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Sample records for severe alcohol dependence

  1. THE SEVERITY OF ALCOHOL DEPENDENCE DATA QUESTIONNAIRE : MODIFICATION AND VALIDATION

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, John; Chandrasekaran, R.

    1997-01-01

    With introduction of the concept of alcohol dependence syndrome, scales specifically to measure dependence were developed and used in clinical and research settings. 12 questions from The Severity of Alcohol Dependence Data Questionnaire were translated into the Iccal language and was administered to 70 patients referred to the deaddiction centre. The translated version showed good evidence of internal validity, criterion validity and external validity. PMID:21584036

  2. Childhood trauma exposure and alcohol dependence severity in adulthood: mediation by emotional abuse severity and neuroticism.

    PubMed

    Schwandt, Melanie L; Heilig, Markus; Hommer, Daniel W; George, David T; Ramchandani, Vijay A

    2013-06-01

    Childhood trauma has been linked with a number of negative outcomes later in life, including alcohol dependence (AD). Previous studies have suggested a mediating role for neuroticism in the relationship between childhood trauma and psychopathology. In this study, we investigate the prevalence of multiple types of childhood trauma in treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent patients, and the associations between childhood trauma and AD severity using multiple mediation analysis. The prevalence of 5 types of childhood trauma-emotional abuse, sexual abuse, physical abuse, emotional neglect, and physical neglect-was assessed in treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent patients (n = 280) and healthy controls (n = 137) using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Multiple mediation analyses were used to model associations between childhood trauma measures and alcohol-related outcomes, primarily the severity of AD in the alcohol-dependent sample. Childhood trauma was significantly more prevalent and more severe in the alcohol-dependent subjects. In addition, childhood trauma was found to influence AD severity, an effect that was mediated by neuroticism. When individual trauma types were examined, emotional abuse was found to be the primary predictor of AD severity, both directly and through the mediating effects of the impulsivity subfacet of neuroticism. Physical abuse also had a moderate direct effect on AD severity. Mediation analysis did not reveal any association between childhood trauma and Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test score in the nondependent control sample. Childhood trauma is highly prevalent in treatment-seeking alcoholics and may play a significant role in the development and severity of AD through an internalizing pathway involving negative affect. Our findings suggest that alcoholics with a history of childhood emotional abuse may be particularly vulnerable to severe dependence. Copyright © 2012 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  3. Cue Reactivity Is Associated with Duration and Severity of Alcohol Dependence: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Sjoerds, Zsuzsika; van den Brink, Wim; Beekman, Aartjan T. F.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Veltman, Dick J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction With the progression of substance dependence, drug cue-related brain activation is thought to shift from motivational towards habit pathways. However, a direct association between cue-induced brain activation and dependence duration has not yet been shown. We therefore examined the relationship between alcohol cue-reactivity in the brain, cue-induced subjective craving and alcohol dependence duration and severity. Since alcohol dependence is highly comorbid with depression/anxiety, which may modulate brain responses to alcohol cues, we also examined the relation between comorbid depression/anxiety and cue-reactivity. Methods We compared 30 alcohol dependent patients with 15 healthy controls and 15 depression/anxiety patients during a visual alcohol cue-reactivity task using functional magnetic resonance imaging blood oxygenated level-dependent responses and subjective craving as outcomes. Within the alcohol dependent group we correlated cue-reactivity with alcohol dependence severity and duration, with cue-induced craving and with depression/anxiety levels. Results Alcohol dependent patients showed greater cue-reactivity in motivational brain pathways and stronger subjective craving than depression/anxiety patients and healthy controls. Depression/anxiety was not associated with cue-reactivity, but depression severity in alcohol dependent patients was positively associated with craving. Within alcohol dependence, longer duration of alcohol dependence was associated with stronger cue-related activation of the posterior putamen, a structure involved in habits, whereas higher alcohol dependence severity was associated with lower cue-reactivity in the anterior putamen, an area implicated in goal-directed behavior preceding habit formation. Conclusion Cue-reactivity in alcohol dependence is not modulated by comorbid depression or anxiety. More importantly, the current data confirm the hypothesis of a ventral to dorsal striatal shift of learning processes

  4. Age of Alcohol-Dependence Onset: Associations with Severity of Dependence and Seeking Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hingson, Ralph W.; Heeren, Timothy; Winter, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: We explored whether people who become alcohol dependent at younger ages are more likely to seek alcohol-related help or treatment or experience chronic relapsing dependence. Methods: In 2001-2002 the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism completed a face-to-face interview survey with a multistage probability sample of 43…

  5. DOUBLE-BLIND, RANDOMIZED PLACEBO-CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIAL OF BENFOTIAMINE FOR SEVERE ALCOHOL DEPENDENCE

    PubMed Central

    Manzardo, Ann M.; He, Jianghua; Poje, Albert; Penick, Elizabeth C.; Campbell, Jan; Butler, Merlin G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Alcohol dependence is associated with severe nutritional and vitamin deficiency. Vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiency erodes neurological pathways that may influence the ability to drink in moderation. The present study examines tolerability of supplementation using the high-potency thiamine analogue, benfotiamine (BF), and BF’s effects on alcohol consumption in severely affected, self-identified, alcohol dependent subjects. Methods A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted on 120 non-treatment seeking, actively drinking, alcohol dependent men and women volunteers (mean age=47 years) from the Kansas City area who met DSM-IV-TR criteria current alcohol dependence. Subjects were randomized to receive 600 mg benfotiamine or placebo (PL) once daily by mouth for 24 weeks with 6 follow-up assessments scheduled at 4 week intervals. Side effects and daily alcohol consumption were recorded. Results Seventy (58%) subjects completed 24 weeks of study (N=21 women; N=49 men) with overall completion rates of 55% (N=33) for PL and 63% (N=37) for BF groups. No significant adverse events were noted and alcohol consumption decreased significantly for both treatment groups. Alcohol consumption decreased from baseline levels for 9 of 10 BF treated women after 1 month of treatment compared with 2 of 11 on PL. Reductions in total alcohol consumption over 6 months were significantly greater for BF treated women (BF: N=10, −611±380 Std Dev; PL: N=11, −159±562 Std Dev, p-value=0.02). Conclusions BF supplementation of actively drinking alcohol dependent men and women was well-tolerated and may discourage alcohol consumption among women. The results do support expanded studies of BF treatment in alcoholism. PMID:23992649

  6. Relationship Between Emotional Processing, Drinking Severity and Relapse in Adults Treated for Alcohol Dependence in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Kopera, Maciej; Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Suszek, Hubert; Glass, Jennifer M.; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Wnorowska, Anna; Brower, Kirk J.; Wojnar, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Growing data reveals deficits in perception, understanding and regulation of emotions in alcohol dependence (AD). The study objective was to explore the relationships between emotional processing, drinking history and relapse in a clinical sample of alcohol-dependent patients. Methods: A group of 80 inpatients entering an alcohol treatment program in Warsaw, Poland was recruited and assessed at baseline and follow-up after 12 months. Baseline information about demographics, psychopathological symptoms, personality and severity of alcohol problems was obtained. The Schutte Self-Report Emotional Intelligence (EI) Test and Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS) were utilized for emotional processing assessment. Follow-up information contained data on drinking alcohol during the last month. Results: At baseline assessment, the duration of alcohol drinking was associated with lower ability to utilize emotions. Patients reporting more difficulties with describing feelings drank more during their last episode of heavy drinking, and had a longer duration of intensive alcohol use. A longer duration of the last episode of heavy drinking was associated with more problems identifying and regulating emotions. Poor utilization of emotions and high severity of depressive symptoms contributed to higher rates of drinking at follow-up. Conclusions: These results underline the importance of systematic identification of discrete emotional problems and dynamics related to AD. This knowledge has implications for treatment. Psychotherapeutic interventions to improve emotional skills could be utilized in treatment of alcohol-dependent patients. PMID:25543129

  7. Insomnia in Alcohol Dependent Subjects is Associated with Greater Psychosocial Problem Severity

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Ninad S.; Kampman, Kyle M.; Kranzler, Henry R.; Grandner, Michael A.; Debbarma, Swarnalata; Chakravorty, Subhajit

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although psychosocial problems are commonly associated with both alcohol misuse and insomnia, very little is known about the combined effects of insomnia and current alcohol dependence on the severity of psychosocial problems. The present study evaluates whether the co-occurrence of insomnia and alcohol dependence is associated with greater psychosocial problem severity. Methods Alcohol dependent individuals (N=123) were evaluated prior to participation in a placebo-controlled medication trial. The Short Index of Problems (SIP), Addiction Severity Index (ASI), Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), and Time Line Follow Back (TLFB), were used to assess psychosocial, employment, and legal problems; insomnia symptoms; and alcohol consumption, respectively. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to evaluate the relations between insomnia and psychosocial problems. Results Subjects’ mean age was 44 years (SD=10.3), 83% were male, and their SIP sub-scale scores approximated the median for normative data. A quarter of subjects reported no insomnia; 29% reported mild insomnia; and 45% reported moderate-severe insomnia. The insomnia groups did not differ on alcohol consumption measures. The ISI total score was associated with the SIP total scale score (β=0.23, p=0.008). Subjects with moderate-severe insomnia had significantly higher scores on the SIP total score, and on the social and impulse control sub-scales, and more ASI employment problems and conflicts with their spouses than others on the ASI. Conclusion In treatment-seeking alcohol dependent subjects, insomnia may increase alcohol-related adverse psychosocial consequences. Longitudinal studies are needed to clarify the relations between insomnia and psychosocial problems in these subjects. PMID:26151580

  8. Validity evidence, sensibility and specificity of the severity dimension of the SDSS alcohol dependence scale.

    PubMed

    Vélez-Moreno, Antonio; Lozano, Óscar M; Fernández-Calderón, Fermín; Rojas, Antonio J; Sayans-Jiménez, Pablo; González-Saiz, Francisco; Ramírez López, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic success in the treatment of alcohol use disorders highly depends on an appropriate diagnosis. The Substance Dependence Severity Scale –SDSS- is a scale that assesses substance dependence in dimensional terms and that follows the diagnostic criteria established by the international classification systems. The aim of this study is to provide validity evidence for the severity dimension of the alcohol dependence scale of the SDSS comparing it with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview –MINI-, and others variables related to substance use included in the EuropASI. A total of 109 patients admitted for treatment in the Drug Abuse Center Services of Huelva who had used alcohol in the month previous to the interview participated. The SDSS, MINI and EuropASI were administered. The diagnostic capacity of the SDSS was assessed by Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, taking the MINI dependence diagnosis as standard. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.917 (CI=0.867-0.968). The trade-off between parameters was detected for a score of 9, with suitable values of sensitivity and specificity (83.58% and 83.72%). The results support the use of the SDSS for the diagnosis of alcohol dependence and for assessment the severity of dependence. Administration of this scale makes it possible to obtain information, with a single score, on how severe the disorder is and whether the dependence criteria have been met.

  9. Similar withdrawal severity in adolescents and adults in a rat model of alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Morris, S A; Kelso, M L; Liput, D J; Marshall, S A; Nixon, K

    2010-02-01

    Alcohol use during adolescence leads to increased risk of developing an alcohol use disorder (AUD) during adulthood. Converging evidence suggests that this period of enhanced vulnerability for developing an AUD may be due to the adolescent's unique sensitivity and response to alcohol. Adolescent rats have been shown to be less sensitive to alcohol intoxication and withdrawal susceptibility; however, age differences in ethanol pharmacokinetics may underlie these effects. Therefore, this study investigated alcohol intoxication behavior and withdrawal severity using a modified Majchrowicz model of alcohol dependence that has been shown to result in similar blood ethanol concentrations (BECs) despite age differences. Adolescent (postnatal day, PND, 35) and adult rats (PND 70+) received ethanol according to this 4-day binge paradigm and were observed for withdrawal behavior for 17h. As expected, adolescents showed decreased sensitivity to alcohol-induced CNS depression as evidenced by significantly lower intoxication scores. Thus, adolescents received significantly more ethanol each day (12.3+/-0.1g/kg/day) than adults (9.2+/-0.2g/kg/day). Despite greater ethanol dosing in adolescent rats, both adolescent and adult groups had comparable peak BECs (344.5+/-10.2 and 338.5+/-7.8mg/dL, respectively). Strikingly, withdrawal severity was similar quantitatively and qualitatively between adolescent and adult rats. Further, this is the first time that withdrawal behavior has been reported for adolescent rats using this model of alcohol dependence. A second experiment confirmed the similarity in BECs at various time points across the binge. These results demonstrate that after consideration of ethanol pharmacokinetics between adults and adolescents by using a model that produces similar BECs, withdrawal severity is nearly identical. This study, in combination with previous reports on ethanol withdrawal in adolescents and adults, suggests only a BEC-dependent effect of ethanol on

  10. Neuropsychological Impairment and Relapse Following Inpatient Detoxification in Severe Alcohol Dependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Fraser

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between neuropsychological impairment in severe alcohol dependence and relapse. This was assessed following inpatient detoxification over a period of three months. Participants were tested on measures of neuropsychological functioning at the end of a seven to ten day stay in an inpatient alcohol…

  11. Neuropsychological Impairment and Relapse Following Inpatient Detoxification in Severe Alcohol Dependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Fraser

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between neuropsychological impairment in severe alcohol dependence and relapse. This was assessed following inpatient detoxification over a period of three months. Participants were tested on measures of neuropsychological functioning at the end of a seven to ten day stay in an inpatient alcohol…

  12. Reliability and Validity of the Turkish Version of the Addiction Severity Index in Male Alcohol Dependents

    PubMed Central

    DEMİRBAŞ, Hatice; ÖZGÜR İLHAN, İnci; DOĞAN, Yıldırım Beyatlı; CANATAN, Ayşe

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to evaluate the psychometric characteristics of the Turkish translation of the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) in 115 male alcohol-dependent patients. Method The reliability of the instrument was assessed by measuring test-retest, interrater and internal reliabilities. In the validity analysis, the correlation coefficients between corresponding severity ratings and composite scores of each subscale and concurrent validity were assessed. Moreover, the discriminant validity and concurrent validity scores were calculated. Results The test-retest reliability of the ASI scores ranged from .79 to .91. The interrater reliability assigned by three raters was high (.74 to .99). Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for internal consistency was .85 for all scales, and it varied between .64 and .77 for the subscales. The Beck Depression Inventory moderately correlated with the Psychatric status, and the MacAndrew Alcoholism Scale correlated with the Alcohol and Drug Use subscales of the Addiction Severity Index (ASI). The correlation coefficient was .91 for the alcohol use subscale. Conclusion The results obtained in this study suggest that the Turkish version of the ASI could be used as a reliable and valid instrument in alcohol-dependent patients.

  13. [Severity of alcohol dependence and social functioning of male patients with alcoholism. I. Functioning in the sharing of marital roles].

    PubMed

    Dabkowski, M; Rogiewicz, M; Ziółkowski, M; Rybakowski, J

    1989-01-01

    The relations between social functioning and severity of alcohol dependence of 40 male patients from Dependence Treatment Ward in Bydgoszcz were studied. Using the MAST, CAGE, and self clinical scale the cohort was divided into two groups: less and more severe dependent probands. The demographic and social data of patients from both groups did not differ significantly. Social functiong was evaluated by use the Scale of Social Roles taking into consideration the set of marital roles (with basic roles of sexual partner, friend, guardian, and family support). The disposition to perform the role, privileges, fulfilling the duties, activity, and harmonization of the role were estimated in each of the role mentioned above and in every patient. It was shown that subjects more dependent on alcohol are significantly less active in the role of sexual partner and in support of family, as well as are less effective in performing such roles and are more egoistic in the role of sexual partner than men less dependent on alcohol. No differences were found in other roles among studied groups. The revealed differences were discussed in the aspect of psychologica and interactive hanges in marital couple.

  14. Gender differences in relationships among PTSD severity, drinking motives, and alcohol use in a comorbid alcohol dependence and PTSD sample.

    PubMed

    Lehavot, Keren; Stappenbeck, Cynthia A; Luterek, Jane A; Kaysen, Debra; Simpson, Tracy L

    2014-03-01

    Alcohol dependence (AD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are highly prevalent and comorbid conditions associated with a significant level of impairment. Little systematic study has focused on gender differences specific to individuals with both AD and PTSD. The current study examined gender-specific associations between PTSD symptom severity, drinking to cope (i.e., reduce negative affect), drinking for enhancement (i.e., increase positive affect), and average alcohol use in a clinical sample of men (n = 46) and women (n = 46) with comorbid AD and PTSD. Results indicated that PTSD symptoms were highly associated with drinking-to-cope motives for both men and women, but with greater drinking for enhancement motives for men only. Enhancement motives were positively associated with average alcohol quantity for both men and women, but coping motives were significantly associated with average alcohol quantity for women only. These findings suggest that for individuals with comorbid AD and PTSD, interventions that focus on reducing PTSD symptoms are likely to lower coping motives for both genders, and targeting coping motives is likely to result in decreased drinking for women but not for men, whereas targeting enhancement motives is likely to lead to reduced drinking for both genders.

  15. Family dysfunction differentially affects alcohol and methamphetamine dependence: a view from the Addiction Severity Index in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Nagisa; Haraguchi, Ayako; Ogai, Yasukazu; Senoo, Eiichi; Higuchi, Susumu; Umeno, Mitsuru; Aikawa, Yuzo; Ikeda, Kazutaka

    2011-10-01

    We investigated the differential influence of family dysfunction on alcohol and methamphetamine dependence in Japan using the Addiction Severity Index (ASI), a useful instrument that multilaterally measures the severity of substance dependence. The participants in this study were 321 male patients with alcohol dependence and 68 male patients with methamphetamine dependence. We conducted semi-structured interviews with each patient using the ASI, which is designed to assess problem severity in seven functional domains: Medical, Employment/Support, Alcohol use, Drug use, Legal, Family/Social relationships, and Psychiatric. In patients with alcohol dependence, bad relationships with parents, brothers and sisters, and friends in their lives were related to current severe psychiatric problems. Bad relationships with brothers and sisters and partners in their lives were related to current severe employment/support problems, and bad relationships with partners in their lives were related to current severe family/social problems. The current severity of psychiatric problems was related to the current severity of drug use and family/social problems in patients with alcohol dependence. Patients with methamphetamine dependence had difficulty developing good relationships with their father. Furthermore, the current severity of psychiatric problems was related to the current severity of medical, employment/support, and family/social problems in patients with methamphetamine dependence. The results of this study suggest that family dysfunction differentially affects alcohol and methamphetamine dependence. Additionally, family relationships may be particularly related to psychiatric problems in these patients, although the ASI was developed to independently evaluate each of seven problem areas.

  16. Intestinal permeability, gut-bacterial dysbiosis, and behavioral markers of alcohol-dependence severity.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Sophie; Matamoros, Sébastien; Cani, Patrice D; Neyrinck, Audrey M; Jamar, François; Stärkel, Peter; Windey, Karen; Tremaroli, Valentina; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Verbeke, Kristin; de Timary, Philippe; Delzenne, Nathalie M

    2014-10-21

    Alcohol dependence has traditionally been considered a brain disorder. Alteration in the composition of the gut microbiota has recently been shown to be present in psychiatric disorders, which suggests the possibility of gut-to-brain interactions in the development of alcohol dependence. The aim of the present study was to explore whether changes in gut permeability are linked to gut-microbiota composition and activity in alcohol-dependent subjects. We also investigated whether gut dysfunction is associated with the psychological symptoms of alcohol dependence. Finally, we tested the reversibility of the biological and behavioral parameters after a short-term detoxification program. We found that some, but not all, alcohol-dependent subjects developed gut leakiness, which was associated with higher scores of depression, anxiety, and alcohol craving after 3 wk of abstinence, which may be important psychological factors of relapse. Moreover, subjects with increased gut permeability also had altered composition and activity of the gut microbiota. These results suggest the existence of a gut-brain axis in alcohol dependence, which implicates the gut microbiota as an actor in the gut barrier and in behavioral disorders. Thus, the gut microbiota seems to be a previously unidentified target in the management of alcohol dependence.

  17. Intestinal permeability, gut-bacterial dysbiosis, and behavioral markers of alcohol-dependence severity

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, Sophie; Matamoros, Sébastien; Cani, Patrice D.; Neyrinck, Audrey M.; Jamar, François; Stärkel, Peter; Windey, Karen; Tremaroli, Valentina; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Verbeke, Kristin; de Timary, Philippe; Delzenne, Nathalie M.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol dependence has traditionally been considered a brain disorder. Alteration in the composition of the gut microbiota has recently been shown to be present in psychiatric disorders, which suggests the possibility of gut-to-brain interactions in the development of alcohol dependence. The aim of the present study was to explore whether changes in gut permeability are linked to gut-microbiota composition and activity in alcohol-dependent subjects. We also investigated whether gut dysfunction is associated with the psychological symptoms of alcohol dependence. Finally, we tested the reversibility of the biological and behavioral parameters after a short-term detoxification program. We found that some, but not all, alcohol-dependent subjects developed gut leakiness, which was associated with higher scores of depression, anxiety, and alcohol craving after 3 wk of abstinence, which may be important psychological factors of relapse. Moreover, subjects with increased gut permeability also had altered composition and activity of the gut microbiota. These results suggest the existence of a gut–brain axis in alcohol dependence, which implicates the gut microbiota as an actor in the gut barrier and in behavioral disorders. Thus, the gut microbiota seems to be a previously unidentified target in the management of alcohol dependence. PMID:25288760

  18. Nicotine dependence severity as a cross-sectional predictor of alcohol-related problems in a sample of adolescent smokers

    PubMed Central

    Schepis, Ty S.; Cavallo, Dana A.; McFetridge, Amanda K.; Liss, Thomas B.; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Given the prevalence of alcohol use among adolescents and its negative consequences, it is important to learn more about correlates of alcohol-related problems in this population. Cigarette smoking appears to be associated with alcohol-related problems in adolescents. The purpose of this study was to assess cigarettes smoked per day and nicotine dependence (ND) severity as predictors of alcohol-related problems in cross-sectional models, using data from a smoking cessation clinical trial for adolescents. Method: Data obtained at intake were used to assess smoking-related variables as cross-sectional predictors of alcohol-related problems in models along with drinks per week and key demographics, using hierarchical multiple regression. Results: ND severity, as measured using the modified Fagerström Tolerance Questionnaire, significantly predicted alcohol-related problems, both when this score included and did not include an item concerning cigarettes smoked per day. A separate continuous item capturing cigarettes per day did not predict alcohol-related problems. Discussion: ND severity predicted alcohol-related problems in cross-sectional regression models, holding constant alcohol consumption and key demographics. This suggests that ND severity may be a clinical indicator of alcohol-related problems among adolescent smokers. To our knowledge, this is the first analysis of associations between smoking and alcohol involvement in a sample of adolescent smokers participating in a clinical trial. PMID:20231243

  19. Residential detoxification: essential for marginalised, severely alcohol- and drug-dependent individuals.

    PubMed

    Silins, Edmund; Sannibale, Claudia; Larney, Sarah; Wodak, Alex; Mattick, Richard

    2008-07-01

    In an era of health care rationalisation, residential detoxification services catering for drug- and alcohol-dependent homeless people are being closed. The principal findings of a recent evaluation of a non-medicated residential detoxification service are presented. The aims were to describe the characteristics of residents, their experience of admission, rates of withdrawal completion, referral patterns, staff and key informant perceptions of the service and its role within the wider treatment system. A process evaluation was utilised incorporating interviews with residents (n = 80) and key informants (n = 13); a survey of all service staff (n = 10); and demographic and clinical data for all residents (n = 392) admitted over one calendar year. Results. Residents were heavily substance-dependent and marginalised, with many exhibiting substantial mental and physical health impairments. Polydrug use and frequent prior engagement with drug and alcohol services were common. The majority completed withdrawal and were referred to further treatment. Residents who presented for heroin and other opiate withdrawal were more likely than other residents to leave before completing treatment (odds ratio 2.47, 95% confidence interval 1.48 - 4.15). Information from key informants, service staff and residents converged in underscoring the important role performed by the service. Out-patient detoxification for homeless and severely drug- and alcohol-dependent populations is unrealistic. For this group, access to residential detoxification is vital as it provides an environment where potentially serious medical and psychological complications can be managed. There continues to be a clear role for supervised withdrawal in such a setting.

  20. Family-based association analysis of alcohol dependence criteria and severity

    PubMed Central

    Wetherill, Leah; Kapoor, Manav; Agrawal, Arpana; Bucholz, Kathleen; Koller, Daniel; Bertelsen, Sarah E.; Le, Nhung; Wang, Jen-Chyong; Almasy, Laura; Hesselbrock, Victor; Kramer, John; Nurnberger, John I.; Schuckit, Marc; Tischfield, Jay A.; Xuei, Xiaoling; Porjesz, Bernice; Edenberg, Howard J.; Goate, Alison M.; Foroud, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the high heritability of alcohol dependence (AD), the genes found to be associated with it account for only a small proportion of its total variability. The goal of this study was to identify and analyze phenotypes based on homogeneous classes of individuals to increase the power to detect genetic risk factors contributing to the risk of AD. Methods The 7 individual DSM-IV criteria for AD were analyzed using latent class analysis (LCA) to identify classes defined by the pattern of endorsement of the criteria. A genome-wide association study was performed in 118 extended European American families (n = 2,322 individuals) densely affected with AD to identify genes associated with AD, with each of the seven DSM-IV criteria, and with the probability of belonging to two of three latent classes. Results Heritability for DSM-IV AD was 61%, and ranged from 17-60% for the other phenotypes. A SNP in the olfactory receptor OR51L1 was significantly associated (7.3 × 10−8) with the DSM-IV criterion of persistent desire to, or inability to, cut down on drinking. LCA revealed a three-class model: the “low risk” class (50%) rarely endorsed any criteria, and none met criteria for AD; the “moderate risk” class (33) endorsed primarily 4 DSM-IV criteria, and 48% met criteria for AD; the “high risk” class (17%) manifested high endorsement probabilities for most criteria and nearly all (99%) met criteria for AD One single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a sodium leak channel NALCN demonstrated genome-wide significance with the high risk class (p=4.1 × 10−8). Analyses in an independent sample did not replicate these associations. Conclusion We explored the genetic contribution to several phenotypes derived from the DSM-IV alcohol dependence criteria. The strongest evidence of association was with SNPs in NALCN and OR51L1. PMID:24015780

  1. Severity of alcohol dependence is associated with the fatty acid amide hydrolase Pro129Thr missense variant.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Matthew E; Gowin, Joshua L; Yan, Jia; Schwandt, Melanie L; Spagnolo, Primavera A; Sun, Hui; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Goldman, David; Ramchandani, Vijay A

    2017-02-01

    The endocannabinoid system plays an important role in reward and addiction. One of the two main endocannabinoid neurotransmitters, anandamide, is metabolized by fatty acid amide hydrolase, an enzyme with a functional genetic polymorphism (FAAH Pro129Thr, rs324420). The Thr129 allele has been linked to problem drug and alcohol use, but the association has not been widely replicated and may be stronger for clinical measures of severity rather than categorical diagnosis. In the present study, we sought to determine whether the Thr129 allele was associated with both alcohol dependence (AD) diagnosis and severity in a sample of 1434 European American and African American individuals, 952 of whom were diagnosed with lifetime AD. Participants were genotyped for FAAH rs324420, and ancestry was determined via a genome-wide panel of ancestry informative markers. Subjects participated in Structured Clinical Interviews for psychiatric disorders and 90-day Timeline Followback interviews to assess recent alcohol use. European American participants with current AD had a higher Thr129 allele frequency than non-dependent controls. In European Americans with lifetime AD, there were significantly different distributions of drinking days and binge drinking days between the two genotype groups, with Thr129 carriers reporting a median of 10 fewer abstinent days and 13 more binge drinking days than Pro129/Pro129 homozygotes. In African American participants, there were no significant differences between Thr129 allele frequency in cases and controls and no significant differences in measures of AD severity by genotype. These findings provide evidence that the Pro129Thr missense variant is associated with AD severity in European Americans.

  2. Alcohol dependence in the Naval Service.

    PubMed

    Dickie, A K; Coetzee, R H

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol misuse is a significant occupational health issue in the United Kingdom Armed Forces. Dependence associated with alcohol misuse represents the severe end of the clinical and occupational consequences of sustained alcohol misuse. This article aims to explore the diagnosis, management and occupational considerations of alcohol dependence in the Naval Service environment.

  3. Validation of differential GDAP1 DNA methylation in alcohol dependence and its potential function as a biomarker for disease severity and therapy outcome.

    PubMed

    Brückmann, Christof; Di Santo, Adriana; Karle, Kathrin Nora; Batra, Anil; Nieratschker, Vanessa

    2016-06-02

    Alcohol dependence is a severe disorder contributing substantially to the global burden of disease. Despite the detrimental consequences of chronic alcohol abuse and dependence, effective prevention strategies as well as treatment options are largely missing to date. Accumulating evidence suggests that gene-environment interactions, including epigenetic mechanisms, play a role in the etiology of alcohol dependence. A recent epigenome-wide study reported widespread alterations of DNA methylation patterns in alcohol dependent patients compared to control individuals. In the present study, we validate and replicate one of the top findings from this previous investigation in an independent cohort: the hypomethylation of GDAP1 in patients. To our knowledge, this is the first independent replication of an epigenome-wide finding in alcohol dependence. Furthermore, the AUDIT as well as the GSI score were negatively associated with GDAP1 methylation and we found a trend toward a negative association between GDAP1 methylation and the years of alcohol dependency, pointing toward a potential role of GDAP1 hypomethylation as biomarker for disease severity. In addition, we show that the hypomethylation of GDAP1 in patients reverses during a short-term alcohol treatment program, suggesting that GDAP1 DNA methylation could also serve as a potential biomarker for treatment outcome. Our data add to the growing body of knowledge on epigenetic effects in alcohol dependence and support GDAP1 as a novel candidate gene implicated in this disorder. As the role of GDAP1 in alcohol dependence is unknown, this novel candidate gene should be followed up in future studies.

  4. [Prevention of alcohol dependence].

    PubMed

    Trova, A C; Paparrigopoulos, Th; Liappas, I; Ginieri-Coccossis, M

    2015-01-01

    With the exception of cardiovascular diseases, no other medical condition causes more serious dysfunction or premature deaths than alcohol-related problems. Research results indicate that alcohol dependent individuals present an exceptionally poor level of quality of life. This is an outcome that highlights the necessity of planning and implementing preventive interventions on biological, psychological or social level, to be provided to individuals who make alcohol abuse, as well as to their families. Preventive interventions can be considered on three levels of prevention: (a) primary prevention, which is focused on the protection of healthy individuals from alcohol abuse and dependence, and may be provided on a universal, selective or indicated level, (b) secondary prevention, which aims at the prevention of deterioration regarding alcoholic dependence and relapse, in the cases of individuals already diagnosed with the condition and (c) tertiary prevention, which is focused at minimizing deterioration of functioning in chronically sufferers from alcoholic dependence. The term "quaternary prevention" can be used for the prevention of relapse. As for primary prevention, interventions focus on assessing the risk of falling into problematic use, enhancing protective factors and providing information and health education in general. These interventions can be delivered in schools or in places of work and recreation for young people. In this context, various programs have been applied in different countries, including Greece with positive results (Preventure, Alcolocks, LST, SFP, Alcohol Ignition Interlock Device). Secondary prevention includes counseling and structured help with the delivery of programs in schools and in high risk groups for alcohol dependence (SAP, LST). These programs aim at the development of alcohol refusal skills and behaviors, the adoption of models of behaviors resisting alcohol use, as well as reinforcement of general social skills. In the

  5. [Alcohol Dependence Syndrome: diagnostic criteria].

    PubMed

    Gigliotti, Analice; Bessa, Marco Antonio

    2004-05-01

    The Alcohol Dependence Syndrome (ADS) is a serious problem of public health. In spite of being deeply studied and having well-established diagnostic criteria, many times clinicians and even psychiatrists do not notice this disorder. The aim of this paper is to make a brief exposition on how men and society have developed their relationship with alcohol, emphasizing the development of the concept of alcoholism in medicine until the definition of ADS in ICD-10 and DSM-IV. The article explains the different ways of alcohol consume and how it influences different levels of risk and severity of its consequences, that evolves as a continuum. At last, it makes a comparison between ADS and alcohol harmful use, very important in the prevention and treatment of such disorders.

  6. Anticonvulsants for alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Pani, Pier Paolo; Trogu, Emanuela; Pacini, Matteo; Maremmani, Icro

    2014-02-13

    anticonvulsants reduced drinks/drinking days (11 studies, 1126 participants, mean difference (MD) -1.49, 95% Cl -2.32 to -0.65) and heavy drinking (12 studies, 1129 participants, standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.35, 95% Cl -0.51 to -0.19). Moreover, withdrawal for medical reasons (12 studies, 1410 participants, RR 1.22, 95% Cl 0.58 to 2.56, moderate-quality evidence) showed no evidence of difference, but for specific adverse effects (nine studies, 1164 participants), two of 18 adverse event outcomes favoured placebo. The direction of results was confirmed by subgroup analyses for topiramate and partially for gabapentin and valproate.Anticonvulsants versus naltrexone: No evidence of difference was shown in dropout rates (five studies, 528 participants, RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.52 to 1.06), severe relapse rates (four studies, 427 participants, RR 0.69, 95% Cl 0.44 to 1.07) and continuous abstinence rates (five studies, 528 participants, RR 1.21, 95% Cl 0.99 to 1.49); anticonvulsants were associated with fewer heavy drinking days (three studies, 308 participants, MD -5.21, 95% Cl -8.58 to -1.83), more days to severe relapse (three studies, 244 participants, MD 11.88, 95% Cl 3.29 to 20.46) and lower withdrawal for medical reasons (three studies, 245 participants, RR 0.13, 95% Cl 0.03 to 0.58). At the current stage of research, randomised evidence supporting the clinical use of anticonvulsants to treat alcohol dependence is insufficient. Results are conditioned by heterogeneity and by the low number and quality of studies comparing anticonvulsants with other medications. The uncertainty associated with these results leaves to clinicians the need to balance possible benefits/risks of treatment with anticonvulsants versus other medications as supported by evidence of efficacy.

  7. AUDIT-C scores as a scaled marker of mean daily drinking, alcohol use disorder severity, and probability of alcohol dependence in a U.S. general population sample of drinkers.

    PubMed

    Rubinsky, Anna D; Dawson, Deborah A; Williams, Emily C; Kivlahan, Daniel R; Bradley, Katharine A

    2013-08-01

    Brief alcohol screening questionnaires are increasingly used to identify alcohol misuse in routine care, but clinicians also need to assess the level of consumption and the severity of misuse so that appropriate intervention can be offered. Information provided by a patient's alcohol screening score might provide a practical tool for assessing the level of consumption and severity of misuse. This post hoc analysis of data from the 2001 to 2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) included 26,546 U.S. adults who reported drinking in the past year and answered additional questions about their consumption, including Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption questionnaire (AUDIT-C) alcohol screening. Linear or logistic regression models and postestimation methods were used to estimate mean daily drinking, the number of endorsed alcohol use disorder (AUD) criteria ("AUD severity"), and the probability of alcohol dependence associated with each individual AUDIT-C score (1 to 12), after testing for effect modification by gender and age. Among eligible past-year drinkers, mean daily drinking, AUD severity, and the probability of alcohol dependence increased exponentially across increasing AUDIT-C scores. Mean daily drinking ranged from < 0.1 to 18.0 drinks/d, AUD severity ranged from < 0.1 to 5.1 endorsed AUD criteria, and probability of alcohol dependence ranged from < 1 to 65% across scores 1 to 12. AUD severity increased more steeply across AUDIT-C scores among women than men. Both AUD severity and mean daily drinking increased more steeply across AUDIT-C scores among younger versus older age groups. Results of this study could be used to estimate patient-specific consumption and severity based on age, gender, and alcohol screening score. This information could be integrated into electronic decision support systems to help providers estimate and provide feedback about patient-specific risks and identify those patients most

  8. Coping mediates the effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy for alcohol use disorder among out-patient clients in Project MATCH when dependence severity is high.

    PubMed

    Roos, Corey R; Maisto, Stephen A; Witkiewitz, Katie

    2017-09-01

    There is inconsistent evidence that alcohol-specific coping is a mechanism of change in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for alcohol use disorder (AUD). Our primary aim was to test whether baseline dependence severity moderates the mediational effect of CBT on drinking outcomes via coping. Secondary data analysis of Project MATCH , a multi-site alcohol treatment trial in which participants, recruited in out-patient and aftercare arms, were randomized to three treatments: CBT, motivational enhancement therapy (MET) and Twelve-Step facilitation (TSF). Nine research sites in the United States. A total of 1063 adults with AUD. The primary outcomes were percentage days abstinent and percentage heavy drinking days at the 1-year follow-up. Coping was assessed with the Processes of Change Questionnaire . Dependence severity was measured with the Alcohol Dependence Scale . Among the full available sample (across treatment arms), there were no significant moderated mediation effects. Double moderated mediation analyses indicated that several moderated mediation effects were moderated by treatment arm (all P < 0.05). In the out-patient arm, there were several significant moderated mediation effects (all P < 0.05), but no significant moderated mediation effects in the aftercare arm. For out-patient clients with high baseline dependence severity, end-of-treatment coping mediated the positive treatment effects of CBT, compared with both MET and TSF, on 1-year drinking outcomes (all P < 0.05). Coping did not mediate treatment effects of CBT among those with low or moderate dependence severity. In the Project MATCH out-patient sample, whether or not coping mediated the effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy for alcohol use disorder was conditional on dependence severity. End-of-treatment coping mediated the positive treatment effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy on 1-year drinking outcomes among out-patient clients when dependence severity was high, but not when

  9. [Alcohol and substance dependence].

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Hideto; Nishimura, Isao; Fukui, Kenji

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we have outlined the neurobiological basis of alcohol and drug dependence. The prevalence of drug dependence is a serious social problem in many countries, including Japan. This problem involves many background factors, including those pertaining to medical sciences, socio economics, and politics. First, we briefly describe the findings pertaining to psychotomimetic drugs as a model of schizophrenia. The biological pathogenesis of schizophrenic disorders is still unknown. The symptoms of methamphetamine (MAP) and phencyclidine (PCP) psychoses are very similar to those of schizophrenic disorders involving hallucination or delusion. PCP causes not only positive symptoms but also negative symptoms. Therefore, it has been considered as a more comprehensive model of schizophrenia than other drugs. Furthermore, amotivational syndrome, which is observed in patients with chronic cannabis and organic solvent dependence, is similar to the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Understanding the neurobiological basis of drug dependence by using the molecular biological approach will provide an important clue for elucidating the mechanisms underlying schizophrenia and endogenous psychiatric disorders. Next, we discuss account for the neurobiological mechanisms underlying drug dependence. The reward system in the brain, which is common for all dependent drugs, has been explained, and the stages of addiction corresponding to the development of drug dependence have been discussed followed. In addition, we have discussed the epigenetics aspects of substance dependence, which is one of the hottest topics in psychiatric genetics. We expect that further studies of the mechanisms underlying drug dependence will aid in elucidating of the pathophysiology of various psychiatric diseases.

  10. Infections in severe alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Karakike, Eleni; Moreno, Christophe; Gustot, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Severe alcoholic hepatitis (sAH), defined by a modified discriminant function ≥32, is the most severe form of alcohol-induced liver disease and is associated with a 1-month mortality rate of around 30%. Corticosteroid treatment remains the only therapeutic option that improves short-term survival. Infectious complications, occurring in approximately 50% of patients, are the main causes of death, even in patients who benefit from corticosteroids. Liver failure, recent alcohol consumption and immunosuppressive drugs contribute to this infectious risk. Although infection is a well-described feature of cirrhosis, little is known about the characteristics of infections in sAH. Infection is mainly of bacterial origin and frequently affects the respiratory tract. Pathogens classically observed in cirrhosis, such as gram-negative bacilli, are frequently involved, but opportunistic pathogens, such as fungi (Aspergillus fumigatus, Pneumocystis jirovecii) or viruses (Cytomegalovirus, Herpes simplex) may appear, mainly related to corticosteroid treatment. A high level of suspicion with systematic screening and prompt, adequate treatment are warranted to improve outcomes in these patients. Prophylactic strategies in this high-risk population should be assessed in well-designed trials. PMID:28243035

  11. Neuropeptide Y Receptor Genes Are Associated with Alcohol Dependence, Alcohol Withdrawal Phenotypes and Cocaine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Wetherill, Leah; Schuckit, Marc A.; Hesselbrock, Victor; Xuei, Xiaoling; Liang, Tiebing; Dick, Danielle M.; Kramer, John; Nurnberger, John I.; Tischfield, Jay A.; Porjesz, Bernice; Edenberg, Howard J.; Foroud, Tatiana

    2008-01-01

    Background Several lines of evidence in both human and animal studies suggest that variation in neuropeptide Y (NPY) or its receptor genes (NPY1R, NPY2R and NPY5R) is associated with alcohol dependence as well as alcohol withdrawal symptoms. Additional studies suggest cocaine may affect NPY expression. Methods A total of 39 SNPs were genotyped across NPY and its 3 receptor genes in a sample of 1,923 subjects from 219 multiplex alcoholic families of European American descent recruited as part of the Collaborative Studies on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) study. Family-based association analysis was performed to test the primary hypothesis that variation in these genes is associated with alcohol dependence. Secondary analyses evaluated whether there was an association of these SNPs with symptoms of alcohol withdrawal, cocaine dependence, or comorbid alcohol and cocaine dependence. Results Although variations in NPY itself were not associated with these phenotypes, variations in two NPY-receptor genes were. SNPs in NPY2R provided significant evidence of association with alcohol dependence, alcohol withdrawal symptoms, comorbid alcohol and cocaine dependence, and cocaine dependence (all p<0.03). Haplotype analyses strengthened the evidence for these phenotypes (global 0.005alcohol withdrawal characterized by seizures (p<0.05). Conclusion These results indicate that sequence variations in NPY receptor genes are associated with alcohol dependence, particularly a severe subtype of alcohol dependence characterized by withdrawal symptoms, comorbid alcohol and cocaine dependence or cocaine dependence. PMID:18828811

  12. [Alcohol dependence, temper and personality].

    PubMed

    Lejoyeux, Michel

    2004-12-01

    This review focuses on classical and recent research work in the field of alcohol dependence. Data from psychopathological studies trying to determine a "pre-addictive" personality are exposed. More recent studies assess personality disorders and dimensions of temperament associated to alcohol dependence. Sensation seeking, antisocial personality and novelty seeking appear as the main psychological parameters involved in dependence. Sensation seeking is a dimension of personality often associated to behavioral dependence. Sensation seeking is assessed with a five-component scale including general factor, thrill and adventure seeking, experience-seeking, disinhibition, and boredom susceptibility. Patients presenting alcohol dependence have a higher level of sensation seeking. Neurophysiological and genetic studies try to correlate these personality features to biological parameters. Preliminary results of these works are presented and discussed.

  13. Pharmacotherapeutic Treatment of Alcohol Dependence: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Erin; Goodwin, Lloyd R., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy medications can reduce the likelihood of relapse, decrease craving intensity and severity of withdrawal symptoms, and bolster the likelihood of achieving and maintaining recovery goals for many individuals seeking recovery from alcohol dependence. An overview of the benefits and concerns of integrating pharmacotherapeutic…

  14. Pharmacotherapeutic Treatment of Alcohol Dependence: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Erin; Goodwin, Lloyd R., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy medications can reduce the likelihood of relapse, decrease craving intensity and severity of withdrawal symptoms, and bolster the likelihood of achieving and maintaining recovery goals for many individuals seeking recovery from alcohol dependence. An overview of the benefits and concerns of integrating pharmacotherapeutic…

  15. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Alcohol Dependence.

    PubMed

    Fein, George

    2015-12-01

    We review our clinical studies of psychiatric comorbidity in short-term and long-term abstinent and in treatment naïve alcoholics (STAA, LTAA and TNA). TNA ypically have less severe alcoholism than treated abstinent samples and evidence less severe psychiatric disturbance. Lifetime psychiatric diagnoses are the norm for STAA and LTAA but not for TNA. Individuals with alcohol and drug use disorders show greater antisocial personality disturbance, but do not show differences in the mood or anxiety domains or in borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms. The studies show that alcoholics can achieve and maintain abstinence in the face of ongoing mood, anxiety, or BPD problems. By contrast, for ASPD, LTAA essentially stop current antisocial behaviors in all seven domains of antisocial behaviors. We believe that ongoing antisocial behavior is not consistent with maintaining abstinence, and that LTAA modify their antisocial behavior despite continued elevated social deviance proneness and antisocial dispositionality. Abstinent individuals without lifetime psychiatric disorders and TNA show more (subdiagnostic threshold) psychiatric symptoms and abnormal psychological measures than non-alcoholic controls in the mood, anxiety, BPD, and antisocial domains. In summary, our studies show that although LTAA have achieved multi-year abstinence, they still report significant psychological distress compared to NAC. We believe this distress may negatively affect their quality of life. This suggests the importance of developing effective care models to address comorbid mental health problems in LTAA. We also show that antisocial personality disorder symptoms decline to the levels seen in normal controls, and that excluding individuals from research with a psychiatric diagnosis does not control for subdiagnostic psychiatric differences between alcoholics and controls.

  16. Alcohol dependency prevention and early intervention.

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, P E

    1988-01-01

    Current data on efforts to prevent alcoholism indicate that we are better able to prevent some of the consequences of alcohol misuse, such as alcohol-related car crashes and fetal alcohol syndrome, than chronic alcohol dependence itself. A review of data on outcomes of treatment for long-term alcohol dependence indicates that 9 of 10 alcohol dependent persons receive no treatment for the disorder in any given year. When treatment is provided for long-term alcohol dependent persons, it has only slightly positive results. As a result, many clinicians and researchers have concluded that rather than exclusive preoccupation with long-term alcoholics, early intervention with persons who are just beginning to abuse alcohol may be a more effective use of resources. PMID:3141965

  17. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Fein, George

    2015-01-01

    We review our clinical studies of psychiatric comorbidity in short-term and long-term abstinent and in treatment naïve alcoholics (STAA, LTAA and TNA). TNA ypically have less severe alcoholism than treated abstinent samples and evidence less severe psychiatric disturbance. Lifetime psychiatric diagnoses are the norm for STAA and LTAA but not for TNA. Individuals with alcohol and drug use disorders show greater antisocial personality disturbance, but do not show differences in the mood or anxiety domains or in borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms. The studies show that alcoholics can achieve and maintain abstinence in the face of ongoing mood, anxiety, or BPD problems. By contrast, for ASPD, LTAA essentially stop current antisocial behaviors in all seven domains of antisocial behaviors. We believe that ongoing antisocial behavior is not consistent with maintaining abstinence, and that LTAA modify their antisocial behavior despite continued elevated social deviance proneness and antisocial dispositionality. Abstinent individuals without lifetime psychiatric disorders and TNA show more (subdiagnostic threshold) psychiatric symptoms and abnormal psychological measures than nonalcoholic controls in the mood, anxiety, BPD, and antisocial domains. In summary, our studies show that although LTAA have achieved multi-year abstinence, they still report significant psychological distress compared to NAC. We believe this distress may negatively affect their quality of life. This suggests the importance of developing effective care models to address comorbid mental health problems in LTAA. We also show that antisocial personality disorder symptoms decline to the levels seen in normal controls, and that excluding individuals from research with a psychiatric diagnosis does not control for subdiagnostic psychiatric differences between alcoholics and controls. PMID:26590836

  18. Alcohol dependence and conduct disorder among Navajo Indians.

    PubMed

    Kunitz, S J; Gabriel, K R; Levy, J E; Henderson, E; Lampert, K; McCloskey, J; Quintero, G; Russell, S; Vince, A

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the association between conduct disorder before age 15 and subsequent alcohol dependence, and to describe the lifetime prevalence of alcohol dependence among Navajo Indian women and men. This was a case-control design which included both men (n = 735) and women (n = 351) and in which the Diagnostic Interview Schedule was used for the diagnosis of the lifetime history of alcohol dependence and conduct disorder. Alcohol dependent cases were selected from inpatient and outpatient treatment programs (204 men, 148 women). Whenever possible, controls were matched for age, sex and community of residence and were randomly selected and interviewed until a nonalcohol dependent individual was found. Among the men, there were 374 alcohol dependent controls and 157 nonalcohol dependent controls. Among the women, the figures were 60 and 143, respectively. When combined, the controls comprise samples of the adult male and female populations from which estimates of lifetime prevalence of alcohol dependence, and of the amount of alcohol dependence in the population attributable to conduct disorder, may be inferred. Conduct disorder is a risk factor for alcohol dependence among both men and women. Lifetime prevalence of alcohol dependence in this population is high (70.4% for men and 29.6% for women), but the amount of alcohol dependence in the population attributable to conduct disorder is low. On the other hand, among the alcohol dependent, those with conduct disorder had the most severe alcohol- and nonalcohol-related problems. The potential limitations of the study are those common to case-control designs, especially biased recall by cases. There are also potential sampling biases among the controls. It is shown that none of the potential biases invalidate the findings, which support the hypothesis that in this population conduct disorder is a risk for alcohol dependence. The implications for primary prevention of alcohol dependence are

  19. Alcohol Use Problem Severity and Problem Behavior Engagement among School-Based Youths in Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mancha, Brent E.; Rojas-Neese, Vanessa C.; Latimer, William W.

