h of incubation in suspensions buffered to pH 7.1 but not in suspensions buffered to pH 6.5 or 5.6. A 24-h coincubation of fecal suspensions with 5 to 10 mM chlorate and as little as 2.5 mM nitrate or 10 to 20 mM 2-nitro-1-propanol, 2-nitroethanol, and, sometimes, nitroethane decreased (P < 0.05) Salmonella but not necessarily E. coli concentrations. 2-Nitro-1-propanol and 2-nitroethanol exhibited inhibitory activity against Salmonella and E. coli by an undetermined mechanism, even in the absence of added chlorate.

  11. Functional insight from the tetratricopeptide repeat-like motifs of the type III secretion chaperone SicA in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Seok; Kim, Bae-Hoon; Jang, Jung Im; Eom, Jeong Seon; Kim, Hyeon Guk; Bang, Iel Soo; Park, Yong Keun

    2014-01-01

    SicA functions both as a class II chaperone for SipB and SipC of the type III secretion system (T3SS)-1 and as a transcriptional cofactor for the AraC-type transcription factor InvF in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Bioinformatic analysis has predicted that SicA possesses three tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-like motifs, which are important for protein-protein interactions and serve as multiprotein complex mediators. To investigate whether the TPR-like motifs in SicA are critical for its transcriptional cofactor function, the canonical residues in these motifs were mutated to glutamate (SicAA44E , SicAA78E , and SicAG112E ). None of these mutants except SicAA44E were able to activate the expression of the sipB and sigD genes. SicAA44E still has a capacity to interact with InvF in vitro, and despite its instability in cell, it could activate the sigDE operon. This suggests that TPR motifs are important for the transcriptional cofactor function of the SicA chaperone.

  12. Molecular characterisation and mechanisms of resistance of multidrug-resistant human Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolated in Amiens (France).

    PubMed

    Biendo, Maurice; Laurans, Geneviève; Thomas, Danièle; Canarelli, Brigitte; Hamdad-Daoudi, Farida; Rousseau, Florence; Castelain, Sandrine; Eb, François

    2005-09-01

    Antimicrobial resistance patterns of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates obtained during the study period were examined. The molecular epidemiology and the mechanisms of resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol and tetracycline were investigated. Resistance to ampicillin increased from 59% between 1996 and 1999 to 62.5% in 2000 and to 66.6% in 2001. Of 51 S. Typhimurium isolates studied, 100% were resistant to ampicillin (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC)>256 mg/L) and sulphonamide (MIC range, 128 to >256 mg/L). Ninety-eight percent of isolates were resistant to streptomycin (MIC range, 48-256 mg/L), 92.2% to tetracycline (MIC range, 32 to >256 mg/L), 88.2% to chloramphenicol (MIC>256 mg/L), 21.5% to sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim (MIC>32 mg/L), 5.8% to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (MIC, 32 mg/L) and 1.9% to cefalothin (MIC, 64mg/L). Six resistance phenotypes were found (a-f), with phenotypes a (47%) and b (27.5%) being predominant. Twenty-five (49%) of 51 isolates produced a single beta-lactamase, among which 48% produced PSE-1, 44% produced TEM-1 and 8% produced OXA-1. Among 26 of the 51 isolates, 10 produced PSE-1+OXA-1, 7 produced TEM-1+PSE-1+OXA-1, 6 produced TEM-1+PSE-1, and 3 produced TEM-1+OXA-1. Forty-eight (94.1%) of the 51 isolates had the plasmid-mediated resistance gene flo(ST) to chloramphenicol and tetracycline. Combining enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), 16 distinct patterns were identified, among which patterns IA (35.3%) and IF (27.4%) were considered as epidemic patterns. The dendrogram obtained from S. Typhimurium pulsotypes allowed five clones (S1-S5) to be identified, with two prevalent clones comprising 47.8% (S2) and 27.3% (S4) of the isolates.

  13. Osmoprotection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by Ngamma-acetyldiaminobutyrate, the precursor of the compatible solute ectoine.

    PubMed

    García-Estepa, Raul; Cánovas, David; Iglesias-Guerra, Fernando; Ventosa, Antonio; Csonka, Laszlo N; Nieto, Joaquín J; Vargas, Carmen

    2006-12-01

    N(gamma)-acetyl-2,4-diaminobutyrate (NADA), the precursor of the compatible solute ectoine, was shown to function as an osmoprotectant for the non-halophilic bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The addition of NADA-containing extracts of an ectoine synthase mutant of the broad salt-growing halophile Chromohalobacter salexigens DSM 3043(T) could alleviate the inhibitory effects of high salinity in S. enterica, which lacks the ectoine biosynthetic pathway. NADA, purified from extracts of the mutant, protected S. enterica against salinity stress. This osmoprotective effect was slightly lower than that of ectoine, but more potent than that of hydroxyectoine. Accumulation of purified NADA by S. enterica was demonstrated by (13)C-NMR spectroscopy and HPLC analysis. In addition, it was shown that NADA was taken up by S. enterica via the ProP and ProU transport systems, which are known to transport glycine betaine and proline. This finding provides evidence that these permeases can recognize a diaminoacid that carries an unsubstituted alpha-amino group. This is the first time that NADA has been connected with osmoprotective functions in non-halophilic bacteria.

  14. Influence of rpoS mutations on the response of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Oppezzo, Oscar J; Costa, Cristina S; Pizarro, Ramón A

    2011-01-10

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an important pathogen, and exhibits considerable resistance to the lethal effects of solar radiation. To evaluate the involvement of the RpoS transcription factor in the defense mechanisms of this organism, the sunlight response of a wild type strain (ATCC14028) was compared with that of an rpoS mutant, which exhibited increased sensitivity. Kinetics of cell death was complex in both strains, probably due to the presence of a variety of targets for the radiation. When ultraviolet radiation was excluded from the incident sunlight, lethal effects were abolished independently of the allelic state of rpoS. Reduction of oxygen concentration in the irradiation medium provided moderate protection to ATCC14028, but notably improved survival of the mutant. Similar assays were developed with another S. enterica strain (DA1468), which is a derivative of strain LT2 and produces low levels of RpoS. In this strain the loss of viability reveals the dependence on solar ultraviolet and oxygen concentration found for ATCC14028, but radiation resistance was slightly reduced. Increased sensitivity was observed in an rpoS mutant derived from DA1468, indicating that RpoS functions related to photoprotection are conserved in this strain. In addition, notable differences in the shape of the survival curves obtained for mutants derived from ATCC14028 and DA1468 were found, suggesting that genes beyond RpoS control are relevant in the sunlight response of these mutants.

  15. Discovery of Novel Secreted Virulence Factors from Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium by Proteomic Analysis of Culture Supernatants

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, George; Brown, Roslyn N.; Gustin, Jean K.; Stufkens, Afke; Shaikh-Kidwai, Afshan S.; Li, Jie; McDermott, Jason E.; Brewer, Heather M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2011-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis in the world. This pathogen has two type-III secretion systems (TTSS) necessary for virulence that are encoded in Salmonella pathogenicity islands 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and SPI-2) and are expressed during extracellular or intracellular infectious states, respectively, to deliver virulence factors (effectors) to the host cell cytoplasm. While many have been identified and at least partially characterized, the full repertoire of effectors has not been catalogued. In this mass spectrometry-based proteomics study, we identified effector proteins secreted under minimal acidic medium growth conditions that induced the SPI-2 TTSS and its effectors, and compared the secretome from the parent strain to the secretome from strains missing either essential (SsaK) or regulatory components (SsaL) of the SPI-2 secretion apparatus. We identified 75% of the known TTSS effector repertoire. Excluding translocon components, 95% of the known effectors were biased for identification in the ssaL mutant background, which demonstrated that SsaL regulates SPI-2 type III secretion. To confirm secretion to animal cells, we made translational fusions of several of the best candidates to the calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis and assayed cAMP levels of infected J774 macrophage-like cells. From these infected cells we identified six new TTSS effectors and two others that are secreted independent of TTSS. Our results substantiate reports of additional secretion systems encoded by Salmonella other than TTSS.

  16. Changes in ultrastructure and Fourier transform infrared spectrum of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium cells after exposure to stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, A; Prieto, M

    2010-11-01

    The effect of exposure to acid (pH 2.5), alkaline (pH 11.0), heat (55°C), and oxidative (40 mM H₂O₂) lethal conditions on the ultrastructure and global chemical composition of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium CECT 443 cells was studied using transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) combined with multivariate statistical methods (hierarchical cluster analysis and factor analysis). Infrared spectra exhibited marked differences in the five spectral regions for all conditions tested compared to those of nontreated control cells, which suggests the existence of a complex bacterial stress response in which modifications in a wide variety of cellular compounds are involved. The visible spectral changes observed in all of the spectral regions, together with ultrastructural changes observed by transmission electron microscopy and data obtained from membrane integrity tests, indicate the existence of membrane damage or alterations in membrane composition after heat, acid, alkaline, and oxidative treatments. Results obtained in this study indicate the potential of FT-IR spectroscopy to discriminate between intact and injured bacterial cells and between treatment technologies, and they show the adequacy of this technique to study the molecular aspects of bacterial stress response.

  17. The Stringent Response Regulator DksA Is Required for Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Growth in Minimal Medium, Motility, Biofilm Formation, and Intestinal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Azriel, Shalhevet; Goren, Alina; Rahav, Galia

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a facultative intracellular human and animal bacterial pathogen posing a major threat to public health worldwide. Salmonella pathogenicity requires complex coordination of multiple physiological and virulence pathways. DksA is a conserved Gram-negative regulator that belongs to a distinct group of transcription factors that bind directly to the RNA polymerase secondary channel, potentiating the effect of the signaling molecule ppGpp during a stringent response. Here, we established that in S. Typhimurium, dksA is induced during the logarithmic phase and DksA is essential for growth in minimal defined medium and plays an important role in motility and biofilm formation. Furthermore, we determined that DksA positively regulates the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 and motility-chemotaxis genes and is necessary for S. Typhimurium invasion of human epithelial cells and uptake by macrophages. In contrast, DksA was found to be dispensable for S. Typhimurium host cell adhesion. Finally, using the colitis mouse model, we found that dksA is spatially induced at the midcecum during the early stage of the infection and required for gastrointestinal colonization and systemic infection in vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that the ancestral stringent response regulator DksA coordinates various physiological and virulence S. Typhimurium programs and therefore is a key virulence regulator of Salmonella. PMID:26553464

  18. Characterisation of recently emerged multiple antibiotic-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium DT104 and other multiresistant phage types from Danish pig herds.

    PubMed

    Baggesen, D L; Aarestrup, F M

    1998-07-25

    A total of 670 isolates of Salmonella enterica were isolated from Danish pig herds, phage typed and tested for susceptibility to amoxycillin + clavulanate, ampicillin, colistin, enrofloxacin, gentamicin, neomycin, spectinomycin, streptomycin, tetracyclines, and trimethoprim + sulphadiazine. S enterica serovar typhimurium (S typhimurium) isolates resistant to ampicillin, streptomycin and tetracycline and three isolates of S typhimurium DT104, two from 1994 and one from 1995, were further tested for resistance against chloramphenicol and sulphonamide and analysed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using the restriction enzyme Xba I. Overall, 66 per cent of the 670 isolates were sensitive to all the antimicrobial agents tested. Eleven isolates of S typhimurium were resistant to ampicillin, streptomycin and tetracycline and also resistant to other antibiotics in different resistance patterns. Seven different multiresistant clones were identified. The most common clones were four isolates of DT104 and three isolates of DT193. Two of the three S typhimurium DT104 from 1994 and 1995 were sensitive to all the antimicrobials tested whereas the remaining isolate from 1994 was resistant to spectinomycin, streptomycin and sulphonamides. All three isolates showed PFGF profiles identical to the four multiresistant DT104 isolates. Compared with most other countries antimicrobial resistance among S enterica isolated from Danish pig herds is uncommon. However, several different multiresistant clones were found.

  19. TRS-based PCR as a potential tool for inter-serovar discrimination of Salmonella Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium, S. Infantis, S. Virchow, S. Hadar, S. Newport and S. Anatum.

    PubMed

    Majchrzak, Marta; Krzyzanowska, Anna; Kubiak, Anna B; Wojtasik, Arkadiusz; Wolkowicz, Tomasz; Szych, Jolanta; Parniewski, Pawel

    2014-11-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica comprises a number of serovars, many of which pose an epidemiological threat to humans and are a worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality. Most reported food infection outbreaks involve the serovars Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium. Rapid identification to determine the primary sources of the bacterial contamination is important to the improvement of public health. In recent years, many DNA-based techniques have been applied to genotype Salmonella. Herein, we report the use of a manual TRS-PCR approach for the differentiation of the Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovars in a single-tube assay. One hundred seventy Salmonella strains were examined in this work. These consisted of serovars S. Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium, S. Infantis, S. Virchow, S. Hadar, S. Newport and S. Anatum. Five of the TRS-primers, N6(GTG)4, N6(CAC)4, N6(CGG)4, N6(CCG)4 and N6(CTG)4, perfectly distinguished the S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium serovars, and the N6(GTG)4 primer additionally grouped the other five frequently isolated serovars. In our opinion, the TRS-PCR methodology could be recommended for a quick and simple DNA-based test for inter-serovar discrimination of Salmonella strains.

  20. Absence of Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule 1, PECAM-1/CD31, In Vivo Increases Resistance to Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lovelace, Michael D.; Yap, May Lin; Yip, Jana; Muller, William; Wijburg, Odilia

    2013-01-01

    PECAM-1/CD31 is known to regulate inflammatory responses and exhibit pro- and anti-inflammatory functions. This study was designed to determine the functional role of PECAM-1 in susceptibility to murine primary in vivo infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and in in vitro inflammatory responses of peritoneal macrophages. Lectin profiling showed that cellular PECAM-1 and recombinant human PECAM-1-Ig chimera contain high levels of mannose sugars and N-acetylglucosamine. Consistent with this carbohydrate pattern, both recombinant human and murine PECAM-1-Ig chimeras were shown to bind S. Typhimurium in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. Using oral and fecal-oral transmission models of S. Typhimurium SL1344 infection, PECAM-1−/− mice were found to be more resistant to S. Typhimurium infection than wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice. While fecal shedding of S. Typhimurium was comparable in wild-type and PECAM-1−/− mice, the PECAM-1-deficient mice had lower bacterial loads in systemic organs such as liver, spleen, and mesenteric lymph nodes than WT mice, suggesting that extraintestinal dissemination was reduced in the absence of PECAM-1. This reduced bacterial load correlated with reduced tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP) levels in sera of PECAM-1−/− mice. Following in vitro stimulation of macrophages with either whole S. Typhimurium, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (Toll-like receptor 4 [TLR4] ligand), or poly(I·C) (TLR3 ligand), production of TNF and IL-6 by PECAM-1−/− macrophages was reduced. Together, these results suggest that PECAM-1 may have multiple functions in resistance to infection with S. Typhimurium, including binding to host cells, extraintestinal spread to deeper tissues, and regulation of inflammatory cytokine production by infected macrophages. PMID:23509149

  1. Distinct innate responses are induced by attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutants.

    PubMed

    Powell, Daniel A; Roberts, Lydia M; Ledvina, Hannah E; Sempowski, Gregory D; Curtiss, Roy; Frelinger, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    Upon bacterial infection the host cells generate a wide variety of cytokines. Genetic attenuation of bacterial physiological pathogens can be accomplished not only by disruption of normal bacterial processes, but also by the loss of the ability to redirect the host immune system. We examined nine attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium mutants for their ability to replicate as well as the cytokines produced after infection of Bone Marrow Derived Macrophages (BMDM). Infection of BMDM with attenuated Salmonella mutants led to host cytokine patterns distinct from those that followed WT infection. Surprisingly, each bacterial mutant had a unique cytokine signature. Because some of the mutants induced an IL-10 response not seen in WT, we examined the role of IL-10 on Salmonella replication. Surprisingly, addition of IL-10 before or concurrent with infection restricted growth of WT Salmonella in BMDM. Bacterial attenuation is not a single process and results in attenuated host responses, which result in unique patterns for each attenuated mutants.

  2. Distinct Innate Responses are Induced by Attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Daniel A.; Roberts, Lydia M.; Ledvina, Hannah E.; Sempowski, Gregory D.; Curtiss, Roy; Frelinger, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Upon bacterial infection the host cells generate a wide variety of cytokines. Genetic attenuation of bacterial physiological pathogens can be accomplished not only by disruption of normal bacterial processes, but also by the loss of the ability to redirect the host immune system. We examined nine attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium mutants for their ability to replicate as well as the cytokines produced after infection of Bone Marrow Derived Macrophages (BMDM). Infection of BMDM with attenuated Salmonella mutants led to host cytokine patterns distinct from those that followed WT infection. Surprisingly, each bacterial mutant had a unique cytokine signature. Because some of the mutants induced an IL-10 response not seen in WT, we examined the role of IL-10 on Salmonella replication. Surprisingly, addition of IL-10 before or concurrent with infection restricted growth of WT Salmonella in BMDM. Bacterial attenuation is not a single process and results in attenuated host responses, which result in unique patterns for each attenuated mutants. PMID:26546408

  3. Genome-guided design of a defined mouse microbiota that confers colonization resistance against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Brugiroux, Sandrine; Beutler, Markus; Pfann, Carina; Garzetti, Debora; Ruscheweyh, Hans-Joachim; Ring, Diana; Diehl, Manuel; Herp, Simone; Lötscher, Yvonne; Hussain, Saib; Bunk, Boyke; Pukall, Rüdiger; Huson, Daniel H; Münch, Philipp C; McHardy, Alice C; McCoy, Kathy D; Macpherson, Andrew J; Loy, Alexander; Clavel, Thomas; Berry, David; Stecher, Bärbel

    2016-11-21

    Protection against enteric infections, also termed colonization resistance, results from mutualistic interactions of the host and its indigenous microbes. The gut microbiota of humans and mice is highly diverse and it is therefore challenging to assign specific properties to its individual members. Here, we have used a collection of murine bacterial strains and a modular design approach to create a minimal bacterial community that, once established in germ-free mice, provided colonization resistance against the human enteric pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Tm). Initially, a community of 12 strains, termed Oligo-Mouse-Microbiota (Oligo-MM(12)), representing members of the major bacterial phyla in the murine gut, was selected. This community was stable over consecutive mouse generations and provided colonization resistance against S. Tm infection, albeit not to the degree of a conventional complex microbiota. Comparative (meta)genome analyses identified functions represented in a conventional microbiome but absent from the Oligo-MM(12). By genome-informed design, we created an improved version of the Oligo-MM community harbouring three facultative anaerobic bacteria from the mouse intestinal bacterial collection (miBC) that provided conventional-like colonization resistance. In conclusion, we have established a highly versatile experimental system that showed efficacy in an enteric infection model. Thus, in combination with exhaustive bacterial strain collections and systems-based approaches, genome-guided design can be used to generate insights into microbe-microbe and microbe-host interactions for the investigation of ecological and disease-relevant mechanisms in the intestine.

  4. Role of Autocleavage in the Function of a Type III Secretion Specificity Switch Protein in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Monjarás Feria, Julia V.; Lefebre, Matthew D.; Stierhof, York-Dieter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are multiprotein machines employed by many Gram-negative bacteria to inject bacterial effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells to promote bacterial survival and colonization. The core unit of T3SSs is the needle complex, a supramolecular structure that mediates the passage of the secreted proteins through the bacterial envelope. A distinct feature of the T3SS is that protein export occurs in a strictly hierarchical manner in which proteins destined to form the needle complex filament and associated structures are secreted first, followed by the secretion of effectors and the proteins that will facilitate their translocation through the target host cell membrane. The secretion hierarchy is established by complex mechanisms that involve several T3SS-associated components, including the “switch protein,” a highly conserved, inner membrane protease that undergoes autocatalytic cleavage. It has been proposed that the autocleavage of the switch protein is the trigger for substrate switching. We show here that autocleavage of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium switch protein SpaS is an unregulated process that occurs after its folding and before its incorporation into the needle complex. Needle complexes assembled with a precleaved form of SpaS function in a manner indistinguishable from that of the wild-type form. Furthermore, an engineered mutant of SpaS that is processed by an external protease also displays wild-type function. These results demonstrate that the cleavage event per se does not provide a signal for substrate switching but support the hypothesis that cleavage allows the proper conformation of SpaS to render it competent for its switching function. PMID:26463164

  5. Low-Shear modeled microgravity alters the Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium stress response in an RpoS-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Wilson, James W; Ott, C Mark; Ramamurthy, Rajee; Porwollik, Steffen; McClelland, Michael; Pierson, Duane L; Nickerson, Cheryl A

    2002-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated that low-shear modeled microgravity (low-shear MMG) serves to enhance the virulence of a bacterial pathogen, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The Salmonella response to low-shear MMG involves a signaling pathway that we have termed the low-shear MMG stimulon, though the identities of the low-shear MMG stimulon genes and regulatory factors are not known. RpoS is the primary sigma factor required for the expression of genes that are induced upon exposure to different environmental-stress signals and is essential for virulence in mice. Since low-shear MMG induces a Salmonella acid stress response and enhances Salmonella virulence, we reasoned that RpoS would be a likely regulator of the Salmonella low-shear MMG response. Our results demonstrate that low-shear MMG provides cross-resistance to several environmental stresses in both wild-type and isogenic rpoS mutant strains. Growth under low-shear MMG decreased the generation time of both strains in minimal medium and increased the ability of both strains to survive in J774 macrophages. Using DNA microarray analysis, we found no evidence of induction of the RpoS regulon by low-shear MMG but did find that other genes were altered in expression under these conditions in both the wild-type and rpoS mutant strains. Our results indicate that, under the conditions of these studies, RpoS is not required for transmission of the signal that induces the low-shear MMG stimulon. Moreover, our studies also indicate that low-shear MMG can be added to a short list of growth conditions that can serve to preadapt an rpoS mutant for resistance to multiple environmental stresses.

  6. Low-Shear modeled microgravity alters the Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium stress response in an RpoS-independent manner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, James W.; Ott, C. Mark; Ramamurthy, Rajee; Porwollik, Steffen; McClelland, Michael; Pierson, Duane L.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2002-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that low-shear modeled microgravity (low-shear MMG) serves to enhance the virulence of a bacterial pathogen, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The Salmonella response to low-shear MMG involves a signaling pathway that we have termed the low-shear MMG stimulon, though the identities of the low-shear MMG stimulon genes and regulatory factors are not known. RpoS is the primary sigma factor required for the expression of genes that are induced upon exposure to different environmental-stress signals and is essential for virulence in mice. Since low-shear MMG induces a Salmonella acid stress response and enhances Salmonella virulence, we reasoned that RpoS would be a likely regulator of the Salmonella low-shear MMG response. Our results demonstrate that low-shear MMG provides cross-resistance to several environmental stresses in both wild-type and isogenic rpoS mutant strains. Growth under low-shear MMG decreased the generation time of both strains in minimal medium and increased the ability of both strains to survive in J774 macrophages. Using DNA microarray analysis, we found no evidence of induction of the RpoS regulon by low-shear MMG but did find that other genes were altered in expression under these conditions in both the wild-type and rpoS mutant strains. Our results indicate that, under the conditions of these studies, RpoS is not required for transmission of the signal that induces the low-shear MMG stimulon. Moreover, our studies also indicate that low-shear MMG can be added to a short list of growth conditions that can serve to preadapt an rpoS mutant for resistance to multiple environmental stresses.

  7. Regulation of the AcrAB multidrug efflux pump in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in response to indole and paraquat.

    PubMed

    Nikaido, Eiji; Shirosaka, Ikue; Yamaguchi, Akihito; Nishino, Kunihiko

    2011-03-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium has at least nine multidrug efflux pumps. Among these, AcrAB is constitutively expressed and is the most efficient, playing a role in both drug resistance and virulence. The acrAB locus is induced by indole, Escherichia coli-conditioned medium, and bile salts. This induction is dependent on RamA through the binding sequence in the upstream region of acrA that binds RamA. In the present study, we made a detailed investigation of the ramA and acrAB induction mechanisms in Salmonella in response to indole, a biological oxidant for bacteria. We found that acrAB and ramA induction in response to indole is dependent on RamR. However, the cysteine residues of RamR do not play a role in the induction of ramA in response to indole, and the oxidative effect of indole is therefore not related to ramA induction via RamR. Furthermore, we showed that paraquat, a superoxide generator, induces acrAB but not ramA. We further discovered that the mechanism of acrAB induction in response to paraquat is dependent on SoxS. The data indicate that there are at least two independent induction pathways for acrAB in response to extracellular signals such as indole and paraquat. We propose that Salmonella utilizes these regulators for acrAB induction in response to extracellular signals in order to adapt itself to environmental conditions.

  8. Igg Subclasses Targeting the Flagella of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Can Mediate Phagocytosis and Bacterial Killing.

    PubMed

    Goh, Yun Shan; Armour, Kathryn L; Clark, Michael R; Grant, Andrew J; Mastroeni, Pietro

    2016-05-30

    Invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella are a common cause of invasive disease in immuno-compromised individuals and in children. Multi-drug resistance poses challenges to disease control, with a critical need for effective vaccines. Flagellin is an attractive vaccine candidate due to surface exposure and high epitope copy number, but its potential as a target for opsonophacytic antibodies is unclear. We examined the effect of targeting flagella with different classes of IgG on the interaction between Salmonella Typhimurium and a human phagocyte-like cell line, THP-1. We tagged the FliC flagellar protein with a foreign CD52 mimotope (TSSPSAD) and bacteria were opsonized with a panel of humanised CD52 antibodies with the same antigen-binding V-region, but different constant regions. We found that IgG binding to flagella increases bacterial phagocytosis and reduces viable intracellular bacterial numbers. Opsonisation with IgG3, followed by IgG1, IgG4, and IgG2, resulted in the highest level of bacterial uptake and in the highest reduction in the intracellular load of viable bacteria. Taken together, our data provide proof-of-principle evidence that targeting flagella with antibodies can increase the antibacterial function of host cells, with IgG3 being the most potent subclass. These data will assist the rational design of urgently needed, optimised vaccines against iNTS disease.

  9. Igg Subclasses Targeting the Flagella of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Can Mediate Phagocytosis and Bacterial Killing

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Yun Shan; Armour, Kathryn L; Clark, Michael R; Grant, Andrew J; Mastroeni, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella are a common cause of invasive disease in immuno-compromised individuals and in children. Multi-drug resistance poses challenges to disease control, with a critical need for effective vaccines. Flagellin is an attractive vaccine candidate due to surface exposure and high epitope copy number, but its potential as a target for opsonophacytic antibodies is unclear. We examined the effect of targeting flagella with different classes of IgG on the interaction between Salmonella Typhimurium and a human phagocyte-like cell line, THP-1. We tagged the FliC flagellar protein with a foreign CD52 mimotope (TSSPSAD) and bacteria were opsonized with a panel of humanised CD52 antibodies with the same antigen-binding V-region, but different constant regions. We found that IgG binding to flagella increases bacterial phagocytosis and reduces viable intracellular bacterial numbers. Opsonisation with IgG3, followed by IgG1, IgG4, and IgG2, resulted in the highest level of bacterial uptake and in the highest reduction in the intracellular load of viable bacteria. Taken together, our data provide proof-of-principle evidence that targeting flagella with antibodies can increase the antibacterial function of host cells, with IgG3 being the most potent subclass. These data will assist the rational design of urgently needed, optimised vaccines against iNTS disease. PMID:27366588

  10. Protection of mice from Brucella infection by immunization with attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium expressing A L7/L12 and BLS fusion antigen of Brucella.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhongpeng; Li, Min; Luo, Deyan; Xing, Li; Wu, Shuo; Duan, Yueqiang; Yang, Penghui; Wang, Xiliang

    2009-08-20

    This study describes the potential use of attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Strains (S. typhimurium) to express and deliver a L7/L12 and BLS fusion antigen of Brucella as a vaccination strategy to prevent Brucella infection in mice. S. typhimurium X4072 that contained a pTrc99A-BLS-L7/L12 plasmid, designated X4072bl, can deliver a L7/L12 and BLS fusion antigen expressed by the bacterium itself, while S. typhimurium X4550 that contained an asd-pVAX1-BLS-L7/L12 (asd-pBL) plasmid, designated X4550bl, can deliver the antigen to be expressed in target eukaryotic cells. When orally administered to BALB/c mice, both attenuated carrier strains were able to elicit mucosal and systemic immunity, which induced protection against B. abortus 544 infection in mice. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of X4072bl and X4550bl were compared with a recombinant BLS-L7/L12 fusion protein vaccine (rBL) and a pVAX1-BLS-L7/L12 DNA vaccine (pBL) in this study. When rBL and pBL were intramuscularly injected into mice, both vaccines could also elicit comparable humoral and cellular immune responses, but not mucosal immunity, which therefore induced lower protection. Taken together, Salmonella-based subunit vaccines are a promising vaccine strategy in the prevention of Brucella infection.

  11. Role of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Two-Component System PreA/PreB in Modulating PmrA-Regulated Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Merighi, Massimo; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Septer, Alecia N.; Bhatiya, Aditi; Gunn, John S.

    2006-01-01

    The PmrA/PmrB two-component system encoded by the pmrCAB operon regulates the modification of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium lipopolysaccharide leading to polymyxin B resistance. PmrA and PhoP are the only known activators of pmrCAB. A transposon mutagenesis screen for additional regulators of a pmrC::MudJ fusion led to the identification of a two-component system, termed PreA/PreB (pmrCAB regulators A and B), that controls the transcription of the pmrCAB operon in response to unknown signals. The initial observations indicated that insertions in, or a deletion of, the preB sensor, but not the preA response regulator, caused upregulation of pmrCAB. Interestingly, the expression of pmrCAB was not upregulated in a preAB mutant grown in LB broth, implicating PreA in the increased expression of pmrCAB in the preB strain. This was confirmed by overexpression of preA+ in preAB or preB backgrounds, which resulted in significant upregulation or further upregulation of pmrCAB. No such effect was observed in any tested preB+ backgrounds. Additionally, an ectopic construct expressing a preA[D51A] allele also failed to upregulate pmrC in any of the pre backgrounds tested, which implies that there is a need for phosphorylation in the activation of the target genes. The observed upregulation of pmrCAB occurred independently of the response regulators PmrA and PhoP. Although a preB mutation led to increased transcription of pmrCAB, this did not result in a measurable effect on polymyxin B resistance. Our genetic data support a model of regulation whereby, in response to unknown signals, the PreB sensor activates PreA, which in turn indirectly upregulates pmrCAB transcription. PMID:16352830

  12. Coordinated Regulation of Virulence during Systemic Infection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Hyunjin; McDermott, Jason E.; Porwollik, Steffen; Mcclelland, Michael; Heffron, Fred

    2009-02-20

    Salmonella must respond to a myriad of environmental cues during infection of a mouse and express specific subsets of genes in a temporal and spatial manner to subvert the host defense mechanisms but these regulatory pathways are poorly established. To unravel how micro-environmental signals are processed and integrated into coordinated action, we constructed in-frame non-polar deletions of 84 regulators inferred to play a role in Salmonella typhimurium virulence and tested them in three virulence assays (intraperitoneal (i.p.), and intragastric (i.g.) infection in BALB/c mice, and persistence in SvJ129 mice). Overall 36 regulators were identified that were less virulent in at least one assay, and of those, 15 regulators were required for systemic mouse infection in an acute infection model. As a first step towards understanding the interplay between a pathogen and its host from a systems biology standpoint we focused on these 15 genes. Transcriptional profiles were obtained for each of these 15 regulators from strains grown under four different environmental conditions. These results as well as publicly available transcriptional profiles were analyzed using both network inference and cluster analysis algorithms. The analysis predicts a regulatory network in which all 15 regulators control a specific set of genes necessary for Salmonella to cause systemic infection. We tested the regulatory model by expressing a subset of the regulators in trans and monitoring transcription of 7 known virulence factors located within Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2). These experiments validated the regulatory model and showed that, for these 7 genes, the response regulator SsrB and the marR type regulator SlyA co-regulate in a regulatory cascade by integrating multiple signals.

  13. Immunogenicity of recombinant proteins consisting of Plasmodium vivax circumsporozoite protein allelic variant-derived epitopes fused with Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium flagellin.

    PubMed

    Leal, Monica Teixeira Andrade; Camacho, Ariane Guglielmi Ariza; Teixeira, Laís Helena; Bargieri, Daniel Youssef; Soares, Irene Silva; Tararam, Cibele Aparecida; Rodrigues, Mauricio M

    2013-09-01

    A Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP)-based recombinant fusion vaccine is the first malaria vaccine to reach phase III clinical trials. Resistance to infection correlated with the production of antibodies to the immunodominant central repeat region of the CSP. In contrast to P. falciparum, vaccine development against the CSP of Plasmodium vivax malaria is far behind. Based on this gap in our knowledge, we generated a recombinant chimeric protein containing the immunodominant central repeat regions of the P. vivax CSP fused to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium-derived flagellin (FliC) to activate the innate immune system. The recombinant proteins that were generated contained repeat regions derived from each of the 3 different allelic variants of the P. vivax CSP or a fusion of regions derived from each of the 3 allelic forms. Mice were subcutaneously immunized with the fusion proteins alone or in combination with the Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR-3) agonist poly(I·C), and the anti-CSP serum IgG response was measured. Immunization with a mixture of the 3 recombinant proteins, each containing immunodominant epitopes derived from a single allelic variant, rather than a single recombinant protein carrying a fusion of regions derived from each of 3 allelic forms elicited a stronger immune response. This response was independent of TLR-4 but required TLR-5/MyD88 activation. Antibody titers significantly increased when poly(I·C) was used as an adjuvant with a mixture of the 3 recombinant proteins. These recombinant fusion proteins are novel candidates for the development of an effective malaria vaccine against P. vivax.

  14. Salmonella typhimurium peptidase active on carnosine.

    PubMed Central

    Kirsh, M; Dembinski, D R; Hartman, P E; Miller, C G

    1978-01-01

    Wild-type Salmonella typhimurium can use carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) as a source of histidine, but carnosine utilization is blocked in particular mutants defective in the constitutive enzyme peptidase D, the product of the pepD gene. Biochemical evidence for assigning carnosinase activity to peptidase D (a broad-specificity dipeptidase) includes: (i) coelution of carnosinase and dipeptidase activity from diethylaminoethyl-cellulose and Bio-Gel P-300 columns; (ii) coelectrophoresis of carnosinase and dipeptidase on polyacrylamide gels; and (iii) inactivation of carnosinase and dipeptidase activities at identical rates at both 4 and 42 degrees C. Genetic evidence indicates that mutations leading to loss of carnosinase activity map at pepD. Several independent pepD mutants have been isolated by different selection procedures, and the patterns of peptide utilization of strains carrying various pepD alleles have been studied. Many pepD mutations lead to the production of partially active peptidase D enzymes with substrate specificities that differ strikingly from those of the wild-type enzyme. The growth yields of carnosinase-deficient strains growing in Difco nutrient broth indicate that carnosine is the major utilizable source of histidine in this medium. PMID:26655

  15. The Salmonella Effector SpvD Is a Cysteine Hydrolase with a Serovar-specific Polymorphism Influencing Catalytic Activity, Suppression of Immune Responses, and Bacterial Virulence*

    PubMed Central

    Grabe, Grzegorz J.; Zhang, Yue; Przydacz, Michal; Rolhion, Nathalie; Yang, Yi; Pruneda, Jonathan N.; Komander, David; Holden, David W.; Hare, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens secrete virulence (effector) proteins that interfere with immune signaling in their host. SpvD is a Salmonella enterica effector protein that we previously demonstrated to negatively regulate the NF-κB signaling pathway and promote virulence of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium in mice. To shed light on the mechanistic basis for these observations, we determined the crystal structure of SpvD and show that it adopts a papain-like fold with a characteristic cysteine-histidine-aspartate catalytic triad comprising Cys-73, His-162, and Asp-182. SpvD possessed an in vitro deconjugative activity on aminoluciferin-linked peptide and protein substrates in vitro. A C73A mutation abolished SpvD activity, demonstrating that an intact catalytic triad is required for its function. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that SpvD is a cysteine protease. The amino acid sequence of SpvD is highly conserved across different S. enterica serovars, but residue 161, located close to the catalytic triad, is variable, with serovar Typhimurium SpvD having an arginine and serovar Enteritidis a glycine at this position. This variation affected hydrolytic activity of the enzyme on artificial substrates and can be explained by substrate accessibility to the active site. Interestingly, the SpvDG161 variant more potently inhibited NF-κB-mediated immune responses in cells in vitro and increased virulence of serovar Typhimurium in mice. In summary, our results explain the biochemical basis for the effect of virulence protein SpvD and demonstrate that a single amino acid polymorphism can affect the overall virulence of a bacterial pathogen in its host. PMID:27789710

  16. A five-strain probiotic combination reduces pathogen shedding and alleviates disease signs in pigs challenged with Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Casey, Pat G; Gardiner, Gillian E; Casey, Garrett; Bradshaw, Bernard; Lawlor, Peadar G; Lynch, P Brendan; Leonard, Finola C; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Hill, Colin

    2007-03-01

    Salmonella spp. infection is a major cause of gastroenteritis, with many thousands of cases reported in the European Union every year. The use of probiotics offers the potential to improve this situation. Here, we investigate the effects of oral treatment of pigs with a defined lactic acid bacteria culture mixture on both clinical and microbiological signs of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection. Fifteen weaned pigs blocked by sex and weight were administered control milk or a mixture of five probiotic strains as either a milk fermentate or milk suspension for a total of 30 days. The mixture consisted of two strains of Lactobacillus murinus and one strain each of Lactobacillus salivarius subsp. salivarius, Lactobacillus pentosus, and Pediococcus pentosaceous. Following probiotic administration for 6 days, animals were challenged orally with serovar Typhimurium; the health of the animals and the microbiological composition of their feces were monitored for 23 days postinfection. Animals treated with probiotic showed reduced incidence, severity, and duration of diarrhea. These animals also gained weight at a greater rate than control pigs administered skim milk. Mean fecal numbers of Salmonella were significantly reduced in probiotic-treated animals at 15 days postinfection (P = 0.01). The administered probiotic bacteria improved both the clinical and microbiological outcome of Salmonella infection. These strains offer significant benefit for use in the food industry and may have potential in human applications.

  17. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes acid tolerance response induced by organic acids at 20 degrees C: optimization and modeling.

    PubMed

    Greenacre, E J; Brocklehurst, T F; Waspe, C R; Wilson, D R; Wilson, P D G

    2003-07-01

    An acid tolerance response (ATR) has been demonstrated in Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in response to low pH poised (i.e., adapted) with acetic or lactic acids at 20 degrees C and modeled by using dynamic differential equations. The ATR was not immediate or prolonged, and optimization occurred after exposure of L. monocytogenes for 3 h at pH 5.5 poised with acetic acid and for 2 h at pH 5.5 poised with lactic acid and after exposure of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium for 2 h at pH 5.5 poised with acetic acid and for 3 h at pH 5.5 poised with lactic acid. An objective mechanistic analysis of the acid inactivation data yielded estimates of the duration of the shoulder (t(s)), the log-linear decline (k(max)), and the magnitude of a critical component (C). The magnitude of k(max) gave the best agreement with estimates of conditions for optimum ATR induction made from the raw data.

  18. CorA affects tolerance of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to the lactoperoxidase enzyme system but not to other forms of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sermon, Jan; Wevers, Eva M-R P; Jansen, Leentje; De Spiegeleer, Philipp; Vanoirbeek, Kristof; Aertsen, Abram; Michiels, Chris W

    2005-11-01

    The enzyme lactoperoxidase is part of the innate immune system in vertebrates and owes its antimicrobial activity to the formation of oxidative reaction products from various substrates. In a previous study, we have reported that, with thiocyanate as a substrate, the lactoperoxidase system elicits a distinct stress response in Escherichia coli MG1655. This response is different from but partly overlapping with the stress responses to hydrogen peroxide and to superoxide. In the current work, we constructed knockouts in 10 lactoperoxidase system-inducible genes to investigate their role in the tolerance of E. coli MG1655 to this antimicrobial system. Five mutations resulted in a slightly increased sensitivity, but one mutation (corA) caused hypersensitivity to the lactoperoxidase system. This hypersensitive phenotype was specific to the lactoperoxidase system, since neither the sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide nor to the superoxide generator plumbagin was affected in the corA mutant. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium corA had a similar phenotype. Although corA encodes an Mg2+ transporter and at least three other inducible open reading frames belonged to the Mg2+ regulon, repression of the Mg stimulon by Mg2+ did not change the lactoperoxidase sensitivity of either the wild-type or corA mutant. Prior exposure to 0.3 mM Ni2+, which is also transported by CorA, strongly sensitized MG1655 but not the corA mutant to the lactoperoxidase system. Furthermore, this Ni2+-dependent sensitization was suppressed by the CorA-specific inhibitor Co(III) hexaammine. These results indicate that CorA affects the lactoperoxidase sensitivity of E. coli by modulating the cytoplasmic concentrations of transition metals that enhance the toxicity of the lactoperoxidase system.

  19. Pronounced susceptibility to infection by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in mice chronically exposed to lead correlates with a shift to Th2-type immune responses

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Cabezudo, Maria J.; Ali, Sumaya A.E.; Ullah, Azim; Hasan, Mohammed Y.; Kosanovic, Melita; Fahim, Mohamed A.; Adem, Abdu; Al-Ramadi, Basel K. . E-mail: ramadi.b@uaeu.ac.ae

    2007-02-01

    Persistent exposure to inorganic lead (Pb) is known to adversely affect the immune system. In the present study, we assessed the effect of chronic Pb exposure on susceptibility to infection by the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Mice were exposed to 10 mM Pb-acetate in drinking water for {approx} 16 weeks, resulting in a significant level of Pb in the blood (106.2 {+-} 8.9 {mu}g/dl). Pb exposure rendered mice susceptible to Salmonella infection, manifested by increased bacterial burden in target organs and heightened mortality. Flow cytometric analysis of the splenic cellular composition in normal and Pb-exposed mice revealed no gross alteration in the ratios of B and T lymphocytes or myeloid cells. Similarly, the capacity of B and T cells to upregulate the expression of activation antigens in response to mitogenic or inflammatory stimuli was not hindered by Pb exposure. Analysis of the ability of ex vivo-cultured splenocytes to secrete cytokines demonstrated a marked reduction in IFN-{gamma} and IL-12p40 production associated with Pb exposure. In contrast, secretion of IL-4 by splenocytes of Pb-treated mice was 3- to 3.6-fold higher than in normal mice. The increased capacity to produce IL-4 correlated with a shift in the in vivo anti-Salmonella antibody response from the protective IgG2a isotype to the Th2-induced IgG1 isotype. We conclude that chronic exposure to high levels of Pb results in a state of immunodeficiency which is not due to an overt cytotoxic or immunosuppressive mechanism, but rather is largely caused by a shift in immune responsiveness to Th2-type reactions.

  20. Structural Alterations of the Cysteine Desulfurase IscS of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Reveal Substrate Specificity of IscS in tRNA Thiolation

    PubMed Central

    Lundgren, Hans K.; Björk, Glenn R.

    2006-01-01

    The cysteine desulfurase IscS in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is required for the formation of all four thiolated nucleosides in tRNA, which is thought to occur via two principally different biosynthetic pathways. The synthesis of 4-thiouridine (s4U) and 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridine (mnm5s2U) occurs by a transfer of sulfur from IscS via various proteins to the target nucleoside in the tRNA, and no iron-sulfur cluster protein participates, whereas the synthesis of 2-thiocytidine (s2C) and N6-(4-hydroxyisopentenyl)-2-methylthioadenosine (ms2io6A) is dependent on iron-sulfur cluster proteins, whose formation and maintenance depend on IscS. Accordingly, inactivation of IscS should result in decreased synthesis of all thiolated nucleosides. We selected mutants defective either in the synthesis of a thiolated nucleoside (mnm5s2U) specific for the iron-sulfur protein-independent pathway or in the synthesis of a thiolated nucleoside (ms2io6A) specific for the iron-sulfur protein-dependent pathway. Although we found altered forms of IscS that influenced the synthesis of all thiolated nucleosides, consistent with the model, we also found mutants defective in subsets of thiolated nucleosides. Alterations in the C-terminal region of IscS reduced the level of only ms2io6A, suggesting that the synthesis of this nucleoside is especially sensitive to minor aberrations in iron-sulfur cluster transfer activity. Our results suggest that IscS has an intrinsic substrate specificity in how it mediates sulfur mobilization and/or iron-sulfur cluster formation and maintenance required for thiolation of tRNA. PMID:16585765

  1. β-Galactomannan and Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii modulate the immune response against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in porcine intestinal epithelial and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Badia, Roger; Brufau, M Teresa; Guerrero-Zamora, Ana Maria; Lizardo, Rosil; Dobrescu, Irina; Martin-Venegas, Raquel; Ferrer, Ruth; Salmon, Henri; Martínez, Paz; Brufau, Joaquim

    2012-03-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes inflammation, necrosis, and diarrhea in pigs, as well as being an important source of food-borne diseases in humans. Probiotics and prebiotics are promising alternatives to antibiotics to control and prevent intestinal infections. The present work investigated a recently developed β-galactomannan (βGM) prebiotic compared to the proven probiotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii on porcine ileum intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) of the IPI-2I line and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) cocultured in vitro with Salmonella. We observed that both S. cerevisiae var. boulardii and βGM inhibited the association of Salmonella with IECs in vitro. Our data indicated that βGM has a higher ability than S. cerevisiae var. boulardii to inhibit Salmonella-induced proinflammatory mRNA (cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-1α [IL-1α], IL-6, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF] and chemokines CCL2, CCL20, and CXCL8) and at protein levels (IL-6 and CXCL8). Additionally, βGM and S. cerevisiae var. boulardii induced some effects on DCs that were not observed on IECs: βGM and S. cerevisiae var. boulardii showed slight upregulation of mRNA for TNF-α, GM-CSF, and CCR7 receptor on porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Indeed, the addition of βGM or S. cerevisiae var. boulardii on DCs cocultured with Salmonella showed higher gene expression (mRNA) for TNF-α, GM-CSF, and CXCL8 compared to that of the control with Salmonella. In conclusion, the addition of βGM inhibits Salmonella-induced proinflammatory profiles in IECs but may promote DC activation, although associated molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated.