    2010-01-01

    This study created an alcohol use problem severity taxonomy and examined its association to engagement in other problem behaviors. Minnesota youths were categorized based on their frequency of alcohol use and DSM-IV alcohol abuse and dependence criteria. Greater alcohol use problem severity was generally associated with higher prevalence of…

  20. Consumption of Noncommercial Alcohol among Alcohol-Dependent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Razvodovsky, Y. E.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores types of alcohol and surrogates consumed, patterns of consumption, and reasons behind noncommercial alcohol consumption among alcohol-dependent patients in Belarus. The study was conducted in the Belarusian city Grodno in 2012 with 223 alcoholics admitted to narcological clinic using structured interviews. The results suggest that at least 20.2% of alcohol dependent patients regularly consume samogon and 11.8% of patients use surrogates, the most popular among which are medications with a high percentage of ethanol and industrial spirits. The belief that, according to quality criteria, samogon exceeds licensed vodka is the main motive for its consumption. The results of this study suggest the existence of the problem of consumption of noncommercial alcohol among alcohol dependent patients in Belarus. PMID:24233448

  1. [Treatment processes of pre-alcoholism and alcohol dependence targeted towards drinking reduction].

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Atsushi; Maesato, Hitoshi; Hisatomi, Nobuko; Higuchi, Susumu

    2013-02-01

    Since the 1990s, we have suggested the concept of pre-alcoholism which encompasses patients who have drunk a great deal of alcohol leading to alcohol related problems such as health issues, domestic violence, drunken driving and black-outs. Pre-alcoholism excludes alcohol-dependent patients who have experienced continuous drinking or withdrawal symptoms. We have treated many outpatients with pre-alcoholism for several years. Our regimen demands that the patients must be abstinent for half a year at the beginning of their treatment. After half a year they can choose whether they will continue to be abstinent or they will resume drinking with the aim of reducing their total alcohol consumption. The study clarified the character of pre-alcoholism by investigation of the patients' background and re-diagnosis of the patients based on the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10). A remarkable ratio of pre-alcoholic patients was diagnosed with alcohol dependence under ICD-10. We classified pre-alcoholic patients into two groups, one diagnosed as having ICD-10-classed alcohol dependence and the other which did not fulfill the ICD-10 diagnostic criteria of alcohol dependence, and examined the therapeutic processes of the two groups. It was shown that most pre-alcoholic patients could finally take required courses of treatment by themselves without regard to diagnosis under ICD-10, even if they chose any treatment and made alcohol related mistakes on the way. Our findings suggested that pre-alcoholic patients, a portion of whom may have exhibited mild alcohol dependence, could select drinking reduction as a primary goal of treatment after a certain period of abstinence.

  2. Alcoholic neurobiology: changes in dependence and recovery.

    PubMed

    Crews, Fulton T; Buckley, Tracey; Dodd, Peter R; Ende, Gabriele; Foley, Nina; Harper, Clive; He, Jun; Innes, David; Loh, El-Wui; Pfefferbaum, Adolph; Zou, Jian; Sullivan, Edith V

    2005-08-01

    This article presents the proceedings of a symposium held at the meeting of the International Society for Biomedical Research on Alcoholism (ISBRA) in Mannheim, Germany, in October, 2004. Chronic alcoholism follows a fluctuating course, which provides a naturalistic experiment in vulnerability, resilience, and recovery of human neural systems in response to presence, absence, and history of the neurotoxic effects of alcoholism. Alcohol dependence is a progressive chronic disease that is associated with changes in neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neural gene expression, psychology, and behavior. Specifically, alcohol dependence is characterized by a neuropsychological profile of mild to moderate impairment in executive functions, visuospatial abilities, and postural stability, together with relative sparing of declarative memory, language skills, and primary motor and perceptual abilities. Recovery from alcoholism is associated with a partial reversal of CNS deficits that occur in alcoholism. The reversal of deficits during recovery from alcoholism indicates that brain structure is capable of repair and restructuring in response to insult in adulthood. Indirect support of this repair model derives from studies of selective neuropsychological processes, structural and functional neuroimaging studies, and preclinical studies on degeneration and regeneration during the development of alcohol dependence and recovery form dependence. Genetics and brain regional specificity contribute to unique changes in neuropsychology and neuroanatomy in alcoholism and recovery. This symposium includes state-of-the-art presentations on changes that occur during active alcoholism as well as those that may occur during recovery-abstinence from alcohol dependence. Included are human neuroimaging and neuropsychological assessments, changes in human brain gene expression, allelic combinations of genes associated with alcohol dependence and preclinical studies investigating mechanisms of

  3. Preclinical and clinical pharmacology of alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Tambour, Sophie; Quertemont, Etienne

    2007-02-01

    In recent years, advances in neuroscience led to the development of new medications to treat alcohol dependence and especially to prevent alcohol relapse after detoxification. Whereas the earliest medications against alcohol dependence were fortuitously discovered, recently developed drugs are increasingly based on alcohol's neurobiological mechanisms of action. This review discusses the most recent developments in alcohol pharmacotherapy and emphasizes the neurobiological basis of anti-alcohol medications. There are currently three approved drugs for the treatment of alcohol dependence with quite different mechanisms of action. Disulfiram is an inhibitor of the enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase and acts as an alcohol-deterrent drug. Naltrexone, an opiate antagonist, reduces alcohol craving and relapse in heavy drinking, probably via a modulation of the mesolimbic dopamine activity. Finally, acamprosate helps maintaining alcohol abstinence, probably through a normalization of the chronic alcohol-induced hyperglutamatergic state. In addition to these approved medications, many other drugs have been suggested for preventing alcohol consumption on the basis of preclinical studies. Some of these drugs remain promising, whereas others have produced disappointing results in preliminary clinical studies. These new drugs in the field of alcohol pharmacotherapy are also discussed, together with their mechanisms of action.

  4. [Severe metabolic acidosis in an alcoholic].

    PubMed

    Sonne, Morten Egede; Rudolph, Søren Finnemann; Pott, Frank Christian

    2008-09-29

    Severe metabolic acidosis is associated with poor prognosis. We present a patient with profound alcohol and starvation-related combined lactic and keto acidosis (lactate = 29 mM; pH = 6.83) who made a good recovery following 18 hours of intensive care therapy. A brief summary of the proposed mechanism by which these metabolic derangements develop is presented.

  5. Management of Alcohol Dependence in Patients with Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Addolorato, Giovanni; Mirijello, Antonio; Leggio, Lorenzo; Ferrulli, Anna; Landolfi, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol dependence represents a chronic and relapsing disease affecting nearly 10% of the general population both in the United States and in Europe, with a widespread burden of morbidity and mortality. Alcohol dependence represents the most common cause of liver damage in the Western Countries. Although alcoholic liver disease is associated primarily with heavy drinking, continued alcohol consumption, even in low doses after the onset of liver disease, increases the risk of severe consequences, including mortality. Consequently the ideal treatment of patients affected by alcohol dependence and alcoholic liver disease should aim at achieving long-term total alcohol abstinence and preventing relapse. The aim of the present review is to provide an update on the management of alcohol dependence in patients with alcoholic liver disease. Increasing evidences suggests the usefulness of psychosocial interventions and medications combined in order to reduce alcohol intake, promote abstinence and prevent relapse in alcohol dependent patients. Disulfiram, naltrexone and acamprosate have been approved for this indication; gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is approved in Italy and Austria. However, these drugs have not been tested in patients with advanced liver disease. Amongst other emerging pharmacotherapies for alcoholism, topiramate, ondansetron, and baclofen seem the most promising ones. Both topiramate and ondansetron hold a safe profile in alcoholic patients; however, none of them has been tested in alcoholic patients with advanced liver disease. To date, baclofen represents the only anti-craving medication formally tested in a randomized clinical trial in alcoholic patients affected by liver cirrhosis, although additional confirmatory studies are warranted. PMID:23456576

  6. Socio-Emotional Factors in Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Tikka, Deyashini Lahiri; Ram, Daya; Dubey, Indu; Tikka, Sai Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Background: Alcohol-dependent patients are traditionally believed to have insecure attachment styles, higher anger expression, and lower self-esteem. There is a need to study them together. Aim: To understand the relationships amongst various of the socio-emotional factors. Materials and Methods: Forty male patients with Alcohol dependence syndrome and 40 matched healthy controls (General Health Questionnaire-12 score <3) were compared on attachment styles (on Relationship Scale Questionnaire), anger domains (on State Trait Anger Expression Inventory), and self-esteem (on Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale). Statistics and Analysis: Comparison using independent samples t test and chi square test; correlation using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results: Patients had significantly higher anger expression, ‘anger in’ and ‘anger out,’ and lower self-esteem than healthy controls. Severity of alcohol dependence had significant correlation with ‘anger out,’ and self-esteem had significant negative correlation with anger expression. Conclusion: The present study suggests that the socio-emotional factors studied are developmentally linked to each other. PMID:24860216

  7. Urine methanol concentration and alcohol hangover severity.

    PubMed

    Mackus, M; Van de Loo, A J A E; Korte-Bouws, G A H; Van Neer, R H P; Wang, X; Nguyen, T T; Brookhuis, K A; Garssen, J; Verster, J C

    2017-03-01

    Congeners are substances, other than ethanol, that are produced during fermentation. Previous research found that the consumption of congener-rich drinks contributes to the severity of alcohol hangover. Methanol is such a congener that has been related to alcohol hangover. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the relationship between urine methanol concentration and alcohol hangover severity. N = 36 healthy social drinkers (22 females, 14 males), aged 18-30 years old, participated in a naturalistic study, comprising a hangover day and a control day (no alcohol consumed the previous day). N = 18 of them had regular hangovers (the hangover group), while the other N = 18 claimed to be hangover-immune (hangover-immune group). Overall hangover severity was assessed, and that of 23 individual hangover symptoms. Urine methanol concentrations on the hangover and control days were compared, and correlated to hangover (symptom) severity. Urine methanol concentration was significantly higher on hangover days compared to control days (p = 0.0001). No significant differences in urine methanol concentration were found between the hangover group and hangover-immune group. However, urine methanol concentration did not significantly correlate with overall hangover severity (r = -0.011, p = 0.948), nor with any of the individual hangover symptoms. These findings were observed also when analyzing the data separately for the hangover-immune group. In the hangover group, a significant correlation with urine methanol concentration was found only with vomiting (r = 0.489, p = 0.037). No significant correlation was observed between urine methanol concentration and hangover severity, nor with individual core hangover symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Alcohol dependence: molecular and behavioral evidence

    PubMed Central

    Trudell, James R.; Messing, Robert O.; Mayfield, Jody; Harris, R. Adron

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is a complex condition with clear genetic factors. Some of the leading candidate genes code for subunits of the inhibitory GABAA and glycine receptors. These and related ion channels are also targets for the acute actions of alcohol, and there is considerable progress in understanding interactions of alcohol with these proteins at the molecular and even atomic levels. X-ray structures of open and closed states of ion channels combined with structural modeling and site-directed mutagenesis have elucidated direct actions of alcohol. Alcohol also alters channel function by translational and post-translational mechanisms, including phosphorylation and protein trafficking. Construction of mutant mice with either deletion of key proteins or introduction of alcohol-resistant channels has further linked specific proteins with discrete behavioral effects of alcohol. A combination of approaches, including genome wide association studies in humans, continues to advance the molecular basis of alcohol action on receptor structure and function. PMID:24865944

  9. Adverse childhood events and lifetime alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Pilowsky, Daniel J; Keyes, Katherine M; Hasin, Deborah S

    2009-02-01

    We sought to study the association between adverse events occurring in childhood and adolescence and lifetime alcohol dependence in a representative sample of American adults. With data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, we conducted logistic regression multivariate analyses to examine the impact of adverse events occurring in childhood (aged < 18 years) on the lifetime prevalence of alcohol dependence. We controlled for age at drinking onset, binge drinking, alcoholism in parents and grandparents of respondents, and demographic characteristics. Adverse childhood events were associated with familial alcoholism and with early and binge drinking, and therefore, we controlled for these potential confounders. Experiencing 2 or more adverse childhood events, compared with none, significantly increased the risk for alcohol dependence, even after we controlled for sociodemographic variables and disorder-specific potential confounders not considered in the extant literature (adjusted odds ratio = 1.37; 95% confidence interval = 1.06, 1.77). Individuals who experienced 2 or more adverse childhood events are at increased risk for lifetime alcohol dependence. A better understanding of the factors underlying the risk for alcohol dependence is important for developing better prevention and early intervention measures.

  10. Cigarette Smoking Predicts Differential Benefit from Naltrexone for Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Fucito, Lisa M.; Park, Aesoon; Gulliver, Suzy Bird; Mattson, Margaret E.; Gueorguieva, Ralitza V.; O’Malley, Stephanie S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Identifying factors that modify responsiveness to pharmacotherapies for alcohol dependence is important for treatment planning. Cigarette smoking predicts more severe alcohol dependence and poorer treatment response in general. Nevertheless, there is limited research on cigarette smoking as a potential predictor of differential response to pharmacological treatment of alcoholism. Methods We examined the association between cigarette smoking and drinking outcomes in the COMBINE study, a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled 16-week trial comparing combinations of medications (i.e., acamprosate and naltrexone) and behavioral interventions (i.e., medical management (MM), combined behavioral therapy (CBI)) in 1383 alcohol dependent individuals. Results Smokers (i.e., more than half the sample) significantly differed from nonsmokers on several demographic and drinking-related variables at baseline and generally had poorer treatment outcomes than nonsmokers. However, smokers who received naltrexone had better drinking outcomes than smokers who received placebo, whereas alcohol use among nonsmokers did not vary by naltrexone assignment. This pattern of findings occurred independent of whether patients received CBI or MM and remained after controlling for alcoholism typology and baseline demographic differences. Approximately 9% of smokers quit smoking and an additional 10% reduced their cigarette intake during treatment. Reductions in smoking did not vary by treatment assignment. Conclusions These results suggest that naltrexone may be particularly beneficial for improving alcohol use outcomes in alcohol dependent smokers. Trial Registration The COMBINE Study, NCT000626, http://www.cscc.unc.edu/combine/. PMID:22541040

  11. Brain pathways to recovery from alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Cui, Changhai; Noronha, Antonio; Warren, Kenneth R; Koob, George F; Sinha, Rajita; Thakkar, Mahesh; Matochik, John; Crews, Fulton T; Chandler, L Judson; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Becker, Howard C; Lovinger, David; Everitt, Barry J; Egli, Mark; Mandyam, Chitra D; Fein, George; Potenza, Marc N; Harris, R Adron; Grant, Kathleen A; Roberto, Marisa; Meyerhoff, Dieter J; Sullivan, Edith V

    2015-08-01

    This article highlights the research presentations at the satellite symposium on "Brain Pathways to Recovery from Alcohol Dependence" held at the 2013 Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting. The purpose of this symposium was to provide an up to date overview of research efforts focusing on understanding brain mechanisms that contribute to recovery from alcohol dependence. A panel of scientists from the alcohol and addiction research field presented their insights and perspectives on brain mechanisms that may underlie both recovery and lack of recovery from alcohol dependence. The four sessions of the symposium encompassed multilevel studies exploring mechanisms underlying relapse and craving associated with sustained alcohol abstinence, cognitive function deficit and recovery, and translational studies on preventing relapse and promoting recovery. Gaps in our knowledge and research opportunities were also discussed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Alcohol use dependence in fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo-Arellano, María J; Lozano, Reymundo; Tassone, Flora; Hagerman, Randi J; Saldarriaga, Wilmar

    2016-01-01

    Summary Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) have been reported in a limited number of individuals with cognitive impairment but rarely in those with fragile X syndrome (FXS). However, in Colombia, culturally, alcohol consumption is very common. Here, we report eight cases of patients with FXS who have frequent alcohol consumption in Ricaurte, Colombia. Some of these patients have also used tobacco and illegal substances, including cocaine, which use has not been previously reported in those with FXS. Alcohol and substance use dependence is associated with exacerbation of their behavioral problems, such as increased impulsivity and aggression, as well as of medical problems such as an increased frequency of seizures. PMID:27672544

  13. Alcohol use dependence in fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Salcedo-Arellano, María J; Lozano, Reymundo; Tassone, Flora; Hagerman, Randi J; Saldarriaga, Wilmar

    2016-08-01

    Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) have been reported in a limited number of individuals with cognitive impairment but rarely in those with fragile X syndrome (FXS). However, in Colombia, culturally, alcohol consumption is very common. Here, we report eight cases of patients with FXS who have frequent alcohol consumption in Ricaurte, Colombia. Some of these patients have also used tobacco and illegal substances, including cocaine, which use has not been previously reported in those with FXS. Alcohol and substance use dependence is associated with exacerbation of their behavioral problems, such as increased impulsivity and aggression, as well as of medical problems such as an increased frequency of seizures.

  14. The effect of alcohol price on dependent drinkers' alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Falkner, Carolyn; Christie, Grant; Zhou, Lifeng; King, Julian

    2015-12-18

    To investigate the current purchasing behaviours of a group of dependent drinkers and their potential response to future increases in the price of alcohol. 115 clients undergoing medical detoxification completed an anonymous survey about their daily alcohol consumption, its cost, their response to potential price increases and strategies previously used when unable to afford alcohol. Mean and median number of standard drinks consumed per day was 24, at a median cost of $25 NZD (95%CI $22, $30). Thirty-six per cent (95%CI 26%, 46%) of the group bought alcohol at $1 or less per standard drink, and the median number of drinks consumed per day (30) by this group was significantly higher (p=0.0028) than the rest of the sample (22.5). The most common strategy used if no money was available to purchase alcohol was to forgo essentials. If facing a potential price rise, 77% (95%CI 69%, 85%) would switch wholly or partially to a cheaper product and 13% (95%CI 8%, 21%) would cut down their drinking. Although the majority of our group would be financially impacted by an increase in the minimum price per standard drink, any potential impacts would be most significant in those buying the cheapest alcohol (who also drink the most), suggesting that minimum pricing may be an important harm minimisation strategy in this group. A minimum price per standard drink would limit the possibility of switching to an alternate cheaper product and likely result in an overall reduction in alcohol consumption in this group. Stealing alcohol, or the use of non-beverage alcohol, were seldom reported as previous strategies used in response to unaffordable alcohol and fears of such are not valid reasons for rejecting minimum pricing to reduce general population consumption.

  15. Brain Pathways to Recovery from Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Changhai; Noronha, Antonio; Warren, Kenneth; Koob, George F.; Sinha, Rajita; Thakkar, Mahesh; Matochik, John; Crews, Fulton T.; Chandler, L. Judson; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Becker, Howard C.; Lovinger, David; Everitt, Barry; Egli, Mark; Mandyam, Chitra; Fein, George; Potenza, Marc N.; Harris, R. Adron; Grant, Kathleen A.; Roberto, Marisa; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.; Sullivan, Edith V.

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights the research presentations at the satellite symposium on “Brain Pathways to Recovery from Alcohol Dependence” held at the 2013 Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting. The purpose of this symposium was to provide an up to date overview of research efforts focusing on understanding brain mechanisms that contribute to recovery from alcohol dependence. A panel of scientists from the alcohol and addiction research field presented their insights and perspectives on brain mechanisms that may underlie both recovery and lack of recovery from alcohol dependence. The four sessions of the symposium encompassed multilevel studies exploring mechanisms underlying relapse and craving associated with sustained alcohol abstinence, cognitive function deficit and recovery, and translational studies on preventing relapse and promoting recovery. Gaps in our knowledge and research opportunities were also discussed. PMID:26074423

  16. Thinking after Drinking: Impaired Hippocampal-Dependent Cognition in Human Alcoholics and Animal Models of Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Miranda C.; Mandyam, Chitra D.

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol use disorder currently affects approximately 18 million Americans, with at least half of these individuals having significant cognitive impairments subsequent to their chronic alcohol use. This is most widely apparent as frontal cortex-dependent cognitive dysfunction, where executive function and decision-making are severely compromised, as well as hippocampus-dependent cognitive dysfunction, where contextual and temporal reasoning are negatively impacted. This review discusses the relevant clinical literature to support the theory that cognitive recovery in tasks dependent on the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus is temporally different across extended periods of abstinence from alcohol. Additional studies from preclinical models are discussed to support clinical findings. Finally, the unique cellular composition of the hippocampus and cognitive impairment dependent on the hippocampus is highlighted in the context of alcohol dependence. PMID:27746746

  17. Alcohol Consumption Indices of Genetic Risk for Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Julia D.; Agrawal, Arpana; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Madden, Pamela A.F.; Pergadia, Michele L.; Nelson, Elliot C.; Lynskey, Michael T.; Todd, Richard D.; Todorov, Alexandre A.; Hansell, Narelle K.; Whitfield, John B.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Heath, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous research has reported a significant genetic correlation between heaviness of alcohol consumption and alcohol dependence (AD), but this association might be driven by the influence of AD on consumption rather than the reverse. We test the genetic overlap between AD symptoms and a heaviness of consumption measure among individuals who do not have AD. A high genetic correlation between these measures would suggest that a continuous measure of consumption may have a useful role in the discovery of genes contributing to dependence risk. Methods Factor analysis of 5 alcohol use measures was used to create a measure of heaviness of alcohol consumption. Quantitative genetic analyses of interview data from the 1989 Australian Twin Panel (n=6257 individuals; M=29.9 years) assessed the genetic overlap between heaviness of consumption, DSM-IV AD symptoms, DSM-IV AD symptom clustering, and DSM-IV alcohol abuse. Results Genetic influences accounted for 30–51% of the variance in the alcohol measures and genetic correlations were 0.90 or higher for all measures, with the correlation between consumption and dependence symptoms among non-dependent individuals estimated at 0.97 (95% CI: 0.80–1.00). Conclusions Heaviness of consumption and AD symptoms have a high degree of genetic overlap even among non-dependent individuals in the general population, implying that genetic influences on dependence risk in the general population are acting to a considerable degree through heaviness of use, and that quantitative measures of consumption will likely have a useful role in the identification of genes contributing to AD. PMID:19576574

  18. Salivary exoglycosidases as markers of alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Chojnowska, Sylwia; Zalewska, Anna; Zwierz, Krzysztof; Szulc, Agata; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Some salivary markers of alcohol abuse/dependence have been proposed so far: aminotransferases, gamma-glutamyltransferase, ethanol, ethyl glucuronide, ethyl sulfate, sialic acid, β-hexosaminidase A, oral peroxidase, methanol, diethylene/ethylene glycol, α-amylase, clusterin, haptoglobin, heavy/light chains of immunoglobulins and transferrin. To investigate the effect of chronic alcohol drinking and smoking on the activity (pKat/ml) and output (pKat/min) of salivary lysosomal exoglycosidases: α-fucosidase (FUC), α-mannosidase (MAN), β-galactosidase (GAL), and β-glucuronidase (GLU), and their applicability as markers of alcohol dependence. The activity of FUC, MAN, GAL and GLU was measured colorimetrically in the saliva of healthy social drinkers, alcohol-dependent non-smokers and alcohol-dependent smokers. We observed an increased salivary activity of FUC, GAL, GLU and MAN, as well as an increased output of GAL and GLU, in comparison with controls. The highest increase in the activity/output was found in salivary GLU and MAN (GLU, even 7- to 18-fold), and the least in GAL. We found an excellent sensitivity and specificity and a high accuracy (measured by the area under the ROC curve) for salivary FUC, GLU and MAN activities. The salivary GLU activity positively correlated with the number of days of last alcohol intoxication. Salivary activity of FUC, GAL and MAN, but not GLU, positively correlated with the periodontal parameters such as gingival index and papilla bleeding index. Although we found an excellent sensitivity and specificity as well as a high accuracy for the salivary activity of FUC, GLU and MAN, the GLU activity seems to be mostly applicable as a marker of chronic alcohol drinking (alcohol dependence). © The Author 2014. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  19. A dysbiotic subpopulation of alcohol-dependent subjects.

    PubMed

    de Timary, Philippe; Leclercq, Sophie; Stärkel, Peter; Delzenne, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of studies that assessed the importance of biological factors for the development of psychiatric disorders focused on processes occurring at the brain level. Alcohol-dependence is a very frequent psychiatric disorder where psycho-pharmacological interventions are only of moderate efficacy. Our laboratory has recently described that a subpopulation of alcohol-dependent subjects, that accounted for approximately 40% of individuals tested, presented with an increased intestinal permeability, with a dysbiosis, with alterations in the metabolomic content of faeces--that could play a role in the increased permeability--and finally with a more severe profile of alcohol-dependence than the other non-dysbiotic subpopulation. In this addendum, we discuss the implications of our observations for the pathophysiology of alcohol dependence where we try to discriminate which addiction dimensions are likely related to the gut microbiota alterations and whether these alterations are the cause or the consequence of drinking habits.

  20. A dysbiotic subpopulation of alcohol-dependent subjects

    PubMed Central

    de Timary, Philippe; Leclercq, Sophie; Stärkel, Peter; Delzenne, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of studies that assessed the importance of biological factors for the development of psychiatric disorders focused on processes occurring at the brain level. Alcohol-dependence is a very frequent psychiatric disorder where psycho-pharmacological interventions are only of moderate efficacy. Our laboratory has recently described that a subpopulation of alcohol-dependent subjects, that accounted for approximately 40% of individuals tested, presented with an increased intestinal permeability, with a dysbiosis, with alterations in the metabolomic content of faeces - that could play a role in the increased permeability - and finally with a more severe profile of alcohol-dependence than the other non-dysbiotic subpopulation. In this addendum, we discuss the implications of our observations for the pathophysiology of alcohol dependence where we try to discriminate which addiction dimensions are likely related to the gut microbiota alterations and whether these alterations are the cause or the consequence of drinking habits. PMID:26727422

  1. [Genetic factors of alcohol-dependence].

    PubMed

    Pinto, E; Ansseau, M

    2009-10-01

    Alcohol dependence is a complex and multifactorial disease resulting both from neurobiological mechanisms and environmental factors. It is frequently associated with comorbid psychiatric disorders or with specific personality or behavioral features. Although action can be taken on the environment in order to decrease the risk of the illness, current methods used to prevent or to treat this pathology show moderate efficacy: problematic consumption of ethanol in the general population as well as relapse rates under treatment in dependent patients remain indeed very high. It is therefore of major importance to broaden our knowledge of alcohol dependence and its comorbidities so as to improve both their prevention and treatment. In this perspective, recent progress in the field of neurosciences may contribute to achieve this goal. Precisely, genetics is a promising way benefiting from many advances in genetic epidemiology, cellular and molecular biology, neuroimaging and pharmacology. In parallel with a better understanding of the neurobiology of addictions and associated behaviors, these techniques led to the identification of brain mechanisms in which a genetic variation may influence the individual vulnerability towards alcohol dependence. Moreover, there is growing evidence that alcoholism results from the interaction of genetic and environmental factors influencing both its expression and its course. Given the fact that alcohol-dependence seems highly heritable (50 to 60% of the variance in both men and women), this review assesses the role of some of the genomic regions linked with the disease, as well as the principal variants of candidate genes identified as specifically involved in the predisposition. Polymorphisms of genes influencing alcohol metabolism, GABAergic, dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotransmission seem, indeed, at stake in the development of alcohol-dependence and its related features such as personality, behavior, impulse control or craving

  2. Genetic Moderators and Psychiatric Mediators of the link between Sexual Abuse and Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, William E.; Magnusson, Åsa; Göransson, Mona; Heilig, Markus A.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Objective This study used a case-control female sample to test psychiatric mediators and genetic moderators of the effect of sexual abuse on later alcohol dependence. The study also tested differences between alcohol dependent women with or without a history of sexual abuse on variables that that might affect treatment planning. Methods A case-control design compared 192 treatment-seeking alcohol dependent women with 177 healthy population controls. All participants were assessed for alcohol-related behaviors, sexual abuse history, psychiatric problems, and personality functioning. Markers were genotyped in the CRHR1, MAO-A and OPRM1 genes. Results The association of sexual abuse with alcohol dependence was limited to the most severe category of sexual abuse involving anal or vaginal penetration. Of the five psychiatric disorders tested, anxiety, anorexia nervosa, and bulimia met criteria as potential mediators of the abuse-alcohol dependence association. Severe sexual abuse continued to have an independent effect on alcohol dependence status even after accounting for these potential mediators. None of the candidate genetic markers moderated the association between sexual abuse and alcohol dependence. Of alcohol dependent participants, those with a history of severe abuse rated higher on alcoholism severity, and psychiatric comorbidities. Conclusion Sexual abuse is associated with later alcohol problems directly as well as through its effect on psychiatric problems. Treatment-seeking alcohol dependent women with a history of abuse have distinct features as compared to other alcohol dependent women. PMID:21193270

  3. Genetic moderators and psychiatric mediators of the link between sexual abuse and alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Copeland, William E; Magnusson, Asa; Göransson, Mona; Heilig, Markus A

    2011-06-01

    This study used a case-control female sample to test psychiatric mediators and genetic moderators of the effect of sexual abuse on later alcohol dependence. The study also tested differences between alcohol dependent women with or without a history of sexual abuse on variables that might affect treatment planning. A case-control design compared 192 treatment-seeking alcohol dependent women with 177 healthy population controls. All participants were assessed for alcohol-related behaviors, sexual abuse history, psychiatric problems, and personality functioning. Markers were genotyped in the CRHR1, MAO-A and OPRM1 genes. The association of sexual abuse with alcohol dependence was limited to the most severe category of sexual abuse involving anal or vaginal penetration. Of the five psychiatric disorders tested, anxiety, anorexia nervosa, and bulimia met criteria as potential mediators of the abuse-alcohol dependence association. Severe sexual abuse continued to have an independent effect on alcohol dependence status even after accounting for these potential mediators. None of the candidate genetic markers moderated the association between sexual abuse and alcohol dependence. Of alcohol dependent participants, those with a history of severe abuse rated higher on alcoholism severity, and psychiatric comorbidities. Sexual abuse is associated with later alcohol problems directly as well as through its effect on psychiatric problems. Treatment-seeking alcohol dependent women with a history of abuse have distinct features as compared to other alcohol dependent women. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Salivary lysozyme in smoking alcohol dependent persons.

    PubMed

    Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Zalewska, Anna; Waszkiewicz, Magdalena; Szajda, Slawomir Dariusz; Repka, Bernadeta; Szulc, Agata; Kepka, Alina; Minarowska, Alina; Ladny, Jerzy Robert; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of chronic alcohol intoxication and smoking on the concentration and output of salivary lysozyme. Thirty seven men participated in the study, including 17 male smoking alcohol-dependent patients after chronic alcohol intoxication (AS), and 20 control non-smoking male social drinkers (CNS) with no history of alcohol abuse or smoking. The level of lysozyme was assessed by the radial immunodiffusion method. Significantly lower lysozyme output in the AS group compared to the CNS group was found. Moreover, gingival index was significantly higher in AS than in the CNS group. It appeared that the reduced salivary lysozyme output was more likely the result of ethanol action than smoking. In conclusion, persons addicted to alcohol and nicotine have a poorer periodontal status than non-smoking social drinkers, which may partially be due to the diminished protective effects of lysozyme present in the saliva.

  5. Urine ethanol concentration and alcohol hangover severity.

    PubMed

    Van de Loo, Aurora; Mackus, Marlou; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien; Brookhuis, Karel; Garssen, Johan; Verster, Joris

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between urine ethanol concentration and alcohol hangover severity. N = 36 healthy social drinkers participated in a naturalistic study, comprising a hangover day and a control day. N = 18 of them have regular hangovers (the hangover group), while the other N = 18 claim to be hangover immune (hangover-immune group). On each test day at 9.30 am, urine samples were collected. Participants rated their overall hangover severity on a scale from 0 (absent) to 10 (extreme), as well as 18 individual hangover symptoms. Urine ethanol concentration was significantly higher on the hangover day when compared to the control day (p = 0.006). On the hangover day, urine ethanol concentration was significantly lower in the hangover-immune group when compared to the hangover group (p = 0.027). In the hangover-immune group, none of the correlations of urine ethanol concentration with individual hangover symptoms was significant. In contrast, in the hangover group, significant correlations were found with a variety of hangover symptoms, including nausea, concentration problems, sleepiness, weakness, apathy, sweating, stomach pain, thirst, heart racing, anxiety, and sleep problems. Urine ethanol levels are significantly associated with the presence and severity of several hangover symptoms.

  6. Operant alcohol self-administration in dependent rats: focus on the vapor model

    PubMed Central

    Vendruscolo, Leandro F.; Roberts, Amanda J.

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholism (alcohol dependence) is characterized by a compulsion to seek and ingest alcohol (ethanol), loss of control over intake, and the emergence of a negative emotional state during withdrawal. Animal models are critical in promoting our knowledge of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying alcohol dependence. Here, we review the studies involving operant alcohol self-administration in rat models of alcohol dependence and withdrawal with the focus on the alcohol vapor model. In 1996, the first articles were published reporting that rats made dependent on alcohol by exposure to alcohol vapors displayed increased operant alcohol self-administration during acute withdrawal compared with nondependent rats (i.e., not exposed to alcohol vapors). Since then, it has been repeatedly demonstrated that this model reliably produces physical and motivational symptoms of alcohol dependence. The functional roles of various systems implicated in stress and reward, including opioids, dopamine, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), glucocorticoids, neuropeptide Y (NPY), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), norepinephrine, and cannabinoids, have been investigated in the context of alcohol dependence. The combination of models of alcohol withdrawal and dependence with operant self-administration constitutes an excellent tool to investigate the neurobiology of alcoholism. In fact, this work has helped lay the groundwork for several ongoing clinical trials for alcohol dependence. Advantages and limitations of this model are discussed, with an emphasis on what future directions of great importance could be. PMID:24290310

  7. Operant alcohol self-administration in dependent rats: focus on the vapor model.

    PubMed

    Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Roberts, Amanda J

    2014-05-01

    Alcoholism (alcohol dependence) is characterized by a compulsion to seek and ingest alcohol (ethanol), loss of control over intake, and the emergence of a negative emotional state during withdrawal. Animal models are critical in promoting our knowledge of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying alcohol dependence. Here, we review the studies involving operant alcohol self-administration in rat models of alcohol dependence and withdrawal with the focus on the alcohol vapor model. In 1996, the first articles were published reporting that rats made dependent on alcohol by exposure to alcohol vapors displayed increased operant alcohol self-administration during acute withdrawal compared with nondependent rats (i.e., not exposed to alcohol vapors). Since then, it has been repeatedly demonstrated that this model reliably produces physical and motivational symptoms of alcohol dependence. The functional roles of various systems implicated in stress and reward, including opioids, dopamine, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), glucocorticoids, neuropeptide Y (NPY), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), norepinephrine, and cannabinoids, have been investigated in the context of alcohol dependence. The combination of models of alcohol withdrawal and dependence with operant self-administration constitutes an excellent tool to investigate the neurobiology of alcoholism. In fact, this work has helped lay the groundwork for several ongoing clinical trials for alcohol dependence. Advantages and limitations of this model are discussed, with an emphasis on what future directions of great importance could be. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Automatic avoidance tendencies for alcohol cues predict drinking after detoxification treatment in alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Field, Matt; Di Lemma, Lisa; Christiansen, Paul; Dickson, Joanne

    2017-03-01

    Alcohol dependence is characterized by conflict between approach and avoidance motivational orientations for alcohol that operate in automatic and controlled processes. This article describes the first study to investigate the predictive validity of these motivational orientations for relapse to drinking after discharge from alcohol detoxification treatment in alcohol-dependent patients. One hundred twenty alcohol-dependent patients who were nearing the end of inpatient detoxification treatment completed measures of self-reported (Approach and Avoidance of Alcohol Questionnaire; AAAQ) and automatic (modified Stimulus-Response Compatibility task) approach and avoidance motivational orientations for alcohol. Their drinking behavior was assessed via telephone follow-ups at 2, 4, and 6 months after discharge from treatment. Results indicated that, after controlling for the severity of alcohol dependence, strong automatic avoidance tendencies for alcohol cues were predictive of higher percentage of heavy drinking days (PHDD) at 4-month (β = 0.22, 95% CI [0.07, 0.43]) and 6-month (β = 0.22, 95% CI [0.01, 0.42]) follow-ups. We failed to replicate previous demonstrations of the predictive validity of approach subscales of the AAAQ for relapse to drinking, and there were no significant predictors of PHDD at 2-month follow-up. In conclusion, strong automatic avoidance tendencies predicted relapse to drinking after inpatient detoxification treatment, but automatic approach tendencies and self-reported approach and avoidance tendencies were not predictive in this study. Our results extend previous findings and help to resolve ambiguities with earlier studies that investigated the roles of automatic and controlled cognitive processes in recovery from alcohol dependence. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Automatic Avoidance Tendencies for Alcohol Cues Predict Drinking After Detoxification Treatment in Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is characterized by conflict between approach and avoidance motivational orientations for alcohol that operate in automatic and controlled processes. This article describes the first study to investigate the predictive validity of these motivational orientations for relapse to drinking after discharge from alcohol detoxification treatment in alcohol-dependent patients. One hundred twenty alcohol-dependent patients who were nearing the end of inpatient detoxification treatment completed measures of self-reported (Approach and Avoidance of Alcohol Questionnaire; AAAQ) and automatic (modified Stimulus-Response Compatibility task) approach and avoidance motivational orientations for alcohol. Their drinking behavior was assessed via telephone follow-ups at 2, 4, and 6 months after discharge from treatment. Results indicated that, after controlling for the severity of alcohol dependence, strong automatic avoidance tendencies for alcohol cues were predictive of higher percentage of heavy drinking days (PHDD) at 4-month (β = 0.22, 95% CI [0.07, 0.43]) and 6-month (β = 0.22, 95% CI [0.01, 0.42]) follow-ups. We failed to replicate previous demonstrations of the predictive validity of approach subscales of the AAAQ for relapse to drinking, and there were no significant predictors of PHDD at 2-month follow-up. In conclusion, strong automatic avoidance tendencies predicted relapse to drinking after inpatient detoxification treatment, but automatic approach tendencies and self-reported approach and avoidance tendencies were not predictive in this study. Our results extend previous findings and help to resolve ambiguities with earlier studies that investigated the roles of automatic and controlled cognitive processes in recovery from alcohol dependence. PMID:27935726

  10. Applying the New Genomics to Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Sean P.; Pietrzykowski, Andrzej Z.; Miles, Michael F.; O'Brien, Megan A.; Sanna, Pietro P.; Zakhari, Samir; Mayfield, R. Dayne; Harris, R. Adron

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes the proceedings of a symposium presented at the “Alcoholism and Stress: A Framework for Future Treatment Strategies” conference held in Volterra, Italy on May 6–9, 2014. The overall goal of the symposium titled “Applying the New Genomics to Alcohol Dependence,” chaired by Dr. Adron Harris, was to highlight recent genomic discoveries and applications for profiling alcohol use disorder (AUD). Dr. Sean Farris discussed the gene expression networks related to lifetime consumption of alcohol within human prefrontal cortex. Dr. Andrzej Pietrzykowski presented the effects of alcohol on microRNAs in humans and animal models. Alcohol-induced alterations in the synaptic transcriptome were discussed by Dr. Michael Miles. Dr. Pietro Sanna examined methods to probe the gene regulatory networks that drive excessive alcohol drinking, and Dr. Samir Zakhari served as a panel discussant and summarized the proceedings. Collectively, the presentations emphasized the power of integrating multiple levels of genetics and transcriptomics with convergent biological processes and phenotypic behaviors to determine causal factors of AUD. The combined use of diverse data types demonstrates how unique approaches and applications can help categorize genetic complexities into relevant biological networks using a systems-level model of disease. PMID:25896098

  11. Alcohol Dependence and Free-Choice Drinking in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol dependence continues to be an important health concern and animal models are critical to furthering our understanding of this complex disease. A hallmark feature of alcoholism is a significant increase in alcohol drinking over time. While several different animal models of excessive alcohol (ethanol) drinking exist for mice and rats, a growing number of laboratories are using a model that combines chronic ethanol exposure procedures with voluntary ethanol drinking with mice as experimental subjects. Primarily, these studies use a chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure pattern to render mice dependent and a 2-h limited access procedure to evaluate drinking behavior. Compared to non-dependent mice that also drink ethanol, the ethanol-dependent mice demonstrate significant increases in voluntary ethanol drinking. The increased drinking significantly elevates blood and brain ethanol concentrations compared to the non-dependent control mice. Studies report that the increased drinking by dependent mice is driven by neuroadaptations in glutamatergic and corticotropin-releasing factor signaling in different brain regions known to be involved in alcohol-related behaviors. The dysregulation of these systems parallels findings in human alcoholics and treatments that demonstrate efficacy in alcoholics can also reduce drinking in this model. Moreover, preclinical findings have informed the development of human clinical trials, further highlighting the translational potential of the model. As a result of these features, the CIE exposure and free-choice drinking model is becoming more widely used and promises to provide more insight into mechanisms of excessive drinking that may be important for developing treatments for human alcoholics. The salient features and possible future considerations for CIE exposure and free-choice drinking in mice are discussed. PMID:24530006

  12. Alcohol dependence and free-choice drinking in mice.

    PubMed

    Griffin, William C

    2014-05-01

    Alcohol dependence continues to be an important health concern and animal models are critical to furthering our understanding of this complex disease. A hallmark feature of alcoholism is a significant increase in alcohol drinking over time. While several different animal models of excessive alcohol (ethanol) drinking exist for mice and rats, a growing number of laboratories are using a model that combines chronic ethanol exposure procedures with voluntary ethanol drinking with mice as experimental subjects. Primarily, these studies use a chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure pattern to render mice dependent and a 2-h limited access procedure to evaluate drinking behavior. Compared to non-dependent mice that also drink ethanol, the ethanol-dependent mice demonstrate significant increases in voluntary ethanol drinking. The increased drinking significantly elevates blood and brain ethanol concentrations compared to the non-dependent control mice. Studies report that the increased drinking by dependent mice is driven by neuroadaptations in glutamatergic and corticotropin-releasing factor signaling in different brain regions known to be involved in alcohol-related behaviors. The dysregulation of these systems parallels findings in human alcoholics and treatments that demonstrate efficacy in alcoholics can also reduce drinking in this model. Moreover, preclinical findings have informed the development of human clinical trials, further highlighting the translational potential of the model. As a result of these features, the CIE exposure and free-choice drinking model is becoming more widely used and promises to provide more insight into mechanisms of excessive drinking that may be important for developing treatments for human alcoholics. The salient features and possible future considerations for CIE exposure and free-choice drinking in mice are discussed.

  13. Negative Symptoms are Associated with Less Alcohol Use, Craving, and “High” in Alcohol Dependent Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Batki, Steven L.; Leontieva, Luba; Dimmock, Jacqueline A.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Background Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) frequently co-occur with and exacerbate schizophrenia, yet the specific relationships between schizophrenia symptoms and alcohol use remain unclear. Methods PANSS scores were correlated with measures of alcohol and other substance use in patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and AUDs entering a trial of monitored naltrexone treatment. Data were analyzed from the first 80 participants; 55% had schizophrenia and 45% had schizoaffective disorder. All had AUDs; 95% had alcohol dependence and 5% alcohol abuse; 34% also had cannabis abuse/dependence and 31% cocaine abuse/dependence. Results PANSS Negative scores were inversely correlated with Addiction Severity Index alcohol composite score, alcohol craving, quality of alcohol “high” (euphoria), and with frequency of cannabis use. An exploratory analysis indicated that the negative symptoms that may most strongly correlate with less alcohol use, craving or euphoria were passive/apathetic social withdrawal, blunted affect, difficulty in abstract thinking, and stereotyped thinking. Higher PANSS Composite scores, indicating the predominance of positive over negative PANSS symptoms, correlated with more alcohol craving and cannabis use. Higher PANSS General scores were associated with more alcohol craving. Conclusions These findings extend previous reports of the association of negative schizophrenia symptoms with less alcohol and substance use to patients with AUDs and indicate that this relationship also includes less alcohol craving and less alcohol euphoria. The findings may also provide some initial evidence that specific negative symptoms may be key to these relationships. PMID:18701256

  14. Personality traits of problem gamblers with and without alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Lister, Jamey J; Milosevic, Aleks; Ledgerwood, David M

    2015-08-01

    A large proportion of individuals with gambling disorder also present with a history of alcohol dependence, but few studies have directly examined the relationship between these two conditions. This study's primary and secondary aims were to 1) examine the relationship of personality traits to co-occurring lifetime (current/past) alcohol dependence status, while 2) accounting for differences in gambling characteristics and co-occurring psychiatric disorders among problem/pathological gamblers recruited from the community. Problem/pathological gamblers (N=150) completed measures of personality traits and gambling characteristics (e.g., gambling severity, gambling involvement, delayed discounting of monetary rewards), and were clinically interviewed for co-occurring psychiatric disorders. A co-occurring lifetime diagnosis of alcohol dependence (n=61, 40.7%) was associated with lower personality scores for Control, Well-Being, Achievement, Traditionalism, and Harm Avoidance, as well as higher scores for Alienation (Tellegen & Waller, 1994) in bivariate analyses. Problem/pathological gamblers with lifetime alcohol dependence reported greater lifetime gambling severity, greater past-year gambling involvement, steeper delayed discounting, and a greater likelihood of current and lifetime substance dependence, lifetime antisocial personality disorder, and current unipolar mood disorders. Multivariate analyses indicated that lower Control, Traditionalism, and Well-Being and a co-occurring lifetime substance dependence diagnosis best accounted for a co-occurring lifetime alcohol dependence diagnosis in problem/pathological gamblers. Problem/pathological gamblers with co-occurring lifetime alcohol dependence demonstrate addictive behavior across multiple domains and report a personality style characterized by hopelessness, impaired control, and resistance to externally-motivated treatment approaches. Implications for the treatment of these complex cases are discussed

  15. DISABILITY ASSOCIATED WITH ALCOHOL ABUSE AND DEPENDENCE

    PubMed Central

    Samokhvalov, Andriy V.; Popova, Svetlana; Room, Robin; Ramonas, Milita; Rehm, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Alcohol use disorders (AUD), i.e., alcohol dependence and abuse are major contributors to burden of disease. A large part of this burden is due to disability. However, there is still controversy about the best disability weighting for alcohol use disorders. The objective of this study was to provide an overview of alcohol-related disabilities. METHODS Systematic literature review and expert interviews. RESULTS There is heterogeneity in experts’ descriptions of disabilities related to AUD. The major core attributes of disability related to AUD are changes of emotional state, social relationships, memory and thinking. The most important supplementary attributes are anxiety, impairments of speech and hearing. CONCLUSIONS This review identified the main patterns of disability associated with alcohol use disorders. However, there was considerable variability, and data on less prominent patterns were fragmented. Further and systematic research is required for increasing the knowledge on disability related to alcohol use disorders and for application of interventions for reducing the associated burden. OBJECTIVE To provide an overview of disabilities associated with AUD. PMID:20662803

  16. Clinical experience of baclofen in alcohol dependence: A chart review

    PubMed Central

    Rozatkar, Abhijit R.; Kapoor, Abhishek; Sidana, Ajeet; Chavan, Bir Singh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Craving is recognized as a formidable barrier in the management of patients with alcohol dependence. Among pharmacological agents that have been used in experimental studies for reduction in craving, baclofen appears to have a significant advantage over other agents. Methodology: The study is retrospective chart review of patients (n = 113) who have been treated with baclofen for alcohol dependence in a tertiary hospital of North India. Baseline assessments included sociodemography, motivation, quantity-frequency of alcohol use, and other alcohol-related clinical parameters. Weekly assessments, for a period of 4 weeks, were extracted from records which included dose of baclofen, craving intensity, and alcohol consumption. Results: The study sample was predominantly male, mean age of 41.49 (±9.75) years, most having a family history of substance use (70.97%), and many reporting binge use pattern in last year (49.46%). Baseline assessment revealed 48.7% of the sample was in precontemplation phase for alcohol use and 70% reported severe and persistent craving. This persistent craving was reported by only 15% of the sample by the end of 4 weeks treatment with baclofen (20–40 mg/day). Thirty-four percent of patients reported continued problematic use of alcohol by the end of 4 weeks. Conclusion: Our clinical experience suggests that baclofen reduces craving and alcohol consumption including in those with poor motivation. The drug causes few side effects and does not add to the intoxication effect of alcohol. Considering that baclofen is safe in those with liver cirrhosis and reduces withdrawal symptoms due to alcohol, a controlled trial comparing it with standard treatment is required. PMID:28163402

  17. Correlates of Baclofen Effectiveness in Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Lekhansh; Shukla, Tulika; Bokka, Spandana; Kandasamy, Arun; Benegal, Vivek; Murthy, Pratima; Chand, Prabhat

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is a global concern. Baclofen has shown promise as an anti-craving agent but its efficiency remains to be settled. We reviewed 549 male cases diagnosed with alcohol dependence who received Acamprosate (201) or Baclofen (348). ‘Time to first drink’ was compared between two groups and multiple regression analysis was done in baclofen group to identify correlates of effectiveness. There was a significant difference in outcome measure between Baclofen (M = 4.44, SD = 3.75) and Acamprosate group (M = 3.73, SD = 2.19); t (547) = 2.45, P = 0.01. Initial regression analysis with six predictor variables (average daily alcohol units, current age, age at onset of dependence, family history, duration of dependence and dose of baclofen in mg/day) showed significant correlation of outcome variable with only two predictor variables — dose of baclofen and average daily intake. Using the hierarchical method it was found that ‘dose of baclofen’ and ‘average alcohol intake’ explain a significant amount of variance in ‘time to first drink’. [F (1, 345) = 182.8, P < 0.001, R2 = 0.52, R2adjusted = 0.51]. This information can be used to select patients in long term longitudinal studies and may explain variable results seen in clinical trials of baclofen done earlier. PMID:26664095

  18. Effects of Alcoholism Severity and Smoking on Executive Neurocognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Glass, J.M.; Buu, A.; Adams, K.M.; Nigg, J.T.; Puttler, L.I.; Jester, J.M.; Zucker, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    Aims Neurocognitive deficits in chronic alcoholic men are well documented and include impairments in memory, visual-spatial processing, problem solving and executive function. The cause of these deficits is unclear, but could include direct effects of alcohol toxicity, pre-existing cognitive deficits that may predispose towards substance abuse, comorbid psychiatric disorders (e.g., depression) and comorbid abuse of substances other than alcohol. For example, cigarette smoking occurs at a much higher rate among persons with alcoholism and has been linked to poor cognitive performance. Until recently, the negative effects of smoking on cognitive function in alcoholism have been ignored. Methods The effects of alcoholism and smoking are examined in a community recruited sample of alcoholic and non-alcoholic men (N=240) using standard neuropsychological measures and reaction-time measures of executive function. Alcoholism severity was measured as an average of alcoholism diagnoses across the study duration (12 yrs). Smoking was measured in pack-years. Results Both alcoholism and smoking were negatively correlated with a composite executive function score. For component measures, alcoholism was negatively correlated with a broad range of measures, whereas smoking was negatively correlated with measures that emphasize response speed. In regression analyses, both smoking and alcoholism are significant predictors of executive function composite. However; when IQ is included in the regression analyses, alcoholism severity is no longer a significant predictor. Conclusions Both smoking and alcoholism were related to executive function. However, the effect of alcoholism on EF was not independent of IQ, suggesting that the alcoholism effect was generalized, perhaps affecting a wide range of cognitive abilities of which executive function is a component. On the other hand, the effect of smoking on measures relying on response speed were independent of IQ, suggesting a more

  19. [Venlafaxine extended release and alcohol dependence].