  2. Extensive Genetic Variability Linked to IS26 Insertions in the fljB Promoter Region of Atypical Monophasic Variants of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Cécile; Bertrand, Sophie; Mattheus, Wesley; Dierick, Katelijne; Jasson, Vicky; Rosseel, Toon; Van Borm, Steven; Mahillon, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Fifty-nine monophasic Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates, collected in Belgium during the period from 2008 to 2011, have been serotyped as 4,[5]:i:− and shown to harbor an fljB coding sequence. The genetic differences between these strains and phenotypically biphasic Salmonella Typhimurium were analyzed through PCR and DNA sequencing. Genetic alterations in the fljB promoter region affecting expression of the phase 2 flagellin were observed in 53 isolates. Other genetic events in the invertible region carrying the fljB promoter were observed in 2 isolates. For the remaining 4 isolates, no molecular differences with a reference biphasic Salmonella Typhimurium strain could be observed. Next-generation sequencing of one representative isolate affected in the fljB promoter region revealed a 26-kb IS26 composite transposon insertion along with a local genomic rearrangement. Several other IS26 element-mediated alterations of this genomic region were observed. This group of monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium isolates was genetically heterogeneous, as revealed by multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), PCR, and sequencing. Pigs and pork represented a major source of such monophasic isolates in Belgium, as reported in other countries. Three out of 5 isolates of human origin presented genetic profiles identical to those of food isolates, demonstrating the pathogenic potential of the newly characterized variants and potential dissemination along the food chain. This study highlighted the key role played by IS26 insertions in the loss of phase 2 flagellin expression and the subsequent generation of multiple monophasic variant lineages from biphasic Salmonella Typhimurium ancestors. PMID:25724958

  3. Characterization of the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium ydcI Gene, Which Encodes a Conserved DNA Binding Protein Required for Full Acid Stress Resistance▿†

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Matthew E.; Quick, Laura N.; Soni, Anjali; Davis, Richard R.; Crosby, Kathleen; Ott, C. Mark; Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Wilson, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium possesses a stimulon of genes that are differentially regulated in response to conditions of low fluid shear force that increase bacterial virulence and alter other phenotypes. In this study, we show that a previously uncharacterized member of this stimulon, ydcI or STM1625, encodes a highly conserved DNA binding protein with related homologs present in a range of Gram-negative bacterial genera. Gene expression analysis shows that ydcI is expressed in different bacterial genera and is involved in its autoregulation in S. Typhimurium. We demonstrate that purified YdcI protein specifically binds a DNA probe consisting of its own promoter sequence. We constructed an S. Typhimurium ΔydcI mutant strain and show that this strain is more sensitive to both organic and inorganic acid stress than is an isogenic WT strain, and this defect is complemented in trans. Moreover, our data indicate that ydcI is part of the rpoS regulon related to stress resistance. The S. Typhimurium ΔydcI mutant was able to invade cultured cells to the same degree as the WT strain, but a strain in which ydcI expression is induced invaded cells at a level 2.8 times higher than that of the WT. In addition, induction of ydcI expression in S. Typhimurium resulted in the formation of a biofilm in stationary-phase cultures. These data indicate the ydcI gene encodes a conserved DNA binding protein involved with aspects of prokaryotic biology related to stress resistance and possibly virulence. PMID:21398541

  4. Removal of the phage-shock protein PspB causes reduction of virulence in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium independently of NRAMP1.

    PubMed

    Wallrodt, Inke; Jelsbak, Lotte; Thomsen, Line E; Brix, Lena; Lemire, Sébastien; Gautier, Laurent; Nielsen, Dennis S; Jovanovic, Goran; Buck, Martin; Olsen, John E

    2014-06-01

    The phage-shock protein (Psp) system is believed to manage membrane stress in all Enterobacteriaceae and has recently emerged as being important for virulence in several pathogenic species of this phylum. The core of the Psp system consists of the pspA-D operon and the distantly located pspG gene. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), it has recently been reported that PspA is essential for systemic infection of mice, but only in NRAMP1(+) mice, signifying that attenuation is related to coping with divalent cation starvation in the intracellular environment. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of individual psp genes to virulence of S. Typhimurium. Interestingly, deletion of the whole pspA-D set of genes caused attenuation in both NRAMP1(+) and NRAMP1(-) mice, indicating that one or more of the psp genes contribute to virulence independently of NRAMP1 expression in the host. Investigations of single gene mutants showed that knock out of pspB reduced virulence in both types of mice, while deletion of pspA only caused attenuation in NRAMP1(+) mice, and deletion of pspD had a minor effect in NRAMP1(-) mice, while deletions of either pspC or pspG did not affect virulence. Experiments addressed at elucidating the role of PspB in virulence revealed that PspB is dispensable for uptake to and intracellular replication in cultured macrophages and resistance to complement-induced killing. Furthermore, the Psp system of S. Typhimurium was dispensable during pIV-induced secretin stress. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that removal of PspB reduces virulence in S. Typhimurium independently of host NRAMP1 expression, demonstrating that PspB has roles in intra-host survival distinct from the reported contributions of PspA.

  5. Characterization of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Isolates from Pigs and Pig Environment-Related Sources and Evidence of New Circulating Monophasic Strains in Spain.

    PubMed

    Andrés-Barranco, Sara; Vico, Juan Pablo; Marín, Clara María; Herrera-León, Silvia; Mainar-Jaime, Raú Carlos

    2016-03-01

    A total of 117 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and 59 monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium (S. enterica serovar 4,[5],12:i:-) strains isolated between 2008 and 2012 from pig, wild bird, rodent, and farm environment samples from the northeast of Spain were characterized by phage typing, antibiotic susceptibility testing, and multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis in order to evaluate their phenotypic and genetic relatedness. In Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:-, the most prevalent phage types were U311 (40.7%) and DT195 (22%), which did not correspond with the so-called Spanish clone and generally showed a different resistance pattern (ASSuT). Antibiotic resistance was found in 85.8% of the isolates, with 94.1% of them displaying multidrug resistance. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis identified 92 different profiles, six of them shared by both serovars. The minimum spanning tree showed one major cluster that included 95% of the Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- isolates, which came from different animal sources, geographic locations, and time periods, suggesting high clonality among those Salmonella strains and the ability to spread among pig farms. Overall, isolates of Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- were more similar to European strains than to the well-characterized Spanish clone. The spread of these new strains of Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- would likely have been favored by the important pig trade between this Spanish region and other European countries. The overall high prevalence of multidrug resistance observed in these new strains should be noted.

  6. A Mutation in the Putative Lysl-tRNA Synthetase Gene, PoxR of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Results in Altered Protein Production, Elevated Susceptibility to Environmental Challenges and Decreased Swine Colonization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using signature-tagged mutagenesis, a mutation in the poxR gene of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was identified with decreased survival in an ex vivo swine stomach content assay(Bearson et al. Appl Environ Microbiol. 72:2829-36). Gastrointestinal colonization and fecal shedding of the pox...

  7. Effect of deletion of genes involved in lipopolysaccharide core and O-antigen synthesis on virulence and immunogenicity of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kong, Qingke; Yang, Jiseon; Liu, Qing; Alamuri, Praveen; Roland, Kenneth L; Curtiss, Roy

    2011-10-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major virulence factor of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and is composed of lipid A, core oligosaccharide (C-OS), and O-antigen polysaccharide (O-PS). While the functions of the gene products involved in synthesis of core and O-antigen have been elucidated, the effect of removing O-antigen and core sugars on the virulence and immunogenicity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium has not been systematically studied. We introduced nonpolar, defined deletion mutations in waaG (rfaG), waaI (rfaI), rfaH, waaJ (rfaJ), wbaP (rfbP), waaL (rfaL), or wzy (rfc) into wild-type S. Typhimurium. The LPS structure was confirmed, and a number of in vitro and in vivo properties of each mutant were analyzed. All mutants were significantly attenuated compared to the wild-type parent when administered orally to BALB/c mice and were less invasive in host tissues. Strains with ΔwaaG and ΔwaaI mutations, in particular, were deficient in colonization of Peyer's patches and liver. This deficiency could be partially overcome in the ΔwaaI mutant when it was administered intranasally. In the context of an attenuated vaccine strain delivering the pneumococcal antigen PspA, all of the mutations tested resulted in reduced immune responses against PspA and Salmonella antigens. Our results indicate that nonreversible truncation of the outer core is not a viable option for developing a live oral Salmonella vaccine, while a wzy mutant that retains one O-antigen unit is adequate for stimulating the optimal protective immunity to homologous or heterologous antigens by oral, intranasal, or intraperitoneal routes of administration.

  8. Inhibition of Intracellular Growth of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Tissue Culture by Antisense Peptide-Phosphorodiamidate Morpholino Oligomer ▿

    PubMed Central

    Mitev, Georgi M.; Mellbye, Brett L.; Iversen, Patrick L.; Geller, Bruce L.

    2009-01-01

    Two types of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) were tested for inhibition of growth of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Both PMOs have the same 11-base sequence that is antisense to the region near the start codon of acpP, which is essential for lipid biosynthesis and viability. To the 3′ end of each is attached the membrane-penetrating peptide (RXR)4XB (R, X, and B indicate arginine, 6-aminohexanoic acid, and β-alanine, respectively). One peptide-PMO (AcpP PPMO) has no charge on the PMO moiety. The second PPMO has three cations (piperazine) attached to the phosphorodiamidate linkages (3+Pip-AcpP PPMO). A scrambled-sequence PPMO (Scr PPMO) was synthesized for each type of PMO. The MICs of AcpP PPMO, 3+Pip-AcpP PPMO, and either one of the Scr PPMOs were 1.25 μM (7 μg/ml), 0.156 μM (0.94 μg/ml), and >160 μM (>900 μg/ml), respectively. 3+Pip-AcpP PPMO at 1.25 or 2.5 μM significantly reduced the growth rates of pure cultures, whereas AcpP PPMO or either Scr PPMO had no effect. However, the viable cell count was significantly reduced at either concentration of 3+Pip-AcpP PPMO or AcpP PPMO, but not with either Scr PPMO. In other experiments, macrophages were infected intracellularly with S. enterica and treated with 3 μM 3+Pip-AcpP PPMO. Intracellular bacteria were reduced >99% with 3+Pip-AcpP PPMO, whereas intracellular bacteria increased 3 orders of magnitude in untreated or Scr PPMO-treated cultures. We conclude that either AcpP PPMO or 3+Pip-AcpP PPMO inhibited growth of S. enterica in pure culture and that 3+Pip-AcpP PPMO reduced intracellular viability of S. enterica in macrophages. PMID:19581453

  9. Immunogenicity of recombinant attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine strains carrying a gene that encodes Eimeria tenella antigen SO7.

    PubMed

    Konjufca, Vjollca; Jenkins, Mark; Wang, Shifeng; Juarez-Rodriguez, Maria Dolores; Curtiss, Roy

    2008-12-01

    Recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccines against avian coccidiosis were developed to deliver Eimeria species antigens to the lymphoid tissues of chickens via the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) and the type 2 secretion system (T2SS) of Salmonella. For antigen delivery via the T3SS, the Eimeria tenella gene encoding sporozoite antigen SO7 was cloned downstream of the translocation domain of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium sopE gene in the parental pYA3868 and pYA3870 vectors to generate pYA4156 and pYA4157. Newly constructed T3SS vectors were introduced into host strain chi8879 (Delta phoP233 Delta sptP1033::xylE Delta asdA16), an attenuated derivative of the highly virulent UK-1 strain. The SopE-SO7 fusion protein was secreted by the T3SS of Salmonella. The vector pYA4184 was constructed for delivery of the SO7 antigen via the T2SS. The SO7 protein was toxic to Salmonella when larger amounts were synthesized; thus, the synthesis of this protein was placed under the control of the lacI repressor gene, whose expression in turn was dependent on the amount of available arabinose in the medium. The pYA4184 vector was introduced into host strain chi9242 (Delta phoP233 Delta asdA16 Delta araBAD23 Delta relA198::araC P(BAD) lacI TT [TT is the T4ipIII transcription terminator]). In addition to SO7, for immunization and challenge studies we used the EAMZ250 antigen of Eimeria acervulina, which was previously shown to confer partial protection against E. acervulina challenge when it was delivered via the T3SS. Immunization of chickens with a combination of the SO7 and EAMZ250 antigens delivered via the T3SS induced superior protection against challenge by E. acervulina. In contrast, chickens immunized with SO7 that was delivered via the T2SS of Salmonella were better protected from challenge by E. tenella.

  10. Transfer of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium from Beef to Tomato through Kitchen Equipment and the Efficacy of Intermediate Decontamination Procedures.

    PubMed

    Gkana, E; Lianou, A; Nychas, G-J E

    2016-07-01

    It is well established that a high percentage of foodborne illness is caused by failure of consumers to prepare food in a hygienic manner. Indeed, a common practice in households is to use the same kitchen equipment for both raw meat and fresh produce. Such a practice may lead to cross-contamination of fruits and vegetables, which are mainly consumed without further processing, with pathogenic microorganisms originating from raw meat. The present study was performed to examine the transfer of the pathogenic bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium from inoculated beef fillets to tomatoes via contact with high-density polyethylene (PE), stainless steel (SS), and wooden (WD) surfaces and through cutting with SS knives. Furthermore, the following decontamination procedures were applied: (i) rinsing with tap water, (ii) scrubbing with tap water and liquid dish detergent, and (iii) using a commercial antibacterial spray. When surfaces and knives that came into contact with contaminated beef fillets were not cleaned prior to handling tomatoes, the lowest level of pathogen transfer to tomatoes was observed through PE surfaces. All of the decontamination procedures applied were more effective on knives than on surfaces, while among the surface materials tested, WD surfaces were the most difficult to decontaminate, followed by PE and SS surfaces. Mechanical cleaning with tap water and detergent was more efficient in decontaminating WD surfaces than using commercial disinfectant spray, followed by rinsing only with water. Specifically, reductions of 2.07 and 1.09 log CFU/cm(2) were achieved by washing the WD surfaces with water and detergent and spraying the surfaces with an antibacterial product, respectively. Although the pathogen's populations on SS and PE surfaces, as well as on tomatoes, after both aforementioned treatments were under the detection limit, the surfaces were all positive after enrichment, and thus, the potential risk of cross-contamination cannot

  11. Revival of an old problem: an increase in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium definitive phage type 8 infections in 2010 in England and Northern Ireland linked to duck eggs.

    PubMed

    Noble, D J; Lane, C; Little, C L; Davies, R; De Pinna, E; Larkin, L; Morgan, D

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium definitive phage type (DT) 8 is uncommon in humans in the UK. In July 2010, the Health Protection Agency reported an excess isolation rate of pan-susceptible S. Typhimurium DT8 in England and Northern Ireland. By the end of October, this amounted to 81 laboratory-confirmed human cases for all regions of England and Northern Ireland in 2010, an increase of 26% and 41% on 2009 and 2008, respectively. Descriptive epidemiological investigation found a strong association with infection and consumption of duck eggs. Duck eggs contaminated with S. Typhimurium DT8 were collected from a patient's home and also at farms in the duck-egg supply chain. Although duck eggs form a small part of total UK eggs sales, there has been significant growth in sales in recent years. This is the first known outbreak of salmonellosis linked to duck eggs in the UK since 1949 and highlighted the impact of a changing food source and market on the re-emergence of salmonellosis linked to duck eggs. Control measures by the duck-egg industry should be improved along with a continued need to remind the public and commercial caterers of the potential high risks of contracting salmonellosis from duck eggs.

  12. Effects of Physical Properties of Feed on Microbial Ecology and Survival of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in the Pig Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Lene Lind; Naughton, Patrick J.; Hedemann, Mette S.; Jensen, Bent Borg

    2004-01-01

    A two-by-two factorial experiment with pigs was conducted to study the effect of feed grinding (fine and coarse) and feed processing (pelleted and nonpelleted) on physicochemical properties, microbial populations, and survival of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT12 in the gastrointestinal tracts of pigs. Results demonstrated a strong effect of diet on parameters measured in the stomachs of the pigs, whereas the effect was less in the other parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Pigs fed the coarse nonpelleted (C-NP) diet showed more solid gastric content with higher dry matter content than pigs fed the fine nonpelleted (F-NP), coarse pelleted (C-P), or fine pelleted (F-P) diet. Pigs fed the C-NP diet also showed significantly increased number of anaerobic bacteria (P < 0.05), increased concentrations of organic acids, and reduced pH in the stomach. In addition, pigs fed the C-NP diet showed increased in vitro death rate of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT12 in content from the stomach (P < 0.001). Pigs fed the C-NP diet had a significantly higher concentration of undissociated lactic acid in gastric content than pigs fed the other diets (P < 0.001). A strong correlation between the concentration of undissociated lactic acid and the death rate of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT12 was found. In the distal small intestine, cecum, and midcolon, significantly lower numbers of coliform bacteria were observed in pigs fed the coarse diets than in pigs fed the fine diets (P < 0.01). Pigs fed the C-NP diet showed the lowest number of coliform bacteria in these segments of the gastrointestinal tract. Pigs fed the coarse diets showed increased concentration of butyric acid in the cecum (P < 0.05) and colon (P < 0.10) compared with pigs fed the fine diets. It was concluded that feeding a coarsely ground meal feed to pigs changes the physicochemical and microbial properties of content in the stomach, which decreases the survival of Salmonella during passage through

  13. Comparative proteomic analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ppGpp-deficient mutant to identify a novel virulence protein required for intracellular survival in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The global ppGpp-mediated stringent response in pathogenic bacteria plays an important role in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), several genes, including virulence genes, are regulated by ppGpp when bacteria are under the stringent response. To understand the control of virulence genes by ppGpp in S. Typhimurium, agarose 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with mass spectrometry was used and a comprehensive 2-DE reference map of amino acid-starved S. Typhimurium strain SH100, a derivative of ATCC 14028, was established. Results Of the 366 examined spots, 269 proteins were successfully identified. The comparative analysis of the wild-type and ppGpp0 mutant strains revealed 55 proteins, the expression patterns of which were affected by ppGpp. Using a mouse infection model, we further identified a novel virulence-associated factor, STM3169, from the ppGpp-regulated and Salmonella-specific proteins. In addition, Salmonella strains carrying mutations in the gene encoding STM3169 showed growth defects and impaired growth within macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, we found that expression of stm3169 was controlled by ppGpp and SsrB, a response regulator of the two-component system located on Salmonella pathogenicity island 2. Conclusions A proteomic approach using a 2-DE reference map can prove a powerful tool for analyzing virulence factors and the regulatory network involved in Salmonella pathogenesis. Our results also provide evidence of a global response mediated by ppGpp in S. enterica. PMID:21176126

  14. Protective Immunity Elicited by Oral Immunization of Mice with Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Braun Lipoprotein (Lpp) and Acetyltransferase (MsbB) Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Erova, Tatiana E.; Kirtley, Michelle L.; Fitts, Eric C.; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Baze, Wallace B.; Andersson, Jourdan A.; Cong, Yingzi; Tiner, Bethany L.; Sha, Jian; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the extent of attenuation and immunogenicity of the ΔlppAB and ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium when delivered to mice by the oral route. These mutants were deleted either for the Braun lipoprotein genes (lppA and lppB) or in combination with the msbB gene, which encodes an acetyltransferase required for lipid A modification of lipopolysaccharide. Both the mutants were attenuated (100% animal survival) and triggered robust innate and adaptive immune responses. Comparable levels of IgG and its isotypes were produced in mice infected with wild-type (WT) S. typhimurium or its aforementioned mutant strains. The ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutant-immunized animals resulted in the production of higher levels of fecal IgA and serum cytokines during later stages of vaccination (adaptive response). A significant production of interleukin-6 from T-cells was also noted in the ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutant-immunized mice when compared to that of the ΔlppAB mutant. On the other hand, IL-17A production was significantly more in the serum of ΔlppAB mutant-immunized mice (innate response) with a stronger splenic T-cell proliferative and tumor-necrosis factor-α production. Based on 2-dimensional gel analysis, alterations in the levels of several proteins were observed in both the mutant strains when compared to that in WT S. typhimurium and could be associated with the higher immunogenicity of the mutants. Finally, both ΔlppAB and ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutants provided complete protection to immunized mice against a lethal oral challenge dose of WT S. typhimurium. Thus, these mutants may serve as excellent vaccine candidates and also provide a platform for delivering heterologous antigens. PMID:27891321

  15. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in peanut butter cracker sandwiches by radio-frequency heating.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jae-Won; Kim, Sung-Youn; Ryu, Sang-Ryeol; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2013-05-01

    A multistate outbreak of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium recently occurred in the USA, which was traced back to various food products made with contaminated peanut butter. This study was conducted to investigate the efficacy of radio-frequency (RF) heating to inactivate S. Typhimurium and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in peanut butter cracker sandwiches using creamy and chunky commercial peanut butter and to determine the effect on quality by measuring color changes and sensory evaluation. Samples were treated for a maximum time of 90 s in a 27.12 MHz RF heating system. Samples were prepared in the form of peanut butter cracker sandwiches and placed in the middle of two parallel-plate electrodes. After 90 s of RF treatment, the log reductions of S. Typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7 were 4.29 and 4.39 log CFU/g, respectively, in creamy peanut butter. RF treatment of chunky peanut butter for 90 s also significantly (P < 0.05) reduced levels of S. Typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7 by 4.55 log CFU/g and 5.32 log CFU/g. Color values and sensory characteristics of the RF treated peanut butter and crackers were not significantly (P > 0.05) different from the control. These results suggest that RF heating can be applied to control pathogens in peanut butter products without affecting quality.

  16. Protective Immunity Elicited by Oral Immunization of Mice with Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Braun Lipoprotein (Lpp) and Acetyltransferase (MsbB) Mutants.

    PubMed

    Erova, Tatiana E; Kirtley, Michelle L; Fitts, Eric C; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Baze, Wallace B; Andersson, Jourdan A; Cong, Yingzi; Tiner, Bethany L; Sha, Jian; Chopra, Ashok K

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the extent of attenuation and immunogenicity of the ΔlppAB and ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium when delivered to mice by the oral route. These mutants were deleted either for the Braun lipoprotein genes (lppA and lppB) or in combination with the msbB gene, which encodes an acetyltransferase required for lipid A modification of lipopolysaccharide. Both the mutants were attenuated (100% animal survival) and triggered robust innate and adaptive immune responses. Comparable levels of IgG and its isotypes were produced in mice infected with wild-type (WT) S. typhimurium or its aforementioned mutant strains. The ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutant-immunized animals resulted in the production of higher levels of fecal IgA and serum cytokines during later stages of vaccination (adaptive response). A significant production of interleukin-6 from T-cells was also noted in the ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutant-immunized mice when compared to that of the ΔlppAB mutant. On the other hand, IL-17A production was significantly more in the serum of ΔlppAB mutant-immunized mice (innate response) with a stronger splenic T-cell proliferative and tumor-necrosis factor-α production. Based on 2-dimensional gel analysis, alterations in the levels of several proteins were observed in both the mutant strains when compared to that in WT S. typhimurium and could be associated with the higher immunogenicity of the mutants. Finally, both ΔlppAB and ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutants provided complete protection to immunized mice against a lethal oral challenge dose of WT S. typhimurium. Thus, these mutants may serve as excellent vaccine candidates and also provide a platform for delivering heterologous antigens.

  17. Modulation of Biofilm-Formation in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium by the Periplasmic DsbA/DsbB Oxidoreductase System Requires the GGDEF-EAL Domain Protein STM3615

    PubMed Central

    Römling, Ute; Rhen, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), biofilm-formation is controlled by the cytoplasmic intracellular small-molecular second messenger cyclic 3′, 5′-di- guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) through the activities of GGDEF and EAL domain proteins. Here we describe that deleting either dsbA or dsbB, respectively encoding a periplasmic protein disulfide oxidase and a cytoplasmic membrane disulfide oxidoreductase, resulted in increased biofilm-formation on solid medium. This increased biofilm-formation, defined as a red, dry and rough (rdar) colony morphotype, paralleled with enhanced expression of the biofilm master regulator CsgD and the biofilm-associated fimbrial subunit CsgA. Deleting csgD in either dsb mutant abrogated the enhanced biofilm-formation. Likewise, overexpression of the c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase YhjH, or mutationally inactivating the CsgD activator EAL-domain protein YdiV, reduced biofilm-formation in either of the dsb mutants. Intriguingly, deleting the GGDEF-EAL domain protein gene STM3615 (yhjK), previously not connected to rdar morphotype development, also abrogated the escalated rdar morphotype formation in dsb mutant backgrounds. Enhanced biofilm-formation in dsb mutants was furthermore annulled by exposure to the protein disulfide catalyst copper chloride. When analyzed for the effect of exogenous reducing stress on biofilm-formation, both dsb mutants initially showed an escalated rdar morphotype development that later dissolved to reveal a smooth mucoid colony morphotype. From these results we conclude that biofilm-development in S. Typhimurium is affected by periplasmic protein disulphide bond status through CsgD, and discuss the involvement of selected GGDEF/EAL domain protein(s) as signaling mediators. PMID:25153529

  18. Protective Effects of a Novel Probiotic Strain of Lactobacillus plantarum JSA22 from Traditional Fermented Soybean Food Against Infection by Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Eom, Jeong Seon; Song, Jin; Choi, Hye Sun

    2015-04-01

    Lactobacillus species have been shown to enhance intestinal epithelial barrier function, modulate host immune responses, and suppress the growth of pathogenic bacteria, yeasts, molds, and viruses. Thus, lactobacilli have been used as probiotics for treating various diseases, including intestinal disorders, and as biological preservatives in the food and agricultural industries. However, the molecular mechanisms used by lactobacilli to suppress pathogenic bacterial infections have been poorly characterized. We previously isolated Lactobacillus plantarum JSA22 from buckwheat sokseongjang, a traditional Korean fermented soybean food, which possessed high enzymatic, fibrinolytic, and broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against foodborne pathogens. In this study, we investigated the effects of L. plantarum JSA22 on the growth of S. Typhimurium and S. Typhimurium-induced cytotoxicity by stimulating the host immune response in intestinal epithelial cells. The results showed that coincubation of S. Typhimurium and L. plantarum JSA22 with intestinal epithelial cells suppressed S. Typhimurium infection, S. Typhimurium-induced NF-kappaB activation, and IL-8 production, and lowered the phosphorylation of both Akt and p38. These data indicated that L. plantarum JSA22 has probiotic properties, and can inhibit S. Typhimurium infection of intestinal epithelial cells. Our findings can be used to develop therapeutic and prophylactic agents against pathogenic bacteria.

  19. Model-driven discovery of synergistic inhibitors against E. coli and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium targeting a novel synthetic lethal pair, aldA and prpC

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Ramy K.; Khaw, Valerie L.; Monk, Jonathan M.; Brunk, Elizabeth; Lewis, Robert; Loh, Suh I.; Mishra, Arti; Nagle, Amrita A.; Satyanarayana, Chitkala; Dhakshinamoorthy, Saravanakumar; Luche, Michele; Kitchen, Douglas B.; Andrews, Kathleen A.; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.; Charusanti, Pep

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical models of biochemical networks form a cornerstone of bacterial systems biology. Inconsistencies between simulation output and experimental data point to gaps in knowledge about the fundamental biology of the organism. One such inconsistency centers on the gene aldA in Escherichia coli: it is essential in a computational model of E. coli metabolism, but experimentally it is not. Here, we reconcile this disparity by providing evidence that aldA and prpC form a synthetic lethal pair, as the double knockout could only be created through complementation with a plasmid-borne copy of aldA. Moreover, virtual and biological screening against the two proteins led to a set of compounds that inhibited the growth of E. coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium synergistically at 100–200 μM individual concentrations. These results highlight the power of metabolic models to drive basic biological discovery and their potential use to discover new combination antibiotics. PMID:26441892

  20. Long-term dissemination of CTX-M-5-producing hypermutable Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium sequence type 328 strains in Russia, Belarus, and Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Kozyreva, Varvara K; Ilina, Elena N; Malakhova, Maja V; Carattoli, Alessandra; Azizov, Ilya S; Tapalski, Dmitry V; Kozlov, Roman S; Edelstein, Mikhail V

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present evidence of long-term circulation of cefotaxime-resistant clonally related Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains over a broad geographic area. The genetic relatedness of 88 isolates collected from multiple outbreaks and sporadic cases of nosocomial salmonellosis in various parts of Russia, Belarus, and Kazakhstan from 1996 to 2009 was established by multilocus tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The isolates belong to sequence type 328 (ST328) and produce CTX-M-5 β-lactamase, whose gene is carried by highly related non-self-conjugative but mobilizable plasmids. Resistance to nalidixic acid and low-level resistance to ciprofloxacin is present in 37 (42%) of the isolates and in all cases is determined by various single point mutations in the gyrA gene quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR). Isolates of the described clonal group exhibit a hypermutable phenotype that probably facilitates independent acquisition of quinolone resistance mutations.

  1. Multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Monophasic Variant 4,12:i:- Isolated from Asymptomatic Wildlife in a Catalonian Wildlife Rehabilitation Center, Spain.

    PubMed

    Molina-López, Rafael A; Vidal, Anna; Obón, Elena; Martín, Marga; Darwich, Laila

    2015-07-01

    Wildlife can act as long-term asymptomatic reservoirs for zoonotic bacteria, such as Salmonella. The prevalence and antimicrobial-susceptibility profiles of Salmonella spp. were assessed in 263 cases in wildlife from 22 animal orders from a wildlife rehabilitation center in Catalonia (NE Spain), September 2013-May 2014. Eleven of 263 tested animals were positive for Salmonella spp., representing an overall prevalence of 4.2%. Prevalences by taxonomic categories were 2% in mammals, 4.7% in birds, and 4.5% in reptiles. By species, one each of European hedgehog (Erinaceus europeus; from a sample of n = 26), Eurasian Eagle Owl (Bubo bubo; n = 2), Barn Owl (Tyto alba; n = 3), Tawny Owl (Strix aluco; n = 20), Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus; n = 1), Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus; n = 1), and Hoopoe (Upupa epops; n = 2), and two each Common Kestrels (Falco tinnunculus; n = 16) and pond sliders (Trachemys scripta; n = 25) were positive for Salmonella. By serotyping, seven of eleven isolates were classified as S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium, and five of seven belonged to the monophasic variant 4,12:i:-. All the monophasic variants were isolated from birds (4/5 in raptors) and showed a multidrug-resistance (MDR) profile to at least ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfonamide, and tetracycline (R-type ASSuT), and up to 12 antibiotics. The large proportion of S. Typhimurium monophasic MDR strains detected in wildlife never treated with antibiotics, especially in raptors, adds more complexity to the epidemiologic control of one of the most frequent serovars involved in human and livestock infection.

  2. Movement of Salmonella serovar Typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7 to Ripe Tomato Fruit Following Various Routes of Contamination.

    PubMed

    Deering, Amanda J; Jack, Dan R; Pruitt, Robert E; Mauer, Lisa J

    2015-11-05

    Salmonella serovars have been associated with the majority of foodborne illness outbreaks involving tomatoes, and E. coli O157:H7 has caused outbreaks involving other fresh produce. Contamination by both pathogens has been thought to originate from all points of the growing and distribution process. To determine if Salmonella serovar Typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7 could move to the mature tomato fruit of different tomato cultivars following contamination, three different contamination scenarios (seed, leaf, and soil) were examined. Following contamination, each cultivar appeared to respond differently to the presence of the pathogens, with most producing few fruit and having overall poor health. The Micro-Tom cultivar, however, produced relatively more fruit and E. coli O157:H7 was detected in the ripe tomatoes for both the seed- and leaf- contaminated plants, but not following soil contamination. The Roma cultivar produced fewer fruit, but was the only cultivar in which E. coli O157:H7 was detected via all three routes of contamination. Only two of the five cultivars produced tomatoes following seed-, leaf-, and soil- contamination with Salmonella Typhimurium, and no Salmonella was found in any of the tomatoes. Together these results show that different tomato cultivars respond differently to the presence of a human pathogen, and for E. coli O157:H7, in particular, tomato plants that are either contaminated as seeds or have a natural opening or a wound, that allows bacteria to enter the leaves can result in plants that have the potential to produce tomatoes that harbor internalized pathogenic bacteria.

  3. Effects of dam and/or seqA mutations on the fatty acid and phospholipid membrane composition of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Aloui, Amine; Mihoub, Mouadh; Sethom, Mohamed Marwan; Chatti, Abdelwaheb; Feki, Moncef; Kaabachi, Naziha; Landoulsi, Ahmed

    2010-05-01

    We examined the phospholipids (Phls) and the membrane fatty acid (FA) composition in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium dam and/or seqA mutants. Phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and cardiolipin (CL) are the major Phls present in all the strains and accounted for greater than 95% of the total lipid phosphorus. Phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylserine are the minor ones. The seqA mutant showed a decrease in PE and an increase in CL and phosphatidylglycerol proportion compared with the wild-type strain. The same changes were observed with the seqA dam double mutant. However, the dam mutation caused an unusual accumulation of CL with a significant decrease in the PE content, compared with the isogenic wild-type strain. FA composition of the total lipids and the different fractions containing Phls have been determined. The major saturated FAs (SFAs) and unsaturated FAs (UFAs) found were C(14:0), C(16:0) and C(16:1w7), C(18:1w9), respectively. Cyclic FAs, cyc(17:0) and cyc(19:0), were also present in appreciable amounts. Moreover, dam and/or seqA mutations caused a decrease in UFA/SFA ratio and there was a progressive reduction in the content of C(16:1w7) and C(18:1w9), going through the order seqA, dam/seqA, and dam mutants. This decrease in UFA content was compensated for in all strains by an increase in the corresponding C(17-) and C(19-) cyclic FAs. So these UFAs were converted to their cyclopropane derivatives, which resulted in a low UFA/SFA ratio. SeqA and Dam proteins might regulate FA biosynthesis and Phls composition of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

  4. Movement of Salmonella serovar Typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7 to Ripe Tomato Fruit Following Various Routes of Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Deering, Amanda J.; Jack, Dan R.; Pruitt, Robert E.; Mauer, Lisa J.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella serovars have been associated with the majority of foodborne illness outbreaks involving tomatoes, and E. coli O157:H7 has caused outbreaks involving other fresh produce. Contamination by both pathogens has been thought to originate from all points of the growing and distribution process. To determine if Salmonella serovar Typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7 could move to the mature tomato fruit of different tomato cultivars following contamination, three different contamination scenarios (seed, leaf, and soil) were examined. Following contamination, each cultivar appeared to respond differently to the presence of the pathogens, with most producing few fruit and having overall poor health. The Micro-Tom cultivar, however, produced relatively more fruit and E. coli O157:H7 was detected in the ripe tomatoes for both the seed- and leaf- contaminated plants, but not following soil contamination. The Roma cultivar produced fewer fruit, but was the only cultivar in which E. coli O157:H7 was detected via all three routes of contamination. Only two of the five cultivars produced tomatoes following seed-, leaf-, and soil- contamination with Salmonella Typhimurium, and no Salmonella was found in any of the tomatoes. Together these results show that different tomato cultivars respond differently to the presence of a human pathogen, and for E. coli O157:H7, in particular, tomato plants that are either contaminated as seeds or have a natural opening or a wound, that allows bacteria to enter the leaves can result in plants that have the potential to produce tomatoes that harbor internalized pathogenic bacteria. PMID:27682118

  5. Chloramphenicol and tetracycline decrease motility and increase invasion and attachment gene expression in specific isolates of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Brunelle, Brian W.; Bearson, Bradley L.; Bearson, Shawn M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is one of the most common serovars isolated from humans and livestock, and over 35% of these isolates are resistant to three or more antibiotics. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella is a public health concern as it is associated with increased morbidity in patients compared to antibiotic sensitive strains, though it is unknown how the antibiotic resistant isolates lead to a more severe infection. Cellular invasion is temporally regulated in Salmonella and normally occurs during late-log and stationary growth. However, our previous work determined that a 30 min exposure to a sub-inhibitory concentration of tetracycline can induce the full invasion phenotype during early-log growth in certain MDR S. Typhimurium isolates. The current study examined whether sub-inhibitory concentrations of other antibiotics could also induce the invasiveness in the same set of isolates. Ampicillin and streptomycin had no effect on invasion, but certain concentrations of chloramphenicol were found to induce invasion in a subset of isolates. Two of the isolates induced by chloramphenicol were also inducible by tetracycline. RNA-seq analyses demonstrated that chloramphenicol and tetracycline both down-regulated motility gene expression, while up-regulating genes associated with attachment, invasion, and intracellular survival. Eleven fimbrial operons were up-regulated, which is notable as only three fimbrial operons were thought to be inducible in culture; six of these up-regulated operons have been reported to play a role in Salmonella persistence in mice. Overall, these data show that the normal progression of the genetic pathways that regulate invasion can be expedited to occur within 30 min due to antibiotic exposure. This altered invasion process due to antibiotics may play a role in the increased intensity and duration of infection observed in patients with MDR Salmonella. PMID:25688233

  6. Evaluation of near-infrared pasteurization in controlling Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat sliced ham.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jae-Won; Ryu, Sang-Ryeol; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2012-09-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the efficacy of near-infrared (NIR) heating to reduce Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat (RTE) sliced ham compared to conventional convective heating, and the effect of NIR heating on quality was determined by measuring the color and texture change. A cocktail of three pathogens was inoculated on the exposed or protected surfaces of ham slices, followed by NIR or conventional heating at 1.8 kW. NIR heating for 50 s achieved 4.1-, 4.19-, and 3.38-log reductions in surface-inoculated S. Typhimurium, E. coli O157:H7, and L. monocytogenes, respectively, whereas convective heating needed 180 s to attain comparable reductions for each pathogen. There were no statistically significant (P > 0.05) differences in reduction between surface- and internally inoculated pathogens at the end of NIR treatment (50 s). However, when treated with conventional convective heating, significant (P < 0.05) differences were observed at the final stages of the treatment (150 and 180 s). Color values and texture parameters of NIR-treated (50-s treatment) ham slices were not significantly (P > 0.05) different from those of nontreated samples. These results suggest that NIR heating can be applied to control internalized pathogens as well as surface-adhering pathogens in RTE sliced meats without affecting product quality.

  7. Characterization of small ColE1-like plasmids conferring kanamycin resistance in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovars Typhimurium and Newport.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Yi; Strobaugh, Terence P; Frye, Jonathan G

    2010-05-01

    Multi-antibiotic resistant (MR) Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Newport are an increasing concern in human and animal health. Many strains are known to carry antibiotic resistance determinants on multiple plasmids, yet detailed information has been scarce. Three plasmids conferring kanamycin (Kan) resistance were isolated and nucleotide sequences were determined. Two Kan(R) plasmids from Salmonella Newport strains, pSN11/00Kan and pSN02/01Kan, were found to be identical and were 5698bp in size. Plasmid pG7601Kan from Salmonella Typhimurium phage type U302 strain G7601 was 3208bp, and was the same as the previously reported pU302S from another U302 strain G8430. All three plasmids carried identical aph(3')-I genes. The plasmids were ColE1-like, containing RNA I/RNA II and the rom gene. Plasmids pSN11/00Kan and pSN02/01Kan also carried mobilization genes mobC and mobABD, similar to those of the pColK-K235 and pColD-157 plasmids from the colicinogenic Escherichia coli strains. All three plasmids were stable without kanamycin selection for approximately 100 generations.

  8. Evaluation of Near-Infrared Pasteurization in Controlling Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes in Ready-To-Eat Sliced Ham

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jae-Won; Ryu, Sang-Ryeol

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the efficacy of near-infrared (NIR) heating to reduce Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat (RTE) sliced ham compared to conventional convective heating, and the effect of NIR heating on quality was determined by measuring the color and texture change. A cocktail of three pathogens was inoculated on the exposed or protected surfaces of ham slices, followed by NIR or conventional heating at 1.8 kW. NIR heating for 50 s achieved 4.1-, 4.19-, and 3.38-log reductions in surface-inoculated S. Typhimurium, E. coli O157:H7, and L. monocytogenes, respectively, whereas convective heating needed 180 s to attain comparable reductions for each pathogen. There were no statistically significant (P > 0.05) differences in reduction between surface- and internally inoculated pathogens at the end of NIR treatment (50 s). However, when treated with conventional convective heating, significant (P < 0.05) differences were observed at the final stages of the treatment (150 and 180 s). Color values and texture parameters of NIR-treated (50-s treatment) ham slices were not significantly (P > 0.05) different from those of nontreated samples. These results suggest that NIR heating can be applied to control internalized pathogens as well as surface-adhering pathogens in RTE sliced meats without affecting product quality. PMID:22773635

  9. Oral immunization with attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium encoding Cryptosporidium parvum Cp23 and Cp40 antigens induces a specific immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Alvaro J; McNair, Nina; Mead, Jan R

    2009-09-01

    Attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine strain SL3261 was used as an antigen delivery system for the oral immunization of mice against two Cryptosporidium parvum antigens, Cp23 and Cp40. Each antigen was subcloned into the pTECH1 vector system, which allows them to be expressed as fusion proteins with highly immunogenic fragment C of tetanus toxin under the control of the anaerobically inducible nirB promoter. The recombinant vector was introduced into Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine strain SL3261, and the stable soluble expression of the chimeric protein was evaluated and confirmed by Western blotting with polyclonal C. parvum antisera. Mice were inoculated orally with a single dose of SL3261/pTECH-Cp23 or Cp40, respectively, and plasmid stability was demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. Specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against the Cp23 or Cp40 antigen were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay 35 days after immunization. Also, serum IgA and mucosal (feces) IgA antibodies were detected in 30% of the mice immunized with Cp23. In addition, prime-boosting with Cp23 and Cp40 DNA vaccine vectors followed by Salmonella immunization significantly increased antibody responses to both antigens. Our data show that a single oral inoculation with recombinant S. Typhimurium SL3261 can induce specific antibody responses to the Cp23 or Cp40 antigen from C. parvum in mice, suggesting that recombinant Salmonella is a feasible delivery system for a vaccine against C. parvum infection.

  10. Mixed biofilm formation by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium enhanced bacterial resistance to sanitization due to extracellular polymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Kalchayanand, Norasak; Schmidt, John W; Harhay, Dayna M

    2013-09-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium are important foodborne pathogens capable of forming single-species biofilms or coexisting in multispecies biofilm communities. Bacterial biofilm cells are usually more resistant to sanitization than their planktonic counterparts, so these foodborne pathogens in biofilms pose a serious food safety concern. We investigated how the coexistence of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium strains would affect bacterial planktonic growth competition and mixed biofilm composition. Furthermore, we also investigated how mixed biofilm formation would affect bacterial resistance to common sanitizers. Salmonella Typhimurium strains were able to outcompete E. coli strains in the planktonic growth phase; however, mixed biofilm development was highly dependent upon companion strain properties in terms of the expression of bacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), including curli fimbriae and exopolysaccharide cellulose. The EPS-producing strains with higher biofilm-forming abilities were able to establish themselves in mixed biofilms more efficiently. In comparison to single-strain biofilms, Salmonella or E. coli strains with negative EPS expression obtained significantly enhanced resistance to sanitization by forming mixed biofilms with an EPS-producing companion strain of the other species. These observations indicate that the bacterial EPS components not only enhance the sanitizer resistance of the EPS-producing strains but also render protections to their companion strains, regardless of species, in mixed biofilms. Our study highlights the potential risk of cross-contamination by multispecies biofilms in food safety and the need for increased attention to proper sanitization practices in food processing facilities.

  11. Distribution of Gifsy-3 and of Variants of ST64B and Gifsy-1 Prophages amongst Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Isolates: Evidence that Combinations of Prophages Promote Clonality

    PubMed Central

    Hiley, Lester; Fang, Ning-Xia; Micalizzi, Gino R.; Bates, John

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella isolates harbour a range of resident prophages which can influence their virulence and ability to compete and survive in their environment. Phage gene profiling of a range of phage types of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) indicates a significant level of correlation of phage gene profile with phage type as well as correlation with genotypes determined by a combination of multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) typing and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) typing. Variation in phage gene profiles appears to be partly linked to differences in composition of variants of known prophages. We therefore conducted a study of the distribution of variants of ST64B and Gifsy-1 prophages and coincidently the presence of Gifsy-3 prophage in a range of S. Typhimurium phage types and genotypes. We have discovered two variants of the DT104 variant of ST64B and at least two new variants of Gifsy-1 as well as variants of related phage genes. While there is definite correlation between phage type and the prophage profile based on ST64B and Gifsy-1 variants we find stronger correlation between the VNTR/CRISPR genotype and prophage profile. Further differentiation of some genotypes is obtained by addition of the distribution of Gifsy-3 and a sequence variant of the substituted SB26 gene from the DT104 variant of ST64B. To explain the correlation between genotype and prophage profile we propose that suites of resident prophages promote clonality possibly through superinfection exclusion systems. PMID:24475087

  12. Antibody-based Detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Grown in Low-shear Modeled Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyquist-Battie, Cynthia; Freeman, Laura; Leckband, Kristen; Martinez, Stephanie; Ansley, Ariel; Lund, Deanna; Lim, Daniel V.

    2008-06-01

    With the advent of prolonged spaceflights, it is important to determine if antibody-based assays can be used to monitor food and water for bacterial contaminants. In the present work, a ground-based high aspect ratio vessel (HARV) was used to determine if low shear modeled microgravity (LSMMG) alters antibody-binding to E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Antibody-bacteria binding was similar under LSMMG and normal gravity because there was no difference in amount of captured bacteria measured by colony forming units (CFU) between assays conducted in the HARV and a conventional roller flask. The ability of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium grown in LSMMG to bind specific antibodies was also studied. After incubations of 4, 18 or 36 h in the HARV or a shaking incubator, bacteria were harvested for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). In the E. coli O157:H7 ELISA using a goat polyclonal primary antibody, LSMMG did not alter the linear range of detection (105-107 cells/ml) nor the signal to noise ratio at any bacterial concentration. Although insignificant changes in signal to noise ratios were evident, LSMMG did not alter the range of detection (105-107 cells/ml) for Salmonella Typhimurium in ELISAs using either a polyclonal or a monoclonal antibody. These results suggest that immunoassays may be used in spacecrafts because LSMMG does not have significant deleterious effects on antibody-binding to bacteria nor does it significantly alter surface antigens necessary for antibody-based methods.

  13. Compensatory role of PspA, a member of the phage shock protein operon, in rpoE mutant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Becker, Lynne A; Bang, Iel-Soo; Crouch, Marie-Laure; Fang, Ferric C

    2005-05-01

    Sigma(E) is an alternative sigma factor that responds to and ameliorates extracytoplasmic stress. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), sigma(E) is required for oxidative stress resistance, stationary-phase survival and virulence in mice. Microarray analysis of stationary-phase gene expression in rpoE mutant bacteria revealed a dramatic increase in expression of pspA, a member of the phage shock protein (psp) operon. The psp operon can be induced by filamentous bacteriophages or by perturbations of protein secretion, and is believed to facilitate the maintenance of proton motive force (PMF). We hypothesized that increased pspA expression may represent a compensatory response to the loss of sigma(E) function. Increased pspA expression was confirmed in rpoE mutant Salmonella and also observed in a mutant lacking the F(1)F(0) ATPase. Alternatively, expression of pspA could be induced by exposure to CCCP, a protonophore that disrupts PMF. An rpoE pspA double mutant strain was found to have a stationary-phase survival defect more pronounced than that of isogenic strains harbouring single mutations. The double mutant strains were also more susceptible to killing by CCCP or by a bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI)-derived anti-microbial peptide. Using fluorescence ratio imaging, differences were observed in the Deltapsi of wild-type and rpoE or pspA mutant bacteria. These findings suggest that pspA expression in S. Typhimurium is induced by alterations in PMF and a functional sigma(E) regulon is essential for the maintenance of PMF.

  14. The In Vitro Redundant Enzymes PurN and PurT Are Both Essential for Systemic Infection of Mice in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Mortensen, Mie I B; Kilstrup, Mogens; Olsen, John E

    2016-07-01

    Metabolic enzymes show a high degree of redundancy, and for that reason they are generally ignored in searches for novel targets for anti-infective substances. The enzymes PurN and PurT are redundant in vitro in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, in which they perform the third step of purine synthesis. Surprisingly, the results of the current study demonstrated that single-gene deletions of each of the genes encoding these enzymes caused attenuation (competitive infection indexes [CI] of <0.03) in mouse infections. While the ΔpurT mutant multiplied as fast as the wild-type strain in cultured J774A.1 macrophages, net multiplication of the ΔpurN mutant was reduced approximately 50% in 20 h. The attenuation of the ΔpurT mutant was abolished by simultaneous removal of the enzyme PurU, responsible for the formation of formate, indicating that the attenuation was related to formate accumulation or wasteful consumption of formyl tetrahydrofolate by PurU. In the process of further characterization, we disclosed that the glycine cleavage system (GCV) was the most important for formation of C1 units in vivo (CI = 0.03 ± 0.03). In contrast, GlyA was the only important enzyme for the formation of C1 units in vitro The results with the ΔgcvT mutant further revealed that formation of serine by SerA and further conversion of serine into C1 units and glycine by GlyA were not sufficient to ensure C1 formation in S Typhimurium in vivo The results of the present study call for reinvestigations of the concept of metabolic redundancy in S Typhimurium in vivo.

  15. The In Vitro Redundant Enzymes PurN and PurT Are Both Essential for Systemic Infection of Mice in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Mortensen, Mie I. B.; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic enzymes show a high degree of redundancy, and for that reason they are generally ignored in searches for novel targets for anti-infective substances. The enzymes PurN and PurT are redundant in vitro in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, in which they perform the third step of purine synthesis. Surprisingly, the results of the current study demonstrated that single-gene deletions of each of the genes encoding these enzymes caused attenuation (competitive infection indexes [CI] of <0.03) in mouse infections. While the ΔpurT mutant multiplied as fast as the wild-type strain in cultured J774A.1 macrophages, net multiplication of the ΔpurN mutant was reduced approximately 50% in 20 h. The attenuation of the ΔpurT mutant was abolished by simultaneous removal of the enzyme PurU, responsible for the formation of formate, indicating that the attenuation was related to formate accumulation or wasteful consumption of formyl tetrahydrofolate by PurU. In the process of further characterization, we disclosed that the glycine cleavage system (GCV) was the most important for formation of C1 units in vivo (CI = 0.03 ± 0.03). In contrast, GlyA was the only important enzyme for the formation of C1 units in vitro. The results with the ΔgcvT mutant further revealed that formation of serine by SerA and further conversion of serine into C1 units and glycine by GlyA were not sufficient to ensure C1 formation in S. Typhimurium in vivo. The results of the present study call for reinvestigations of the concept of metabolic redundancy in S. Typhimurium in vivo. PMID:27113361

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of a Human-Invasive Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strain of the Emerging Sequence Type 213 Harboring a Multidrug Resistance IncA/C Plasmid and a blaCMY-2-Carrying IncF Plasmid.

    PubMed

    Silva, Claudia; Calva, Edmundo; Calva, Juan J; Wiesner, Magdalena; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Puente, José L; Vinuesa, Pablo

    2015-11-12

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain 33676 was isolated in Mexico City, Mexico, from a patient with a systemic infection, and its complete genome sequence was determined using PacBio single-molecule real-time technology. Strain 33676 harbors an IncF plasmid carrying the extended-spectrum cephalosporin gene blaCMY-2 and a multidrug resistance IncA/C plasmid.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of a Human-Invasive Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strain of the Emerging Sequence Type 213 Harboring a Multidrug Resistance IncA/C Plasmid and a blaCMY-2-Carrying IncF Plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Calva, Edmundo; Calva, Juan J.; Wiesner, Magdalena; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Puente, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain 33676 was isolated in Mexico City, Mexico, from a patient with a systemic infection, and its complete genome sequence was determined using PacBio single-molecule real-time technology. Strain 33676 harbors an IncF plasmid carrying the extended-spectrum cephalosporin gene blaCMY-2 and a multidrug resistance IncA/C plasmid. PMID:26564044

  18. Hemagglutinating activity of serovar reference strains of Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale.

    PubMed

    Vega, Vicente; Zepeda, Andrea; Ramírez, Saúl; Morales, Vladimir; Fernández, Pomposo; de Oca, Roberto Montes; Guerra-Infante, Fernando M; de Jesús de Haro-Cruz, María; Blackall, Patrick J; Soriano, Edgardo V

    2008-05-01

    In the present study, the hemagglutinating activity of 9 reference strains (serovars A-I) of Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale was investigated by using fresh erythrocytes from 15 different species: chicken (broiler, rooster, hen), turkey, pigeon, quail, duck, Harris hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus), house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus), cow, sheep, horse, dog, rabbit, pig, human (groups A, B, AB, and O), and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). All 9 strains agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes. None of the strains was able to agglutinate hen, cow, horse, or rainbow trout erythrocytes. The number of positive reactions among the remaining species varied. Results indicate that the use of rabbit erythrocytes is better suited for testing the hemagglutinating activity of O. rhinotracheale.

  19. Effect of zinc on growth performance, gut morphometry, and cecal microbial community in broilers challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yuxin; Lei, Zhao; Yuan, Jianmin; Yang, Ying; Guo, Yuming; Zhang, Bingkun

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of supplemental zinc on growth performance, gut morphometry, and the cecal microbial community in broilers challenged with Salmonella typhimurium, 180, 1-day-old male Cobb 500 broiler chicks were randomly assigned to 3 treatments with ten replicates for a 42 day experiment. The 3 treatments were: unchallenged, S. typhimurium-challenged, and S. typhimurium-challenged with 120 mg/kg of zinc supplementation in the diet. Salmonella infection caused a reduction in body-weight gain and feed intake, disrupted the intestinal structure by decreasing the villus-height/crypt-depth ratio of the ileum and increasing the apoptotic index of ileal epithelial cells. Moreover, the cecal microbial community was altered by Salmonella infection, as demonstrated by a reduced number of Lactobacillus and total bacteria. Dietary zinc supplementation improved growth performance by increasing the body-weight gain and feed intake in the challenged broilers. In addition, zinc repaired intestinal injury by reducing the apoptotic index of ileal epithelial cells, enhancing villus height and the villus-height/crypt-depth ratio of the ileum, and the proliferation index of ileal epithelial cells. Finally, zinc regulated the cecal microbial community by increasing the number of total bacteria and beneficial Lactobacillus bacteria, and reducing the number of Salmonella. The results indicated that dietary zinc supplementation improved growth performance, intestinal morphology, and intestinal microbiota in S. typhimurium-challenged broilers.

  20. Identification of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium isolates that have an antibiotic-induced invasion phenotype

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella is an important food safety issue in humans and animals. The National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) has reported that 27.3% of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium isolates in humans were resistant to three or more classes of antibiotics...

  1. The agricultural antibiotic carbadox induces generalized transducing phage in multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella, a leading cause of U.S. foodborne disease and food-related deaths, often asymptomatically colonizes food-producing animals. In fact, >50% of U.S. swine production facilities test positive for Salmonella. The multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 NCTC13348 c...

  2. Small outer-membrane lipoprotein, SmpA, is regulated by sigmaE and has a role in cell envelope integrity and virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Claire; Skovierova, Henrieta; Rowley, Gary; Rezuchova, Bronislava; Homerova, Dagmar; Stevenson, Andrew; Sherry, Aileen; Kormanec, Jan; Roberts, Mark

    2008-03-01

    SmpA is a small outer-membrane lipoprotein that is a component of the essential YaeT outer-membrane protein assembly complex. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), expression of the smpA gene was shown to be directed by two promoters, smpAp1 and smpAp2. The more distal promoter, smpAp1, is dependent upon the extracytoplasmic stress response sigma factor sigma(E). An smpA null mutant was constructed in S. Typhimurium SL1344 and was shown to be more sensitive than its wild-type parent to growth at high temperature and in the presence of sodium cholate, SDS plus EDTA, and the hydrophobic antibiotic rifampicin. The lack of SmpA in S. Typhimurium elicits a sigma(E)-dependent stress response. These findings are indicative of altered outer-membrane integrity in the smpA mutant, probably due to a defect in outer-membrane protein biogenesis. SmpA was not important for entry or survival within murine macrophages; however, the S. Typhimurium smpA mutant was attenuated in mice by both the oral and parenteral routes of infection, and SmpA appeared to be most important for the growth of S. Typhimurium at systemic sites.

  3. Platform for identification of Salmonella serovar differentiating bacterial proteins by top-down mass spectrometry: S. Typhimurium vs S. Heidelberg.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Melinda A; Andrzejewski, Denis; Musser, Steven M; Callahan, John H

    2014-07-15

    Intact protein expression profiling has proven to be a powerful tool for bacterial subspecies differentiation. To facilitate typing, epidemiology, and trace-back of Salmonella contamination in the food supply, a minimum of serovar level differentiation is required. Subsequent identification and validation of marker proteins is integral to rapid screening development and to determining which proteins are subject to environmental pressure. Bacterial sequencing efforts have expanded the number of sequenced genomes available for single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses, but annotation is often missing, start site errors are not uncommon, and the likelihood of expression is not known. In this work we show that the combination of intact protein expression profiles and top-down liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) facilitates the identification of proteins that result from expressed serovar specific nonsynonymous SNPs. Combinations of these marker proteins can be used in assays for rapid differentiation of bacteria. LC-MS generated intact protein expression profiles establish which bacterial protein masses differ across samples and can be determined without prior knowledge of the sample. Subsequent top-down LC-MS/MS is used to identify expressed proteins and their post-translational modifications (PTM), identify serovar specific markers, and validate genomic predicted orthologues as expressed biomarkers.

  4. Foodborne Salmonellosis in Italy: Characterization of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Monophasic Variant 4,[5],12:i- Isolated from Salami and Human Patients.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, Giuseppina; Merla, Cristina; Valle, Claudia Dalla; Corpus, Francesco; Morganti, Marina; D'incau, Mario; Colmegna, Silvia; Marone, Piero; Fabbi, Massimo; Barco, Lisa; Carra, Elena

    2017-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (STm) and its monophasic variant 4,[5],12:i:- (VMSTm) have been responsible for an increased number of foodborne infections in humans in Europe in recent years. The aim of this study was to investigate the origin of three foodborne salmonellosis outbreaks that occurred in Pavia Province (Lombardy region, northern Italy) in 2010. Phenotypic and genetic characteristics of the STm and VMSTm isolates from patients and from food that were recovered in the framework of the three outbreaks were evaluated through serotyping, phage typing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Salami from three artisan producers, which had all purchased meat from the same slaughterhouse, was the food source of infection in outbreak I. STm isolates were recovered from salami and patients with symptoms of gastroenteritis. These isolates had the same PFGE type and the same rare MLVA profile (3-18-9-NA-211). The same molecular profiles were found in an STm isolate from a salami, which likely was the source of another family outbreak (II). A VMSTm strain with common phenotypic and molecular profiles was isolated from three hospitalized patients and identified as the cause of another putative outbreak (III). During the following 3 years (2011 through 2013), 360 salami produced in Pavia Province were monitored for the presence of S. enterica . In 2011, no STm and VMSTm isolates were recovered from 159 salami tested. During 2012 and 2013, 13.9% of 201 tested salami harbored S. enterica , and half of the isolates were VMSTm, mainly in salami from those artisan producers involved in the previous outbreaks. These isolates were genetically variable, especially in terms of MLVA profiles. The data collected suggest that from 2012, VMSTm has replaced STm in the environments of the salami producers monitored in this study, and these data confirm the dominance of

  5. Development of a novel in-water vaccination protocol for DNA adenine methylase deficient Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine in adult sheep.

    PubMed

    Mohler, V L; Heithoff, D M; Mahan, M J; Hornitzky, M A; Thomson, P C; House, J K

    2012-02-14

    Intensive livestock production is associated with an increased incidence of salmonellosis. The risk of infection and the subsequent public health concern is attributed to increased pathogen exposure and disease susceptibility due to multiple stressors experienced by livestock from farm to feedlot. Traditional parenteral vaccine methods can further stress susceptible populations and cause carcass damage, adverse reactions, and resultant increased production costs. As a potential means to address these issues, in-water delivery of live attenuated vaccines affords a low cost, low-stress method for immunization of livestock populations that is not associated with the adverse handling stressors and injection reactions associated with parenteral administration. We have previously established that in-water administration of a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium dam vaccine conferred significant protection in livestock. While these experimental trials hold significant promise, the ultimate measure of the vaccine will not be established until it has undergone clinical testing in the field wherein environmental and sanitary conditions are variable. Here we show that in-water administration of a S. Typhimurium dam attenuated vaccine was safe, stable, and well-tolerated in adult sheep. The dam vaccine did not alter water consumption or vaccine dosing; remained viable under a wide range of temperatures (21-37°C); did not proliferate within fecal-contaminated trough water; and was associated with minimal fecal shedding and clinical disease as a consequence of vaccination. The capacity of Salmonella dam attenuated vaccines to be delivered in drinking water to protect livestock from virulent Salmonella challenge offers an effective, economical, stressor-free Salmonella prophylaxis for intensive livestock production systems.

  6. The Impact of 18 Ancestral and Horizontally-Acquired Regulatory Proteins upon the Transcriptome and sRNA Landscape of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Colgan, Aoife M; Kröger, Carsten; Diard, Médéric; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Puente, José L; Sivasankaran, Sathesh K; Hokamp, Karsten; Hinton, Jay C D

    2016-08-01

    We know a great deal about the genes used by the model pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to cause disease, but less about global gene regulation. New tools for studying transcripts at the single nucleotide level now offer an unparalleled opportunity to understand the bacterial transcriptome, and expression of the small RNAs (sRNA) and coding genes responsible for the establishment of infection. Here, we define the transcriptomes of 18 mutants lacking virulence-related global regulatory systems that modulate the expression of the SPI1 and SPI2 Type 3 secretion systems of S. Typhimurium strain 4/74. Using infection-relevant growth conditions, we identified a total of 1257 coding genes that are controlled by one or more regulatory system, including a sub-class of genes that reflect a new level of cross-talk between SPI1 and SPI2. We directly compared the roles played by the major transcriptional regulators in the expression of sRNAs, and discovered that the RpoS (σ38) sigma factor modulates the expression of 23% of sRNAs, many more than other regulatory systems. The impact of the RNA chaperone Hfq upon the steady state levels of 280 sRNA transcripts is described, and we found 13 sRNAs that are co-regulated with SPI1 and SPI2 virulence genes. We report the first example of an sRNA, STnc1480, that is subject to silencing by H-NS and subsequent counter-silencing by PhoP and SlyA. The data for these 18 regulatory systems is now available to the bacterial research community in a user-friendly online resource, SalComRegulon.

  7. The Impact of 18 Ancestral and Horizontally-Acquired Regulatory Proteins upon the Transcriptome and sRNA Landscape of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Colgan, Aoife M.; Diard, Médéric; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Puente, José L.; Sivasankaran, Sathesh K.; Hokamp, Karsten; Hinton, Jay C. D.

    2016-01-01

    We know a great deal about the genes used by the model pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to cause disease, but less about global gene regulation. New tools for studying transcripts at the single nucleotide level now offer an unparalleled opportunity to understand the bacterial transcriptome, and expression of the small RNAs (sRNA) and coding genes responsible for the establishment of infection. Here, we define the transcriptomes of 18 mutants lacking virulence-related global regulatory systems that modulate the expression of the SPI1 and SPI2 Type 3 secretion systems of S. Typhimurium strain 4/74. Using infection-relevant growth conditions, we identified a total of 1257 coding genes that are controlled by one or more regulatory system, including a sub-class of genes that reflect a new level of cross-talk between SPI1 and SPI2. We directly compared the roles played by the major transcriptional regulators in the expression of sRNAs, and discovered that the RpoS (σ38) sigma factor modulates the expression of 23% of sRNAs, many more than other regulatory systems. The impact of the RNA chaperone Hfq upon the steady state levels of 280 sRNA transcripts is described, and we found 13 sRNAs that are co-regulated with SPI1 and SPI2 virulence genes. We report the first example of an sRNA, STnc1480, that is subject to silencing by H-NS and subsequent counter-silencing by PhoP and SlyA. The data for these 18 regulatory systems is now available to the bacterial research community in a user-friendly online resource, SalComRegulon. PMID:27564394

  8. RNA-seq-based analysis of drug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium selected in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Dai, Xingyang; Wang, Ying; Yang, Yanfei; Zhao, Xia; Wang, Lei; Zeng, Minghua

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the mechanism of fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance in Salmonella Typhimurium. We established the Caenorhabditis elegans-Salmonella Typhimurium model to select for ciprofloxacin resistance in Salmonella Typhimurium colonizing C. elegans, generating the resistant strains TN4. Gradient doses of ciprofloxacin were used to generate the resistant strain TW4 in vitro. RNA sequencing was used to establish the whole-transcriptome profile of three strains of Salmonella Typhimurium. The gene expression patterns of resistant strains TN4 and TW4 differed from those of the parental strain. In TN4, 2,277 genes were differentially expressed (1,833 upregulated and 444 downregulated) relative to the parental strain, and in TW4, 3,464 genes were differentially expressed (3,433 upregulated and 31 downregulated). Among these differentially expressed genes, 28 were associated with drug resistance and 26 were associated with the two-component systems in the two resistant strains. Seven different pathways were significantly sffected in two strains. Efflux pump overexpression was identified as one of the main mechanisms underlying FQ resistance in the two resistant strains. TW4 differentially expressed more efflux pump genes than TN4 and most of these genes were more strongly expressed than in TN4. However, expression of the efflux pump repressor gene and the mar operon was downregulated in TN4 but not in TW4. Two-component systems are also important in drug resistance. Our findings provide an important basis for further studies of the complex network that regulate FQ resistance in Salmonella.

  9. Lipopolysaccharides belonging to different Salmonella serovars are differentially capable of activating Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Chessa, Daniela; Spiga, Luisella; De Riu, Nicola; Delaconi, Paola; Mazzarello, Vittorio; Ganau, Giulia; Rubino, Salvatore

    2014-11-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar (serotype) Abortusovis is a member of the Enterobacteriaceae. This serotype is naturally restricted to ovine species and does not infect humans. Limited information is available about the immune response of sheep to S. Abortusovis. S. Abortusovis, like Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhi, causes a systemic infection in which, under natural conditions, animals are not able to raise a rapid immune response. Failure to induce the appropriate response allows pathogens to reach the placenta and results in an abortion. Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) that are specific to bacteria and are not synthesized by the host. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of receptors that specifically recognize PAMPs. As a first step, we were able to identify the presence of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on the ovine placenta by using an immunohistochemistry technique. To our knowledge, this is the first work describing the interaction between S. Abortusovis LPS and TLR4. Experiments using an embryonic cell line (HEK293) transfected with human and ovine TLR4s showed a reduction of interleukin 8 (IL-8) production by S. Abortusovis and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Paratyphi upon LPS stimulation compared to Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Identical results were observed using heat-killed bacteria instead of LPS. Based on data obtained with TLR4 in vitro stimulation, we demonstrated that the serotype S. Abortusovis is able to successfully evade the immune system whereas S. Typhimurium and other serovars fail to do so.

  10. Dam methylation regulates the expression of SPI-5-encoded sopB gene in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Giacomodonato, Mónica N; Llana, Mariángeles Noto; Castañeda, María del Rosario Aya; Buzzola, Fernanda; García, Mauro D; Calderón, Marina Gallo; Sarnacki, Sebastián H; Cerquetti, María C

    2014-08-01

    DNA adenine methylation is an essential factor in Salmonella virulence. Here, we investigate the involvement of DNA adenine methylase (Dam) in the expression and translocation of a SPI-5-encoded effector of S. Typhimurium. SopB expression and secretion were determined using SopB-FLAG-tagged wild type and dam strains of S. Typhimurium. Western blot and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis showed that the dam mutant expresses lower levels of SopB protein and sopB mRNA than the wild type strain under SPI-1 and SPI-2 inducing conditions in vitro. SopB secretion was also considerably impaired in the absence of dam. In agreement with in vitro experiments, SopB synthesis in dam mutants recovered from infected epithelial cells and from murine mesenteric lymph nodes was reduced by 40% respect to the wild type strain (p < 0.05). SopB translocation was neither detected in the cytosol of epithelial cells nor in the cytosol of cells isolated from mesenteric lymph nodes infected with the dam mutant. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, in S. Typhimurium, Dam methylation modulates the expression and translocation of SPI-5-encoded SopB effector.

  11. Identification of cptA, a PmrA-Regulated Locus Required for Phosphoethanolamine Modification of the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Lipopolysaccharide Core

    PubMed Central

    Tamayo, R.; Choudhury, B.; Septer, A.; Merighi, M.; Carlson, R.; Gunn, J. S.

    2005-01-01

    In response to the in vivo environment, the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is modified. These modifications are controlled in part by the two-component regulatory system PmrA-PmrB, with the addition of 4-aminoarabinose (Ara4N) to the lipid A and phosphoethanolamine (pEtN) to the lipid A and core. Here we demonstrate that the PmrA-regulated STM4118 (cptA) gene is necessary for the addition of pEtN to the LPS core. pmrC, a PmrA-regulated gene necessary for the addition of pEtN to lipid A, did not affect core pEtN addition. Although imparting a similar surface charge modification as Ara4N, which greatly affects polymyxin B resistance and murine virulence, neither pmrC nor cptA plays a dramatic role in antimicrobial peptide resistance in vitro or virulence in the mouse model. Therefore, factors other than surface charge/electrostatic interaction contribute to resistance to antimicrobial peptides such as polymyxin B. PMID:15866924

  12. Metabolic Engineering of a Novel Propionate-Independent Pathway for the Production of Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate-co-3-Hydroxyvalerate) in Recombinant Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Aldor, Ilana S.; Kim, Seon-Won; Jones Prather, Kristala L.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2002-01-01

    A pathway was metabolically engineered to produce poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV), a biodegradable thermoplastic with proven commercial applications, from a single, unrelated carbon source. An expression system was developed in which a prpC strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, with a mutation in the ability to metabolize propionyl coenzyme A (propionyl-CoA), served as the host for a plasmid harboring the Acinetobacter polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis operon (phaBCA) and a second plasmid with the Escherichia coli sbm and ygfG genes under an independent promoter. The sbm and ygfG genes encode a novel (2R)-methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and a (2R)-methylmalonyl-CoA decarboxylase, respectively, which convert succinyl-CoA, derived from the tricarboxylic acid cycle, to propionyl-CoA, an essential precursor of 3-hydroxyvalerate (HV). The S. enterica system accumulated PHBV with significant HV incorporation when the organism was grown aerobically with glycerol as the sole carbon source. It was possible to vary the average HV fraction in the copolymer by adjusting the arabinose or cyanocobalamin (precursor of coenzyme B12) concentration in the medium. PMID:12147480

  13. Internalisation potential of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus in lettuce seedlings and mature plants.

    PubMed

    Standing, Taryn-Ann; du Plessis, Erika; Duvenage, Stacey; Korsten, Lise

    2013-06-01

    The internalisation potential of Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium in lettuce was evaluated using seedlings grown in vermiculite in seedling trays as well as hydroponically grown lettuce. Sterile distilled water was spiked with one of the four human pathogenic bacteria (10(5) CFU/mL) and used to irrigate the plants. The potential for pathogen internalisation was investigated over time using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and viable plate counts. Additionally, the identities of the pathogens isolated from internal lettuce plant tissues were confirmed using polymerase chain reaction with pathogen-specific oligonucleotides. Internalisation of each of the human pathogens was evident in both lettuce seedlings and hydroponically grown mature lettuce plants. To our knowledge, this is the first report of S. aureus internalisation in lettuce plants. In addition, the levels of background microflora in the lettuce plants were determined by plate counting and the isolates identified using matrix-assisted laser ionisation-time of flight (MALDI-TOF). Background microflora assessments confirmed the absence of the four pathogens evaluated in this study. A low titre of previously described endophytes and soil inhabitants, i.e., Enterobacter cloacae, Enterococcus faecalis, Lysinibacillus fusiformis, Rhodococcus rhodochrous, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus hominis were identified.

  14. Effect of frequency and waveform on inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in salsa by ohmic heating.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Yeon; Ryu, Sangryeol; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    The effect of frequency of alternating current during ohmic heating on electrode corrosion, heating rate, inactivation of food-borne pathogens, and quality of salsa was investigated. The impact of waveform on heating rate was also investigated. Salsa was treated with various frequencies (60 Hz to 20 kHz) and waveforms (sine, square, and sawtooth) at a constant electric field strength of 12.5 V/cm. Electrode corrosion did not occur when the frequency exceeded 1 kHz. The heating rate of the sample was dependent on frequency up to 500 Hz, but there was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in the heating rate when the frequency was increased above 1 kHz. The electrical conductivity of the sample increased with a rise in the frequency. At a frequency of 60 Hz, the square wave produced a lower heating rate than that of sine and sawtooth waves. The heating rate between waveforms was not significantly (P > 0.05) different when the frequency was >500 Hz. As the frequency increased, the treatment time required to reduce Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to below the detection limit (1 log CFU/g) decreased without affecting product quality. These results suggest that ohmic heating can be effectively used to pasteurize salsa and that the effect of inactivation is dependent on frequency and electrical conductivity rather than waveform.

  15. Long-Term Dissemination of CTX-M-5-Producing Hypermutable Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Sequence Type 328 Strains in Russia, Belarus, and Kazakhstan

    PubMed Central

    Ilina, Elena N.; Malakhova, Maja V.; Carattoli, Alessandra; Azizov, Ilya S.; Tapalski, Dmitry V.; Kozlov, Roman S.; Edelstein, Mikhail V.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present evidence of long-term circulation of cefotaxime-resistant clonally related Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains over a broad geographic area. The genetic relatedness of 88 isolates collected from multiple outbreaks and sporadic cases of nosocomial salmonellosis in various parts of Russia, Belarus, and Kazakhstan from 1996 to 2009 was established by multilocus tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The isolates belong to sequence type 328 (ST328) and produce CTX-M-5 β-lactamase, whose gene is carried by highly related non-self-conjugative but mobilizable plasmids. Resistance to nalidixic acid and low-level resistance to ciprofloxacin is present in 37 (42%) of the isolates and in all cases is determined by various single point mutations in the gyrA gene quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR). Isolates of the described clonal group exhibit a hypermutable phenotype that probably facilitates independent acquisition of quinolone resistance mutations. PMID:24957829

  16. Protection of neonatal mice from lethal enterovirus 71 infection by maternal immunization with attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing VP1 of enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Chu, Chishih; He, Chao-Che; Lin, Tzou-Yien

    2006-06-01

    This study describes the potential use of attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains to express and deliver VP1 of enterovirus 71 (EV71) as a vaccination strategy to prevent EV71 infection in mice. When orally administered to BALB/c mice, both attenuated carrier strains, CNP101 and SL7207, were able to efficiently invade livers and spleens, while only the virulence plasmid-carrying strain SL7207 persisted for more than 30 days in these organs. A recombinant in vivo-regulated promoter expression plasmid expressing VP1 antigen of EV71 was constructed. The expression of the VP1, directed by the pagC promoter, in attenuated Salmonella was confirmed by Western blot hybridization. Both humoral and cellular immune responses were elicited in mice by oral immunization with such Salmonella-based VP1 vaccines. We evaluated the protective efficacy of the vaccines in mice using a maternal immunization protocol. With a lethal challenge, ICR newborn mice born to dams immunized with Salmonella-based VP1 vaccine showed a 50-60% survival; in contrast, none of the mice in the control group survived the challenge. Our data indicated that Salmonella-based VP1 subunit vaccines are a promising vaccine strategy in the prevention of EV71 infection.

  17. Leaching of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts, Escherichia coli, and a Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Bacteriophage through Intact Soil Cores following Surface Application and Injection of Slurry▿

    PubMed Central

    Forslund, Anita; Markussen, Bo; Toenner-Klank, Lise; Bech, Tina B.; Jacobsen, Ole Stig; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Increasing amounts of livestock manure are being applied to agricultural soil, but it is unknown to what extent this may be associated with contamination of aquatic recipients and groundwater if microorganisms are transported through the soil under natural weather conditions. The objective of this study was therefore to evaluate how injection and surface application of pig slurry on intact sandy clay loam soil cores influenced the leaching of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium bacteriophage 28B, Escherichia coli, and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. All three microbial tracers were detected in the leachate on day 1, and the highest relative concentration was detected on the fourth day (0.1 pore volume). Although the concentration of the phage 28B declined over time, the phage was still found in leachate at day 148. C. parvum oocysts and chloride had an additional rise in the relative concentration at a 0.5 pore volume, corresponding to the exchange of the total pore volume. The leaching of E. coli was delayed compared with that of the added microbial tracers, indicating a stronger attachment to slurry particles, but E. coli could be detected up to 3 months. Significantly enhanced leaching of phage 28B and oocysts by the injection method was seen, whereas leaching of the indigenous E. coli was not affected by the application method. Preferential flow was the primary transport vehicle, and the diameter of the fractures in the intact soil cores facilitated transport of all sizes of microbial tracers under natural weather conditions. PMID:21948848

  18. Effects of leachate from crumb rubber and zinc in green roofs on the survival, growth, and resistance characteristics of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Crampton, Mollee; Ryan, Allayna; Eckert, Cori; Baker, Katherine H; Herson, Diane S

    2014-05-01

    The use of green roofs is a growing practice worldwide, particularly in densely populated areas. In an attempt to find new methods for recycling crumb rubber, incorporation of crumb rubber into artificial medium for plant growth in green roofs and similar engineered environments has become an attractive option for the recycling of waste tires. Though this approach decreases waste in landfills, there are concerns about the leaching of zinc and other heavy metals, as well as nutrient and organic compounds, into the environment. The present study analyzed the impact of leachate from crumb rubber and zinc on the growth and viability of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Zinc was chosen for further studies since it has been previously implicated with other biological functions, including biofilm formation, motility, and possible cross-resistance to antimicrobial agents. The study showed that Salmonella can colonize crumb rubber and that crumb rubber extract may provide nutrients that are usable by this bacterium. Salmonella strains with reduced susceptibility (SRS) to zinc were obtained after subculturing in increasing concentrations of zinc. The SRS exhibited differences in gene expression of flux pump genes zntA and znuA compared to that of the parent when exposed to 20 mM added zinc. In biofilm formation studies, the SRS formed less biofilm but was more motile than the parental strain.

  19. Effects of Leachate from Crumb Rubber and Zinc in Green Roofs on the Survival, Growth, and Resistance Characteristics of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Crampton, Mollee; Ryan, Allayna; Eckert, Cori; Baker, Katherine H.

    2014-01-01

    The use of green roofs is a growing practice worldwide, particularly in densely populated areas. In an attempt to find new methods for recycling crumb rubber, incorporation of crumb rubber into artificial medium for plant growth in green roofs and similar engineered environments has become an attractive option for the recycling of waste tires. Though this approach decreases waste in landfills, there are concerns about the leaching of zinc and other heavy metals, as well as nutrient and organic compounds, into the environment. The present study analyzed the impact of leachate from crumb rubber and zinc on the growth and viability of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Zinc was chosen for further studies since it has been previously implicated with other biological functions, including biofilm formation, motility, and possible cross-resistance to antimicrobial agents. The study showed that Salmonella can colonize crumb rubber and that crumb rubber extract may provide nutrients that are usable by this bacterium. Salmonella strains with reduced susceptibility (SRS) to zinc were obtained after subculturing in increasing concentrations of zinc. The SRS exhibited differences in gene expression of flux pump genes zntA and znuA compared to that of the parent when exposed to 20 mM added zinc. In biofilm formation studies, the SRS formed less biofilm but was more motile than the parental strain. PMID:24584242

  20. Effect of drinking-water administration of experimental chlorate ion preparations on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium colonization in weaned and finished pigs.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R C; Hume, M E; Genovese, K J; Callaway, T R; Jung, Y S; Edrington, T S; Poole, T L; Harvey, R B; Bischoff, K M; Nisbet, D J

    2004-04-01

    Foodborne disease caused by Salmonella is of public health and economic significance. In order to assess the practical effectiveness of a new intervention strategy, experimental chlorate preparations (ECP) were administered via the drinking water to weaned and finished pigs that had been orally challenged the previous day with 10(9)-10(10) colony-forming units of Salmonella serovar Typhimurium. After 24 or 36 h ad libitum access to 0X, 1X or 2X ECP treatment (where X is the concentration estimated to deliver a minimal daily effective dose), the pigs were euthanized and gut contents and lymph tissue collected at necropsy were cultured for the challenge Salmonella. Drinking water administration of ECP effectively reduced (p < 0.05) caecal Salmonella concentrations and, with the weaned pigs, tended (p < or = 0.10) to reduce rectal Salmonella concentrations. No negative effects of ECP treatment on water intake and animal wellbeing were observed and only marginal effects on gut fermentation characteristics occurred. The bactericidal effect of administering ECP in drinking water was relatively rapid, with reductions in caecal Salmonella concentrations occurring within 24 h. These results suggest that ECP administered to pigs just days before slaughter may reduce gut concentrations of Salmonella; however, the impacts of such reductions on slaughter hygiene have yet to be determined.

  1. Outer membrane vesicles derived from Salmonella Typhimurium mutants with truncated LPS induce cross-protective immune responses against infection of Salmonella enterica serovars in the mouse model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiong; Liu, Qing; Yi, Jie; Liang, Kang; Liu, Tian; Roland, Kenneth L; Jiang, Yanlong; Kong, Qingke

    2016-12-01

    Salmonella enterica cause diarrheal and systemic diseases and are of considerable concern worldwide. Vaccines that are cross-protective against multiple serovars could provide effective control of Salmonella-mediated diseases. Bacteria-derived outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are highly immunogenic and are capable of eliciting protective immune responses. Alterations in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) length can result in outer membrane remodeling and composition of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) changing. In this study, we investigated the impact of truncated LPS on both the production and immunogenicity of Salmonella OMVs, including the ability of OMVs to elicit cross-protection against challenge by heterologous Salmonella strains. We found that mutations in waaJ and rfbP enhanced vesiculation, while mutations in waaC, waaF and waaG inhibited this process. Animal experiments indicated that OMVs from waaC, rfaH and rfbP mutants induced stronger serum immune responses compared to OMVs from the parent strain, while all elicited protective responses against the wild-type S. Typhimurium challenge. Furthermore, intranasal or intraperitoneal immunization with OMVs derived from the waaC and rfbP mutants elicited significantly higher cross-reactive IgG responses and provided enhanced cross-protection against S. Choleraesuis and S. Enteritidis challenge than the wild-type OMVs. These results indicate that truncated-LPS OMVs are capable of conferring cross protection against multiple serotypes of Salmonella infection.

  2. Influence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection on intestinal goblet cells and villous morphology in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Fasina, Y O; Hoerr, F J; McKee, S R; Conner, D E

    2010-06-01

    Live broiler chickens are important in the transmission of Salmonella to humans. Reducing Salmonella levels in the intestine of broiler chickens, in part, requires understanding of the interactions between Salmonella and the intestinal barriers that represent the first line of defense. Such barriers include the mucus layer (composed of mucins secreted by goblet cells) and the underlying epithelium. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of Salmonella Typhimurium infection on intestinal goblet cell dynamics (density and size) and villous morphology in broiler chicks. In Experiment 1, broiler chicks were either challenged with sterile media (control treatment) or orally given 7.4 x 10(7) colony-forming units (CFU) at 3 days of age (termed the CST treatment). Treatments were similar in Experiment 2, except that chicks in the CST treatment were challenged with 7.8 x 10(6) CFU at 4 days of age. Duration of each experiment was 14 days. At 7 days postchallenge (PC) in Experiment 1, jejunal tissue sections were collected, formalin-fixed, and routinely processed for histologic measurement of villous morphometric indices. In Experiment 2, at 10 days PC, jejunal tissue sections were collected and processed for histologic determination of goblet cell numbers and size, in addition to villous measurements. Results showed that Salmonella Typhimurium infection increased goblet cell density, reduced villous surface area, increased the incidence of epithelial exfoliation, and increased the incidence of heterophil influx into the lamina propria (P < 0.05). It was concluded that Salmonella Typhimurium infection impacts goblet cell biology and exerts morphopathologic changes in the jejunum of broiler chicks.

  3. Genomic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Characterizes Strain Diversity for Recent U.S. Salmonellosis Cases and Identifies Mutations Linked to Loss of Fitness under Nitrosative and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Hillary S.; Matamouros, Susana; Hager, Kyle R.; Brittnacher, Mitchell J.; Rohmer, Laurence; Radey, Matthew C.; Weiss, Eli J.; Kim, Katie B.; Jacobs, Michael A.; Sims-Day, Elizabeth H.; Yue, Min; Zaidi, Mussaret B.; Schifferli, Dieter M.; Manning, Shannon D.; Walson, Judd L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is one of the most common S. enterica serovars associated with U.S. foodborne outbreaks. S. Typhimurium bacteria isolated from humans exhibit wide-ranging virulence phenotypes in inbred mice, leading to speculation that some strains are more virulent in nature. However, it is unclear whether increased virulence in humans is related to organism characteristics or initial treatment failure due to antibiotic resistance. Strain diversity and genetic factors contributing to differential human pathogenicity remain poorly understood. We reconstructed phylogeny, resolved genetic population structure, determined gene content and nucleotide variants, and conducted targeted phenotyping assays for S. Typhimurium strains collected between 1946 and 2012 from humans and animals in the United States and abroad. Strains from recent U.S. salmonellosis cases were associated with five S. Typhimurium lineages distributed within three phylogenetic clades, which are not restricted by geography, year of acquisition, or host. Notably, two U.S. strains and four Mexican strains are more closely related to strains associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals in sub-Saharan Africa than to other North American strains. Phenotyping studies linked variants specific to these strains in hmpA and katE to loss of fitness under nitrosative and oxidative stress, respectively. These results suggest that U.S. salmonellosis is caused by diverse S. Typhimurium strains circulating worldwide. One lineage has mutations in genes affecting fitness related to innate immune system strategies for fighting pathogens and may be adapting to immunocompromised humans by a reduction in virulence capability, possibly due to a lack of selection for its maintenance as a result of the worldwide HIV epidemic. PMID:26956590

  4. Novel synergistic approach to exploit the bactericidal efficacy of commercial disinfectants on the biofilms of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Singla, Richu; Goel, Honey; Ganguli, Abhijit

    2014-07-01

    Combined effect of malic acid and ozone as sanitizer to inhibit the biofilm formation by Salmonella typhimurium on different food contact surfaces was investigated in this study. Different surfaces used in food industry including PVC pipes, polyethylene bags, plastic surfaces and fresh produce were analyzed for the biofilm formation by S. typhimurium ST1 and ST2. Malic acid alone was not able to inhibit biofilm formation in all the samples. However, combination of malic acid with ozone reduced the biofilm formation on plastic bags as well as on PVC pipes suggesting as an effective disinfectant for food contact surfaces. Five- and six-fold reduction in biofilm formation was observed in microtitre plates after 20 h and 40 h. Scanning electron micrographs of carrot and turnip showed control over the biofilms. Malic acid as sanitizer in food industry was effective for the complete inhibition of biofilm in carrot and other food contact surfaces, besides this, combined sanitizer (malic acid and ozone) was effective in turnip. Biofilms in food-processing industries can survive even after the sanitizer treatment and may represent reservoirs of product contamination leading to subsequent spoilage and/or food safety risks.

  5. Reduction of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium DT104 infection in experimentally challenged weaned pigs fed a lactobacillus-fermented feed.

    PubMed

    Yin, Fugui; Farzan, Abdolvahab; Wang, Qi Chuck; Yu, Hai; Yin, Yulong; Hou, Yongqing; Friendship, Robert; Gong, Joshua

    2014-08-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium is a foodborne pathogen and commonly present on pig farms. Probiotics have shown potential as a means of reducing Salmonella shedding in pigs. Three experimental challenge trials were conducted to investigate the potential application of newly isolated Lactobacillus isolates for controlling Salmonella infection in pigs. In each trial, 16 Yorkshire piglets (28-d old) were randomly allocated to 1 of 4 dietary treatments: (1) basal diet (BD), (2) naturally fermented (NF) feed, (3) Lactobacillus zeae-fermented (LZ-F) feed, and 4) Lactobacillus casei-fermented (LC-F) feed. All pigs consumed their assigned diets for 3 d prior to the challenge of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 (approximately 6 log colony-forming units/pig) through gavage. Pediococcus pentosaceus, L. zeae, and L. casei were most abundant in NF, LZ-F, and LC-F feed, respectively. After the challenge, pigs on fermented feed had lower rectal temperature, diarrhea scores, serum haptoglobin concentrations, and intestinal Salmonella counts than the control group (BD) (p ≤ 0.01). Salmonella spp. were detected in both ileocecal lymph nodes (ICLN) and spleens from all pigs on BD, NF, and LC-F, but only 50% of spleens from pigs on LZ-F. Pigs had a dynamic spatial and temporal immune response to Salmonella infection and dietary treatments, as indicated by up- and downregulation in gene expression of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor) in the ileum, ICLN, and spleen. The alternation in cytokine expression by fermented feed, particularly LZ-F, appeared to benefit pigs in combating Salmonella infection.

  6. Diversity of plasmids encoding virulence and resistance functions in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium monophasic variant 4,[5],12:i:- strains circulating in Europe.

    PubMed

    García, Patricia; Hopkins, Katie L; García, Vanesa; Beutlich, Janine; Mendoza, M Carmen; Threlfall, John; Mevius, Dik; Helmuth, Reiner; Rodicio, M Rosario; Guerra, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Plasmids encoding resistance and virulence properties in multidrug resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica (S.) serovar Typhimurium monophasic variant 4,[5],12:i:- isolates recovered from pigs and humans (2006-2008) in Europe were characterised. The isolates were selected based on the detection by PCR-amplification of S. Typhimurium virulence plasmid pSLT genes and were analysed by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). The resistance genes present in the isolates and the association of these genes with integrons, transposons and insertion sequences were characterised by PCR-sequencing, and their plasmid location was determined by alkaline lysis and by S1-nuclease pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) Southern-blot hybridisation. Plasmids were further analysed by replicon typing, plasmid MLST and conjugation experiments. The 10 S. 4,[5],12,i:- selected isolates belonged to ST19. Each isolate carried a large plasmid in which MDR with pSLT-associated virulence genes were located. After analysis, eight different plasmids of three incompatibility groups (IncA/C, IncR and IncF) were detected. Two IncA/C plasmids represented novel variants within the plasmid family of the S. 4,[5],12:i:- Spanish clone, and carried an empty class 1 integron with a conventional qacEΔ1-sul1 3' conserved segment or an In-sul3 type III with estX-psp-aadA2-cmlA1-aadA1-qacH variable region linked to tnpA440-sul3, part of Tn2, Tn21 and Tn1721 transposons, and ISCR2. Four newly described IncR plasmids contained the resistance genes within In-sul3 type I (dfrA12-orfF-aadA2-cmlA1-aadA1-qacH/tnpA440-sul3) and part of Tn10 [tet(B)]. Two pSLT-derivatives with FIIs-ST1+FIB-ST17 replicons carried cmlA1-[aadA1-aadA2]-sul3-dfrA12 and blaTEM-1 genes linked to an In-sul3 type I integron and to Tn2, respectively. In conclusion, three emerging European clones of S. 4,[5],12:i:- harboured MDR plasmids encoding additional virulence functions that could contribute significantly to their evolutionary success.