    PubMed

    Cáceres Anillo, David; Ana Rodriguez, Yuste; Morillo Velarde, Carlos; Cabrera Gisbert, Ma Victoria

    2007-01-01

    The aim is to determine the effect of the treatment with venlafaxine extended release in patients with alcohol or cocaine dependence disorder that initiate detoxification treatment. Observational, open, prospective study carried out in Spain in 2005. 55 patients older than 18 years of age with diagnosis of alcohol and/or cocaine dependence disorder, hospitalized in Specialty Care Center to initiate detoxification treatment, were included. Daily doses of 75 to 225 mg of venlafaxine extended release were administered for 6 months. Treatment was associated with significant reductions in EuropASI scores in the following areas: 3, alcohol use, baseline and final score of 8.2 +/- 0.2 and 6.4 +/- 0.4, respectively (P < 0.01); 5, family/social relations, initial score of 6.9 +/- 0.2 and of 5.2 +/- 0.5 at endpoint (P < 0.001); 1, medical status, scores of 3.7 +/- 0.4 and 0.9 +/- 0.3 (baseline and final visits, respectively) (P < 0.001); and 6, psychiatric status, with a baseline score of 7.8 +/- 0.1 and final score of 5.4 +/- 0.4 (P < 0.001). The VAS alcohol craving scores at baseline were 26.7 +/- 4.6, decreasing to 4.1 +/- 1.5 at endpoint (P < 0.001). The results of this observational study suggest that venlafaxine extended release could be effective as a coadyuvant in the treatment of alcohol dependent patients in alcohol detoxification therapy. Nevertheless, this should be confirmed with bigger placebo-controlled samples.

  20. Change in Psychiatric Symptomatology after Benfotiamine Treatment in Males is a Function of Lifetime Alcoholism Severity

    PubMed Central

    Manzardo, Ann M.; Pendleton, Tiffany; Poje, Albert; Penick, Elizabeth C.; Butler, Merlin G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe alcoholism can be associated with significant nutritional and vitamin deficiency, especially vitamin B1 (thiamine) which is associated with serious illness and neurological deficits that influence mood and cognition. We previously reported reduced alcohol consumption among female but not male alcoholics after supplementation with the high potency thiamine analog benfotiamine (BF). As a follow-up, we have examined the relationship between lifetime alcoholism severity and psychiatric symptoms among the alcohol dependent men from this cohort and their response to BF treatment. Methods Eighty-five adult men (mean age = 48 ± 8 yrs) meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for current alcohol dependence participated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 600 mg BF vs placebo (PL) for 6 months. Psychometric testing included a derived Lifetime Alcoholism Severity Score (AS), Symptom Checklist 90R (SCL-90R), and the Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS) at baseline and at 6 months with data analyzed using ANOVA and MANOVA modeling. Results Baseline SCL-90-R scale scores for men with high alcoholism severity (AS ≥ 24; N=46 HAS) were significantly greater than for men with low alcoholism severity (AS < 24; N=39 LAS), but BIS scores did not differ. MANOVA modeling identified a significant treatment effect (F=2.5, df=10, p<0.03) and treatment x alcoholism severity level interaction (F=2.5, dfnum=10, dfden=30, p<0.03) with SCL-90-R scores showing a reduction in symptoms among BF treated, high severity males. Conclustion BF appears to reduce psychiatric distress and may facilitate recovery in severely affected males with lifetime alcohol dependence and should be considered for adjuvant therapy in alcohol rehabilitation. PMID:25908323

  1. Dissociative disorders among alcohol-dependent inpatients.

    PubMed

    Evren, Cuneyt; Sar, Vedat; Karadag, Figen; Tamar Gurol, Defne; Karagoz, Mustafa

    2007-08-30

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of dissociative disorders among inpatients with alcohol dependency. The Dissociative Experiences Scale was used to screen 111 alcohol-dependent patients consecutively admitted to the inpatient unit of a dependency treatment center. Subgroups of 29 patients who scored 30.0 or above and 25 patients who scored below 10.0 were then evaluated with the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule and the Structured Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders. The interviewers were blind to the Dissociative Experiences Scale scores. Of the 54 patients evaluated, 10 (9.0% of the original 111) patients had a dissociative disorder. A considerable number of the remaining patients reported a high level of dissociative experiences. Among the dissociative disorder group, nine patients had dissociative disorder not otherwise specified and one patient had depersonalization disorder. Female gender, younger age, history of suicide attempt, childhood emotional and sexual abuse, and neglect were more frequent in the dissociative disorder group than among non-dissociative patients. The dissociative disorder group also had somatization disorder, borderline personality disorder, and lifetime major depression more frequently. For 9 of the 10 dissociative patients, dissociative symptoms started before the onset of alcohol use. Although the probability of having a comorbid dissociative disorder was not higher among alcohol-dependent inpatients than among the general psychiatric inpatients, the dissociative subgroup had distinct features. Many patients without a dissociative disorder diagnosis (predominantly men) provided hints of subtle dissociative psychopathology. Implications of comorbid dissociative disorders and dissociative experiences on prevention and treatment of alcohol dependency and the importance of gender-specific characteristics in this relationship require further study.

  2. Linkage Scan of Alcohol Dependence in the UCSF Family Alcoholism Study

    PubMed Central

    Gizer, Ian R.; Ehlers, Cindy L.; Vietan, Cassandra; Seaton-Smith, Kimberly L.; Feiler, Heidi S.; Lee, James V.; Segall, Samantha K.; Gilder, David A.; Wilhelmsen, Kirk C.

    2010-01-01

    Ample data suggest alcohol dependence represents a heritable condition, and several research groups have performed linkage analysis to identify genomic regions influencing this disorder. In the present study, a genome-wide linkage scan for alcohol dependence was conducted in a community sample of 565 probands and 1080 first-degree relatives recruited through the UCSF Family Alcoholism Study. The Semi-Structured Assessment for the Genetics of Alcoholism (SSAGA) was used to derive DSM-IV alcohol dependence diagnoses. Although no loci achieved genome-wide significance (i.e., LOD score > 3.0), several linkage peaks of interest (i.e., LOD score > 1.0) were identified. When the strict DSM-IV alcohol dependence diagnosis requiring the temporal clustering of symptoms served as the phenotype, linkage peaks were identified on chromosomes 1p36.31–p36.22, 2q37.3, 8q24.3, and 18p11.21–p11.2. When the temporal clustering of symptoms was not required, linkage peaks were again identified on chromosomes 1p36.31–p36.22 and 8q24.3 as well as novel loci on chromosomes 1p22.3, 2p24.3–p24.1, 9p24.1–p23, and 22q12.3–q13.1. Follow-up analyses were conducted by performing linkage analysis for the 12 alcohol dependence symptoms assessed by the SSAGA across the support intervals for the observed linkage peaks. These analyses demonstrated that different collections of symptoms often assessing distinct aspects of alcohol dependence (e.g., uncontrollable drinking and withdrawal vs. tolerance and drinking despite health problems) contributed to each linkage peak and often yielded LOD scores exceeding that reported for the alcohol dependence diagnosis. Such findings provide insight into how specific genomic regions may influence distinct aspects of alcohol dependence. PMID:20817416

  3. GABA receptors, alcohol dependence and criminal behavior.

    PubMed

    Terranova, Claudio; Tucci, Marianna; Sartore, Daniela; Cavarzeran, Fabiano; Di Pietra, Laura; Barzon, Luisa; Palù, Giorgio; Ferrara, Santo D

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the connection between alcohol dependence and criminal behavior by an integrated genetic-environmental approach. The research, structured as a case-control study, examined 186 alcohol-dependent males; group 1 (N = 47 convicted subjects) was compared with group 2 (N = 139 no previous criminal records). Genetic results were innovative, highlighting differences in genotype distribution (p = 0.0067) in group 1 for single-nucleotide polymorphism rs 3780428, located in the intronic region of subunit 2 of the GABA B receptor gene (GABBR2). Some environmental factors (e.g., grade repetition) were associated with criminal behavior; others (e.g., attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous) were inversely related to convictions. The concomitant presence of the genetic and environmental factors found to be associated with the condition of alcohol-dependent inmate showed a 4-fold increase in the risk of antisocial behavior. The results need to be replicated on a larger population to develop new preventive and therapeutic proposals.

  4. Immunological parameters in patients suffering from alcohol-dependence syndrome.

    PubMed

    Leksowski, W; Kawalaski, H; Czuba, Z; Krol, W; Gorczyca, P; Dworniczak, S; Rajca, M; Shani, J

    2000-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a major cause of abnormal liver development and activity. In addition to enzymatic malfunction, alcohol and its metabolites induce changes in the levels of some liver antigens, resulting in immunological disturbance. The purpose of the present study is to correlate the severity of liver function impairment with the length of alcohol abuse, in order to be able to use such tests as indicative of the severity of Alcohol Dependence Syndrome. Thirty-one alcohol abusers were allocated to three groups on the basis of the levels of their liver enzymes, and were tested for a variety of immunological parameters and skin reactions. The data indicate that even though not all immunological values measured differed significantly from the control values, in those that did (granulocytes, lymphocytes, CD4/CD8 ratio, C3, IgG, IgM and some skin positive reactions), the biggest difference was between the healthy volunteers and the group with the longest abuse period. It is suggested that changes in selected immunological parameters in alcohol abusers may indicate the severity of their liver dysfunction.

  5. Chronological relationship between antisocial personality disorder and alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Bahlmann, M; Preuss, U W; Soyka, M

    2002-11-01

    Personality disorders, and particularly antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), frequently co-occur with alcohol dependence. ASPD is considered to be an important cofactor in the pathogenesis and clinical course of alcohol dependence. The chronological relationship between the onset of symptoms of ASPD and alcohol-dependence characteristics has not yet been studied in great detail and the role of ASPD in classification schemes of alcohol dependence as suggested by Cloninger and Schuckit has yet to be determined. We studied 55 alcohol-dependent patients to assess the prevalence and age at manifestation of ASPD, conduct disorder characteristics as well as alcohol dependence by employing the Semi-Structured Assessment for the Genetics of Alcoholism and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R. Results indicate that the onset of ASPD characteristics precede that of alcohol dependence by some 4 years. This finding suggests that in patients with ASPD, alcohol dependence might be a secondary syndrome as suggested by previous research.

  6. Efficacy and safety of aripiprazole in alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Martinotti, Giovanni; Di Nicola, Marco; Janiri, Luigi

    2007-01-01

    Dopaminergic agonists and antagonists have both been examined for the treatment of substance abuse with contrasting results. To the best of our knowledge dopamine receptor partial agonists have not been investigated in alcohol use disorders. Thirteen detoxified alcohol-dependent subjects were treated with flexible doses of aripiprazole for 16 weeks. Six patients maintained an alcohol free condition for all the study period. All the subjects experienced a reduction of craving in both OCDS (p < .05) and VAS (p < .05), and a decrease of the SCL-90 General Severity Index (GSI) (p < .05). The data of this pilot clinical study, suggest a possible role for this drug in the treatment of individuals with alcohol problems.

  7. Parent's alcoholism severity and family topic avoidance about alcohol as predictors of perceived stigma among adult children of alcoholics: Implications for emotional and psychological resilience.

    PubMed

    Haverfield, Marie C; Theiss, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholism is a highly stigmatized condition, with both alcohol-dependent individuals and family members of the afflicted experiencing stigmatization. This study examined the severity of a parent's alcoholism and family topic avoidance about alcohol as two factors that are associated with family members' perceptions of stigma. Three dimensions of stigma were considered: discrimination stigma, disclosure stigma, and positive aspect stigma. In addition, this study assessed associations between perceived stigmatization and individuals' experiences of depressive symptoms, self-esteem, and resilience. Adult children of alcoholics (N = 622) were surveyed about family conditions, perceived stigma, and their emotional and psychological well-being. Regression analyses revealed that the severity of a parent's alcoholism predicted all three types of stigma for females, but not for males. In addition, family topic avoidance about alcohol predicted all types of stigma for males and discrimination stigma and positive aspect stigma for females. With few exceptions, the three types of stigma predicted depressive symptoms, self-esteem, and resilience for both male and female adult children of alcoholics. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for promoting a family environment that mitigates stigma and encourages emotional and psychological well-being. In 2012, approximately 3.3 million deaths worldwide were due to the harmful use of alcohol (World Health Organization [WHO], 2014). Individuals who abuse alcohol are susceptible to a variety of negative health outcomes (Rehm et al., 2009) and display inappropriate social behaviors (Klingemann, 2001; Schomerus et al., 2011a). General societal perceptions tend to characterize alcohol-dependent individuals as irresponsible and lacking in self-control (Schomerus et al., 2011b). Research in the United Kingdom found that 54% of the population believes alcohol-dependent individuals are personally to blame for their own

  8. Permanent impairment of birth and survival of cortical and hippocampal proliferating cells following excessive drinking during alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Heather N.; Chan, Stephanie H.; Crawford, Elena F.; Lee, Youn Kyung; Funk, Cindy K.; Koob, George F.; Mandyam, Chitra D.

    2009-01-01

    Experimenter-delivered alcohol decreases adult hippocampal neurogenesis, and hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. The present study used clinically relevant rodent models of nondependent limited access alcohol self-administration and excessive drinking during alcohol dependence (alcohol self-administration followed by intermittent exposure to alcohol vapors over several weeks) to compare alcohol-induced effects on cortical gliogenesis and hippocampal neurogenesis. Alcohol dependence, but not nondependent drinking, reduced proliferation and survival in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Apoptosis was reduced in both alcohol groups within the mPFC, which may reflect an initiation of a reparative environment following alcohol exposure as decreased proliferation was abolished after prolonged dependence. Reduced proliferation, differentiation, and neurogenesis was observed in the hippocampus of both alcohol groups, and prolonged dependence worsened the effects. Increased hippocampal apoptosis and neuronal degeneration following alcohol exposure suggests a loss in neuronal turnover and indicates that the hippocampal neurogenic niche is highly vulnerable to alcohol. PMID:19501165

  9. Alcohol-cue exposure decreases response inhibition towards alcohol-related stimuli in detoxified alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Kreusch, Fanny; Billieux, Joël; Quertemont, Etienne

    2017-03-01

    The induction of alcohol craving and the cognitive processing of alcohol-related stimuli in alcohol-dependent patients have been reported to compete with inhibitory control and contribute to alcohol relapse. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether the induction of a craving state, using an alcohol cue exposure paradigm, influences response inhibition towards both neutral stimuli and alcohol-related stimuli in alcohol-dependent patients. Thirty-one detoxified alcohol-dependent patients were exposed to either their preferred alcoholic beverage or to a glass of water. They then performed a modified stop signal task, which used alcohol-related words, neutral words and non-words, and a lexical decision as the Go response. The alcohol-cue exposure group reported significantly higher alcohol craving and showed higher percentages of commission errors towards alcohol-related words than the control group. All participants, but especially those of the alcohol-cue exposure group, showed also shorter reaction times when alcohol words were used as targets in go trials. The induction of alcohol craving in detoxified alcohol-dependent patients increases the motivational salience value of alcohol stimuli, leading them to automatically approach alcohol-related cues and therefore impairing response inhibition towards those stimuli. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Change in psychiatric symptomatology after benfotiamine treatment in males is related to lifetime alcoholism severity.

    PubMed

    Manzardo, Ann M; Pendleton, Tiffany; Poje, Albert; Penick, Elizabeth C; Butler, Merlin G

    2015-07-01

    Severe alcoholism can be associated with significant nutritional and vitamin deficiency, especially vitamin B1 (thiamine) which is associated with neurological deficits impacting mood and cognition. Alcohol consumption was reduced among female but not male alcoholics after supplementation with the high potency thiamine analog benfotiamine (BF). We examined the relationship between lifetime alcoholism severity, psychiatric symptoms and response to BF among the alcohol dependent men from this cohort. Eighty-five adult men (mean age=48±8 years) meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for a current alcohol use disorder who were abstinent <30days participated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 600mg BF vs placebo (PL) for 6 months. Psychometric testing included a derived Lifetime Alcoholism Severity Score (AS), Symptom Checklist 90R (SCL-90R), and the Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS) at baseline and at 6 months. Baseline SCL-90-R scale scores for men with high alcoholism severity (AS≥24; N=46 HAS) were significantly greater than for men with low alcoholism severity (AS<24; N=39 LAS), but BIS scores did not differ. MANOVA modeling at follow-up (N=50 completed subjects) identified a significant treatment effect (F=2.5, df=10, p<0.03) and treatment×alcoholism severity level interaction (F=2.5, dfnum=10, dfden=30, p<0.03) indicating reduced SCL-90-R scores among BF treated, HAS males. Above normal plasma thiamine levels at follow-up predicted reduced depression scores in a BF-treated subset (F=3.2, p<0.09, N=26). BF appears to reduce psychiatric distress and may facilitate recovery in severely affected males with a lifetime alcohol use disorder and should be considered for adjuvant therapy in alcohol rehabilitation. #NCT00680121 High Dose Vitamin B1 to Reduce Abusive Alcohol Use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pharmacotherapy for alcohol dependence: A stratified approach.

    PubMed

    Thompson, A; Owens, L; Pushpakom, S P; Faizal, M; Pirmohamed, M

    2015-09-01

    Alcohol dependence is a common disorder in many societies worldwide, and remains difficult to identify and treat. It is also a risk factor for many secondary non-communicable diseases. Pharmacotherapy is one available treatment option, but appears to be underutilised in practice. Major barriers to use of medications in this area include lack of clinical guidance and questionable efficacy. However, for each medication there appears to be a subpopulation that responds positively, and understanding the moderating factors to treatment efficacy is an important research goal. Thus, this review provides a narrative regarding potential stratification techniques in pharmacological treatment of alcohol dependence, with a specific focus on typologies and pharmacogenetics. In addition, we discuss the basic background of stratified medicine and recent studies on genetic predisposition to alcohol dependence. A growing repository of data exists for both approved and non-approved pharmacotherapies, but failure to replicate findings, inadequate sample sizes, and insufficient funding has resulted in a translational gap. Implementing evidence-based stratified/personalised therapy and identifying new therapeutic agents may lead to improved clinical outcomes and reduced financial burden. Despite some promising findings to date, much work is still required. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Genome-wide search for genes affecting the risk for alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Reich, T; Edenberg, H J; Goate, A; Williams, J T; Rice, J P; Van Eerdewegh, P; Foroud, T; Hesselbrock, V; Schuckit, M A; Bucholz, K; Porjesz, B; Li, T K; Conneally, P M; Nurnberger, J I; Tischfield, J A; Crowe, R R; Cloninger, C R; Wu, W; Shears, S; Carr, K; Crose, C; Willig, C; Begleiter, H

    1998-05-08

    Alcohol dependence is a leading cause of morbidity and premature death. Several lines of evidence suggest a substantial genetic component to the risk for alcoholism: sibs of alcoholic probands have a 3-8 fold increased risk of also developing alcoholism, and twin heritability estimates of 50-60% are reported by contemporary studies of twins. We report on the results of a six-center collaborative study to identify susceptibility loci for alcohol dependence. A genome-wide screen examined 291 markers in 987 individuals from 105 families. Two-point and multipoint nonparametric linkage analyses were performed to detect susceptibility loci for alcohol dependence. Multipoint methods provided the strongest suggestions of linkage with susceptibility loci for alcohol dependence on chromosomes 1 and 7, and more modest evidence for a locus on chromosome 2. In addition, there was suggestive evidence for a protective locus on chromosome 4 near the alcohol dehydrogenase genes, for which protective effects have been reported in Asian populations.

  13. [Motivational interviewing with alcohol-dependent patients].

    PubMed

    Spaeth, Michael; Bleich, Stefan; Hillemacher, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Motivational interviewing with alcohol-dependent patients Alcohol-dependent patients do not need to be motivated from the outside. They are mostly ambivalent, and the inner voice, which already speaks for change (change talk), is heard through motivational interviewing, carefully strengthened and developed together with the patient. The practitioner has to deal with the human spirit of motivational interviewing and should be able to communicate with empathy, respect, congruence, and openness. The patient's autonomy should always be maintained. Advice is only given upon request. The conversation style is directive-guiding instead of authoritariansteering. OARS and the EPE principle are the motivational interviewing basics, which are consistently applied over 4 processes of motivational interviewing: engaging, focusing, evocing, and planning. The likelihood of change talk increases as soon as discrepancies between life goals and alcohol consumption emerge. An increased rate of change talk makes a change in behavior more likely. If a patient argues against change (sustain talk), one should not confront, but should consistently work with reflections, reframing, and an emphasis on autonomy. Motivational interviewing can be applied in different settings and populations, should be learned by the entire team (best professional guidance) in teamwork, and be subjected to a critical and constant evaluation. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Alcohol dependent patients have weak negative rather than strong positive implicit alcohol associations.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Joanne M; Gately, Claire; Field, Matt

    2013-08-01

    Alcohol dependence is characterised by motivational conflict (or ambivalence) in controlled cognitive processes, but it is unclear if ambivalence also exists within automatic cognitive processes, and if ambivalence operates between controlled and automatic processes. To investigate ambivalence operating within and between controlled and automatic processes in alcohol dependence. Alcohol-dependent patients who had recently completed inpatient alcohol detoxification (N = 47) and social drinking controls (N = 40) completed unipolar implicit association tests and self-report measures of alcohol approach and avoidance motivation and alcohol outcome expectancies. As predicted, both positive and negative alcohol outcome expectancies were stronger in alcohol-dependent patients compared to controls, indicative of ambivalence. Groups did not differ on implicit alcohol-positive associations, but alcohol-dependent participants had significantly weaker alcohol-negative associations than controls. Regression analyses revealed that implicit negative associations accounted for unique variance in group membership after controlling for alcohol outcome expectancies. Our findings demonstrate that alcohol dependent patients possess weak automatic alcohol-negative associations but not strong automatic alcohol-positive associations, and they suggest the presence of conflict between controlled and automatic processes with regard to negative alcohol cognitions.

  15. Does alcohol involvement increase the severity of intimate partner violence?

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, Christy M.; Caetano, Raul; Rodriguez, Lori A.; Okoro, Ngozi

    2012-01-01

    Background Most studies that have examined alcohol use immediately prior to intimate partner violence (IPV) have been limited to male-to-female partner violence (MFPV) and are subject to a number of methodological limitations. We add new information concerning the relationship between alcohol involvement and severity of IPV, MFPV, and female-to-male partner violence (FMPV). Methods We analyzed data from a 1995 US national population-based survey of couples ≥18 years old. We examined 436 couples who reported IPV and had information on alcohol involvement with IPV. We measured IPV using a revised Conflict Tactics Scale, Form R that asked respondents about 11 violent behaviors in the past year. Respondents were classified into mutually exclusive categories as having experienced mild only or mild+severe (‘severe’) IPV, MFPV or FMPV. Respondents were also asked if they or their partner were drinking at the time the violent behavior occurred and were classified as exposed to IPV with or without alcohol involvement. We estimated proportions, odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals and p-values of the proposed associations, accounting for the complex survey design. Results Overall, 30.2% of couples who reported IPV reported alcohol involved IPV; 69.8% reported no alcohol involvement. In adjusted analyses, those reporting severe (vs. mild only) IPV were more than twice as likely to report alcohol involvement. In adjusted analyses, those reporting severe (vs. mild) MFPV or FMPV were more likely to report female but not male alcohol involvement. Though estimates were positive and strong, most confidence intervals were compatible with a wide range of estimates including no association. Conclusions Our findings suggest alcohol involvement of either or both in the couple increases the risk of severe IPV. Our findings also suggest female alcohol use may play an important role in determining the severity of IPV, MFPV or FMPV. PMID:20102574

  16. Total sleep time, alcohol consumption, and the duration and severity of alcohol hangover.

    PubMed

    van Schrojenstein Lantman, Marith; Mackus, Marlou; Roth, Thomas; Verster, Joris C

    2017-01-01

    An evening of alcohol consumption often occurs at the expense of sleep time. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between total sleep time and the duration and severity of the alcohol hangover. A survey was conducted among Dutch University students to collect data on their latest alcohol hangover. Data on alcohol consumption, total sleep time, hangover severity, and duration were collected. Alcohol consumption and hangover severity and duration were compared for participants who (a) slept <5 hours, (b) slept between 5 and 7 hours, or (c) slept >7 hours. Data from N=578 students (40.1% men and 59.9% women) were included in the statistical analyses. Significant correlations were found between total sleep time and alcohol consumption (r=0.117, p=0.005), hangover severity (r= -0.178, p=0.0001) and hangover duration (r=0.168, p=0.0001). In contrast, total alcohol consumption did not correlate significantly with overall hangover severity or duration. Those who slept longer than 7 hours consumed significantly more alcohol (p=0.016) and reported extended hangover duration (p=0.004). However, they also reported significantly less severe hangovers (p=0.001) than students who slept <7 hours. Reduced total sleep time is associated with more severe alcohol hangovers.

  17. Rare ADH Variant Constellations are Specific for Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Lingjun; Zhang, Heping; Malison, Robert T.; Li, Chiang-Shan R.; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Fei; Lu, Lingeng; Lu, Lin; Wang, Xiaoping; Krystal, John H.; Zhang, Fengyu; Deng, Hong-Wen; Luo, Xingguang

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Some of the well-known functional alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene variants (e.g. ADH1B*2, ADH1B*3 and ADH1C*2) that significantly affect the risk of alcohol dependence are rare variants in most populations. In the present study, we comprehensively examined the associations between rare ADH variants [minor allele frequency (MAF) <0.05] and alcohol dependence, with several other neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders as reference. Methods: A total of 49,358 subjects in 22 independent cohorts with 11 different neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders were analyzed, including 3 cohorts with alcohol dependence. The entire ADH gene cluster (ADH7–ADH1C–ADH1B–ADH1A–ADH6–ADH4–ADH5 at Chr4) was imputed in all samples using the same reference panels that included whole-genome sequencing data. We stringently cleaned the phenotype and genotype data to obtain a total of 870 single nucleotide polymorphisms with 0< MAF <0.05 for association analysis. Results: We found that a rare variant constellation across the entire ADH gene cluster was significantly associated with alcohol dependence in European-Americans (Fp1: simulated global P = 0.045), European-Australians (Fp5: global P = 0.027; collapsing: P = 0.038) and African-Americans (Fp5: global P = 0.050; collapsing: P = 0.038), but not with any other neuropsychiatric disease. Association signals in this region came principally from ADH6, ADH7, ADH1B and ADH1C. In particular, a rare ADH6 variant constellation showed a replicable association with alcohol dependence across these three independent cohorts. No individual rare variants were statistically significantly associated with any disease examined after group- and region-wide correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusion: We conclude that rare ADH variants are specific for alcohol dependence. The ADH gene cluster may harbor a causal variant(s) for alcohol dependence. PMID:23019235

  18. Severe Gastrooesophageal Reflux Disease Associated with Foetal Alcohol Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sujay, N. K.; Jones, Matthew; Whittle, Emma; Murphy, Helen; Auth, Marcus K. H.

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure may have adverse effects on the developing foetus resulting in significant growth restriction, characteristic craniofacial features, and central nervous system dysfunction. The toxic effects of alcohol on the developing brain are well recognised. However, little is known about the effects of alcohol on the developing gastrointestinal tract or their mechanism. There are few case reports showing an association between foetal alcohol syndrome and gastrointestinal neuropathy. We report a rare association between foetal alcohol syndrome and severe gastrooesophageal reflux disease in an infant who ultimately required fundoplication to optimise her growth and nutrition. The child had failed to respond to maximal medical treatment (domperidone and omeprazole), high calorie feeds, PEG feeding, or total parenteral nutrition. The effect of alcohol on the developing foetus is not limited to the central nervous system but also can have varied and devastating effects on the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:22957290

  19. Quantitative electroencephalography analysis in university students with hazardous alcohol consumption, but not alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Jaramillo, Luis; Vega-Perera, Paulo; Ramírez-Lugo, Leticia; Reyes-López, Julián V; Santiago-Rodríguez, Efraín; Herrera-Morales, Wendy V

    2015-07-08

    Hazardous alcohol consumption is a pattern of consumption that leads to a higher risk of harmful consequences either for the user or for others. This pattern of alcohol consumption has been linked to risky behaviors, accidents, and injuries. Individuals with hazardous alcohol consumption do not necessarily present alcohol dependence; thus, a study of particular neurophysiological correlates of this alcohol consumption pattern needs to be carried out in nondependent individuals. Here, we carried out a quantitative electroencephalography analysis in health sciences university students with hazardous alcohol consumption, but not alcohol dependence (HAC), and control participants without hazardous alcohol consumption or alcohol dependence (NHAC). We analyzed Absolute Power (AP), Relative Power (RP), and Mean Frequency (MF) for beta and theta frequency bands under both eyes closed and eyes open conditions. We found that participants in the HAC group presented higher beta AP at centroparietal region, as well as lower beta MF at frontal and centroparietal regions in the eyes closed condition. Interestingly, participants did not present any change in theta activity (AP, RP, or MF), whereas previous reports indicate an increase in theta AP in alcohol-dependent individuals. Our results partially resemble those found in alcohol-dependent individuals, although are not completely identical, suggesting a possible difference in the underlying neuronal mechanism behind alcohol dependence and hazardous alcohol consumption. Similarities could be explained considering that both hazardous alcohol consumption and alcohol dependence are manifestations of behavioral disinhibition.

  20. Alcohol Dependence, Co-occurring Conditions and Attributable Burden

    PubMed Central

    Odlaug, B.L.; Gual, A.; DeCourcy, J.; Perry, R.; Pike, J.; Heron, L.; Rehm, J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Alcohol dependence is associated with high rates of co-occurring disorders which impact health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and add to the cost-of-illness. This study investigated the burden of alcohol dependence and associated co-occurring conditions on health and productivity. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in eight European countries. Physicians (Psychiatrists and General Practitioners) completed patient record forms, which included assessment of co-occurring conditions, and patients completed matching self-completion forms. Drinking risk level (DRL) was calculated and the relationship between DRL, co-occurring conditions, work productivity, hospitalisations and rehabilitation stays was explored. Results Data were collected for 2979 alcohol-dependent patients (mean age 48.8 ± 13.6 years; 70% male). In total, 77% of patients suffered from moderate-to-severe co-occurring psychiatric and/or somatic conditions. High DRL was significantly associated with depression, greater work productivity losses, increased hospitalisations and rehabilitation stays. Co-occurring conditions were significantly associated with poorer HRQoL and decreased work productivity, with a statistical trend towards an increased frequency of rehabilitation stays. Conclusions Alcohol-dependent patients manifest high rates of co-occurring psychiatric and somatic conditions, which are associated with impaired work productivity and HRQoL. The continued burden of illness observed in these already-diagnosed patients suggests an unmet need in both primary and secondary care. PMID:26246514

  1. Cognitive Impairments in Alcohol-Dependent Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bernardin, Florent; Maheut-Bosser, Anne; Paille, François

    2014-01-01

    Chronic excessive alcohol consumption induces cognitive impairments mainly affecting executive functions, episodic memory, and visuospatial capacities related to multiple brain lesions. These cognitive impairments not only determine everyday management of these patients, but also impact on the efficacy of management and may compromise the abstinence prognosis. Maintenance of lasting abstinence is associated with cognitive recovery in these patients, but some impairments may persist and interfere with the good conduct and the efficacy of management. It therefore appears essential to clearly define neuropsychological management designed to identify and evaluate the type and severity of alcohol-related cognitive impairments. It is also essential to develop cognitive remediation therapy so that the patient can fully benefit from the management proposed in addiction medicine units. PMID:25076914

  2. Ectopic hippocampal neurogenesis in adolescent male rats following alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    McClain, Justin A; Morris, Stephanie A; Marshall, S Alexander; Nixon, Kimberly

    2014-07-01

    The adolescent hippocampus is highly vulnerable to alcohol-induced damage, which could contribute to their increased susceptibility to alcohol use disorder. Altered adult hippocampal neurogenesis represents one potential mechanism by which alcohol (ethanol) affects hippocampal function. Based on the vulnerability of the adolescent hippocampus to alcohol-induced damage, and prior reports of long-term alcohol-induced effects on adult neurogenesis, we predicted adverse effects on adult neurogenesis in the adolescent brain following abstinence from alcohol dependence. Thus, we examined neurogenesis in adolescent male rats during abstinence following a 4-day binge model of alcohol dependence. Bromodeoxyuridine and Ki67 immunohistochemistry revealed a 2.2-fold increase in subgranular zone cell proliferation after 7 days of abstinence. Increased proliferation was followed by a 75% increase in doublecortin expression and a 56% increase in surviving bromodeoxyuridine-labeled cells 14 and 35 days post-ethanol exposure, respectively. The majority of newborn cells in ethanol and control groups co-localized with NeuN, indicating a neuronal phenotype and therefore a 1.6-fold increase in hippocampal neurogenesis during abstinence. Although these results mirror the magnitude of reactive neurogenesis described in adult rat studies, ectopic bromodeoxyuridine and doublecortin positive cells were detected in the molecular layer and hilus of adolescent rats displaying severe withdrawal symptoms, an effect that has not been described in adults. The presence of ectopic neuroblasts suggests that a potential defect exists in the functional incorporation of new neurons into the existing hippocampal circuitry for a subset of rats. Age-related differences in functional incorporation could contribute to the increased vulnerability of the adolescent hippocampus to ethanol.

  3. Perceived carer attitudes to alcohol dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Riley, A J

    1996-03-27

    Negative attitudes among carers towards people with alcohol-related problems have been reported in many studies. However, few studies have examined whether these attitudes are perceived by patients during face to face contact with healthcare professionals when receiving inpatient treatment. A sample of 26 discharged patients completed a 37-item questionnaire following treatment for alcohol problems. The Likert scale was used to measure whether patients felt that the attitude under investigation existed in the caring environment. The findings indicated that negative attitudes reported in other studies were not perceived by patients during inpatient treatment. Some barriers to treatment effectiveness such as prognostic pessimism were detected by the patients. Many upheld the view that the only goal of treatment adopted by staff was that of total abstinence. There is an increasing need to obtain feedback from patients who have received inpatient care. Greater flexibility and creativity in the care of the alcohol dependent person needs to be explored rather than the maintenance of a prescriptive approach.

  4. Ethnic Differences in Presentation and Severity of Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Halsted, Charles H.; Medici, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Background The frequency of alcoholic liver disease (ALD), including alcoholic steatosis, hepatitis and cirrhosis, varies significantly by ethnicity. Methods With the goal to assess the role of ethnicity in determining the age of onset and severity of ALD and to compare the risk factors for its progression among ethnic groups, we conducted a retrospective chart review of all patients with ALD who were admitted or were followed as outpatients at University of California Davis Medical Center between 2002 and 2010. After excluding HBsAg and HIV positive subjects, we reviewed the charts of 791 ALD patients including 130 with alcoholic fatty liver, 154 with alcoholic hepatitis, and 507 with alcoholic cirrhosis. Results When controlling for all variables in the model, Hispanic patients presented at significantly 4-10 years younger ages than White/Caucasian patients, in each of the three disease severity categories and the results were confirmed after excluding HCV Ab/RNA positive subjects. There were more obese Hispanic patients than White/Caucasian patients, whereas the proportion of patients with hepatitis C was significantly greater in African/American subjects with alcoholic hepatitis and the proportion of patients with diabetes mellitus was significantly lower in White/Caucasian subjects than in Hispanic subjects with cirrhosis. The proportion of subjects with severe alcoholic hepatitis was similar in Hispanic and White/Caucasian patients, but lower in African/American subjects. Conclusion Ethnicity is a major factor affecting the age and severity of presentation of different subtypes of ALD. PMID:25702770

  5. Alcohol consumption, alcohol dependence and related harms in Spain, and the effect of treatment-based interventions on alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Jürgen; Rehm, Maximilien X; Shield, Kevin D; Gmel, Gerrit; Gual, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol consumption in Spain has traditionally followed the Mediterranean drinking pattern, featuring daily drinking with meals, beer as the preferred beverage, and comparatively little drinking to intoxication. Alcohol dependence (AD), one of the most detrimental disorders caused by alcohol, was prevalent in 0.2% of women and 1.2% of men, corresponding to 31,200 women and 186,000 men in Spain with AD in 2005 in the age group of 15 to 64 year. These prevalence estimates of alcohol dependence are likely underestimated due to limitations in the World Mental Health Survey which cannot be fully corrected for; however, the estimates of AD for Spain represent the most accurate and up to date estimates available. Alcohol creates a significant health burden in Spain with 11.3 premature deaths in women per 100,000 aged 15 to 64 years, and 40.9 premature deaths in men per 100,000 in the same age group were due to alcohol consumption (data for 2004). This amounts to 8.4% of all female deaths and 12.3% of all the male deaths in this age group being attributable to alcohol consumption. A large percentage of these harms were due to heavy alcohol consumption and AD. AD is undertreated in Spain, with less than 10% of all people with AD treated. For those who are treated, psychotherapy is the most utilized form of treatment to avoid relapse. If 40% of AD patients in Spain were treated with pharmacological treatment (the most effective treatment method), 2.2% of female and 6.2% of male deaths due to AD would be prevented within one year. Thus by increasing treatment rates is an important means of reducing the alcohol-attributable mortality and health burden in Spain.

  6. Acamprosate: A prototypic neuromodulator in the treatment of alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Heyser, Charles J.

    2010-01-01

    Alcoholism is one of the most prevalent substance dependence disorders in the world. Advances in research in the neurobiological mechanisms underlying alcohol dependence have identified specific neurotransmitter targets for the development of pharmacological treatments. Acamprosate, marketed under the brand name Campral, is an orally administered drug available by prescription in the U.S. and throughout much of the world for treating alcohol dependence. Its safety and efficacy have been demonstrated in numerous clinical trials worldwide. Here we provide an overview of acamprosate in the context of the neurobiological underpinnings of alcohol dependence. We propose that unlike previously available pharmacotherapies, acamprosate represents a prototype of a neuromodulatory approach in the treatment of alcohol dependence. A neuromodulatory approach seeks to restore the disrupted changes in neurobiology resulting from chronic alcohol intake. It is our opinion that a neuromodulatory approach will provide a heuristic framework for developing more effective pharmacotherapies for alcohol dependence. PMID:20201812

  7. The effectiveness of brief intervention among injured patients with alcohol dependence: who benefits from brief interventions?

    PubMed

    Field, Craig A; Caetano, Raul

    2010-09-01

    Research investigating the differential effectiveness of Brief Motivational Interventions (BMIs) among alcohol-dependent and non-dependent patients in the medical setting is limited. Clinical guidelines suggest that BMI is most appropriate for patients with less severe alcohol problems. As a result, most studies evaluating the effectiveness of BMI have excluded patients with an indication of alcohol dependence. A randomized controlled trial of brief intervention in the trauma care setting comparing BMI to treatment as usual plus assessment (TAU+) was conducted. Alcohol dependence status was determined for 1336 patients using DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. The differential effectiveness of BMI among alcohol-dependent and non-dependent patients was determined with regard to volume per week, maximum amount consumed, percent days abstinent, alcohol problems at 6 and 12 months follow-up. In addition, the effect of BMI on dependence status at 6 and 12 months was determined. There was a consistent interaction between BMI and alcohol dependence status, which indicated significantly higher reductions in volume per week at 6 and 12 months follow-up (beta=-.56, p=.03, beta=-.63, p=.02, respectively), maximum amount at 6 months (beta=-.31, p=.04), and significant decreases in percent days abstinent at 12 months (beta=.11, p=.007) and alcohol problems at 12 months (beta=-2.7, p(12)=.04) among patients with alcohol dependence receiving BMI. In addition, patients with alcohol dependence at baseline that received BMI were .59 (95% CI=.39-.91) times less likely to meet criteria for alcohol dependence at six months. These findings suggest that BMI is more beneficial among patients with alcohol dependence who screen positive for an alcohol-related injury. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Effectiveness of Brief Intervention among Injured Patients with Alcohol Dependence: Who Benefits from Brief Interventions?

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Raul

    2009-01-01

    Background Research investigating the differential effectiveness of Brief Motivational Interventions (BMI) among alcohol dependent and non-dependent patients in the medical setting is limited. Clinical guidelines suggest that BMI is most appropriate for patients with less severe alcohol problems. As a result, most studies evaluating the effectiveness of BMI have excluded patients with an indication of alcohol dependence. Methods A randomized controlled trial of brief intervention in the trauma care setting comparing BMI to treatment as usual plus assessment (TAU+) was conducted. Alcohol dependence status was determined for 1336 patients using DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. The differential effectiveness of BMI among alcohol dependent and non-dependent patients was determined with regard to volume per week, maximum amount consumed, percent days abstinent, alcohol problems at six and 12 month follow up. In addition, the effect of BMI on dependence status at six and 12 months was determined. Results There was a consistent interaction between BMI and alcohol dependence status, which indicated significantly higher reductions in volume per week at six and twelve month follow up (β=−.56, p=.03, β=−.63, p=.02, respectively), maximum amount at six months (β=−.31, p=.04), and significant decreases in percent days abstinent at twelve months (β=.11, p=.007) and alcohol problems at twelve months (β=−2.7, p12=.04) among patients with alcohol dependence receiving BMI. In addition, patients with alcohol dependence at baseline that received BMI were .59 (95% CI=.39–.91) times less likely to meet criteria for alcohol dependence at six months. Conclusions These findings suggest that BMI is more beneficial among patients with alcohol dependence who screen positive for an alcohol related injury. PMID:20493644

  9. Role of the Serotonergic System in Alcohol Dependence: From Animal Models to Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Youssef; Johnson, Verity R.; Weedman, Jason M.

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol dependence remains among the most common substance abuse problems worldwide, and compulsive alcohol consumption is a significant public health concern. Alcohol is an addictive drug that alters brain function through interactions with multiple neurotransmitter systems. These neurotransmitter systems mediate the reinforcing effects of alcohol. Specifically, the serotonergic system is important in mediating alcohol reward, preference, dependence, and craving. In this review chapter, we first discuss the serotonin system as it relates to alcoholism, and then outline interactions between this system and other neurotransmitter systems. We emphasize the serotonin transporter and its possible role in alcoholism, then present several serotonergic receptors and discuss their contribution to alcoholism, and finally assess the serotonin system as a target for pharmacotherapy, with an emphasis on current and potential treatments. PMID:21199778

  10. FKBP5 Moderates Alcohol Withdrawal Severity: Human Genetic Association and Functional Validation in Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ming-Chyi; Schwandt, Melanie L; Chester, Julia A; Kirchhoff, Aaron M; Kao, Chung-Feng; Liang, Tiebing; Tapocik, Jenica D; Ramchandani, Vijay A; George, David T; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Goldman, David; Heilig, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol withdrawal is associated with hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunction. The FKBP5 gene codes for a co-chaperone, FK506-binding protein 5, that exerts negative feedback on HPA axis function. This study aimed to examine the effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the FKBP5 gene in humans and the effect of Fkbp5 gene deletion in mice on alcohol withdrawal severity. We genotyped six FKBP5 SNPs (rs3800373, rs9296158, rs3777747, rs9380524, rs1360780, and rs9470080) in 399 alcohol-dependent inpatients with alcohol consumption 48 h before admission and recorded scores from the Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment-Alcohol revised (CIWA-Ar). Fkbp5 gene knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice were assessed for alcohol withdrawal using handling-induced convulsions (HICs) following both acute and chronic alcohol exposure. We found the minor alleles of rs3800373 (G), rs9296158 (A), rs1360780 (T), and rs9470080 (T) were significantly associated with lower CIWA-Ar scores whereas the minor alleles of rs3777747 (G) and rs9380524 (A) were associated with higher scores. The haplotype-based analyses also showed an association with alcohol withdrawal severity. Fkbp5 KO mice showed significantly greater HICs during withdrawal from chronic alcohol exposure compared with WT controls. This study is the first to show a genetic effect of FKBP5 on the severity of alcohol withdrawal syndrome. In mice, the absence of the Fkbp5 gene enhances sensitivity to alcohol withdrawal. We suggest that FKBP5 variants may trigger different adaptive changes in HPA axis regulation during alcohol withdrawal with concomitant effects on withdrawal severity. PMID:24603855

  11. Alcohol-dependent patients with comorbid phobic disorders: a comparison between comorbid patients, pure alcohol-dependent and pure phobic patients.

    PubMed

    Schadé, Annemiek; Marquenie, Loes A; Van Balkom, Anton J L M; Koeter, Maarten W J; De Beurs, Edwin; Van Den Brink, Wim; Van Dyck, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Patients with a double diagnosis of alcohol dependence and phobic disorders are a common phenomenon in both alcohol and anxiety disorder clinics. If we are to provide optimum treatment we need to know more about the clinical characteristics of this group of comorbid patients. To answer the following questions. (1). What are the clinical characteristics of treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent patients with a comorbid phobic disorder? (2). Are alcohol dependence and other clinical characteristics of comorbid patients different from those of 'pure' alcohol-dependent patients? (3). Are the anxiety symptoms and other clinical characteristics of comorbid patients different from those of 'pure' phobic patients? Three groups of treatment-seeking patients were compared on demographic and clinical characteristics: alcohol dependent patients with a comorbid phobic disorder (n = 110), alcohol-dependent patients (n = 148) and patients with social phobia or agoraphobia (n = 106). In order to diagnose the comorbid disorders validly, the assessment took place at least 6 weeks after detoxification. Comorbid patients have high scores on depressive symptoms and general psychopathology: 25% of patients have a current and 52% a lifetime depressive disorder. The majority have no partner and are unemployed, they have a high incidence of other substance use (benzodiazepine, cocaine, cannabis) and a substantial proportion of comorbid patients have been emotionally, physically and sexually abused. They do not have a more severe, or different type of alcohol dependence or anxiety disorder than 'pure' alcohol-dependent patients and phobic patients respectively. Comorbid patients constitute a complex part of the treatment-seeking population in alcohol clinics and psychiatric hospitals. These findings should be taken into account when diagnosing and treating alcohol-dependent patients with a comorbid phobic disorder.

  12. Transcription factor AP2 beta involved in severe female alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Nordquist, Niklas; Göktürk, Camilla; Comasco, Erika; Nilsson, Kent W; Oreland, Lars; Hallman, Jarmila

    2009-12-11

    Susceptibility to alcoholism and antisocial behavior exhibits an evident link to monoaminergic neurotransmission. The serotonin system in particular, which is associated with regulation of mood and behavior, has an influence on personality characters that are firmly connected to risk of developing alcoholism and antisocial behavior, such as impulsiveness, and aggression. The transcription factor TFAP2b has repeatedly been shown to be involved in monoaminergic transmission, likely due to a regulatory effect on genes that are fundamental to this system, e.g. monoamine oxidase type A, and the serotonin transporter. Recent research has identified a functional polymorphism in the gene encoding TFAP2B that regulates its level of expression. In the present study we have compared a sample of female alcoholics (n=107), sentenced to institutional care for their severe addiction, contrasted against a control sample of adolescent females (n=875). The results showed that parental alcohol misuse was significantly more common among the alcoholic females, and also that parental alcohol misuse was associated with a reduction in age of alcohol debut. We also addressed the question of whether a functional TFAP2b polymorphism was associated with alcoholism. Results showed that the high-functioning allele was significantly more common among the female alcoholics, compared to the non-alcoholic controls. Furthermore, the results also indicated that psychosocial factors, in terms of parental alcohol misuse, depression or psychiatric disorder, had an influence on the association. It was observed that the genetic association was restricted to the subset of cases that had not experienced these negative psychosocial factors.

  13. Ethnic differences in presentation and severity of alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Levy, Robert; Catana, Andreea M; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Halsted, Charles H; Medici, Valentina

    2015-03-01

    The frequency of alcoholic liver disease (ALD), including alcoholic steatosis, hepatitis, and cirrhosis, varies significantly by ethnicity. With the goal to assess the role of ethnicity in determining the age of onset and severity of ALD and to compare the risk factors for its progression among ethnic groups, we conducted a retrospective chart review of all patients with ALD who were admitted or were followed as outpatients at University of California Davis Medical Center between 2002 and 2010. After excluding HBsAg- and HIV-positive subjects, we reviewed the charts of 791 patients with ALD including 130 with alcoholic fatty liver, 154 with alcoholic hepatitis, and 507 with alcoholic cirrhosis. When controlling for all variables in the model, Hispanic patients presented at significantly 4 to 10 years younger ages than White/Caucasian patients, in each of the 3 disease severity categories, and the results were confirmed after excluding HCV Ab-/RNA-positive subjects. There were more obese Hispanic patients than White/Caucasian patients, whereas the proportion of patients with hepatitis C was significantly greater in African American subjects with alcoholic hepatitis, and the proportion of patients with diabetes mellitus was significantly lower in White/Caucasian subjects than in Hispanic subjects with cirrhosis. The proportion of subjects with severe alcoholic hepatitis was similar in Hispanic and White/Caucasian patients, but lower in African American subjects. Ethnicity is a major factor affecting the age and severity of presentation of different subtypes of ALD. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  14. Severity of alcohol use and problem behaviors among school-based youths in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Latimer, William W.; Rojas, Vanessa Cecilia; Mancha, Brent Edward

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The present study sought to: (a) categorize youths into groups based on their level of alcohol use and number of symptoms of alcohol abuse and dependence defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), and (b) examine whether these categories were associated with other problem behaviors in which youths engage (marijuana use, sexual intercourse, and having been arrested or having trouble with the law). Methods The study is based on a cross-sectional survey administered to 972 school-based youths from one middle school and one high school in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Youths were categorized based on their alcohol use and alcohol problems. These categories were then examined for associations with lifetime marijuana use, lifetime sexual intercourse, and having been arrested or having had trouble with the law in the past year. The original eight categories of alcohol use were collapsed into six categories based on the results. Results For virtually every group characterized by higher severity of alcohol use and alcohol problems, researchers found an increasing prevalence of marijuana use in their lifetimes, increasing odds of sexual intercourse in their lifetimes, and having had trouble with the law in the past year. Conclusions Knowing about variations in alcohol use and alcohol problems may be instrumental in measuring the degree to which youths may also be engaging in a range of other elevated risk behaviors and a progression to more serious forms of alcohol and drug use. PMID:18510792

  15. Perception of sleep and dreams in alcohol-dependent patients during detoxication and abstinence.

    PubMed

    Steinig, Jana; Foraita, Ronja; Happe, Svenja; Heinze, Martin

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to investigate sleep quality and the subjective dream experience in alcohol-dependent patients during withdrawal and abstinence compared with healthy controls. Thirty-seven patients with alcohol dependency and 35 healthy control subjects were asked to fill in several questionnaires and to give information about their subjective sleep and dream experiences. Twelve patients participated in a follow-up interview 4 weeks later. Sleep quality is impaired in alcohol-dependent patients during detoxication, and the subjective dream experience is more negatively toned compared with healthy controls. Both sleep quality and dream experience improves slightly after 4 weeks of abstinence. Patients with alcohol dependency during withdrawal and abstinence dream significantly more often about alcohol. However, none of the abstinent alcohol-dependent patients dreamed about alcohol during withdrawal. This study shows that the subjective sleep and dream quality is strongly impaired in patients with alcohol dependency. Differences in the dream experience between alcohol-dependent patients and healthy controls are in accordance with the continuity hypotheses of dreaming. The hypothesis of dreaming about alcohol as a compensatory effect, however, could not be confirmed.

  16. Prevalence of alcohol dependence among excessive drinkers in New Mexico.

    PubMed

    Woerle, Sandra; Roeber, Jim; Landen, Michael G

    2007-02-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption claims more than 75,000 lives in the United States each year. The prevalence of alcohol dependence among excessive drinkers is not well known. Data from the 2002 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) in New Mexico were used to assess the prevalence of excessive drinking, including binge drinking, heavy drinking, alcohol-impaired driving, and alcohol dependence. Of 4,761 respondents, 16.5% were excessive drinkers; 14.4% binge drank and 1.8% were alcohol dependent. While the rates of alcohol dependence were higher among the youngest age group, males, those with some college education, and those of race/ethnicity other than White, non-Hispanic, only differences by age were statistically significant. The prevalence of alcohol dependence was the highest among those who reported alcohol-impaired driving in the past 30 days (15.9%), and was lower among those who reported heavy drinking (13.4%) and binge drinking (8.1%). Although 16.5% of New Mexico adults had at least 1 type of excessive drinking, only 1.8% of all adults met the criteria for alcohol dependence. Furthermore, only a minority of those who reported binge drinking, heavy drinking, or alcohol-impaired driving met the criteria for alcohol dependence. This suggests that most alcohol problems in New Mexico are likely due to excessive drinking among persons who are not alcohol dependent. The adverse health and social consequences associated with excessive drinking are not limited to those who are alcohol dependent, but extend to a broader range of problem drinkers across the population.

  17. Positive affect and stress reactivity in alcohol-dependent outpatients.

    PubMed

    McHugh, R Kathryn; Kaufman, Julia S; Frost, Katherine H; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; Weiss, Roger D

    2013-01-01

    Reactivity to stress is a common feature of alcohol dependence and is associated with poorer treatment outcome among alcohol-dependent patients. Despite the importance of stress reactivity in alcohol dependence, little is known about markers of resilience to stress in this population. The current study examined whether positive affect buffered the effect of stress on negative affect and alcohol craving in an alcohol-dependent sample. Outpatients (N = 1,375) enrolled in a large, randomized controlled trial for alcohol dependence (the Combined Pharmacotherapies and Behavioral Interventions for Alcohol Dependence [COMBINE] Study) completed measures of stress, positive affect, negative affect, and alcohol craving. In this secondary analysis, we hypothesized that positive affect would moderate the association between stress and negative affect and that positive affect would be negatively associated with craving. Results supported these hypotheses, such that patients with higher levels of positive affect exhibited a weaker relationship between stress and negative affect relative to those with low positive affect. Positive affect was negatively associated with craving but did not moderate the association between stress and craving. These results replicate studies suggesting a protective effect of positive affect on stress reactivity and extend this effect to an alcohol-dependent sample. If positive affect can aid in resilience to stress, the utilization of interventions that enhance positive affect may be of particular utility for alcohol-dependent patients. Future experimental studies testing the causality of this association as well as studies examining the effect of interventions to enhance positive affect are needed.

  18. Gene-based and pathway-based genome-wide association study of alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    ZUO, Lingjun; ZHANG, Clarence K.; SAYWARD, Frederick G.; CHEUNG, Kei-Hoi; WANG, Kesheng; KRYSTAL, John H.; ZHAO, Hongyu; LUO, Xingguang

    2015-01-01

    Background The organization of risk genes within signaling pathways may provide clues about the converging neurobiological effects of risk genes for alcohol dependence. Aim Identify risk genes and risk gene pathways for alcohol dependence. Methods We conducted a pathway-based genome-wide association study (GWAS) of alcohol dependence using a gene-set-rich analytic approach. Approximately one million genetic markers were tested in the discovery sample which included 1409 European-American (EA) alcohol dependent individuals and 1518 EA healthy comparison subjects. An additional 681 African-American (AA) cases and 508 AA healthy subjects served as the replication sample. Results We identified several genome-wide replicable risk genes and risk pathways that were significantly associated with alcohol dependence. After applying the Bonferroni correction for multiple testing, the ‘cellextracellular matrix interactions’ pathway (p<2.0E-4 in EAs) and the PXN gene (which encodes paxillin) (p=3.9E-7 in EAs) within this pathway were the most promising risk factors for alcohol dependence. There were also two nominally replicable pathways enriched in alcohol dependence-related genes in both EAs (0.015≤p≤0.035) and AAs (0.025≤p≤0.050): the ‘Na+/Cl- dependent neurotransmitter transporters’ pathway and the ‘other glycan degradation’ pathway. Conclusion These findings provide new evidence highlighting several genes and biological signaling processes that may be related to the risk for alcohol dependence. PMID:26120261

  19. Prazosin for Treatment With PTSD And Comorbid Alcohol Dependence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    There is a high rate of comorbidity with alcohol dependence (AD) and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The rates of PTSD among individuals with...AD are at least twice as high as those in the general population. In addition, alcohol dependence is the most common comorbid condition in men with...sleep disturbance in combat veterans with PTSD and alcohol dependence . The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of prazosis (16mg

  20. Low-molecular-weight metabolites relevant to ethanol metabolism: correlation with alcohol withdrawal severity and utility for identification of alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Pronko, P S; Velichko, M G; Moroz, A R; Rubanovich, N N

    1997-01-01

    The blood levels of ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetate, methanol, acetone, lactate, pyruvate, and glucose were measured in 23 male alcohol-dependent patients on days 2 to 6 after hospitalization and in 22 healthy male blood donors. Correlations between the biochemical parameters and 17 symptoms of the alcohol-withdrawal syndrome (AWS) were calculated. Abnormally high levels of ethanol, methanol, acetate, and acetone as well as hypoglycaemia were found on day 2, but lactacidaemia and pyruvataemia were pronounced throughout the observation period. AWS severity correlated positively with the acetone content on day 2 and with the acetate content on days 2 to 6. Negative correlations were found between ethanol levels and craving for alcohol, methanol levels and craving for alcohol, and between psychopathologic disorders and the total AWS severity score. The results suggest that concentrations of blood ethanol, methanol, acetate, and acetone exceeding their normal endogenous levels can be used only as indicators of recent heavy drinking. Linear discriminant analysis using the levels of the nine parameters studied enabled the correct classification of 91% to 96% of alcoholic patients during 1 week of abstinence and 100% of control subjects. The most informative parameters in the discrimination between alcoholics and controls were lactate, pyruvate, the lactate/pyruvate ratio, acetate, and acetone.

  1. Examining the Associations among Severity of Injunctive Drinking Norms, Alcohol Consumption, and Alcohol-Related Negative Consequences: The Moderating Roles of Alcohol Consumption and Identity

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Melissa A.; Neighbors, Clayton; Geisner, Irene Markman; Lee, Christine M.; Kilmer, Jason R.; Atkins, David C.

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined a range of injunctive norms for alcohol use and related consequences from less severe behaviors (e.g., drinking with friends) to more severe behaviors (e.g., drinking enough alcohol to pass out), and their relationship with alcohol consumption and alcohol-related negative consequences among college students. In addition, this research aimed to determine if these relationships between injunctive norms and consequences were moderated by alcohol consumption and level of identification with the typical same-sex college student. A random sample (N = 1,002) of undergraduates (56.9% female) completed a Web–based survey that was comprised of measures of drinking behavior, perceived approval of drinking behaviors that ranged in severity (i.e., injunctive norms), and level of identification with the typical same-sex college student. Results suggest that the association between negative consequences and injunctive drinking norms depend on one's own drinking behavior, identification with other students, and the severity of the alcohol use and related consequences for which injunctive norms are assessed. Findings are discussed in terms of false consensus and false uniqueness effects, and deviance regulation perspectives. Implications for preventative interventions are discussed. PMID:20565144

  2. [Spanish adaptation of the Substance Dependence Severity Scale: preliminar results].

    PubMed

    Vélez-Moreno, Antonio; González-Saiz, Francisco; Ramírez López, Juan; Torrico Linares, Esperanza; Fernández-Calderón, Fermín; Rojas, Antonio J; Lozano, Óscar M

    2013-01-01

    The Substance Dependence Severity Scale -SDSS- is one of the few scales that assesses substance dependence and abuse according DSM criteria in dimensional terms. Several studies have provided evidence of psychometric validity and reliability in its English version, but there is no Spanish version available. The aim of this work was to describe the adaptation process of the English version of the SDSS into Spanish, and provide preliminary results on its reliability and validity evidence. Participants were 146 patients (79.6% male), consumers of alcohol, cocaine, heroin and cannabis admitted to treatment in the Drug Abuse Centre Services of Huelva. Besides the SDSS, the EUROPASI and the Health Related Quality of Life for Drug Abusers test -HRQOLDA- were also administered. The Substance Dependence Severity Scale -SDSS- has shown adequate psychometric properties in terms of the rates of discrimination and internal consistency (α=0.881 for alcohol; α=0.814 for cocaine; α=0.531 for cannabis; α=0.785 for heroin). However, the scale assessing abuse showed poorer results. Concerning the validity evidence, the evidence based on internal structure showed a unidimensional structure. Furthermore, the evidence based from the relationships with other variables empirically support the theoretical relationships postulated. Preliminary results support the use of the Substance Dependence Severity Scale. The severity scale, which evaluates abuse criteria, needs further empirical evidence to assess its utility. Therefore, its current version is not recommended for use.

  3. Nf1 regulates alcohol dependence-associated excessive drinking and GABA release in the central amygdala in mice, and is associated with alcohol dependence in humans

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Tomoya; Kranzler, Henry R.; Sherva, Richard; Gelernter, Joel; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Roberto, Marisa; Sanna, Pietro Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Background The neurofibromatosis type 1 (Nf1) gene encodes a GTPase activating protein that negatively regulates small GTPases of the Ras family. Methods We assessed alcohol-related behaviors including alcohol sensitivity, dependent and non-dependent drinking, and basal and alcohol-induced GABA release in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) in Nf1 heterozygous null mice (Nf1+/−). We also investigated the associations of Nf1 polymorphisms with alcohol dependence risk and severity in humans. Results Nf1+/− mice do not differ from wild-type (WT) mice in non-dependent drinking, such as 24-hr, 2-bottle choice (2BC), drinking in the dark binge drinking, or limited access 2BC. However, Nf1+/− mice failed to escalate alcohol drinking following chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure (CIE) to induce dependence. Alcohol acutely increases GABA release in the CeA and alcohol dependence is characterized by increased baseline GABA release in CeA. Interestingly, GABA release in Nf1+/− mice is greater at baseline than WT mice, is not elevated by induction of dependence by CIE, and failed to show alcohol-induced facilitation both before and after CIE. Additionally, we observed that multiple variants in the human NF1 gene are associated with a quantitative measure of alcohol dependence in both African Americans and European Americans. Conclusions In this translational investigation, we found that Nf1 activity regulates excessive drinking and basal and ethanol-stimulated GABA release in the mouse central amygdala. We also found that genetic variation in NF1 may confer an inherent susceptibility to the transition from non-dependent to dependent drinking in humans. PMID:25483400

  4. Linkage of an alcoholism-related severity phenotype to chromosome 16.

    PubMed

    Foroud, T; Bucholz, K K; Edenberg, H J; Goate, A; Neuman, R J; Porjesz, B; Koller, D L; Rice, J; Reich, T; Bierut, L J; Cloninger, C R; Nurnberger, J I; Li, T K; Conneally, P M; Tischfield, J A; Crowe, R; Hesselbrock, V; Schuckit, M; Begleiter, H

    1998-12-01

    There is substantial evidence for a significant genetic component to the risk for alcoholism. In searching for genes that contribute to this risk, the diagnostic criteria for alcohol dependence may not be the optimal phenotype; rather, creation of a more homogeneous phenotype will lead to a more homogeneous genetic etiology. Items from the Semi-Structured Assessment for the Genetics of Alcoholism collected from 830 individuals in 105 alcoholic families were used in a latent class analysis to identify a more homogeneous alcoholism-related phenotype. A four-class solution was chosen: class 1, unaffected group; class 2, mildly problematic group; class 3, moderately affected group; and class 4, severely affected group. Classes 3 and 4 had higher symptom endorsement probabilities than classes 1 and 2 for items reflecting severe alcohol dependence, and were combined to provide enough sibling pairs for genetic linkage analysis. A total of 291 markers distributed throughout the genome, with an average intermarker distance of 14 cM, were genotyped. Linkage analysis was performed to detect loci underlying classes 3 and 4, the moderately and severely affected alcoholics, of whom 88% met the Collaborative Study of the Genetics of Alcoholism, and >99% met ICD-10 criteria for alcohol dependence. Evidence for a locus on chromosome 16, near the marker D16S675, was found with a maximum multipoint lod score of 4.0. Analysis of additional markers on chromosome 16 yielded a lod score of 3.2, narrowed the critical region, and placed the gene between D16S475 and D16S675 in a 15 cM interval.

  5. Divergent Regulation of Distinct Glucocorticoid Systems in Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Scott; Little, Hilary J.; Richardson, Heather N.; Vendruscolo, Leandro F.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption disrupts glucocorticoid signaling at multiple physiological levels to interact with several disease-related processes associated with neuroendocrine and psychiatric disorders. Excessive alcohol use produces stress-related neuroadaptations at the level of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis as well as within central (extra-hypothalamic) neural circuitry, including the central amygdala (CeA) and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Altered glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling in these areas following excessive alcohol exposure is postulated to mediate the transition from recreational drinking to dependence, as well as the manifestation of a host of cognitive and neurological deficits. Specifically, a bidirectional regulation of stress systems by glucocorticoids leads to the development of an HPA axis tolerance and a concomitant sensitization of cortical and subcortical circuitries. A greater understanding of how hypothalamic and extra-hypothalamic glucocorticoid systems interact to mediate excessive drinking and related pathologies will lead to more effective therapeutic strategies for alcohol use disorder (AUD) and closely related comorbidities. PMID:26003866

  6. To approach or avoid alcohol? Automatic and self-reported motivational tendencies in alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Barkby, Helen; Dickson, Joanne M; Roper, Louise; Field, Matt

    2012-02-01

    Motivational conflict is central to alcohol dependence, with patients reporting motivation to limit their drinking at the same time as urges to drink alcohol. In addition, dual process models of addiction emphasise the power of automatic cognitive processes, particularly automatic approach responses elicited by alcohol-related cues, as determinants of drinking behavior. We aimed to examine the strength of automatic and self-reported alcohol approach and avoidance tendencies among alcohol-dependent inpatients relative to matched controls. A total of 63 alcohol-dependent patients undergoing detoxification and 64 light-drinking controls completed a stimulus-response compatibility (SRC) task, which assesses the speed of categorization of alcohol-related pictures by making symbolic approach and avoidance movements. We also included modified versions of the SRC task to assess automatic motivational conflict, that is, strong approach and avoidance tendencies elicited simultaneously by alcohol-related cues. There were no differences between alcohol-dependent patients and controls on the SRC task, although individual differences in the quantity of alcohol consumed before entering treatment were significantly positively correlated with the strength of approach (but not avoidance) tendencies elicited by alcohol-related cues. Automatic approach tendencies were also positively correlated with self-reported "approach" inclinations and negatively correlated with self-reported "avoidance" inclinations. Although alcohol-dependent patients and matched controls did not differ on automatic approach and avoidance tendencies elicited by alcohol-related cues, individual differences in the quantity of alcohol consumed before entering treatment were associated with the strength of automatic approach tendencies elicited by alcohol cues. Copyright © 2011 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  7. General practitioners recognizing alcohol dependence: a large cross-sectional study in 6 European countries.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Jürgen; Allamani, Allaman; Della Vedova, Roberto; Elekes, Zsuzsanna; Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Landsmane, Inga; Manthey, Jakob; Moreno-España, José; Pieper, Lars; Probst, Charlotte; Snikere, Sigita; Struzzo, Pierluigi; Voller, Fabio; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Gual, Antoni; Wojnar, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Although alcohol dependence causes marked mortality and disease burden in Europe, the treatment rate is low. Primary care could play a key role in reducing alcohol-attributable harm by screening, brief interventions, and initiating or referral to treatment. This study investigates identification of alcohol dependence in European primary care settings. Assessments from 13,003 general practitioners, and 9,098 interviews (8,476 joint number of interviewed patients with a physician's assessment) were collected in 6 European countries. Alcohol dependence, comorbidities, and health service utilization were assessed by the general practitioner and independently using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) and other structured interviews. Weighted regression analyses were used to compare the impact of influencing variables on both types of diagnoses. The rate of patients being identified as alcohol dependent by the CIDI or a general practitioner was about equally high, but there was not a lot of overlap between cases identified. Alcohol-dependent patients identified by a physician were older, had higher rates of physicial comorbidity (liver disease, hypertension), and were socially more marginalized, whereas average consumption of alcohol and mental comorbidity were equally high in both groups. General practitioners were able to identify alcohol dependence, but the cases they identified differed from cases identified using the CIDI. The role of the CIDI as the reference standard should be reexamined, as older alcohol-dependent patients with severe comorbidities seemed to be missed in this assessment. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  8. General Practitioners Recognizing Alcohol Dependence: A Large Cross-Sectional Study in 6 European Countries

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, Jürgen; Allamani, Allaman; Vedova, Roberto Della; Elekes, Zsuzsanna; Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Landsmane, Inga; Manthey, Jakob; Moreno-España, José; Pieper, Lars; Probst, Charlotte; Snikere, Sigita; Struzzo, Pierluigi; Voller, Fabio; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Gual, Antoni; Wojnar, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Although alcohol dependence causes marked mortality and disease burden in Europe, the treatment rate is low. Primary care could play a key role in reducing alcohol-attributable harm by screening, brief interventions, and initiating or referral to treatment. This study investigates identification of alcohol dependence in European primary care settings. METHODS Assessments from 13,003 general practitioners, and 9,098 interviews (8,476 joint number of interviewed patients with a physician’s assessment) were collected in 6 European countries. Alcohol dependence, comorbidities, and health service utilization were assessed by the general practitioner and independently using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) and other structured interviews. Weighted regression analyses were used to compare the impact of influencing variables on both types of diagnoses. RESULTS The rate of patients being identified as alcohol dependent by the CIDI or a general practitioner was about equally high, but there was not a lot of overlap between cases identified. Alcohol-dependent patients identified by a physician were older, had higher rates of physicial comorbidity (liver disease, hypertension), and were socially more marginalized, whereas average consumption of alcohol and mental comorbidity were equally high in both groups. CONCLUSION General practitioners were able to identify alcohol dependence, but the cases they identified differed from cases identified using the CIDI. The role of the CIDI as the reference standard should be reexamined, as older alcohol-dependent patients with severe comorbidities seemed to be missed in this assessment. PMID:25583889

  9. Dihydrocodeine/Agonists for Alcohol Dependents

    PubMed Central

    Ulmer, Albrecht; Müller, Markus; Frietsch, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Alcohol addiction too often remains insufficiently treated. It shows the same profile as severe chronic diseases, but no comparable, effective basic treatment has been established up to now. Especially patients with repeated relapses, despite all therapeutic approaches, and patients who are not able to attain an essential abstinence to alcohol, need a basic medication. It seems necessary to acknowledge that parts of them need any agonistic substance, for years, possibly lifelong. For >14 years, we have prescribed such substances with own addictive character for these patients. Methods: We present a documented best possible practice, no designed study. Since 1997, we prescribed Dihydrocodeine (DHC) to 102 heavily alcohol addicted patients, later, also Buprenorphine, Clomethiazole (>6 weeks), Baclofen, and in one case Amphetamine, each on individual indication. This paper focuses on the data with DHC, especially. The Clomethiazole-data has been submitted to a German journal. The number of treatments with the other substances is still low. Results: The 102 patients with the DHC treatment had 1367 medically assisted detoxifications and specialized therapies before! The 4 years-retention rate was 26.4%, including 2.8% successfully terminated treatments. In our 12-steps scale on clinical impression, we noticed a significant improvement from mean 3.7 to 8.4 after 2 years. The demand for medically assisted detoxifications in the 2 years remaining patients was reduced by 65.5%. Mean GGT improved from 206.6 U/l at baseline to 66.8 U/l after 2 years. Experiences with the other substances are similar but different in details. Conclusion: Similar to the Italian studies with GHB and Baclofen, we present a new approach, not only with new substances, but also with a new setting and much more trusting attitude. We observe a huge improvement, reaching an almost optimal, stable, long term status in around 1/4 of the patients already. Many further

  10. Variables involved in the cue modulation of the startle reflex in alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Gabriel; Borrell, José; Jiménez, Mónica; Jurado, Rosa; Grüsser, Sabine M; Heinz, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Cue modulation of the startle reflex is a paradigm that has been used to understand the emotional mechanisms involved in alcohol dependence. Attenuation of the startle reflex has been demonstrated when alcohol-dependent subjects are exposed to alcohol-related stimuli. However, the role of clinical variables on the magnitude of this response is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between a number of clinical variables-severity of alcoholism, family history of alcoholism (FHA+), personality traits related to the sensitivity to reward-and the startle reflex response when subjects with alcohol dependence were viewing alcohol-related cues. After detoxification, 98 participants completed self-report instruments and had eye blink electromyograms measured to acoustic startle probes [100-millisecond burst of white noise at 95 dB(A)] while viewing alcohol-related pictures, and standardised appetitive, aversive and neutral control scenes. Ninety-eight healthy controls were also assessed with the same instruments. There were significant differences on alcohol-startle magnitude between patients and controls. Comparisons by gender showed that women perceived alcohol cues and appetitive cues more appetitive than men. Male and female patients showed more appetitive responses to alcohol cues when compared with their respective controls. Our patients showed an appetitive effect of alcohol cues that was positively related to severity of alcohol dependence, sensitivity to reward and a FHA+. The data confirmed that the pattern of the modulation of the acoustic startle reflex reveals appetitive effects of the alcohol cues and extended it to a variety of clinical variables.

  11. Alcohol Dependence and Health Care Utilization in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Vanessa J.; Kalu, Nnenna; Kwagyan, John; Scott, Denise M.; Cain, Gloria E.; Hill, Karen; Hesselbrock, Victor; Ferguson, Clifford L.; Taylor, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Ethnic and cultural differences in patterns of alcohol use disorders must be understood in order to address improvement in prevention of such disorders and accessibility to health care services. The purpose of this study was to evaluate factors that influence the utilization of medical and mental health services among alcohol-dependent and non alcohol–dependent African Americans. Method A cohort of 454 African Americans was evaluated. Alcohol-dependent participants were recruited from various inpatient treatment facilities in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area and through advertisement and word of mouth. Non–alcohol-dependent participants were recruited by advertisements. Each participant was administered the Semi-Structured Assessment for the Genetics of Alcoholism to assess alcohol dependency and the Family History Assessment module to access family history of alcoholism. χ2 Test and analysis of variance were used to analyze the data. Results Alcohol dependence was more prevalent among men, those with lower income, those with less education, and they utilized mental health counseling as opposed to medical-based therapy. Increased reports of medical conditions such as migraine (p < .001), loss of consciousness (p = .001), and sexually transmitted diseases (p < .001) were also associated with alcohol dependency. Other factors, including visits to inpatient treatment programs, were directly related to incidence of alcohol dependency regardless of gender status (p < .001). Conclusions This study suggests an association exists among alcohol dependence, medical conditions, health care, and mental care utilization among African Americans. Future research may benefit from investigating if an association exists between alcohol use disorders and health care utilization for other ethnic groups. PMID:23862295

  12. Gender-Specific Associations Between Trauma Cognitions, Alcohol Cravings and Alcohol-Related Consequences in Individuals with Comorbid PTSD and Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Jayawickreme, Nuwan; Yasinski, Carly; Williams, Monnica; Foa, Edna B.

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined gender-specific associations between trauma cognitions, alcohol cravings and alcohol-related consequences in individuals with dually diagnosed PTSD and alcohol dependence (AD). Participants (N = 167) had entered a treatment study for concurrent PTSD and AD; baseline information was collected from participants about PTSD-related cognitions in three areas: negative cognitions about self, negative cognitions about the world, and self-blame; and two aspects of AD, alcohol cravings and consequences of AD. Gender differences were examined while controlling for PTSD severity. The results indicate that negative cognitions about the self are significantly related to alcohol cravings in men but not women, and that interpersonal consequences of AD are significantly related to self-blame in women but not in men. These findings suggest that for individuals with comorbid PTSD and AD, psychotherapeutic interventions that focus on reducing trauma-related cognitions are likely to reduce alcohol cravings in men and relational problems in women. PMID:21480680

  13. The loss of metabolic control on alcohol drinking in heavy drinking alcohol-dependent subjects.

    PubMed

    de Timary, Philippe; Cani, Patrice D; Duchemin, Julie; Neyrinck, Audrey M; Gihousse, Dominique; Laterre, Pierre-François; Badaoui, Abdenor; Leclercq, Sophie; Delzenne, Nathalie M; Stärkel, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Most physiological studies interested in alcohol-dependence examined ethanol as a pharmacological agent rather than a nutrient. We conducted two studies, which assessed the metabolic and endocrine factors involved in the regulation of alcohol and nutrient intake in alcohol-dependent (AD) subjects. We also examined the potential role of a disruption in energy balance in alcohol-dependence. In Study-1, quantitative dietetic interviews of eating and drinking habits were conducted with 97 AD subjects. The population was split around a median alcohol intake value of 12.5 kcal/kg/day. The results showed that the "low alcohol" drinking AD subjects had high Body Mass Index (BMI) and Fat Mass (FM) and alcohol intake was compensated for by a decrease in non-alcoholic intakes. "High alcohol" drinking AD subjects, on the other hand, had low BMI and FM and the total caloric intakes were largely above norms. In Study-2, 24 AD inpatients were submitted to dietetic interviews, calorimetry and blood samplings for the measurement of biomarkers of the regulation of metabolism and satiety, on day 2, 5 and 16 of abstinence. These patients were compared with 20 controls matched for age and gender. We observed in AD patients an increase in cortisol, leptin and PYY plasma levels and a decrease in ghrelin, which might explain the observed decrease in non-alcoholic intakes. However, alcoholic and non-alcoholic intakes correlated positively with basal metabolism and negatively with leptin and leptin/BMI. For individuals consuming below 12.5 kcal/kg/day of alcohol, alcohol intake is compensated for by a decrease in non-alcoholic nutrient intakes, probably due to changes in metabolic and satiety factors. For individuals consuming above 12.5 kcal/kg/day of alcohol, alcohol accelerates metabolism and decreases fat mass and leptin levels, and the total caloric intake largely exceeds norms. A dual model for regulation of energy intake in AD subjects is proposed.

  14. Alcohol abuse-related severe acute pancreatitis with rhabdomyolysis complications

    PubMed Central

    SU, MAO-SHENG; JIANG, YING; YAN, XIAO-YUAN HU; ZHAO, QING-HUA; LIU, ZHI-WEI; ZHANG, WEN-ZHI; HE, LEI

    2013-01-01

    Non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis is a rare complication of acute pancreatitis. One of the major risk factors of both acute pancreatitis and rhabdomyolysis is alcohol abuse. However, only a few studies have reported the prognosis and association of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and rhabdomyolysis in alcohol abuse patients. In the present study, we report two cases presenting with SAP complicated by rhabdomyolysis following high-dose alcohol intake. The disease onset, clinical manifestations, laboratory data, diagnosis and treatment procedure of each patient were recorded, and the association with rhabdomyolysis was analyzed. Alcohol consumption was the most predominant cause of SAP and rhabdomyolysis in these patients. SAP-related rhabdomyolysis was primarily induced by the toxicity associated with pancreatic necrosis. The laboratory tests revealed that the concentration of serum creatine kinase (CK) and myoglobin increased and acute renal failure symptoms were present, which provided an exact diagnosis for SAP-induced rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdomyolysis and subsequent hypermyoglobinuria severely impaired kidney function and aggravated hypocalcemia. The therapy of early stage SAP complicated by rhabdomyolysis involved liquid resuscitation support. When first stage treatment fails, blood purification should be performed immediately. Both patients developed multiple organ failure (MOF) and succumbed to the disease. Considering the two cases presented, we conclude that alcohol-related SAP complicated by rhabdomyolysis may have a poor clinical prognosis. PMID:23251265

  15. Neurobiology of alcohol dependence: focus on motivational mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Nicholas W; Koob, George F

    2008-01-01

    Alcoholism is a debilitating disorder for the individual and very costly for society. A major goal of alcohol research is to understand the neural underpinnings associated with the transition from alcohol use to alcohol dependence. Positive reinforcement is important in the early stages of alcohol use and abuse. Negative reinforcement can be important early in alcohol use by people self-medicating coexisting affective disorders, but its role likely increases following the transition to dependence. Chronic exposure to alcohol induces changes in neural circuits that control motivational processes, including arousal, reward, and stress. These changes affect systems utilizing the signaling molecules dopamine, opioid peptides, γ-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, and serotonin, as well as systems modulating the brain's stress response. These neuroadaptations produce changes in sensitivity to alcohol's effects following repeated exposure (i.e., sensitization and tolerance) and a withdrawal state following discontinuation of alcohol use. Chronic alcohol exposure also results in persistent neural deficits, some of which may fully recover following extended periods of abstinence. However, the organism remains susceptible to relapse, even after long periods of abstinence. Recent research focusing on brain arousal, reward, and stress systems is accelerating our understanding of the components of alcohol dependence and contributing to the development of new treatment strategies.

  16. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Several State Initiatives. inForum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Eve

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the characteristics of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD); identify several federal-level FASD initiatives that emphasize education; and describe four state-level FASD initiatives that involve state education agencies (SEAs). An appendix at the end of the document provides a list of educational…

  17. Corticosteroid-dependent plasticity mediates compulsive alcohol drinking in rats

    PubMed Central

    Vendruscolo, Leandro F.; Barbier, Estelle; Schlosburg, Joel E.; Misra, Kaushik K.; Whitfield, Timothy W.; Logrip, Marian L.; Rivier, Catherine; Repunte-Canonigo, Vez; Zorrilla, Eric P.; Sanna, Pietro P.; Heilig, Markus; Koob, George F.

    2012-01-01

    Alcoholism is characterized by a compulsion to seek and ingest alcohol, loss of control over intake, and the emergence of a negative emotional state during abstinence. We hypothesized that sustained activation of neuroendocrine stress systems (e.g., corticosteroid release via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal [HPA] axis) by alcohol intoxication and withdrawal and consequent alterations in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) activation drive compulsive alcohol drinking. Our results showed that rats exposed to alcohol vapor to the point of dependence displayed increased alcohol intake, compulsive drinking measured by progressive-ratio responding, and persistent alcohol consumption despite punishment, assessed by adding quinine to the alcohol solution, compared with control rats that were not exposed to alcohol vapor. No group differences were observed in the self-administration of saccharin-sweetened water. Acute alcohol withdrawal was accompanied by downregulated GR mRNA in various stress/reward-related brain regions (i.e., prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens [NAc], and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis [BNST]), whereas protracted alcohol abstinence was accompanied by upregulated GR mRNA in the NAc core, ventral BNST, and central nucleus of the amygdala. No significant alterations in MR mRNA levels were found. Chronic GR antagonism with mifepristone (RU38486) prevented the escalation of alcohol intake and compulsive responding induced by chronic, intermittent alcohol vapor exposure. Chronic treatment with mifepristone also blocked escalated alcohol drinking and compulsive responding during protracted abstinence. Thus, the GR system appears to be involved in the development of alcohol dependence and may represent a potential pharmacological target for the treatment of alcoholism. PMID:22649234

  18. Pharmacotherapy for alcohol dependence: status of current treatments.

    PubMed

    Franck, Johan; Jayaram-Lindström, Nitya

    2013-08-01

    The efficacy of medications for alcohol dependence remains modest, and there are no strong clinical predictors of treatment response. Approved medications include acamprosate (an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA) modulator), disulfiram (an acetaldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor) and naltrexone (an opioid antagonist) while nalmefene (an opioid antagonist) is currently under review for approval in Europe. Clinical trials suggest that baclofen (a GABA-B agonist) and topiramate (an anticonvulsant) may be promising candidates, while several other drug candidates are currently evaluated at early clinical stages.

  19. Relationship between Alcohol Dependence, Escape Drinking, and Early Neural Attention to Alcohol-Related Cuess

    PubMed Central

    Dickter, Cheryl L.; Forestell, Catherine A.; Hammett, Patrick J.; Young, Chelsie M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Previous work has indicated that implicit attentional biases to alcohol-related cues are indicative of susceptibility to alcohol dependence and escape drinking, or drinking to avoid dysphoric mood or emotions. Objective The goal of the current study was to examine whether alcohol dependence and escape drinking were associated with early neural attentional biases to alcohol cues. Methods EEG data were recorded from 54 college students who reported that they regularly drank alcohol, while they viewed alcohol and control pictures that contained human content (active) or no human content (inactive). Results Those who were alcohol dependent showed more neural attentional bias to the active alcohol-related stimuli than to the matched control stimuli early in processing, as indicated by N1 amplitude. Escape drinkers showed greater neural attention to the active alcohol cues than non-escape drinkers, as measured by larger N2 amplitudes. Conclusions While alcohol dependence is associated with enhanced automatic attentional biases early in processing, escape drinking is associated with more controlled attentional biases to active alcohol cues during a relatively later stage in processing. These findings reveal important information about the time-course of attentional processing in problem drinkers and have important implications for addiction models and treatment. PMID:24292342

  20. Association between Socio-Demographics and Alcohol Dependence among Individuals Living in an Indian Setting

    PubMed Central

    Vignesh, B. T.; Singh, Awnish K.; Mohan, S. K.; Murthy, Shruti; Joshi, Ashish

    2014-01-01

    Background: Alcohol use is on the rise worldwide and urgent steps are required to curb this growing burden of alcohol consumption. Alcohol drinking leads to serious social, physical and mental consequences. Objective: The objective of this pilot study is to examine association between socio-demographics and severity of alcohol dependence among individuals obtaining treatment at alcohol de-addiction center. Methods: This pilot cross sectional study was conducted in September 2013 in South India. A convenient sample of 100 participants was enrolled. Individuals aged 30 years and above, receiving treatment from de-addiction center and providing written informed consent were eligible for the study. A modified version of previously validated questionnaires was used for gathering information on socio-demographic characteristics, severity of alcohol dependence (using Alcohol Dependent Scale [ADS] and Short Alcohol Dependence Data questionnaire [SADD]), motivational incentives for alcohol quitting and challenges faced while quitting alcohol. Results: All participants were males with mean age of 43 years (SD = 6.5 years). Significant association was seen between ADS and annual income (p = 0.001), education (p = 0.001), occupation (p < 0.0001) and work timing (p < 0.0001). Similar results were seen with SADD scores. Family support (100%) and health (60%) were reported to be the most important motivating factors for quitting alcohol. Discussion: Results showed an urgent need of interventions that are family centered and focus on unskilled, less educated individuals having high work stress. Public health interventions should not only be home based, but should also include worksite awareness initiatives. A national policy is needed to promote alcohol quitting and to bring awareness regarding the consequences of alcohol consumption on individual’s life. PMID:24762342

  1. Craving and physiological reactivity to trauma and alcohol cues in posttraumatic stress disorder and alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Scott F; Schumacher, Julie A; Stasiewicz, Paul R; Henslee, Amber M; Baillie, Lauren E; Landy, Noah

    2010-08-01

    The high comorbidity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol dependence (AD) has been firmly established. Although laboratory studies have examined self-reported craving in response to trauma and alcohol cues, no studies have reported on alcohol-related physiological responding in response to trauma cues in PTSD-AD individuals. Using a cue reactivity paradigm, this study examined the impact of personalized trauma-image cues and in vivo alcohol cues on alcohol-related responding (e.g., salivation, craving) in individuals with PTSD and AD (n = 40). Participants displayed reactivity to both trauma and alcohol cues when compared to neutral cues, including increased self-reported craving and distress, as well as greater salivation. These findings suggest that through repeated pairings of trauma memories and alcohol consumption, salivation may become classically conditioned to trauma cues. Moreover, the fact that the trauma-alcohol cue combination elicited greater alcohol craving, salivary responding, distress, and arousal than either the trauma-neutral or neutral-alcohol cue combinations suggests that effects of the trauma and alcohol cues were additive in nature. Evidence that AD individuals with PTSD report increased alcohol craving and display greater salivation in response to trauma memories, supplements prior research indicating that PTSD-related negative emotion and trauma-related alcohol craving may play an important role in the maintenance of AD. PsycINFO Database Record 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. [Treatment of alcohol dependence: rational and arguable approaches].

    PubMed

    Sivolap, Iu P

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of alcohol dependence consist of alcohol detoxification with withdrawal alleviation and relapse prevention or maintenance therapy. Drugs of choice for alcohol withdrawal cure are benzodiazepines and anticonvulsants are an alternative for them. Relapse prevention and alcohol abuse alleviation are carried out using disulfiram, acamprosate, naltrexone and nalmefene. Moreover, therapeutic possibilities of memantine, gabapentine, pregabalin, baclofen, modafinil, ondansetron D-cycloserine and aripiprazole are studying nowadays. Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors including fluvoxamine for alcohol patients is of great importance due to frequent comorbidity of alcoholism, depression and anxiety. There are some doubtful methods of alcoholism treatment accepted in Russian addictive medicine such as clearance detoxification and use of antipsychotics for craving elimination.

  3. Puberty, hormones, and sex differences in alcohol abuse and dependence.

    PubMed

    Witt, Ellen D

    2007-01-01

    Sex differences in patterns of drinking and rates of alcohol abuse and dependence begin to emerge during the transition from late puberty to young adulthood. Increases in pubertal hormones, including gonadal and stress hormones, are a prominent developmental feature of adolescence and could contribute to the progression of sex differences in alcohol drinking patterns during puberty. This paper reviews experimental and correlational studies of gonadal and stress-related hormone changes and their effects on alcohol drinking and other associated actions of alcohol. Mechanisms are suggested by which reproductive hormones and stress-related hormones may modulate neural circuits within the brain reward system to produce sex differences in alcohol drinking patterns and vulnerability to alcohol abuse and dependence which become apparent during the late pubertal period.

  4. An empowerment process: successful recovery from alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Mei-Yu; Che, Hui-Lian; Lee, Li-Wei; Horng, Fen-Fang

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the concepts and processes for successful abstinence from alcohol for Taiwanese Alcoholics Anonymous members. Attempting to identify the psychological and social influences upon alcohol consumption remission outside of alcoholism treatment could help professionals to engage in a broad array of community interventions in an informed fashion. Grounded theory method was utilized in this study. The study chose nine participants who had succeeded in abstinence, using theoretical sampling and conducted in-depth interviews by an open-ended questionnaire. The results of this study indicated that the core of the process during which alcoholic individuals succeeded in abstaining from further alcohol consumption was an empowerment process for the involved individual. Alcoholics felt that their family, interpersonal relationships, jobs and personal finances all had been at 'rock-bottom' level following a long period of alcohol dependence. This feeling caused the individual to experience an emotion of a loss of control and provoked the arousal of an alcoholic's inner consciousness levels, this then resulting in the generation of a driving force for abstinence from alcohol for these individuals. The expansion of an individual's internal awakening power helps the individual to obtain assistance and to resist the temptation of further alcohol consumption. Therefore, the power derived by individuals from the stages of repositioning, releasing, active sharing, resistance and assistance are the maintenance factors for an individual's empowerment process that help maintain the successful recovery from alcohol for the involved individual. A good comprehension of the recovery processes for alcoholics, we believe, will trigger clinical professionals to pay appropriate attention to the specific problems and needs of alcoholic individuals, to build an effective resource network for treatment and to help solve alcoholics' physical and psychosocial

  5. Loss of brain graph network efficiency in alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Sjoerds, Zsuzsika; Stufflebeam, Steven M; Veltman, Dick J; Van den Brink, Wim; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Douw, Linda

    2017-03-01

    Alcohol dependence (AD) is characterized by corticostriatal impairments in individual brain areas such as the striatum. As yet however, complex brain network topology in AD and its association with disease progression are unknown. We applied graph theory to resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI) to examine weighted global efficiency and local (clustering coefficient, degree and eigenvector centrality) network topology and the functional role of the striatum in 24 AD patients compared with 20 matched healthy controls (HCs), and their association with dependence characteristics. Graph analyses were performed based on Pearson's correlations between RS-fMRI time series, while correcting for age, gender and head motion. We found no significant group differences between AD patients and HCs in network topology. Notably, within the patient group, but not in HCs, the whole-brain network showed reduced average cluster coefficient with more severe alcohol use, whereas longer AD duration within the patient group was associated with a global decrease in efficiency, degree and clustering coefficient. Additionally, within four a-priori chosen bilateral striatal nodes, alcohol use severity was associated with lower clustering coefficient in the left caudate. Longer AD duration was associated with reduced clustering coefficient in caudate and putamen, and reduced degree in bilateral caudate, but with increased eigenvector centrality in left posterior putamen. Especially changes in global network topology and clustering coefficient in anterior striatum remained strikingly robust after exploratory variations in network weight. Our results show adverse effects of AD on overall network integration and possibly on striatal efficiency, putatively contributing to the increasing behavioral impairments seen in chronically addicted patients.

  6. Abnormal intrinsic functional hubs in alcohol dependence: evidence from a voxelwise degree centrality analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoping; Guo, Linghong; Dai, Xi-Jian; Wang, Qinglai; Zhu, Wenzhong; Miao, Xinjun; Gong, Honghan

    2017-01-01

    To explore the abnormal intrinsic functional hubs in alcohol dependence using voxelwise degree centrality analysis approach, and their relationships with clinical features. Twenty-four male alcohol dependence subjects free of medicine (mean age, 50.21±9.62 years) and 24 age- and education-matched male healthy controls (mean age, 50.29±8.92 years) were recruited. The alcohol use disorders identification test and the severity of alcohol dependence questionnaire (SADQ) were administered to assess the severity of alcohol craving. Voxelwise degree centrality approach was used to assess the abnormal intrinsic functional hubs features in alcohol dependence. Simple linear regression analysis was performed to investigate the relationships between the clinical features and abnormal intrinsic functional hubs. Compared with healthy controls, alcohol dependence subjects exhibited significantly different degree centrality values in widespread left lateralization brain areas, including higher degree centrality values in the left precentral gyrus (BA 6), right hippocampus (BA 35, 36), and left orbitofrontal cortex (BA 11) and lower degree centrality values in the left cerebellum posterior lobe, bilateral secondary visual network (BA 18), and left precuneus (BA 7, 19). SADQ revealed a negative linear correlation with the degree centrality value in the left precentral gyrus (R(2)=0.296, P=0.006). The specific abnormal intrinsic functional hubs appear to be disrupted by alcohol intoxication, which implicates at least three principal neural systems: including cerebellar, executive control, and visual cortex, which may further affect the normal motor behavior such as an explicit type of impaired driving behavior. These findings expand our understanding of the functional characteristics of alcohol dependence and may provide a new insight into the understanding of the dysfunction and pathophysiology of alcohol dependence.

  7. Factors associated with resilience in wives of individuals with alcohol dependence syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sreekumar, Sreeja; Subhalakshmi, T. P.; Varghese, P. Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Mental health and resilience of family members of individuals with alcohol dependence affect their ability to cope with stress, maintain emotional well-being, and to positively adapt to their difficult life circumstances. This study attempted to study resilience among wives of men with alcohol dependence syndrome. Materials and Methods: Consecutive patients with a diagnosis of alcohol dependence and their wives attending the Department of Psychiatry, MOSC Medical College, Kolenchery, Kerala, over a 1-year period were recruited. The wives were assessed using the Resilience Scale for Adults and the Hamilton Depressive Rating Scale, whereas their spouses were evaluated using severity of alcohol dependence questionnaire and a proforma to collect sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Women with good resilience were compared to those with low scores using a case–control framework to evaluate factors associated with resilience. Multivariable analysis to adjust for common confounders was done using multiple linear regression. Results: Eighty patients and their spouses were recruited and evaluated. Resilience was inversely related to the severity of alcohol dependence, years of drinking in dependence pattern, history of domestic violence, and severity of depression in wives. Involvement in support groups was protective. Conclusion: Assessment of resilience in wives of individuals with alcohol dependence and identification and management of those with poor resilience should go hand in hand with their husband's treatment program. PMID:28066009

  8. Alcohol and nutrient intake: mechanisms of reinforcement and dependence.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Michael J

    2011-07-25

    Alcohol is not only a drug of abuse but is also a food. This combination has a significant impact on the development and consequences of alcohol abuse and dependence. Understanding the neurobiological and behavioral processes that mediate them is perhaps best approached from the perspective of ingestive behavior. Research from the Hoebel laboratory has provided innovation and leadership in understanding that feeding neuropeptides plays a significant role in alcohol intake. The research reviewed here shows that galanin and other feeding peptides increase intake and also motivate abuse and the development of dependence. In addition, the consequences of long term alcohol abuse and dependence alter nutritional systems and drinking behavior. A major challenge is understanding the role of alcohol's dual properties and feeding neuropeptide in the motivation to drink.

  9. Alcohol Abuse/Dependence Symptoms Among Hospital Employees Exposed to a SARS Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ping; Liu, Xinhua; Fang, Yunyun; Fan, Bin; Fuller, Cordelia J.; Guan, Zhiqiang; Yao, Zhongling; Kong, Junhui; Lu, Jin; Litvak, Iva J.