  7. Diversity of Plasmids Encoding Virulence and Resistance Functions in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Typhimurium Monophasic Variant 4,[5],12:i:- Strains Circulating in Europe

    PubMed Central

    García, Patricia; Hopkins, Katie L.; García, Vanesa; Beutlich, Janine; Mendoza, M. Carmen; Threlfall, John; Mevius, Dik; Helmuth, Reiner; Rodicio, M. Rosario; Guerra, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Plasmids encoding resistance and virulence properties in multidrug resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica (S.) serovar Typhimurium monophasic variant 4,[5],12:i:- isolates recovered from pigs and humans (2006-2008) in Europe were characterised. The isolates were selected based on the detection by PCR-amplification of S. Typhimurium virulence plasmid pSLT genes and were analysed by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). The resistance genes present in the isolates and the association of these genes with integrons, transposons and insertion sequences were characterised by PCR-sequencing, and their plasmid location was determined by alkaline lysis and by S1-nuclease pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) Southern-blot hybridisation. Plasmids were further analysed by replicon typing, plasmid MLST and conjugation experiments. The 10 S. 4,[5],12,i:- selected isolates belonged to ST19. Each isolate carried a large plasmid in which MDR with pSLT-associated virulence genes were located. After analysis, eight different plasmids of three incompatibility groups (IncA/C, IncR and IncF) were detected. Two IncA/C plasmids represented novel variants within the plasmid family of the S. 4,[5],12:i:- Spanish clone, and carried an empty class 1 integron with a conventional qacEΔ1-sul1 3′ conserved segment or an In-sul3 type III with estX-psp-aadA2-cmlA1-aadA1-qacH variable region linked to tnpA440-sul3, part of Tn2, Tn21 and Tn1721 transposons, and ISCR2. Four newly described IncR plasmids contained the resistance genes within In-sul3 type I (dfrA12-orfF-aadA2-cmlA1-aadA1-qacH/tnpA440-sul3) and part of Tn10 [tet(B)]. Two pSLT-derivatives with FIIs-ST1+FIB-ST17 replicons carried cmlA1-[aadA1-aadA2]-sul3-dfrA12 and blaTEM-1 genes linked to an In-sul3 type I integron and to Tn2, respectively. In conclusion, three emerging European clones of S. 4,[5],12:i:- harboured MDR plasmids encoding additional virulence functions that could contribute significantly to their evolutionary success. PMID

  8. A multi-pronged search for a common structural motif in the secretion signal of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium type III effector proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Niemann, George; Baker, Erin Shammel; Belov, Mikhail E.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred; Adkins, Joshua N.; McDermott, Jason E.

    2010-11-08

    Many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria use a type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into the host cell where they reprogram host defenses and facilitate pathogenesis. While it has been determined that the first 20 - 30 N-terminal residues usually contain the ‘secretion signal’ that targets effector proteins for translocation, the molecular basis for recognition of this signal is not understood. Recent machine-learning approaches, such as SVM-based Identification and Evaluation of Virulence Effectors (SIEVE), have improved the ability to identify effector proteins from genomics sequence information. While these methods all suggest that the T3SS secretion signal has a characteristic amino acid composition bias, it is still unclear if the amino acid pattern is important and if there are any unifying structural properties that direct recognition. To address these issues a peptide corresponding to the secretion signal for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium effector SseJ was synthesized (residues 1-30, SseJ) along with scrambled peptides of the same amino acid composition that produced high (SseJ-H) and low (SseJ-L) SIEVE scores. The secretion properties of these three peptides were tested using a secretion signal-CyaA fusion assay and their structures systematically probed using circular dichroism, nuclear magnetic resonance, and ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry. The signal-CyaA fusion assay showed that the native and SseJ-H fusion constructs were secreted into J774 macrophage at similar levels via the SPI-2 secretion pathway while secretion of the SseJ-L fusion construct was substantially retarded, suggesting that the SseJ secretion signal was sequence order dependent. The structural studies showed that the SseJ, SseJ-H, and SseJ-L peptides were intrinsically disordered in aqueous solution with only a small predisposition to adopt nascent helical structure in the presence of the powerful structure stabilizing agent, 1

  9. Immunological responses induced by asd and wzy/asd mutant strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Piao, Hong Hua; Tam, Vo Thi Minh; Na, Hee Sam; Kim, Hyun Ju; Ryu, Phil Youl; Kim, Soo Young; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Choy, Hyon E; Kim, Suhng Wook; Hong, Yeongjin

    2010-08-01

    Attenuated bacteria have long been developed as vaccine candidates but can have some disadvantages, such as the potential for damage to immune organs due to insufficient clearance. To minimize these disadvantages, we generated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutants SHJ2104 (asd::cm) and HTSaYA (wzy::km, asd::cm). The wzy gene codes for the O-antigen polymerase, which is involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis, and asd codes for aspartate beta-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, which participates in cell wall formation. The strains synthesized LPS with a short-chain length, and showed lower cytotoxicity and reduced intracellular proliferation in animal cells compared to wild-type bacteria. After oral infection, the mutants were cleared in immune tissues, including the Peyer's patch, mesenteric lymph node, and spleen, within 5 days. The LD50 of the mutants in Balb/c mice was estimated to be 10(6) higher than wild-type bacteria when administered either via an oral or i.p. route, indicating that the two strains are highly attenuated. To compare the immune response to and protective effects of the mutants against wild-type bacterial infection, we inoculated the mutants into mice via an oral (1x10(10)CFU) or i.p. (1x10(7) CFU) route once or twice at a two week interval. All immune responses, such as serum IgG and secretory IgA levels, cytokine production, and delayed hypersensitivity, were highly induced by two rounds of immunization. HTSaYA and SHJ2104 induced similar immune responses, and mice immunized with HTSaYA or SHJ2104 via an i.p. route were protected against wild-type Salmonella infection even at 100-fold of the LD(50) (5x10(6) CFU). Taken together, these data indicate that HTSaYA and SHJ2104 could be developed as live attenuated Salmonella vaccine candidates.

  10. Peroral ciprofloxacin therapy impairs the generation of a protective immune response in a mouse model for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium diarrhea, while parenteral ceftriaxone therapy does not.

    PubMed

    Endt, Kathrin; Maier, Lisa; Käppeli, Rina; Barthel, Manja; Misselwitz, Benjamin; Kremer, Marcus; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2012-05-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) species cause self-limiting diarrhea and sometimes severe disease. Antibiotic treatment is considered only in severe cases and immune-compromised patients. The beneficial effects of antibiotic therapy and the consequences for adaptive immune responses are not well understood. We used a mouse model for Salmonella diarrhea to assess the effects of per os treatment with ciprofloxacin (15 mg/kg of body weight intragastrically 2 times/day, 5 days) or parenteral ceftriaxone (50 mg/kg intraperitoneally, 5 days), two common drugs used in human patients. The therapeutic and adverse effects were assessed with respect to generation of a protective adaptive immune response, fecal pathogen excretion, and the emergence of nonsymptomatic excreters. In the mouse model, both therapies reduced disease severity and reduced the level of fecal shedding. In line with clinical data, in most animals, a rebound of pathogen gut colonization/fecal shedding was observed 2 to 12 days after the end of the treatment. Yet, levels of pathogen shedding and frequency of appearance of nonsymptomatic excreters did not differ from those for untreated controls. Moreover, mice treated intraperitoneally with ceftriaxone developed an adaptive immunity protecting the mice from enteropathy in wild-type Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium challenge infections. In contrast, the mice treated intragastrically with ciprofloxacin were not protected. Thus, antibiotic treatment regimens can disrupt the adaptive immune response, but treatment regimens may be optimized in order to preserve the generation of protective immunity. It might be of interest to determine whether this also pertains to human patients. In this case, the mouse model might be a tool for further mechanistic studies.

  11. Pediatric Epidemic of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in the Area of L’Aquila, Italy, Four Years after a Catastrophic Earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Nigro, Giovanni; Bottone, Gabriella; Maiorani, Daniela; Trombatore, Fabiana; Falasca, Silvana; Bruno, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Background: A Salmonella enterica epidemic occurred in children of the area of L’Aquila (Central Italy, Abruzzo region) between June 2013 and October 2014, four years after the catastrophic earthquake of 6 April 2009. Methods: Clinical and laboratory data were collected from hospitalized and ambulatory children. Routine investigations for Salmonella infection were carried out on numerous alimentary matrices of animal origin and sampling sources for drinking water of the L’Aquila district, including pickup points of the two main aqueducts. Results: Salmonella infection occurred in 155 children (83 females: 53%), aged 1 to 15 years (mean 2.10). Of these, 44 children (28.4%) were hospitalized because of severe dehydration, electrolyte abnormalities, and fever resistant to oral antipyretic and antibiotic drugs. Three children (1.9%) were reinfected within four months after primary infection by the same Salmonella strain. Four children (2.6%), aged one to two years, were coinfected by rotavirus. A seven-year old child had a concomitant right hip joint arthritis. The isolated strains, as confirmed in about the half of cases or probable/possible in the remaining ones, were identified as S. enterica serovar Typhimurium [4,5:i:-], monophasic variant. Aterno river, bordering the L’Aquila district, was recognized as the main responsible source for the contamination of local crops and vegetables derived from polluted crops. Conclusions: The high rate of hospitalized children underlines the emergence of a highly pathogenic S. enterica strain probably subsequent to the contamination of the spring water sources after geological changes occurred during the catastrophic earthquake. PMID:27164121

  12. The effect of electron beam irradiation on the survival of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium and psychrotrophic bacteria on raw chicken breasts stored at four degrees celsius for fourteen days.

    PubMed

    Sarjeant, K C; Williams, S K; Hinton, A

    2005-06-01

    The effect of high-energy electron beam irradiation on the survival of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and psychrotrophic bacteria on commercial chicken breast meat was evaluated. Fresh chicken breast meat was purchased from a local poultry processor, inoculated with 8 log10 cfu/mL Salmonella, packaged in Styrofoam trays and over wrapped with a polyvinyl chloride film, and subjected to 0, 1, 2, or 3 kGy of irradiation. The packaged samples were stored at 4 degrees C and analyzed for Salmonella Typhimurium and psychrotrophic organisms at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14 d of storage. Direct plating and enrichment methods were used for S. Typhimurium analyses. The direct plating method revealed a 4 log reduction in Salmonella for chicken breasts inoculated and treated with 1, 2, or 3 kGy of irradiation. Psychrotrophic counts were conducted at 7 degrees C for 10 d and 25 degrees C for 5 d to determine the effect of incubation methods on the recovery of psychrotrophic organisms. The enrichment method resulted in the repair of injured Salmonella cells and an elevated Salmonella Typhimurium count for all irradiation dosages when compared with data reported for the direct plating method. In general, psychrotrophic counts increased as storage time increased. However, psychrotrophic counts decreased (P < 0.05) as the irradiation dosage increased.

  13. Transcriptional response of selected genes of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium biofilm cells during inactivation by superheated steam.

    PubMed

    Ban, Ga-Hee; Kang, Dong-Hyun; Yoon, Hyunjin

    2015-01-02

    Superheated steam (SHS), produced by the addition of heat to saturated steam (SS) at the same pressure, has great advantages over conventional heat sterilization due to its high temperature and accelerated drying rate. We previously demonstrated that treatment with SHS at 200°C for 10 sec inactivated Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes biofilm cells on the surface of stainless steel to below the detection limit. However, bacteria withstanding heat stress become more resistant to other stress conditions, and may be more virulent when consumed by a host. Herein, we studied the transcriptional regulation of genes important for stress resistance and virulence in Salmonella biofilms after SHS treatments. Genes encoding heat shock proteins and general stress resistance proteins showed transcriptional surges after 1 sec of SHS treatment at 200°C, with parallel induction of stress-related regulator genes including rpoE, rpoS, and rpoH. Interestingly, Salmonella biofilm cells exposed to SHS showed decreased transcription of flagella and Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1) genes required for motility and invasion of host cells, respectively, whereas increased transcription of SPI-2 genes, important for bacterial survival and replication inside host cells, was detected. When the transcriptional response was compared between cells treated with SHS (200°C) and SS (100°C), SHS caused immediate changes in gene expression by shorter treatments. Understanding the status of Salmonella virulence and stress resistance induced by SHS treatments is important for wider application of SHS in controlling Salmonella biofilm formation during food production.

  14. Cold plasma inactivation of internalised bacteria and biofilms for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ziuzina, Dana; Han, Lu; Cullen, Patrick J; Bourke, Paula

    2015-10-01

    Microbial biofilms and bacteria internalised in produce tissue may reduce the effectiveness of decontamination methods. In this study, the inactivation efficacy of in-package atmospheric cold plasma (ACP) afterglow was investigated against Salmonella Typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli in the forms of planktonic cultures, biofilms formed on lettuce and associated bacteria internalised in lettuce tissue. Prepared lettuce broth (3%) was inoculated with bacteria resulting in a final concentration of ~7.0 log10 CFU/ml. For biofilm formation and internalisation, lettuce pieces (5 × 5 cm) were dip-inoculated in bacterial suspension of ~7.0 log10 CFU/ml for 2 h and further incubated for 0, 24 and 48 h at either 4 °C or room temperature (~22 °C) in combination with light/dark photoperiod or at 4 °C under dark conditions. Inoculated samples were sealed inside a rigid polypropylene container and indirectly exposed (i.e. placed outside plasma discharge) to a high voltage (80 kVRMS) air ACP with subsequent storage for 24 h at 4 °C. ACP treatment for 30s reduced planktonic populations of Salmonella, L. monocytogenes and E. coli suspended in lettuce broth to undetectable levels. Depending on storage conditions, bacterial type and age of biofilm, 300 s of treatment resulted in reduction of biofilm populations on lettuce by a maximum of 5 log10 CFU/sample. Scanning electron and confocal laser microscopy pointed to the incidence of bacterial internalisation and biofilm formation, which influenced the inactivation efficacy of ACP. Measured intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) revealed that the presence of organic matter in the bacterial suspension might present a protective effect against the action of ROS on bacterial cells. This study demonstrated that high voltage in-package ACP could be a potential technology to overcome bacterial challenges associated with food produce. However, the existence of biofilms and internalised bacteria should be

  15. Infection with Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Leads to Increased Proportions of F4/80+ Red Pulp Macrophages and Decreased Proportions of B and T Lymphocytes in the Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Rosche, Kristin L.; Aljasham, Alanoud T.; Kipfer, James N.; Piatkowski, Bryan T.; Konjufca, Vjollca

    2015-01-01

    Infection of mice with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella) causes systemic inflammatory disease and enlargement of the spleen (splenomegaly). Splenomegaly has been attributed to a general increase in the numbers of phagocytes, lymphocytes, as well as to the expansion of immature CD71+Ter119+ reticulocytes. The spleen is important for recycling senescent red blood cells (RBCs) and for the capture and eradication of blood-borne pathogens. Conservation of splenic tissue architecture, comprised of the white pulp (WP), marginal zone (MZ), and red pulp (RP) is essential for initiation of adaptive immune responses to captured pathogens. Using flow cytometry and four color immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM), we show that Salmonella-induced splenomegaly is characterized by drastic alterations of the splenic tissue architecture and cell population proportions, as well as in situ cell distributions. A major cause of splenomegaly appears to be the significant increase in immature RBC precursors and F4/80+ macrophages that are important for recycling of heme-associated iron. In contrast, the proportions of B220+, CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes, as well as MZ MOMA+ macrophages decrease significantly as infection progresses. Spleen tissue sections show visible tears and significantly altered tissue architecture with F4/80+ macrophages and RBCs expanding beyond the RP and taking over most of the spleen tissue. Additionally, F4/80+ macrophages actively phagocytose not only RBCs, but also lymphocytes, indicating that they may contribute to declining lymphocyte proportions during Salmonella infection. Understanding how these alterations of spleen microarchitecture impact the generation of adaptive immune responses to Salmonella has implications for understanding Salmonella pathogenesis and for the design of more effective Salmonella-based vaccines. PMID:26068006

  16. Infection with Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Leads to Increased Proportions of F4/80+ Red Pulp Macrophages and Decreased Proportions of B and T Lymphocytes in the Spleen.

    PubMed

    Rosche, Kristin L; Aljasham, Alanoud T; Kipfer, James N; Piatkowski, Bryan T; Konjufca, Vjollca

    2015-01-01

    Infection of mice with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella) causes systemic inflammatory disease and enlargement of the spleen (splenomegaly). Splenomegaly has been attributed to a general increase in the numbers of phagocytes, lymphocytes, as well as to the expansion of immature CD71+Ter119+ reticulocytes. The spleen is important for recycling senescent red blood cells (RBCs) and for the capture and eradication of blood-borne pathogens. Conservation of splenic tissue architecture, comprised of the white pulp (WP), marginal zone (MZ), and red pulp (RP) is essential for initiation of adaptive immune responses to captured pathogens. Using flow cytometry and four color immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM), we show that Salmonella-induced splenomegaly is characterized by drastic alterations of the splenic tissue architecture and cell population proportions, as well as in situ cell distributions. A major cause of splenomegaly appears to be the significant increase in immature RBC precursors and F4/80+ macrophages that are important for recycling of heme-associated iron. In contrast, the proportions of B220+, CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes, as well as MZ MOMA+ macrophages decrease significantly as infection progresses. Spleen tissue sections show visible tears and significantly altered tissue architecture with F4/80+ macrophages and RBCs expanding beyond the RP and taking over most of the spleen tissue. Additionally, F4/80+ macrophages actively phagocytose not only RBCs, but also lymphocytes, indicating that they may contribute to declining lymphocyte proportions during Salmonella infection. Understanding how these alterations of spleen microarchitecture impact the generation of adaptive immune responses to Salmonella has implications for understanding Salmonella pathogenesis and for the design of more effective Salmonella-based vaccines.

  17. The Type III Secretion System Effector SptP of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Rebecca; Byrne, Alexander; Berger, Cedric N.; Klemm, Elizabeth; Crepin, Valerie F.; Dougan, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Strains of the various Salmonella enterica serovars cause gastroenteritis or typhoid fever in humans, with virulence depending on the action of two type III secretion systems (Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 [SPI-1] and SPI-2). SptP is a Salmonella SPI-1 effector, involved in mediating recovery of the host cytoskeleton postinfection. SptP requires a chaperone, SicP, for stability and secretion. SptP has 94% identity between S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. Typhi; direct comparison of the protein sequences revealed that S. Typhi SptP has numerous amino acid changes within its chaperone-binding domain. Subsequent comparison of ΔsptP S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium strains demonstrated that, unlike SptP in S. Typhimurium, SptP in S. Typhi was not involved in invasion or cytoskeletal recovery postinfection. Investigation of whether the observed amino acid changes within SptP of S. Typhi affected its function revealed that S. Typhi SptP was unable to complement S. Typhimurium ΔsptP due to an absence of secretion. We further demonstrated that while S. Typhimurium SptP is stable intracellularly within S. Typhi, S. Typhi SptP is unstable, although stability could be recovered following replacement of the chaperone-binding domain with that of S. Typhimurium. Direct assessment of the strength of the interaction between SptP and SicP of both serovars via bacterial two-hybrid analysis demonstrated that S. Typhi SptP has a significantly weaker interaction with SicP than the equivalent proteins in S. Typhimurium. Taken together, our results suggest that changes within the chaperone-binding domain of SptP in S. Typhi hinder binding to its chaperone, resulting in instability, preventing translocation, and therefore restricting the intracellular activity of this effector. IMPORTANCE Studies investigating Salmonella pathogenesis typically rely on Salmonella Typhimurium, even though Salmonella Typhi causes the more severe disease in humans. As such, an understanding of

  18. Evidence of metabolic switching and implications for food safety from the phenome(s) of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 cultured at selected points across the pork production food chain.

    PubMed

    Martins, Marta; McCusker, Matthew P; McCabe, Evonne M; O'Leary, Denis; Duffy, Geraldine; Fanning, Séamus

    2013-09-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 is a recognized food-borne pathogen that displays a multidrug-resistant phenotype and that is associated with systemic infections. At one extreme of the food chain, this bacterium can infect humans, limiting the treatment options available and thereby contributing to increased morbidity and mortality. Although the antibiotic resistance profile is well defined, little is known about other phenotypes that may be expressed by this pathogen at key points across the pork production food chain. In this study, 172 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104/DT104b isolated from an extensive "farm-to-fork" surveillance study, focusing on the pork food chain, were characterized in detail. Isolates were cultured from environmental, processing, retail, and clinical sources, and the study focused on phenotypes that may have contributed to persistence/survival in these different niches. Molecular subtypes, along with antibiotic resistance profiles, tolerance to biocides, motility, and biofilm formation, were determined. As a basis for human infection, acid survival and the ability to utilize a range of energy sources and to adhere to and/or invade Caco-2 cells were also studied. Comparative alterations to biocide tolerance were observed in isolates from retail. l-Tartaric acid and d-mannose-1-phosphate induced the formation of biofilms in a preselected subset of strains, independent of their origin. All clinical isolates were motile and demonstrated an enhanced ability to survive in acidic conditions. Our data report on a diverse phenotype, expressed by S. Typhimurium isolates cultured from the pork production food chain. Extending our understanding of the means by which this pathogen adapts to environmental niches along the "farm-to-fork" continuum will facilitate the protection of vulnerable consumers through targeted improvements in food safety measures.

  19. Effects of dietary clays on performance and intestinal mucus barrier of broiler chicks challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and on goblet cell function in vitro.

    PubMed

    Almeida, J A S; Ponnuraj, N P; Lee, J J; Utterback, P; Gaskins, H R; Dilger, R N; Pettigrew, J E

    2014-04-01

    In vivo and in vitro experiments were conducted to test for beneficial effects of dietary clays on broiler chicks challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and to explore potential mechanisms. First, two hundred forty 1-d-old male broilers (initial BW: 41.6 ± 0.4 g) were allotted in a 2 × 4 factorial arrangement in a randomized complete block design. There were 2 infection treatments (with or without Salmonella) and 4 diets: basal (BAS), 0.3% smectite A (SMA), 0.3% smectite B, and 0.3% zeolite. The Salmonella reduced (P < 0.05) the growth rate of chicks fed the BAS, and feeding clay largely restored it (challenge × diet interaction, P < 0.05). Goblet cell number and size were increased (P < 0.05) by Salmonella in chicks fed the BAS and were reduced (P < 0.05) in Salmonella-challenged chicks by feeding SMA. Villus height was reduced by the Salmonella challenge in the chicks fed dietary clays (P < 0.01) but not in chicks fed the BAS (interaction P < 0.05). A human adenocarcinoma cell line (LS174T) was cultured in vitro in 3 separate experiments in the absence or presence of 3 concentrations (0.05, 0.10, and 0.50%) of SMA. Expression of mucin 2 (MUC2), resistin-like molecule β (RELMß), and trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) were determined by real-time reverse-transcription PCR. The expression of RELMβ was increased and expression of MUC2 was reduced (P < 0.05) by 0.10% SMA. Also, LS174T cells were cultured without or with SMA (0.05 and 0.10%) and the medium and cell lysate were analyzed for RELMβ using an immunoblot assay. Protein expression of RELMß in the cell lysate was reduced (P < 0.05) by SMA addition but increased in the medium, indicating that SMA increased secretion of RELMß, thus depleting the cell and concentrating this protein in the medium. In conclusion, the dietary clays restored the growth depression caused by Salmonella, and changes in goblet cell function may contribute to the benefits of one of the clays, specifically SMA.

  20. Improving resolution of public health surveillance for human Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection: 3 years of prospective multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prospective typing of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (STM) by multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) can assist in identifying clusters of STM cases that might otherwise have gone unrecognised, as well as sources of sporadic and outbreak cases. This paper describes the dynamics of human STM infection in a prospective study of STM MLVA typing for public health surveillance. Methods During a three-year period between August 2007 and September 2010 all confirmed STM isolates were fingerprinted using MLVA as part of the New South Wales (NSW) state public health surveillance program. Results A total of 4,920 STM isolates were typed and a subset of 4,377 human isolates was included in the analysis. The STM spectrum was dominated by a small number of phage types, including DT170 (44.6% of all isolates), DT135 (13.9%), DT9 (10.8%), DT44 (4.5%) and DT126 (4.5%). There was a difference in the discriminatory power of MLVA types within endemic phage types: Simpson's index of diversity ranged from 0.109 and 0.113 for DTs 9 and 135 to 0.172 and 0.269 for DTs 170 and 44, respectively. 66 distinct STM clusters were observed ranging in size from 5 to 180 cases and in duration from 4 weeks to 25 weeks. 43 clusters had novel MLVA types and 23 represented recurrences of previously recorded MLVA types. The diversity of the STM population remained relatively constant over time. The gradual increase in the number of STM cases during the study was not related to significant changes in the number of clusters or their size. 667 different MLVA types or patterns were observed. Conclusions Prospective MLVA typing of STM allows the detection of community outbreaks and demonstrates the sustained level of STM diversity that accompanies the increasing incidence of human STM infections. The monitoring of novel and persistent MLVA types offers a new benchmark for STM surveillance. A part of this study was presented at the MEEGID × (Molecular Epidemiology

  1. Curcumin Reduces the Motility of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium by Binding to the Flagella, Thereby Leading to Flagellar Fragility and Shedding

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Arjun; Negi, Vidya Devi; Sakorey, Deepika; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT One of the important virulence properties of the pathogen is its ability to travel to a favorable environment, cross the viscous mucus barrier (intestinal barrier for enteric pathogens), and reach the epithelia to initiate pathogenesis with the help of an appendage, like flagella. Nonetheless, flagella can act as an “Achilles heel,” revealing the pathogen's presence to the host through the stimulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. We assessed whether curcumin, a dietary polyphenol, could alter the motility of Salmonella, a foodborne pathogen. It reduced the motility of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by shortening the length of the flagellar filament (from ∼8 μm to ∼5 μm) and decreasing its density (4 or 5 flagella/bacterium instead of 8 or 9 flagella/bacterium). Upon curcumin treatment, the percentage of flagellated bacteria declined from ∼84% to 59%. However, no change was detected in the expression of the flagellin gene and protein. A fluorescence binding assay demonstrated binding of curcumin to the flagellar filament. This might make the filament fragile, breaking it into smaller fragments. Computational analysis predicted the binding of curcumin, its analogues, and its degraded products to a flagellin molecule at an interface between domains D1 and D2. Site-directed mutagenesis and a fluorescence binding assay confirmed the binding of curcumin to flagellin at residues ASN120, ASP123, ASN163, SER164, ASN173, and GLN175. IMPORTANCE This work, to our knowledge the first report of its kind, examines how curcumin targets flagellar density and affects the pathogenesis of bacteria. We found that curcumin does not affect any of the flagellar synthesis genes. Instead, it binds to the flagellum and makes it fragile. It increases the torsional stress on the flagellar filament that then breaks, leaving fewer flagella around the bacteria. Flagella, which are crucial ligands for Toll-like receptor 5, are some of the most important

  2. Use of carvacrol, thymol, and eugenol for biofilm eradication and resistance modifying susceptibility of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains to nalidixic acid.

    PubMed

    Miladi, Hanene; Zmantar, Tarek; Kouidhi, Bochra; Chaabouni, Yassine; Mahdouani, Kacem; Bakhrouf, Amina; Chaieb, Kamel

    2017-03-01

    The Aims of the study was to evaluate the antibacterial susceptibility and the biofilm eradication of three natural compounds carvacrol (CAR), thymol (TH) and eugenol (EUG), alone or in combination with nalidixic acid (NA) against twelve Salmonella Typhimurium strains. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum biofilm eradication concentration (BEC50) of the tested compounds (CAR, TH and EUG) and their combinations with NA were evaluated. In order to assess whether these bacteria had active efflux pumps, ethidium bromide (EtBr) accumulation assays was achieved using spectrophotometric accumulation assays. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy was used to visualize the bacterial biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces after exposed to NA, CAR, TH and EUG alone and in combination. TH was the most effective essential oil, with the lowest MICs values ranging from 32 to 128 μg/mL followed by EUG and CAR. In addition, the combination of NA with the different compounds enhances antibiotic susceptibility of the tested bacterial strains. These results were confirmed by EtBr accumulation assays. A pronounced effect in decreasing biofilm mass was also noticed. Moreover, SEM revealed that bacterial membrane was disrupted and a complete loss of membrane integrity was also evident. The combination of natural compounds with antibiotic enhances bacterial susceptibility to NA. This combination ameliorates eradication of biofilm formed by S. Typhimurium on polystyrene microtitre plates. Additionally, this synergy induces an alteration of the bacterial cell surface visualized by SEM.

  3. Salmonella Typhimurium infection primes a nutriprive mechanism in piglets.

    PubMed

    Miarelli, Maria; Drumo, Rosanna; Signorelli, Federica; Marchitelli, Cinzia; Pavone, Silvia; Pesciaroli, Michele; Ruggieri, Jessica; Chirullo, Barbara; Ammendola, Serena; Battistoni, Andrea; Alborali, Giovanni L; Manuali, Elisabetta; Pasquali, Paolo

    2016-04-15

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is an important cause of acute food- borne zoonoses worldwide, typically carried by pigs. It is well known that Salmonella has evolved a wide array of strategies enabling it to invade the host, but little information is available on the specific host responses to Salmonella infections. In the present study, we used an in vivo approach (involving piglets infected with a virulent or an attenuated S. Typhimurium strain) coupled to histological and proteomic analysis of the cecum mucosa, to highlight the host pathways activated during S. Typhimurium infection. We confirm the complex host-pathogen interaction. Our data showed that the metabolic and the cytoskeleton organization functions were the most significantly altered. In particular, the modifications of energy metabolic pathway could suggest a "nutriprive" mechanism, in which the host reduce its metabolic and energetic status to limit Salmonella infection. This study could represent a preliminary approach, providing information useful to better understand the host-Salmonella interaction.

  4. The Role of the QseC Sensor Kinase in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Quorum Sensing and Swine Colonization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    At least two quorum sensing molecules, autoinducer-3 (AI-3) and norepinephrine (NE), are present in the gastrointestinal tract and activate the E. coli QseBC quorum sensing system. AI-3 is produced by enteric bacteria, whereas NE is produced by the animal host, often during stress. Both 10% pre-co...

  5. Eavesdropping by bacteria: the role of SdiA in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium quorum sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many gram-negative bacteria utilize N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones (AHLs) to sense and respond to their own population densities and to regulate gene transcription. The AHLs, produced by AHL synthases, bind to receptors belonging to the LuxR family of transcriptional regulators leading to activation...

  6. prpR, ntrA, and ihf functions are required for expression of the prpBCDE operon, encoding enzymes that catabolize propionate in Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium LT2.

    PubMed

    Palacios, S; Escalante-Semerena, J C

    2000-02-01

    The genes required for the catabolism of propionate in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium are organized as two transcriptional units (prpR and prpBCDE) that are divergently transcribed from one another. Sequence homology to genes encoding members of the sigma-54 family of transcriptional activators and the identification of a consensus sigma-54 promoter 5' to the prpBCDE operon suggested that PrpR was required to activate expression of this operon. We isolated insertions in prpR and showed that prpR function was needed for growth on propionate as a carbon and energy source. A medium-copy-number plasmid carrying the lacZ gene under the control of the native sigma-54 promoter of prpBCDE was used to study prpBCDE operon expression. Transcription of the lacZ reporter in prpR, ntrA, and ihfB mutants was 85-, 83-, and 15-fold lower than the level of transcription measured in strains carrying the wild-type allele of the gene tested. These data indicated that PrpR, IHF, and transcription sigma factor RpoN were required for the expression of the prpBCDE operon. Further analysis of the involvement of the integration host factor (IHF) protein in the expression of this operon is required due to the well-documented pleiotropic effect the lack of this global regulator has on gene expression. Deletion of the 5' 615-bp portion of the prpR gene resulted in a PrpR(c) mutant protein that activated prpBCDE transcription regardless of the ability of the strain to synthesize 2-methylcitrate, the putative coactivator of PrpR. These results indicate that the N terminus of PrpR is the coactivator-sensing domain of the protein. When placed under the control of the arabinose-inducible promoter P(araBAD), expression of prpR(c) allele by arabinose had a strong negative effect on growth of the cell. It is proposed that this deleterious effect of PrpR(c) may be due to an uncontrolled ATPase activity of PrpR or to cross-activation of genes whose functions negatively affect cell growth under

  7. Antimicrobial activity of plant compounds against Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 in ground pork and the influence of heat and storage on the antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cynthia H; Ravishankar, Sadhana; Marchello, John; Friedman, Mendel

    2013-07-01

    Salmonella enterica is a predominant foodborne pathogen that causes diarrheal illness worldwide. A potential method of inhibiting pathogenic bacterial growth in meat is through the introduction of plant-derived antimicrobials. The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of heat (70°C for 5 min) and subsequent cold storage (4°C up to 7 days) on the effectiveness of oregano and cinnamon essential oils and powdered olive and apple extracts against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 in ground pork and to evaluate the activity of the most effective antimicrobials (cinnamon oil and olive extract) at higher concentrations in heated ground pork. The surviving Salmonella populations in two groups (heated and unheated) of antimicrobial-treated pork were compared. Higher concentrations of the most effective compounds were then tested (cinnamon oil at 0.5 to 1.0% and olive extract at 3, 4, and 5%) against Salmonella Typhimurium in heated ground pork. Samples were stored at 4°C and taken on days 0, 3, 5, and 7 for enumeration of survivors. The heating process did not affect the activity of antimicrobials. Significant 1.3- and 3-log reductions were observed with 1.0% cinnamon oil and 5% olive extract, respectively, on day 7. The minimum concentration required to achieve . 1-log reduction in Salmonella population was 0.8% cinnamon oil or 4% olive extract. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of these antimicrobials against multidrug-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium in ground pork and their stability during heating and cold storage. The most active formulations have the potential to enhance the microbial safety of ground pork.

  8. Impact of sporadic reporting of poultry Salmonella serovars from selected developing countries.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Elie K; Ayyash, Danielle B; Alturkistni, Wafa; Alyahiby, Areej; Yaghmoor, Soonham; Iyer, Archana; Yousef, Jehad; Kumosani, Taha; Harakeh, Steve

    2015-01-15

    This review documents the sporadic reporting of poultry Salmonella serovars in South Africa, Egypt, Indonesia, India, and Romania, five countries selected based on the importance of their distribution in different regions of the world and their cumulative significant population size of 1.6 billion. South Africa reported contamination of its poultry carcasses by S. Hadar, S. Blockley, S. Irumu, and S. Anatum. Results from Egypt showed that S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium were predominant in poultry along with other non-typhoid strains, namely S. Infantis, S. Kentucky, S. Tsevie, S. Chiredzi, and S. Heidelberg. In Indonesia, the isolation of Salmonella Typhi was the main focus, while other serovars included S. Kentucky, S. Typhimurium, and S. Paratyhi C. In India, S. Bareilly was predominant compared to S. Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium, S. Paratyphi B, S. Cerro, S. Mbandaka, S. Molade, S. Kottbus, and S. Gallinarum. Romania reported two Salmonella serovars in poultry that affect humans, namely S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, and other non-typhoid strains including S. Infantis, S. Derby, S. Colindale, S. Rissen, S. Ruzizi, S. Virchow, S. Brandenburg, S. Bredeney, S. Muenchen, S. Kortrijk, and S. Calabar. The results showed the spread of different serovars of Salmonella in those five developing countries, which is alarming and emphasizes the urgent need for the World Health Organization Global Foodborne Infections Network (WHO-GFN) to expand its activities to include more strategic participation and partnership with most developing countries in order to protect poultry and humans from the serious health impact of salmonellosis.

  9. Effect of feed particle size and feed processing on morphological characteristics in the small and large intestine of pigs and on adhesion of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT12 in the ileum in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hedemann, M S; Mikkelsen, L L; Naughton, P J; Jensen, B B

    2005-07-01

    A 2 x 2 factorial experiment with pigs was undertaken to investigate the effect of particle size (fine and coarse) and feed processing (pelleted and nonpelleted) on morphological characteristics in the small intestine, cecum, and colon of pigs and on the adhesion of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT12 to the ileum in vitro. Ninety-six pigs (average BW = 33 +/- 7 kg) were fed the experimental diets. After 4 wk, 24 pigs were selected (six pigs per diet) and euthanized, and tissue samples were taken from the mid and distal small intestine, cecum, and distal colon. The effects of particle size and feed processing on villus height and crypt depth in the small intestine were minor. Feeding coarse diets increased (P = 0.05) the crypt depth in the colon. The crypt depth was 420 +/- 12 and 449 +/- 12 microm in pigs fed finely and coarsely ground feed, respectively. Pigs fed pelleted diets had a larger (P = 0.01) staining area for neutral mucins, as well as for acidic and sulfomucins on the villi of the distal small intestine than pigs fed nonpelleted diets. The area was 41, 46, and 33% larger for neutral, acidic, and sulfomucins, respectively. The mucin-staining areas of the crypts in the cecum and the colon were not affected by the experimental diets. Examination of lectin binding characteristics of the distal small intestine and the cecum did not reveal any differences between the experimental diets. Using a pig intestine organ culture model, Salmonella adhered less (P < 0.05) to the ileal tissue of pigs fed the nonpelleted diets than to those fed pelleted diets; the adherence was 60% less in these pigs. Results of this study suggest that pigs fed pelleted diets secrete mucins that are capable of binding Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT12 and thereby allowing for colonization. Therefore, pigs fed a nonpelleted diet are better protected against Salmonella infections than pigs fed a pelleted diet.

  10. Intestinal invasion of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the avian host is dose dependent and does not depend on motility and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Hoegh-Andersen, Kirsten Hobolt; Rosenkrantz, Jesper Tjørnholt; Schroll, Casper; Casadesús, Josep; Aabo, Søren; Christensen, Jens Peter

    2013-08-30

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) can invade in the intestine of the avian host, and knowledge on the mechanisms that govern this is potentially important for prevention of disease. This study investigated the invasion of S. Typhimurium in the avian host and to which extent it depended on motility and chemotaxis. Wild type and previously well-characterized transposon mutants in flagella genes fliC and fljB and in chemotaxis genes cheA, cheB and cheR were used as challenge strains in intestinal loop experiments. Invasion was shown to be dose dependent, but did not require functional flagella or chemotaxis genes. In support of the results from intestinal loop experiments, flagella and chemotaxis genes were not significantly important to the outcome of an oral infection. The results showed that S. Typhimurium invasion in the avian host was dose dependent and was not affected by the loss of flagella and chemotaxis genes.

  11. Emergence of a multidrug-resistant (ASSuTTm) strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT120 in England in 2011 and the use of multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis in supporting outbreak investigations.

    PubMed

    Paranthaman, Karthikeyan; Haroon, Sophie; Latif, Samia; Vinnyey, Natalie; de Souza, Valerie; Welfare, William; Tahir, Mamoona; Cooke, Edward; Stone, Kirsten; Lane, Chris; Peters, Tansy; Puleston, Richard

    2013-10-01

    In summer 2011, two outbreaks of a unique, multidrug-resistant strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium phage type 120 (DT120) occurred mainly in the Midlands, England. The first outbreak occurred among guests attending a wedding in July 2011 ('Wedding outbreak'), followed by a more geographically dispersed outbreak in August and September 2011 ('Midlands outbreak'). Fifty-one cases were confirmed. Detailed epidemiological and environmental health investigations suggested that pork was the most likely source of both outbreaks. All human samples and one pork sample showed the specific multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) profile 3-11-12-NA-0211, with at most two loci variations. Trace-back investigations suggested a link to a butcher's shop and a pig farm in the East Midlands. The investigations highlight the utility of molecular analysis (MLVA) in supporting epidemiological investigations of outbreaks caused by S. Typhimurium DT120. Safe handling and cooking of pork by food business operators and consumers are key interventions to prevent future outbreaks.

  12. Simultaneous near-infrared radiant heating and UV radiation for inactivating Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in powdered red pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Ha, Jae-Won; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2013-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the efficacy of the simultaneous application of near-infrared (NIR) heating and UV irradiation for reducing populations of food-borne pathogens, including Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in red pepper powder and to clarify the mechanisms of the lethal effect of the NIR-UV combined treatment. Also, the effect of the combination treatment on quality was determined by measuring changes in color and pungency constituents. Simultaneous NIR-UV combined treatment for 5 min achieved 3.34- and 2.78-log CFU reductions in S. Typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7, respectively, which involved 1.86- and 1.31-log CFU reductions, respectively, which were attributed to the synergistic effect. Through qualitative and quantitative analyses, damage to the cell envelope was identified as the main factor contributing to the synergistic lethal effect of NIR-UV combined treatment. Color values and capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin content of NIR-UV simultaneously treated red pepper powder were not significantly (P > 0.05) different from those of untreated samples. These results suggest that simultaneous application of NIR and UV treatment can be effectively used to control food-borne pathogens in powdered red pepper without affecting quality.

  13. Simultaneous Near-Infrared Radiant Heating and UV Radiation for Inactivating Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Powdered Red Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jae-Won

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the efficacy of the simultaneous application of near-infrared (NIR) heating and UV irradiation for reducing populations of food-borne pathogens, including Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in red pepper powder and to clarify the mechanisms of the lethal effect of the NIR-UV combined treatment. Also, the effect of the combination treatment on quality was determined by measuring changes in color and pungency constituents. Simultaneous NIR-UV combined treatment for 5 min achieved 3.34- and 2.78-log CFU reductions in S. Typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7, respectively, which involved 1.86- and 1.31-log CFU reductions, respectively, which were attributed to the synergistic effect. Through qualitative and quantitative analyses, damage to the cell envelope was identified as the main factor contributing to the synergistic lethal effect of NIR-UV combined treatment. Color values and capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin content of NIR-UV simultaneously treated red pepper powder were not significantly (P > 0.05) different from those of untreated samples. These results suggest that simultaneous application of NIR and UV treatment can be effectively used to control food-borne pathogens in powdered red pepper without affecting quality. PMID:23956394

  14. ChIP-seq analysis of the σE regulon of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium reveals new genes implicated in heat shock and oxidative stress response

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Jie; Overall, Christopher C.; Johnson, Rudd C.; ...

    2015-09-21

    The alternative sigma factor σE functions to maintain bacterial homeostasis and membrane integrity in response to extracytoplasmic stress by regulating thousands of genes both directly and indirectly. The transcriptional regulatory network governed by σE in Salmonella and E. coli has been examined using microarray, however a genome-wide analysis of σE–binding sites inSalmonella has not yet been reported. We infected macrophages with Salmonella Typhimurium over a select time course. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq), 31 σE–binding sites were identified. Seventeen sites were new, which included outer membrane proteins, a quorum-sensing protein, a cell division factor, and amore » signal transduction modulator. The consensus sequence identified for σE in vivo binding was similar to the one previously reported, except for a conserved G and A between the -35 and -10 regions. One third of the σE–binding sites did not contain the consensus sequence, suggesting there may be alternative mechanisms by which σE modulates transcription. By dissecting direct and indirect modes of σE-mediated regulation, we found that σE activates gene expression through recognition of both canonical and reversed consensus sequence. Lastly, new σE regulated genes (greA, luxS, ompA and ompX) are shown to be involved in heat shock and oxidative stress responses.« less

  15. ChIP-Seq Analysis of the σE Regulon of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Reveals New Genes Implicated in Heat Shock and Oxidative Stress Response

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jie; Overall, Christopher C.; Johnson, Rudd C.; Jones, Marcus B.; McDermott, Jason E.; Heffron, Fred; Adkins, Joshua N.; Cambronne, Eric D.; Hensel, Michael

    2015-09-21

    The alternative sigma factor σE functions to maintain bacterial homeostasis and membrane integrity in response to extracytoplasmic stress by regulating thousands of genes both directly and indirectly. The transcriptional regulatory network governed by σE in Salmonella and E. colihas been examined using microarray, however a genome-wide analysis of σE–binding sites inSalmonella has not yet been reported. We infected macrophages with Salmonella Typhimurium over a select time course. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq), 31 σE–binding sites were identified. Seventeen sites were new, which included outer membrane proteins, a quorum-sensing protein, a cell division factor, and a signal transduction modulator. The consensus sequence identified for σE in vivo binding was similar to the one previously reported, except for a conserved G and A between the -35 and -10 regions. One third of the σE–binding sites did not contain the consensus sequence, suggesting there may be alternative mechanisms by which σE modulates transcription. By dissecting direct and indirect modes of σE-mediated regulation, we found that σE activates gene expression through recognition of both canonical and reversed consensus sequence. New σEregulated genes (greA, luxS, ompA and ompX) are shown to be involved in heat shock and oxidative stress responses.

  16. Subversion of innate and adaptive immune activation induced by structurally modified lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Pérez-Shibayama, Christian I; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; Cervantes-Barragán, Luisa; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ludewig, Burkhard; Cunningham, Adam F; García-Zepeda, Eduardo A; Becker, Ingeborg; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura; Gunn, John S; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2011-08-01

    Salmonella are successful pathogens that infect millions of people every year. During infection, Salmonella typhimurium changes the structure of its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in response to the host environment, rendering bacteria resistant to cationic peptide lysis in vitro. However, the role of these structural changes in LPS as in vivo virulence factors and their effects on immune responses and the generation of immunity are largely unknown. We report that modified LPS are less efficient than wild-type LPS at inducing pro-inflammatory responses. The impact of this LPS-mediated subversion of innate immune responses was demonstrated by increased mortality in mice infected with a non-lethal dose of an attenuated S. typhimurium strain mixed with the modified LPS moieties. Up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells and CD4(+) T-cell activation were affected by these modified LPS. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing specific antibody responses. Immunization with modified LPS moiety preparations combined with experimental antigens, induced an impaired Toll-like receptor 4-mediated adjuvant effect. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing immunity against challenge with virulent S. typhimurium. Hence, changes in S. typhimurium LPS structure impact not only on innate immune responses but also on both humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses.

  17. Subversion of innate and adaptive immune activation induced by structurally modified lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Pérez-Shibayama, Christian I; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; Cervantes-Barragán, Luisa; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ludewig, Burkhard; Cunningham, Adam F; García-Zepeda, Eduardo A; Becker, Ingeborg; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura; Gunn, John S; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella are successful pathogens that infect millions of people every year. During infection, Salmonella typhimurium changes the structure of its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in response to the host environment, rendering bacteria resistant to cationic peptide lysis in vitro. However, the role of these structural changes in LPS as in vivo virulence factors and their effects on immune responses and the generation of immunity are largely unknown. We report that modified LPS are less efficient than wild-type LPS at inducing pro-inflammatory responses. The impact of this LPS-mediated subversion of innate immune responses was demonstrated by increased mortality in mice infected with a non-lethal dose of an attenuated S. typhimurium strain mixed with the modified LPS moieties. Up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells and CD4+ T-cell activation were affected by these modified LPS. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing specific antibody responses. Immunization with modified LPS moiety preparations combined with experimental antigens, induced an impaired Toll-like receptor 4-mediated adjuvant effect. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing immunity against challenge with virulent S. typhimurium. Hence, changes in S. typhimurium LPS structure impact not only on innate immune responses but also on both humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses. PMID:21631497

  18. The agricultural antibiotic carbadox induces prophage and antibiotic resistance gene transfer in multidrug-resistant salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium DT104

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella strains cause ~1 million cases of foodborne disease each year in the U.S. and are a leading cause of food-related deaths. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella serovars has increased over the last few decades, and infection with these strains has an increase...

  19. Impacts of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Its speG Gene on the Transcriptomes of In Vitro M Cells and Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke-Chuan; Huang, Chih-Hung; Huang, Ching-Jou

    2016-01-01

    Microfold or membranous (M) cells are specialized intestinal epithelial cells responsible for host immunity. The speG mutant of Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a nonreplicating strain within human cells to be a candidate vaccine vector for interacting with M cells. We conducted this study to identify the genes are differently expressed between in vitro M cells and Caco-2 cells, and to determine whether S. Typhimurium and speG affect the transcriptomes of both cell types. In vitro M cells and Caco-2 cells were infected with wild-type (WT) S. Typhimurium, its ΔspeG mutant, or none for 1 h for RNA microarrays; the transcriptomes among the 6 pools were pairwisely compared. Genetic loci encoding scaffold (e.g., HSCHR7_CTG4_4, HSCHR9_CTG9_35), long noncoding RNA, membrane-associated protein (PITPNB), neuron-related proteins (OR8D1, OR10G9, and NTNG2), and transporter proteins (MICU2 and SLC28A1) were significantly upregulated in uninfected M cells compared with uninfected Caco-2 cells; and their encoding proteins are promising M-cell markers. Significantly upregulated HSCHR7_CTG4_4 of uninfected in vitro M cells were speG-independently downregulated by S. Typhimurium infection that is a remarkable change representing an important but unreported characteristic of M cells. The immune responses of in vitro M cells and Caco-2 cells can differ and reply on speG or not, with speG-dependent regulation of KYL4, SCTR, IL6, TNF, and CELF4 in Caco-2 cells, JUN, KLF6, and KCTD11 in M cells, or speG-independent modulation of ZFP36 in both cells. This study facilitates understanding of the immune responses of in vitro M cells after administering the S. Typhimurium ΔspeG mutant as a future vaccine vector. PMID:27064787

  20. Transfer of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium from contaminated irrigation water to parsley is dependent on curli and cellulose, the biofilm matrix components.

    PubMed

    Lapidot, Anat; Yaron, Sima

    2009-03-01

    Enteric pathogens can contaminate fresh produce, and this contaminated produce can be a significant potential source of human illness. The objective of this study was to determine a possible mode of transfer of Salmonella Typhimurium from contaminated irrigation water to mature parsley plants and to investigate the role of bacterial cellulose and curli. Parsley plants were drip irrigated with water containing green fluorescent protein-labeled Salmonella Typhimurium. Stems and leaves were harvested 1 day after the third irrigation and examined for the presence of Salmonella Typhimurium. Three weeks after harvesting, the presence of Salmonella was again confirmed in the regrown plants. During this period, bacterial numbers on leaves declined from 4.1 (+/- 0.3) to 2.3 (+/- 0.1) log CFU g(-1) (P < 0.05). Numbers in the soil were constant (5 log CFU g(-1)). Results demonstrated the ability of Salmonella Typhimurium to transfer from irrigation water to the edible parts of the plants. Confocal laser scanning microscopic images revealed that Salmonella Typhimurium formed aggregates at a depth of 8 to 32 microm beneath the leaf surface. Penetration might be achieved through the roots or the phyllosphere. The importance of the bacterial cellulose and curli was determined by comparing the wild-type strain with its mutants, which lack the ability to synthesize cellulose and curli. Counts of the double mutant were 2-log higher in the soil but 1-log lower in the leaves (P < 0.05). Deletion of the agfBA gene (for curli) was more effective than deletion of bcsA (for cellulose). Thus, curli and cellulose play a role in the transfer or survival of Salmonella Typhimurium in the plant, as they do for plant pathogens.

  1. The Type III Secretion System Effector SptP of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rebecca; Byrne, Alexander; Berger, Cedric N; Klemm, Elizabeth; Crepin, Valerie F; Dougan, Gordon; Frankel, Gad

    2017-02-15

    Strains of the various Salmonella enterica serovars cause gastroenteritis or typhoid fever in humans, with virulence depending on the action of two type III secretion systems (Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 [SPI-1] and SPI-2). SptP is a Salmonella SPI-1 effector, involved in mediating recovery of the host cytoskeleton postinfection. SptP requires a chaperone, SicP, for stability and secretion. SptP has 94% identity between S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S Typhi; direct comparison of the protein sequences revealed that S Typhi SptP has numerous amino acid changes within its chaperone-binding domain. Subsequent comparison of ΔsptP S Typhi and S. Typhimurium strains demonstrated that, unlike SptP in S. Typhimurium, SptP in S Typhi was not involved in invasion or cytoskeletal recovery postinfection. Investigation of whether the observed amino acid changes within SptP of S Typhi affected its function revealed that S Typhi SptP was unable to complement S. Typhimurium ΔsptP due to an absence of secretion. We further demonstrated that while S. Typhimurium SptP is stable intracellularly within S Typhi, S Typhi SptP is unstable, although stability could be recovered following replacement of the chaperone-binding domain with that of S. Typhimurium. Direct assessment of the strength of the interaction between SptP and SicP of both serovars via bacterial two-hybrid analysis demonstrated that S Typhi SptP has a significantly weaker interaction with SicP than the equivalent proteins in S. Typhimurium. Taken together, our results suggest that changes within the chaperone-binding domain of SptP in S Typhi hinder binding to its chaperone, resulting in instability, preventing translocation, and therefore restricting the intracellular activity of this effector.

  2. RNA-seq analysis of prophage induction in multidrug-resistant salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium DT104 following exposure to the agricultural antibiotic carbadox

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella is a leading cause of U.S. foodborne disease and food-related deaths. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 contains 5 prophages in the genome that may be induced to produce phage under various environmental conditions, including antibiotic exposure. We inve...

  3. Inactivation of Bacillus cereus and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by aqueous ozone (O3): Modeling and Uv-Vis spectroscopic analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ozone (O3) is a natural antimicrobial agent with potential applications in food industry. In this study, inactivation of Bacillus cereus and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium by aqueous ozone was evaluated. Ozone gas was generated using a domestic ozone generator with an output of 200 mg/hr (approx. 0...

  4. The sigma54 global regulon in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium 14028s: an extensive array of intragenic sigma54 regulatory sites revealed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An essential determinant of a transcriptional regulon is the sigma factor that associates with core RNA polymerase (E) to direct promoter-specific binding and transcription initiation by the holoenzyme (Esigma). In addition to the primary sigma factor, sigma70, S. Typhimurium has five alternative si...

  5. Antimicrobial activity of butyrate glycerides toward Salmonella Typhimurium and Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Namkung, H; Yu, H; Gong, J; Leeson, S

    2011-10-01

    The antimicrobial activities of n-butyric acid and its derivatives against Salmonella Typhimurium and Clostridium perfringens were studied. n-Butyric acid and its derivatives (monobutyrin and a mixture of mono-, di-, and tri-glycerides of butyric acid) were added at different concentrations (ranging from 250 to 7,000 mg/kg to a media inoculated with either Salmonella Typhimurium or C. perfringens. The antimicrobial activity of butyric acid against C. perfringens was measured at 2 bacterium concentrations and 2 inoculations involving ambient aerobic or anaerobic conditions. The most effective antimicrobial activity for Salmonella Typhimurium was observed with n-butyric acid, with 90% inhibition rate at a concentration of 1,500 mg/kg. Although minimal inhibition for Salmonella Typhimurium was observed with butyric acid glycerides, lipase addition to a mixture of mono-, di-, and triglycerides of butyric acid increased (P < 0.01) antimicrobial activity of these derivatives. Antimicrobial activity of butyric acid and its derivative against C. perfringens was higher when using a moderate initial inoculation concentration (10(5)) compared with a higher initial concentration (10(7)) of this bacterium. At a lower inoculation of C. perfringens (10(5)), >90% inhibition rate by all butyric acid glycerides was observed with prior aerobic inoculation at 2,000 mg/kg, whereas using anaerobic inoculation, only 50% monobutyrin maintained >90% inhibitory effect at 3,000 mg/kg. The antimicrobial effect of monobutyrin against C. perfringens was generally higher (P < 0.01) for 50% monobutyrin than for 100% monobutyrin. Either a mixture of butyric acid derivatives or 50% monobutyrin decreased (P < 0.01) C. perfringens in a media containing intestinal contents whereas only 50% monobutyrin decreased (P < 0.01) Salmonella Typhimurium within a media containing cecal contents from mature Leghorns. These results show that n-butyric acid and 50% monobutyrin could be used to control Salmonella

  6. Influence of moisture content on inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in powdered red and black pepper spices by radio-frequency heating.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seul-Gi; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2014-04-17

    The influence of moisture content during radio-frequency (RF) heating on heating rate, dielectric properties, and inactivation of foodborne pathogens was investigated. The effect of RF heating on the quality of powdered red and black pepper spices with different moisture ranges was also investigated. Red pepper (12.6%, 15.2%, 19.1%, and 23.3% dry basis, db) and black pepper (10.1%, 17.2%, 23.7%, and 30.5% db) inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium were treated in a RF heating system with 27.12 MHz. The heating rate of the sample was dependent on moisture content up to 19.1% (db) of red pepper and 17.2% (db) of black pepper, but there was a significant decrease in the heating rate when the moisture content was increased beyond these levels. The dielectric properties of both samples increased with a rise in moisture content. As the moisture content increased, treatment time required to reduce E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium by more than 7 log CFU/g (below the detection limit, 1 log CFU/g) decreased and then increased again without affecting product quality when the moisture content exceeded a level corresponding to the peak heating rate. RF treatment significantly (P<0.05) reduced moisture content of both spices. These results suggest that RF heating can be effectively used to not only control pathogens but also reduce moisture levels in spices and that the effect of inactivation is dependent on moisture content.

  7. Inactivation kinetics of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat sliced ham by near-infrared heating at different radiation intensities.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jae-Won; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inactivation kinetics of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes on ready-to-eat sliced ham by near-infrared (NIR) heating as a function of the processing parameter, radiation intensity. Precooked ham slices inoculated with the three pathogens were treated at different NIR intensities (ca. 100, 150, and 200 μW/cm(2)/nm). An increase in the applied radiation intensity resulted in a gradual increase of inactivation of all pathogens. The survival curves of the three pathogens exhibited both shoulder and tailing behavior at all light intensities. Among nonlinear models, the Weibull distribution and log-logistic model were used to describe the experimental data, and the statistical results (mean square error and R(2) values) indicated the suitability of the model for prediction. The log-logistic model more accurately described survival curves of the three pathogens than did the Weibull distribution at all radiation intensities. The output of this study and the proposed kinetics model would be beneficial to the deli meat industry for selecting the optimum processing conditions of NIR heating to meet the target pathogen inactivation on ready-to-eat sliced ham.

  8. Outer membrane vesicles from flagellin-deficient Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium induce cross-reactive immunity and provide cross-protection against heterologous Salmonella challenge

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiong; Liu, Qing; Yi, Jie; Liang, Kang; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Xiangmin; Curtiss, Roy; Kong, Qingke

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) isolated from Salmonella Typhimurium are potentially useful for developing subunit vaccines because of high immunogenicity and protective efficacy. However, flagella might remain in OMV pellets following OMV purification, resulting in non-essential immune responses and counteraction of bacterial protective immune responses when developing a vaccine against infection of multiple serotypes Salmonella. In this study, a flagellin-deficient S. Typhimurium mutant was constructed. Lipopolysaccharide profiles, protein profiles and cryo-electron microscopy revealed that there were no significant differences between the wild-type and mutant OMVs, with the exception of a large amount of flagellin in the wild-type OMVs. Neither the wild-type OMVs nor the non-flagellin OMVs were toxic to macrophages. Mice immunized with the non-flagellin OMVs produced high concentrations of IgG. The non-flagellin OMVs elicited strong mucosal antibody responses in mice when administered via the intranasal route in addition to provoking higher cross-reactive immune responses against OMPs isolated from S. Choleraesuis and S. Enteritidis. Both intranasal and intraperitoneal immunization with the non-flagellin OMVs provided efficient protection against heterologous S. Choleraesuis and S. Enteritidis challenge. Our results indicate that the flagellin-deficient OMVs may represent a new vaccine platform that could be exploited to facilitate the production of a broadly protective vaccine. PMID:27698383

  9. Inactivation kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium on fresh-cut bell pepper treated with slightly acidic electrolyzed water combined with ultrasound and mild heat.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ke; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2016-02-01

    The goal of this study was to enhance the antimicrobial effect of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) through addition of synergistic treatment with ultrasound (US) and mild heat treatment in order to improve the microbial safety of fresh-cut bell pepper. To evaluate the synergistic effects, the Weibull model was used to mathematically measure the effectiveness of the individual and combined treatments against Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella Typhimurium on the pepper. The combined treatment (SAEW+US+60 °C) resulted in the TR values of 0.04 and 0.09 min for L. monocytogenes and S. Typhimurium, respectively, as consequence of the minimum value. Subsequently, texture analysis was carried out to test the potential effect on quality of the samples due to the involved mild heat and ultrasound treatment. When compared to the control, there was no significant change (p ≥ 0.05) in the texture (color and hardness) of the samples that were treated by 1 min of the combined treatment (SAEW+US+60 °C) during storage at 4 °C for 7 days. This combined treatment achieved approximately 3.0 log CFU/g reduction in the two pathogens. The results demonstrate that the involved hurdle factors which are ultrasound and mild heat achieved the synergistic effect of SAEW against the two pathogens. According to the results of texture analysis, 1 min of SAEW+US+60 °C is the optimal condition due to without negative influence on the quality of the samples during the storage. The optimal condition shows the enhanced antimicrobial effect of SAEW and enables to improve microbial safety of fresh bell pepper in food industry as a consequence of hurdle approach.

  10. Evaluation of alternariol and alternariol methyl ether for mutagenic activity in Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, V.M.; Stack, M.E. )

    1994-10-01

    Alternariol and alternariol methyl ether were tested in the Ames Salmonella typhimurium assay, and both were shown, with and without metabolic activation, to be nonmutagenic to strains TA98 and TA100. The finding of other investigators that alternariol methyl ether is weakly mutagenic to Ta98 without metabolic activation could have resulted from the presence of a small amount of one of the highly mutagenic altertoxins in the alternariol methyl ether originally tested. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Anaerobic Respiration of Elemental Sulfur and Thiosulfate by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Requires psrA, a Homolog of the phsA Gene of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium LT2▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Justin L.; DiChristina, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a facultatively anaerobic gammaproteobacterium, respires a variety of anaerobic terminal electron acceptors, including the inorganic sulfur compounds sulfite (SO32−), thiosulfate (S2O32−), tetrathionate (S4O62−), and elemental sulfur (S0). The molecular mechanism of anaerobic respiration of inorganic sulfur compounds by S. oneidensis, however, is poorly understood. In the present study, we identified a three-gene cluster in the S. oneidensis genome whose translated products displayed 59 to 73% amino acid similarity to the products of phsABC, a gene cluster required for S0 and S2O32− respiration by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2. Homologs of phsA (annotated as psrA) were identified in the genomes of Shewanella strains that reduce S0 and S2O32− yet were missing from the genomes of Shewanella strains unable to reduce these electron acceptors. A new suicide vector was constructed and used to generate a markerless, in-frame deletion of psrA, the gene encoding the putative thiosulfate reductase. The psrA deletion mutant (PSRA1) retained expression of downstream genes psrB and psrC but was unable to respire S0 or S2O32− as the terminal electron acceptor. Based on these results, we postulate that PsrA functions as the main subunit of the S. oneidensis S2O32− terminal reductase whose end products (sulfide [HS−] or SO32−) participate in an intraspecies sulfur cycle that drives S0 respiration. PMID:19542325

  12. Incidence and Genetic Bases of Nitrofurantoin Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Two Successful Multidrug-Resistant Clones of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium: Pandemic "DT 104" and pUO-StVR2.

    PubMed

    García, Vanesa; Montero, Ignacio; Bances, Margarita; Rodicio, Rosaura; Rodicio, M Rosario

    2016-11-03

    In this study, the incidence and genetic bases of nitrofurantoin resistance were established for clinical isolates of two successful clones of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, the pandemic "DT 104" and the pUO-StVR2 clone. A total of 61 "DT 104" and 40 pUO-StVR2 isolates recovered from clinical samples during 2008-2014 and assigned to different phage types, were tested for nitrofurantoin susceptibility. As previously shown for older isolates, all newly tested pUO-StVR2 isolates were highly resistant to nitrofurantoin (minimal inhibitory concentration [MIC] of 128 μg/ml), while 42.6%, 24.6%, and 32.8% of the "DT 104" isolates were susceptible, showed intermediate resistance or were highly resistant, with MICs of 8, 64, and 128 μg/ml, respectively. The genetic bases of nitrofurantoin resistance were established by PCR amplification and sequencing of the nfsA and nfsB genes encoding oxygen-insensitive nitroreductases. pUO-StVR2 isolates shared identical alterations in both nfsA (IS1 inserted into the coding region) and nfsB (in frame duplication of two codons). "DT 104" isolates with intermediate or high resistance had a missense mutation affecting the start codon of nfsA, while a single resistant isolate carried an additional frameshift mutation affecting nfsB. Complementation studies, performed with wild-type nfsA and nfsB, cloned independently and together into low and high copy-number vectors, confirmed NfsA and NfsB as responsible for nitrofurantoin toxicity. The same alterations persisted along time in isolates of each clone belonging to different phage types. Accordingly, changes leading to nitrofurantoin resistance have probably occurred before phage type diversification.

  13. Interaction of the carbon monoxide-releasing molecule Ru(CO)3Cl(glycinate) (CORM-3) with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium: in situ measurements of carbon monoxide binding by integrating cavity dual-beam spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Rana, Namrata; McLean, Samantha; Mann, Brian E; Poole, Robert K

    2014-12-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a toxic gas that binds to haems, but also plays critical signalling and cytoprotective roles in mammalian systems; despite problems associated with systemic delivery by inhalation of the gas, it may be employed therapeutically. CO delivered to cells and tissues by CO-releasing molecules (CO-RMs) has beneficial and toxic effects not mimicked by CO gas; CO-RMs are also attractive candidates as novel antimicrobial agents. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an enteropathogen causing gastroenteritis in humans. Recent studies have implicated haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the protein that catalyses the degradation of haem into biliverdin, free iron and CO, in the host immune response to Salmonella infection. In several studies, CO administration via CO-RMs elicited many of the protective roles of HO-1 induction and so we investigated the effects of a well-characterized water-soluble CO-RM, Ru(CO)3Cl(glycinate) (CORM-3), on Salmonella. CORM-3 exhibits toxic effects at concentrations significantly lower than those reported to cause toxicity to RAW 264.7 macrophages. We demonstrated here, through oxyhaemoglobin assays, that CORM-3 did not release CO spontaneously in phosphate buffer, buffered minimal medium or very rich medium. CORM-3 was, however, accumulated to high levels intracellularly (as shown by inductively coupled plasma MS) and released CO inside cells. Using growing Salmonella cultures without prior concentration, we showed for the first time that sensitive dual-beam integrating cavity absorption spectrophotometry can detect directly the CO released from CORM-3 binding in real-time to haems of the bacterial electron transport chain. The toxic effects of CO-RMs suggested potential applications as adjuvants to antibiotics in antimicrobial therapy.

  14. Effect of electropermeabilization by ohmic heating for inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes in buffered peptone water and apple juice.

    PubMed

    Park, Il-Kyu; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2013-12-01

    The effect of electric field-induced ohmic heating for inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes in buffered peptone water (BPW) (pH 7.2) and apple juice (pH 3.5; 11.8 °Brix) was investigated in this study. BPW and apple juice were treated at different temperatures (55°C, 58°C, and 60°C) and for different times (0, 10, 20, 25, and 30 s) by ohmic heating compared with conventional heating. The electric field strength was fixed at 30 V/cm and 60 V/cm for BPW and apple juice, respectively. Bacterial reduction resulting from ohmic heating was significantly different (P<0.05) from that resulting from conventional heating at 58°C and 60°C in BPW and at 55°C, 58°C, and 60°C in apple juice for intervals of 0, 10, 20, 25, and 30 s. These results show that electric field-induced ohmic heating led to additional bacterial inactivation at sublethal temperatures. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations and the propidium iodide (PI) uptake test were conducted after treatment at 60°C for 0, 10, 20, 25 and 30 s in BPW to observe the effects on cell permeability due to electroporation-caused cell damage. PI values when ohmic and conventional heating were compared were significantly different (P<0.05), and these differences increased with increasing levels of inactivation of three food-borne pathogens. These results demonstrate that ohmic heating can more effectively reduce bacterial populations at reduced temperatures and shorter time intervals, especially in acidic fruit juices such as apple juice. Therefore, loss of quality can be minimized in a pasteurization process incorporating ohmic heating.

  15. Effect of Electropermeabilization by Ohmic Heating for Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes in Buffered Peptone Water and Apple Juice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Il-Kyu

    2013-01-01

    The effect of electric field-induced ohmic heating for inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes in buffered peptone water (BPW) (pH 7.2) and apple juice (pH 3.5; 11.8 °Brix) was investigated in this study. BPW and apple juice were treated at different temperatures (55°C, 58°C, and 60°C) and for different times (0, 10, 20, 25, and 30 s) by ohmic heating compared with conventional heating. The electric field strength was fixed at 30 V/cm and 60 V/cm for BPW and apple juice, respectively. Bacterial reduction resulting from ohmic heating was significantly different (P < 0.05) from that resulting from conventional heating at 58°C and 60°C in BPW and at 55°C, 58°C, and 60°C in apple juice for intervals of 0, 10, 20, 25, and 30 s. These results show that electric field-induced ohmic heating led to additional bacterial inactivation at sublethal temperatures. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations and the propidium iodide (PI) uptake test were conducted after treatment at 60°C for 0, 10, 20, 25 and 30 s in BPW to observe the effects on cell permeability due to electroporation-caused cell damage. PI values when ohmic and conventional heating were compared were significantly different (P < 0.05), and these differences increased with increasing levels of inactivation of three food-borne pathogens. These results demonstrate that ohmic heating can more effectively reduce bacterial populations at reduced temperatures and shorter time intervals, especially in acidic fruit juices such as apple juice. Therefore, loss of quality can be minimized in a pasteurization process incorporating ohmic heating. PMID:23995939

  16. Sublethal Exposure to Commercial Formulations of the Herbicides Dicamba, 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid, and Glyphosate Cause Changes in Antibiotic Susceptibility in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Kurenbach, Brigitta; Marjoshi, Delphine; Amábile-Cuevas, Carlos F.; Ferguson, Gayle C.; Godsoe, William; Gibson, Paddy

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Biocides, such as herbicides, are routinely tested for toxicity but not for sublethal effects on microbes. Many biocides are known to induce an adaptive multiple-antibiotic resistance phenotype. This can be due to either an increase in the expression of efflux pumps, a reduced synthesis of outer membrane porins, or both. Exposures of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to commercial formulations of three herbicides—dicamba (Kamba), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), and glyphosate (Roundup)—were found to induce a changed response to antibiotics. Killing curves in the presence and absence of sublethal herbicide concentrations showed that the directions and the magnitudes of responses varied by herbicide, antibiotic, and species. When induced, MICs of antibiotics of five different classes changed up to 6-fold. In some cases the MIC increased, and in others it decreased. Herbicide concentrations needed to invoke the maximal response were above current food maximum residue levels but within application levels for all herbicides. Compounds that could cause induction had additive effects in combination. The role of soxS, an inducer of the AcrAB efflux pump, was tested in β-galactosidase assays with soxS-lacZ fusion strains of E. coli. Dicamba was a moderate inducer of the sox regulon. Growth assays with Phe-Arg β-naphtylamide (PAβN), an efflux pump inhibitor, confirmed a significant role of efflux in the increased tolerance of E. coli to chloramphenicol in the presence of dicamba and to kanamycin in the presence of glyphosate. Pathways of exposure with relevance to the health of humans, domestic animals, and critical insects are discussed. PMID:25805724

  17. Survival of foodborne pathogenic bacteria (Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes) and Bacillus cereus spores in fermented alcoholic beverages (beer and refined rice wine).

    PubMed

    Kim, S A; Kim, N H; Lee, S H; Hwang, I G; Rhee, M S

    2014-03-01

    Only limited information is available on the microbiological safety of fermented alcoholic beverages because it is still a common belief that such beverages do not provide a favorable environment for bacterial growth and survival. Thus, in this study, we examined the survival of major foodborne pathogens and spores in fermented alcoholic beverages. Foodborne pathogens (Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus) and B. cereus spores (initial population, 3 to 4 log CFU/ml) were inoculated separately into three types of beer and refined rice wine, which were then stored at 5 and 22°C. Bacterial counts were assayed periodically for up to 28 days. Vegetative B. cereus counts decreased rapidly, whereas B. cereus spore counts remained constant (P > 0.05) for a long period of time in all beverages. Vegetative B. cereus cells formed spores in beer at 5 and 22°C, and the spores survived for long periods. Among vegetative cells, E. coli O157:H7 had the highest survival (only 1.49 to 1.56 log reduction during 28 days in beer at 5°C). Beer and refined rice wine supported microbial survival from several days to several weeks. Our results appear to contradict the common belief that pathogens cannot survive in alcoholic beverages. Long-term survival of pathogens (especially B. cereus and E. coli O157:H7) in beer and refined rice wine should be taken into consideration by the manufacturers of these beverages. This study provides basic information that should help further research into microbial survival in alcoholic beverages and increase the microbiological safety regulation of fermented alcoholic beverages.

  18. Anaerobic respiration of elemental sulfur and thiosulfate by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 requires psrA, a homolog of the phsA gene of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium LT2.

    PubMed

    Burns, Justin L; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2009-08-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a facultatively anaerobic gammaproteobacterium, respires a variety of anaerobic terminal electron acceptors, including the inorganic sulfur compounds sulfite (SO3(2-)), thiosulfate (S2O3(2-)), tetrathionate (S4O6(2-)), and elemental sulfur (S(0)). The molecular mechanism of anaerobic respiration of inorganic sulfur compounds by S. oneidensis, however, is poorly understood. In the present study, we identified a three-gene cluster in the S. oneidensis genome whose translated products displayed 59 to 73% amino acid similarity to the products of phsABC, a gene cluster required for S(0) and S2O3(2-) respiration by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2. Homologs of phsA (annotated as psrA) were identified in the genomes of Shewanella strains that reduce S(0) and S2O3(2-) yet were missing from the genomes of Shewanella strains unable to reduce these electron acceptors. A new suicide vector was constructed and used to generate a markerless, in-frame deletion of psrA, the gene encoding the putative thiosulfate reductase. The psrA deletion mutant (PSRA1) retained expression of downstream genes psrB and psrC but was unable to respire S(0) or S2O3(2-) as the terminal electron acceptor. Based on these results, we postulate that PsrA functions as the main subunit of the S. oneidensis S2O3(2-) terminal reductase whose end products (sulfide [HS-] or SO3(2-)) participate in an intraspecies sulfur cycle that drives S(0) respiration.

  19. Non-essential genes form the hubs of genome scale protein function and environmental gene expression networks in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Salmonella Typhimurium is an important pathogen of human and animals. It shows a broad growth range and survives in harsh conditions. The aim of this study was to analyze transcriptional responses to a number of growth and stress conditions as well as the relationship of metabolic pathways and/or cell functions at the genome-scale-level by network analysis, and further to explore whether highly connected genes (hubs) in these networks were essential for growth, stress adaptation and virulence. Results De novo generated as well as published transcriptional data for 425 selected genes under a number of growth and stress conditions were used to construct a bipartite network connecting culture conditions and significantly regulated genes (transcriptional network). Also, a genome scale network was constructed for strain LT2. The latter connected genes with metabolic pathways and cellular functions. Both networks were shown to belong to the family of scale-free networks characterized by the presence of highly connected nodes or hubs which are genes whose transcription is regulated when responding to many of the assayed culture conditions or genes encoding products involved in a high number of metabolic pathways and cell functions. The five genes with most connections in the transcriptional network (wraB, ygaU, uspA, cbpA and osmC) and in the genome scale network (ychN, siiF (STM4262), yajD, ybeB and dcoC) were selected for mutations, however mutagenesis of ygaU and ybeB proved unsuccessful. No difference between mutants and the wild type strain was observed during growth at unfavorable temperatures, pH values, NaCl concentrations and in the presence of H2O2. Eight mutants were evaluated for virulence in C57/BL6 mice and none differed from the wild type strain. Notably, however, deviations of phenotypes with respect to the wild type were observed when combinations of these genes were deleted. Conclusion Network analysis revealed the presence of hubs in both

  20. Mapping B-cell responses to Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis in chickens for the discrimination of infected from vaccinated animals

    PubMed Central

    Naqid, Ibrahim A.; Owen, Jonathan P.; Maddison, Ben C.; Spiliotopoulos, Anastasios; Emes, Richard D.; Warry, Andrew; Flynn, Robin J.; Martelli, Francesca; Gosling, Rebecca J.; Davies, Robert H.; La Ragione, Roberto M.; Gough, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Serological surveillance and vaccination are important strategies for controlling infectious diseases of food production animals. However, the compatibility of these strategies is limited by a lack of assays capable of differentiating infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA tests) for established killed or attenuated vaccines. Here, we used next generation phage-display (NGPD) and a 2-proportion Z score analysis to identify peptides that were preferentially bound by IgY from chickens infected with Salmonella Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis compared to IgY from vaccinates, for both an attenuated and an inactivated commercial vaccine. Peptides that were highly enriched against IgY from at least 4 out of 10 infected chickens were selected: 18 and 12 peptides for the killed and attenuated vaccines, respectively. The ten most discriminatory peptides for each vaccine were identified in an ELISA using a training set of IgY samples. These peptides were then used in multi-peptide assays that, when analysing a wider set of samples from infected and vaccinated animals, diagnosed infection with 100% sensitivity and specificity. The data describes a method for the development of DIVA assays for conventional attenuated and killed vaccines. PMID:27510219

  1. Comparative Effects of Ohmic and Conventional Heating for Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes in Skim Milk and Cream.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Soon; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2015-06-01

    Ohmic heating has proven advantages over conventional thermal processing and novel thermal alternative technologies. In this study, the effect of ohmic and conventional heating for pasteurizing skim milk and cream was examined. All treatment conditions for ohmic and conventional heating were identical except for composition of the heating chamber. In most cases, the reduction of three pathogens did not differ significantly between ohmic heating and conventional heating at fixed treatment temperatures and times. However, temperature can be increased more rapidly with ohmic than with conventional heating treatment, both in skim milk and in cream. Therefore, E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes were inactivated more effectively by ohmic heating treatment for the same treatment time intervals. Also, the time required for pathogen populations to decrease to below the detection limit was less for ohmic heating than conventional heating. Quality aspects (viscosity, pH, and color) of skim milk and cream suffered less degradation by ohmic than by conventional heating. Although there was little evidence of a nonthermal effect of ohmic heating, the results demonstrate significant advantages in the use of ohmic heating over conventional methods for pasteurizing skim milk and cream.

  2. The role of ClpP, RpoS and CsrA in growth and filament formation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium at low temperature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Salmonellae are food-borne pathogens of great health and economic importance. To pose a threat to humans, Salmonellae normally have to cope with a series of stressful conditions in the food chain, including low temperature. In the current study, we evaluated the importance of the Clp proteolytic complex and the carbon starvation protein, CsrA, for the ability of Salmonella Typhimurium to grow at low temperature. Results A clpP mutant was severely affected in growth and formed pin point colonies at 10°C. Contrary to this, rpoS and clpP/rpoS mutants were only slightly affected. The clpP mutant formed cold resistant suppressor mutants at a frequency of 2.5 × 10−3 and these were found not to express RpoS. Together these results indicated that the impaired growth of the clpP mutant was caused by high level of RpoS. Evaluation by microscopy of the clpP mutant revealed that it formed filamentous cells when grown at 10°C, and this phenotype too, disappered when rpoS was mutated in parallel indicating a RpoS-dependency. A csrA (sup) mutant was also growth attenuated a low temperature. An rpoS/csrA (sup) double mutant was also growth attenuated, indicating that the phenotype of the csrA mutant was independent from RpoS. Conclusions The cold sensitivity of clpP mutant was associated with increased levels of RpoS and probably caused by toxic levels of RpoS. Although a csrA mutant also accumulated high level of RpoS, growth impairment caused by lack of csrA was not related to RpoS levels in a similar way. PMID:25123657

  3. New sub-family of lysozyme-like proteins shows no catalytic activity: crystallographic and biochemical study of STM3605 protein from Salmonella Typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Michalska, Karolina; Brown, Roslyn N.; Li, Hui; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Niemann, George; Heffron, Fred; Cort, John R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2013-03-01

    Phage viruses that infect prokaryotes integrate their genome into the host chromosome; thus, microbial genomes typically contain genetic remnants of both recent and ancient phage infections. Often phage genes occur in clusters of atypical G+C content that reflect integration of the foreign DNA. However, some phage genes occur in isolation without other phage gene neighbors, probably resulting from horizontal gene transfer. In these cases, the phage gene product is unlikely to function as a component of a mature phage particle, and instead may have been co-opted by the host for its own benefit. The product of one such gene from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, STM3605, encodes a protein with modest sequence similarity to phage-like lysozyme (N-acetylmuramidase) but appears to lack essential catalytic residues that are strictly conserved in all lysozymes. Close homologs in other bacteria share this characteristic. The structure of the STM3605 protein was characterized by X-ray crystallography, and functional assays showed that it is a stable, folded protein whose structure closely resembles lysozyme. However, this protein is unlikely to hydrolyze peptidoglycan. Instead, STM3605 is presumed to have evolved an alternative function because it shows some lytic activity and partitions to micelles.

  4. Activity of KB-5246 against outer membrane mutants of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Kotera, Y; Inoue, M; Mitsuhashi, S

    1990-01-01

    The inhibitory activity of KB-5246 against Escherichia coli DNA gyrase and the antibacterial activity and apparent uptake in E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium outer membrane mutants of KB-5246 were measured. The 50% inhibitory concentrations of KB-5246, ciprofloxacin, oflaxacin, and norfloxacin for E. coli KL-16 DNA gyrase were 0.72, 0.62, 0.84, and 1.16 micrograms/ml, respectively. The activity of KB-5246 was twofold lower against an OmpF-deficient mutant and twofold higher against a mutant which produced OmpF constitutively than against the parent with osmoregulated OmpF production. KB-5246 had twofold-higher activity against a deep rough mutant of S. typhimurium than against the parent. The apparent uptake of KB-5246 in the OmpF-deficient mutant was decreased and its uptake in the deep rough mutant was increased when compared with those in the parents. These results suggest that KB-5246 is taken up by porin and nonporin pathways and has strong inhibitory activity against DNA gyrase, resulting in potent antibacterial activity. PMID:2167038

  5. Salmonella typhimurium induces epithelial IL-8 expression via Ca2+-mediated activation of the NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gewirtz, Andrew T.; Rao, Anjali S.; Simon, Peter O.; Merlin, Didier; Carnes, Denice; Madara, James L.; Neish, Andrew S.

    2000-01-01

    Interactions between the enteric pathogen Salmonella typhimurium and the luminal surface of the intestine provoke an acute inflammatory response, mediated in part by epithelial cell secretion of the chemokine IL-8 and other proinflammatory molecules. This study investigated the mechanism by which this pathogen induces IL-8 secretion in physiologically polarized model intestinal epithelia. IL-8 secretion induced by both the prototypical proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α and S. typhimurium was NF-κB dependent. However, NF-κB activation and IL-8 secretion induced by S. typhimurium, but not by TNF-α, was preceded by and required an increase in intracellular [Ca2+]. Additionally, agonists that increased intracellular [Ca2+] by receptor-dependent (carbachol) or independent (thapsigargin, ionomycin) means also induced IL-8 secretion. Furthermore, the ability of S. typhimurium mutants to induce IκB-α degradation, NF-κB translocation, and IL-8 transcription and secretion correlated precisely with their ability to induce an intracellular [Ca2+] increase in model intestinal epithelia, but not with their ability to invade these cells. Finally, S. typhimurium, but not TNF-α, induced a Ca2+-dependent phosphorylation of IκB-α. These results indicate that S. typhimurium–induced activation of NF-κB–dependent epithelial inflammatory responses proceeds by a Ca2+-mediated activation of an IκB-α kinase. These observations raise the possibility that pharmacologic intervention of the acute inflammatory response can be selectively matched to the specific class of initiating event. PMID:10619864

  6. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi conceals the invasion-associated type three secretion system from the innate immune system by gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Winter, Sebastian E; Winter, Maria G; Poon, Victor; Keestra, A Marijke; Sterzenbach, Torsten; Faber, Franziska; Costa, Luciana F; Cassou, Fabiane; Costa, Erica A; Alves, Geraldo E S; Paixão, Tatiane A; Santos, Renato L; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2014-07-01

    Delivery of microbial products into the mammalian cell cytosol by bacterial secretion systems is a strong stimulus for triggering pro-inflammatory host responses. Here we show that Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), the causative agent of typhoid fever, tightly regulates expression of the invasion-associated type III secretion system (T3SS-1) and thus fails to activate these innate immune signaling pathways. The S. Typhi regulatory protein TviA rapidly repressed T3SS-1 expression, thereby preventing RAC1-dependent, RIP2-dependent activation of NF-κB in epithelial cells. Heterologous expression of TviA in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) suppressed T3SS-1-dependent inflammatory responses generated early after infection in animal models of gastroenteritis. These results suggest that S. Typhi reduces intestinal inflammation by limiting the induction of pathogen-induced processes through regulation of virulence gene expression.

  7. Tc52 Amino-Terminal-Domain DNA Carried by Attenuated Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Induces Protection against a Trypanosoma cruzi Lethal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Marina N.; Cazorla, Silvia I.; Bivona, Augusto E.; Morales, Celina; Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we immunized mice with DNA encoding full-length Tc52 or its amino- or carboxy-terminal (N- and C-term, respectively) domain carried by attenuated Salmonella as a DNA delivery system. As expected, Salmonella-mediated DNA delivery resulted in low antibody titers and a predominantly Th1 response, as shown by the ratio of IgG2a/IgG1-specific antibodies. Despite modest expression of Tc52 in trypomastigotes, the antibodies elicited by vaccination were able to mediate lysis of the trypomastigotes in the presence of complement and inhibit their invasion of mammal cells in vitro. The strongest functional activity was observed with sera from mice immunized with Salmonella carrying the N-term domain (SN-term), followed by Tc52 (STc52), and the C-term domain (SC-term). All immunized groups developed strong cellular responses, with predominant activation of Th1 cells. However, mice immunized with SN-term showed higher levels of interleukin-10 (IL-10), counterbalancing the inflammatory reaction, and also strong activation of Tc52-specific gamma interferon-positive (IFN-γ+) CD8+ T cells. In agreement with this, although all prototypes conferred protection against infection, immunization with SN-term promoted greater protection than that with SC-term for all parameters tested and slightly better protection than that with STc52, especially in the acute stage of infection. We conclude that the N-terminal domain of Tc52 is the section of the protein that confers maximal protection against infection and propose it as a promising candidate for vaccine development. PMID:25069980

  8. Unique Helicase Determinants in the Essential Conjugative TraI Factor from Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Plasmid pCU1

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, K. J.; Nash, R. P.; Redinbo, M. R.

    2014-06-16

    The widespread development of multidrug-resistant bacteria is a major health emergency. Conjugative DNA plasmids, which harbor a wide range of antibiotic resistance genes, also encode the protein factors necessary to orchestrate the propagation of plasmid DNA between bacterial cells through conjugative transfer. Successful conjugative DNA transfer depends on key catalytic components to nick one strand of the duplex DNA plasmid and separate the DNA strands while cell-to-cell transfer occurs. The TraI protein from the conjugative Salmonella plasmid pCU1 fulfills these key catalytic roles, as it contains both single-stranded DNA-nicking relaxase and ATP-dependent helicase domains within a single, 1,078-residue polypeptide. In this work, we unraveled the helicase determinants of Salmonella pCU1 TraI through DNA binding, ATPase, and DNA strand separation assays. TraI binds DNA substrates with high affinity in a manner influenced by nucleic acid length and the presence of a DNA hairpin structure adjacent to the nick site. TraI selectively hydrolyzes ATP, and mutations in conserved helicase motifs eliminate ATPase activity. Surprisingly, the absence of a relatively short (144-residue) domain at the extreme C terminus of the protein severely diminishes ATP-dependent strand separation. Collectively, these data define the helicase motifs of the conjugative factor TraI from Salmonella pCU1 and reveal a previously uncharacterized C-terminal functional domain that uncouples ATP hydrolysis from strand separation activity.

  9. Genetic Manipulation of Pathogenicity Loci in Non-Typhimurium Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Butela, Kristen; Lawrence, Jeffrey G.

    2012-01-01

    The traditional genetic tools used in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium rely heavily on a high-transducing mutant of bacteriophage P22. P22 recognizes its hosts by the structure of their O-antigens, which vary among serovars of Salmonella; therefore, it cannot be used in most non-Typhimurium Salmonella, including the majority of those causing food-borne illnesses in both humans and livestock. Bacteriophage P1 infects a variety of enteric bacteria, including galE mutants of serovar Typhimurium; however, the degree to which the presence of coimmune prophages, the lack of required attachment sites or the lack of host factors act as barriers to using phage P1 in natural isolates of Salmonella is unknown. Here, we show that recombineering can be used to make virtually any serovar of Salmonella susceptible to P1 infection; as a result, P1 can be utilized for facile genetic manipulation of non-Typhimurium Salmonella, including movement of very large pathogenicity islands. A toolkit for easy manipulation of non-Typhimurium serovars of Salmonella is described. PMID:23041268

  10. Resolvase-In Vivo Expression Technology Analysis of the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium PhoP and PmrA Regulons in BALB/c Mice†

    PubMed Central

    Merighi, Massimo; Ellermeier, Craig D.; Slauch, James M.; Gunn, John S.

    2005-01-01

    Salmonella enterica modulates resistance to antimicrobial peptides in part via covalent modifications of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The two-component systems PhoP/PhoQ and PmrA/PmrB are activated during infection and regulate several genes involved in LPS modifications by responding to signals such as pH, iron, magnesium, and antimicrobial peptides. A recombination-based in vivo expression technology approach was adopted to analyze the spatial-temporal patterns of in vivo expression of genes of the PhoP and PmrA regulons and to identify the in vivo signals modulating their transcription. In vitro, we showed PhoP- and/or PmrA-dependent induction of pmrH (LPS aminoarabinose modification operon) by acidic pH, low levels of magnesium, or high levels of Fe(III). Upregulation in cultured J774A.1 macrophages was shown for pmrH, pagP (LPS palmitate addition), and ssaB (pathogenicity island II secretion) but not for prgH (pathogenicity island I secretion). Increased levels of pmrH, phoP, and prgH transcription but not ssaB were observed in bacteria isolated from the lumen of the distal ileum. Bacteria isolated from spleens of orally inoculated mice showed no further induction of prgH but had the highest expression of pmrH, pagP, and ssaB. In vivo induction of pmrH was fully dependent on pmrA and phoP, and buffering stomach acidity, iron chelation, or low-iron diets did not affect the expression of pmrH in the intestinal lumen. The observation of pmrH and pagP expression in the intestine refutes the paradigm of PhoP/PhoQ and PmrA/PmrB in vivo expression as solely intracellularly induced and supports previous data demonstrating peroral virulence attenuation of pmrH mutants. PMID:16237024

  11. Intestinal autophagy activity is essential for host defense against Salmonella typhimurium infection in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Curt, Alexander; Zhang, Jiuli; Minnerly, Justin; Jia, Kailiang

    2014-08-01

    Salmonella typhimurium infects both intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages. Autophagy is a lysosomal degradation pathway that is present in all eukaryotes. Autophagy has been reported to limit the Salmonella replication in Caenorhabditis elegans and in mammals. However, it is unknown whether intestinal autophagy activity plays a role in host defense against Salmonella infection in C. elegans. In this study, we inhibited the autophagy gene bec-1 in different C. elegans tissues and examined the survival of these animals following Salmonella infection. Here we show that inhibition of the bec-1 gene in the intestine but not in other tissues confers susceptibility to Salmonella infection, which is consistent with recent studies in mice showing that autophagy is involved in clearance of Salmonella in the intestinal epithelial cells. Therefore, the intestinal autophagy activity is essential for host defense against Salmonella infection from C. elegans to mice, perhaps also in humans.

  12. Tolerance to stress and ability of acid-adapted and non-acid-adapted Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 to invade and survive in mammalian cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fratamico, Pina M

    2003-07-01

    The ability of acid-adapted (AA) and non-acid-adapted (NA) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium definitive type 104 (DT104) strains to invade and multiply in mammalian cells in vitro and to survive stress conditions was examined. DT104 and non-DT104 strains were grown in tryptic soy broth without glucose (NA) or in tryptic soy broth containing 1% glucose (AA) for 18 h at 37 degrees C. The invasiveness of DT104 strains in J774A.1 macrophage and Int407 intestinal cell lines was not more extensive than that of non-DT104 strains. In most cases, AA bacteria were less invasive than NA bacteria in both cell lines. Confocal microscopy showed that both DT104 and non-DT104 strains replicated in the two cell lines. In related studies, the survival levels of three strains of AA and NA DT104 and a non-DT104 (LT2) strain in 150 and 15 mM H2O2, 170 and 43 mM acetic acid, 2.6 M NaCl, 2.6 M NaCl containing 170 mM acetic acid, synthetic gastric fluid (SGF) at pH 2 and pH 3, and apple cider were compared. For all four strains, acid adaptation did not result in increased survival in apple cider. After 15 days of storage at 4 degrees C, reductions ranged from 1.96 to 4.1 log10 CFU/ml for AA bacteria and from 0.48 to 1.34 log10 CFU/ml for NA bacteria from a starting level of ca. 7.00 log10 CFU/ml of cider. Neither AA nor NA DT104 strains were more resistant to NaCl, acetic acid, H2O2, or SGF solutions than non-DT104 strain LT2. The level of AA bacteria was not appreciably reduced after exposure to SGF; however, the level of NA bacteria decreased to nondetectable levels in SGF at pH 2 within 3 h of exposure. These results indicate that the DT104 strains examined were not more invasive, nor did they display increased survival in mammalian cells or increased resistance to food environment stresses compared with non-DT104 strains. However, acid adaptation resulted in increased resistance to a low-pH gastric environment for all strains tested. These data indicate that DT104 strains are

  13. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi impairs CD4 T cell responses by reducing antigen availability.