    2008-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to examine alcohol abuse/dependence symptoms among hospital employees exposed to a severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak, and the relationship between types of exposure to the SARS outbreak and subsequent alcohol abuse/dependence symptoms. Methods: A survey was conducted among 549 randomly selected hospital employees in Beijing, China, concerning the psychological impact of the 2003 SARS outbreak. Subjects were assessed on sociodemographic factors and types of exposure to the outbreak, and on symptoms of post-traumatic stress (PTS), alcohol abuse/dependence and depression. Results: Current alcohol abuse/dependence symptom counts 3 years after the outbreak were positively associated with having been quarantined, or worked in high-risk locations such as SARS wards, during the outbreak. However, having had family members or friends contract, SARS was not related to alcohol abuse/dependence symptom count. Symptoms of PTS and of depression, and having used drinking as a coping method, were also significantly associated with increased alcohol abuse/dependence symptoms. The relationship between outbreak exposure and alcohol abuse/dependence symptom count remained significant even when sociodemographic and other factors were controlled for. When the intrusion, avoidance and hyperarousal PTS symptom clusters were entered into the model, hyperarousal was found to be significantly associated with alcohol abuse/dependence symptoms. Conclusions: Exposure to an outbreak of a severe infectious disease can, like other disaster exposures, lead not only to PTSD but also to other psychiatric conditions, such as alcohol abuse/dependence. The findings will help policy makers and health professionals to better prepare for potential outbreaks of diseases such as SARS or avian flu. PMID:18790829

  10. Alcohol abuse/dependence symptoms among hospital employees exposed to a SARS outbreak.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ping; Liu, Xinhua; Fang, Yunyun; Fan, Bin; Fuller, Cordelia J; Guan, Zhiqiang; Yao, Zhongling; Kong, Junhui; Lu, Jin; Litvak, Iva J

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine alcohol abuse/dependence symptoms among hospital employees exposed to a severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak, and the relationship between types of exposure to the SARS outbreak and subsequent alcohol abuse/dependence symptoms. A survey was conducted among 549 randomly selected hospital employees in Beijing, China, concerning the psychological impact of the 2003 SARS outbreak. Subjects were assessed on sociodemographic factors and types of exposure to the outbreak, and on symptoms of post-traumatic stress (PTS), alcohol abuse/dependence and depression. Current alcohol abuse/dependence symptom counts 3 years after the outbreak were positively associated with having been quarantined, or worked in high-risk locations such as SARS wards, during the outbreak. However, having had family members or friends contract, SARS was not related to alcohol abuse/dependence symptom count. Symptoms of PTS and of depression, and having used drinking as a coping method, were also significantly associated with increased alcohol abuse/dependence symptoms. The relationship between outbreak exposure and alcohol abuse/dependence symptom count remained significant even when sociodemographic and other factors were controlled for. When the intrusion, avoidance and hyperarousal PTS symptom clusters were entered into the model, hyperarousal was found to be significantly associated with alcohol abuse/dependence symptoms. Exposure to an outbreak of a severe infectious disease can, like other disaster exposures, lead not only to PTSD but also to other psychiatric conditions, such as alcohol abuse/dependence. The findings will help policy makers and health professionals to better prepare for potential outbreaks of diseases such as SARS or avian flu.

  11. COMT Val158Met modulates the effect of childhood adverse experiences on the risk of alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Schellekens, Arnt F A; Franke, Barbara; Ellenbroek, Bart; Cools, Alexander; de Jong, Cor A J; Buitelaar, Jan K; Verkes, Robbert-Jan

    2013-03-01

    Genetic factors and childhood adverse experiences contribute to the vulnerability to alcohol dependence. However, empirical data on the interplay between specific genes and adverse experiences are few. The COMT Val158Met and DRD2/ANKK1 Taq1A genotypes have been suggested to affect both stress sensitivity and the risk for alcohol dependence. This study tested the hypothesis that genetic variation in COMT Val158Met and DRD2/ANKK1 Taq1A interacts with childhood adverse experiences to predict alcohol dependence. Male abstinent alcohol-dependent patients (n = 110) and age-matched healthy male controls (n = 99) were genotyped for the COMT Val158Met and the DRD2/ANKK1 Taq1A genotypes. Childhood adverse events were measured using three self-report questionnaires. Alcohol dependence severity, age of onset and duration of alcohol dependence were analyzed as secondary outcome measures. Statistical analysis involved logistic regression analysis and analysis of variance. Alcohol-dependent patients reported increased childhood adversity. The interaction between childhood adversity and the COMT Val158Met genotype added significantly to the prediction model. This gene-environment interaction was confirmed in the analysis of the secondary outcome measures, i.e. alcohol dependence severity, age of onset and duration of alcohol dependence. The DRD2/ANKK1 Taq1A genotype was not related to alcohol dependence, nor did it interact with childhood adversity in predicting alcohol dependence. This study provides evidence for a gene-environment interaction in alcohol dependence, in which an individual's sensitivity to childhood adverse experience is moderated by the COMT genotype. Exposed carriers of a low-activity Met allele have a higher risk to develop severe alcohol dependence than individuals homozygous for the Val allele.

  12. Deficits in Emotion-Regulation Skills Predict Alcohol Use During and After Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Berking, Matthias; Margraf, Matthias; Ebert, David; Wupperman, Peggilee; Hofmann, Stefan G.; Junghanns, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Objective As emotion regulation is widely considered to be a primary motive in the misuse of alcohol, the aim of the study was to investigate whether deficits in adaptive emotion-regulation skills maintain alcohol dependence (AD). Method A prospective study investigated whether emotion-regulation skills were associated with AD and whether these skills predicted alcohol use during and after treatment for AD. Participants were 116 individuals treated for AD with cognitive behavioral therapy. Emotion regulation and severity of AD symptoms were assessed by self-report. Alcohol use during treatment was assessed by breathalyzer and urine analysis for ethyl glucuronid; alcohol use during the 3-month follow-up interval was assessed by self-report. Results Pretreatment emotion-regulation skills predicted alcohol use during treatment, and posttreatment emotion-regulation skills predicted alcohol use at follow-up, even when controlling for other predictors potentially related to emotion regulation. Among a broad range of specific emotion-regulation skills, the ability to tolerate negative emotions was the only skill that negatively predicted subsequent alcohol consumption when controlling for the other skills. Individuals in the AD sample reported significantly more deficits in emotion-regulation skills than did those in a non-clinical control sample, but significantly less than did those in a sample of individuals exclusively meeting criteria for major depressive disorder. Conclusions Enhancement of general emotion-regulation skills, especially the ability to tolerate negative emotions, appears to be an important target in the treatment of AD. PMID:21534653

  13. Hopelessness in Alcohol- and Heroin-Dependent Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Aaron T.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Administered the Beck Hopelessness Scale to alcoholic (N=20) and heroin-addicted (N=20) women. Results indicated that although both groups expressed comparable levels of overall hopelessness, alcoholic women anticipated more success and better lives in the next 10 years than did the heroin-dependent women. (LLL)

  14. Hopelessness in Alcohol- and Heroin-Dependent Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Aaron T.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Administered the Beck Hopelessness Scale to alcoholic (N=20) and heroin-addicted (N=20) women. Results indicated that although both groups expressed comparable levels of overall hopelessness, alcoholic women anticipated more success and better lives in the next 10 years than did the heroin-dependent women. (LLL)

  15. Energy drink consumption and increased risk for alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Arria, Amelia M.; Caldeira, Kimberly M.; Kasperski, Sarah J.; Vincent, Kathryn B.; Griffiths, Roland R.; O'Grady, Kevin E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Energy drinks are highly caffeinated beverages that are increasingly consumed by young adults. Prior research has established associations between energy drink use and heavier drinking and alcohol-related problems among college students. This study investigated the extent to which energy drink use might pose additional risk for alcohol dependence over and above that from known risk factors. Methods Data were collected via personal interview from 1,097 fourth-year college students sampled from one large public university as part of an ongoing longitudinal study. Alcohol dependence was measured with DSM-IV criteria. Results After adjustment for the sampling design, 51.3%wt of students were classified as “low-frequency” energy drink users (1 to 51 days in the past year) and 10.1%wt as “high-frequency” users (≥52 days). Typical caffeine consumption varied widely depending on the brand consumed. Compared to the low-frequency group, high-frequency users drank alcohol more frequently (141.6 vs. 103.1 days) and in higher quantities (6.15 vs. 4.64 drinks/typical drinking day). High-frequency users were at significantly greater risk for alcohol dependence relative to both non-users (AOR=2.40, 95% CI=1.27-4.56, p=.007) and low-frequency users (AOR=1.86, 95% CI=1.10, 3.14, p=.020), even after holding constant demographics, typical alcohol consumption, fraternity/sorority involvement, depressive symptoms, parental history of alcohol/drug problems, and childhood conduct problems. Low-frequency energy drink users did not differ from non-users on their risk for alcohol dependence. Conclusions Weekly or daily energy drink consumption is strongly associated with alcohol dependence. Further research is warranted to understand the possible mechanisms underlying this association. College students who frequently consume energy drinks represent an important target population for alcohol prevention. PMID:21073486

  16. Alcohol criteria endorsement and psychiatric and drug use disorders among DUI offenders: Greater severity among women and multiple offenders

    PubMed Central

    McCutcheon, Vivia V.; Heath, Andrew C.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Grucza, Richard A.; Hesselbrock, Victor M.; Kramer, John R.; Bierut, Laura Jean; Bucholz, Kathleen K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Data from the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA), a high-risk family study of alcohol dependence, were used to examine differences in alcohol diagnostic criteria endorsement and psychiatric and drug use disorders by gender and by number of DUI offenses. Results Individuals with two or more DUIs exhibited greater severity of alcohol dependence than those with none or one DUI. This severity was characterized in three ways: (1) higher endorsement of alcohol diagnostic criterion items, with evidence of greater severity among women, (2) higher prevalence of co-occurring lifetime psychiatric disorders, and (3) higher rates of drug use and of dependence on cocaine, stimulants, and, for women only, marijuana and opiates. Conclusions By examining gradations of disorder within a combination of two high-risk indicators, DUI and family vulnerability, this study provides useful information for clinical research about individuals with chronic and severe alcohol problems. In addition, the observed gender differences in this high-risk sample will contribute to the literature on alcohol dependence among women at the more severe end of the dependence spectrum. PMID:19167170

  17. A Controlled Trial of Topiramate Treatment for Alcohol Dependence in Veterans with PTSD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    severity in patients with both of these conditions. Topiramate is one of the few medications for alcohol dependence that has also been separately...tested as a potential medication to treat PTSD. Topiramate’s efficacy in alcohol dependence in patients without PTSD has been shown in two recent...large controlled trials. Open trials have suggested that topiramate may be effective in reducing PTSD symptoms in patients without AUDs, and a number

  18. Protective association of genetic variation in alcohol dehydrogenase with alcohol dependence in Native American Mission Indians.

    PubMed

    Wall, Tamara L; Carr, Lucinda G; Ehlers, Cindy L

    2003-01-01

    Two alcohol dehydrogenase genes (ADH2 and ADH3 on chromosome 4) and one aldehyde dehydrogenase gene (ALDH2 on chromosome 12) exhibit functional polymorphisms. The goal of this study was to determine whether any associations exist between the ADH2, ADH3, and ALDH2 polymorphisms and alcohol dependence in a group of Native Americans. An additional goal was to determine if any associations exist between these polymorphisms and the endophenotype, maximum number of drinks ever consumed in a 24-hour period. Mission Indian adults (N=340) were recruited for participation from reservations in southern California. Each participant completed an interview with the Semi-Structured Assessment for the Genetics of Alcoholism. A blood sample was collected from each participant for genotyping at the ALDH2, ADH2, and ADH3 loci. Sixty percent of all participants (72% of men and 53% of women) met lifetime DSM-III-R criteria for alcohol dependence. A significant difference in the ADH2 allele distributions was found between alcohol-dependent and non-alcohol-dependent participants. Those with alcohol dependence were significantly less likely to have the ADH2*3 allele (odds ratio=0.28) and significantly more likely to have the ADH2*1 allele (odds ratio=2.00) than those who were not alcohol dependent. Individuals with ADH2*3 reported a lower number of maximum drinks ever consumed in a 24-hour period, compared to those without this allele. These results are consistent with genetic linkage studies showing protective associations for alcohol dependence and related behavior on chromosome 4 and suggest that ADH2 polymorphisms may account for these findings. These results also highlight the utility of evaluating protective factors in populations with high rates of alcohol dependence.

  19. Intravenous Ghrelin Administration Increases Alcohol Craving in Alcohol-Dependent Heavy Drinkers: a Preliminary Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Leggio, Lorenzo; Zywiak, William H.; Fricchione, Samuel R.; Edwards, Steven M.; de la Monte, Suzanne M.; Swift, Robert M.; Kenna, George A.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a need to identify novel pharmacological targets to treat alcoholism. Animal and human studies suggest a role of ghrelin in the neurobiology of alcohol dependence and craving. Here, we were the first to test the hypothesis that intravenous administration of exogenous ghrelin acutely increases alcohol craving. Methods This was a double-blind placebo-controlled human laboratory proof-of-concept study. Non-treatment seeking alcohol-dependent heavy drinking individuals were randomized to receive intravenous ghrelin 1mcg/kg, 3 mcg/kg or 0 mcg/kg (placebo), followed by a cuereactivity procedure, during which participants were exposed to neutral (juice) and alcohol cues. The primary outcome variable was the increase in alcohol craving (also called “urge”) for alcohol, assessed by the Alcohol Visual Analogue Scale. Results Out of 103 screenings, 45 individuals received the study drug. Repeated measures of ANCOVA revealed a group effect across ghrelin doses in increasing alcohol craving (p < .05). A dose-specific examination revealed a significant effect of ghrelin 3 mcg/kg vs. placebo in increasing alcohol craving (p < .05) with a large effect size (d = .94). By contrast, no significant ghrelin effect was found in increasing either urge to drink juice or food craving (p: n.s.). No significant differences in side effects were found (p: n.s.). Conclusions Intravenous administration of exogenous ghrelin increased alcohol craving in alcohol-dependent heavy drinking individuals. Although the small sample requires confirmatory studies, these findings provide preliminary evidence that ghrelin may play a role in the neurobiology of alcohol craving, thus demonstrating a novel pharmacological target for treatment. PMID:24775991

  20. Effects of cognitive bias modification training on neural alcohol cue reactivity in alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Wiers, Corinde E; Stelzel, Christine; Gladwin, Thomas E; Park, Soyoung Q; Pawelczack, Steffen; Gawron, Christiane K; Stuke, Heiner; Heinz, Andreas; Wiers, Reinout W; Rinck, Mike; Lindenmeyer, Johannes; Walter, Henrik; Bermpohl, Felix

    2015-04-01

    In alcohol-dependent patients, alcohol cues evoke increased activation in mesolimbic brain areas, such as the nucleus accumbens and the amygdala. Moreover, patients show an alcohol approach bias, a tendency to more quickly approach than avoid alcohol cues. Cognitive bias modification training, which aims to retrain approach biases, has been shown to reduce alcohol craving and relapse rates. The authors investigated effects of this training on cue reactivity in alcohol-dependent patients. In a double-blind randomized design, 32 abstinent alcohol-dependent patients received either bias modification training or sham training. Both trainings consisted of six sessions of the joystick approach-avoidance task; the bias modification training entailed pushing away 90% of alcohol cues and 10% of soft drink cues, whereas this ratio was 50/50 in the sham training. Alcohol cue reactivity was measured with functional MRI before and after training. Before training, alcohol cue-evoked activation was observed in the amygdala bilaterally, as well as in the right nucleus accumbens, although here it fell short of significance. Activation in the amygdala correlated with craving and arousal ratings of alcohol stimuli; correlations in the nucleus accumbens again fell short of significance. After training, the bias modification group showed greater reductions in cue-evoked activation in the amygdala bilaterally and in behavioral arousal ratings of alcohol pictures, compared with the sham training group. Decreases in right amygdala activity correlated with decreases in craving in the bias modification but not the sham training group. These findings provide evidence that cognitive bias modification affects alcohol cue-induced mesolimbic brain activity. Reductions in neural reactivity may be a key underlying mechanism of the therapeutic effectiveness of this training.

  1. Neurobiological Signatures of Alcohol Dependence Revealed by Protein Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Gorini, Giorgio; Roberts, Amanda J.; Mayfield, R. Dayne

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol abuse causes dramatic neuroadaptations in the brain, which contribute to tolerance, dependence, and behavioral modifications. Previous proteomic studies in human alcoholics and animal models have identified candidate alcoholism-related proteins. However, recent evidences suggest that alcohol dependence is caused by changes in co-regulation that are invisible to single protein-based analysis. Here, we analyze global proteomics data to integrate differential expression, co-expression networks, and gene annotations to unveil key neurobiological rearrangements associated with the transition to alcohol dependence modeled by a Chronic Intermittent Ethanol (CIE), two-bottle choice (2BC) paradigm. We analyzed cerebral cortices (CTX) and midbrains (MB) from male C57BL/6J mice subjected to a CIE, 2BC paradigm, which induces heavy drinking and represents one of the best available animal models for alcohol dependence and relapse drinking. CIE induced significant changes in protein levels in dependent mice compared with their non-dependent controls. Multiple protein isoforms showed region-specific differential regulation as a result of post-translational modifications. Our integrative analysis identified modules of co-expressed proteins that were highly correlated with CIE treatment. We found that modules most related to the effects of CIE treatment coordinate molecular imbalances in endocytic- and energy-related pathways, with specific proteins involved, such as dynamin-1. The qRT-PCR experiments validated both differential and co-expression analyses, and the correspondence among our data and previous genomic and proteomic studies in humans and rodents substantiates our findings. The changes identified above may play a key role in the escalation of ethanol consumption associated with dependence. Our approach to alcohol addiction will advance knowledge of brain remodeling mechanisms and adaptive changes in response to drug abuse, contribute to understanding of

  2. Nicotine Dependence and Alcohol Problems from Adolescence to Young Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Dierker, Lisa; Selya, Arielle; Rose, Jennifer; Hedeker, Donald; Mermelstein, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the highly replicated relationship between symptoms associated with both alcohol and nicotine, little is known about this association across time and exposure to both drinking and smoking. In the present study, we evaluate if problems associated with alcohol use are related to emerging nicotine dependence symptoms and whether this relationship varies from adolescence to young adulthood, after accounting for both alcohol and nicotine exposure. Methods The sample was drawn from the Social and Emotional Contexts of Adolescent Smoking Patterns Study which measured smoking, nicotine dependence, alcohol use and alcohol related problems over 6 assessment waves spanning 6 years. Analyses were based on repeated assessment of 864 participants reporting some smoking and drinking 30 days prior to individual assessment waves. Mixed-effects regression models were estimated to examine potential time, smoking and/or alcohol varying effects in the association between alcohol problems and nicotine dependence. Findings Inter-individual differences in mean levels of alcohol problems and within subject changes in alcohol problems from adolescence to young adulthood were each significantly associated with nicotine dependence symptoms over and above levels of smoking and drinking behaviour. This association was consistent across both time and increasing levels of smoking and drinking. Conclusions Alcohol related problems are a consistent risk factor for nicotine dependence over and above measures of drinking and smoking and this association can be demonstrated from the earliest experiences with smoking in adolescents, through the establishment of more regular smoking patterns across the transition to young adulthood. These findings add to accumulating evidence suggesting that smoking and drinking may be related through a mechanism that cannot be wholly accounted for by exposure to either substance. PMID:27610424

  3. Prefrontal Cortical Thickness Deficit in Detoxified Alcohol-dependent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sujin; Kang, Ilhyang; Lee, Boung Chul; Jeon, Yujin; Cho, Han Byul; Yoon, Sujung; Lim, Soo Mee; Kim, Jungyoon; Lyoo, In Kyoon

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is a serious disorder that can be related with a number of potential health-related and social consequences. Cortical thickness measurements would provide important information on the cortical structural alterations in patients with alcohol dependence. Twenty-one patients with alcohol dependence and 22 healthy comparison subjects have been recruited and underwent high-resolution brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and clinical assessments. T1-weighted MR images were analyzed using the cortical thickness analysis program. Significantly thinner cortical thickness in patients with alcohol dependence than healthy comparison subjects was noted in the left superior frontal cortical region, correcting for multiple comparisons and adjusting with age and hemispheric average cortical thickness. There was a significant association between thickness in the cluster of the left superior frontal cortex and the duration of alcohol use. The prefrontal cortical region may particularly be vulnerable to chronic alcohol exposure. It is also possible that the pre-existing deficit in this region may have rendered individuals more susceptible to alcohol dependence. PMID:28035184

  4. Glucocorticoid receptor antagonism decreases alcohol seeking in alcohol-dependent individuals

    PubMed Central

    Vendruscolo, Leandro F.; Estey, David; Goodell, Vivian; Macshane, Lauren G.; Logrip, Marian L.; Schlosburg, Joel E.; McGinn, M. Adrienne; Zamora-Martinez, Eva R.; Belanoff, Joseph K.; Hunt, Hazel J.; Sanna, Pietro P.; George, Olivier; Koob, George F.; Edwards, Scott; Mason, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholism, or alcohol use disorder, is a major public health concern that is a considerable risk factor for morbidity and disability; therefore, effective treatments are urgently needed. Here, we demonstrated that the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist mifepristone reduces alcohol intake in alcohol-dependent rats but not in nondependent animals. Both systemic delivery and direct administration into the central nucleus of the amygdala, a critical stress-related brain region, were sufficient to reduce alcohol consumption in dependent animals. We also tested the use of mifepristone in 56 alcohol-dependent human subjects as part of a double-blind clinical and laboratory-based study. Relative to placebo, individuals who received mifepristone (600 mg daily taken orally for 1 week) exhibited a substantial reduction in alcohol-cued craving in the laboratory, and naturalistic measures revealed reduced alcohol consumption during the 1-week treatment phase and 1-week post-treatment phase in mifepristone-treated individuals. Mifepristone was well tolerated and improved liver-function markers. Together, these results support further exploration of GR antagonism via mifepristone as a therapeutic strategy for alcoholism. PMID:26121746

  5. Effects of Depression on Treatment Motivation in Male Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    CENGİSİZ, Cengiz; DEVECİ, Artuner; YAPICI, Aslıhan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Treatment motivation in alcohol dependents is usually viewed as a strong predictor of seeking treatment and treatment success. The conditions affecting motivation in alcohol dependence, however, has not been clarified. In this study, it is aimed to determine the effects of depression on treatment motivation in male alcohol dependence. Methods The present study included 34 male alcohol dependents presenting to outpatient clinics in Manisa Hospital of Mental Disorders and Hospital of Celal Bayar University. The patients underwent evaluation using the socio-demographic and clinical information form, DSM-IV SCID-I Clinical Version, Treatment Motivation Questionnaire (TMQ), and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). Results A significant relationship was found between the total score of TMQ and HDRS (p=.039). Conclusion We believe that the present study, in which we examined the relationship between treatment motivation in male alcohol dependence and depression, would provide a significant contribution to literature. It is also important to investigate other factors that may affect treatment motivation in male alcohol dependence. Studies with larger samples are needed on this topic.

  6. The treatment of alcohol and opioid dependence in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Heberlein, Annemarie; Leggio, Lorenzo; Stichtenoth, Dirk; Hillemacher, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    This article addresses the question of 'best treatment options', which clinicians face when treating pregnant women with alcohol and opioid dependence. Studies show that alcohol consumption is associated with fetal abnormalities and long-term cognitive problems depending on the amount consumed, drinking pattern, and time of gestation. Screening and evaluation of specific interventions are important to reduce alcohol consumption during pregnancy and associated problems in infants. Opioid detoxification is only recommended beyond the first trimester and only in those pregnant women who refuse opioid maintenance therapy. Methadone is the most established treatment of pregnant opioid-dependent women, though recent results indicate some advantages of buprenorphine, slow-release oral methadone and diamorphine compared with methadone. Benzodiazepines seem to be the most recommendable option for managing alcohol withdrawal, and psychosocial interventions succeed in reducing alcohol consumption or in maintaining abstinence in alcohol-dependent pregnant women. Regarding opioid dependence, current results suggest that factors like the health status of the mother, the need for additional medications (e.g. treatment for HIV), comorbid drug dependence, and concurrent drug use need to be considered in order to find the 'best opioid substitute'.

  7. Naltrexone ameliorates functional network abnormalities in alcohol-dependent individuals.

    PubMed

    Morris, Laurel S; Baek, Kwangyeol; Tait, Roger; Elliott, Rebecca; Ersche, Karen D; Flechais, Remy; McGonigle, John; Murphy, Anna; Nestor, Liam J; Orban, Csaba; Passetti, Filippo; Paterson, Louise M; Rabiner, Ilan; Reed, Laurence; Smith, Dana; Suckling, John; Taylor, Eleanor M; Bullmore, Edward T; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R; Deakin, Bill; Nutt, David J; Sahakian, Barbara J; Robbins, Trevor W; Voon, Valerie

    2017-02-28

    Naltrexone, an opioid receptor antagonist, is commonly used as a relapse prevention medication in alcohol and opiate addiction, but its efficacy and the mechanisms underpinning its clinical usefulness are not well characterized. In the current study, we examined the effects of 50-mg naltrexone compared with placebo on neural network changes associated with substance dependence in 21 alcohol and 36 poly-drug-dependent individuals compared with 36 healthy volunteers. Graph theoretic and network-based statistical analysis of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data revealed that alcohol-dependent subjects had reduced functional connectivity of a dispersed network compared with both poly-drug-dependent and healthy subjects. Higher local efficiency was observed in both patient groups, indicating clustered and segregated network topology and information processing. Naltrexone normalized heightened local efficiency of the neural network in alcohol-dependent individuals, to the same levels as healthy volunteers. Naltrexone failed to have an effect on the local efficiency in abstinent poly-substance-dependent individuals. Across groups, local efficiency was associated with substance, but no alcohol exposure implicating local efficiency as a potential premorbid risk factor in alcohol use disorders that can be ameliorated by naltrexone. These findings suggest one possible mechanism for the clinical effects of naltrexone, namely, the amelioration of disrupted network topology.

  8. Emotional Intelligence Components in Alcohol Dependent and Mentally Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Mohagheghi, Arash; Amiri, Shahrokh; Mousavi Rizi, Seyedreza; Safikhanlou, Salman

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Emotional intelligence might play an important role in the onset and persistence of different psychopathologies. This study investigated the relationship between emotional intelligence and alcohol dependence. Methods. In this case-control study, participants included alcohol dependent individuals and mentally healthy inpatients. Each group consisted of 40 individuals (male/female: 1). The diagnosis was based on the criteria of the DSM-IV-TR using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-IV). All the participants completed Bar-On emotional intelligence test. Results. 20 males and 20 females were included in each group. Mean age of alcohol dependent participants and controls was 31.28 ± 7.82 and 34.93 ± 9.83 years in that order. The analyses showed that the alcohol dependent individuals had a significant difference compared with the control group and received lower scores in empathy, responsibility, impulse control, self-esteem, optimism, emotional consciousness, stress tolerance, autonomy, problem-solving, and total score of emotional intelligence components. Conclusion. Patients with alcohol dependence have deficits in components of emotional intelligence. Identifying and targeted training of the individuals with lower scores in components of emotional intelligence may be effective in prevention of alcohol dependence. PMID:25893214

  9. Emotional intelligence components in alcohol dependent and mentally healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Mohagheghi, Arash; Amiri, Shahrokh; Mousavi Rizi, Seyedreza; Safikhanlou, Salman

    2015-01-01

    Emotional intelligence might play an important role in the onset and persistence of different psychopathologies. This study investigated the relationship between emotional intelligence and alcohol dependence. In this case-control study, participants included alcohol dependent individuals and mentally healthy inpatients. Each group consisted of 40 individuals (male/female: 1). The diagnosis was based on the criteria of the DSM-IV-TR using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-IV). All the participants completed Bar-On emotional intelligence test. 20 males and 20 females were included in each group. Mean age of alcohol dependent participants and controls was 31.28±7.82 and 34.93±9.83 years in that order. The analyses showed that the alcohol dependent individuals had a significant difference compared with the control group and received lower scores in empathy, responsibility, impulse control, self-esteem, optimism, emotional consciousness, stress tolerance, autonomy, problem-solving, and total score of emotional intelligence components. Patients with alcohol dependence have deficits in components of emotional intelligence. Identifying and targeted training of the individuals with lower scores in components of emotional intelligence may be effective in prevention of alcohol dependence.

  10. Alcohol expectancies, self-efficacy and coping in an alcohol-dependent sample.

    PubMed

    Hasking, Penelope A; Oei, Tian P S

    2007-01-01

    This study expanded earlier work conducted by this laboratory by examining the independent and interactive effects of avoidant coping strategies, positive and negative alcohol expectancies and self-efficacy, in predicting volume and frequency of alcohol consumption in a sample dependent on alcohol (n=296). Coping strategies were found to be salient predictors of frequency of drinking, while venting emotion interacted with negative expectancies to predict both volume and frequency of drinking. Venting emotion was also found to interact with drinking refusal self-efficacy in predicting volume of alcohol consumed. These interactions are discussed in terms of the cognitive and behavioural mechanisms thought to underlie drinking behaviour.

  11. Are there gender differences in locus of control specific to alcohol dependence?

    PubMed

    McPherson, Andrew; Martin, Colin R

    2017-01-01

    To investigate gender differences in locus of control in an alcohol-dependent population. Locus of control helps to explain behaviour in terms of internal (the individual is responsible) or external (outside forces, such as significant other people or chance, are responsible) elements. Past research on gender differences in locus of control in relation to alcohol dependence has shown mixed results. There is a need then to examine gender and locus of control in relation to alcohol dependence to ascertain the veracity of any locus of control differences as a function of gender. The Multidimensional Health Locus of Control form-C was administered to clients from alcohol dependence treatment centres in the West of Scotland. Independent t-tests were carried out to assess gender differences in alcohol dependence severity and internal/external aspects of locus of control. One hundred and eighty-eight (53% females) participants were recruited from a variety of alcohol dependence treatment centres. The majority of participants (72%) came from Alcoholics Anonymous groups. Women revealed a greater internal locus of control compared with men. Women also had a greater 'significant others' locus of control score than men. Men were more reliant on 'chance' and 'doctors' than women. All these trends were not, however, statistically significant. Gender differences in relation to locus of control and alcohol dependence from past studies are ambiguous. This study also found no clear statistically significant differences in locus of control orientation as a function of gender. This article helps nurses to contextualise health behaviours as a result of internal or external forces. It also helps nursing staff to better understand alcohol dependence treatment in relation to self-efficacy and control. Moreover, it highlights an important concept in health education theory. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Predicting Post-Treatment-Initiation Alcohol Use among Patients with Severe Mental Illness and Alcohol Use Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradizza, Clara M.; Maisto, Stephen A.; Vincent, Paula C.; Stasiewicz, Paul R.; Connors, Gerard J.; Mercer, Nicole D.

    2009-01-01

    Few investigators studying alcohol abuse among individuals with a severe mental illness (SMI) have examined predictors of posttreatment alcohol outcomes. In the present study, a multivariate approach based on a theoretical model was used to study the relationship between psychosocial factors and post-treatment-initiation alcohol use. Predictors of…

  13. The Effects of Levetiracetam on Alcohol Consumption in Alcohol-Dependent Subjects: An Open Label Study

    PubMed Central

    Sarid-Segal, Ofra; Piechniczek-Buczek, Joanna; Knapp, Clifford; Afshar, Maryam; Devine, Eric; Sickles, Laurie; Uwodukunda, Emma; Richambault, Courtney; Koplow, Jillian; Ciraulo, Domenic

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this open-label pilot study was to assess the efficacy and safety of the novel anticonvulsant agent, levetiracetam, for the treatment of alcohol dependence. A maximal dose of 2000 mg was administered daily for 10 weeks to alcohol dependent subjects (n = 20). Mean reported ethanol intake declined significantly from 5.3 to 1.7 standard drinks per day. Levetiracetam was well tolerated by most subjects. PMID:18584574

  14. Case of severe alcoholic hepatitis treated with granulocytapheresis

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yukari; Kamimura, Kenya; Iwasaki, Tomohiro; Abe, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Shunsaku; Mizuno, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Manabu; Eino, Atsushi; Narita, Ichiei; Terai, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    Severe alcoholic hepatitis (AH) has a high mortality, and it is associated with encephalopathy, acute renal failure, sepsis, gastrointestinal bleeding, and endotoxemia. The 28-d mortality remains poor (34%-40%), because no effective treatment has been established. Recently, corticosteroids (CS) have been considered effective for significantly improving the prognosis of those with AH, as it prevents the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. However, CS are not always appropriate as an initial therapeutic option, such as in cases with an infection or resistance to CS. We describe a patient with severe AH complicated by a severe infection caused by the multidrug resistance bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa), and was successfully treated with granulocytapheresis monotherapy without using CS. The experience of this case will provide understanding of the disease and information treating cases without using CS. PMID:27900326

  15. The impact of alcohol use severity on anxiety treatment outcomes in a large effectiveness trial in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate; Brown, Lily A.; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Sherbourne, Cathy; Stein, Murray B.; Sullivan, Greer; Bystritsky, Alexander; Craske, Michelle G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The presence of anxiety disorders is associated with poorer alcohol use disorder treatment outcomes, but little is known about the impact of alcohol use problems on anxiety disorder treatment outcomes despite their high comorbidity. The current study examined the impact of alcohol use symptom severity on anxiety disorder treatment outcomes in a multi-site primary care effectiveness study of anxiety disorder treatment. Method Data came from the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) effectiveness trial. Participants (N = 1004) were randomized to an evidence-based anxiety intervention (including cognitive behavioral therapy and medications) or usual care in primary care. Participants completed measures of alcohol use, anxiety, and depression a baseline, 6-mo, 12-mo, and 18-mo follow-up periods. Patients with alcohol dependence were excluded. Results There were no significant moderating (Treatment Group x Alcohol Use Severity) interactions. The majority of analyses revealed no predictive effects of alcohol use severity on outcome; however, alcohol problems at baseline were associated with somewhat higher anxiety and depression symptoms at the 18-mo follow-up. Conclusions These data indicate that patients with alcohol problems in primary care can be effectively treated for anxiety disorders. Baseline alcohol problems were associated with some poorer long-term outcomes, but this was evident across CALM and usual care. These findings provide preliminary evidence that there may be no need to postpone treatment of anxiety disorders until alcohol problems are addressed, at least among those who have mild to moderate alcohol problems. Replication with more severe alcohol use disorders is needed. PMID:25615523

  16. [From one beer with friends to alcohol dependence: a synthesis about our knowledge of this path].

    PubMed

    Ramos, Sérgio de Paula; Woitowitz, Arnaldo Broll

    2004-05-01

    Review paper about prospective studies concerning the natural history of alcoholism. Emphasizing Vaillant and the impact of his contribution to the evolution of the concepts of harmful use and dependence, as well as its most important therapeutic implications. The fact that the abstinence rates, in the treatment of a severe dependence, almost remaining the same in the last twenty-five years is highlighted.

  17. The Loss of Metabolic Control on Alcohol Drinking in Heavy Drinking Alcohol-Dependent Subjects

    PubMed Central

    de Timary, Philippe; Cani, Patrice D.; Duchemin, Julie; Neyrinck, Audrey M.; Gihousse, Dominique; Laterre, Pierre-François; Badaoui, Abdenor; Leclercq, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Background Most physiological studies interested in alcohol-dependence examined ethanol as a pharmacological agent rather than a nutrient. We conducted two studies, which assessed the metabolic and endocrine factors involved in the regulation of alcohol and nutrient intake in alcohol-dependent (AD) subjects. We also examined the potential role of a disruption in energy balance in alcohol-dependence. Methods and Results In Study-1, quantitative dietetic interviews of eating and drinking habits were conducted with 97 AD subjects. The population was split around a median alcohol intake value of 12.5 kcal/kg/day. The results showed that the “low alcohol” drinking AD subjects had high Body Mass Index (BMI) and Fat Mass (FM) and alcohol intake was compensated for by a decrease in non-alcoholic intakes. “High alcohol” drinking AD subjects, on the other hand, had low BMI and FM and the total caloric intakes were largely above norms. In Study-2, 24 AD inpatients were submitted to dietetic interviews, calorimetry and blood samplings for the measurement of biomarkers of the regulation of metabolism and satiety, on day 2, 5 and 16 of abstinence. These patients were compared with 20 controls matched for age and gender. We observed in AD patients an increase in cortisol, leptin and PYY plasma levels and a decrease in ghrelin, which might explain the observed decrease in non-alcoholic intakes. However, alcoholic and non-alcoholic intakes correlated positively with basal metabolism and negatively with leptin and leptin/BMI. Conclusion For individuals consuming below12.5 kcal/kg/day of alcohol, alcohol intake is compensated for by a decrease in non-alcoholic nutrient intakes, probably due to changes in metabolic and satiety factors. For individuals consuming above 12.5 kcal/kg/day of alcohol, alcohol accelerates metabolism and decreases fat mass and leptin levels, and the total caloric intake largely exceeds norms. A dual model for regulation of energy intake in AD subjects

  18. Alcohol dependence and driving: knowledge of DVLA regulations.

    PubMed

    Collier, Andrew; Watts, Maggie; Ghosh, Sujoy; Rice, Peter; Dewhurst, Neil

    2015-02-01

    Aims and Methods The UK's Driver Vehicle Licensing Authority (DVLA) requires individuals to report if they have a medical condition such as alcohol dependence. General Medical Council guidance indicates that medical practitioners should ensure patients are aware of their impairment and requirement to notify the DVLA. Results In a survey of 246 people with known alcohol dependence, none were aware of advice on driving given by medical practitioners and none had self-reported. In addition, 362 doctors, either attending a college symposium or visiting a college website, were asked about their knowledge of DVLA regulations regarding alcohol dependence: 73% of those attending the symposium and 63% of those visiting the website answered incorrectly. In Scotland, over 20 000 people have alcohol dependence (over 1 million people with alcohol abuse), yet only 2548 people with alcohol problems self-reported to the DVLA in 2011. Clinical implications If the DVLA regulations were implemented, it could make an enormous difference to the behaviours of the driving public.

  19. Alcohol dependence and driving: knowledge of DVLA regulations

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Andrew; Watts, Maggie; Ghosh, Sujoy; Rice, Peter; Dewhurst, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Methods The UK’s Driver Vehicle Licensing Authority (DVLA) requires individuals to report if they have a medical condition such as alcohol dependence. General Medical Council guidance indicates that medical practitioners should ensure patients are aware of their impairment and requirement to notify the DVLA. Results In a survey of 246 people with known alcohol dependence, none were aware of advice on driving given by medical practitioners and none had self-reported. In addition, 362 doctors, either attending a college symposium or visiting a college website, were asked about their knowledge of DVLA regulations regarding alcohol dependence: 73% of those attending the symposium and 63% of those visiting the website answered incorrectly. In Scotland, over 20 000 people have alcohol dependence (over 1 million people with alcohol abuse), yet only 2548 people with alcohol problems self-reported to the DVLA in 2011. Clinical implications If the DVLA regulations were implemented, it could make an enormous difference to the behaviours of the driving public. PMID:26191423

  20. Proof-of-concept human laboratory study for protracted abstinence in alcohol dependence: effects of gabapentin.

    PubMed

    Mason, Barbara J; Light, John M; Williams, Lauren D; Drobes, David J

    2009-01-01

    There is a need for safe medications that can effectively support recovery by treating symptoms of protracted abstinence that may precipitate relapse in alcoholics, e.g. craving and disturbances in sleep and mood. This proof-of-concept study reports on the effectiveness of gabapentin 1200 mg for attenuating these symptoms in a non-treatment-seeking sample of cue-reactive, alcohol-dependent individuals. Subjects were 33 paid volunteers with current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV alcohol dependence and a strength of craving rating 1 SD or greater for alcohol than water cues. Subjects were randomly assigned to gabapentin or placebo for 1 week and then participated in a within-subjects trial where each was exposed to standardized sets of pleasant, neutral and unpleasant visual stimuli followed by alcohol or water cues. Gabapentin was associated with significantly greater reductions than placebo on several measures of subjective craving for alcohol as well as for affectively evoked craving. Gabapentin was also associated with significant improvement on several measures of sleep quality. Side effects were minimal, and gabapentin effects were not found to resemble any major classes of abused drugs. Results suggest that gabapentin may be effective for treating the protracted abstinence phase in alcohol dependence and that a randomized clinical trial would be an appropriate next step. The study also suggests the value of cue-reactivity studies as proof-of-concept screens for potential antirelapse drugs.

  1. Coping Styles and Alcohol Dependence among Homeless People

    PubMed Central

    Opalach, Cezary; Romaszko, Jerzy; Jaracz, Marcin; Kuchta, Robert; Borkowska, Alina; Buciński, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives The ways in which homeless individuals cope with stress may differ from those relied upon by the members of the general population and these differences may either be the result or the cause of their living conditions. The aim of the study was to determine the preferred coping style among the homeless and its relationship with alcohol dependence. Methods The study included 78 homeless individuals and involved the collection of demographic, sociological, psychological and medical data from each participant. Coping styles relied upon when dealing with stressful situations were assessed using a Polish adaptation of the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations. Alcohol dependence was assessed using the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST) and a quantitative analysis of alcohol consumption. Results Men accounted for 91.93% of the study population. Nearly 75% of the subjects met the alcohol dependence criterion. Significant relationships were observed between the individual's age, preferred coping style and alcohol consumption level. As an individual’s age increased, the use of emotion-oriented coping styles decreased, while an increase in alcohol consumption was associated with a more frequent use of emotion- and avoidance-oriented strategies. Conclusions The findings of this study, similarly to those of many other studies of homeless individuals but investigating other areas (e.g. epidemiology of tuberculosis and traumatic injuries), are an exaggerated representation of associations observed in the general population. The results describe a group of people living on the margins of the society, often suffering from extremely advanced alcoholism, with clear evident psychodegradation. The presence of specific ways of coping with stress related to excessive alcohol consumption in this group of individuals may interfere with active participation in support programmes provided for the homeless and may further exacerbate their problems. PMID

  2. Prefrontal correlates of approach preferences for alcohol stimuli in alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Lena H; Plichta, Michael M; Dresler, Thomas; Zesewitz, Anna K; Tupak, Sara V; Haeussinger, Florian B; Fischer, Matthias; Polak, Thomas; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Ehlis, Ann-Christine

    2014-05-01

    An approach bias for alcohol stimuli (i.e. faster approach than avoidance reactions) might facilitate relapses in alcohol dependence. Neurobiological models suggest hypersensitivity in the reward system [inter alia nucleus accumbens and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC)] to cause pathologically enhanced approach impulses towards alcohol stimuli. At the same time, in alcohol dependence, these structures are only insufficiently controlled by a hypoactive dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). The present study investigated the cortical aspects of this model with functional near-infrared spectroscopy in 21 alcohol-dependent in-patients and 21 healthy controls (HC; comparable in age, gender and education) during performance of the Approach-Avoidance Task (AAT) for the first time. Complementing previous findings, in reaction times (RTs), patients showed stronger approach preferences for alcohol than non-alcohol stimuli. For non-alcohol stimuli, patients even displayed avoidance preferences. The reversed pattern was found in HC. Group differences in activity of the OFC were identical to those in RTs, revealing patients to assign higher subjective value to approaching alcohol stimuli. In both groups, regulatory activity in the right DLPFC was stronger during avoiding than approaching alcohol pictures. Probable awareness of the behavioural hypotheses due to explicit task instructions and patients' deficient prefrontal function might account for this equally aligned pattern. Results are discussed with regard to recent findings revealing a reduced behavioural approach bias and risk for relapse by applying a retraining version of the AAT. Functional measurements might serve as a method for monitoring the corresponding neurobiological changes and-possibly-predicting the success of such a training.

  3. Disrupted Control Network Connectivity in Abstinent Patients with Alcohol Dependence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Siekyeong; Im, Sungjin; Lee, Jeonghwan; Lee, Sang-Gu

    2017-05-01

    Alcohol causes damage to the brain and is associated with various functional impairments. However, much of the brain damage can be reversed by abstaining for enough time. This study aims to investigate the patterns and degrees of brain function in abstinent patients with alcohol dependence by using resting-state functional connectivity. 26 male patients with alcohol dependence (alcohol group) and 28 age-matched male healthy volunteers (control group) were recruited from a mental hospital and the community, respectively. Using 3T MRI scan data, the resting-state functional connectivity of the task-negative and task-positive networks was determined and compared between the groups. There were no significant group differences in the resting-state functional connectivity in the default mode or in the salience and sensorimotor networks. Compared with the control group, the alcohol group showed significantly lower functional connectivity in the executive control network, especially in the cingulo-opercular network and, in some regions of interest, the dorsal attention network. This finding suggests that some brain networks do not normalize their functions after abstinence from drinking, and these results may be helpful in future research to investigate the mechanisms for craving alcohol and alcohol relapse prevention.

  4. Type D personality, alcohol dependence, and drinking motives in the general population.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Gillian; Curren, Cindy; Williams, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    The current study had two key aims: (a) to determine if Type D personality (the synergistic effect of negative affect and social inhibition) is associated with alcohol consumption in social drinkers and (b) to examine if this relationship is mediated by drinking motives. In a cross-sectional study, 862 participants (206 men, 656 women, mean age 26.1 years) completed the Type D Personality Scale, the Drinking Motives Questionnaire, and the Severity of Alcohol Dependence Questionnaire. Correlation analysis revealed that Type D personality was significantly and positively correlated with alcohol dependence (r = .11, p < .001). In addition, regression analyses demonstrated that this relationship was fully mediated by coping and conformity drinking motives. The present study has identified a positive relationship between Type D personality and alcohol dependence in the general population. We have also shown that this relationship is mediated by coping and conformity drinking motives.

  5. Physiopathological and therapeutical correlations in alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Szalontay, Andreea Silvana

    2014-01-01

    No doubt, alcoholism represents nowadays the toxicomany with the highest expansion rate among all population groups, being recognized by the specialists from the medical, social, economic and legal field as a true "toxic pandemy". Researchers consider ethanol, this small but highly aggressive molecule, to have supremacy if we were to consider the number of pages dedicated to it worldwide on daily bases, in the medical or any other specialty literature. Nonetheless, the large volume of data regarding ethanol toxicity does not seen to simplify things, on the contrary it points out new information about the its negative effects on human body. Ethanol represents a toxic that is rapidly and completely absorbed in the intestinal tract being distributed to most tissues and organs; ethanol is recognized as an enzymatic inductor of its own metabolization but also of the metabolization of numerous therapeutic agents.

  6. Safer-drinking Strategies Used by Chronically Homeless Individuals with Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Grazioli, Véronique S.; Hicks, Jennifer; Kaese, Greta; Lenert, James; Collins, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Chronically homeless individuals with alcohol dependence experience severe alcohol-related consequences. It is therefore important to identify factors that might be associated with reduced alcohol-related harm, such as the use of safer-drinking strategies. Whereas effectiveness of safer-drinking strategies has been well-documented among young adults, no studies have explored this topic among more severely affected populations, such as chronically homeless individuals with alcohol dependence. The aims of this study were thus to qualitatively and quantitatively document safer-drinking strategies used in this population. Participants (N=31) were currently or formerly chronically homeless individuals with alcohol dependence participating in a pilot study of extended-release naltrexone and harm-reduction counseling. At weeks 0 and 8, research staff provided a list of safer-drinking strategies for participants to endorse. Implementation of endorsed safer-drinking strategies was recorded at the next appointment. At both time points, strategies to buffer the effects of alcohol on the body (e.g., eating prior to and during drinking) were most highly endorsed, followed by changing the manner in which one drinks (e.g., spacing drinks), and reducing alcohol consumption. Quantitative analyses indicated that all participants endorsed safer-drinking strategies, and nearly all strategies were implemented (80–90% at weeks 0 and 8, respectively). These preliminary findings indicate that chronically homeless people with alcohol dependence use strategies to reduce harm associated with their drinking. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to test whether interventions that teach safer-drinking strategies may reduce overall alcohol-related harm in this population. PMID:25690515

  7. Safer-drinking strategies used by chronically homeless individuals with alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Grazioli, Véronique S; Hicks, Jennifer; Kaese, Greta; Lenert, James; Collins, Susan E

    2015-07-01

    Chronically homeless individuals with alcohol dependence experience severe alcohol-related consequences. It is therefore important to identify factors that might be associated with reduced alcohol-related harm, such as the use of safer-drinking strategies. Whereas effectiveness of safer-drinking strategies has been well-documented among young adults, no studies have explored this topic among more severely affected populations, such as chronically homeless individuals with alcohol dependence. The aims of this study were thus to qualitatively and quantitatively document safer-drinking strategies used in this population. Participants (N=31) were currently or formerly chronically homeless individuals with alcohol dependence participating in a pilot study of extended-release naltrexone and harm-reduction counseling. At weeks 0 and 8, research staff provided a list of safer-drinking strategies for participants to endorse. Implementation of endorsed safer-drinking strategies was recorded at the next appointment. At both time points, strategies to buffer the effects of alcohol on the body (e.g., eating prior to and during drinking) were most highly endorsed, followed by changing the manner in which one drinks (e.g., spacing drinks), and reducing alcohol consumption. Quantitative analyses indicated that all participants endorsed safer-drinking strategies, and nearly all strategies were implemented (80-90% at weeks 0 and 8, respectively). These preliminary findings indicate that chronically homeless people with alcohol dependence use strategies to reduce harm associated with their drinking. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to test whether interventions that teach safer-drinking strategies may reduce overall alcohol-related harm in this population.

  8. Recovery from alcohol dependence: Do smoking indicators predict abstinence?

    PubMed

    Hufnagel, Anna; Frick, Ulrich; Ridinger, Monika; Wodarz, Norbert

    2017-06-01

    There is inconsistent evidence about the potential influence of smoking on recovery from alcohol dependence. Our study aimed at assessing the impact of smoking-behavior on relapse during a 12 months follow-up period following a detoxification in patients with Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD). Three hundred Patients with AUD (74.9% smoking) were recruited from two inpatient detoxification units in psychiatric hospitals in Germany and their alcohol consumption was prospectively followed for 1 year. Data on different indicators of smoking behavior was gathered. Cox regression model was used to evaluate potential risk factors on time to relapse of alcohol consumption. Two hundred seventy-nine participants (n = 279) were included in the final analysis. Smoking increased the risk for alcohol relapse (hazard ratio = 3.962, 95% CI 1.582-9.921). However, this increased risk is slightly reduced with higher numbers of daily consumed cigarettes (hazard ratio per cigarette = .986, 95% CI .976-.995). Smoking reduced the probability of maintaining alcohol abstinence significantly, whereas higher number of cigarettes smoked daily diminished the increased risk of alcohol relapse in alcohol-dependent patients. Coordinated psychiatric and substance abuse interventions for different subgroups of patients with AUD in the post-acute treatment phase are necessary. Individualized treatment planning is especially important in smoking patients with AUD who are vulnerable for a relapse to alcohol drinking and for somatic complications. Our findings might support individualized treatment plans. (Am J Addict 2017;26:366-373). © 2017 American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  9. Abstract and concrete repetitive thinking modes in alcohol-dependence.

    PubMed

    Grynberg, Delphine; de Timary, Philippe; Philippot, Pierre; D'Hondt, Fabien; Briane, Yasmine; Devynck, Faustine; Douilliez, Céline; Billieux, Joël; Heeren, Alexandre; Maurage, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Emotional and interpersonal deficits play a crucial role in alcohol-related disorders as they predict alcohol consumption and relapse. Recent models of emotion regulation in psychopathology postulate that these deficits are centrally related to increased abstract/analytic repetitive thinking, combined with reduced concrete/experiential repetitive thinking. As this assumption has not been tested in addictions, this study aimed at investigating repetitive thinking modes in a large sample of alcohol-dependent individuals. One hundred recently detoxified alcohol-dependent individuals (29 females; mean age = 49.51-years-old) recruited during the 3rd week of their treatment in a detoxification center were compared to 100 healthy controls (29 females; mean age = 48.51-years-old) recruited in the experimenters' social network, matched at the group level for age, gender, and educational level. All participants completed the Mini Cambridge Exeter Repetitive Thought Scale measuring abstract/analytic and concrete/experiential repetitive thinking modes as well as complementary psychopathological measures (Beck Depression Inventory and State/Trait Anxiety Inventory). Alcohol-dependent individuals have similar levels of concrete repetitive thinking as controls but report significantly higher levels of abstract repetitive thinking (p < 0.001; d = 1.28). This effect remains significant after controlling for depression and anxiety. Relative to healthy controls, alcohol-dependent patients report more frequent use of abstract/analytic repetitive thinking, with preserved concrete/experiential thinking. Despite the cross-sectional nature of the study, the frequent use of abstract repetitive thinking thus appears to constitute a main feature of alcohol-dependence.

  10. Impulsivity-related cognition in alcohol dependence: Is it moderated by DRD2/ANKK1 gene status and executive dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Gullo, Matthew J; St John, Nathan; McD Young, Ross; Saunders, John B; Noble, Ernest P; Connor, Jason P

    2014-11-01

    Perceived impaired control over alcohol use is a key cognitive construct in alcohol dependence that has been related prospectively to treatment outcome and may mediate the risk for problem drinking conveyed by impulsivity in non-dependent drinkers. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether perceived impaired control may mediate the association between impulsivity-related measures (derived from the Short-form Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised) and alcohol-dependence severity in alcohol-dependent drinkers. Furthermore, the extent to which this hypothesized relationship was moderated by genetic risk (Taq1A polymorphism in the DRD2/ANKK1 gene cluster) and verbal fluency as an indicator of executive cognitive ability (Controlled Oral Word Association Test) was also examined. A sample of 143 alcohol-dependent inpatients provided an extensive clinical history of their alcohol use, gave 10ml of blood for DNA analysis, and completed self-report measures relating to impulsivity, impaired control and severity of dependence. As hypothesized, perceived impaired control (partially) mediated the association between impulsivity-related measures and alcohol-dependence severity. This relationship was not moderated by the DRD2/ANKK1 polymorphism or verbal fluency. These results suggest that, in alcohol dependence, perceived impaired control is a cognitive mediator of impulsivity-related constructs that may be unaffected by DRD2/ANKK1 and neurocognitive processes underlying the retrieval of verbal information.

  11. Risk of alcohol dependence: prevalence, related problems and socioeconomic factors.

    PubMed

    Martins-Oliveira, Juliana Gabrielle; Jorge, Kelly Oliva; Ferreira, Raquel Conceição; Ferreira, Efigênia Ferreira E; Vale, Míriam Pimenta; Zarzar, Patrícia Maria

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the possible alcohol dependence and related problems among adolescents and determined possible associations with socioeconomic factors and gender. A cross-sectional study was conducted with a representative sample of 936 adolescents aged 15 to 19 years enrolled at public and private schools in the city of Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Data related to alcohol consumption and associated problems were collected using the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT). The Social Vulnerability Index (SVI), mother's schooling and type of school were used to assess socioeconomic factors. Statistical analysis involved the chi-square test (p < 0.05) and Poisson regression. The prevalence of possible dependence was 16.4%, 52.1% reported concern of a family member regarding the adolescent's alcohol consumption. Female adolescents were less likely to exhibit possible dependence in comparison to males. Participants with living in a low vulnerability area were more likely to consume alcohol in comparison to those living in underprivileged areas. The results of the present study demonstrate that possible dependence was significantly associated with the male gender and low social vulnerability.

  12. Social anxiety and dissociation among male patients with alcohol dependency.

    PubMed

    Evren, Cuneyt; Sar, Vedat; Dalbudak, Ercan; Oncu, Fatih; Cakmak, Duran

    2009-02-28

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between social anxiety and dissociation among male patients with alcohol dependency. Participants were 176 male patients consecutively admitted to an alcohol dependency treatment unit. The Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, the Dissociative Experiences Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Spielberger State and Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test, and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised were administered to all participants. The dissociative (N=58, 33.0%) group had significantly higher social anxiety scores than the non-dissociative participants. Patients with a history of suicide attempt or childhood abuse had elevated social anxiety scores compared to those without. In multivariate analysis, dissociative taxon membership predicted both of the two social anxiety subscale scores consisting of fear/anxiety and avoidance in a highly significant level while trait anxiety was a significant covariant for these subscales. Among dissociative symptoms, only depersonalization and amnesia/fugue were predictors of social anxiety. Dissociation and social anxiety are interrelated among alcohol-dependent men. This relationship may have implications for prevention and treatment of alcohol dependency among men with a childhood trauma history in particular.

  13. Baclofen promotes alcohol abstinence in alcohol dependent cirrhotic patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection

    PubMed Central

    Leggio, L.; Ferrulli, A.; Zambon, A.; Caputo, F.; Kenna, G.A.; Swift, R.M.; Addolorato, G.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and alcoholic liver disease (ALD), either alone or in combination, count for more than two thirds of all liver diseases in the Western world. There is no safe level of drinking in HCV-infected patients and the most effective goal for these patients is total abstinence. Baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, represents a promising pharmacotherapy for alcohol dependence (AD). Previously, we performed a randomized clinical trial (RCT), which demonstrated the safety and efficacy of baclofen in patients affected by AD and cirrhosis. The goal of this post-hoc analysis was to explore baclofen's effect in a subgroup of alcohol-dependent HCV-infected cirrhotic patients. Any patient with HCV infection was selected for this analysis. Among the 84 subjects randomized in the main trial, 24 alcohol-dependent cirrhotic patients had a HCV infection; 12 received baclofen 10mg t.i.d. and 12 received placebo for 12-weeks. With respect to the placebo group (3/12, 25.0%), a significantly higher number of patients who achieved and maintained total alcohol abstinence was found in the baclofen group (10/12, 83.3%; p=0.0123). Furthermore, in the baclofen group, compared to placebo, there was a significantly higher increase in albumin values from baseline (p=0.0132) and a trend toward a significant reduction in INR levels from baseline (p=0.0716). In conclusion, baclofen was safe and significantly more effective than placebo in promoting alcohol abstinence, and improving some LFTs (i.e. albumin, INR) in alcohol-dependent HCV-infected cirrhotic patients. Baclofen may represent a clinically relevant alcohol pharmacotherapy for these patients. PMID:22244707

  14. [MAST and AUDIT. Evaluation of psychometric characteristics in patients with alcohol dependence].

    PubMed

    Fonte, Aníbal; Mota-Cardoso, Rui

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the correlation between scores on the MAST and AUDIT in patients hospitalized for detoxification from alcohol dependence and consider if the intensity of those scores reflect the severity of dependence and problems related to alcohol use. Correlational study. Patients admitted for the first time for alcohol dependence treatment. In addition to a structured interview, the MAST and the AUDIT, SADD was used to assess the degree of alcohol dependence and the APQ to assess the problems related to alcohol consumption. The internal consistency (Cronbach's α) of the MAST was 0.77 and the AUDIT was 0.73. The correlation between the two instruments was moderate (R = 0.497, p < 0.001). Both presented moderate and significant correlation (p < 0.001) with the APQ and SADD. The set of items from AUDIT directed towards dependence led to a higher correlation with SADD than with APQ, the reverse being true with the set of items belonging to the dimension problems / adverse consequences. The two instruments have low correlation with the volume of alcohol consumption measured in g/d. Both the MAST and the AUDIT have a total score that reflects the severity of dependence and alcohol-induced disorders. In clinical populations, these instruments can be used as a continuous variable to record quantitatively the magnitude of the problems. The AUDIT, relatively to the MAST, has the advantage of representing a smaller number of items, making it easier to answer and quote. The AUDIT also has the advantage of presenting sets of items belonging to three dimensions (quantity / frequency, dependency, problems / adverse effects) that can be analyzed separately, allowing for the characterization and further specification of the situations under study.

  15. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... distress and harm. It includes alcoholism and alcohol abuse. Alcoholism, or alcohol dependence, is a disease that ... alcohol to feel the same effect With alcohol abuse, you are not physically dependent, but you still ...

  16. Temperament, character, and dissociation among detoxified male inpatients with alcohol dependency.

    PubMed

    Evren, Cuneyt; Sar, Vedat; Dalbudak, Ercan

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine possible relationships of pathological dissociation with temperament, character, and concurrent psychopathological features in a consecutive series of male alcohol-dependent patients. Fifty-eight patients with pathological dissociation were compared with 118 nondissociative patients classified by dissociative taxon membership. Beside higher scores on anxiety, depression, and alcoholism scales, a larger proportion of dissociative group reported childhood abuse, suicide attempts, and self-mutilation than did the nondissociative group. They also had higher scores of novelty seeking and harm avoidance, but lower scores of persistence, self-directedness, and cooperativeness. Trait anxiety, depression, and severity of alcoholism predicted dissociative experiences; however, none of the temperament or character measures did. Rather than being a derivative of temperament or character features, dissociative experiences of male alcohol-dependent patients are associated with overall concurrent psychopathology. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Salivary alcohol dehydrogenase in non-smoking and smoking alcohol-dependent persons.

    PubMed

    Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Jelski, Wojciech; Zalewska, Anna; Szulc, Agata; Szmitkowski, Maciej; Zwierz, Krzysztof; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2014-09-01

    Increasing attention to the importance of saliva testing is not surprising because smoking and alcohol drinking act synergistically on oral tissues, and their metabolite levels, e.g., acetaldehyde, are much higher in saliva than in blood. The activity of salivary alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) comes from oral microbiota, mucosa, and salivary glands. The purpose of this study was to investigate the involvement of ADH in the oral health pathology of smoking (AS) and non-smoking (ANS) alcohol-dependent males. The results indicated that the AS group had a more significant and longer duration (until the 30th day of alcohol abstinence) decrease in ADH activity and output than the ANS group (until the 15th day of alcohol abstinence) compared to controls (social drinkers; C). The decreased salivary flow (SF) in alcoholics was observed longer in the ANS group (until the 30th day of alcohol abstinence), whereas in the AS group SF normalized at the 15th day, probably due to the irritating effect of tobacco smoke on the oral mucosa. Because saliva was centrifuged to remove cells and debris (including microbial cells), the detected salivary ADH activity was derived from salivary glands and/or oral mucosa. A more profound and longer decrease in ADH activity/output in smoking than non-smoking alcoholics was likely due to the damaged salivary glands and/or oral mucosa, caused by the synergistic effect of alcohol drinking and smoking. The lower values of salivary ADH in smoking than non-smoking alcoholics might also be partly due to the reversed/inhibited ADH reaction by high levels of accumulated acetaldehyde. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Personality traits and psychiatric comorbidities in alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Donadon, M.F.; Osório, F.L.

    2015-01-01

    Non-adaptive personality traits may constitute risk factors for development of psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety. We aim to evaluate associations and the predictive value of personality traits among alcohol-dependent individuals, with or without psychiatric comorbidities. The convenience sample comprised two groups of males over 18 years of age: one with subjects who had an alcohol dependence diagnosis (AG, n=110), and a control group without abuse and/or alcohol dependence diagnosis (CG, n=110). The groups were assessed by means of the Structured Clinical Interview DSM-IV (SCID-IV). AG participants were recruited among outpatients from the university hospital, whereas CG participants were recruited from a primary healthcare program. Data collection was done individually with self-assessment instruments. Parametric statistics were performed, and a significance level of P=0.05 was adopted. A positive correlation was observed between openness and the length of time that alcohol has been consumed, as were significant and negative correlations between conscientiousness and both the length of time alcohol has been consumed and the number of doses. For alcoholics, extraversion emerged as a protective factor against depression development (P=0.008) and tobacco abuse (P=0.007), whereas openness worked as a protective factor against anxiety (P=0.02). The findings point to specific deficits presented by alcoholics in relation to personality traits with or without psychiatric comorbidities and to the understanding that therapeutic approaches should favor procedures and/or preventive measures that allow more refined awareness about the disorder. PMID:26628399

  19. Trajectories of alcohol and drug use and dependence from adolescence to adulthood: the effects of familial alcoholism and personality.

    PubMed

    Chassin, Laurie; Fora, David B; King, Kevin M

    2004-11-01

    This study describes trajectories of substance use and dependence from adolescence to adulthood. Identified consumption groups include heavy drinking/heavy drug use, moderate drinking/experimental drug use, and light drinking/rare drug use. Dependence groups include alcohol only, drug only, and comorbid groups. The heavy drinking/heavy drug use group was at risk for alcohol and drug dependence and persistent dependence and showed more familial alcoholism, negative emotionality, and low constraint. The moderate drinking/experimental drug use group was at risk for alcohol dependence but not comorbid or persistent dependence and showed less negative emotionality and higher constraint. Familial alcoholism raised risk for alcohol and drug use and dependence in part because children from alcoholic families were more impulsive and lower in agreeableness.

  20. Childhood trauma and dissociation in patients with alcohol dependence, drug dependence, or both-A multi-center study.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Ingo; Langeland, Willemien; Hissbach, Johanna; Luedecke, Christel; Ohlmeier, Martin D; Chodzinski, Claudia; Kemper, Ulrich; Keiper, Peter; Wedekind, Dirk; Havemann-Reinecke, Ursula; Teunissen, Sybille; Weirich, Steffen; Driessen, Martin

    2010-06-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the level of dissociative symptoms in patients with different substance related disorders (alcohol dependence, drug dependence, and combined alcohol and drug dependence), and to investigate the influence of potentially traumatic events in childhood, age, gender, and posttraumatic stress disorder on the relationship between dissociative symptoms and type of substance abuse. Of the 459 participants (59.7% male) 182 (39.7%) were alcohol-dependent (A), 154 (33.6%) were drug-dependent (D), and 123 (26.8%) were dependent on both, alcohol and drugs (AD) based on the DSM-IV criteria for a current diagnosis. Participants completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES). The International Diagnostics Checklist (IDCL) was administered to diagnose PTSD. Higher levels of dissociation were observed in patients with drug dependence as compared to patients with mere alcohol dependence (mean DES group A: 9.9+/-8.8; group D: 12.9+/-11.7; group AD: 15.1+/-11.3). However, when severity of potentially traumatic events in childhood, PTSD, age and gender were included in the analysis, the influence of the type of substance abuse did not prove to be statistically significant. The variable most strongly related to dissociative symptoms was severity of potentially traumatic events in childhood, in particular emotional abuse, even after controlling for PTSD and other potential confounders. It seems appropriate to screen SUD patients for dissociative symptoms, especially those with a more complex risk profile including (additional) drug abuse, female gender, younger age and most importantly a history of childhood trauma. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Neural and psychological characteristics of college students with alcoholic parents differ depending on current alcohol use.

    PubMed

    Brown-Rice, Kathleen A; Scholl, Jamie L; Fercho, Kelene A; Pearson, Kami; Kallsen, Noah A; Davies, Gareth E; Ehli, Erik A; Olson, Seth; Schweinle, Amy; Baugh, Lee A; Forster, Gina L

    2017-09-20

    A significant proportion of college students are adult children of an alcoholic parent (ACoA), which can confer greater risk of depression, poor self-esteem, alcohol and drug problems, and greater levels of college attrition. However, some ACoA are resilient to these negative outcomes. The goal of this study was to better understand the psychobiological factors that distinguish resilient and vulnerable college-aged ACoAs. To do so, scholastic performance and psychological health were measured in ACoA college students not engaged in hazardous alcohol use (resilient) and those currently engaged in hazardous alcohol use (vulnerable). Neural activity (as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging) in response to performing working memory and emotion-based tasks were assessed. Furthermore, the frequency of polymorphisms in candidate genes associated with substance use, risk taking and stress reactivity were compared between the two ACoA groups. College ACoAs currently engaged in hazardous alcohol use reported more anxiety, depression and posttraumatic stress symptoms, and increased risky nicotine and marijuana use as compared to ACoAs resistant to problem alcohol use. ACoA college students with current problem alcohol showed greater activity of the middle frontal gyrus and reduced activation of the posterior cingulate in response to visual working memory and emotional processing tasks, which may relate to increased anxiety and problem alcohol and drug behaviors. Furthermore, polymorphisms of cholinergic receptor and the serotonin transporter genes also appear to contribute a role in problem alcohol use in ACoAs. Overall, findings point to several important psychobiological variables that distinguish ACoAs based on their current alcohol use that may be used in the future for early intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Rasch analysis of alcohol abuse and dependence diagnostic criteria in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Reslan, S; Kalpakjian, C Z; Hanks, R A; Millis, S R; Bombardier, C H

    2017-05-01

    Cross-sectional. The objective of the study is to examine whether alcohol use disorders should be conceptualized categorically as abuse and dependence as in the 'Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders' 4th edition or on a single continuum with mild to severe category ratings as in the 'Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders' 5th edition in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). United States of America. Data from 379 individuals who sustained SCI either traumatically or non-traumatically after the age of 18 and were at least 1 year post injury. Rasch analyses used the alcohol abuse and dependence modules of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders Non-patient Edition (SCID-I/NP). Fifty-seven percent (n=166) of the entire sample endorsed criteria for alcohol abuse, and 25% (n=65) endorsed criteria for alcohol dependence. Fit values were generally acceptable except for one item (for example, alcohol abuse criterion 2), suggesting that the items fit the expectation of unidimensionality. Examination of the principal components analysis did not provide support for unidimensionality. The item-person map illustrates poor targeting of items. Alcohol abuse and dependence criterion appear to reflect a unidimensional construct, a finding that supports a single latent construct or factor consistent with the DSM-5 diagnostic model.

  3. Baclofen for alcohol dependence: Relationships between baclofen and alcohol dosing and the occurrence of major sedation.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Benjamin; Labreuche, Julien; Duhamel, Alain; Deheul, Sylvie; Gautier, Sophie; Auffret, Marine; Pignon, Baptiste; Valin, Thomas; Bordet, Régis; Cottencin, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    High-dose baclofen, i.e., 300 mg/d or more, has recently emerged as a strategy for treating alcohol dependence. The impact that the co-exposure of large amounts of alcohol and baclofen has on sedation is unclear. In a prospective cohort of 253 subjects with alcohol dependence, we collected daily alcohol and baclofen doses across the first year of baclofen treatment and the monthly maximum subjective sedation experienced by each patient (0-10 visual analog scale). For each patient-month, we determined the average weekly alcohol consumption (AWAC; standard-drinks/week) and the maximum daily dose of baclofen (DDB; mg/d). The occurrence of an episode of major sedation (EMS) during a patient-month was defined as a sedation score ≥7. The relationship between the EMS occurrence and the concurrent AWAC and DDB was investigated using a generalized estimating equation model. In total, 1528 patient-months were compiled (70 with an EMS). Univariate analyses demonstrated that the rate of patient-month to EMS increased gradually with AWAC (p<0.001), from 0.9% for AWAC=0 to 9.4% for AWAC >35. There was also a significant gradual risk for EMS associated with DDB (<0.001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant interaction between DDB and AWAC on EMS risk (p=0.047). Each 20mg/d increase in DDB was associated with an OR of EMS in AWAC >35 of 1.22 (95%CI, 1.08-1.38) versus 1.11 (95%CI, 0.96-1.29) in AWAC=1-35, and 0.95 (95%CI, 0.76-1.19) in AWAC=0. The level of sedation observed in patients using baclofen for alcohol dependence appears to directly depend on the immediate doses of both the baclofen and the alcohol.

  4. Incubation of alcohol craving during abstinence in patients with alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Wu, Ping; Xin, Xue; Fan, Yun-Li; Wang, Gui-Bin; Wang, Fan; Ma, Meng-Ying; Xue, Ming-Ming; Luo, Yi-Xiao; Yang, Fu-De; Bao, Yan-Ping; Shi, Jie; Sun, Hong-Qiang; Lu, Lin

    2015-05-01

    Time-dependent increases in cue-induced nicotine and methamphetamine craving during abstinence were recently reported in human drug-dependent individuals. In the present study, we sought to determine whether this 'incubation of craving' phenomenon also occurs in alcoholics. Four groups of 80 inpatient adult male alcoholics were assessed in a single session (between-group design) for cue-induced alcohol craving at 7, 14, 30 and 60 days of abstinence. Another group that included 19 patients was repeatedly tested for cue-induced alcohol craving at the same abstinence days as above. Other psychological and physiological measures were assessed at the four abstinence timepoints. Cue-induced alcohol craving measured with visual analogue scales was the highest at 60 days of abstinence both between and within groups. However, heart rate, blood pressure and skin conductance responses did not differ between abstinent groups. These results provide evidence of the incubation of alcohol craving in humans, extending previous reports with smokers and methamphetamine addicts.

  5. Epigenetic alteration of the dopamine transporter gene in alcohol-dependent patients is associated with age.

    PubMed

    Nieratschker, Vanessa; Grosshans, Martin; Frank, Josef; Strohmaier, Jana; von der Goltz, Christoph; El-Maarri, Osman; Witt, Stephanie H; Cichon, Sven; Nöthen, Markus M; Kiefer, Falk; Rietschel, Marcella

    2014-03-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse and dependence are associated with dysfunctional dopaminergic neurotransmission in mesocorticolimbic circuits. Genetic and environmental factors have been shown to modulate susceptibility to alcohol dependence, and both may act through epigenetic mechanisms that can modulate gene expression, e.g. DNA methylation at CpG sites. Recent studies have suggested that DNA methylation patterns may change over time. However, few data are available concerning the rate of these changes in specific genes. A recent study found that hypermethylation of the promoter of the dopamine transporter (DAT) gene was positively correlated with alcohol dependence and negatively correlated with alcohol craving. The aim of the present study was to replicate these findings in a larger sample of alcohol-dependent patients and population-based controls matched for age and sex. No difference in methylation level was observed between patients and controls, and no difference in methylation level was observed before and after alcohol withdrawal in patients. However, patients with more severe craving showed a trend towards lower DAT methylation levels (P = 0.07), which is consistent with previous findings. Furthermore, in our overall sample, DAT methylation levels increased with age. Interestingly, a separate analysis of patients suggested that this finding was mainly driven by the patient group. Although the present data do not clarify whether chronic alcohol abuse is responsible for this phenomenon or merely enhances an ageing-specific process, our findings suggest that hypermethylation in alcohol-dependent patients is a consequence, rather than a cause, of the disorder. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  6. Predicting Post Treatment-Initiation Alcohol Use Among Patients With Severe Mental Illness and Alcohol Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bradizza, Clara M.; Maisto, Stephen A.; Vincent, Paula C.; Stasiewicz, Paul R.; Connors, Gerard J.; Mercer, Nicole D.

    2010-01-01

    Few studies examining alcohol abuse among individuals with a severe mental illness (SMI) have examined predictors of post-treatment alcohol outcomes. The present study uses a multivariate approach based on a theoretical model to study the relationship between psychosocial factors and post treatment-initiation alcohol use. Predictors of alcohol use outcomes were examined in 278 individuals diagnosed with a current DSM-IV schizophrenia-spectrum or bipolar disorder and an alcohol use disorder (AUD). At 6-months follow-up after initiating treatment, 144 of 228 available participants (63%) had good clinical outcomes. The results of structural equation modeling indicated that type of pretreatment residential setting was directly related to treatment with participants living in supervised settings (41%) reporting significantly more days of treatment (β = .34, p < .001). In addition, participants with more psychiatric symptoms, assessed by the Brief Symptom Inventory and Structured Clinical Interview for the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, reported significantly fewer treatment days (β = −.20, p < .001). Number of days participants attended treatment was indirectly associated with alcohol use outcomes and was mediated by use of alcohol coping skills, such that more frequent use of alcohol-specific coping skills was associated with less post treatment-initiation alcohol use (β = −.34, p < .001). This study emphasizes the favorable prognosis for alcohol outcomes among treated individuals with a SMI and AUD and the importance of psychosocial interventions, particularly those that result in better alcohol-specific coping skills. PMID:19968390

  7. Life stress in adolescence predicts early adult reward-related brain function and alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Daniel S.; Sitnick, Stephanie L.; Musselman, Samuel C.; Forbes, Erika E.

    2015-01-01

    Stressful life events increase vulnerability to problematic alcohol use, and they may do this by disrupting reward-related neural circuitry. This is particularly relevant for adolescents because alcohol use rises sharply after mid-adolescence and alcohol abuse peaks at age 20. Adolescents also report more stressors compared with children, and neural reward circuitry may be especially vulnerable to stressors during adolescence because of prefrontal cortex remodeling. Using a large sample of male participants in a longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging study (N = 157), we evaluated whether cumulative stressful life events between the ages of 15 and 18 were associated with reward-related brain function and problematic alcohol use at age 20 years. Higher cumulative stressful life events during adolescence were associated with decreased response in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) during monetary reward anticipation and following the receipt of monetary rewards. Stress-related decreases in mPFC response during reward anticipation and following rewarding outcomes were associated with the severity of alcohol dependence. Furthermore, mPFC response mediated the association between stressful life events and later symptoms of alcohol dependence. These data are consistent with neurobiological models of addiction that propose that stressors during adolescence increase risk for problematic alcohol use by disrupting reward circuit function. PMID:24795442

  8. Life stress in adolescence predicts early adult reward-related brain function and alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Casement, Melynda D; Shaw, Daniel S; Sitnick, Stephanie L; Musselman, Samuel C; Forbes, Erika E

    2015-03-01

    Stressful life events increase vulnerability to problematic alcohol use, and they may do this by disrupting reward-related neural circuitry. This is particularly relevant for adolescents because alcohol use rises sharply after mid-adolescence and alcohol abuse peaks at age 20. Adolescents also report more stressors compared with children, and neural reward circuitry may be especially vulnerable to stressors during adolescence because of prefrontal cortex remodeling. Using a large sample of male participants in a longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging study (N = 157), we evaluated whether cumulative stressful life events between the ages of 15 and 18 were associated with reward-related brain function and problematic alcohol use at age 20 years. Higher cumulative stressful life events during adolescence were associated with decreased response in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) during monetary reward anticipation and following the receipt of monetary rewards. Stress-related decreases in mPFC response during reward anticipation and following rewarding outcomes were associated with the severity of alcohol dependence. Furthermore, mPFC response mediated the association between stressful life events and later symptoms of alcohol dependence. These data are consistent with neurobiological models of addiction that propose that stressors during adolescence increase risk for problematic alcohol use by disrupting reward circuit function.

  9. Relationship of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptom severity with severity of alcohol-related problems in a sample of inpatients with alcohol use disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, Muge; Evren, Cuneyt; Umut, Gokhan; Evren, Bilge

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been shown to be related to a higher risk of developing psychiatric problems such as depressive disorders, substance use disorder, and impulsivity. Adults who have comorbid ADHD and alcohol use disorder (AUD) are at greater risk of negative outcomes. Thus, it is important to evaluate the relationship of ADHD symptoms and the severity of alcohol-related problems among patients with AUD. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of ADHD symptoms on severity of alcohol-related problems, while controlling the effects of depression and impulsivity in a sample of inpatients with AUD. Patients and methods Participants (n=190) were evaluated with the Beck Depression Inventory, the Short Form Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, the Michigan Alcohol Screening Test, and the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale. Results Severity of the scale scores was positively correlated with each other. Although severity of depression and impulsivity (particularly non-planning impulsivity) predicted the severity of alcohol-related problems in a linear regression model, when severity of ADHD symptoms was included in the analysis, the inattentive subscale score, in particular, predicted the severity of alcohol-related problems together with non-planning impulsivity, whereas depression was no longer a predictor. Conclusion These findings suggest that, together with non-planning impulsivity, symptoms of ADHD (particularly inattentive factor) are an important factor that predict alcohol-related problems, while controlling the severity of depressive symptoms among inpatients with AUD. PMID:27462159

  10. Treatment of alcohol dependence: recent progress and reduction of consumption.

    PubMed

    Testino, G; Leone, S; Borro, P

    2014-12-01

    Alcohol dependence (AD) is a major public health problem. Currently, three drugs for the treatment of AD have been approved by both the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA): acamprosate, disulfiram, and oral naltrexone. The FDA also approved the use of long-acting injectable naltrexone. In Austria and in Italy sodium oxybate is also approved. The EMA's Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use has recently granted marketing authorization for nalmefene for the reduction of alcohol consumption. Many patients, while accepting the problem, are unable or unwilling to completely stop consuming alcohol, leading to an inevitable deterioration over time of their psycho-physical state, and social and family relationships. It is appropriate to offer these patients the opportunity to significantly reduce their consumption of alcohol. The reduction may be an opportunity to prepare the individual for achieving complete abstinence. Abstinence should always be the main goal. Currently, nalmefene is the only drug that has been authorized for the reduction of alcohol consumption. Its association with psycho-social support is mandatory; it is taken on an "as-needed" basis, which should preferably be 1-2 hours before the possible intake of alcohol. The trials showed a significant reduction in alcohol consumption, which resulted in a significant reduction in morbidity and mortality. Reducing consumption allows a decrease in the progression of numerous alcohol-induced chronic diseases, as well as a reduction in psycho-physical damage, acts of violence, motor vehicle accidents, and accidents at work, which in turn means fewer healthcare costs.

  11. [Case management applied to the treatment of alcohol dependence].

    PubMed

    Figlie, Neliana Buzi; Laranjeira, Ronaldo

    2004-05-01

    This article aims is to conceptualize and describe the main steps in case management applied to the treatment of alcohol dependence. It is important to note the case manager functions, the importance of the first appointment, check the motivation to the treatment, some goals and activities suggestions for adherence reinforcement.

  12. Place and recovery from alcohol dependence: A journey through photovoice.

    PubMed

    Shortt, Niamk K; Rhynas, Sarah J; Holloway, Aisha

    2017-09-01

    It has been suggested that place, and interaction with the environment, may play a role in recovery from alcohol dependence. In this paper we report findings from a project that used an adapted photovoice methodology to better understand individuals' experience and perceptions of the role of place in recovery from alcohol dependence. Individuals attending a recovery café in central Scotland documented their environment and, in focus group settings, the individuals discussed and analysed their photographs. Here we report aspects of the environment, both therapeutic and risky, experienced by individuals negotiating the journey of dependence recovery. Elements of the natural environment were largely referred to as supportive and therapeutic, as were other more quotidian spaces, such as the home and café. The largest place-based risk faced by participants was the persistent availability and marketing of alcohol. The results demonstrate that the journey of recovery from alcohol dependence is contextually shaped, with place both supporting and hindering this journey. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Temporal dynamics and determinants of whole brain tissue volume changes during recovery from alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Gazdzinski, Stefan; Durazzo, Timothy C; Meyerhoff, Dieter J

    2005-06-01

    Brain shrinkage and its partial reversibility with abstinence is a common neuroimaging finding in alcohol dependent individuals. We used an automated three-dimensional whole brain magnetic resonance imaging method (boundary shift integral) in 23 alcohol dependent individuals to measure the temporal dynamics of cerebral tissue and spinal fluid volume changes over a 12-month interval and to examine the major determinants of brain tissue change rates during abstinence and non-abstinence. We found more rapid brain tissue gain during the first month of sobriety than in the following months. The most rapid volume recovery was observed in abstinent individuals with the greatest baseline brain shrinkage and drinking severity. The rapid reversal of brain volume gains in non-abstinent individuals and tissue volume changes are modulated by duration of abstinence and non-abstinence periods, as well as recency of non-abstinence. Age, family history density of alcoholism, relapse severity, and duration or age of onset of heavy drinking were not major determinants of brain shrinkage and brain volume recovery rates. Treatment providers may use this tangible information to reinforce the biomedical benefits of sobriety. Previous quantitative measurements of brain volumes in alcohol dependent individuals performed after several weeks of abstinence likely underestimated the full extent of chronic alcohol-associated brain shrinkage.

  14. The importance of quality of life in patients with alcohol abuse and dependence.

    PubMed

    Ugochukwu, Chio; Bagot, Kara Simone; Delaloye, Sibylle; Pi, Sarah; Vien, Linda; Garvey, Tim; Bolotaulo, Nestor Ian; Kumar, Nishant; Ishak, Waguih William

    2013-01-01

    After participating in this educational activity, the reader should be better able to identify the instruments that are currently being used to measure quality of life (QoL) in alcohol abuse and dependence; determine the impact of alcohol abuse and dependence on QoL; and evaluate the impact of treating alcohol abuse and dependence on QoL. Quality of life, which consists of the physical, mental, and social domains, has been shown to be negatively affected by alcohol abuse and dependence. This review aims to examine QoL in alcohol abuse and dependence by reviewing the instruments used to measure it and by analyzing the impact of alcohol abuse and dependence and of treatment on QoL. Studies were identified using a database search of PubMed and PsycINFO from the past 40 years (1971-2011) using the following keywords: abuse OR dependence, OR use AND alcohol, AND Quality of Life, QoL, Health-related quality of life, HRQOL. Two authors agreed independently on including 50 studies that met specific selection criteria. Although several global measures of QoL have established reliability and validity, many alcohol-specific measures of QoL have not yet been validated. Nevertheless, QoL has been shown to be significantly impaired in those with alcohol abuse and dependence, particularly in the domains of mental health and social functioning, the very areas that show the greatest improvement with abstinence and its maintenance. Moreover, the literature demonstrates the utility of using QoL measures throughout assessment and treatment as a motivational tool and as a marker for treatment efficacy. Measuring and monitoring QoL during assessment and treatment can add important value to patient recovery, for QoL improves with treatment and successful abstinence. Therefore, targeted, disease-specific assessments of QoL are warranted to address the impairments in the physical, mental, and social domains in alcohol abuse and dependence, thereby improving long-term outcomes.

  15. Poor autonomic nervous system functioning during sleep in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent men and women

    PubMed Central

    de Zambotti, Massimiliano; Baker, Fiona C.; Sugarbaker, David S.; Nicholas, Christian L.; Trinder, John; Colrain, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcoholism is considered an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Autonomic nervous system (ANS) function is a major indicator of cardiovascular health. Sleep is a suitable model to investigate ANS activity free from wake-related confounders. We investigated night-time ANS functioning, and the relationship between ANS activity and severity of alcohol dependence in chronic alcoholism. Methods Fourteen recently abstaining alcoholics (Age: 42.0±9.0y, 7 women) and sixteen age- and sex-matched controls (Age: 45.2±9.1y, 8 women) underwent a night of standard clinical polysomnography, including electrocardiographic recording. Time- and frequency-domain spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) was performed across hours of the night and during artifact-free epochs of stable sleep and wakefulness (pre-sleep wakefulness, rapid-eye-movement (REM) and non-REM sleep). Results Alcoholics had a poorer subjective and objective sleep quality compared to controls. Across the night, alcoholic men and women had elevated heart rate, reduced total HRV, i.e. lower standard deviation of normal-to-normal inter-beat-intervals, and reduced high frequency activity (assessed by the high frequency power and by the square root of the mean squared of successive heart period differences). This ANS pattern was most apparent at the beginning of the night. None of the ANS measures was associated with lifetime alcohol consumption or duration of alcohol dependence. Conclusions Our results show that ANS functioning is disrupted during the night, even in undisturbed sleep periods, indicating poor cardiovascular functioning in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent men and women. PMID:24575956

  16. Neuropeptide Y Opposes Alcohol Effects on GABA Release in Amygdala and Blocks the Transition to Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Gilpin, Nicholas W.; Misra, Kaushik; Herman, Melissa A.; Cruz, Maureen T.; Koob, George F.; Roberto, Marisa

    2011-01-01

    Background During the transition to alcohol and drug addiction, neuromodulator systems in the extended amygdala are recruited to mediate aspects of withdrawal and relapse via convergence on inhibitory GABA neurons in central amygdala (CeA). Methods This study investigated the role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in excessive alcohol drinking by making rats dependent on alcohol via alcohol vapor inhalation. This study also utilized intracellular and whole-cell recording techniques to determine the effects of NPY on GABAergic inhibitory transmission in CeA, synaptic mechanisms involved in these NPY effects, and NPY interactions with alcohol in the CeA of alcohol-naïve and alcohol-dependent rats. Results Chronic NPY treatment blocked excessive operant alcohol-reinforced responding associated with alcohol dependence, as well as gradual increases in alcohol responding by intermittently tested non-dependent controls. NPY decreased baseline GABAergic transmission and reversed alcohol-induced enhancement of inhibitory transmission in CeA by suppressing GABA release via actions at presynaptic Y2 receptors. Conclusions These results highlight NPY modulation of GABAergic signaling in central amygdala as a promising pharmacotheraputic target for the treatment of alcoholism. GABA neurons in the CeA likely constitute a major point of convergence for neuromodulator systems recruited during the transition to alcohol dependence. PMID:21459365

  17. In silico Models of Alcohol Dependence and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kovatchev, Boris; Breton, Marc; Johnson, Bankole

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we view alcohol dependence and the response to treatment as a recurrent bio-behavioral process developing in time and propose formal models of this process combining behavior and biology in silico. The behavioral components of alcohol dependence and treatment are formally described by a stochastic process of human behavior, which serves as an event generator challenging the metabolic system. The biological component is driven by the biochemistry of alcohol intoxication described by deterministic models of ethanol pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics to enable simulation of drinking addiction in humans. Derived from the known physiology of ethanol and the literature of both ethanol intoxication and ethanol absorption, the different models are distilled into a minimal model (as simple as the complexity of the data allows) that can represent any specific patient. We use these modeling and simulation techniques to explain responses to placebo and ondansetron treatment observed in clinical studies. Specifically, the response to placebo was explained by a reduction of the probability of environmental reinforcement, while the effect of ondansetron was explained by a gradual decline in the degree of ethanol-induced neuromodulation. Further, we use in silico experiments to study critical transitions in blood alcohol levels after specific average number of drinks per day, and propose the existence of two critical thresholds in the human – one at 5 and another at 11 drinks/day – at which the system shifts from stable to critical and to super critical state indicating a state of alcohol addiction. The advantages of such a model-based investigation are that (1) the process of instigation of alcohol dependence and its treatment can be deconstructed into meaningful steps, which allow for individualized treatment tailoring, and (2) physiology and behavior can be quantified in different (animal or human) studies and then the results can be integrated in silico

  18. The impact of atrial natriuretic peptide on anxiety, stress and craving in patients with alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Koopmann, Anne; Leménager, Tagrid; Wolf, Nadine Donata; Reinhard, Iris; Hermann, Derik; Koch, Jan; Wiedemann, Klaus; Kiefer, Falk

    2014-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is well known to modulate fluid and electrolyte homeostasis but also to counter-regulate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity. Correspondingly, recent studies suggest an important role of ANP in the neurobiology of anxiety. Preclinical and clinical data now provide evidence for an involvement of ANP in the pathophysiology of addictive behavior. The present study aims to elucidate the effects of ANP on alcohol-dependent patients' anxiety, perceived stress and craving during alcohol withdrawal. A sample of 59 alcohol-dependent inpatients was included in the analysis. A blood sample was taken at day 14 of detoxification in order to assess the concentrations of ANP and cortisol in plasma. In parallel, we assessed patients' alcohol craving, using the Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale, as well as anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory). Patients' stress levels were assessed using the Perceived Stress Scale. We found a significant negative association between patients' ANP plasma concentrations and anxiety, craving for alcohol and perceived stress. Regression analyses suggest that ANP is a significant predictor both for patients' perceived stress and for the severity of anxiety during early abstinence. The association of patients' ANP plasma levels and craving is suggested to be mediated by perceived stress. Our results suggest that the association of patients' ANP plasma levels and craving is mediated by their perceived stress. For this reason, intranasal application of ANP may prove to be a new avenue for the treatment of alcohol dependence in patients exhibiting high levels of perceived stress.

  19. Nicotinic Mechanisms Modulate Ethanol Withdrawal and Modify Time Course and Symptoms Severity of Simultaneous Withdrawal from Alcohol and Nicotine.

    PubMed

    Perez, Erika; Quijano-Cardé, Natalia; De Biasi, Mariella

    2015-09-01

    Alcohol and nicotine are among the top causes of preventable death in the United States. Unfortunately, people who are dependent on alcohol are more likely to smoke than individuals in the general population. Similarly, smokers are more likely to abuse alcohol. Alcohol and nicotine codependence affects health in many ways and leads to poorer treatment outcomes in subjects who want to quit. This study examined the interaction of alcohol and nicotine during withdrawal and compared abstinence symptoms during withdrawal from one of the two drugs only vs both. Our results indicate that simultaneous withdrawal from alcohol and nicotine produces physical symptoms that are more severe and last longer than those experienced during withdrawal from one of the two drugs alone. In animals experiencing withdrawal after chronic ethanol treatment, acute nicotine exposure was sufficient to prevent abstinence symptoms. Similarly, symptoms were prevented when alcohol was injected acutely in mice undergoing nicotine withdrawal. These experiments provide evidence for the involvement of the nicotinic cholinergic system in alcohol withdrawal. Furthermore, the outcomes of intracranial microinfusions of mecamylamine, a nonselective nicotinic receptor antagonist, highlight a major role for the nicotinic receptors expressed in medial habenula and interpeduncular nucleus during withdrawal. Overall, the data support the notion that modulating the nicotinic cholinergic system might help to maintain long-term abstinence from alcohol.

  20. Nicotinic Mechanisms Modulate Ethanol Withdrawal and Modify Time Course and Symptoms Severity of Simultaneous Withdrawal from Alcohol and Nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Erika; Quijano-Cardé, Natalia; De Biasi, Mariella

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol and nicotine are among the top causes of preventable death in the United States. Unfortunately, people who are dependent on alcohol are more likely to smoke than individuals in the general population. Similarly, smokers are more likely to abuse alcohol. Alcohol and nicotine codependence affects health in many ways and leads to poorer treatment outcomes in subjects who want to quit. This study examined the interaction of alcohol and nicotine during withdrawal and compared abstinence symptoms during withdrawal from one of the two drugs only vs both. Our results indicate that simultaneous withdrawal from alcohol and nicotine produces physical symptoms that are more severe and last longer than those experienced during withdrawal from one of the two drugs alone. In animals experiencing withdrawal after chronic ethanol treatment, acute nicotine exposure was sufficient to prevent abstinence symptoms. Similarly, symptoms were prevented when alcohol was injected acutely in mice undergoing nicotine withdrawal. These experiments provide evidence for the involvement of the nicotinic cholinergic system in alcohol withdrawal. Furthermore, the outcomes of intracranial microinfusions of mecamylamine, a nonselective nicotinic receptor antagonist, highlight a major role for the nicotinic receptors expressed in medial habenula and interpeduncular nucleus during withdrawal. Overall, the data support the notion that modulating the nicotinic cholinergic system might help to maintain long-term abstinence from alcohol. PMID:25790020

  1. Childhood or Adolescent Parental Divorce/Separation, Parental History of Alcohol Problems, and Offspring Lifetime Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Ronald G.; Lizardi, Dana; Keyes, Katherine M.; Hasin, Deborah S.

    2013-01-01

    Background This study examined whether the experiences of childhood or adolescent parental divorce/separation and parental alcohol problems affected the likelihood of offspring DSM-IV lifetime alcohol dependence, controlling for parental history of drug, depression, and antisocial behavior problems. Method Data were drawn from the 2001–2002 National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), a nationally representative United States survey of 43,093 civilian non-institutionalized participants aged 18 and older, interviewed in person. Logistic regression models were used to calculate the main and interaction effects of childhood or adolescent parental divorce/separation and parental history of alcohol problems on offspring lifetime alcohol dependence, after adjusting for parental history of drug, depression, and antisocial behavior problems. Results Childhood or adolescent parental divorce/separation and parental history of alcohol problems were significantly related to offspring lifetime alcohol dependence, after adjusting for parental history of drug, depression, and antisocial behavior problems. Experiencing parental divorce/separation during childhood, even in the absence of parental history of alcohol problems, remained a significant predictor of lifetime alcohol dependence. Experiencing both childhood or adolescent parental divorce/separation and parental alcohol problems had a significantly stronger impact on the risk for DSM-IV alcohol dependence than the risk incurred by either parental risk factor alone. Conclusions Further research is needed to better identify the factors that increase the risk for lifetime alcohol dependence among those who experience childhood or adolescent parental divorce/separation. PMID:18757141

  2. Childhood or adolescent parental divorce/separation, parental history of alcohol problems, and offspring lifetime alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Ronald G; Lizardi, Dana; Keyes, Katherine M; Hasin, Deborah S

    2008-12-01

    This study examined whether the experiences of childhood or adolescent parental divorce/separation and parental alcohol problems affected the likelihood of offspring DSM-IV lifetime alcohol dependence, controlling for parental history of drug, depression, and antisocial behavior problems. Data were drawn from the 2001-2002 National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), a nationally representative United States survey of 43,093 civilian non-institutionalized participants aged 18 and older, interviewed in person. Logistic regression models were used to calculate the main and interaction effects of childhood or adolescent parental divorce/separation and parental history of alcohol problems on offspring lifetime alcohol dependence, after adjusting for parental history of drug, depression, and antisocial behavior problems. Childhood or adolescent parental divorce/separation and parental history of alcohol problems were significantly related to offspring lifetime alcohol dependence, after adjusting for parental history of drug, depression, and antisocial behavior problems. Experiencing parental divorce/separation during childhood, even in the absence of parental history of alcohol problems, remained a significant predictor of lifetime alcohol dependence. Experiencing both childhood or adolescent parental divorce/separation and parental alcohol problems had a significantly stronger impact on the risk for DSM-IV alcohol dependence than the risk incurred by either parental risk factor alone. Further research is needed to better identify the factors that increase the risk for lifetime alcohol dependence among those who experience childhood or adolescent parental divorce/separation.

  3. Naltrexone depot formulations for opioid and alcohol dependence: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lobmaier, Philipp P; Kunøe, Nikolaj; Gossop, Michael; Waal, Helge

    2011-12-01

    Naltrexone is an opioid receptor antagonist that blocks the reinforcing effects of opioids and reduces alcohol consumption and craving. It has no abuse potential, mild and transient side effects, and thus appears an ideal pharmacotherapy for opioid dependence. Its effectiveness in alcohol dependence is less evident, but compliance with naltrexone combined with psychosocial support has been repeatedly shown to improve drinking outcomes. Limited compliance with oral naltrexone treatment is a known drawback. Several naltrexone implant and injectable depot formulations are being investigated and provide naltrexone release for at least 1 month. Studies among opioid-dependent patients indicate significant reductions in heroin use, but sample sizes are usually small. In alcohol dependence, two large multicenter trials report alcohol and craving reductions for naltrexone and placebo groups, indicating a significant but moderate effect. The pharmacokinetic profile of the injectable formulation indicates reliable naltrexone release over 1 month at therapeutic levels. Implant formulations releasing naltrexone up to 7 months are reported. Findings on safety and tolerability confirm the generally mild adverse effects described for naltrexone tablets. However, further research on therapeutic levels (i.e., opioid blocking) is warranted. The majority of naltrexone implants lacks approval for regular clinical use and larger longitudinal studies are needed. The available naltrexone depot formulations have the potential to significantly improve medication compliance in opioid and alcohol dependence. In certain circumstances, they may constitute a promising new treatment option. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Social Support and Treatment Outcome in Alcohol Dependence Syndrome in Armed Forces

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Vinay Singh; Azad, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Social factors play vital role in unfolding of alcohol use disorders in any given population. Several factors beyond the confines of treatment settings influence treatment outcome in alcohol dependence syndrome. Social support has positive effect in treatment outcome of alcohol dependence syndrome. This has not been much studied in India in past. Therefore we decided to study the perception of social support in cases of alcohol dependence syndrome admitted in a busy hospital in armed forces. Aim The aim was to study the perception of social support across relapsed and abstinent group and see if it reached any statistical proportion and also to see if any socio-demographic variables also affected perception of social support. Materials and Methods Fifty five consecutive male patients of alcohol dependent syndrome without a co-morbid neurological/psychiatric diagnosis were assessed for their perception of social support after taking informed consent. They were explained the procedure and their alcoholic milestones were recorded in specially designed pro-forma. Subjects were then divided in abstinent and relapsed group. Subsequently they were assessed for their perception of social support by administering Social provision scale and Social support questionnaire. Statistical Analysis Data were tabulated and statistically analysed by using chi square test, Mann Whitney U-Test and Rank ANOVA test where applicable p-value <.05 was taken as significant. Results Results indicated that perception of social support across abstinent (n=18) and relapsed (n= 37) group reached significant statistical proportion as measured by social provision scale and social support questionnaire. Duration of use, dependence and family history of alcoholism did not influence perception of social support across patient population. There was inverse relationship between patients with alcohol related problem and their perception of social support. Professional and qualified soldiers

  5. Alcohol-based hand sanitizers: severe intoxication in children.

    PubMed

    2012-07-01

    Alcohol-based hand sanitizers are an alternative to hand washing with soap and water when water is unavailable. Their use has increased over the last decade. Cases of acute intoxication have been reported in children after accidental ingestion of alcohol-based hand sanitizers, sometimes leading to inebriation, agitation, drowsiness, impaired consciousness, and blood alcohol levels sometimes exceeding 2 g/I. In practice, alcohol-based hand sanitizers should be kept out of reach of children and should only be used when hand washing with soap and water is not possible. The possibility of alcohol intoxication should be borne in mind when a child suddenly presents with behaviour problems or altered consciousness.