    PubMed

    Atif, Shaikh M; Winter, Sebastian E; Winter, Maria G; McSorley, Stephen J; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2014-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi is associated with a disseminated febrile illness in humans, termed typhoid fever, while Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes localized gastroenteritis in immunocompetent individuals. One of the genetic differences between both pathogens is the presence in S. Typhi of TviA, a regulatory protein that shuts down flagellin (FliC) expression when bacteria transit from the intestinal lumen into the intestinal mucosa. Here we investigated the consequences of TviA-mediated flagellum gene regulation on flagellin-specific CD4 T cell responses in a mouse model of S. Typhimurium infection. Introduction of the S. Typhi tviA gene into S. Typhimurium suppressed antigen presentation of dendritic cells to flagellin-specific CD4 T cells in vitro. Furthermore, TviA-mediated repression of flagellin expression impaired the activation and proliferation of naive flagellin-specific CD4 T cells in Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes, which was accompanied by increased bacterial dissemination to the spleen. We conclude that TviA-mediated repression of flagellin expression reduces antigen availability, thereby weakening flagellin-specific CD4 T cell responses.

  14. Activation of inflammasome by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium in bacteria-mediated cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Phan, Thuy Xuan; Nguyen, Vu Hong; Duong, Mai Thi-Quynh; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2015-11-01

    Escherichia coli and attenuated Salmonella both naturally accumulate in a tumor mass, yet have distinct therapeutic efficacy: the E. coli K-12 strain (MG1655) cannot induce as significant a tumor suppression as attenuated Salmonella typhimurium, despite similar levels of accumulation in the tumor. To elucidate the mechanism of the robust antitumor effect of S. typhimurium, the cytokine profiles elicited by bacterial colonization in tumors were analyzed. C57BL/6 mice bearing MC38 tumors were injected with Salmonella or MG1655 in the tail vein. Tumors were collected 3 days post-infection and homogenized. Inflammasome-related signals were measured by real-time PCR, ELISA and western blot analysis. Only attenuated Salmonella triggered significant levels of the inflammatory cytokine IL-1β in the tumor, whereas tumor growth was significantly suppressed. In addition, transcript levels of the core molecules of inflammasome signaling, IPAF, NLRP3 and P2X7, were significantly elevated only in Salmonella-treated tumors. Upon direct interaction between Salmonella and BMDM, BMDM expressed inflammasome-related proteins such as NLRP3, IPAF and caspase-1 p10, and secreted a significant amount of IL-1β in supernatants. Coincubation assays with BMDM and Salmonella-treated MC38 cells (damaged cancer cells) revealed secretion of IL-1β only when TLR4 and inflammasome were activated by both LPS and damaged cancer cells. ATP released from damaged cancer cells was also identified as a mechanism of NLRP3 activation. In conclusion, Salmonella activate the inflammasome pathway using damage signals released from cancer cells and through direct interaction with macrophages.

  15. Human migration is important in the international spread of exotic Salmonella serovars in animal and human populations.

    PubMed

    Iveson, J B; Bradshaw, S D; How, R A; Smith, D W

    2014-11-01

    The exposure of indigenous humans and native fauna in Australia and the Wallacea zoogeographical region of Indonesia to exotic Salmonella serovars commenced during the colonial period and has accelerated with urbanization and international travel. In this study, the distribution and prevalence of exotic Salmonella serovars are mapped to assess the extent to which introduced infections are invading native wildlife in areas of high natural biodiversity under threat from expanding human activity. The major exotic Salmonella serovars, Bovismorbificans, Derby, Javiana, Newport, Panama, Saintpaul and Typhimurium, isolated from wildlife on populated coastal islands in southern temperate areas of Western Australia, were mostly absent from reptiles and native mammals in less populated tropical areas of the state. They were also not recorded on the uninhabited Mitchell Plateau or islands of the Bonaparte Archipelago, adjacent to south-eastern Indonesia. Exotic serovars were, however, isolated in wildlife on 14/17 islands sampled in the Wallacea region of Indonesia and several islands off the west coast of Perth. Increases in international tourism, involving islands such as Bali, have resulted in the isolation of a high proportion of exotic serovar infections suggesting that densely populated island resorts in the Asian region are acting as staging posts for the interchange of Salmonella infections between tropical and temperate regions.

  16. β-glucans from Coriolus versicolor protect mice against S. typhimurium challenge by activation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shao-Hua; Yang, Wen-Tao; Huang, Ke-Yan; Jiang, Yan-Long; Yang, Gui-Lian; Wang, Chun-Feng; Li, Yu

    2016-05-01

    The effects of β-glucans from Coriolus versicolor (CVP), which are extracted from a well-known immune stimulator C. versicolor, have been demonstrated extensively in vitro and in vivo. However, until now, the phagocytic activity has not been elucidated. Hence, the objective of the present study was to identify the antibacterial activity of CVP or CVP-treated macrophages by an analysis of cell cytotoxicity, phagocytic activity, intracellular bacterial survival, macrophage activation, production of nitric oxide (NO) and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in CVP-treated macrophages using flow cytometry, RT-PCR, a gentamicin protection assay, a Nitric oxide assay and an iNOS enzymatic activity assay. The results indicate that CVP-treated macrophages can phagocytize and kill bacteria, probably due to the production of NO and iNOS. More importantly, CVP-treated macrophages are effective at protecting mice against the challenge of Salmonella typhimurium. The results of this study suggest that the antibacterial effects of CVP are probably caused by the activation of innate immune cells, especially macrophages, because the activated macrophage produces NO, which kills bacteria. These phenomena indicate the possibility of CVP as a potential alternative for antibiotics against resistant bacteria.

  17. The oxido-reductase enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPX4) governs Salmonella Typhimurium-induced neutrophil transepithelial migration.

    PubMed

    Agbor, Terence A; Demma, Zachary; Mrsny, Randall J; Castillo, Antonio; Boll, Erik J; McCormick, Beth A

    2014-09-01

    Neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leucocytes; PMN) transmigration across mucosal surfaces contributes to dysfunction of epithelial barrier properties, a characteristic underlying many mucosal inflammatory diseases. Using Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) as a prototypic proinflammatory insult, we have previously reported that the eicosanoid hepoxilin A3 (HXA3 ), an endogenous product of 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX) activity, is secreted from the apical surface of the intestinal epithelium to establish a chemotactic gradient that guides PMN across the epithelial surface. Since little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms that regulate 12-LOX during S. Typhimurium infection, we investigated this pathway. We found that expression of phospholipid glutathione peroxidase (GPX4), which is known to have an inhibitory effect on 12-LOX activity, is significantly decreased at both the mRNA and protein level during infection with S. Typhimurium. Moreover, employing intestinal epithelial cell monolayers expressing siRNA against GPX4 mRNA, S. Typhimurium-induced PMN migration was significantly increased compared with the non-specific siRNA control cells. Conversely, in cells engineered to overexpress GPX4, S. Typhimurium-induced PMN migration was significantly decreased, which is consistent with the finding that partial depletion of GPX4 by RNAi resulted in a significant increase in HXA3 secretion during S. Typhimurium infection. Mechanistically, although we found Salmonella entry not to be required for the induced decrease in GPX4, the secreted effector, SipA, which is known to induce epithelial responses leading to stimulation of HXA3 , governed the decrease in GPX4 in a process that does not lead to an overall increase in the levels of ROS. Taken together, these results suggest that S. Typhimurium induces apical secretion of HXA3 by decreasing the expression of phospholipid GPX, which in turn leads to an increase in 12-LOX activity, and hence HXA3

  18. Antibacterial activity of bee honey and its therapeutic usefulness against Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    Badawy, O F H; Shafii, S S A; Tharwat, E E; Kamal, A M

    2004-12-01

    The authors studied the effect of storage period and heat on the physical and chemical properties of honey and proceeded to study the antibacterial effect of honey on Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. In samples of honey (Egyptian clover honey) that were heat-treated and stored over a long period of time, water content decreased, hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF) was produced and increased in concentration, and enzyme activity decreased. Colour, measured in optical density, was markedly affected in honey samples stored over long periods of time, as was the refractive index, but electrical conductivity remained unaffected by storage or heating. Similarly, the storage period had no effect on pH value. To study the therapeutic effect of honey on E.coli and S. typhimurium, 25 isolates of E. coil O157:H7 (18.5%) and 49 isolates of S. typhimurium (36.2%) were isolated from 135 samples taken from children and calves (30 stool samples from children and 105 samples from calf organs and faecal swabs). Most E. coli O157:H7 and S. typhimurium isolates were highly resistant to most antibiotic discs. In vitro, the antibacterial effect of honey was more pronounced on E. coil O157:H7 than on S. typhimurium. Water content, pH value, HMF and the presence of H2O, all played an important role in the potency of olover honey as an antibacterial agent. In vivo, mice were used as a model for studying the parenteral usefulness of honey as an antibacterial agent against both pathogens. The antibacterial activity of honey that had been stored over a long period of time decreased and high concentrations of honey proved more effective as antibacterial agents. In this study there was lower mortality among mice treated with honey but the parenteral application of honey and its therapeutic properties require further investigation.

  19. Cytotoxic mechanism of cytolethal distending toxin in nontyphoidal Salmonella serovar (Salmonella Javiana) during macrophage infection.

    PubMed

    Williams, Katherine; Gokulan, Kuppan; Shelman, Diamond; Akiyama, Tatsuya; Khan, Ashraf; Khare, Sangeeta

    2015-02-01

    Cytolethal distending toxin B (cdtB) is a conserved virulence factor in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. Here we report the presence and functionality of cdtB in some nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars, including Salmonella Javiana (cdtB+wt S. Javiana), isolated from imported food. To understand the role of cdtB in NTS serovars, a deletion mutant (cdtB(-)ΔS. Javiana) was constructed. Macrophages were infected with cdtB+wt S. Javiana (wild type), cdtB(-)Δ S. Javiana (mutant), and cdtB-negative NTS serovar (S. Typhimurium). Cytotoxic activity and transcription level of genes involved in cell death (apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis) were assessed in infected macrophages. The cdtB+wt S. Javiana caused cellular distension as well as high degree of vacuolization and presence of the autophagosome marker LC3 in infected macrophages as compared with cdtB(-)ΔS. Javiana. The mRNA expression of genes involved in the induction of autophagy in response to toxin (Esr1 and Pik3C3) and coregulators of autophagy and apoptosis (Bax and Cyld) were significantly upregulated in cdtB(+)wt S. Javiana-infected macrophages. As autophagy destroys internalized pathogens in addition to the infected cell, it may reduce the spread of infection.

  20. Rhizosphere effect on survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in manure-amended soil during cabbage (Brassica oleracea) cultivation under tropical field conditions in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Ongeng, Duncan; Muyanja, Charles; Ryckeboer, Jaak; Geeraerd, Annemie H; Springael, Dirk

    2011-09-15

    The effect of cabbage (Brassica oleracea) rhizosphere on survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium in manure-amended soils under tropical field conditions was investigated in the Central Agro-Ecological Zone of Uganda. Three-week old cabbage seedlings were transplanted and cultivated for 120 days on manure-amended soil inoculated with 4 or 7 log CFU/g non-virulent E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium. Cabbage rhizosphere did not affect survival of the 4log CFU/g inocula in manure-amended soil and the two enteric bacteria were not detected on/in cabbage leaves at harvest. The 7 log CFU/g E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium survived in bulk soil for a maximum of 80 and 96 days, respectively, but the organisms remained culturable in cabbage rhizosphere up to the time of harvest. At 7 log CFU/g inoculum, E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium contamination on cabbage leaves occurred throughout the cultivation period. Leaf surface sterilisation with 1% AgNO(3) indicated that the organisms were present superficially and in protected locations on the leaves. These results demonstrate that under tropical field conditions, cabbage rhizosphere enhances the persistence of E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium in manure-amended soil at high inoculum density and is associated with long-term contamination of the leaves.

  1. Disubstituted amino-, nitroso-, and nitrofluorenes: a physicochemical basis for structure-activity relationships in Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, W.A.; Wang, Y.Y.; Okamoto, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-nine derivatives of fluorene were tested for mutagenic potency in four strains of Salmonella typhimurium with and/or without S9 microsomal activation. The effects of a second functional group on the mutagenic activity of an amino-nitroso-, and nitrofluorene were correlated with its physical and chemical properties. When the functional group is conjugated by resonance, both inductive and resonance effects are determinants of mutagenic potency. Electron-withdrawing groups such as the halogens (F, Cl, Br, and I), nitro, nitroso, and cyano at C-7 increased the mutagenic potency of 2-nitrofluorene. Acetylation of a hydroxy or an amino group at C-7 increased the mutagenic potency of 2-nitrofluorene. The physical properties of a second functional group are expected to exert their effect(s) at three points in the metabolic activation of 2,7-disubstituted fluorene derivatives: 1) initial reduction of the nitro group (redox effect), 2) stabilization of the hydroxylamine (inductive effect), and 3) stabilization/destabilization of the nitrenium ion (resonance and inductive effects). The relationships between the physical properties of a second functional group and their effects on biological activities of nitro- and aminofluorenes in the Ames Salmonella assay may be of predictive value in a first approximation of both the mutagenic and carcinogenic potency of chemicals with comparable structures such as fluoranthene and biphenyl.

  2. Transfer and internalisation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in cabbage cultivated on contaminated manure-amended soil under tropical field conditions in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Ongeng, D; Vasquez, G A; Muyanja, C; Ryckeboer, J; Geeraerd, A H; Springael, D

    2011-01-31

    Surface contamination and internalisation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium in cabbage leaf tissues at harvest (120 days post-transplantation) following amendment of contaminated bovine manure to soil at different times during crop cultivation were investigated under tropical field conditions in the Central Agro-Ecological Zone of Uganda. Fresh bovine manure inoculated with rifampicin-resistant derivatives of non-virulent strains of E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium was incorporated into the soil to achieve inoculum concentrations of 4 and 7 log CFU/g at the point of transplantation, 56 or 105 days post-transplantation of cabbage seedlings. Frequent sampling of the soil enabled the accurate identification of the survival kinetics in soil, which could be described by the Double Weibull model in all but one of the cases. The persistence of 4 log CFU/g E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium in the soil was limited, i.e. only inocula applied 105 days post-transplantation were still present at harvest. Moreover, no internalisation in cabbage leaf tissues was observed. In contrast, at the 7 log CFU/g inoculum level, E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium survived in the soil throughout the cultivation period. All plants (18/18) examined for leaf contamination were positive for E. coli O157:H7 at harvest irrespective of the time of manure application. A similar incidence of leaf contamination was found for S. Typhimurium. On the other hand, only plants (18/18) cultivated on soil amended with contaminated manure at the point of transplantation showed internalised E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium at harvest. These results demonstrate that under tropical field conditions, the risk of surface contamination and internalisation of E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium in cabbage leaf tissues at harvest depend on the inoculum concentration and the time of manure application. Moreover, the internalisation of E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium in cabbage leaf tissues

  3. The distribution of Salmonella enterica serovars and subtypes in surface water from five agricultural regions across Canada.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, C C; Koot, J; Cole, L; Desruisseau, A; Edge, T A; Khan, I U H; Koning, W; Lapen, D R; Pintar, K D M; Reid-Smith, R; Thomas, J L; Topp, E; Wang, L Y; Wilkes, G; Ziebell, K; van Bochove, E; Gannon, V P J

    2015-06-01

    Serovar prevalence of the zoonotic pathogen, Salmonella enterica, was compared among 1624 surface water samples collected previously from five different Canadian agricultural watersheds over multiple years. Phagetyping, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and antimicrobial resistance subtyping assays were performed on serovars Enteritidis, Typhimurium, and Heidelberg. Serovars and subtypes from surface water were compared with those from animal feces, human sewage, and serovars reported to cause salmonellosis in Canadians. Sixty-five different serovars were identified in surface water; only 32% of these were isolated from multiple watersheds. Eleven of the 13 serovars most commonly reported to cause salmonellosis in Canadians were identified in surface water; isolates of these serovars constituted >40% of the total isolates. Common phagetypes and PFGE subtypes of serovars associated with illness in humans such as S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium were also isolated from surface water and animal feces. Antimicrobial resistance was generally low, but was highest among S. Typhimurium. Monitoring of these rivers helps to identify vulnerable areas of a watershed and, despite a relatively low prevalence of S. enterica overall, serovars observed in surface water are an indication of the levels of specific S. enterica serovars present in humans and animals.

  4. ChIP-seq analysis of the σE regulon of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium reveals new genes implicated in heat shock and oxidative stress response

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jie; Overall, Christopher C.; Johnson, Rudd C.; Jones, Marcus B.; McDermott, Jason E.; Heffron, Fred; Adkins, Joshua N.; Cambronne, Eric D.; Hensel, Michael

    2015-09-21

    The alternative sigma factor σE functions to maintain bacterial homeostasis and membrane integrity in response to extracytoplasmic stress by regulating thousands of genes both directly and indirectly. The transcriptional regulatory network governed by σE in Salmonella and E. coli has been examined using microarray, however a genome-wide analysis of σE–binding sites inSalmonella has not yet been reported. We infected macrophages with Salmonella Typhimurium over a select time course. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq), 31 σE–binding sites were identified. Seventeen sites were new, which included outer membrane proteins, a quorum-sensing protein, a cell division factor, and a signal transduction modulator. The consensus sequence identified for σE in vivo binding was similar to the one previously reported, except for a conserved G and A between the -35 and -10 regions. One third of the σE–binding sites did not contain the consensus sequence, suggesting there may be alternative mechanisms by which σE modulates transcription. By dissecting direct and indirect modes of σE-mediated regulation, we found that σE activates gene expression through recognition of both canonical and reversed consensus sequence. Lastly, new σE regulated genes (greA, luxS, ompA and ompX) are shown to be involved in heat shock and oxidative stress responses.

  5. Evaluation of the immunogenicity and biological activity of the Citrobacter freundii Vi-CRM197 conjugate as a vaccine for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    PubMed

    Rondini, Simona; Micoli, Francesca; Lanzilao, Luisa; Hale, Christine; Saul, Allan J; Martin, Laura B

    2011-03-01

    Typhoid fever remains a major health problem in developing countries. Young children are at high risk, and a vaccine effective for this age group is urgently needed. Purified capsular polysaccharide from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (Vi) is licensed as a vaccine, providing 50 to 70% protection in individuals older than 5 years. However, this vaccine is ineffective in infants. Vi conjugated to a carrier protein (i.e., an exoprotein A mutant from Pseudomonas aeruginosa [rEPA]) is highly immunogenic, provides long-term protection, and shows more than 90% protective efficacy in children 2 to 5 years old. Here, we describe an alternative glycoconjugate vaccine for S. Typhi, Vi-CRM(197), where Vi was obtained from Citrobacter freundii WR7011 and CRM(197), the mutant diphtheria toxin protein, was used as the carrier. We investigated the optimization of growth conditions for Vi production from C. freundii WR7011 and the immunogenicity of Vi-CRM(197) conjugates in mice. The optimal saccharide/protein ratio of the glycoconjugates was identified for the best antibody production. We also demonstrated the ability of this new vaccine to protect mice against challenge with Vi-positive Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

  6. RNA-seq Brings New Insights to the Intra-Macrophage Transcriptome of Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Hébrard, Magali; Colgan, Aoife; Owen, Siân V.; Sivasankaran, Sathesh K.; Cameron, Andrew D. S.; Hokamp, Karsten; Hinton, Jay C. D.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is arguably the world’s best-understood bacterial pathogen. However, crucial details about the genetic programs used by the bacterium to survive and replicate in macrophages have remained obscure because of the challenge of studying gene expression of intracellular pathogens during infection. Here, we report the use of deep sequencing (RNA-seq) to reveal the transcriptional architecture and gene activity of Salmonella during infection of murine macrophages, providing new insights into the strategies used by the pathogen to survive in a bactericidal immune cell. We characterized 3583 transcriptional start sites that are active within macrophages, and highlight 11 of these as candidates for the delivery of heterologous antigens from Salmonella vaccine strains. A majority (88%) of the 280 S. Typhimurium sRNAs were expressed inside macrophages, and SPI13 and SPI2 were the most highly expressed pathogenicity islands. We identified 31 S. Typhimurium genes that were strongly up-regulated inside macrophages but expressed at very low levels during in vitro growth. The SalComMac online resource allows the visualisation of every transcript expressed during bacterial replication within mammalian cells. This primary transcriptome of intra-macrophage S.-Typhimurium describes the transcriptional start sites and the transcripts responsible for virulence traits, and catalogues the sRNAs that may play a role in the regulation of gene expression during infection. PMID:26561851

  7. A community effort towards a knowledge-base and mathematical model of the human pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium LT2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic reconstructions (MRs) are common denominators in systems biology and represent biochemical, genetic, and genomic (BiGG) knowledge-bases for target organisms by capturing currently available information in a consistent, structured manner. Salmonella enterica subspecies I serovar Typhimurium...

  8. Toll-like receptor 5-dependent immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a recombinant fusion protein vaccine containing the nontoxic domains of Clostridium difficile toxins A and B and Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium flagellin in a mouse model of Clostridium difficile disease.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Chandrabali; Verhagen, Janneke M; Chen, Xinhua; Yu, Jian; Huang, Yaoxing; Chenesseau, Olivia; Kelly, Ciarán P; Ho, David D

    2013-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming bacillus that produces toxin-mediated enteric disease. C. difficile expresses two major virulence factors, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB). Human and animal studies demonstrate a clear association between humoral immunity to these toxins and protection against C. difficile infection (CDI). The receptor binding-domains (RBDs) of TcdA and TcdB are known to be immunogenic. Here, we tested the immunoadjuvant properties of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium flagellin (FliC) subunit D1 as an innate immune agonist expressed as a recombinant fusion vaccine targeting the RBDs of TcdA and TcdB in mice. Intraperitoneally immunized mice developed prominent anti-TcdA and anti-TcdB immunoglobulin G in serum. The protective efficacy of the recombinant vaccines, with or without an adjuvant, was tested in a mouse model of CDI that closely represents the human disease. Following intraperitoneal immunization equivalent to two doses of toxoid A and toxoid B vaccine adjuvanted with alum and oral challenge with C. difficile VPI 10463, C57BL/6 mice were able to mount a protective immune response that prevented diarrhea and death compared to mice immunzed with alum alone. These results are significantly different from those for control mice (P < 0.001). These results provide evidence that a recombinant protein-based vaccine targeting the RBDs of the C. difficile toxins adjuvanted with S. Typhimurium flagellin can induce rapid, high-level protection in a mouse model of CDI when challenged with the homologous strain from which the vaccine antigens were derived and warrant further preclinical testing against clinically relevant C. difficile strains in the mouse and hamster models of CDI.

  9. Activation and genetic modification of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells using attenuated Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Michael, Agnieszka; John, Justin; Meyer, Brendan; Pandha, Hardev

    2010-03-05

    Live attenuated bacterial vectors, such as Salmonella typhimurium, have shown promise as delivery vehicles for DNA. We have examined two new strains of S. typhimurium and their impact on dendritic cell maturation (CD12-sifA/aroC mutant and WT05-ssaV/aroC, both in TML background). Strain WT05 matured dendritic cells in a more efficient way; caused higher release of cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-12, IL-1beta; and was efficient for gene transfer. These findings suggest that the genetic background of the attenuation can influence the pattern of inflammatory immune response to Salmonella infection.

  10. A Leptospira borgpetersenii Serovar Hardjo vaccine induces a Th1 response, activates NK cells, and reduces renal colonization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic infection of cattle with Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo reduces animal production through reproductive failure and presents a persistent health threat to workers in the animal industry. Cattle are maintenance hosts for serovar Hardjo and development of a protective vaccine has bee...

  11. The flagellar regulator TviA reduces pyroptosis by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    PubMed

    Winter, Sebastian E; Winter, Maria G; Atluri, Vidya; Poon, Victor; Romão, Everton L; Tsolis, Renée M; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2015-04-01

    To discern virulent from innocuous microbes, the innate immune system senses events associated with bacterial access to immunoprivileged sites such as the host cell cytosol. One such pathway is triggered by the cytosolic delivery of flagellin, the major subunit of the flagellum, by bacterial secretion systems. This leads to inflammasome activation and subsequent proinflammatory cell death (pyroptosis) of the infected phagocyte. In this study, we demonstrate that the causative agent of typhoid fever, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, can partially subvert this critical innate immune recognition event. The transcriptional regulator TviA, which is absent from Salmonella serovars associated with human gastroenteritis, repressed the expression of flagellin during infection of human macrophage-like (THP-1) cells. This mechanism allowed S. Typhi to dampen inflammasome activation, leading to reduced interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion and diminished cell death. Likewise, the introduction of the tviA gene in nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium reduced flagellin-induced pyroptosis. These data suggest that gene regulation of virulence factors enables S. Typhi to evade innate immune recognition by concealing a pathogen-induced process from being sensed by the inflammasome.

  12. MCR-1.3: a new MCR variant carried by an IncP plasmid in a colistin-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolated from a healthy individual.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xin; Hu, Yongfei; Luo, Ming; Zhou, Haijian; Wang, Xiaoxun; Du, Yu; Li, Zhenpeng; Xu, Jialiang; Zhu, Baoli; Xu, Xuebin; Kan, Biao

    2017-03-06

    In this study, we reported a novel mcr-1 gene variant, named mcr-1.3, carried by an IncP plasmid in a colistin-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium from a healthy person. Compared with mcr-1, the mcr-1.3 gene contained two SNPs; one of them resulted in an arginine to histidine variation (Arg536->His). The plasmid carrying mcr-1.3 gene was designated pMCR1.3_P053, and was highly similar to a recently discovered mcr-1-bearing plasmid found in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

  13. Biological activity of Pityrosporum. I. Enhancement of resistance in mice stimulated by Pityrosporum against Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, M; Ushijima, T; Ozaki, Y

    1984-01-01

    The effect of administration with Pityrosporum (P. orbiculare, P. ovale, P. pachydermatis and Pityrosporum sp.) on susceptibility of mice to Salmonella typhimurium infection was studied. Pretreatment of mice with 50 mg (wet weight) of killed Pityrosporum 4 days prior to the intraperitoneal (i.p.) challenge of 4 X 10(5) (10 LD50) S. typhimurium elicited resistance comparable to that induced by 500 micrograms (dry weight) of killed Propionibacterium acnes and over 30% of the infected mice survived. Among the species tested, P. pachydermatis was slightly less effective. The challenged organisms were not detected from the blood of mice treated with Pityrosporum but were present in the liver and spleen in approximately level amounts (10(4)-10(5)/organ) during the course of testing. These results suggest that the increased resistance in mice is the result of stimulation of the reticuloendothelial system by Pityrosporum. PMID:6368372

  14. Identification of genes associated with survival of salmonellaenterica serovar enteridis in chicken egg albumen

    SciTech Connect

    Clavijo, Raul I.; Loui, Cindy; Andersen, Gary L.; Riley, Lee W.; Lu, Sangwei

    2005-07-13

    Salmonella enterica consists of over 2,000 serovars that aremajor causes of morbidity and mortality associated with contaminatedfood. Despite similarities among serovars of Salmonella enterica, manydemonstrate unique host specificities, epidemiological characteristics,and clinical manifestations. One of the unique epidemiologicalcharacteristics of the serovar Enteritidis is that it is the onlybacterium routinely transmitted to humans through intact chicken eggs.Therefore, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis must be able topersist inside chicken eggs to be transmitted to humans, and its survivalin egg is important for its transmission to the human population. Theability of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis to survive in andtransmit through eggs may have contributed to its drastically increasedprevalence in the 1980s and 1990s. In the present study, usingtransposon-mediated mutagenesis, we have identified genes important forthe association of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis with chickeneggs. Our results indicate that genes involved in cell wall structuraland functional integrity, and nucleic acid and amino acid metabolism areimportant for Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis to persist in eggalbumen. Two regions unique toSalmonella enterica serovar Enteritidiswere also identified, one of which enhanced the survival of a Salmonellaenterica serovar Typhimurium isolate in egg albumen. The implication ofour results to the serovar specificity of Salmonella enterica is alsoexplored in the present study.

  15. Natural and experimental Salmonella Typhimurium infections in foxes (Vulpes vulpes).

    PubMed

    Handeland, Kjell; Nesse, Live L; Lillehaug, Atle; Vikøren, Turid; Djønne, Berit; Bergsjø, Bjarne

    2008-11-25

    The red fox (Vulpes vulpes) can be considered as a relevant indicator species for Salmonella in the local environment and Salmonella faecal carriage was investigated in 215 red foxes in Norway shot during the winters 2002/2003 and 2003/2004. Fourteen (6.5%) of the foxes carried Salmonella. Four isolates were determined as serovars Kottbus (n=2) and Hessarek (n=2) of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica, and one as S. enterica subspecies IIIb:61:k:1,5,(7). The remaining nine isolates were S. enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium 4,12:i:1,2 and all displayed the same pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profile designated A2. This serovar regularly causes disease outbreaks amongst small passerine birds during winter and most of these outbreaks are associated with the PFGE profile A2. The results strongly indicated that the Salmonella Typhimurium infections in red foxes were primarily acquired through ingestion of infected small passerines. To investigate the capability of the A2 strain to establish a true intestinal infection in the fox an inoculation experiment with an A2 isolate from small passerines was carried out in farmed silver foxes (V. vulpes). The experiment also included one strain with an uncommonly occurring profile (X201) from small passerines. To highlight possible differences in capability of the two inoculation strains to pass the acid gastric juice in the fox, in vitro studies of their acid tolerance was carried out. Also their catalase activity and biofilm production were studied. All three foxes inoculated with the A2 strain developed sub-clinical intestinal infection of 2 weeks duration, whereas none of the three foxes inoculated with the X201 strain shed this bacterium. The X201 strain displayed a much lower capability, than the A2 strain, to survive at pH 3 in vitro. The low acid tolerance probably made it difficult for the X201 strain to pass the stomach and establish an intestinal infection in the experimental foxes. Reduced

  16. A comparative study on invasion, survival, modulation of oxidative burst, and nitric oxide responses of macrophages (HD11), and systemic infection in chickens by prevalent poultry Salmonella serovars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poultry is a major reservoir for foodborne Salmonella serovars. Salmonella Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis, S. Heidelberg, S. Kentucky, and S. Senftenberg are the most prevalent serovars in poultry. Information concerning the interactions between different Salmonella species and host cells in poultry i...

  17. Immunogenicity of a Bivalent Adjuvanted Glycoconjugate Vaccine against Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Fiorino, Fabio; Rondini, Simona; Micoli, Francesca; Lanzilao, Luisa; Alfini, Renzo; Mancini, Francesca; MacLennan, Calman A.; Medaglini, Donata

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis are the predominant causes of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease. Considering the co-endemicity of S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis, a bivalent vaccine formulation against both pathogens is necessary for protection against iNTS disease, thus investigation of glycoconjugate combination is required. In the present work, we investigated the immune responses induced by S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis monovalent and bivalent glycoconjugate vaccines adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide (alum) only or in combination with cytosine-phosphorothioate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG). Humoral and cellular, systemic and local, immune responses were characterized in two different mouse strains. All conjugate vaccines elicited high levels of serum IgG against the respective O-antigens (OAg) with bactericidal activity. The bivalent conjugate vaccine induced systemic production of antibodies against both S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis OAg. The presence of alum or alum + CpG adjuvants in vaccine formulations significantly increased the serum antigen-specific antibody production. The alum + CpG bivalent vaccine formulation triggered the highest systemic anti-OAg antibodies and also a significant increase of anti-OAg IgG in intestinal washes and fecal samples, with a positive correlation with serum levels. These data demonstrate the ability of monovalent and bivalent conjugate vaccines against S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis to induce systemic and local immune responses in different mouse strains, and highlight the suitability of a bivalent glycoconjugate formulation, especially when adjuvanted with alum + CpG, as a promising candidate vaccine against iNTS disease. PMID:28289411

  18. A dual-signal regulatory circuit activates transcription of a set of divergent operons in Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guang; Weatherspoon, Natasha; Kong, Wei; Curtiss, Roy; Shi, Yixin

    2008-01-01

    We present a molecular mechanism for signal transduction that activates transcription of the SlyA regulon in Salmonella typhimurium. We demonstrate that SlyA mediates transcriptional activation in response to guanosine tetraphosphate, ppGpp, according to the following observations: (i) in vivo transcription of SlyA-dependent genes is repressed when ppGpp is absent; this transcription can be restored by overproducing SlyA; (ii) in vivo dimerization and binding of SlyA to the target promoter are facilitated in the presence of ppGpp; and (iii) in vitro SlyA binding to the target promoter is enhanced when ppGpp is supplemented. Thus, ppGpp must be the cytoplasmic component that stimulates SlyA regulatory function by interacting directly with this regulator in Salmonella. This signaling domain, integrated by the PhoP/PhoQ 2-component system that activates slyA transcription by sensing Mg2+, forms feedforward loops that regulate chromosomal loci identified through a motif search over the S. typhimurium genome. Many such loci are divergent operons, each formed by 2 neighboring genes in which transcription of these 2 loci proceeds in opposite directions. Both genes, however, are controlled by PhoP and SlyA through a single shared PhoP box and SlyA box present in their intergenic regions. A substitution in either box sequence causes a simultaneous cessation of transcription of a divergent operon, pagD-pagC, equivalent to the phenotype in a phoP or slyA mutant. We also identified several chromosomal loci that possess pagC-type genes without the cognate pagD-type genes. Therefore, our results provide a molecular basis for the understanding of SlyA-dependent phenotypes associated with Salmonella virulence. PMID:19091955

  19. Inducible spy Transcription Acts as a Sensor for Envelope Stress of Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Seok; Lee, Sang Dae

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella enterica infects a broad range of host animals, and zoonostic infection threatens both public health and the livestock and meat processing industries. Many antimicrobials have been developed to target Salmonella envelope that performs essential bacterial functions; however, there are very few analytical methods that can be used to validate the efficacy of these antimicrobials. In this study, to develop a potential biosensor for Salmonella envelope stress, we examined the transcription of the S. enterica serovar typhimurium spy gene, the ortholog of which in Escherichia coli encodes Spy (spheroplast protein y). Spy is a chaperone protein expressed and localized in the periplasm of E. coli during spheroplast formation, or by exposure to protein denaturing conditions. spy expression in S. typhimurium was examined by constructing a spy-gfp transcriptional fusion. S. typhimurium spy transcription was strongly induced during spheroplast formation, and also when exposed to membrane-disrupting agents, including ethanol and the antimicrobial peptide polymyxin B. Moreover, spy induction required the activity of regulator proteins BaeR and CpxR, which are part of the major envelope stress response systems BaeS/BaeR and CpxA/CpxR, respectively. Results suggest that monitoring spy transcription may be useful to determine whether a molecule particularly cause envelope stress in Salmonella. PMID:28316480

  20. Changes in thermal resistance of three Salmonella serovars in response to osmotic shock and adaptation at water activities reduced by different humectants.

    PubMed

    Peña-Meléndez, Marilia; Perry, Jennifer J; Yousef, Ahmed E

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of osmotic shock and adaptation at low water activity (aw) and the type of humectant used to lower the aw, on heat resistance of three Salmonella enterica serovars (Saintpaul 02-109, Tennessee 2053H, and Elmsbuettel 1236H). The serovars were grown (adapted) or transferred (osmotic shocked) in low-aw broths and subjected to heat treatment at 55°C for up to 45 min; samples were removed at 5-min intervals and immediately placed in an ice-water bath until plating. The aw of tryptic soy broth (TSB) was lowered by the addition of 20% (wt/wt) glycerol (aw 0.94), 4% (wt/wt) sodium chloride (NaCl; aw 0.97), or 35% sucrose (wt/wt) (aw 0.95). The type of humectant and cell adaptation significantly affected the D55°C-value. Cells merely suspended in 20% glycerol broth (i.e., nonadapted) prior to heat treatment showed a larger D55°C-value (3.0 to 3.9 min), when compared with that of cells adapted in the same medium (D55°C-values of 0.86 to 0.98 min). Interestingly, cells adapted to TSB plus glycerol were not more resistant to heat than were the controls. NaCl and sucrose showed a net protective effect for all serovars under both the adapted and nonadapted conditions, with sucrose providing the most protection. Highest D55°C-values were obtained for cultures adapted to TSB plus sucrose. Based on these results, the effect of reduced aw on thermal resistance of Salmonella serovars varies greatly, depending on medium constituents and adaptation of the pathogen in these media.

  1. Use of an attenuated live Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine on three breeding pig units: A longitudinal observational field study.

    PubMed

    Davies, R; Gosling, R J; Wales, A D; Smith, R P

    2016-06-01

    The study examined the effects of a licensed live Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine, administered to sows and gilts on three commercial pig units experiencing clinical salmonellosis associated with S. Typhimurium or its monophasic variant. After vaccination, clinical salmonellosis resolved and shedding of S. Typhimurium declined markedly and persistently on all breeding or breeding-finishing units, during the one- to two-year monitoring period. On two finishing units supplied in part by one of the vaccinated herds, pigs from the vaccinated herd were less likely to shed Salmonella than those from non-vaccinating herds, and Salmonella counts in faeces were also lower from the vaccine-linked animals. Non-Typhimurium Salmonella serovars were isolated typically in fewer than 10% of samples, and showed no clear temporal changes in frequency. Vaccination of dams alone with S. Typhimurium was associated with reduced shedding of closely-related serovars among all age groups in this commercial setting.

  2. rpoS-Regulated Core Genes Involved in the Competitive Fitness of Salmonella enterica Serovar Kentucky in the Intestines of Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ying; Pedroso, Adriana Ayres; Porwollik, Steffen; McClelland, Michael; Lee, Margie D.; Kwan, Tiffany; Zamperini, Katherine; Soni, Vivek; Sellers, Holly S.; Russell, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky has become the most frequently isolated serovar from poultry in the United States over the past decade. Despite its prevalence in poultry, it causes few human illnesses in the United States. The dominance of S. Kentucky in poultry does not appear to be due to single introduction of a clonal strain, and its reduced virulence appears to correlate with the absence of virulence genes grvA, sseI, sopE, and sodC1. S. Kentucky's prevalence in poultry is possibly attributable to its metabolic adaptation to the chicken cecum. While there were no difference in the growth rate of S. Kentucky and S. Typhimurium grown microaerophilically in cecal contents, S. Kentucky persisted longer when chickens were coinfected with S. Typhimurium. The in vivo advantage that S. Kentucky has over S. Typhimurium appears to be due to differential regulation of core Salmonella genes via the stationary-phase sigma factor rpoS. Microarray analysis of Salmonella grown in cecal contents in vitro identified several metabolic genes and motility and adherence genes that are differentially activated in S. Kentucky. The contributions of four of these operons (mgl, prp, nar, and csg) to Salmonella colonization in chickens were assessed. Deletion of mgl and csg reduced S. Kentucky persistence in competition studies in chickens infected with wild-type or mutant strains. Subtle mutations affecting differential regulation of core Salmonella genes appear to be important in Salmonella's adaptation to its animal host and especially for S. Kentucky's emergence as the dominant serovar in poultry. PMID:25362062

  3. Methionine Sulfoxide Reductases Are Essential for Virulence of Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Rouf, Syed Fazle; Kitowski, Vera; Böhm, Oliver M.; Rhen, Mikael; Jäger, Timo; Bange, Franz-Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Production of reactive oxygen species represents a fundamental innate defense against microbes in a diversity of host organisms. Oxidative stress, amongst others, converts peptidyl and free methionine to a mixture of methionine-S- (Met-S-SO) and methionine-R-sulfoxides (Met-R-SO). To cope with such oxidative damage, methionine sulfoxide reductases MsrA and MsrB are known to reduce MetSOs, the former being specific for the S-form and the latter being specific for the R-form. However, at present the role of methionine sulfoxide reductases in the pathogenesis of intracellular bacterial pathogens has not been fully detailed. Here we show that deletion of msrA in the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella (S.) enterica serovar Typhimurium increased susceptibility to exogenous H2O2, and reduced bacterial replication inside activated macrophages, and in mice. In contrast, a ΔmsrB mutant showed the wild type phenotype. Recombinant MsrA was active against free and peptidyl Met-S-SO, whereas recombinant MsrB was only weakly active and specific for peptidyl Met-R-SO. This raised the question of whether an additional Met-R-SO reductase could play a role in the oxidative stress response of S. Typhimurium. MsrC is a methionine sulfoxide reductase previously shown to be specific for free Met-R-SO in Escherichia (E.) coli. We tested a ΔmsrC single mutant and a ΔmsrBΔmsrC double mutant under various stress conditions, and found that MsrC is essential for survival of S. Typhimurium following exposure to H2O2, as well as for growth in macrophages, and in mice. Hence, this study demonstrates that all three methionine sulfoxide reductases, MsrA, MsrB and MsrC, facilitate growth of a canonical intracellular pathogen during infection. Interestingly MsrC is specific for the repair of free methionine sulfoxide, pointing to an important role of this pathway in the oxidative stress response of Salmonella Typhimurium. PMID:22073230

  4. Correlations between chemical reactivity and mutagenic activity against S. typhimurium TA100 for alpha-dicarbonyl compounds as a proof of the mutagenic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Mellado, J M; Ruiz Montoya, M

    1994-01-16

    The mutagenic activities in the Ames test against S. typhimurium TA100 for a series of alpha-dicarbonyl compounds are examined together with the formation constants of the adducts formed between such compounds and guanine and guanosine. Correlations between the equilibrium constants, the apparent reaction enthalpies, and the mutagenic activity are presented. These correlations imply that the mutagenic activity is related to the chemical reactivity of the dicarbonyl compounds with the puric bases.

  5. Understanding the sequential activation of Type III and Type VI Secretion Systems in Salmonella typhimurium using Boolean modeling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Three pathogenicity islands, viz. SPI-1 (Salmonella pathogenicity island 1), SPI-2 (Salmonella pathogenicity island 2) and T6SS (Type VI Secretion System), present in the genome of Salmonella typhimurium have been implicated in the virulence of the pathogen. While the regulation of SPI-1 and SPI-2 (both encoding components of the Type III Secretion System - T3SS) are well understood, T6SS regulation is comparatively less studied. Interestingly, inter-connections among the regulatory elements of these three virulence determinants have also been suggested to be essential for successful infection. However, till date, an integrated view of gene regulation involving the regulators of these three secretion systems and their cross-talk is not available. Results In the current study, relevant regulatory information available from literature have been integrated into a single Boolean network, which portrays the dynamics of T3SS (SPI-1 and SPI-2) and T6SS mediated virulence. Some additional regulatory interactions involving a two-component system response regulator YfhA have also been predicted and included in the Boolean network. These predictions are aimed at deciphering the effects of osmolarity on T6SS regulation, an aspect that has been suggested in earlier studies, but the mechanism of which was hitherto unknown. Simulation of the regulatory network was able to recreate in silico the experimentally observed sequential activation of SPI-1, SPI-2 and T6SS. Conclusions The present study integrates relevant gene regulatory data (from literature and our prediction) into a single network, representing the cross-communication between T3SS (SPI-1 and SPI-2) and T6SS. This holistic view of regulatory interactions is expected to improve the current understanding of pathogenesis of S. typhimurium. PMID:24079299

  6. Poor biofilm-forming ability and long-term survival of invasive Salmonella Typhimurium ST313.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Girish; Aheto, Komi; Shirtliff, Mark E; Tennant, Sharon M

    2016-07-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, an enteric pathogen that causes a self-limiting gastroenteritis, forms biofilms on different surfaces. In sub-Saharan Africa, Salmonella Typhimurium of a novel sequence type (ST) 313 was identified and produces septicemia in the absence of gastroenteritis. No animal reservoir has been identified, and it is hypothesized that transmission occurs via human to human. In this study, we show that invasive Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 strains from Mali are poor biofilm producers compared to Salmonella Typhimurium ST19 strains, which are found worldwide and are known to be associated with gastroenteritis. We evaluated biofilms using crystal violet staining, examination of the red, dry and rough morphotype, pellicle formation and a continuous flow system. One month-old Salmonella Typhimurium ST19 colonies survived in the absence of exogenous nutrients and were highly resistant to sodium hypochlorite treatment compared to Salmonella Typhimurium ST313. This study for the first time demonstrates the comparative biofilm-forming ability and long-term survival of clinical Salmonella Typhimurium ST19 and ST313 isolates. Salmonella Typhimurium ST19 strains are strong biofilm producers and can survive desiccation compared to Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 that form weak biofilms and survive poorly following desiccation. Our data suggest that like Salmonella Typhi, Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 lack mechanisms that allow it to persist in the environment.

  7. The Vi capsular polysaccharide enables Salmonella enterica serovar typhi to evade microbe-guided neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Wangdi, Tamding; Lee, Cheng-Yuk; Spees, Alanna M; Yu, Chenzhou; Kingsbury, Dawn D; Winter, Sebastian E; Hastey, Christine J; Wilson, R Paul; Heinrich, Volkmar; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2014-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) causes typhoid fever, a disseminated infection, while the closely related pathogen S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is associated with a localized gastroenteritis in humans. Here we investigated whether both pathogens differ in the chemotactic response they induce in neutrophils using a single-cell experimental approach. Surprisingly, neutrophils extended chemotactic pseudopodia toward Escherichia coli and S. Typhimurium, but not toward S. Typhi. Bacterial-guided chemotaxis was dependent on the presence of complement component 5a (C5a) and C5a receptor (C5aR). Deletion of S. Typhi capsule biosynthesis genes markedly enhanced the chemotactic response of neutrophils in vitro. Furthermore, deletion of capsule biosynthesis genes heightened the association of S. Typhi with neutrophils in vivo through a C5aR-dependent mechanism. Collectively, these data suggest that expression of the virulence-associated (Vi) capsular polysaccharide of S. Typhi obstructs bacterial-guided neutrophil chemotaxis.