  6. The tridimensional personality model: influencing variables in a sample of detoxified alcohol dependents. European Fluvoxamine in Alcoholism Study Group.

    PubMed

    Meszaros, K; Willinger, U; Fischer, G; Schönbeck, G; Aschauer, H N

    1996-01-01

    C.R. Cloninger proposed a biosocial model for personality, linking personality traits to patterns of responses to various external stimuli, including alcohol. The Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire (TPQ) was administered in a multicenter study to detoxified alcohol-dependent patients (N = 521). The objectives of the study were to evaluate (1) the expression of the three personality dimensions, novelty-seeking (NS), harm avoidance (HA), and reward dependence (RD), of the TPQ in this sample, and (2) the influence of different variables on these personality dimensions. The following variables were selected for a multiple and a stepwise regression analysis: sex, family history for major psychiatric disorders, marital status, occupation, age at study enrollment, age of onset of alcoholism, serum cholesterol level, intake of neuroleptics or benzodiazepines for detoxification, and severity of depression and anxiety. In comparison to Austrian normative data, both sexes of detoxified alcohol addicts scored higher in HA. The variables examined explain 23% of the variance of NS and 35% of HA. Only one variable, namely age of onset, is significantly influencing NS (19% explained variance). HA is significantly influenced by three variables: anxiety state, anxiety trait, and sex (32% explained variance). RD is not influenced by any of the variables examined.

  7. College Students' Perceptions of Severity and Willingness to Seek Psychological Help For Drug and Alcohol Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowinger, Robert Jay

    2012-01-01

    A sample of 201 college students were surveyed with respect to their perceptions of severity and willingness to seek psychological help for drug and alcohol problems. Results indicated that students perceive alcohol problems as significantly less serious than drug problems and are significantly less willing to seek help for alcohol problems. Males…

  8. College Students' Perceptions of Severity and Willingness to Seek Psychological Help For Drug and Alcohol Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowinger, Robert Jay

    2012-01-01

    A sample of 201 college students were surveyed with respect to their perceptions of severity and willingness to seek psychological help for drug and alcohol problems. Results indicated that students perceive alcohol problems as significantly less serious than drug problems and are significantly less willing to seek help for alcohol problems. Males…

  9. DSM-IV alcohol abuse and dependence criteria characteristics for recent onset adolescent drinkers.

    PubMed

    Rose, Jennifer S; Lee, Chien-Ti; Selya, Arielle S; Dierker, Lisa C

    2012-07-01

    Little is known about the psychometric properties of alcohol abuse and dependence criteria among recent-onset adolescent drinkers, particularly for those who consume alcohol infrequently. This study evaluated how well DSM-IV alcohol dependence criteria measure an alcohol use disorder (AUD) construct for recent onset adolescent drinkers at different levels of drinking frequency. Data were drawn from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, a nationally representative sample of 9356 recent-onset adolescent drinkers, aged 12-21, who began drinking within the past year. Multiple group item response theory analysis was conducted to assess the 11 DSM-IV alcohol abuse and dependence criteria. Criteria most likely to be endorsed at lower AUD severity included "withdrawal," "problems at home, school or work" and "tolerance." The criteria "drinking larger amounts/longer period of time," "unsuccessful efforts to cut down" and "continuing to drink despite related health problems" were more likely to be endorsed at higher AUD severity. Two criteria, "tolerance" and "time spent getting, using or recovering from alcohol" showed differential item functioning between drinking frequency groups (<7 vs. ≥ 7 days in past month), with lower discrimination and severity for more frequent drinkers. DSM-IV criteria were most precise for intermediate levels of AUD severity. All but two DSM-IV criteria had consistent psychometric properties across drinking frequency groups. Symptoms were most precise for a narrow, intermediate range of AUD severity. Those assessing AUD in recent onset adolescent drinkers might consider additional symptoms to capture the full AUD continuum. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Val158Met COMT polymorphism and risk of aggression in alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Soyka, Michael; Zill, Peter; Koller, Gabi; Samochowiec, Agnieszka; Grzywacz, Anna; Preuss, Ulrich W

    2015-01-01

    Aggression, violence and antisocial behavior are common in alcoholism, but their biological basis is poorly understood. Several studies and recent meta-analyses indicate that in schizophrenia the catecholamine-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met genotype may be associated with aggression, most often in methionine allele carriers. We tested this hypothesis in a sample of treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent in-patients (293 German patients and 499 controls, and additional 190 Polish patients as replication sample). As expected, patients with a history of violent or non-violent crime were more often male, had an earlier onset of alcoholism and more withdrawal seizures and delirium tremens, and were more likely to have a history of suicide attempts. COMT genotype was not associated with a history of violent or non-violent crime. More studies are needed on the neurobiological basis of aggression and violence in alcoholism.

  11. Panic disorder in a Spanish sample of 89 patients with pure alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Seguí, J; Márquez, M; Canet, J; Cascio, A; García, L; Ortiz, M

    2001-07-01

    High rates of anxiety disorders, including panic disorder (PD), have been found in patients suffering from alcohol dependence (AD). It has been suggested that alcoholic subjects with PD represent a more severe subgroup of patients. Eighty-nine patients with 'pure' AD (without abuse of other drugs) were examined and compared for the presence of PD. Several clinical scales were administered to assess symptomatology and severity. Twenty-three patients (25.8%) met the criteria for PD. The mean age at onset for alcohol use was 18.7 versus 28.5 years for PD onset. Our finding of an earlier onset for alcoholism than for PD in a sample of Spanish patients illustrates the potential importance of transcultural factors. These patients were more likely to be women and to have first-degree relatives with PD. Overall, alcoholic patients with comorbid PD showed greater clinical severity. They were found to have more comorbidity with axis I disorders (major depression and dysthymia), greater clinical severity, and a history of more suicide attempts.

  12. The role of topiramate and other anticonvulsants in the treatment of alcohol dependence: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    De Sousa, Avinash

    2010-03-01

    Alcohol dependence is a major health problem worldwide. Various pharmacological agents have been used in the management of alcohol dependence. This review looks at the role of topiramate and other anticonvulsants in the management of alcohol dependence. Topiramate is the most widely used anticonvulsant in the treatment of alcohol dependence. The literature on topiramate is reviewed and critically analyzed, along with its proposed mechanism of action in alcohol dependence. A review of data available on other anticonvulsants like carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, sodium valproate, gabapentin and levetiracetam are presented and their potential in the treatment of alcohol dependence is considered, together with future research directions.

  13. Empirically Defined Subtypes of Alcohol Dependence in an Irish Family Sample

    PubMed Central

    Sintov, Nicole D.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Young-Wolff, Kelly C.; Walsh, Dermot; Patterson, Diana G.; Prescott, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    Alcohol dependence (AD) is clinically and etiologically heterogeneous. The goal of this study was to explore AD subtypes among a sample of 1, 221 participants in the Irish Affected Sib Pair Study of Alcohol Dependence, all of whom met DSM-IV criteria for AD. Variables used to identify the subtypes included major depressive disorder, antisocial personality disorder, illicit drug dependence (cannabis, sedatives, stimulants, cocaine, opioids, and hallucinogens), nicotine dependence, the personality traits of neuroticism and novelty seeking, and early alcohol use. Using latent class analysis, a 3-class solution was identified as the most parsimonious description of the data. Individuals in a Mild class were least likely to have comorbid psychopathology, whereas a Severe class had highest probabilities of all comorbid psychopathology. The third class was characterized by high probabilities of major depression and higher neuroticism scores, but lower likelihood of other comorbid disorders than seen in the Severe class. Overall, sibling pair resemblance for class was stronger within than between classes, and was greatest for siblings within the Severe class, suggesting a stronger familial etiology for this class. These findings are consistent with the affective regulation and behavioral disinhibition subtypes of alcoholism, and are in line with prior work suggesting familial influences on subtype etiology. PMID:20022183

  14. [Cognitive impairments in alcohol dependence: From screening to treatment improvements].

    PubMed

    Cabé, N; Laniepce, A; Ritz, L; Lannuzel, C; Boudehent, C; Vabret, F; Eustache, F; Beaunieux, H; Pitel, A-L

    2016-02-01

    Alcohol-related cognitive impairments are largely underestimated in clinical practice, even though they could limit the benefit of alcohol treatment and hamper the patient's ability to remain abstinent or to respect his/her therapeutic contract. These neuropsychological deficits can impact the management of patients well before the development of the well-known Korsakoff's syndrome. Indeed, even in the absence of ostensible neurological complications, excessive and chronic alcohol consumption results in damage of brain structure and function. The frontocerebellar circuit and the circuit of Papez, respectively involved in motor and executive abilities and episodic memory, are mainly affected. Those brain dysfunctions are associated with neuropsychological deficits, including deficits of executive functions, episodic memory, social cognition, as well as visuospatial and motor abilities. Such cognitive disorders can interfere with the motivation process to abandon maladjusted drinking behavior in favor of a healthier lifestyle (such as abstinence or controlled alcohol consumption). They can also limit the patient's capacity to fully benefit from treatment (notably psychoeducation and cognitive-behavioural treatments) currently widely proposed in French Addiction departments. In addition, they may contribute to relapse which is multi-determinated. A neuropsychological assessment appears therefore crucial to take relevant clinical decisions. However, very few addiction departments have the human and financial resources to conduct an extensive neuropsychological examination of all patients with alcohol dependence. Some brief screening tools can be used, notably the MOntreal Cognitive Assessment and the Brief Evaluation of Alcohol-Related Neuropsychological Impairments, which has been especially designed to assess cognitive and motor deficits in alcoholism. These tools can be used by non-psychologist clinicians to detect alcohol-related cognitive deficits, which require

  15. Bioactivation of cinnamic alcohol forms several strong skin sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Ida B; Ponting, David J; Luthman, Kristina; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2014-04-21

    Cinnamic alcohol is a frequent contact allergen, causing allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) in a substantial number of individuals sensitized from contacts with fragrances. Hence, cinnamic alcohol is one of the constituents in fragrance mix I (FM I) used for screening contact allergy in dermatitis patients. Cinnamic alcohol lacks structural alerts for protein reactivity and must therefore be activated by either air oxidation or bioactivation to be able to act as a sensitizer. In the present study, we explored the bioactivation of cinnamic alcohol using human liver microsomes (HLM), and the potential pathways for these reactions were modeled by in silico (DFT) techniques. Subsequently, the reactivity of cinnamic alcohol and its metabolites toward a model hexapeptide were investigated. In addition to cinnamic aldehyde and cinnamic acid, two highly sensitizing epoxides previously unobserved in studies of bioactivation were detected in the incubations with HLMs. Formation of epoxy cinnamic aldehyde was shown (both by the liver microsomal experiments, in which no depletion of epoxy cinnamic alcohol was observed after initial formation, and by the very high activation energy found for the oxidation thereof by calculations) to proceed via cinnamic aldehyde and not epoxy cinnamic alcohol.

  16. Traumatic Experiences, Revictimization and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in German Inpatients Treated for Alcohol Dependence.

    PubMed

    Grundmann, Johanna; Lincoln, Tania M; Lüdecke, Daniel; Bong, Sönke; Schulte, Bernd; Verthein, Uwe; Schäfer, Ingo

    2017-09-27

    Traumatic experiences and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are prevalent in patients with alcohol use disorders (AUDs) and affect its course and outcome. Prior prevalence reports are limited by the inclusion of individuals with additional substance use disorders (SUDs), a focus on childhood events only and the use of self-ratings only. To examine the prevalence of traumatic experiences, revictimization and PTSD in inpatients treated for alcohol dependence without other SUD, emphasizing interpersonal violence across the whole lifespan. For this cross-sectional study alcohol-dependent patients without additional SUD (N = 230, 73% male, mean age 43 years) were recruited in an inpatient detoxification unit and were administered the Structured Trauma Interview, the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale, and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Data analysis comprised descriptive statistics and appropriate significance tests. 36.2% reported severe childhood physical or sexual abuse and 45.6% reported at least one of these types of abuse in adulthood. The lifetime rate of interpersonal violence was 61.1%. The prevalence of current PTSD was 13.2%. Women with a history of childhood abuse were about seven times as likely to be victimized in adulthood as women without these experiences, while in men revictimization was not significant. Even in patients with alcohol dependence without additional SUD experiences of interpersonal violence and PTSD are frequent. In order to adequately respond to the needs of this population, trauma and PTSD should routinely be assessed in alcohol-dependence treatment and considered in treatment planning if necessary.

  17. Alcohol and drug misuse, abuse, and dependence in women veterans.

    PubMed

    Hoggatt, Katherine J; Jamison, Andrea L; Lehavot, Keren; Cucciare, Michael A; Timko, Christine; Simpson, Tracy L

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a systematic literature review on substance misuse, abuse, and dependence in women veterans, including National Guard/reserve members. We identified 837 articles published between 1980 and 2013. Of 56 included studies, 32 reported rates of alcohol misuse, binge drinking, or other unhealthy alcohol use not meeting diagnostic criteria for abuse or dependence, and 33 reported rates of drug misuse or diagnosed alcohol or drug use disorders. Rates ranged from 4% to 37% for alcohol misuse and from 7% to 25% for binge drinking; among Veterans Health Administration (VA) health-care system outpatients, rates ranged from 3% to 16% for substance use disorder. Studies comparing women veterans and civilians reported no clear differences in binge or heavy drinking. Substance misuse rates were generally lower among women veterans than men veterans. Substance misuse was associated with higher rates of trauma, psychiatric and medical conditions, and increased mortality and suicide rates. Most studies included only VA patients, and many used only VA medical record data; therefore, the reported substance misuse rates likely do not reflect true prevalence. Rates also varied by assessment method, source of data, and the subgroups studied. Further efforts to develop epidemiologically valid prevalence estimates are needed to capture the true health burden of substance misuse in women veterans, particularly those not using VA care.

  18. Laboratory paradigms of impulsivity and alcohol dependence: a review.

    PubMed

    Aragues, M; Jurado, R; Quinto, R; Rubio, G

    2011-01-01

    Impulsivity can be defined as choosing a smaller, immediate reward over a larger, delayed reward. From this perspective, addictive behaviors such as substance abuse and pathological gambling reflect a series of impulsive choices. However, impulsivity is not a homogeneous construct. Laboratory measures of impulsivity reflect two types of processes. The first is related to behavioral inhibition and refers to an individual's ability to appropriately inhibit thoughts or actions. The second is the delay of reward dimension, namely the degree to which immediate (rewarding) consequences have more control over an individual's behavior than consequences that are delayed. In this review, we describe how alcohol is associated with significant impairments in these paradigms. We also suggest that they may have a role in the development of alcohol dependence. These results are in agreement with a model in which delay of gratification might be a marker for early use and/or abuse of alcohol, whereas impairment in behavioral inhibition might be a marker for maintained use in time and, therefore, for progression towards alcohol dependence. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Alcohol dependence: international policy implications for prison populations

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Gail Yvonne; Hoffmann, Norman G

    2006-01-01

    Background In light of the emphasis on drug abuse, this study explored the relative prevalence of substance use disorders among United Kingdom (UK) prison inmates in the context of findings from a general inmate population in the United States (US). The lead author of the report conducted a structured diagnostic interview with 155 new admissions to one of two prisons in the UK using the CAAPE (Comprehensive Addiction And Psychological Evaluation), a structured diagnostic interview, to ensure consistent assessments. The US sample consisted of 6,881 male inmates in a state prison system evaluated with an automated version of the SUDDS-IV (Substance Use Disorder Diagnostic Schedule-IV) interview. Results Alcohol dependence emerged as the most prevalent substance use disorder in both UK prisons and in the US sample. Relative frequencies of abuse and dependence for alcohol and other drugs revealed that dependence on a given substance was more prevalent than abuse ad defined by the current diagnostic criteria. Conclusion Despite the emphasis on drugs in correctional populations, alcohol dependence appears to be the most prominent substance use disorder among the incarcerated in both the US and UK and must be considered in developing treatment programs and policy priorities. PMID:17092339

  20. Heavy Alcohol Drinking Associated Akathisia and Management with Quetiapine XR in Alcohol Dependent Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Heavy drinking contributes to involuntary body movements such as akathisia. Quetiapine has been shown to alleviate symptoms of akathisia; however, its efficacy in the alcohol dependent population is not well established. Thus, we aimed to identify efficacy of Quetiapine in treating akathisia in very heavy drinking alcohol dependent patients. 108 male and female heavy alcohol consuming study participants received 13 weeks of Quetiapine XR. Drinking history (Timeline Followback, TLFB), depression (Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, MADRS), and movement (Barnes Akathisia Scale, BARS) measures were collected at baseline (0 W), week 6 (6 W), and week 12 (12 W). The role of drinking, symptoms of depression, and efficacy of Quetiapine for treating akathisia were assessed. In patients with no symptoms of depression (low MADRS), Quetiapine treatment decreased symptoms of akathisia. Patients with clinically significant depression (high MADRS) reported a significant increase in akathisia measures at 6 W which eventually decreased at 12 W to below baseline levels. The increase in akathisia at 6 W corresponded with a significant increase in the patients' total drinks and heavy drinking pattern. Treatment with Quetiapine progressively lowered the occurrence of akathisia in alcohol dependent patients who do not show symptoms of depression. Quetiapine treatment lowered akathisia over time in heavy drinkers who had clinically significant symptoms of depression. PMID:27847671

  1. 5' UTR polymorphism of dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1) associated with severity and temperament of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dai-Jin; Park, Byung Lae; Yoon, Sujung; Lee, Hae-Kook; Joe, Keun-Ho; Cheon, Young-Hoon; Gwon, Do-Hoon; Cho, Sung-Nam; Lee, Hye Won; NamGung, Suk; Shin, Hyoung Doo

    2007-06-15

    Multiple dopamine receptors in the dopaminergic system may be prime candidates for genetic influence on alcohol abuse and dependence due to their involvement in reward and reinforcing mechanisms. Genetic polymorphisms in dopamine receptor genes are believed to influence the development and/or severity of alcoholism. To examine the genetic effects of the Dopamine Receptor D1 (DRD) gene family (DRD1-DRD5) in the Korean population, 11 polymorphisms in the DRD gene family were genotyped and analyzed in 535 alcohol-dependent subjects and 273 population controls. Although none of the polymorphisms of DRD1-5 genes were found to be associated with the risk of alcoholism, one 5' UTR polymorphism in the DRD1 (DRD1-48A>G) gene was significantly associated with severity of alcohol-related problem, as measured by the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) in a gene dose-dependent manner, i.e., 24.37 (+/-8.19) among patients with -48A/A genotype, 22.37 (+/-9.49) among those with -48A/G genotype, and 17.38 (+/-8.28) among those with -48G/G genotype (P=0.002). The genetic effects of DRD1-48A>G were further analyzed with other phenotypes among alcohol-dependent subjects. Interestingly, the DRD1-48A>A genotype was also found to be associated with novelty seeking (NC), harm avoidance (HA), and persistence (P) (P =0.01, 0.02, and 0.003, respectively). The information derived from this study could be valuable for understanding the genetic factors involved in alcoholic phenotypes and genetic distribution of the DRD gene family, and could facilitate further investigation in other ethnic groups.

  2. Sleep abnormalities during abstinence in alcohol-dependent patients. Aetiology and management.

    PubMed

    Landolt, H P; Gillin, J C

    2001-01-01

    Virtually every type of sleep problem occurs in alcohol-dependent patients. Typically, these individuals take a longer time to fall asleep and show decreased sleep efficiency, shorter sleep duration and reduced amounts of slow wave sleep when compared with healthy controls. Their sleep patterns are fragmented, and the typical time course of electroencephalogram (EEG) delta wave activity is severely disrupted. The amount of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep may be reduced or increased. Sleep changes can persist during months or years of abstinence, and recent studies indicate that certain alterations in sleep architecture, as well as subjective sleep complaints, predict relapse to alcoholism. The mechanisms of action of short and long term alcohol administration on sleep are incompletely understood. They may arise from an interaction with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT), adenosine or other neurotransmitter systems. While only a few pharmacological and nonpharmacological strategies to improve or normalise disturbed sleep in individuals who have recovered from alcoholism have been studied, the use of benzodiazepines, other hypnosedatives or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors is not recommended. Therapies include sleep hygiene, bright light therapy, meditation, relaxation methods, and other nonpharmacological approaches. Further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between sleep, sleep abnormalities and alcoholism, and to establish new approaches to improve sleep in alcohol-dependent patients and to prevent withdrawal reactions that affect sleep during abstinence.

  3. Relationships between the emotional and cognitive components of alexithymia and dependency in alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Loas, G; Otmani, O; Lecercle, C; Jouvent, R

    2000-09-25

    Several authors have shown that alexithymia, emotional and perceptual dependency characterize patients suffering from substance abuse. The aim of the study is to test the hypothesis that the emotional and cognitive components of alexithymia are associated with dependency in alcoholics. Three groups were investigated: 60 inpatients meeting the DSM-IV criteria for alcohol dependence, 57 healthy subjects, 144 university students. All subjects completed the following rating scales: The 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), the Interpersonal Dependency Inventory (IDI), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Embedded Figures Test (EFT). Partial correlations, using the BDI score as constant, were calculated. In normal subjects, the 'Emotion' subscale of the TAS-20 correlated with the 'Lack of social self-confidence' subscale of the IDI and the 'Cognitive' subscale of the TAS-20 did not correlate with the EFT score. In alcoholics, the 'Cognitive' subscale of the TAS-20 correlated with the 'Lack of social self-confidence' subscale, with the EFT score and with the 'Affirmation of autonomy' subscale. A particular cognitive style characterized by externally oriented thinking, affirmation of autonomy as denial of emotional dependency and field dependence could characterize alcoholics.

  4. Relationships of personality dimensions with impulsivity in alcohol-dependent inpatient men.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Muge; Evren, Cuneyt; Can, Yesim; Evren, Bilge; Cetingok, Sera; Yilmaz, Alkin

    2014-07-01

    Impulsivity is closely related to substance use and abuse, both as a contributor to use and as a consequence of use. Particular dimensions of temperament and character were reported to be associated with trait impulsivity in different populations. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship of personality dimensions with impulsivity among men with alcohol dependence. Also we wanted to control the effect of depression and anxiety symptoms on this relationship. Participants were consecutively admitted male alcohol-dependent inpatients (n = 94) and healthy controls (n = 63). Patients were investigated with the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, version 11 (BIS-11), the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) and the Symptom Checklist-Revised (SCL-90-R). Severity of impulsivity and dimensions of impulsivity were higher in alcohol-dependent inpatients than in healthy controls. Impulsivity was negatively correlated with reward dependence, persistence, self-directedness and cooperativeness, but positively correlated with novelty seeking, harm avoidance, depression and anxiety. Although high depression and temperament dimensions (high novelty seeking, harm avoidance and low reward dependence) predicted impulsivity, combinations of personality dimensions that predict dimensions of impulsivity differed. RESULTS may suggest that together with depression when impulsivity is the problem, both dimensions of impulsivity and personality must be evaluated and the treatment should be shaped accordingly for alcohol-dependent inpatients.

  5. Typologies of alcohol dependence. From Jellinek to genetics and beyond.

    PubMed

    Leggio, Lorenzo; Kenna, George A; Fenton, Miriam; Bonenfant, Erica; Swift, Robert M

    2009-03-01

    The goal of typology research is to identify subtypes of alcohol dependent (AD) patients sharing fundamental characteristics and try to match each subtype, with the most precise treatment strategy. This review provides a comprehensive history of the literature on alcohol dependent subtypes starting from the earliest attempt made by Jellinek. The binary models identified most closely with Cloninger and Babor as well as the successively more complex classifications are discussed. Typology classification potentially useful in guiding the treatment of AD patients, especially in the case of the serotonergic medications. Contrasting data suggests that other factors could influence the response to a medication and/or that more complex typologies should be identified. In summary, typology models may assist in the ascertainment criteria for clinical trials performed in behavioral and pharmacotherapeutic interventions. Greater emphasis, however, must be made to more clearly delineate this field of research, while moving toward more standardized typologies.

  6. Qualitatively and quantitatively evaluating harm-reduction goal setting among chronically homeless individuals with alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Susan E.; Grazioli, Véronique S.; Torres, Nicole I.; Taylor, Emily M.; Jones, Connor B.; Hoffman, Gail E.; Haelsig, Laura; Zhu, Mengdan D.; Hatsukami, Alyssa S.; Koker, Molly J.; Herndon, Patrick; Greenleaf, Shawna M.; Dean, Parker E.

    2015-01-01

    Most treatment programs for alcohol dependence have prioritized alcohol abstinence as the primary treatment goal. However, abstinence-based goals are not always considered desirable or attainable by more severely affected populations, such as chronically homeless people with alcohol dependence. Because these individuals comprise a multimorbid and high-utilizing population, they are in need of more focused research attention that elucidates their preferred treatment goals. The aim of this secondary study was therefore to qualitatively and quantitatively document participant-generated treatment goals. Participants were currently or formerly chronically homeless individuals (N=31) with alcohol dependence who participated in a pilot of extended-release naltrexone and harm-reduction counseling. Throughout the treatment period, study interventionists elicited participants’ goals and recorded them on an open-ended grid. In subsequent weeks, progress towards and achievement of goals was obtained via self-report and recorded by study interventionists. Conventional content analysis was performed to classify participant-generated treatment goals. Representation of the three top categories remained stable over the course of treatment. In the order of their frequency, they included drinking-related goals, quality-of-life goals and health-related goals. Within the category of drinking-related goals, participants consistently endorsed reducing drinking and alcohol-related consequences ahead of abstinence-based goals. Quantitative analyses indicated participants generated an increasing number of goals over the course of treatment. Proportions of goals achieved and progressed toward kept pace with this increase. Findings confirmed hypotheses that chronically homeless people with alcohol dependence can independently generate and achieve treatment goals toward alcohol harm reduction and quality-of-life improvement. PMID:25697724

  7. Qualitatively and quantitatively evaluating harm-reduction goal setting among chronically homeless individuals with alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Collins, Susan E; Grazioli, Véronique S; Torres, Nicole I; Taylor, Emily M; Jones, Connor B; Hoffman, Gail E; Haelsig, Laura; Zhu, Mengdan D; Hatsukami, Alyssa S; Koker, Molly J; Herndon, Patrick; Greenleaf, Shawna M; Dean, Parker E

    2015-06-01

    Most treatment programs for alcohol dependence have prioritized alcohol abstinence as the primary treatment goal. However, abstinence-based goals are not always considered desirable or attainable by more severely affected populations, such as chronically homeless people with alcohol dependence. Because these individuals comprise a multimorbid and high-utilizing population, they are in need of more focused research attention that elucidates their preferred treatment goals. The aim of this secondary study was therefore to qualitatively and quantitatively document participant-generated treatment goals Participants were currently or formerly chronically homeless individuals (N=31) with alcohol dependence who participated in a pilot of extended-release naltrexone and harm-reduction counseling. Throughout the treatment period, study interventionists elicited participants' goals and recorded them on an open-ended grid. In subsequent weeks, progress towards and achievement of goals was obtained via self-report and recorded by study interventionists. Conventional content analysis was performed to classify participant-generated treatment goals Representation of the three top categories remained stable over the course of treatment. In the order of their frequency, they included drinking-related goals, quality-of-life goals and health-related goals. Within the category of drinking-related goals, participants consistently endorsed reducing drinking and alcohol-related consequences ahead of abstinence-based goals. Quantitative analyses indicated participants generated an increasing number of goals over the course of treatment. Proportions of goals achieved and progressed towards kept pace with this increase Findings confirmed hypotheses that chronically homeless people with alcohol dependence can independently generate and achieve treatment goals towards alcohol harm reduction and quality-of-life improvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The contribution of emotional maltreatment to alcohol dependence in a treatment-seeking sample.

    PubMed

    Potthast, Nadine; Neuner, Frank; Catani, Claudia

    2014-05-01

    Studies reporting a link between child maltreatment and addiction have typically focused on physical and sexual abuse. In contrast, emotional maltreatment has rarely been studied in substance-abusing samples although it is associated with a wide range of dysfunction. The current study aimed to determine the specific impact of different types of maltreatment and peer victimization on alcohol dependence and to examine the potentially mediating role of psychopathology. A sample of treatment seeking adults with alcohol dependence (N=72) underwent an extensive clinical examination including both a standardized interview and self-report measures. Child maltreatment, peer victimization, severity of alcohol dependence, and general psychopathology were assessed. Regression analyses revealed that emotional maltreatment was the strongest predictor of alcohol dependence severity whereas a unique contribution of peer victimization was not found. Our findings suggest that emotional maltreatment might have a major role in the etiology of AD that seems to exceed the contribution of other abuse and victimization experiences. Thereby, the study underscores the need for considering child maltreatment experiences in the prevention and treatment of AD.

  9. Interactions Between Alcohol Metabolism Genes and Religious Involvement in Association With Maximum Drinks and Alcohol Dependence Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Chartier, Karen G; Dick, Danielle M; Almasy, Laura; Chan, Grace; Aliev, Fazil; Schuckit, Marc A; Scott, Denise M; Kramer, John; Bucholz, Kathleen K; Bierut, Laura J; Nurnberger, John; Porjesz, Bernice; Hesselbrock, Victor M

    2016-05-01

    Variations in the genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) enzymes are associated with both alcohol consumption and dependence in multiple populations. Additionally, some environmental factors have been recognized as modifiers of these relationships. This study examined the modifying effect of religious involvement on relationships between ADH gene variants and alcohol consumption-related phenotypes. Subjects were African American, European American, and Hispanic American adults with lifetime exposure to alcohol (N = 7,716; 53% female) from the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism. Genetic markers included ADH1Brs1229984, ADH1B-rs2066702, ADH1C-rs698, ADH4-rs1042364, and ADH4-rs1800759. Phenotypes were maximum drinks consumed in a 24-hour period and total number of alcohol dependence symptoms according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Religious involvement was defined by self-reported religious services attendance. Both religious involvement and ADH1B-rs1229984 were negatively associated with the number of maximum drinks consumed and the number of lifetime alcohol dependence symptoms endorsed. The interactions of religious involvement with ADH1B-rs2066702, ADH1C-rs698, and ADH4-rs1042364 were significantly associated with maximum drinks and alcohol dependence symptoms. Risk variants had weaker associations with maximum drinks and alcohol dependence symptoms as a function of increasing religious involvement. This study provided initial evidence of a modifying effect for religious involvement on relationships between ADH variants and maximum drinks and alcohol dependence symptoms.

  10. The effects of US state income inequality and alcohol policies on symptoms of depression and alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Claire; Liu, Xinhua; Diez Roux, Ana V; Link, Bruce G; Hasin, Deborah

    2004-02-01

    Mental health is likely to be influenced by contextual variables that emerge only at the level of the group. We studied the effect of two such group-level variables, within-state income inequality and alcohol tax policy, on symptoms of current depression and alcohol dependence in a US national sample, controlling for state-level and individual characteristics. A cross-sectional US national probability sample provided the individual-level data. State income data were obtained from the 1990 US census. The Gini coefficient (raw and adjusted) indicated income inequality. Outcome measures included current symptoms of depression and alcohol dependence. Controlling for individual-level variables and state median income, the odds of depressive symptoms was not positively associated with state income inequality. Controlling for individual-level variables, state median income and alcohol distribution method, a weak negative association between Gini and alcohol dependence was observed in women, but this association disappeared after additional adjustment for beer tax. No association was observed in men. Higher state beer tax was significantly associated with lower prevalence of alcohol dependence symptoms for both men and women. The results suggest that state income inequality does not increase the experience of alcohol dependence or depression symptoms. However, evidence was found for a protective effect of increased beer taxation against alcohol dependence symptoms, suggesting the need to further consider the impact of alcohol policies on alcohol use disorders.

  11. Sodium oxybate: a review of its use in alcohol withdrawal syndrome and in the maintenance of abstinence in alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2014-01-01

    A liquid formulation of sodium oxybate (Alcover(®)), the sodium salt of γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), is approved in Italy and Austria for use in alcohol withdrawal syndrome and for the maintenance of abstinence in alcohol dependence. This article reviews the efficacy and tolerability of sodium oxybate in alcohol withdrawal syndrome and in the maintenance of abstinence in alcohol dependence, as well as summarizing its pharmacological properties. Results of randomized controlled trials indicate that sodium oxybate was at least as effective as diazepam and clomethiazole in patients with alcohol withdrawal syndrome, rapidly alleviating symptoms, and was at least as effective as naltrexone or disulfiram in the maintenance of abstinence in alcohol-dependent patients. Sodium oxybate was generally well tolerated. The risk of sodium oxybate abuse is generally low when it is administered to alcohol-dependent patients at its approved dosage, under the supervision of a designated family member and with continuous strict medical surveillance. However, certain patient groups, such as patients with alcohol dependence and borderline personality disorder or who are in remission from heroin or cocaine addiction, may not be suitable candidates for sodium oxybate therapy because of an increased risk of abuse. In conclusion, sodium oxybate is a useful option for the treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome and for the maintenance of abstinence in alcohol dependence.

  12. Sexual dysfunctions in alcohol-dependent men: A study from north India

    PubMed Central

    Pendharkar, Shreyas; Mattoo, Surendra K.; Grover, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Sexual dysfunctions have been reported in alcohol-dependent men. Most of the studies conducted had limitation of using non-validated measures of sexual dysfunction and sampling design. This study was, therefore, conducted to determine the typology, demographic and clinical correlates of sexual dysfunction in alcohol-dependent men. Methods: One hundred and one patients with alcohol dependence (AD) attending the Drug De-addiction and Treatment Centre and 50 healthy controls were evaluated in this cross-sectional study. Participants in both the groups were assessed on Arizona Sexual experience scale (ASEX), Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). In addition, patients with AD were assessed on Severity of Alcohol Dependence Questionnaire (SADQ) for severity of AD and revised clinical institute withdrawal assessment for alcohol scale (CIWA-Ar) to ensure that no participant was in active alcohol withdrawal state. Results: Overall, 58.4 per cent of patients in the AD group had sexual dysfunction. Among the domains, the highest frequency was seen for dysfunction for arousal (57.4%), followed by problems in desire (54.4%), erection (36.6%), satisfaction with orgasm (34.6%) and ability to reach orgasm was least affected (12.87%). The patient and control groups differed significantly in overall dyadic adjustment, in the domains of dyadic satisfaction and affective expression. Interpretation & conclusions: The finding of this study showed that a significant proportion of patients with AD has sexual dysfunction. Longitudinal studies using validated assessment tools should be done to confirm these findings. PMID:28139538

  13. Alexithymia and personality dimensions in relation to depression and anxiety in male alcohol-dependent inpatients.

    PubMed

    Evren, Cuneyt; Evren, Bilge; Dalbudak, Ercan

    2009-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship of alexithymia and temperament and character model of personality with depression and anxiety symptoms in detoxified male alcohol-dependent inpatients. Method. The subjects consisted of 176 male alcohol-dependent inpatients according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition. Patients were investigated with the Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, State and Trait Anxiety Inventory, Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST), Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) and Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). Results. MAST score and scores of all three factors of the TAS-20 significantly predicted depression scale and anxiety scales. Difficulty in identifying feelings and difficulty in describing feelings factors were particularly effective, relative to the externally orientated thinking factor of the TAS-20 for prediction depression and anxiety. The TCI dimensions emerged as distinct and conceptually meaningful predictors for the depression scale and anxiety scales. Conclusion. Depression and anxiety symptoms among detoxified male alcohol dependents are associated with alexithymia, a broad range of personality dimensions and higher severity of alcohol-related problems, which make these related factors highly relevant for clinical practice.

  14. Gender Differences in Predictors of Treatment Attrition with High Dose Naltrexone in Cocaine and Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jesse J.; Pettinati, Helen M.; Kampman, Kyle M.; O’Brien, Charles P.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, we reported that naltrexone at 150mg/day significantly decreased cocaine and alcohol use for men, but not women with co-occurring cocaine and alcohol dependence. The present study is an exploratory investigation of predictors that explain the different gender response to naltrexone, with a particular focus on differential predictors of treatment attrition. No significant predictors were associated with treatment discontinuation in men. Women, however, were more likely to discontinue treatment when reporting severe pre-treatment psychiatric problems, or nausea while in treatment. Further research on the impact of pre-treatment and in-treatment gender differences with naltrexone is warranted. PMID:19034737

  15. Comparison of alcohol-dependent patients at a gastroenterological and a psychiatric ward according to the Lesch alcoholism typology: implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Vyssoki, Benjamin; Steindl-Munda, Petra; Ferenci, Peter; Walter, Henriette; Höfer, Peter; Blüml, Victor; Friedrich, Fabian; Kogoj, Dagmar; Lesch, Otto M

    2010-01-01

    To assess the clinical and biological status of alcohol-dependent patients admitted to a psychiatric or a gastroenterological ward, assessing and comparing dimensions important for prescribing treatment for withdrawal and relapse prevention. Eighty patients, alcohol-dependent according to international classification of diseases tenth revision and diagnostic and statistical manual, text revised, version IV, admitted to the Vienna General Hospital between January 2005 and  November 2006, were examined, of whom 44 were admitted to the psychiatric ward and 36 to the gastroenterological ward. Dimensions of alcohol dependence were assessed using a computerized structured interview, the Lesch alcoholism typology (LAT). Biological markers and the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score defined the severity of alcohol-related physical disturbances. As might be expected, gastroenterological patients had more advanced physical diseases than psychiatric patients, and affective disorders and suicidal tendencies were significantly commoner among the psychiatric patients. Thus, LAT Type II patients were overrepresented at the gastroenterological ward and LAT Type III patients at the psychiatric ward. The severity of somatic diseases and psychiatric disorders as well as the distribution of the four types according to Lesch differ between alcohol-dependent patients admitted to a psychiatric ward or a gastroenterological ward. Regarding the positive long-term outcome, different evidence-based medical treatment approaches for withdrawal and relapse prevention are needed for these patients.

  16. PET imaging of the serotonin transporter and 5HT1A receptor in alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Diana; Slifstein, Mark; Gil, Roberto; Hwang, Dah-Ren; Huang, Yiyun; Perez, Audrey; Frankle, W. Gordon; Laruelle, Marc; Krystal, John; Abi-Dargham, Anissa

    2009-01-01

    Background Rodent models as well as studies in humans have suggested alterations in serotonin (5HT) innervation and transmission in early onset genetically determined or type II alcoholism. This study examines two indices of serotonergic transmission, 5HT transporter levels and 5-HT1A availability, in vivo, in type II alcoholism. This is the first report of combined tracers for pre and post-synaptic serotonergic transmission in the same alcoholic subjects and the first study of 5HT1A receptors in alcoholism. Method Fourteen alcohol dependent subjects were scanned (11 with both tracers, 1 with [11C]DASB only and two with [11C]WAY100635 only). Twelve healthy controls (HC) subjects were scanned with [11C]DASB and another 13 were scanned with [11C]WAY100635. Binding Potential (BPp, mL/cm3) and the specific to nonspecific partition coefficient (BPND, unitless) were derived for both tracers using 2 tissue compartment model and compared to HC across different brain regions. Relationships to severity of alcoholism were assessed. Results No significant differences were observed in regional BPp or BPND between patients and controls in any of the regions examined. No significant relationships were observed between regional 5HT transporter availability, 5-HT1A availability, and disease severity with the exception of a significant negative correlation between SERT and years of dependence in amygdala and insula. Conclusion This study did not find alterations in measures of 5-HT1A or 5HT transporter levels in patients with type II alcoholism. PMID:18962444

  17. The development and initial validation of the identification of alcohol dependence in women scale.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Carol; Maranda, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop the Identification of Alcohol Dependence in Women (IADW) Scale, which is a 51-question instrument, designed to discriminate between alcohol and non-alcohol dependent women. Questions focus on physical, psychological, family and home life, and use of alcohol. Initial testing of the IADW Scale provides preliminary evidence that it is reliable, has content validity, and is capable of correctly classifying group membership with accuracy. Eighty-six percent of the cases in the alcohol dependent group and 98% of the non-alcohol dependent group were correctly classified using direct and stepwise methods of discriminant analysis.

  18. Caffeinated Alcohol Consumption Profiles and Associations with Use Severity and Outcome Expectancies

    PubMed Central

    Lau-Barraco, Cathy; Milletich, Robert J.; Linden, Ashley N.

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the consumption of caffeinated alcoholic beverages (CAB) may be riskier than alcohol alone. Efforts to identify patterns of CAB use and the correlates of such drinking patterns could further our conceptualization of and intervention for this health issue. Consequently, the current study aimed to (1) identify distinct classes of CAB users, (2) examine differences between classes on measures of alcohol and caffeine problems, and (3) compare distinct classes of CAB users on caffeine and alcohol outcome expectancies. Participants were 583 (31% men) undergraduate students from a psychology research pool. Latent profile analysis models were derived using four indicators: CAB use quantity, CAB use frequency, alcohol use quantity, and alcohol use frequency. Finding revealed four classes of drinkers: High Alcohol/High CAB (6.00%), High Alcohol/Moderate CAB (5.15%), High Alcohol/Low CAB (22.99%), and Low Alcohol/Low CAB (65.87%). The Low Alcohol/Low CAB class reported the lowest relative levels of caffeine dependence symptoms, caffeine withdrawal, alcohol use problems, and heavy episodic drinking frequency. Further, results indicated differential expectancy endorsement based on use profiles. CAB users in the High Alcohol/Low CAB class endorsed more positive alcohol expectancies than the Low Alcohol/Low CAB group. Those in the High Alcohol/High CAB class endorsed stronger withdrawal symptoms caffeine expectancies than all other classes. Inclusion of substance-specific expectancies into larger theoretical frameworks in future work of CAB use may be beneficial. Findings may inform intervention efforts for those at greatest risk related to CAB consumption. PMID:24210683

  19. Griffith Edwards' work on the life course of alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Marshall, E Jane

    2015-07-01

    In 1976 Edwards & Gross proposed the concept of the alcohol dependence syndrome, based on the clinical observation that heavy drinkers manifested an inter-related clustering of signs and symptoms. That this modest 'provisional description' turned out to be so significant and influential is perhaps unsurprising when the context in which it was made is appreciated. Griffith Edwards and his colleagues at the Maudsley Hospital had undergone a rigorous 3-year training in clinical psychiatry, during which they had been taught to think critically and were grounded in the art of clinical observation. As he assessed patients for various alcohol research studies he realized that there was a clustering of certain elements. Thus clinical observation and an appreciation of the patient's drinking history contributed to the genesis of the concept. This paper reflects on the integration of his rigorous training at the Maudsley, his enquiring mind and encyclopaedic knowledge of the historical and research literature which enabled him to formulate a testable hypothesis about the alcohol dependence syndrome.

  20. The performance of the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) in detecting alcohol abuse and dependence in a population of depressed or anxious persons.

    PubMed

    Boschloo, Lynn; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Smit, Johannes H; van den Brink, Wim; Veltman, Dick J; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2010-11-01

    Alcohol use disorders are highly prevalent but often remain unrecognized among depressed and/or anxious persons. This study examines the performance of the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) in detecting alcohol abuse and dependence in this high-risk group and compares it to that in healthy controls. Data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) were used, including 1756 persons with a past-year depressive and/or anxiety disorder and 648 persons without a lifetime depressive and anxiety disorder. The performance of the AUDIT was compared against the gold standard of a CIDI-based diagnosis of past-year alcohol abuse or dependence by means of sensitivity, specificity and areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs). The AUDIT accurately detected alcohol dependence in depressed and/or anxious men (AUC=0.89) and women (AUC==0.88), with detected cut-off points of ≥9 and ≥6, respectively, comparable to that in healthy controls (men: AUC=0.89; women: AUC=0.94). However, the overall accuracy in detecting alcohol abuse was limited in depressed/anxious men (AUC=0.74) and women (AUC=0.78) and no adequate cut-off points with both acceptable sensitivity and specificity could be identified. Persons with a primary diagnosis of an addiction disorder were excluded and therefore the sample may not be fully representative of the most severely addicted patients. These findings confirm the accuracy of the AUDIT in detecting alcohol dependence, but not alcohol abuse, in depressed and/or anxious persons. Screening for alcohol dependence in this high-risk group could improve identification of persons suffering from this impairing comorbid condition. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Vitamin-dependent methionine metabolism and alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Halsted, Charles H; Medici, Valentina

    2011-09-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that ethanol-induced alterations in hepatic methionine metabolism play a central role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Because malnutrition is a universal clinical finding in this disease and hepatic methionine metabolism is dependent upon dietary folate and vitamins B-6 and B-12, ALD can be considered an induced nutritional disorder that is conditioned by alcohol abuse. The present review describes the etiologies of these 3 vitamin deficiencies in ALD and how they interact with chronic ethanol exposure to alter hepatic methionine metabolism. Subsequent sections focus on molecular mechanisms for the interactions of aberrant methionine metabolism with ethanol in the pathogenesis of ALD, in particular the role of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) in regulating the epigenetic expressions of genes relevant to pathways of liver injury. The review will conclude with descriptions of studies on the efficacy of SAM in the treatment of ALD and with discussion of potentially fruitful future avenues of research.

  2. Vitamin-Dependent Methionine Metabolism and Alcoholic Liver Disease1

    PubMed Central

    Halsted, Charles H.; Medici, Valentina

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that ethanol-induced alterations in hepatic methionine metabolism play a central role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Because malnutrition is a universal clinical finding in this disease and hepatic methionine metabolism is dependent upon dietary folate and vitamins B-6 and B-12, ALD can be considered an induced nutritional disorder that is conditioned by alcohol abuse. The present review describes the etiologies of these 3 vitamin deficiencies in ALD and how they interact with chronic ethanol exposure to alter hepatic methionine metabolism. Subsequent sections focus on molecular mechanisms for the interactions of aberrant methionine metabolism with ethanol in the pathogenesis of ALD, in particular the role of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) in regulating the epigenetic expressions of genes relevant to pathways of liver injury. The review will conclude with descriptions of studies on the efficacy of SAM in the treatment of ALD and with discussion of potentially fruitful future avenues of research. PMID:22332083

  3. Effects of naltrexone on neural and subjective response to alcohol in treatment-seeking alcohol dependent patients

    PubMed Central

    Spagnolo, Primavera A.; Ramchandani, Vijay A.; Schwandt, Melanie L.; Zhang, Lishu; Blaine, Sara K.; Usala, Julie M.; Diamond, Kristie A.; Phillips, Monte J.; George, David T.; Momenan, Reza; Heilig, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Positively reinforcing properties of alcohol are in part mediated by activation of the ventral striatum (VS). Alcohol-induced release of endogenous opioids is thought to contribute to this response. Preclinical studies show that the opioid antagonist naltrexone (NTX) can block this cascade, but its ability to do so in treatment seeking alcoholics has not been examined. Objectives To study the effects of NTX on alcohol-induced VS activation and on amygdala response to affective stimuli in treatment seeking alcohol dependent inpatients. Methods Sixty-three treatment seeking alcoholics were randomized to receive NTX (50 mg) or placebo (PLC) daily. On day 7, participants underwent an alcohol cue reactivity session, and craving was measured using the Penn Alcohol Craving Scale. On day 9, participants received a saline infusion followed by an alcohol infusion and also viewed affective stimuli in an MR scanner. Results Irrespective of medication treatment condition, the alcohol infusion did not activate the VS in the alcohol dependent patients. Unexpectedly, VS activation was greater in NTX treated patients than in the PLC group. NTX treated patients also reported increased craving in response to alcohol cue exposure, and increased subjective response to alcohol (‘high’ and ‘intoxicated’) compared to PLC subjects. No significant effects of alcohol infusion on brain response to affective stimuli were in the NTX or placebo groups. Conclusions Unlike previous findings in social drinkers, a moderate level of intoxication did not activate the VS in treatment seeking alcoholics. This is likely to reflect tolerance to the positively reinforcing properties of alcohol in this clinical population. Our findings may help explain the efficacy of NTX to reduce heavy drinking, but not to maintain abstinence. PMID:25581657

  4. Hair ethyl glucuronide as a biomarker of alcohol consumption in alcohol-dependent patients: role of gender differences.