  8. Identification by PCR of Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica Serovars Associated with Invasive Infections among Febrile Patients in Mali

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Sharon M.; Diallo, Souleymane; Levy, Haim; Livio, Sofie; Sow, Samba O.; Tapia, Milagritos; Fields, Patricia I.; Mikoleit, Matthew; Tamboura, Boubou; Kotloff, Karen L.; Nataro, James P.; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2010-01-01

    Background In sub-Saharan Africa, non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) are emerging as a prominent cause of invasive disease (bacteremia and focal infections such as meningitis) in infants and young children. Importantly, including data from Mali, three serovars, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin, account for the majority of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolated from these patients. Methods We have extended a previously developed series of polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) based on O serogrouping and H typing to identify Salmonella Typhimurium and variants (mostly I 4,[5],12:i:-), Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin. We also designed primers to detect Salmonella Stanleyville, a serovar found in West Africa. Another PCR was used to differentiate diphasic Salmonella Typhimurium and monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium from other O serogroup B, H:i serovars. We used these PCRs to blind-test 327 Salmonella serogroup B and D isolates that were obtained from the blood cultures of febrile patients in Bamako, Mali. Principal Findings We have shown that when used in conjunction with our previously described O-serogrouping PCR, our PCRs are 100% sensitive and specific in identifying Salmonella Typhimurium and variants, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Dublin and Salmonella Stanleyville. When we attempted to differentiate 171 Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[ 5],12:i:1,2) strains from 52 monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[5],12:i:-) strains, we were able to correctly identify 170 of the Salmonella Typhimurium and 51 of the Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- strains. Conclusion We have described a simple yet effective PCR method to support surveillance of the incidence of invasive disease caused by NTS in developing countries. PMID:20231882

  9. Transport of Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, and microspheres in biochar-amended soils with different textures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochar amendment has been shown to affect bacterial transport in soils. The effect of soil texture on the transport of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in soils amended with 2 % poultry litter or pine chip biochars pyrolyzed under two temperatures (350 and 700 'C...

  10. Animal-to-Human Transmission of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104A Variant

    PubMed Central

    Orsel, Karin; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Miko, Angelika; van Duijkeren, Engeline

    2004-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was isolated from a pig, a calf, and a child on a farm in the Netherlands. The isolates were indistinguishable by phenotyping and genotyping methods, which suggests nonfoodborne animal-to-animal and animal-to-human transmission. Persons in close contact with farm animals should be aware of this risk. PMID:15663868

  11. [Outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium infections associated with consumption of chorizo in Bizkaia].

    PubMed

    Hernández Arricibita, Esther; Santamaria Zuazua, Rosaura; Ramos López, Gemma; Herrera-León, Silvia; Kárkamo Zuñeda, José Antonio; Muniozguren Agirre, Nerea

    2016-11-01

    A report is presented on an outbreak of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection that affected six people. The epidemiological and laboratory investigation associated the outbreak with the consumption of homemade chorizo purchased at a local street market. The vendor and producer were informed that the sale of meat products without sanitary authorization is prohibited, and the product was withdrawn from sale.

  12. Signatures of Adaptation in Human Invasive Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 Populations from Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Okoro, Chinyere K.; Barquist, Lars; Connor, Thomas R.; Harris, Simon R.; Clare, Simon; Stevens, Mark P.; Arends, Mark J.; Hale, Christine; Kane, Leanne; Pickard, Derek J.; Hill, Jennifer; Harcourt, Katherine; Parkhill, Julian; Dougan, Gordon; Kingsley, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Two lineages of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) of multi-locus sequence type ST313 have been linked with the emergence of invasive Salmonella disease across sub-Saharan Africa. The expansion of these lineages has a temporal association with the HIV pandemic and antibiotic usage. We analysed the whole genome sequence of 129 ST313 isolates representative of the two lineages and found evidence of lineage-specific genome degradation, with some similarities to that observed in S. Typhi. Individual ST313 S. Typhimurium isolates exhibit a distinct metabolic signature and modified enteropathogenesis in both a murine and cattle model of colitis, compared to S. Typhimurium outside of the ST313 lineages. These data define phenotypes that distinguish ST313 isolates from other S. Typhimurium and may represent adaptation to a distinct pathogenesis and lifestyle linked to an-immuno-compromised human population. PMID:25803844

  13. The Bacterial Two-Hybrid System Uncovers the Involvement of Acetylation in Regulating of Lrp Activity in Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Ran; Sang, Yu; Ren, Jie; Zhang, Qiufen; Li, Shuxian; Cui, Zhongli; Yao, Yu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    N𝜀-lysine acetylation is an abundant and important Post-translational modification in bacteria. We used the bacterial two-hybrid system to screen the genome library of the Salmonella Typhimurium to identify potential proteins involved in acetyltransferase Pat – or deacetylase CobB-mediated acetylation. Then, the in vitro (de)acetylation assays were used to validate the potential targets, such as STM14_1074, NrdF, RhaR. Lrp, a leucine-responsive regulatory protein and global regulator, was shown to interact with Pat. We further demonstrate that Lrp could be acetylated by Pat and deacetylated by NAD+-dependent CobB in vitro. Specifically, the conserved lysine residue 36 (K36) in helix-turn-helix (HTH) DNA-binding domain of Lrp was acetylated. Acetylation of K36 impaired the function of Lrp through altering the affinity with the target promoter. The mutation of K36 in chromosome mimicking acetylation enhanced the transcriptional level of itself and attenuated the mRNA levels of Lrp-regulated genes including fimA, which was confirmed by yeast agglutination assay. These findings demonstrate that the acetylation regulates the DNA-binding activity of Lrp, suggesting that acetylation modification of transcription factors is a conserved regulatory manner to modulate gene expression in bacteria and eukaryotes. PMID:27909434

  14. Hyperinvasiveness of Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis linked to hyperexpression of type III secretion systems in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuan-Yeh; Wang, Yi-Hsin; Chien, Kun-Yi; Janapatla, Rajendra Prasad; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Choleraesuis and Typhimurium are among the non-typhoid Salmonella serovars that are important zoonotic pathogens. In clinical observation, S. Typhimurium typically causes diarrheal diseases; however, S. Choleraesuis shows high predilection to cause bacteremia. The mechanism why S. Choleraesuis is more invasive to humans remains unknown. In this study, we compared the S. Typhimurium LT2 and S. Choleraesuis SC-B67 proteomes through stable isotope labeling of amino acid in cell culture (SILAC). In SILAC, the expression of many virulence proteins in two type III secretion systems (T3SSs) were significantly higher in S. Choleraesuis than in S. Typhimurium. Similar differences were also found at the transcriptional level. Compared to S. Typhimurium, S. Choleraesuis showed a higher penetration level to Caco-2 (>100-fold) and MDCK (>10-fold) monolayers. In mice after oral challenge, the invasion of spleen and liver was also higher in S. Choleraesuis than in S. Typhimurium. The transcription of hilD in S. Choleraesuis was increased in physiological (1 mM) or high (10 mM) concentrations of Mg2+, but not in low (8 μM) concentration. We conclude that S. Choleraesuis showed hyperinvasiveness in cellular as well as mouse models due to hyperexpression of T3SS genes. PMID:27886215

  15. Comparison of the environmental survival characteristics of Salmonella Dublin and Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Miranda J; Liebana, Ernesto; McLaren, Ian; Clifton-Hadley, Felicity A; Wales, Andrew D; Davies, Robert H

    2012-10-12

    To examine possible correlations in bovine Salmonella isolates between environmental survival and serovar-associated epidemiological patterns, bovine field isolates of Salmonella serovars Typhimurium and Dublin (two each) were inoculated into bovine faeces slurry and tested monthly by culture for survival during a six-month period of storage at a variable ambient temperature in a disused animal transporter. Low moisture conditions, where the slurry was dried onto wooden dowels, increased detectable survival of a low-level inoculum by up to five months, compared with wet slurry. A more modest increase of survival time was seen with storage of wet slurry under refrigeration at 4°C. Under both dry and wet conditions, the concentration of culturable Salmonella Typhimurium declined at a slower rate than did that of Salmonella Dublin. Salmonella that was naturally contaminating bovine faeces from farms with Salmonella Typhimurium did not show superior survival times compared with Salmonella Typhimurium that had been artificially inoculated into samples. The differing survival characteristics of the two serovars that was observed in environmental faeces may complement their different modes of infection in cattle. Salmonella Dublin, being a bovine host-adapted strain that establishes chronic infection in some animals, may have less need to survive for a prolonged period outside of its host than does Salmonella Typhimurium.

  16. Salmonella enterica Typhimurium infection causes metabolic changes in chicken muscle involving AMPK, fatty acid and insulin/mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Arsenault, Ryan J; Napper, Scott; Kogut, Michael H

    2013-05-17

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella Typhimurium) infection of chickens that are more than a few days old results in asymptomatic cecal colonization with persistent shedding of bacteria. We hypothesized that while the bacterium colonizes and persists locally in the cecum it has systemic effects, including changes to metabolic pathways of skeletal muscle, influencing the physiology of the avian host. Using species-specific peptide arrays to perform kinome analysis on metabolic signaling pathways in skeletal muscle of Salmonella Typhimurium infected chickens, we have observed key metabolic changes that affected fatty acid and glucose metabolism through the 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and the insulin/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Over a three week time course of infection, we observed changes in the phosphorylation state of the AMPK protein, and proteins up and down the pathway. In addition, changes to a large subset of the protein intermediates of the insulin/mTOR pathway in the skeletal muscle were altered by infection. These changes occur in pathways with direct effects on fatty acid and glucose metabolism. This is the first report of significant cellular metabolic changes occurring systemically in chicken due to a Salmonella infection. These results have implications not only for animal production and health but also for the understanding of how Salmonella infection in the intestine can have widespread, systemic effects on the metabolism of chickens without disease-like symptoms.

  17. Antibacterial activity and dual mechanisms of peptide analog derived from cell-penetrating peptide against Salmonella typhimurium and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Li, Lirong; Shi, Yonghui; Cheserek, Maureen Jepkorir; Su, Guanfang; Le, Guowei

    2013-02-01

    A number of research have proven that antimicrobial peptides are of greatest potential as a new class of antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides and cell-penetrating peptides share some similar structure characteristics. In our study, a new peptide analog, APP (GLARALTRLLRQLTRQLTRA) from the cell-penetrating peptide ppTG20 (GLFRALLRLLRSLWRLLLRA), was identified simultaneously with the antibacterial mechanism of APP against Salmonella typhimurium and Streptococcus pyogenes. APP displayed potent antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains. The minimum inhibitory concentration was in the range of 2 to 4 μM. APP displayed higher cell selectivity (about 42-fold increase) as compared to the parent peptide for it decreased hemolytic activity and increased antimicrobial activity. The calcein leakage from egg yolk L-α-phosphatidylcholine (EYPC)/egg yolk L-α-phosphatidyl-DL-glycerol and EYPC/cholesterol vesicles demonstrated that APP exhibited high selectivity. The antibacterial mechanism analysis indicated that APP induced membrane permeabilization in a kinetic manner for membrane lesions allowing O-nitrophenyl-β-D-galactoside uptake into cells and potassium release from APP-treated cells. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that APP induced bacterial live cell membrane damage. Circular dichroism, fluorescence spectra, and gel retardation analysis confirmed that APP interacted with DNA and intercalated into the DNA base pairs after penetrating the cell membrane. Cell cycle assay showed that APP affected DNA synthesis in the cell. Our results suggested that peptides derived from the cell-penetrating peptide have the potential for antimicrobial agent development, and APP exerts its antibacterial activity by damaging bacterial cell membranes and binding to bacterial DNA to inhibit cellular functions, ultimately leading to cell death.

  18. A comparative study assaying commonly used sanitizers for antimicrobial activity against indicator bacteria and a Salmonella Typhimurium strain on fresh produce.

    PubMed

    Shirron, Natali; Kisluk, Guy; Zelikovich, Yifat; Eivin, Inna; Shimoni, Eyal; Yaron, Sima

    2009-11-01

    With increased concerns over failures in vegetable and fruit sanitation, evaluating the efficacy of widely approved chemicals is ever more important. The purpose of this study was to determine whether sanitation treatments are equally effective against indicator bacteria and human enteric pathogens on cucumber and parsley. We provide here an experimental overview on the efficacy of common sanitation methods, which are based on peracetic acid-hydrogen peroxide, sodium dichloroisocyanurate, and the quaternary ammonium compound didecyldimethylammonium chloride. The sanitizers were tested for their activity against natural populations of total aerobic microorganisms, enterococci, and coliforms, and against the enteric pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 (which was added artificially). Results revealed that compared with washing parsley and cucumbers with water, treatments with all three sanitizers were not effective, resulting in a maximal reduction of only 0.7 log CFU of Salmonella Typhimurium. These sanitizers were also not effective in removal of natural bacteria from parsley (maximal reduction was 0.7 log CFU). Sanitation of cucumber was more successful; peracetic acid showed the most effective result, with a reduction of 2.7 log in aerobic microorganisms compared with cucumbers washed with water. Still, removal of natural bacteria from cucumbers proved more efficient than the removal of Salmonella Typhimurium. This may create a debate about the necessity of the sanitation and its contribution to safety, because sanitation of some contaminated vegetables may result in an increased likelihood of foods that, although they are given good hygienic ratings due to low microbial counts, harbor pathogens.

  19. Chromosome-Directed PCR-Based Detection and Quantification of Bacillus cereus Group Members with Focus on B. thuringiensis Serovar israelensis Active against Nematoceran Larvae.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Salome; Hendriksen, Niels B; Melin, Petter; Lundström, Jan O; Sundh, Ingvar

    2015-08-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis is a wide-spread soil bacterium affiliated with the B. cereus group (Bcg) and is widely used in biocontrol products applied against mosquito and black fly larvae. For monitoring and quantification of applied B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and its effect on indigenous B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg assemblages, efficient and reliable tools are essential. The abundance and properties of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis strains in the environment traditionally have been investigated with cultivation-dependent techniques, which are hampered by low sensitivity and the morphological similarity between B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. Currently available PCR-based detection and quantification tools target markers located on plasmids. In this study, a new cultivation-independent PCR-based method for efficient and specific quantification of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg is presented, utilizing two sets of PCR primers targeting the bacterial chromosome. Sequence database searches and empirical tests performed on target and nontarget species, as well as on bulk soil DNA samples, demonstrated that this diagnostic tool is specific for B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg. The method will be useful for comparisons of Bcg and B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis abundances in the same samples. Moreover, the effect of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis-based insecticide application on the total Bcg assemblages, including indigenous populations, can be investigated. This type of information is valuable in risk assessment and policy making for use of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis in the environment.

  20. Chromosome-Directed PCR-Based Detection and Quantification of Bacillus cereus Group Members with Focus on B. thuringiensis Serovar israelensis Active against Nematoceran Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Niels B.; Melin, Petter; Lundström, Jan O.; Sundh, Ingvar

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis is a wide-spread soil bacterium affiliated with the B. cereus group (Bcg) and is widely used in biocontrol products applied against mosquito and black fly larvae. For monitoring and quantification of applied B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and its effect on indigenous B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg assemblages, efficient and reliable tools are essential. The abundance and properties of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis strains in the environment traditionally have been investigated with cultivation-dependent techniques, which are hampered by low sensitivity and the morphological similarity between B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. Currently available PCR-based detection and quantification tools target markers located on plasmids. In this study, a new cultivation-independent PCR-based method for efficient and specific quantification of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg is presented, utilizing two sets of PCR primers targeting the bacterial chromosome. Sequence database searches and empirical tests performed on target and nontarget species, as well as on bulk soil DNA samples, demonstrated that this diagnostic tool is specific for B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg. The method will be useful for comparisons of Bcg and B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis abundances in the same samples. Moreover, the effect of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis-based insecticide application on the total Bcg assemblages, including indigenous populations, can be investigated. This type of information is valuable in risk assessment and policy making for use of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis in the environment. PMID:25979887

  1. Influence of water activity on inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes in peanut butter by microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Song, Won-Jae; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a 915 MHz microwave with 3 different electric power levels to inactivate three pathogens in peanut butter with different aw. Peanut butter inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes (0.3, 0.4, and 0.5 aw) were treated with a 915 MHz microwave with 2, 4, and 6 kW for up to 5 min. Six kW 915 MHz microwave treatment for 5 min reduced these three pathogens by 1.97 to >5.17 log CFU/g. Four kW 915 MHz microwave processing for 5 min reduced these pathogens by 0.41-1.98 log CFU/g. Two kW microwave heating did not inactivate pathogens in peanut butter. Weibull and Log-Linear + Shoulder models were used to describe the survival curves of three pathogens because they exhibited shouldering behavior. Td and T5d values were calculated based on the Weibull and Log-Linear + Shoulder models. Td values of the three pathogens were similar to D-values of Salmonella subjected to conventional heating at 90 °C but T5d values were much shorter than those of conventional heating at 90 °C. Generally, increased aw resulted in shorter T5d values of pathogens, but not shorter Td values. The results of this study can be used to optimize microwave heating pasteurization system of peanut butter.

  2. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities int he Enolase Superfamily: L-Talarate/Galactarate Dehydratase from Salmonella typhimurium LT2

    SciTech Connect

    Yew,W.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2007-01-01

    We assigned L-talarate dehydratase (TalrD) and galactarate dehydratase (GalrD) functions to a group of orthologous proteins in the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily, focusing our characterization on the protein encoded by the Salmonella typhimurium LT2 genome (GI:16766982; STM3697). Like the homologous mandelate racemase, L-fuconate dehydratase, and D-tartrate dehydratase, the active site of TalrD/GalrD contains a general acid/base Lys 197 at the end of the second {beta}-strand in the ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 7}{beta}-barrel domain, Asp 226, Glu 252, and Glu 278 as ligands for the essential Mg{sup 2+} at the ends of the third, fourth, and fifth {sup {beta}}-strands, a general acid/base His 328-Asp 301 dyad at the ends of the seventh and sixth {beta}-strands, and an electrophilic Glu 348 at the end of the eighth {beta}-strand. We discovered the function of STM3697 by screening a library of acid sugars; it catalyzes the efficient dehydration of both L-talarate (k{sub cat} = 2.1 s{sup -1}, k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 9.1 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}) and galactarate (k{sub cat} = 3.5 s{sup -1}, k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 1.1 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). Because L-talarate is a previously unknown metabolite, we demonstrated that S. typhimurium LT2 can utilize L-talarate as carbon source. Insertional disruption of the gene encoding STM3697 abolishes this phenotype; this disruption also diminishes, but does not eliminate, the ability of the organism to utilize galactarate as carbon source. The dehydration of L-talarate is accompanied by competing epimerization to galactarate; little epimerization to L-talarate is observed in the dehydration of galactarate. On the basis of (1) structures of the wild type enzyme complexed with L-lyxarohydroxamate, an analogue of the enolate intermediate, and of the K197A mutant complexed with L-glucarate, a substrate for exchange of the {alpha}-proton, and (2) incorporation of solvent deuterium into galactarate in competition with

  3. Identification of environmental reservoirs of nontyphoidal salmonellosis: aptamer-assisted bioconcentration and subsequent detection of salmonella typhimurium by quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Jyoti, Anurag; Vajpayee, Poornima; Singh, Gulshan; Patel, Chandra Bali; Gupta, Kailash Chand; Shanker, Rishi

    2011-10-15

    In this study, identification of environmental reservoirs of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (abbreviated as Salmonella Typhimurium) in sediments, water, and aquatic flora collected from the Ganges River (Ganges riverine material) was carried out by adopting a two-step strategy. Step 1 comprised a selective serovar-specific capture of Salmonella Typhimurium from potential reservoirs. Step 2 involved culture-free detection of selectively captured Salmonella Typhimurium by ttr gene-specific molecular beacon (MB) based quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR). The ttr gene-specific MB designed in this study could detect 1 colony-forming unit (cfu)/PCR captured by serovar-specific DNA aptamer. Sediments, water, and aquatic flora collected from the Ganges River were highly contaminated with Salmonella Typhimurium. The preanalytical step in the form of serovar-specific DNA aptamer-based biocapture of bacterial cells was found to enhance the sensitivity of the fluorescent probe in the presence of nonspecific DNA . Information about the presence of environmental reservoirs of Salmonella Typhimurium in the Ganges River region may pave the way for forecasting and management of nontyphoidal salmonellosis in south Asia.

  4. Cold plasma-activated hydrogen peroxide aerosol inactivates Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria innocua and maintains quality of grape tomato, spinach and cantaloupe.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yunbin; Sokorai, Kimberly; Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Demokritou, Philip; Li, Xihong; Mukhopadhyay, Sudarsan; Jin, Tony; Fan, Xuetong

    2017-03-10

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of aerosolized hydrogen peroxide in inactivating bacteria and maintaining quality of grape tomatoes, baby spinach leaves and cantaloupes. Stem scars and smooth surfaces of tomatoes, spinach leaves, and cantaloupe rinds, inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria innocua, were treated for 45s followed by additional 30min dwell time with hydrogen peroxide (7.8%) aerosols activated by atmospheric cold plasma. Non-inoculated samples were used to study the effects on quality and native microflora populations. Results showed that two ranges of hydrogen peroxide droplets with mean diameters of 40nm and 3.0μm were introduced into the treatment chamber. The aerosolized hydrogen peroxide treatment reduced S. Typhimurium populations by 5.0logCFU/piece, and E. coli O157:H7 and L. innocua populations from initial levels of 2.9 and 6.3logCFU/piece, respectively, to non-detectable levels (detection limit 0.6logCFU/piece) on the smooth surface of tomatoes. However, on the stem scar area of tomatoes, the reductions of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. innocua were only 1.0, 1.3, and 1.3 log, respectively. On the cantaloupe rind, the treatment reduced populations of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium and L. innocua by 4.9, 1.3, and 3.0logCFU/piece, respectively. Under the same conditions, reductions achieved on spinach leaves were 1.5, 4.2 and 4.0 log for E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium and L. innocua, respectively. The treatments also significantly reduced native aerobic plate count, and yeasts and mold count of tomato fruits and spinach leaves. Furthermore, firmness and color of the samples were not significantly affected by the aerosolized hydrogen peroxide. Overall, our results showed that the efficacy of aerosolized hydrogen peroxide depended on type of inoculated bacteria, location of bacteria and type of produce items, and aerosolized hydrogen peroxide could potentially be used to

  5. Highly sensitive umu test system for the detection of mutagenic nitroarenes in Salmonella typhimurium NM3009 having high O-acetyltransferase and nitroreductase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Oda, Yoshimitsu; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Nohmi, Takehiko; Shimada, Tsutomu )

    1993-01-01

    A highly sensitive umu test system for the detection of genotoxic activities of a variety of mutagenic nitroarenes has been developed using a new tester strain, Salmonella typhimurium NM3009 having high O-acetyltransferase (O-AT) and nitroreductase (NR) activities. The NM3009 was constructed by subcloning both the O-AT and NR genes into plasmid vector pACYC184, and the resulting plasmid was introduced into the parent tester strain S. typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002 harboring an umuC[prime]-[prime]lacZ fusion gene. The induction of umuC gene expression could be monitored by measuring the cellular [beta]-galactosidase activity produced by fusion gene. The purpose of the study was to evaluate whether the newly developed strain NM3009 is highly sensitive toward nitroarene compounds. The sensitivity of the strain NM3009 was compared with those of the parent TA1535/pSK1002 strain, the NR-overexpressing strain NM1011, the NR-deficient strain NM1000, the O-AT-overexpressing strain NM2009, and the O-AT-defective strain NM2000. The newly developed NM3009 strain had about 13-fold and 3-fold higher activities for N-AT and NR, respectively, than the original S. typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002 strain. Among six strains tested, NM3009 showed the highest sensitivity toward such chemicals as 1-nitronaphthalene, 2-nitrofluorene, 3,7-dinitro-fluoranthene, 3-nitrofluoranthene, 5-nitroacenaphthene, 2-nitronaphthalene, 1-nitropyrene, 1,6-dinitropyrene, 3,9-dinitrofluoranthene, 4,4[prime]-dinitrobiphenyl, 1,8-dinitropyrene, m-dinitrobenzene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, and 1,3-dinitropyrene. The authors have also found that the order of sensitivities to induce umuC gene expression toward a variety of nitroarenes was NM3009 > NM2009 > NM1011 > TA1535/pSK1002 > NM2000 > NM1000. 40 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Typhi as model organisms

    PubMed Central

    Garai, Preeti; Gnanadhas, Divya Prakash; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2012-01-01

    The lifestyle of intracellular pathogens has always questioned the skill of a microbiologist in the context of finding the permanent cure to the diseases caused by them. The best tool utilized by these pathogens is their ability to reside inside the host cell, which enables them to easily bypass the humoral immunity of the host, such as the complement system. They further escape from the intracellular immunity, such as lysosome and inflammasome, mostly by forming a protective vacuole-bound niche derived from the host itself. Some of the most dreadful diseases are caused by these vacuolar pathogens, for example, tuberculosis by Mycobacterium or typhoid fever by Salmonella. To deal with such successful pathogens therapeutically, the knowledge of a host-pathogen interaction system becomes primarily essential, which further depends on the use of a model system. A well characterized pathogen, namely Salmonella, suits the role of a model for this purpose, which can infect a wide array of hosts causing a variety of diseases. This review focuses on various such aspects of research on Salmonella which are useful for studying the pathogenesis of other intracellular pathogens. PMID:22722237

  7. Autoinducer-2 controls virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial communication via quorum sensing (QS) has been reported to be important in the production of virulence factors, antibiotic sensitivity, and biofilm development. Three QS systems, known as the autoinducer (AI) - AI-1, AI-2, and AI-3 systems, have been identified previously in the foodborne ...

  8. Evaluation of Molecular Methods for Identification of Salmonella Serovars

    PubMed Central

    Gurnik, Simone; Ahmad, Aaminah; Blimkie, Travis; Murphy, Stephanie A.; Kropinski, Andrew M.; Nash, John H. E.

    2016-01-01

    Classification by serotyping is the essential first step in the characterization of Salmonella isolates and is important for surveillance, source tracking, and outbreak detection. To improve detection and reduce the burden of salmonellosis, several rapid and high-throughput molecular Salmonella serotyping methods have been developed. The aim of this study was to compare three commercial kits, Salm SeroGen (Salm Sero-Genotyping AS-1 kit), Check&Trace (Check-Points), and xMAP (xMAP Salmonella serotyping assay), to the Salmonella genoserotyping array (SGSA) developed by our laboratory. They were assessed using a panel of 321 isolates that represent commonly reported serovars from human and nonhuman sources globally. The four methods correctly identified 73.8% to 94.7% of the isolates tested. The methods correctly identified 85% and 98% of the clinically important Salmonella serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium, respectively. The methods correctly identified 75% to 100% of the nontyphoidal, broad host range Salmonella serovars, including Heidelberg, Hadar, Infantis, Kentucky, Montevideo, Newport, and Virchow. The sensitivity and specificity of Salmonella serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis ranged from 85% to 100% and 99% to 100%, respectively. It is anticipated that whole-genome sequencing will replace serotyping in public health laboratories in the future. However, at present, it is approximately three times more expensive than molecular methods. Until consistent standards and methodologies are deployed for whole-genome sequencing, data analysis and interlaboratory comparability remain a challenge. The use of molecular serotyping will provide a valuable high-throughput alternative to traditional serotyping. This comprehensive analysis provides a detailed comparison of commercial kits available for the molecular serotyping of Salmonella. PMID:27194688

  9. Identification of PhoP-PhoQ activated genes within a duplicated region of the Salmonella typhimurium chromosome.

    PubMed

    Gunn, J S; Belden, W J; Miller, S I

    1998-08-01

    Salmonellae virulence requires the PhoP-PhoQ two-component regulatory system. PhoP-PhoQ activate the transcription of genes following phagocytosis by macrophages which are necessary for survival within the phagosome environment. Thirteen previously undefined PhoP-activated gene fusions generated by MudJ and TnphoA (pag A, and E-P, respectively) were cloned and sequenced. Most pag products show no similarity to proteins in the database, while others are predicted to encode: a UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (pagA); a protein with similarity to the product of an E. coli aluminium-induced gene (pagH); a protein encoded within a Salmonella-unique region adjacent to the sinR gene (pagN); a protein similar to a product of the Yersinia virulence plasmid (pagO); and a protein with similarity to CrcA which is necessary for resistance of E. coli to camphor (pagP). Of the pag characterized, only pagK, M and O were closely linked. pagJ and pagK were shown to be unlinked but nearly identical in DNA sequence, as each was located within a 1.6 kb DNA duplication. The translations of sequences surrounding pagJ and pagK show similarity to proteins from extrachromosomal elements as well as those involved in DNA transposition and rearrangement, suggesting that this region may have been or is a mobile element. The transcriptional start sites of pagK, M, and J were determined; however, comparison to other known pag gene promoters failed to reveal a consensus sequence for PhoP-regulated activation. DNA sequences hybridizing to a Salmonella typhimurium pagK specific probe were found in S. enteritidis but absent in other Salmonella serotypes and Enterobacteriaceae tested, suggesting that these genes are specific for broad host range Salmonellae that cause diarrhoea in humans. Cumulatively, these data further demonstrate: (1) that PhoP-PhoQ is a global regulator of the production of diverse envelope or secreted proteins; (2) that PhoP-PhoQ regulate the production of proteins of redundant function

  10. Mutagenic activity of sweepings and pigments from a household-wax factory assayed with Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Varella, S D; Pozetti, G L; Vilegas, W; Varanda, E A

    2004-12-01

    The mutagenic activity of garbage originating from a household wax industry was determined by the Salmonella/microsome assay, using the bacterial strains TA100, TA98 and YG1024. The garbage was obtained by sweeping the floor of the factory at the end of the work shift. Organic compounds were extracted by ultrasound for 30 min in dichloromethane or 70% ethanol. After evaporation of solvent, these extracts (HFS: household-wax factory sweepings) were dissolved in DMSO, and were tested for the mutagenic activity at varying concentrations (HFS-ET: 0.08-0.68 mg/plate, HFS-DCM: 0.60-7.31 mg/plate). The colouring agents (pigments) used in the production of the wax were also dissolved in DMSO and tested with the assay. The concentrations tested for each pigment were: Amaranth: 0.46-3.65 mg/plate, Auramine: 0.15-1.2 mg/plate and Rhodamine B: 0.22-1.82 mg/plate. Both ET and DCM organic extracts had mutagenic activity, especially in the YG1024 strain. The pigments behaved in a similar way, demonstrating that YG1024 was the most sensitive strain for the detection of mutagenicity, and that metabolization increased the activity. Human exposure (occupational and non-occupational) to industrial residues generated during the household-wax manufacturing and packaging process should be monitored, since this type of garbage is normally deposited in the environment without any control.

  11. Salmonella Typhimurium and Multidirectional Communication in the Gut

    PubMed Central

    Gart, Elena V.; Suchodolski, Jan S.; Welsh, Thomas H.; Alaniz, Robert C.; Randel, Ronald D.; Lawhon, Sara D.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian digestive tract is home to trillions of microbes, including bacteria, archaea, protozoa, fungi, and viruses. In monogastric mammals the stomach and small intestine harbor diverse bacterial populations but are typically less populated than the colon. The gut bacterial community (microbiota hereafter) varies widely among different host species and individuals within a species. It is influenced by season of the year, age of the host, stress and disease. Ideally, the host and microbiota benefit each other. The host provides nutrients to the microbiota and the microbiota assists the host with digestion and nutrient metabolism. The resident microbiota competes with pathogens for space and nutrients and, through this competition, protects the host in a phenomenon called colonization resistance. The microbiota participates in development of the host immune system, particularly regulation of autoimmunity and mucosal immune response. The microbiota also shapes gut–brain communication and host responses to stress; and, indeed, the microbiota is a newly recognized endocrine organ within mammalian hosts. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium hereafter) is a food-borne pathogen which adapts to and alters the gastrointestinal (GI) environment. In the GI tract, S. Typhimurium competes with the microbiota for nutrients and overcomes colonization resistance to establish infection. To do this, S. Typhimurium uses multiple defense mechanisms to resist environmental stressors, like the acidic pH of the stomach, and virulence mechanisms which allow it to invade the intestinal epithelium and disseminate throughout the host. To coordinate gene expression and disrupt signaling within the microbiota and between host and microbiota, S. Typhimurium employs its own chemical signaling and may regulate host hormone metabolism. This review will discuss the multidirectional interaction between S. Typhimurium, host and microbiota as well as mechanisms that allow S

  12. Cloning of a hemolysin gene from Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo.

    PubMed Central

    del Real, G; Segers, R P; van der Zeijst, B A; Gaastra, W

    1989-01-01

    A DNA fragment encoding both hemolysin and sphingomyelinase C activity was cloned from the pathogenic bacterium Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo. Initial clones were obtained by screening a genomic library in EMBL3 for hemolytic activity. Both hemolytic and sphingomyelinase C activities were coded for by a 3.9-kilobase BamHI fragment. The hemolysin was expressed from its own promoter in Escherichia coli K-12. Similar DNA sequences were also present in the serovars tarassovi and ballum. Images PMID:2744864

  13. Immune reaction and survivability of salmonella typhimurium and salmonella infantis after infection of primary avian macrophages.

    PubMed

    Braukmann, Maria; Methner, Ulrich; Berndt, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella serovars are differentially able to infect chickens. The underlying causes are not yet fully understood. Aim of the present study was to elucidate the importance of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and -2) for the virulence of two non-host-specific, but in-vivo differently invasive, Salmonella serovars in conjunction with the immune reaction of the host. Primary avian splenic macrophages were inoculated with Salmonella enterica sub-species enterica serovar (S.) Typhimurium and S. Infantis. The number and viability of intracellular bacteria and transcription of SPI-1 and -2 genes by the pathogens, as well as transcription of immune-related proteins, surface antigen expression and nitric oxide production by the macrophages, were compared at different times post inoculation. After infection, both of the Salmonella serovars were found inside the primary macrophages. Invasion-associated SPI-1 genes were significantly higher transcribed in S. Infantis- than S. Typhimurium-infected macrophages. The macrophages counteracted the S. Infantis and S. Typhimurium infection with elevated mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), interleukin (IL)-12, IL-18 and lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha factor (LITAF) as well as with an increased synthesis of nitric oxide. Despite these host cell attacks, S. Typhimurium was better able than S. Infantis to survive within the macrophages and transcribed higher rates of the SPI-2 genes spiC, ssaV, sifA, and sseA. The results showed similar immune reactions of primary macrophages after infection with both of the Salmonella strains. The more rapid and stronger transcription of SPI-2-related genes by intracellular S. Typhimurium compared to S. Infantis might be responsible for its better survival in avian primary macrophages.

  14. Inactivation of Salmonella Typhimurium and quality preservation of cherry tomatoes by in-package aerosolization of antimicrobials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of in-package aerosolized aqueous sanitizers in reducing populations of attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium inoculated on tomato fruit and in maintaining fruit quality. Cherry tomatoes were inoculated with a cocktail of ...

  15. Evaluation of chlorinated benz[a]anthracene on hepatic toxicity in rats and mutagenic activity in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kido, T; Sakakibara, H; Ohura, T; Guruge, K S; Kojima, M; Hasegawa, J; Iwamura, T; Yamanaka, N; Masuda, S; Sakaguchi, M; Amagai, T; Shimoi, K

    2013-01-01

    Chlorinated benz[a]anthracenes (Cl-BaA) are halogenated aromatic compounds (typified by dioxins) found in the environment at relatively high concentrations. Fischer 344 rats were intragastrically administered 0, 1, or 10 mg of Cl-BaA or its parent compound benz[a]anthracene (BaA) per kg of body weight for 14 consecutive days. Both chemicals at 10 mg/kg/day inhibited the gain in body weight, and consequent increase in relative liver weight. Hepatic gene expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1, 1A2, and 1B1 was significantly stimulated by administration of BaA (10 mg/kg/day) compared with the control. After administration of Cl-BaA, only the CYP1A2 gene was significantly induced, even at the lower dosage; CYP1A1 and 1B1 mRNA levels remained unchanged in Cl-BaA-treated rats compared with controls. To elucidate the role of such Cl-BaA exposure and induced CYPs at toxicity onset, we investigated the mutagenicity of BaA and Cl-BaA using Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100. BaA and Cl-BaA at 10 μg/plate produced positive results in both strains in the presence of rat S-9. Incubation of Cl-BaA with recombinant rat CYP1A2 produced a significantly higher number of revertant colonies in TA98 and TA100 than in controls, but no such change was observed for BaA. In conclusion, BaA changes its own physiological and toxicological actions by its chlorination; (1) daily exposure to Cl-BaA selectively induces hepatic CYP1A2 in rats and (2) Cl-BaA induces frameshift mutations in the presence of CYP1A2, although BaA does not exert mutagenicity. This indicates that CYP1A2 may metabolize Cl-BaA to active forms.

  16. Survival of Salmonella Tennessee, Salmonella Typhimurium DT104, and Enterococcus faecium in peanut paste formulations at two different levels of water activity and fat.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Ai; Enache, Elena; Black, D Glenn; Elliott, Philip H; Napier, Carla D; Podolak, Richard; Hayman, Melinda M

    2014-08-01

    Long-term survival of heat-stressed Salmonella Tennessee, Salmonella Typhimurium DT104, and Enterococcus faecium was evaluated in four model peanut paste formulations with a combination of two water activity (aw) levels (0.3 and 0.6) and two fat levels (47 and 56%) over 12 months at 20 ± 1°C. Prior to storage, the inoculated peanut paste formulations were heat treated at 75°C for up to 50 min to obtain an approximately 1.0-log reduction of each organism. The cell population of each organism in each formulation was monitored with tryptic soy agar plate counts, immediately after heat treatment, at 2 weeks for the first month, and then monthly for up to 1 year. The log reductions (log CFU per gram) following 12 months of storage were between 1.3 and 2.4 for Salmonella Tennessee, 1.8 and 2.8 for Salmonella Typhimurium, and 1.1 and 2.1 for E. faecium in four types of model peanut paste formulations. Enhanced survivability was observed in pastes with lower aw for all organisms, compared with those with higher aw (P < 0.05). In contrast, the effect of fat level (47 and 56%) on survival of all organisms was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Whereas survivability of Salmonella Tennessee and Typhimurium DT104 did not differ significantly (P > 0.05), E. faecium demonstrated higher survivability than Salmonella (P < 0.05). Salmonella survived in the model peanut pastes well over 12 months, which is longer than the expected shelf life for peanut butter products. The information from this study can be used to design safer food processing and food safety plans for peanut butter processing.

  17. Salmonella Typhimurium utilizes a T6SS-mediated antibacterial weapon to establish in the host gut

    PubMed Central

    Flaugnatti, Nicolas; Lugo, Kyler A.; Lam, Lilian H.; Jacobson, Amanda; Baylot, Virginie; Durand, Eric; Journet, Laure; Cascales, Eric; Monack, Denise M.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian gastrointestinal tract is colonized by a high-density polymicrobial community where bacteria compete for niches and resources. One key competition strategy includes cell contact-dependent mechanisms of interbacterial antagonism, such as the type VI secretion system (T6SS), a multiprotein needle-like apparatus that injects effector proteins into prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic target cells. However, the contribution of T6SS antibacterial activity during pathogen invasion of the gut has not been demonstrated. We report that successful establishment in the gut by the enteropathogenic bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium requires a T6SS encoded within Salmonella pathogenicity island-6 (SPI-6). In an in vitro setting, we demonstrate that bile salts increase SPI-6 antibacterial activity and that S. Typhimurium kills commensal bacteria in a T6SS-dependent manner. Furthermore, we provide evidence that one of the two T6SS nanotube subunits, Hcp1, is required for killing Klebsiella oxytoca in vitro and that this activity is mediated by the specific interaction of Hcp1 with the antibacterial amidase Tae4. Finally, we show that K. oxytoca is killed in the host gut in an Hcp1-dependent manner and that the T6SS antibacterial activity is essential for Salmonella to establish infection within the host gut. Our findings provide an example of pathogen T6SS-dependent killing of commensal bacteria as a mechanism to successfully colonize the host gut. PMID:27503894

  18. Functional Activity of Antibodies Directed towards Flagellin Proteins of Non-Typhoidal Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Girish; Tennant, Sharon M; Boyd, Mary A; Wang, Jin Y; Tulapurkar, Mohan E; Pasetti, Marcela F; Levine, Myron M; Simon, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis are major causes of invasive bacterial infections in children under 5 years old in sub-Saharan Africa, with case fatality rates of ~20%. There are no licensed NTS vaccines for humans. Vaccines that induce antibodies against a Salmonella Typhi surface antigen, Vi polysaccharide, significantly protect humans against typhoid fever, establishing that immune responses to Salmonella surface antigens can be protective. Flagella proteins, abundant surface antigens in Salmonella serovars that cause human disease, are also powerful immunogens, but the functional capacity of elicited anti-flagellar antibodies and their role in facilitating bacterial clearance has been unclear. We examined the ability of anti-flagellar antibodies to mediate microbial killing by immune system components in-vitro and assessed their role in protecting mice against invasive Salmonella infection. Polyclonal (hyperimmune sera) and monoclonal antibodies raised against phase 1 flagellin proteins of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium facilitated bacterial uptake and killing of the homologous serovar pathogen by phagocytes. Polyclonal anti-flagellar antibodies accompanied by complement also achieved direct bacterial killing. Serum bactericidal activity was restricted to Salmonella serovars expressing the same flagellin used as immunogen. Notably, individual anti-flagellin monoclonal antibodies with complement were not bactericidal, but this biological activity was restored when different monoclonal anti-flagellin antibodies were combined. Passive transfer immunization with a monoclonal IgG antibody specific for phase 1 flagellin from S. Typhimurium protected mice against lethal challenge with a representative African invasive S. Typhimurium strain. These findings have relevance for the use of flagellin proteins in NTS vaccines, and confirm the role of anti-flagellin antibodies as mediators of protective immunity.

  19. Novel surface antigen based impedimetric immunosensor for detection of Salmonella typhimurium in water and juice samples.

    PubMed

    Mutreja, Ruchi; Jariyal, Monu; Pathania, Preeti; Sharma, Arunima; Sahoo, D K; Suri, C Raman

    2016-11-15

    A specific surface antigen, OmpD has been reported first time as a surface biomarker in the development of selective and sensitive immunosensor for detecting Salmonella typhimurium species. The OmpD surface antigen extraction was done from Salmonella typhimurium serovars, under the optimized growth conditions for its expression. Anti-OmpD antibodies were generated and used as detector probe in immunoassay format on graphene-graphene oxide (G-GO) modified screen printed carbon electrodes. The water samples were spiked with standard Salmonella typhimurium cells, and detection was done by measuring the change in impedimetric response of developed immunosensor to know the concentration of serovar Salmonella typhimurium. The developed immunosensor was able to specifically detect S. typhimurium in spiked water and juice samples with a sensitivity upto 10(1)CFUmL(-1), with high selectivity and very low cross-reactivity with other strains. This is the first report on the detection of Salmonella typhimurum species using a specific biomarker, OmpD. The developed technique could be very useful for the detection of nontyphoidal Salmonellosis and is also important from an epidemiological point of view.

  20. LPS structure and PhoQ activity are important for Salmonella Typhimurium virulence in the Galleria mellonella infection model [corrected].

    PubMed

    Bender, Jennifer K; Wille, Thorsten; Blank, Kathrin; Lange, Anna; Gerlach, Roman G

    2013-01-01

    The larvae of the wax moth, Galleria mellonella, have been used experimentally to host a range of bacterial and fungal pathogens. In this study we evaluated the suitability of G. mellonella as an alternative animal model of Salmonella infection. Using a range of inoculum doses we established that the LD₅₀ of SalmonellaTyphimurium strain NCTC 12023 was 3.6 × 10³ bacteria per larva. Further, a set of isogenic mutant strains depleted of known virulence factors was tested to identify determinants essential for S. Typhimurium pathogenesis. Mutants depleted of one or both of the type III secretion systems encoded by Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands 1 and 2 showed no virulence defect. In contrast, we observed reduced pathogenic potential of a phoQ mutant indicating an important role for the PhoPQ two-component signal transduction system. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure was also shown to influence Salmonella virulence in G. mellonella. A waaL(rfaL) mutant, which lacks the entire O-antigen (OAg), was virtually avirulent, while a wzz(ST)/wzz(fepE) double mutant expressing only a very short OAg was highly attenuated for virulence. Furthermore, shortly after infection both LPS mutant strains showed decreased replication when compared to the wild type in a flow cytometry-based competitive index assay. In this study we successfully established a G. mellonella model of S. Typhimurium infection. By identifying PhoQ and LPS OAg length as key determinants of virulence in the wax moth larvae we proved that there is an overlap between this and other animal model systems, thus confirming that the G. mellonella infection model is suitable for assessing aspects of Salmonella virulence function.

  1. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against the O-5 antigen of Salmonella typhimurium lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Jaradat, Z W; Zawistowski, J

    1996-01-01

    Three murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced by fusion of P3X63-Ag8.653 myeloma cells and splenocytes of a mouse immunized with heat-attenuated (20 min, 80 degrees C) Salmonella typhimurium cells. MAbs 5A5 and 5B2 were of the immunoglobulin M (IgM) class, while MAb 4A8 was IgG2a. All possessed the kappa light chains. The MAbs were specific to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-5 antigen of Salmonella B serogroup, as determined by electrophoresis followed by immunoblotting. All MAbs recognized the same epitope, as determined by an additive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), although IgM MAbs exhibited higher avidity than the IgG MAb. ELISA analyses revealed that all three MAbs reacted with S. typhimurium (LPS O:1, 4, 5, and 12) while failing to recognize S. typhimurium var. copenhagen (LPS O:1, 4, and 12). The MAbs reacted equally with live and heat-attenuated Salmonella B serovars containing LPS O-5 antigen. The ability of the MAbs to detect live bacterial cells was further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Treatment of bacteria with cholic acid and extremely low pH did not affect antibody binding to S. typhimurium. However, when S. typhimurium cells were exposed to alkaline conditions prior to reaction with all three MAbs, no binding was observed. The use of MAbs to discriminate between S. typhimurium and S. typhimurium var. copenhagen in meat samples was investigated. PMID:8572685

  2. Induction of seroconversion and persistence of Salmonella Typhimurium in pigs are strain dependent.

    PubMed

    Van Parys, Alexander; Boyen, Filip; Leyman, Bregje; Verbrugghe, Elin; Maes, Dominiek; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank

    2013-09-01

    Foodborne salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial zoonotic diseases worldwide. Salmonella Typhimurium is the serovar most frequently isolated from persistently infected slaughter pigs in Europe. Salmonella Typhimurium pathogenesis is host species specific. In addition, differences in in vitro behaviour of Salmonella Typhimurium strains have also been described, which may be reflected by a different course of infection within a host species. We compared the course of a Salmonella Typhimurium infection in pigs, using two Salmonella Typhimurium strains that were able to interfere with MHC II expression on porcine macrophages to a different extent in vitro. After experimental inoculation, blood and faecal samples from all pigs were collected at regular time points. At 40 days post inoculation (pi), animals were euthanized and tissue samples were bacteriologically analysed. The proportion of serologically positive piglets at 33 days pi was significantly higher in pigs that were inoculated with the strain that did not downregulate MHC II expression in vitro. Furthermore, this strain was less frequently shed and isolated in lower numbers from tonsils and ileocaecal lymph nodes than the strain that was able to markedly downregulate MHC II expression in vitro. We thus found that the delayed onset of seroconversion after oral inoculation of piglets with a particular Salmonella Typhimurium strain coincided with higher faecal shedding and increased persistence. Strain specific differences in Salmonella pathogenesis might thus have repercussions on the serological detection of Salmonella Typhimurium infections in pigs.

  3. RpoS-dependent expression of OsmY in Salmonella enterica serovar typhi: activation under stationary phase and SPI-2-inducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xueming; Ji, Ying; Weng, Xiaoqin; Huang, Xinxiang

    2015-06-01

    OsmY is a periplasmic protein with two BON domains which may attach to phospholipid membranes. Previous reports showed that the expression of OsmY in Escherichia coli was hyperosmotically inducible and RpoS dependent. But little work was done to investigate the expression and function of OsmY in Salmonella. Here, we detected the endogenous OsmY in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) with polyclonal antibody. The results showed that the expression of OsmY was also RpoS dependent and was activated under stationary phase. Further, using in vitro culture, we established the Salmonella pathogenesis island (SPI)-1 and SPI-2-inducing conditions with hyperosmolarity and low-phosphate, low-magnesium medium (pH 5.8), respectively, and found that only SPI-2-inducing conditions can activate the expression of OsmY. osmY deletion mutant showed delayed growth compared with wild-type S. Typhi in SPI-2-inducing conditions. The results indicated that OsmY may function to resist the stress and be favorable for Salmonella's replication in the Salmonella-containing vesicles of macrophage.

  4. Effect of pH, water activity and gel micro-structure, including oxygen profiles and rheological characterization, on the growth kinetics of Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Theys, T E; Geeraerd, A H; Verhulst, A; Poot, K; Van Bree, I; Devlieghere, F; Moldenaers, P; Wilson, D; Brocklehurst, T; Van Impe, J F

    2008-11-30

    In this study, the growth of Salmonella Typhimurium in Tryptic Soy Broth was examined at different pH (4.50-5.50), water activity a(w) (0.970-0.992) and gelatin concentration (0%, 1% and 5% ) at 20 degrees C. Experiments in TSB with 0% gelatin were carried out in shaken erlenmeyers, in the weak 1% gelatin media in petri plates and in the firm 5% gelatin media in gel cassettes. A quantification of gel strength was performed by rheological measurements and the influence of oxygen supply on the growth of S. Typhimurium was investigated. pH, as well as a(w) as well as gelatin concentration had an influence on the growth rate. Both in broth and in gelatinized media, lowering pH or water activity caused a decrease of growth rate. In media with 1% gelatin a reduction of growth rate and maximal cell density was observed compared to broth at all conditions. However, the effects of decreasing pH and a(w) were less pronounced. A further increase in gelatin concentration to 5% gelatin caused a small or no additional drop of growth rate. The final oxygen concentration dropped from 5.5 ppm in stirred broth to anoxic values in petri plates, also when 0% and 5% gelatin media were tested in this recipient. Probably, not stirring the medium, which leads to anoxic conditions, has a more pronounced effect on the growth rate of S. Typhimurium then medium solidness. Finally, growth data were fitted with the primary model of Baranyi and Roberts [Baranyi, J. and Roberts, T. A., 1994. A dynamic approach to predicting bacterial growth in food. International Journal of Food Microbiology 23, 277-294]. An additional factor was introduced into the secondary model of Ross et al. [Ross, T. and Ratkowsky, D. A. and Mellefont, L. A. and McMeekin, T. A., 2003. Modelling the effects of temperature, water activity, pH and lactic acid concentration on the growth rate of Escherichia coli. International Journal of Food Microbiology 82, 33-43.] to incorporate the effect of gelatin concentration, next to

  5. The Molecular Epidemiological Characteristics and Genetic Diversity of Salmonella Typhimurium in Guangdong, China, 2007–2011

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanhui; He, Dongmei; Li, Xiaocui; Liang, Zhaoming; Ke, Changwen

    2014-01-01

    Background Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is the most important serovar associated with human salmonellosis worldwide. Here we aimed to explore the molecular epidemiology and genetic characteristics of this serovar in Guangdong, China. Methodology We evaluated the molecular epidemiology and genetic characteristics of 294 endemic Salmonella Typhimurium clinical isolates which were collected from 1977 to 2011 in Guangdong, China, and compared them with a global set of isolates of this serovar using epidemiological data and Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) analysis. Principal Finding The 294 isolates were assigned to 13 Sequencing types (STs) by MLST, of which ST34 and ST19 were the most common in Guangdong. All the STs were further assigned to two eBurst Groups, eBG1 and eBG138. The eBG1 was the major group endemic in Guangdong. Nucleotide and amino acid variability were comparable for all seven MLST loci. Tajima’s D test suggested positive selection in hisD and thrA genes (p<0.01), but positive selection was rejected for the five other genes (p>0.05). In addition, The Tajima’s D test within each eBG using the global set of isolates showed positive selection in eBG1 and eBG138 (p<0.05), but was rejected in eBG243 (p>0.05). We also analyzed the phylogenetic structure of Salmonella Typhimurium from worldwide sources and found that certain STs are geographically restricted. ACSSuT was the predominant multidrug resistance pattern for this serovar. The resistant profiles ACSSuTTmNaG, ACSSuTTmNa and ACSuTTmNaG seem to be specific for ST34, and ASSuTNa for ST19. Conclusion Here we presented a genotypic characterization of Salmonella Typhimurium isolates using MLST and found two major STs are endemic in Guangdong. Our analyses indicate that genetic selection may have shaped the Salmonella Typhimurium populations. However, further evaluation with additional isolates from various sources will be essential to reveal the scope of the epidemiological characteristics

  6. DNA Adenine Methylation Regulates Virulence Gene Expression in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium▿

    PubMed Central

    Balbontín, Roberto; Rowley, Gary; Pucciarelli, M. Graciela; López-Garrido, Javier; Wormstone, Yvette; Lucchini, Sacha; García-del Portillo, Francisco; Hinton, Jay C. D.; Casadesús, Josep

    2006-01-01

    Transcriptomic analyses during growth in Luria-Bertani medium were performed in strain SL1344 of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and in two isogenic derivatives lacking Dam methylase. More genes were repressed than were activated by Dam methylation (139 versus 37). Key genes that were differentially regulated by Dam methylation were verified independently. The largest classes of Dam-repressed genes included genes belonging to the SOS regulon, as previously described in Escherichia coli, and genes of the SOS-inducible Salmonella prophages ST64B, Gifsy-1, and Fels-2. Dam-dependent virulence-related genes were also identified. Invasion genes in pathogenicity island SPI-1 were activated by Dam methylation, while the fimbrial operon std was repressed by Dam methylation. Certain flagellar genes were repressed by Dam methylation, and Dam− mutants of S. enterica showed reduced motility. Altered expression patterns in the absence of Dam methylation were also found for the chemotaxis genes cheR (repressed by Dam) and STM3216 (activated by Dam) and for the Braun lipoprotein gene, lppB (activated by Dam). The requirement for DNA adenine methylation in the regulation of specific virulence genes suggests that certain defects of Salmonella Dam− mutants in the mouse model may be caused by altered patterns of gene expression. PMID:16997949

  7. Pseudogenization of sopA and sopE2 is functionally linked and contributes to virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, L M; Hidalgo, A A; Rodríguez, L; Urrutia, I M; Ortega, A P; Villagra, N A; Paredes-Sabja, D; Calderón, I L; Gil, F; Saavedra, C P; Mora, G C; Fuentes, J A

    2015-07-01

    The difference in host range between Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) and S. enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) can be partially attributed to pseudogenes. Pseudogenes are genomic segments homologous to functional genes that do not encode functional products due to the presence of genetic defects. S. Typhi lacks several protein effectors implicated in invasion or other important processes necessary for full virulence of S. Typhimurium. SopA and SopE2, effectors that have been lost by pseudogenization in S. Typhi, correspond to an ubiquitin ligase involved in cytokine production by infected cells, and to a guanine exchange factor necessary for invasion of epithelial cells, respectively. We hypothesized that sopA and/or sopE pseudogenization contributed to the virulence of S. Typhi. In this work, we found that S. Typhi expressing S. Typhimurium sopE2 exhibited a decreased invasion in different epithelial cell lines compared with S. Typhi WT. S. Typhimurium sopA completely abolished the hypo-invasive phenotype observed in S. Typhi expressing S. Typhimurium sopE2, suggesting that functional SopA and SopE2 participate concertedly in the invasion process. Finally, the expression of S. Typhimurium sopA and/or sopE2 in S. Typhi, determined changes in the secretion of IL-8 and IL-18 in infected epithelial cells.

  8. A novel contribution of spvB to pathogenesis of Salmonella Typhimurium by inhibiting autophagy in host cells

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yuanyuan; Gao, Song; Wang, Ting; Yan, Jing; Xu, Guangmei; Li, Yuanyuan; Niu, Hua; Huang, Rui; Wu, Shuyan

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella plasmid virulence genes (spv) are highly conserved in strains of clinically important Salmonella serovars. It is essential for Salmonella plasmid-correlated virulence, although the exact mechanism remains to be elucidated. Autophagy has been reported to play an important role in host immune responses limiting Salmonella infection. Our previous studies demonstrated that Salmonella conjugative plasmid harboring spv genes could enhance bacterial cytotoxicity by inhibiting autophagy. In the present study, we investigated whether spvB, which is one of the most important constituents of spv ORF could intervene in autophagy pathway. Murine macrophage-like cells J774A.1, human epithelial HeLa cells, and BALB/c mice infected with Salmonella Typhimurium wild type, mutant and complementary strains (carrying or free spvB or complemented only with ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of SpvB) were used in vitro and in vivo assay, respectively. To further explore the molecular mechanisms, both SpvB ectopic eukaryotic expression system and cells deficient in essential autophagy components by siRNA were generated. Results indicated that spvB could suppress autophagosome formation through its function in depolymerizing actin, and aggravate inflammatory injury of the host in response to S. Typhimurium infection. Our studies demonstrated virulence of spvB involving in inhibition of autophagic flux for the first time, which could provide novel insights into Salmonella pathogenesis, and have potential application to develop new antibacterial strategies for Salmonellosis. PMID:26811498

  9. Antimicrobial activity of plant compounds against Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 in ground pork and the influence of heat and storage on the activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of heat (70oC for 5 min) and cold-storage (4oC up to 7 days) on the effectiveness of oregano and cinnamon essential oils and powdered olive and apple extracts against Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 in ground pork and to evaluate the activi...

  10. Salmonella typhimurium mutants lacking NAD pyrophosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Park, U E; Roth, J R; Olivera, B M

    1988-01-01

    NAD can serve as both a purine and a pyridine source for Salmonella typhimurium. Exogenous NAD is rapidly broken down into nicotinamide mononucleotide and AMP by an NAD pyrophosphatase, the first step in the pathway for the assimilation of exogenous NAD. We isolated and characterized mutants of S. typhimurium lacking NAD pyrophosphatase activity; such mutants were identified by their failure to use exogenous NAD as a purine source. These mutants carry mutations that map at a new locus, designated pnuE, between 86 and 87 min on the Salmonella chromosome. PMID:2841298

  11. Tissue colonization and circulating T lymphocytes in laying hens upon oral challenge with Salmonella enterica serovars.

    PubMed

    Balan, Kannan V; Bigley, Elmer C; Gaines, Dennis W; Babu, Uma S

    2016-12-01

    Evaluating the potential of Salmonella serovars for tissue colonization and egg contamination in laying hens is critical due to widespread consumption of poultry and egg-containing products. The 2009 FDA Egg Rule was implemented to target the eradication of Salmonella enterica Enteritidis (SE) from layers; however, other Salmonella serovars, such as Heidelberg (SH) and Typhimurium (ST), have also been associated with poultry-related outbreaks. We conducted this study to see if serovars other than SE could colonize in laying hens, cause egg contamination, and modulate circulating T-cell populations. Laying hens were orally gavaged with 10(7) colony forming units (CFU) of SE, SH, or ST and assessed for colonization in spleen, ovaries, and oviduct 10 d postchallenge. Splenic colonization was similar for all the serovars; however, colonization of ovaries and oviducts was significantly higher with SH compared to SE and ST. Furthermore, SH challenge resulted in egg contamination, while SE and ST did not result in contaminated eggs. Phenotypic evaluation of peripheral blood lymphocytes showed significant reduction in CD4 cells in SH-challenged birds and lower CD8α and CD8β cells in SE-challenged birds compared to controls. Our data showed that non-SE serovars have equal or higher potential to colonize reproductive tissues of laying hens and may be accompanied by altered lymphocyte populations.

  12. A comparative study on invasion, survival, modulation of oxidative burst, and nitric oxide responses of macrophages (HD11), and systemic infection in chickens by prevalent poultry Salmonella serovars.

    PubMed

    He, Haiqi; Genovese, Kenneth J; Swaggerty, Christina L; Nisbet, David J; Kogut, Michael H

    2012-12-01

    Poultry is a major reservoir for foodborne Salmonella serovars. Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Kentucky, and Salmonella Senftenberg are the most prevalent serovars in U.S. poultry. Information concerning the interactions between different Salmonella species and host cells in poultry is lacking. In the present study, the above mentioned Salmonella serovars were examined for invasion, intracellular survival, and their ability to modulate oxidative burst and nitric oxide (NO) responses in chicken macrophage HD11 cells. All Salmonella serovars demonstrated similar capacity to invade HD11 cells. At 24 h post-infection, a 36-43% reduction of intracellular bacteria, in log(10)(CFU), was observed for Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Kentucky, and Salmonella Senftenberg, whereas a significantly lower reduction (16%) was observed for Salmonella Enteritidis, indicating its higher resistance to the killing by HD11 cells. Production of NO was completely diminished in HD11 cells infected with Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis, but remained intact when infected with Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Kentucky, and Salmonella Senftenberg. Phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated oxidative burst in HD11 cells was greatly impaired after infection by each of the five serovars. When newly hatched chickens were challenged orally, a high rate (86-98%) of systemic infection (Salmonella positive in liver/spleen) was observed in birds challenged with Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Heidelberg, and Salmonella Kentucky, while only 14% of the birds were Salmonella Senftenberg positive. However, there was no direct correlation between systemic infection and in vitro differential intracellular survival and modulation of NO response among the tested serovars.

  13. Whole Genome Shotgun Analysis: the Resolving Power to Distinguish 2009 and 2010 Clinical Isolates of Salmonella Typhimurium Possessing the Same PFGE Type

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Between 2009 and 2011, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium with the JPXX01.0014 pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) type was isolated across the United States. The 2009 isolates were associated with an outbreak from an unidentified food source, while later isolates were linked...

  14. Intracontinental spread of human invasive Salmonella Typhimurium pathovariants in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Okoro, Chinyere K; Kingsley, Robert A; Connor, Thomas R; Harris, Simon R; Parry, Christopher M; Al-Mashhadani, Manar N; Kariuki, Samuel; Msefula, Chisomo L; Gordon, Melita A; de Pinna, Elizabeth; Wain, John; Heyderman, Robert S; Obaro, Stephen; Alonso, Pedro L; Mandomando, Inacio; MacLennan, Calman A; Tapia, Milagritos D; Levine, Myron M; Tennant, Sharon M; Parkhill, Julian; Dougan, Gordon

    2012-11-01

    A highly invasive form of non-typhoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease has recently been documented in many countries in sub-Saharan Africa. The most common Salmonella enterica serovar causing this disease is Typhimurium (Salmonella Typhimurium). We applied whole-genome sequence-based phylogenetic methods to define the population structure of sub-Saharan African invasive Salmonella Typhimurium isolates and compared these to global Salmonella Typhimurium populations. Notably, the vast majority of sub-Saharan invasive Salmonella Typhimurium isolates fell within two closely related, highly clustered phylogenetic lineages that we estimate emerged independently ∼52 and ∼35 years ago in close temporal association with the current HIV pandemic. Clonal replacement of isolates from lineage I by those from lineage II was potentially influenced by the use of chloramphenicol for the treatment of iNTS disease. Our analysis suggests that iNTS disease is in part an epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa caused by highly related Salmonella Typhimurium lineages that may have occupied new niches associated with a compromised human population and antibiotic treatment.

  15. Molecular characterization of Salmonella Typhimurium isolated in Brazil by CRISPR-MVLST.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Fernanda; Medeiros, Marta Inês Cazentini; Rodrigues, Dália Dos Prazeres; Allard, Marc W; Falcão, Juliana Pfrimer

    2017-02-01

    CRISPR-multi-locus virulence sequence typing (CRISPR-MVLST) was performed to type 92 S. Typhimurium strains isolated from humans and food sources between 1983 and 2013 in Brazil and assess the suitability of this methodology comparing it with PFGE already used for subtyping the same strains. Among the 92 S. Typhimurium strains studied, we identified 25 CRISPR1 alleles, 27 CRISPR2 alleles, 2 fimH alleles and 3 sseL alleles showing that the genetic variability is much higher in the CRISPRs loci than in the virulence genes. The CRISPR-MVLST analysis provided similar results to the PFGE previously published used to type the same set of strains, demonstrating that CRISPR-MVLST is a very efficient approach for subtyping S. Typhimurium serovar and can be used to complement and validate results obtained by the PFGE methodology.

  16. HtpG contributes to Salmonella Typhimurium intestinal persistence in pigs.

    PubMed

    Verbrugghe, Elin; Van Parys, Alexander; Leyman, Bregje; Boyen, Filip; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank

    2015-10-14

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella Typhimurium) contamination of pork, is one of the major sources of human salmonellosis. The bacterium is able to persist and hide in asymptomatic carrier animals, generating a reservoir for Salmonella transmission to other animals and humans. Mechanisms involved in Salmonella persistence in pigs remain poorly understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that the Salmonella htpG gene, encoding a homologue of the eukaryotic heat shock protein 90, contributes to Salmonella Typhimurium persistence in intestine-associated tissues of pigs, but not in the tonsils. HtpG does not seem to play an important role during the acute phase of infection. The contribution to persistence was shown to be associated with htpG-dependent Salmonella invasion and survival in porcine enterocytes and macrophages. These results reveal the role of HtpG as a virulence factor contributing to Salmonella persistence in pigs.

  17. Investigations on the mutagenicity of primary and secondary alpha-acetoxynitrosamines with Salmonella typhimurium: activation and deactivation of structurally related compounds by S-9.

    PubMed

    Pool, B L; Wiessler, M

    1981-01-01

    alpha-Acetoxynitrosamines may serve as model compounds to study mechanisms of action of N-nitrosamines. They are readily cleaved through hydrolysis, or by esterases, to yield the same ultimate, reactive species presumably also arising after metabolic activation of N-nitrosamines, Structure-activity investigations on alpha-acetoxynitrosamines promise to aid in elucidating mechanisms involved during the activation of N-nitrosamines. A series of alpha-acetoxyalkynitrosamines was therefore tested for mutagenicity with Salmonella typhimurium TA 1535. The compounds were readily cleaved, by hydrolysis, to mutagenic intermediates. When comparing compounds according to their proposed alkylating properties, unstable secondary alpha-acetates were considerably more mutagenic than the corresponding relatively stable primary alpha-acetates. Addition of S-9 mix caused both activation as well as deactivation in an unexpected structure-related pattern. This was so because an exactly opposite influence of S-9 components on the mutagenicity was observed for each pair of primary and secondary compounds containing the same alkylating spices. Furthermore, pairs of compounds with both methylating and ethylating properties were differently influenced by S-9 addition than those with propylating or butylating effects. This clearly demonstrates how different chemical properties of intermediate forms may strongly influence the biological activity of otherwise quite similar compounds.

  18. ANALYSIS OF PORCINE TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSE TO SALMONELLA ENTERICA SEROVAR CHOLERAESUIS SUGGESTS NOVEL TARGETS OF NFKAPPAB ARE ACTIVATED IN THE MESENTERIC LYMPH NODE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Affymetrix GeneChip® porcine genome array was used to identify differentially expressed genes in pig mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) responding to infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis (S. Choleraesuis) at acute (8 hours (h), 24h and 48h post-inoculation (pi)) and chronic stages (...

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Bacteriophage f18SE, Isolated in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Segovia, Cristopher; Vasquez, Ignacio; Maracaja-Coutinho, Vinicius; Robeson, James

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophage f18SE was isolated from poultry sewage in Olmue, Chile, and lytic activity was demonstrated against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and serovar Pullorum strains. This bacteriophage has a 41,868-bp double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) genome encoding 53 coding sequences (CDSs) and belongs to the family Siphoviridae, subfamily Jerseyvirinae. PMID:26450716

  20. Prevalence, numbers and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Salmonella serovars and Campylobacter spp. in retail poultry in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Lay, Kruy Sun; Vuthy, Yith; Song, Ping; Phol, Khem; Sarthou, Jean Louis

    2011-03-01

    Salmonella and Campylobacter are common bacterial pathogens associated with human gastro-enteritis; and raw poultry is considered to be an important source of these bacteria. To evaluate whether the Salmonella serovars and Campylobacter spp. bacteria could be monitored for the purpose of microbial presence, enumeration and antimicrobial resistance in raw poultry, 152 poultry carcasses were randomly selected from 10 markets in retail outlets of Phnom Penh during March 2006 to February 2007. The majority of poultry samples was contaminated by Salmonella serovars (88.2%) and Campylobacter spp. (80.9%). A very high contamination of Salmonella was found at 3-4 log₁₀ CFU/g for 22.4% of samples and of Campylobacter at 7-8 log₁₀ CFU/g for 1.3% of samples. Fifty nine different Salmonella serovars contaminated 134 poultry carcasses; five most prevalent serovars covered 29.1% of serovars isolates (Anatum, Typhimurium, Corvallis, Stanley and Enteritidis). Three Campylobacter species contaminating 123 raw poultry were Campylobacter jejuni (50.0%), Campylobacter coli (29.0%) and Campylobacter lari (21.0%). High antibiotic resistance percentages were found among Salmonella serovars and Campylobacter spp. isolates. This study revealed that raw poultry at the retail outlets in Phnom Penh markets are contaminated with high prevalences of food-borne pathogens, and communicating the importance of minimizing this risk in reducing human infections.

  1. Mutagenic activity of the 4,5- and 9,10-dihydrodiols of benzo[i]fluoranthene and their syn- and anti-dihydrodiol epoxides in Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, M.V. ); He, Z.M.; Weyand, E.H.; Rice, J.E.; LaVoie, E.J. )

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relative mutagenic activities of the major dihydrodiol metabolites of benzo[i]fluoranthene (B[i]F) and their corresponding syn- and anti-dihydrodiol epoxides. Salmonella typhimurium tester strains TA97a, TA98, and TA100 were used to evaluate the mutagenic potencies of the parent hydrocarbon and these suspect proximate and ultimate mutagenic metabolites. B[i]F and the trans-dihydrodiol metabolites were active only in the presence of an external metabolic activation system (S9) with the exception of the B[i]F-4,5-diol, which was weakly active in TA98 and TA100 in the absence of S9. The B[i]F-4,5-diol was more mutagenic than the B[i]F-9,10-diol in tester strains TA98 and TA100, whereas the opposite effect was observed in TA97a. In the absence of S9, the anti-B[i]F-4,5-diol epoxide was more mutagenic than the syn-B[i]F-4,5-diol epoxide and the syn- and anti-B[i]F-9,10-diol epoxides in tester strains TA97a and TA100. The exceptional mutagenic potency of the anti-B[i]F-4,5-diol epoxide in TA100 resembles that observed by epoxides located within a fjord, or by the anti-diol epoxides of bay region methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In contrast, the mutagenicity of the pseudo bay region dihydrodiol epoxides arising from the B[i]F-9,10-diol more closely resembles that observed with the classical bay region dihydrodiol epoxides of chrysene. In summary, both dihydrodiol metabolites of B[i]F are mutagenic in S. typhimurium, and the relative potency varies among the tester strains. The highest mutagenic response was achieved in tester strain TA100, which detects base-pair substitutions. The most potent direct-acting dihydrodiol epoxide in this tester strain was the anti-B[i]F-4,5-diol epoxide, which agrees with the results of mouse skin painting studies that indicate that the B[i]F-4,5-diol is more tumorigenic than the parent hydrocarbon or the B[i]F-9,10-diol. 34 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Salmonella DNA Adenine Methylase Mutants Elicit Protective Immune Responses to Homologous and Heterologous Serovars in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Dueger, E. L.; House, J. K.; Heithoff, D. M.; Mahan, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    Salmonella DNA adenine methylase (Dam) mutants that lack or overproduce Dam are highly attenuated for virulence in mice and confer protection against murine typhoid fever. To determine whether vaccines based on Dam are efficacious in poultry, a Salmonella Dam− vaccine was evaluated in the protection of chicken broilers against oral challenge with homologous and heterologous Salmonella serovars. A Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Dam− vaccine strain was attenuated for virulence in day-of-hatch chicks more than 100,000-fold. Vaccination of chicks elicited cross-protective immune responses, as evidenced by reduced colonization (10- to 10,000-fold) of the gastrointestinal tract (ileum, cecum, and feces) and visceral organs (bursa and spleen) after challenge with homologous (Typhimurium F98) and heterologous (Enteritidis 4973 and S. enterica O6,14,24: e,h-monophasic) Salmonella serovars that are implicated in Salmonella infection of poultry. The protection conferred was observed for the organ or the maximum CFU/tissue/bird as a unit of analysis, suggesting that Dam mutant strains may serve as the basis for the development of efficacious poultry vaccines for the containment of Salmonella. PMID:11705984

  3. Repression of flagella is a common trait in field isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin and is associated with invasive human infections.

    PubMed

    Yim, Lucía; Sasías, Sebastián; Martínez, Arací; Betancor, Laura; Estevez, Verónica; Scavone, Paola; Bielli, Alejandro; Sirok, Alfredo; Chabalgoity, José Alejandro

    2014-04-01

    The nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin is adapted to cattle but infrequently infects humans, very often resulting in invasive infections with high levels of morbidity and mortality. A Salmonella-induced intestinal acute inflammatory response is postulated as a mechanism to prevent bacterial dissemination to systemic sites. In S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, flagella contribute to this response by providing motility and FliC-mediated activation of pattern recognition receptors. In this study, we found 4 Salmonella enterica isolates, with the antigenic formula 9,12:-:-, that, based on fliC sequence and multilocus sequence type (MLST) analyses, are aflagellate S. Dublin isolates. Interestingly, all were obtained from human bloodstream infections. Thus, we investigated the potential role of flagella in the unusual invasiveness exhibited by S. Dublin in humans by analyzing flagellation and proinflammatory properties of a collection of 10 S. Dublin human clinical isolates. We found that 4 of 7 blood isolates were aflagellate due to significantly reduced levels of fliC expression, whereas all 3 isolates from other sources were flagellated. Lack of flagella correlated with a reduced ability of triggering interleukin-8 (IL-8) and CCL20 chemokine expression in human intestinal Caco-2 cells and with reduced early inflammation in the ceca of streptomycin-pretreated C57/BL6 mice. These results indicate that flagella contribute to the host intestinal inflammatory response to Salmonella serovar Dublin and suggest that their absence may contribute to its systemic dissemination through dampening of the gut immune response. Analysis of FliC production in a collection of cattle isolates indicated that the aflagellate phenotype is widely distributed in field isolates of S. Dublin.

  4. Repression of Flagella Is a Common Trait in Field Isolates of Salmonella enterica Serovar Dublin and Is Associated with Invasive Human Infections

    PubMed Central

    Sasías, Sebastián; Martínez, Arací; Betancor, Laura; Estevez, Verónica; Scavone, Paola; Bielli, Alejandro; Sirok, Alfredo; Chabalgoity, José Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin is adapted to cattle but infrequently infects humans, very often resulting in invasive infections with high levels of morbidity and mortality. A Salmonella-induced intestinal acute inflammatory response is postulated as a mechanism to prevent bacterial dissemination to systemic sites. In S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, flagella contribute to this response by providing motility and FliC-mediated activation of pattern recognition receptors. In this study, we found 4 Salmonella enterica isolates, with the antigenic formula 9,12:−:−, that, based on fliC sequence and multilocus sequence type (MLST) analyses, are aflagellate S. Dublin isolates. Interestingly, all were obtained from human bloodstream infections. Thus, we investigated the potential role of flagella in the unusual invasiveness exhibited by S. Dublin in humans by analyzing flagellation and proinflammatory properties of a collection of 10 S. Dublin human clinical isolates. We found that 4 of 7 blood isolates were aflagellate due to significantly reduced levels of fliC expression, whereas all 3 isolates from other sources were flagellated. Lack of flagella correlated with a reduced ability of triggering interleukin-8 (IL-8) and CCL20 chemokine expression in human intestinal Caco-2 cells and with reduced early inflammation in the ceca of streptomycin-pretreated C57/BL6 mice. These results indicate that flagella contribute to the host intestinal inflammatory response to Salmonella serovar Dublin and suggest that their absence may contribute to its systemic dissemination through dampening of the gut immune response. Analysis of FliC production in a collection of cattle isolates indicated that the aflagellate phenotype is widely distributed in field isolates of S. Dublin. PMID:24421045

  5. Coordinate Regulation of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI1) and SPI4 in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium▿

    PubMed Central

    Main-Hester, Kara L.; Colpitts, Katherine M.; Thomas, Gracie A.; Fang, Ferric C.; Libby, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium harbors five pathogenicity islands (SPI) required for infection in vertebrate hosts. Although the role of SPI1 in promoting epithelial invasion and proinflammatory cell death has been amply documented, SPI4 has only more recently been implicated in Salmonella virulence. SPI4 is a 24-kb pathogenicity island containing six open reading frames, siiA to siiF. Secretion of the 595-kDa SiiE protein requires a type I secretory system encoded by siiC, siiD, and siiF. An operon polarity suppressor (ops) sequence within the 5′ untranslated region upstream of siiA is required for optimal SPI4 expression and predicted to bind the antiterminator RfaH. SiiE concentrations are decreased in a SPI1 mutant strain, suggesting that SPI1 and SPI4 may have common regulatory inputs. SPI1 gene expression is positively regulated by the transcriptional activators HilA, HilC, and HilD, encoded within SPI1, and negatively regulated by the regulators HilE and PhoP. Here, we show that mutations in hilA, hilC, or hilD similarly reduce expression of siiE, and mutations in hilE or phoP enhance siiE expression. Individual overexpression of HilA, HilC, or HilD in the absence of SPI1 cannot activate siiE expression, suggesting that these transcriptional regulators act in concert or in combination with additional SPI1-encoded regulatory loci to activate SPI4. HilA is no longer required for siiE expression in an hns mutant strain, suggesting that HilA promotes SPI4 expression by antagonizing the global transcriptional silencer H-NS. Coordinate regulation suggests that SPI1 and SPI4 play complementary roles in the interaction of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium with the host intestinal mucosa. PMID:18160484

  6. Inactivation of Salmonella Senftenberg, Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Tennessee in peanut butter by 915 MHz microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Song, Won-Jae; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a 915 MHz microwave with 3 different levels to inactivate 3 serovars of Salmonella in peanut butter. Peanut butter inoculated with Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. enterica serovar Tennessee were treated with a 915 MHz microwave with 2, 4 and 6 kW and acid and peroxide values and color changes were determined after 5 min of microwave heating. Salmonella populations were reduced with increasing treatment time and treatment power. Six kW 915 MHz microwave treatment for 5 min reduced these three Salmonella serovars by 3.24-4.26 log CFU/g. Four and two kW 915 MHz microwave processing for 5 min reduced these Salmonella serovars by 1.14-1.48 and 0.15-0.42 log CFU/g, respectively. Microwave treatment did not affect acid, peroxide, or color values of peanut butter. These results demonstrate that 915 MHz microwave processing can be used as a control method for reducing Salmonella in peanut butter without producing quality deterioration.

  7. Copurification of Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona hemolysin and sphingomyelinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Bernheimer, A W; Bey, R F

    1986-01-01

    The hemolytic and sphingomyelinase C activities of supernatants of cultures of Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona tended to copurify when isoelectric fractionation was carried out. Both activities focused primarily at pH 8.1. Considered in conjunction with other circumstantial evidence, the results led to the conclusion that sphingomyelinase C is responsible for hemolysis. PMID:3019890

  8. Antibiotic resistance profiles of Salmonella serovars isolated from retail pork and chicken meat in North Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Thai, Truong Ha; Hirai, Takuya; Lan, Nguyen Thi; Yamaguchi, Ryoji

    2012-05-15

    The spread of antibiotic resistance via meat poses a serious public health concerns. During 2007-2009, a total of 586 retail meat samples (318 pork and 268 chicken meats) were collected from three provinces (Bac Ninh, Ha Noi and Ha Tay) of North Vietnam to determine the prevalence of Salmonella. Isolates were characterized by serotyping and antibiotic susceptibility testing. Approximately 39.6% (n=126) of pork and 42.9% (n=115) of chicken samples were Salmonella-positive, and 14 Salmonella serovars were identified. Anatum (15.8%) was the most common serovar, followed by Infantis (13.3%), Emek (10.4%), Derby and Rissen (9.5%), Typhimurium (9.1%), Reading (7.5%) and London (6.2%). The isolation frequency of serovars Enteritidis, Albany, Hadar, Weltevreden, Newport and Blockey ranged from 1.2%-5.8%. Resistance to at least one antibiotic agent was detected in 78.4% of isolates (n=189) and the most frequent resistance were to tetracycline (58.5%), sulphonamides (58.1%), streptomycin (47.3%), ampicillin (39.8%), chloramphenicol (37.3%), trimethoprim (34.0%) and nalidixic acid (27.8%). No Salmonella isolates were resistant to ceftazidime. Chicken isolates had higher resistance to antibiotic agents than pork isolates (P<0.05). It showed that 159 Salmonella isolates belong to the 14 serovars were multidrug resistant (MDR) and 50 MDR patterns were found. This study indicated that Salmonella serovars isolated from retail meat samples were resistant to multiple antibiotics and this resistance was widespread among different serovars. The widespread resistance may have arisen from misuse or overuse of antibiotics during animal husbandry in North Vietnam.

  9. Identification of Salmonella Typhimurium deubiquitinase SseL substrates by immunoaffinity enrichment and quantitative proteomic analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Sydor, Michael A.; Brown, Roslyn N.; ...

    2015-07-06

    Ubiquitination is a key protein post-translational modification that regulates many important cellular pathways and whose levels are regulated by equilibrium between the activities of ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinases. Here we present a method to identify specific deubiquitinase substrates based on treatment of cell lysates with recombinant enzymes, immunoaffinity purification and global quantitative proteomic analysis. As model system to identify substrates, we used a virulence-related deubiquitinase secreted by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium into the host cells, SseL. By using this approach two SseL substrates were identified in RAW 264.7 murine macrophage-like cell line, S100A6 and het-erogeneous nuclear ribonuclear protein K, inmore » addition to the previously reported K63-linked ubiquitin chains. These substrates were further validated by a combination of enzymatic and binding assays. Finally, this method can be used for the systematic identification of substrates of deubiquitinases from other organisms and applied to study their functions in physiology and disease.« less

  10. Identification of Salmonella Typhimurium deubiquitinase SseL substrates by immunoaffinity enrichment and quantitative proteomic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Sydor, Michael A.; Brown, Roslyn N.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Sobreira, Tiago; Slysz, Gordon W.; Humphrys, Daniel R.; Skarina, Tatiana; Onoprienko, Olena; Di Leo, Rosa; Kaiser, Brooke L. Deatherage; Li, Jie; Ansong, Charles; Cambronne, Eric; Smith, Richard D.; Savchenko, Alexei; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2015-07-06

    Ubiquitination is a key protein post-translational modification that regulates many important cellular pathways and whose levels are regulated by equilibrium between the activities of ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinases. Here we present a method to identify specific deubiquitinase substrates based on treatment of cell lysates with recombinant enzymes, immunoaffinity purification and global quantitative proteomic analysis. As model system to identify substrates, we used a virulence-related deubiquitinase secreted by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium into the host cells, SseL. By using this approach two SseL substrates were identified in RAW 264.7 murine macrophage-like cell line, S100A6 and het-erogeneous nuclear ribonuclear protein K, in addition to the previously reported K63-linked ubiquitin chains. These substrates were further validated by a combination of enzymatic and binding assays. Finally, this method can be used for the systematic identification of substrates of deubiquitinases from other organisms and applied to study their functions in physiology and disease.

  11. Analysis of the Salmonella typhimurium Proteome through Environmental Response toward Infectious Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, Joshua N.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Gustin, Jean K.; Rue, Joanne; Clauss, Therese RW; Purvine, Samuel O.; Rodland, Karin D.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (aka, S. typhimurium) is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes ~40,000 reported cases of acute gastroenteritis and diarrhea a year in the United States. To develop a deeper understanding of the infectious state of S. typhimurium, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based “bottom-up” proteomics was used to globally analyze the proteins present under specific growth conditions. Salmonella typhimurium LT2 strain cells were grown in contrasting culture conditions that mimicked both natural free-living conditions and an infectious state, i.e., logarithm phase, stationary phase and Mg-depleted medium growth. Initial comparisons of the LT2 strain protein abundances among cell culture conditions indicate that the majority of proteins do not change significantly. Not unexpectedly, cells grown in Mg-depleted medium conditions had a higher abundance of Mg2+ transport proteins than found in other growth conditions. A second more virulent Salmonella typhimurium strain (14028) was also studied with these growth conditions and used to directly compare to the LT2 strain. The strain comparison offers a unique opportunity to compare and contrast observations in these closely related bacteria. One particular protein family, propanediol utilization proteins, was drastically more abundant in the 14028 strain than in the LT2 strain, and may be a contributor to increased pathogenicity in the 14028 strain.

  12. Effect of Holarrhena antidysentrica (Ha) and Andrographis paniculata (Ap) on the biofilm formation and cell membrane integrity of opportunistic pathogen Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Tanwar, Ankit; Chawla, Raman; Chakotiya, Ankita Singh; Thakur, Pallavi; Goel, Rajeev; Basu, Mitra; Arora, Rajesh; Khan, Haider Ali

    2016-12-01

    Increasing occurrence of gastroenteritis outbreaks caused by food borne opportunistic microorganisms has become a major problem in food industry as well as in immunocompromised host. Antimicrobial agents are losing their efficacy due to increase in the microbial resistance. For such reasons, conventional treatment has become limited to manage the infections state. Need of the hour is to instigate the search for safer holistic alternatives. The present study was hence conducted to assess the antibiofilm effect and mode of action of aquo alcoholic extracts of Holarrhena antidysentrica (Ha) and Andrographis paniculata (Ap) against the Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium. Both the extracts were screened for the presence of phytocompounds followed by the characterization using Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) infrared spectroscopy and bioactivity finger print analysis. Anti-biofilm assays were determined to test the potential of both extracts to inhibit the biofilm formation, while Propidium Iodide (PI) uptake analysis revealed that cell membrane was damaged by the exposure of nutraceuticals for 1 h. This study has demonstrated that both nutraceuticals have anti-biofilm and antimicrobial activity perturbing the membrane integrity of food-borne S. typhimurium and could be used as curative remedy to control the food borne microbial infection.

  13. Multiresistant Salmonella enterica serovar 4,[5],12:i:- in Europe: a new pandemic strain?

    PubMed

    Hopkins, K L; Kirchner, M; Guerra, B; Granier, S A; Lucarelli, C; Porrero, M C; Jakubczak, A; Threlfall, E J; Mevius, D J

    2010-06-03

    A marked increase in the prevalence of S. enterica serovar 4,[5],12:i:- with resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, sulphonamides and tetracyclines (R-type ASSuT) has been noted in food-borne infections and in pigs/pig meat in several European countries in the last ten years. One hundred and sixteen strains of S. enterica serovar 4,[5],12:i:- from humans, pigs and pig meat isolated in England and Wales, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Spain and the Netherlands were further subtyped by phage typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis to investigate the genetic relationship among strains. PCR was performed to identify the fljB flagellar gene and the genes encoding resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, sulphonamides and tetracyclines. Class 1 and 2 integrase genes were also sought. Results indicate that genetically related serovar 4,[5],12:i:- strains of definitive phage types DT193 and DT120 with ampicillin, streptomycin, sulphonamide and tetracycline resistance encoded by blaTEM, strA-strB, sul2 and tet(B) have emerged in several European countries, with pigs the likely reservoir of infection. Control measures are urgently needed to reduce spread of infection to humans via the food chain and thereby prevent the possible pandemic spread of serovar 4,[5],12:i:- of R-type ASSuT as occurred with S. Typhimurium DT104 during the 1990s.

  14. Salmonella typhimurium mediated delivery of Apoptin in human laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Guan, Guo-fang; Zhao, Ming; Liu, Li-ming; Jin, Chun-shun; Sun, Kai; Zhang, De-jun; Yu, Duo-jiao; Cao, Hong-wei; Lu, Yan-qing; Wen, Lian-ji

    2013-01-01

    An effective cancer therapeutic should target tumours specifically with limited systemic toxicity. Here, we transformed an attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) with an Apoptin expressing plasmid into a human laryngeal carcinoma cell line. The expression of the inserted gene was measured using fluorescence and immunoblotting assays. The attenuated S. typhimurium-mediated Apoptin significantly decreased cytotoxicity and strongly increased cell apoptosis through the activation of caspase-3. The process was mediated by Bax, cytochrome c and caspase-9. A syngeneic nude murine tumour model was used to determine the anti-tumour effects of the recombinant bacteria in vivo. Systemic injection of the recombinant bacteria with and without re-dosing caused significant tumour growth delay and reduced tumour microvessel density, thereby extending host survival. Our findings indicated that the use of recombinant Salmonella typhimurium as an Apoptin expression vector has potential cancer therapeutic benefits.

  15. Antibiotic resistance and diversity of Salmonella enterica serovars associated with broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Diarra, Moussa Sory; Delaquis, Pascal; Rempel, Heidi; Bach, Susan; Harlton, Colleen; Aslam, Mueen; Pritchard, Jane; Topp, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the antibiotic resistance phenotype and genotype of Salmonella isolated from broiler production facilities. A total of 193 Salmonella isolates recovered from commercial farms in British Columbia, Canada, were evaluated. Susceptibility to antibiotics was determined with the Sensititre system. Virulence and antibiotic resistance genes were detected by PCR assay. Genetic diversity was determined by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing. Seventeen serovars of Salmonella were identified. The most prevalent Salmonella serovars were Kentucky (29.0% of isolates), Typhimurium (23.8%), Enteritidis (13.5%), and Hadar (11.9%); serovars Heidelberg, Brandenburg, and Thompson were identified in 7.7, 4.1, and 3.6% of isolates, respectively. More than 43% of the isolates were simultaneously resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ceftiofur, cefoxitim, and ceftriaxone. This β-lactam resistance pattern was observed in 33 (58.9%) of the Salmonella Kentucky isolates; 2 of these isolates were also resistant to chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, and tetracycline. Genes associated with resistance to aminoglycosides (aadA1, aadA2, and strA), β-lactams (blaCMY-2, blaSHV, and blaTEM), tetracycline (tetA and tetB), and sulfonamide (sul1) were detected among corresponding resistant isolates. The invasin gene (invA) and the Salmonella plasmid virulence gene (spvC) were found in 97.9 and 25.9% of the isolates, respectively, with 33 (71.7%) of the 46 Salmonella Typhimurium isolates and 17 (65.4%) of the 26 Salmonella Enteritidis isolates carrying both invA and spvC. PGFE typing revealed that the antibiotic-resistant serovars were genetically diverse. These data confirm that broiler chickens can be colonized by genetically diverse antibiotic-resistant Salmonella isolates harboring virulence determinants. The presence of such strains is highly relevant to food safety and public health.

  16. Prevalence of Salmonella Isolates from Chicken and Pig Slaughterhouses and Emergence of Ciprofloxacin and Cefotaxime Co-Resistant S. enterica Serovar Indiana in Henan, China

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Li; Lan, Ruiting; Zhang, Xiuli; Cui, Shenghui; Xu, Jin; Guo, Yunchang; Li, Fengqin; Zhang, Ding

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of Salmonella from chicken and pig slaughterhouses in Henan, China and antimicrobial susceptibility of these isolates to antibiotics was determined. From 283 chicken samples and 240 pig samples collected, 128 and 70 Salmonella isolates were recovered with an isolation rate of 45.2 and 29.2% respectively. The predominant serovars in chicken samples were S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, S. enterica serovar Hadar and S. enterica serovar Indiana, while those in pig samples were S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, S. enterica serovar Derby and S. enterica serovar Enteritidis. Resistance to ciprofloxacin was 8.6 and 10.0% for isolates from chickens and pigs respectively, whereas re