    PubMed

    Crunelle, Cleo L; Cappelle, Delphine; Covaci, Adrian; van Nuijs, Alexander L N; Maudens, Kristof E; Sabbe, Bernard; Dom, Geert; Michielsen, Peter; Yegles, Michel; Neels, Hugo

    2014-08-01

    Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) is a minor alcohol metabolite that accumulates in hair and is proposed as a stable marker for the detection of chronic and excessive alcohol consumption above a cut-off level of 30pg/mg hair. A correlation between drinking behavior and EtG hair concentrations is observed, but large variability exists. To investigate the correlation between alcohol consumption and hair EtG concentrations in alcohol dependent patients, and the effect of gender differences as a factor for the variability on this correlation. EtG was measured by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in the hairs (first 3cm) of 36 alcohol dependent patients (25 males/11 females) starting and alcohol detoxification program. Factors that possibly influence EtG content in hair (except age and gender) were excluded. Detailed retrospective alcohol consumption was obtained over the last 3 months using the Timeline Follow Back interview. Median total alcohol consumption over 3 months was 13,050g pure alcohol (range 60-650g/day). Hair EtG concentrations varied between 32 and 662pg/mg. There was a statistically significant linear and positive correlation between hair EtG and amounts of alcohol consumed (Pearson r=0.83; p<0.001), in both males (Pearson r=0.83; p<0.001) and females (Pearson r=0.76; p=0.007). There is a linear correlation, with no significant effect of gender, between hair EtG concentrations and amounts of alcohol consumed in alcohol-dependent individuals. Analysis of EtG in hair can be applied to estimate retrospective alcohol consumption in both male and female alcohol dependent subjects using the same cut-off. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sex differences in alcohol consumption and alterations in nucleus accumbens endocannabinoid mRNA in alcohol-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Henricks, Angela M; Berger, Anthony L; Lugo, Janelle M; Baxter-Potter, Lydia N; Bieniasz, Kennedy V; Craft, Rebecca M; McLaughlin, Ryan J

    2016-10-29

    Chronic intermittent alcohol (CIA) exposure produces altered motivational states characterized by anxiety and escalated alcohol consumption during withdrawal. The endocannabinoid (ECB) system contributes to these symptoms, and sex differences in alcohol dependence, as well as bidirectional interactions between ECBs and gonadal hormones have been documented. Thus, we evaluated sex differences in alcohol consumption, anxiety-like behavior, and ECB mRNA expression in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of alcohol-dependent rats during acute withdrawal. Male rats exposed to six weeks of CIA showed escalated alcohol consumption during acute withdrawal and reductions in NAc N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPEPLD), DAG lipase alpha (DAGLα), and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) mRNA. Intact alcohol-dependent female rats also escalated their consumption, but notably, this effect was also present in non-dependent females. No differences in NAc ECB mRNA were observed between CIA- and air-exposed females during acute withdrawal. However, when these data were analyzed according to estrous stage, significant differences in NAPEPLD and MAGL mRNA expression emerged in the NAc of air-exposed control rats, which were absent in alcohol-dependent females. We subsequently measured alcohol consumption and NAc ECB mRNA in ovariectomized (OVX) females with or without estradiol (E2) replacement during withdrawal. Neither E2 nor CIA altered alcohol consumption in OVX females. However, E2 reduced both DAGLα and MAGL mRNA, suggesting that E2 may influence the biosynthesis and degradation of 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the NAc. Collectively, these studies indicate sexual dimorphism in alcohol consumption in non-dependent rats and suggest that E2-mediated alterations in NAc ECB mRNA expression during withdrawal may be a mechanism by which sex differences in alcohol dependence emerge. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The role of early life stress as a predictor for alcohol and drug dependence.

    PubMed

    Enoch, Mary-Anne

    2011-03-01

    Genetic and environmental influences on the development of alcohol and drug dependence are equally important. Exposure to early life stress, that is unfortunately common in the general population, has been shown to predict a wide range of psychopathology, including addiction. This review will look at the characteristics of early life stress that may be specific predictors for adolescent and adult alcohol and drug dependence and will focus on studies in humans, non-human primates and rodents. Experiencing maltreatment and cumulative stressful life events prior to puberty and particularly in the first few years of life is associated with early onset of problem drinking in adolescence and alcohol and drug dependence in early adulthood. Early life stress can result in permanent neurohormonal and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis changes, morphological changes in the brain, and gene expression changes in the mesolimbic dopamine reward pathway, all of which are implicated in the development of addiction. However, a large proportion of children who have experienced even severe early life stress do not develop psychopathology indicating that mediating factors such as gene-environment interactions and family and peer relationships are important for resilience. There appears to be a direct pathway from chronic stress exposure in pre-pubertal children via adolescent problem drinking to alcohol and drug dependence in early adulthood. However, this route can be moderated by genetic and environmental factors. The role that gene-environment interactions play in the risk-resilience balance is being increasingly recognized.

  7. The Role of Early Life Stress as a Predictor for Alcohol and Drug Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Enoch, Mary-Anne

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Genetic and environmental influences on the development of alcohol and drug dependence are equally important. Exposure to early life stress, that is unfortunately common in the general population, has been shown to predict a wide range of psychopathology, including addiction. Objective This review will look at the characteristics of early life stress that may be specific predictors for adolescent and adult alcohol and drug dependence and will focus on studies in humans, non-human primates and rodents. Results Experiencing maltreatment and cumulative stressful life events prior to puberty and particularly in the first few years of life is associated with early onset of problem drinking in adolescence and alcohol and drug dependence in early adulthood. Early life stress can result in permanent neurohormonal and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis changes, morphological changes in the brain and gene expression changes in the mesolimbic dopamine reward pathway, all of which are implicated in the development of addiction. However, a large proportion of children who have experienced even severe early life stress do not develop psychopathology indicating that mediating factors such as gene-environment interactions and family and peer relationships are important for resilience. Conclusions There appears to be a direct pathway from chronic stress exposure in pre-pubertal children via adolescent problem drinking to alcohol and drug dependence in early adulthood. However, this route can be moderated by genetic and environmental factors. The role that gene-environment interactions play in the risk-resilience balance is being increasingly recognized. PMID:20596857

  8. Guidelines of the Brazilian Association of Studies on Alcohol and Other Drugs (ABEAD) for diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric comorbidity with alcohol and other substance and dependence.

    PubMed

    Zaleski, Marcos; Laranjeira, Ronaldo Ramos; Marques, Ana Cecília Petta Roselli; Ratto, Lílian; Romano, Marcos; Alves, Hamer Nastasy Palhares; de Macedo Soares, Márcia Britto; Abelardino, Valter; Kessler, Félix; Brasiliano, Sílvia; Nicastri, Sérgio; Brunferntrinker Hochgraf, Patrícia; de Paula Gigliotti, Analice; Lemos, Tadeu

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, several studies have been focused on the comorbidity of psychiatric disorders with alcohol and other substance dependence. In this context, the Brazilian Association of Studies on Alcohol and Other Drugs initiated a project to establish Brazilian Guidelines. The aim of this study was to review diagnostic and therapeutic criteria for the most prevalent psychiatric comorbidities. Randomized clinical trials, epidemiological studies, animal testing and other forms of research are reviewed herein. The main psychiatric comorbidities are investigated and data published in the literature are reviewed, based on guidelines adopted by other countries. Epidemiological aspects, diagnostic criteria, integrated treatment and the organization of specialized service, as well as details regarding psychotherapy and pharmacological treatment are discussed. The guidelines of the Brazilian Association of Studies on Alcohol and Other Drugs reinforce the importance of adequate diagnosis and treatment regarding alcoholic and drug dependent patients suffering of comorbid psychiatric disorders.

  9. Plasma concentrations of oleoylethanolamide and other acylethanolamides are altered in alcohol-dependent patients: effect of length of abstinence.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Marchena, Nuria; Pavon, Francisco J; Pastor, Antoni; Araos, Pedro; Pedraz, Maria; Romero-Sanchiz, Pablo; Calado, Montserrat; Suarez, Juan; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Orio, Laura; Boronat, Anna; Torrens, Marta; Rubio, Gabriel; de la Torre, Rafael; Rodriguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Serrano, Antonia

    2016-05-22

    Acylethanolamides are a family of endogenous lipid mediators that are involved in physiological and behavioral processes associated with addiction. Recently, oleoylethanolamide (OEA) has been reported to reduce alcohol intake and relapse in rodents but the contribution of OEA and other acylethanolamides in alcohol addiction in humans is unknown. The present study is aimed to characterize the plasma acylethanolamides in alcohol dependence. Seventy-nine abstinent alcohol-dependent subjects (27 women) recruited from outpatient treatment programs and age-/sex-/body mass-matched healthy volunteers (28 women) were clinically assessed with the diagnostic interview PRISM according to the DSM-IV-TR after blood extraction for quantification of acylethanolamide concentrations in the plasma. Our results indicate that all acylethanolamides were significantly increased in alcohol-dependent patients compared with control subjects (p < 0.001). A logistic model based on these acylethanolamides was developed to distinguish alcohol-dependent patients from controls and included OEA, arachidonoylethanolamide (AEA) and docosatetraenoylethanolamide (DEA), providing a high discriminatory power according to area under the curve [AUC = 0.92 (95%CI: 0.87-0.96), p < 0.001]. Additionally, we found a significant effect of the duration of alcohol abstinence on the concentrations of OEA, AEA and DEA using a regression model (p < 0.05, p < 0.01 and p < 0.001, respectively), which was confirmed by a negative correlation (rho = -0.31, -0.40 and -0.44, respectively). However, acylethanolamides were not influenced by the addiction alcohol severity, duration of problematic alcohol use or diagnosis of psychiatric comorbidity. Our results support the preclinical studies and suggest that OEA, AEA and DEA are altered in alcohol-dependence during abstinence and that might act as potential markers for predicting length of alcohol abstinence.

  10. Do alcohol-dependent patients show different neural activation during response inhibition than healthy controls in an alcohol-related fMRI go/no-go-task?

    PubMed

    Czapla, Marta; Baeuchl, Christian; Simon, Joe J; Richter, Barbara; Kluge, Matthias; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Mann, Karl; Herpertz, Sabine C; Loeber, Sabine

    2017-03-01

    Alcohol dependence is associated with impaired response inhibition and heightened cue reactivity towards alcohol-related stimuli. Several brain areas, but mainly prefrontal structures, have been linked to response inhibition in addiction. This study aimed at combining both aspects: salience of drug-associated cues and response inhibition using a go/no-go task with alcohol-associated stimuli during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Nineteen abstinent alcohol-dependent patients (ADP) and 21 healthy control subjects (HC) were compared on blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses during successful inhibition of no-go stimuli and successful reactions to go stimuli. ADP and HC did not significantly differ in their behavioural performance in the task. However, both groups performed worse during the inhibition of alcoholic-associated stimuli compared to neutral stimuli. On the neural level, ADP displayed enhanced BOLD activity relative to HC during successful response inhibition in several areas involved in visual processing, cognitive and impulse control, including occipital structures, anterior cingulate gyrus, medial frontal gyrus and medial orbitofrontal cortex. We interpret these findings as a possible compensation strategy for impaired cognitive processing. Furthermore, the results underline the impact of salience of alcohol-related stimuli on response inhibition, which seems to affect both ADP and HC.

  11. Effect of quality chronic disease management for alcohol and drug dependence on addiction outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Theresa W; Saitz, Richard; Cheng, Debbie M; Winter, Michael R; Witas, Julie; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2012-12-01

    We examined the effect of the quality of primary care-based chronic disease management (CDM) for alcohol and/or other drug (AOD) dependence on addiction outcomes. We assessed quality using (1) a visit frequency based measure and (2) a self-reported assessment measuring alignment with the chronic care model. The visit frequency based measure had no significant association with addiction outcomes. The self-reported measure of care-when care was at a CDM clinic-was associated with lower drug addiction severity. The self-reported assessment of care from any healthcare source (CDM clinic or elsewhere) was associated with lower alcohol addiction severity and abstinence. These findings suggest that high quality CDM for AOD dependence may improve addiction outcomes. Quality measures based upon alignment with the chronic care model may better capture features of effective CDM care than a visit frequency measure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Alcohol Dependence and Its Relationship With Insomnia and Other Sleep Disorders.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Subhajit; Chaudhary, Ninad S; Brower, Kirk J

    2016-11-01

    Sleep-related complaints are widely prevalent in those with alcohol dependence (AD). AD is associated not only with insomnia, but also with multiple sleep-related disorders as a growing body of literature has demonstrated. This article will review the various aspects of insomnia associated with AD. In addition, the association of AD with other sleep-related disorders will be briefly reviewed. The association of AD with insomnia is bidirectional in nature. The etiopathogenesis of insomnia has demonstrated multiple associations and is an active focus of research. Treatment with cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia is showing promise as an optimal intervention. In addition, AD may be associated with circadian abnormalities, short sleep duration, obstructive sleep apnea, and sleep-related movement disorder. The burgeoning knowledge on insomnia associated with moderate-to-severe alcohol use disorder has expanded our understanding of its underlying neurobiology, clinical features, and treatment options. Copyright © 2016 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  13. Disinhibitory psychopathology and delay discounting in alcohol dependence: personality and cognitive correlates.

    PubMed

    Bobova, Lyuba; Finn, Peter R; Rickert, Martin E; Lucas, Jesolyn

    2009-02-01

    Increased discounting of delayed rewards may reflect a decision bias that contributes to excessive use of alcohol and more generally, to an impulsive, disinhibitory predisposition that is characterized by a preference for immediate over long-term rewards. The current study examined the association between delay discounting of rewards and the covariation among several types of disinhibitory problems that are often comorbid with alcohol dependence (AD). Lifetime problems with alcohol, marijuana, other drugs, childhood conduct disorder, and adult antisocial behavior were assessed in a sample of 426 young adults, 257 of whom had a lifetime diagnosis of AD. Higher delay discounting rates were associated with the covariation among all domains of disinhibitory problems and were not uniquely associated with any one domain. Higher delay discounting rates also were associated with lower intelligence, lower working memory capacity, and higher trait impulsivity. The results suggest that increased delay discounting of rewards may reflect aspects of a general vulnerability to externalizing, disinhibitory disorders.

  14. B-Vitamin dependent methionine metabolism and alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Halsted, Charles H

    2013-03-01

    Convincing evidence links aberrant B-vitamin dependent hepatic methionine metabolism to the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). This review focuses on the essential roles of folate and vitamins B6 and B12 in hepatic methionine metabolism, the causes of their deficiencies among chronic alcoholic persons, and how their deficiencies together with chronic alcohol exposure impact on aberrant methionine metabolism in the pathogenesis of ALD. Folate is the dietary transmethylation donor for the production of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), which is the substrate for all methyltransferases that regulate gene expressions in pathways of liver injury, as well as a regulator of the transsulfuration pathway that is essential for production of glutathione (GSH), the principal antioxidant for defense against oxidative liver injury. Vitamin B12 regulates transmethylation reactions for SAM production and vitamin B6 regulates transsulfuration reactions for GSH production. Folate deficiency accelerates the experimental development of ALD in ethanol-fed animals while reducing liver SAM levels with resultant abnormal gene expression and decreased production of antioxidant GSH. Through its effects on folate metabolism, reduced SAM also impairs nucleotide balance with resultant increased DNA strand breaks, oxidation, hepatocellular apoptosis, and risk of carcinogenesis. The review encompasses referenced studies on mechanisms for perturbations of methionine metabolism in ALD, evidence for altered gene expressions and their epigenetic regulation in the pathogenesis of ALD, and clinical studies on potential prevention and treatment of ALD by correction of methionine metabolism with SAM.

  15. High-dose naltrexone therapy for cocaine-alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Joy M; Lindsay, Jan A; Green, Charles E; Herin, David V; Stotts, Angela L; Moeller, F Gerard

    2009-01-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study compared the effects of high-dose (100 mg/d) naltrexone versus placebo in a sample of 87 randomized subjects with both cocaine and alcohol dependence. Medication conditions were crossed with two behavioral therapy platforms that examined whether adding contingency management (CM) that targeted cocaine abstinence would enhance naltrexone effects compared to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) without CM. Primary outcome measures for cocaine (urine screens) and alcohol use (timeline followback) were collected thrice-weekly during 12 weeks of treatment. Retention in treatment and medication compliance rates were low. Rates of cocaine use and drinks per day did not differ between treatment groups; however naltrexone did reduce frequency of heavy drinking days, as did CBT without CM. Notably, adding CM to CBT did not enhance treatment outcomes. These weak findings suggest that pharmacological and behavioral interventions that have shown efficacy in the treatment of a single drug dependence disorder may not provide the coverage needed when targeting dual drug dependence.

  16. Pharmacological treatment of alcohol dependence: target symptoms and target mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Heilig, Markus; Egli, Mark

    2006-09-01

    Alcoholism is a major public health problem and resembles, in many ways, other chronic relapsing medical conditions. At least 2 separate dimensions of its symptomatology offer targetable pathophysiological mechanisms. Systems that mediate positive reinforcement by alcohol are likely important targets in early stages of the disease, particularly in genetically susceptible individuals. In contrast, long term neuroadaptive changes caused by chronic alcohol use primarily appear to affect systems mediating negative affective states, and gain importance following a prolonged history of dependence. Feasibility of pharmacological treatment in alcoholism has been demonstrated by a first wave of drugs which consists of 3 currently approved medications, the aldehyde dehydrogenase blocker disulfiram, the opioid antagonist naltrexone (NTX) and the functional glutamate antagonist acamprosate (ACM). The treatment toolkit is likely to be expanded in the near future. This will improve overall efficacy and allow individualized treatment, ultimately taking in account the patient's genetic makeup. In a second wave, early human efficacy data are available for the 5HT3 antagonist ondansetron, the GABA-B agonist baclofen and the anticonvulsant topiramate. The third wave is comprised of compounds predicted to be effective based on a battery of animal models. Using such models, a short list of additional targets has accumulated sufficient preclinical validation to merit clinical development. These include the cannabinoid CB1 receptor, receptors modulating glutamatergic transmission (mGluR2, 3 and 5), and receptors for stress-related neuropeptides corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and nociceptin. Once novel treatments are developed, the field faces a major challenge to assure their delivery to patients.

  17. Ghrelin system in alcohol-dependent subjects: role of plasma ghrelin levels in alcohol drinking and craving

    PubMed Central

    Leggio, Lorenzo; Ferrulli, Anna; Cardone, Silvia; Nesci, Antonio; Miceli, Antonio; Malandrino, Noemi; Capristo, Esmeralda; Canestrelli, Benedetta; Monteleone, Palmiero; Kenna, George A.; Swift, Robert M.; Addolorato, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies suggest that the gut-brain peptide ghrelin plays an important role in the neurobiology of alcohol dependence (AD). Human studies show an effect of alcohol on ghrelin levels and a correlation between ghrelin levels and alcohol craving in alcoholics. This investigation consisted of two studies. Study 1 was a 12-week study with alcohol-dependent subjects, where plasma ghrelin determinations were assessed four times (T0-T3) and related to alcohol intake and craving [Penn Alcohol Craving Score (PACS) and Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale (OCDS)]. Serum growth hormone (GH) levels and assessment of the nutritional/metabolic status were also performed. Study 2 was a pilot case-control study to assess ghrelin gene polymorphisms (Arg51Gln and Leu72Met) in alcohol-dependent individuals. Study 1 showed no significant differences in ghrelin levels in the whole sample, while there was a statistical difference for ghrelin between non-abstinent and abstinent subjects. Baseline ghrelin levels were significantly and positively correlated with the PACS score at T1 and with all craving scores both at T2 and T3 (PACS, OCDS, obsessive and compulsive OCDS subscores). In Study 2, although there was a higher frequency of the Leu72Met ghrelin gene polymorphism in alcohol-dependent individuals, the distribution between healthy controls and alcohol dependent individuals was not statistically significant. This investigation suggests that ghrelin is potentially able to affect alcohol-seeking behaviors, such as alcohol drinking and craving, representing a new potential neuropharmacological target for AD. PMID:21392177

  18. Ethanol up-regulates nucleus accumbens neuronal activity dependent pentraxin (Narp): implications for alcohol-induced behavioral plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Ary, Alexis W.; Cozzoli, Debra K.; Finn, Deborah A.; Crabbe, John C.; Dehoff, Marlin H.; Worley, Paul F.; Szumlinski, Karen K.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal activity-dependent pentraxin (Narp) interacts with α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) glutamate receptors to facilitate excitatory synapse formation by aggregating them at established synapses. Alcohol is well-characterized to influence central glutamatergic transmission, including AMPA receptor function. Herein, we examined the influence of injected and ingested alcohol upon Narp protein expression, as well as basal Narp expression in mouse lines selectively bred for high blood alcohol concentrations under limited access conditions. Alcohol up-regulated accumbens Narp levels, concomitant with increases in levels of the GluR1 AMPA receptor subunit. However, accumbens Narp or GluR1 levels did not vary as a function of selectively bred genotype. We next employed a Narp knock-out (KO) strategy to begin to understand the behavioral relevance of alcohol-induced changes in protein expression in several assays of alcohol reward. Compared to wild-type mice, Narp KO animals: fail to escalate daily intake of high alcohol concentrations under free-access conditions; shift their preference away from high alcohol concentrations with repeated alcohol experience; exhibit a conditioned place-aversion in response to the repeated pairing of 3 g/kg alcohol with a distinct environment and fail to exhibit alcohol-induced locomotor hyperactivity following repeated alcohol treatment. Narp deletion did not influence the daily intake of either food or water, nor did it alter any aspect of spontaneous or alcohol-induced motor activity, including the development of tolerance to its motor-impairing effects with repeated treatment. Taken together, these data indicate that Narp induction, and presumably subsequent aggregation of AMPA receptors, may be important for neuroplasticity within limbic subcircuits mediating or maintaining the rewarding properties of alcohol. PMID:22444953

  19. Ethanol up-regulates nucleus accumbens neuronal activity dependent pentraxin (Narp): implications for alcohol-induced behavioral plasticity.

    PubMed

    Ary, Alexis W; Cozzoli, Debra K; Finn, Deborah A; Crabbe, John C; Dehoff, Marlin H; Worley, Paul F; Szumlinski, Karen K

    2012-06-01

    Neuronal activity dependent pentraxin (Narp) interacts with α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) glutamate receptors to facilitate excitatory synapse formation by aggregating them at established synapses. Alcohol is well-characterized to influence central glutamatergic transmission, including AMPA receptor function. Herein, we examined the influence of injected and ingested alcohol upon Narp protein expression, as well as basal Narp expression in mouse lines selectively bred for high blood alcohol concentrations under limited access conditions. Alcohol up-regulated accumbens Narp levels, concomitant with increases in levels of the GluR1 AMPA receptor subunit. However, accumbens Narp or GluR1 levels did not vary as a function of selectively bred genotype. We next employed a Narp knock-out (KO) strategy to begin to understand the behavioral relevance of alcohol-induced changes in protein expression in several assays of alcohol reward. Compared to wild-type mice, Narp KO animals: fail to escalate daily intake of high alcohol concentrations under free-access conditions; shift their preference away from high alcohol concentrations with repeated alcohol experience; exhibit a conditioned place-aversion in response to the repeated pairing of 3 g/kg alcohol with a distinct environment and fail to exhibit alcohol-induced locomotor hyperactivity following repeated alcohol treatment. Narp deletion did not influence the daily intake of either food or water, nor did it alter any aspect of spontaneous or alcohol-induced motor activity, including the development of tolerance to its motor-impairing effects with repeated treatment. Taken together, these data indicate that Narp induction, and presumably subsequent aggregation of AMPA receptors, may be important for neuroplasticity within limbic subcircuits mediating or maintaining the rewarding properties of alcohol.

  20. Effects of acute alcohol withdrawal on nest building in mice selectively bred for alcohol withdrawal severity.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Gian D; Phillips, Tamara J; Crabbe, John C

    2016-10-15

    Nest building has been used to assess thermoregulatory behavior and positive motivational states in mice. There are known genetic influences on ethanol withdrawal severity as well as individual/thermoregulatory nest building. Withdrawal Seizure-Prone (WSP-1, WSP-2) and Withdrawal Seizure-Resistant (WSR-1, WSR-2) mice were selectively bred for high vs low handling-induced convulsion (HIC) severity, respectively, during withdrawal from chronic ethanol vapor inhalation. They also differ in HIC severity during withdrawal from an acute, 4g/kg ethanol injection. In our initial study, withdrawal from an acute dose of ethanol dose-dependently impaired nest building over the initial 24h of withdrawal in genetically segregating Withdrawal Seizure Control (WSC) mice. In two further studies, acute ethanol withdrawal suppressed nest building for up to two days in WSP-1 females. Deficits in nest building from ethanol were limited to the initial 10h of withdrawal in WSR-1 females and to the initial 24h of withdrawal in WSP-1 and WSR-1 males. Effects of ethanol on nest building for up to two days were found in WSP-2 and WSR-2 mice of both sexes. Nest building deficits in female mice from the first replicate could not be explained by a general decrease in locomotor behavior. These results suggest that nest building is a novel behavioral phenotype for indexing the severity of acute ethanol withdrawal, and that genes contributing to this trait differ from those affecting acute withdrawal HIC severity. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Gender Differences in Affects and Craving in Alcohol-Dependence: A Study During Alcohol Detoxification.

    PubMed

    Petit, Géraldine; Luminet, Olivier; Cordovil de Sousa Uva, Mariana; Monhonval, Pauline; Leclercq, Sophie; Spilliaert, Quentin; Zammit, François; Maurage, Pierre; de Timary, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    Alcohol craving is a major cause of relapse in alcohol-dependent (AD) patients. It is closely related to the high depression and anxiety symptoms that are frequently observed at the early stages of abstinence, and these comorbid symptoms might thus constitute a relapse factor when they persist after detoxification. As these negative affects are known to evolve during the detoxification process, the aim of this study was to investigate the course of the relation between affects and craving during detoxification, with a particular attention given to gender in light of the known differences in affects between AD men and women. AD patients (n = 256) undergoing a detoxification program were evaluated for positive (PA) and negative affectivity (NA), depression and anxiety symptoms, and craving, twice within a 3-week interval (on the first [T1] and the eighteenth day [T2] of abstinence). Detoxification course was associated with improvements regarding NA, depression and anxiety symptoms, and craving. Moreover, these negative affects were related to craving intensity. However, for men, the relation was only present at the beginning of detoxification, while, for women, it persisted at the end of detoxification as did high levels of depression. Furthermore, only with women was the level of craving at T2 proportional to negative affects reported at T1, and depression symptoms experienced at T1 were reliable predictors of craving at T2. Given the importance of craving in relapse, special care should be given to improve depressive symptoms in AD women to promote long-term abstinence. Also, the remaining portion of AD women who still exhibit substantial symptoms of anxiety and depression at the end of detoxification could benefit from an integrated treatment simultaneously tackling mood and alcohol-dependence disorders. Copyright © 2017 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  2. Personality traits in alcohol-dependent individuals in the context of childhood abuse.

    PubMed

    Gerhant, Aneta; Olajossy, Marcin

    2016-10-31

    The aim of this study was to identify groups of alcohol-dependent individuals differing in the severity of childhood physical, emotional and sexual abuse and to find the personality variables that discriminate between those groups. The study included 90 individuals dependent on alcohol. The following questionnaires were used: the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), the Coping Inventory (COPE), the Buss and Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ), Cattell's IPAT Anxiety Scale, and the Early Trauma Inventory (ETI). Two groups of subjects addicted to alcohol were identified: group 1 with high and group 2 with low childhood physical, emotional and sexual abuse indices. The subjects in Group 1 had significantly higher scores than the subjects in Group 2 on the TCI Temperament scales of NS and HA and lower scores on the TCI character scales of SD, C2 and C4. Group 1 subjects were significantly more likely than those from Group 2 to use avoidant coping strategies; they were also less likely to use problem-focused strategies and had significantly higher scores on general anxiety, overt anxiety, latent anxiety, level of aggression, physical aggression, hostility and anger. The higher severity of childhood physical, emotional and sexual abuse in alcoholics is associated with those personality traits that seem to be crucial for maintaining abstinence and the quality of cooperation in therapy.

  3. Amphetamine Dependence and Co-Morbid Alcohol Abuse: Associations to Brain Cortical Thickness

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Long-term amphetamine and methamphetamine dependence has been linked to cerebral blood perfusion, metabolic, and white matter abnormalities. Several studies have linked methamphetamine abuse to cortical grey matter reduction, though with divergent findings. Few publications investigate unmethylated amphetamine's potential effects on cortical grey matter. This work investigated if amphetamine dependent patients showed reduced cortical grey matter thickness. Subjects were 40 amphetamine dependent subjects and 40 healthy controls. While all subjects were recruited to be free of alcohol dependence, structured clinical interviews revealed significant patterns of alcohol use in the patients. Structural magnetic resonance brain images were obtained from the subjects using a 1.5 Tesla GE Signa machine. Brain cortical thickness was measured with submillimeter precision at multiple finely spaced cortical locations using semi-automated post-processing (FreeSurfer). Contrast analysis of a general linear model was used to test for differences between the two groups at each cortical location. In addition to contrasting patients with controls, a number of analyses sought to identify possible confounding effects from alcohol. Results No significant cortical thickness differences were observed between the full patient group and controls, nor between non-drinking patients and controls. Patients with a history of co-morbid heavy alcohol use (n = 29) showed reductions in the superior-frontal right hemisphere and pre-central left hemisphere when compared to healthy controls (n = 40). Conclusions Amphetamine usage was associated with reduced cortical thickness only in patients co-morbid for heavy alcohol use. Since cortical thickness is but one measure of brain structure and does not capture brain function, further studies of brain structure and function in amphetamine dependence are warranted. PMID:20487539

  4. Mental state decoding and mental state reasoning in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent individuals.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Patrizia; Winter, Natalia; Juckel, Georg; Roser, Patrik

    2013-02-28

    Impaired social cognition has been associated with interpersonal problems and with the development of and relapse into alcohol abuse. In the present study, self-reported trait empathy, decoding of complex mental states and cognitive and affective mental state reasoning were assessed in alcohol-dependent participants, and the association with executive function and psychopathological characteristics was investigated. Twenty recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients and 20 matched healthy controls were assessed with an abbreviated German version of the interpersonal reactivity index, the revised reading the mind in the eyes test, the faux pas story test, the trail making test and the letter-number-sequencing test. Patients were impaired relative to controls with regard to mental state decoding on the eyes test and showed reduced faux pas detection and impaired mental state reasoning reflected by lower faux pas understanding and faux pas empathy scores. There were no group differences regarding self-reported trait empathy. Performance on the sociocognitive measures was related to executive functioning and the severity of depressive symptoms. Although self-report measures might not always reliably detect impairments of social cognition, behavioural measures suggest pronounced impairments of mental state decoding and mental state reasoning in association with alcohol dependence. Findings ought to be incorporated into current treatment strategies.

  5. Psilocybin-assisted treatment for alcohol dependence: a proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Bogenschutz, Michael P; Forcehimes, Alyssa A; Pommy, Jessica A; Wilcox, Claire E; Barbosa, P C R; Strassman, Rick J

    2015-03-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that classic (5HT2A agonist) hallucinogens have clinically relevant effects in alcohol and drug addiction. Although recent studies have investigated the effects of psilocybin in various populations, there have been no studies on the efficacy of psilocybin for alcohol dependence. We conducted a single-group proof-of-concept study to quantify acute effects of psilocybin in alcohol-dependent participants and to provide preliminary outcome and safety data. Ten volunteers with DSM-IV alcohol dependence received orally administered psilocybin in one or two supervised sessions in addition to Motivational Enhancement Therapy and therapy sessions devoted to preparation for and debriefing from the psilocybin sessions. Participants' responses to psilocybin were qualitatively similar to those described in other populations. Abstinence did not increase significantly in the first 4 weeks of treatment (when participants had not yet received psilocybin), but increased significantly following psilocybin administration (p < 0.05). Gains were largely maintained at follow-up to 36 weeks. The intensity of effects in the first psilocybin session (at week 4) strongly predicted change in drinking during weeks 5-8 (r = 0.76 to r = 0.89) and also predicted decreases in craving and increases in abstinence self-efficacy during week 5. There were no significant treatment-related adverse events. These preliminary findings provide a strong rationale for controlled trials with larger samples to investigate efficacy and mechanisms. NCT02061293. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Cognitive impairment in euthymic bipolar patients with and without prior alcohol dependence. A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    van Gorp, W G; Altshuler, L; Theberge, D C; Wilkins, J; Dixon, W

    1998-01-01

    Few studies of the neurocognitive performance of patients with bipolar disorder have been performed while patients are in the euthymic state. Twenty-five euthymic bipolar patients (12 with and 13 without a history of alcohol dependence) were compared with 22 normal control subjects on a neuropsychological test battery assessing a range of cognitive domains. The relationship between subjects' neurocognitive performance and the course-of-illness variables (lifetime episodes and duration of mania, depression, or both), as well as current lithium level, was determined. The results indicated differences across the groups, with the bipolar patients with and without alcohol dependence performing more poorly than controls on tests of verbal memory. Furthermore, bipolar subjects with a history of alcohol dependence had additional decrements in executive (i.e., frontal lobe) functions when compared with controls. For subjects in the bipolar group, lifetime months of mania and depression were negatively correlated with performance in verbal memory and several executive function measures. Our findings support the presence of persistent neurocognitive difficulties in patients with long-standing bipolar disorder who are not in the psychiatrically acute state or who are suffering the effects of alcohol abuse and suggest that there may be an aggregate negative effect of lifetime duration of bipolar illness on memory and frontal or executive systems.

  7. Studies on natural recovery from alcohol dependence: sample selection bias by media solicitation?

    PubMed

    Rumpf, H J; Bischof, G; Hapke, U; Meyer, C; John, U

    2000-05-01

    To assess the selection bias of recruiting participants in studies on natural recovery from alcohol dependence through media solicitation. Two samples with different recruitment strategies are compared. Media solicitation and general population. Sample 1 consists of 176 alcohol-dependent individuals remitted without formal help and recruited through media solicitation, sample 2 consists of 32 natural remitters derived from a representative general population study with a sample size of 4075 respondents and a response rate of 70.2%. Several triggering mechanisms and maintenance factors of remission were assessed in a personal interview using standardized questionnaires. Results of logistic regression analyses show that media-solicited subjects were more often abstinent in the last 12 months, were more severely dependent, were less satisfied with eight life domains prior to remission and showed higher scores in a coping behaviour measure. Besides these major differences from the multivariate analysis, media subjects revealed more health problems prior to remission, experienced more social pressure to change drinking behaviour, and showed differences in reasons for not seeking help. Media solicitation leads to a sample selection bias in research on natural recovery from alcohol dependence. When measures to foster self-change are derived from such studies, findings from representative samples have to be considered.

  8. Alcohol consumption and use of health care services in people with severe mental illness and stressful childhood experiences.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Andres R; Huber, Christian G; Seixas, Azizi; Muenzenmaier, Kristina H; Lang, Undine E; Castille, Dorothy; Larkin, Stefan; Link, Bruce G

    2017-01-01

    People who suffer from severe mental illness often present with histories of abuse during childhood. Alcohol use disorders is a common co-morbidity of survivors of childhood abuse and neglect. This study analyzes the effects of stressful childhood experiences, a proxy for trauma, on the frequency of alcohol consumption and the utilization of health care services in a population of people with severe mental illness. There were 111 men (mean age: 35 years) and 72 women (mean age: 40.0 years) with severe mental illness that were recruited from psychiatric outpatient clinics in New York City. The analysis focused on lifetime prevalence of stressful childhood experiences, alcohol consumption, and utilization of health care services over time. The longitudinal data were analyzed over 12 months with a level-2 model (multilevel modeling). Out of the participants, 41.5% reported a history of more than four types of abusive experiences. There were 33.3% that had a DSM-IV diagnosis of alcohol abuse and 27.3% qualified for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition diagnosis of alcohol dependence throughout their lives. Stressful childhood experiences predicted an increased frequency of alcohol consumption over time. People with histories of childhood abuse had more often been to outpatient clinics and 12-step programs, but at the same time showed lower frequency rates of psychiatrist visits and visits to outpatient clinics. Childhood abuse is prevalent in people with severe mental illness and is related to an increased alcohol consumption. Despite an increased need of health care services, affected persons might encounter more barriers to access them.

  9. Ethnicity and gender comparisons of health consequences in adults with alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Chartier, Karen G; Hesselbrock, Michie N; Hesselbrock, Victor M

    2013-02-01

    The moderating effects of ethnicity and gender on factors associated with physical health consequences in adults manifesting alcohol dependence were examined using data from the 2001-2002 US National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Black and white respondents with a lifetime diagnosis of DSM-IV alcohol dependence were selected for the study (n = 3,852). A multiple-group structural equation model tested ethnicity, gender, and intervening variables as predictors of physical health status in alcohol-dependent men and women. Study findings offer implications for clinical practice with alcohol-dependent individuals by identifying likely target groups and problems for intervention.

  10. Ethnicity and Gender Comparisons of Health Consequences in Adults with Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Karen G.; Hesselbrock, Michie N.; Hesselbrock, Victor M.

    2010-01-01

    The moderating effects of ethnicity and gender on factors associated with physical health consequences in adults with alcohol dependence was examined using data from the 2001–2002 U.S. National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Black and White respondents with a lifetime diagnosis of DSM-IV alcohol dependence were selected for the study (n = 3,852). A multiple-group structural equation model tested ethnicity, gender, and intervening variables as predictors of physical health status in alcohol dependent men and women. Study findings offer implications for clinical practice with alcohol dependent individuals by identifying likely target groups and problems for intervention. PMID:23302062

  11. Problematic alcohol use among individuals with HIV: relations with everyday memory functioning and HIV symptom severity.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Adrienne J; Fogler, Kethera A; Newcomb, Michael E; Trafton, Jodie A; Bonn-Miller, Marcel O

    2014-07-01

    Problematic alcohol use has been shown to negatively impact cognitive functions germane to achieving optimal HIV health outcomes. The present study, a secondary data analysis, examined the impact of problematic alcohol use on aspects of everyday memory functioning in a sample of 172 HIV-infected individuals (22 % female; Mage = 48.37 years, SD = 8.64; 39 % Black/non-Hispanic). Additionally, we tested whether self-reported memory functioning explained the relation between problematic alcohol use and HIV symptom severity. Results indicated that problematic patterns of alcohol use were associated with lower total memory functioning, retrieval (e.g., recall-difficulty) and memory for activity (e.g., what you did yesterday) and greater HIV symptom severity. Memory functioning mediated the relation between problematic alcohol use and HIV symptom severity. However, the direction of this relation was unclear as HIV symptom severity also mediated the relation between problematic alcohol use and memory functioning. Findings highlight the importance of integrated care for HIV and alcohol use disorders and suggest that routine alcohol and cognitive screenings may bolster health outcomes among this vulnerable population.

  12. [Comparative study of the relationship between alexithymia and affective dependence on 60 alcoholics and 57 control subjects].

    PubMed

    Otmani, O; Loas, G; Lecercle, C; Jouvent, R

    1999-01-01

    Several authors have shown that alexithymia characterizes patients suffering from substance abuses. Moreover emotional and perceptual dependencies have also been described in these disorders. The aim of this study is to test two hypotheses: First that the emotional components of alexithymia and dependency were linked in alcoholics and secondly that the cognitive components of these two dimensions were also linked in these subjects. Two groups were recruited: 60 inpatients filled out the DSM IV criteria for alcohol dependence and 57 healthy subjects were the controls. All the subjects completed the following rating scales: the twenty items Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), the Interpersonal Dependency Inventory (IDI), the Beck Depression Inventory, the Embedded Figures Test (EFT). Partial correlations (r Bravais Pearson), using BDI score as constant, were calculated. In normals the Feelings subscale of the TAS-20 correlated with the Lack of social self confidence subscale of the IDI (r = 0.43, p < 0.0018) and in alcoholics the Cognitive factor of the TAS-20 correlated with the Lack of social self confidence subscale (r = 0.41, p < 0.0018). Moreover in alcoholics, the cognitive factor of the TAS-20 correlated significantly with the EFT score (r = -0.35, p < 0.003). In alcoholics the cognitive component of alexithymia and the perceptual component of dependency were linked, independently of an associated depression. A particular cognitive style characterized by externality and field dependence could characterized dependent alcoholics.

  13. A new definition of early age at onset in alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Le Strat, Yann; Grant, Bridget F; Ramoz, Nicolas; Gorwood, Philip

    2010-04-01

    The accurate cut-off of an early onset of alcohol dependence is unknown. The objectives of this analysis are (1) to confirm that ages at onset variability in alcohol dependence is best described as a two subgroups entity, (2) to define the most appropriate cut-off, and (3) to test the relevancy of such distinction. Data were drawn the Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). This study focused on the 4782 adults with lifetime alcohol dependence. The best-fit model distinguished two subgroups of age at onset of alcohol dependence, with a cut-off point at 22 years. Subjects with an earlier onset of alcohol dependence (< or = 22 years old) reported higher lifetime rates of specific phobia, antisocial behaviors and nearly all addictive disorders. The early onset of alcohol dependence is best defined as beginning before the age of 22 years. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A new definition of early age at onset in alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Le Strat, Yann; Grant, Bridget F.; Ramoz, Nicolas; Gorwood, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Objective The accurate cut-off of an early onset of alcohol dependence is unknown. The objectives of this analysis are (1) to confirm that ages at onset variability in alcohol dependence is best described as a two sub-groups entity, (2) to define the most appropriate cut-off, and (3) to test the relevancy of such distinction. Method Data were drawn the Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). This study focused on the 4,782 adults with lifetime alcohol dependence. Results The best-fit model distinguished two subgroups of age at onset of alcohol dependence, with a cut-off point at 22 years. Subjects with an earlier onset of alcohol dependence (≤22 years old) reported higher lifetime rates of specific phobia, antisocial behaviors and nearly all addictive disorders. Conclusions The early onset of alcohol dependence is best defined as beginning before the age of 22 years. PMID:20018459

  15. Medical treatment of alcohol dependence: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Miller, Peter M; Book, Sarah W; Stewart, Scott H

    2011-01-01

    To summarize published data on pharmacologic treatments for alcohol dependence alone and in combination with brief psychosocial therapies that may be feasible for primary care and specialty medical settings. We conducted electronic searches of published original research articles and reviews in MEDLINE, SCOPUS, CINAHL, Embase, and PsychINFO. In addition, hand searches of reference lists of review articles, supplemental searches of internet references and contacts with experts in the field were conducted. Randomized controlled studies published between January 1960 and August 2010 that met our inclusion/exclusion criteria were included. A total of 85 studies, representing 18,937 subjects, met our criteria for inclusion. The evidence base for oral naltrexone (6% more days abstinent than placebo in the largest study) and topiramate (prescribed off-label) (e.g., 26.2% more days abstinent than placebo in a recent study) is positive but modest. Acamprosate shows modest efficacy with recently abstinent patients, with European studies showing better results than U.S. ones. The evidence-base for disulfiram is equivocal. Depot naltrexone shows efficacy (25% greater reduction in rate of heavy drinking vs. placebo, in one of the largest studies) in a limited number of studies. Some studies suggest that patients do better with extensive psychosocial treatments added to medications while others show that brief support can be equally effective. Although treatment effects are modest, medications for alcohol dependence, in conjunction with either brief support or more extensive psychosocial therapy, can be effective in primary and specialty care medical settings.

  16. Substance Dependence Severity Scale: reliability and validity for ICD-10 substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    Miele, G M; Carpenter, K M; Cockerham, M S; Trautman, K D; Blaine, J; Hasin, D S

    2001-01-01

    The Substance Dependence Severity Scale (SDSS) is a semistructured interview that assesses the severity of the DSM-IV diagnoses of dependence and abuse and the ICD-10 diagnoses of substance dependence and harmful use across a wide range of substances. Previous research has demonstrated that the SDSS' DSM-IV dependence scales are reliable and valid indicators of diagnostic severity. However, the ICD-10 scales have not been psychometrically tested. This study investigated the test-retest reliability, internal consistency, diagnostic concordance, and concurrent validity of the SDSS' ICD-10 dependence and harmful use scales in 180 (112 male and 68 female) treated substance users. Test-retest reliabilities for the ICD-10 dependence scales ranged from good to excellent for alcohol, cocaine, heroin, and cannabis. Test-retest reliabilities for the SDSS' ICD-10 harmful use scales were in the good range for alcohol, cocaine, and heroin and the poor to fair range for cannabis. Internal consistency, diagnostic concordance, and concurrent validity results were comparable to the test-retest findings. These results support the use of the SDSS for assessing the severity of the ICD-10 dependence and harmful use diagnoses.

  17. Alcohol-Dependent Liver Cell Necrosis in vitro: A New Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanne, Francis A. X.; Zucker, Amy H.; Farber, John L.; Rubin, Emanuel

    1981-04-01

    In alcoholic liver injury, necrosis is involved in the progression from benign fatty liver to alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis. However, there is no practical model of alcohol-dependent liver cell necrosis. The calcium-dependent killing of cultured rat hepatocytes by two different membrane-active hepatotoxins, galactosamine and phalloidin, is potentiated by ethyl alcohol. This indicates that some general physical effect of alcohol on cellular membranes renders cells susceptible to otherwise nonlethal injuries. The in vitro model described in this report may thus be used to search for a general mechanism underlying alcohol-related tissue injury.

  18. Behavioral Economic Measures of Alcohol Reward Value as Problem Severity Indicators in College Students

    PubMed Central

    Skidmore, Jessica R.; Murphy, James G.; Martens, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the current study were to examine the associations among behavioral economic measures of alcohol value derived from three distinct measurement approaches, and to evaluate their respective relations with traditional indicators of alcohol problem severity in college drinkers. Five behavioral economic metrics were derived from hypothetical demand curves that quantify reward value by plotting consumption and expenditures as a function of price, another metric measured proportional behavioral allocation and enjoyment related to alcohol versus other activities, and a final metric measured relative discretionary expenditures on alcohol. The sample included 207 heavy drinking college students (53% female) who were recruited through an on-campus health center or university courses. Factor analysis revealed that the alcohol valuation construct comprises two factors: one factor that reflects participants’ levels of alcohol price sensitivity (demand persistence), and a second factor that reflects participants’ maximum consumption and monetary and behavioral allocation towards alcohol (amplitude of demand). The demand persistence and behavioral allocation metrics demonstrated the strongest and most consistent multivariate relations with alcohol-related problems, even when controlling for other well-established predictors. The results suggest that behavioral economic indices of reward value show meaningful relations with alcohol problem severity in young adults. Despite the presence of some gender differences, these measures appear to be useful problem indicators for men and women. PMID:24749779

  19. Behavioral economic measures of alcohol reward value as problem severity indicators in college students.

    PubMed

    Skidmore, Jessica R; Murphy, James G; Martens, Matthew P

    2014-06-01

    The aims of the current study were to examine the associations among behavioral economic measures of alcohol value derived from 3 distinct measurement approaches, and to evaluate their respective relations with traditional indicators of alcohol problem severity in college drinkers. Five behavioral economic metrics were derived from hypothetical demand curves that quantify reward value by plotting consumption and expenditures as a function of price, another metric measured proportional behavioral allocation and enjoyment related to alcohol versus other activities, and a final metric measured relative discretionary expenditures on alcohol (RDEA). The sample included 207 heavy-drinking college students (53% female) who were recruited through an on-campus health center or university courses. Factor analysis revealed that the alcohol valuation construct comprises 2 factors: 1 factor that reflects participants' levels of alcohol price sensitivity (demand persistence), and a second factor that reflects participants' maximum consumption and monetary and behavioral allocation toward alcohol (amplitude of demand). The demand persistence and behavioral allocation metrics demonstrated the strongest and most consistent multivariate relations with alcohol-related problems, even when controlling for other well-established predictors. The results suggest that behavioral economic indices of reward value show meaningful relations with alcohol problem severity in young adults. Despite the presence of some gender differences, these measures appear to be useful problem indicators for men and women. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Sleep electroencephalographic spectral power after withdrawal from alcohol in alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Feige, Bernd; Scaal, Susanne; Hornyak, Magdolna; Gann, Horst; Riemann, Dieter

    2007-01-01

    Dysfunctional hyperarousal is suspected to be a neurophysiological determinant of relapse in abstinent alcohol-dependent patients. In the present study, we used spectral power analysis of the sleep electroencephalographic (EEG) to quantify brain activity during sleep in patients during subacute withdrawal as well as in control subjects. Our hypothesis was that the subgroup of patients who relapsed within the 3 months to follow-up would exhibit-increased dysfunctional arousal manifested by higher-frequency (beta) EEG power during sleep. Twenty-six alcohol-dependent in-patients were examined with polysomnography over 2 nights 2 to 3 weeks after withdrawal. At the 3-month clinical follow-up assessment, 12 of them had relapsed and 14 abstained. The control group consisted of 23 healthy subjects similar to the patients with alcohol dependence in age and gender distribution. Spectral sleep EEG analysis was performed on both nights (adaptation and baseline) of all subjects. Logarithmic artifact-controlled spectral band power of sleep stage 2 and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was analyzed for Group, Gender, and Age effects using multiple analyses of covariance. Three groups were compared with the Group factor: relapsers, abstainers, and controls. Generally, both Group and Age effects were significant for the second, baseline night for the visually scored sleep parameters, while spectral EEG parameters showed significant differences in the adaptation night. In the adaptation night, a significant enhancement in the beta2 band (24-32 Hz) was seen in REM sleep in relapsers relative to both abstainers and controls. The beta2 increase could be interpreted as a sign of dysfunctional arousal during REM sleep "unmasked" by the additional stressor of sleep environment adaptation. Its determinants are likely to be both premorbid and drinking history related.

  1. [Absinthe - history of dependence to thujone or to alcohol?].

    PubMed

    Lachenmeier, D W

    2007-05-01

    The etiopathology of absinthe dependence was previously attributed to the effects of the wormwood constituent thujone. Current research proves otherwise. Foremost, it must be considered that the wormwood plant shows a very large variance in quantity of thujone (0 - 70 % in essential oil) dependent on chemo type and cultivation area. Thus, absinthe does not contain thujone in general. Experimental production of absinthes and analyses of vintage absinthes (1900 - 1930) consistently showed that they contained only relatively low concentrations of thujone below today's maximum limits. Scientific literature contains no proof that historic absinthes may have contained thujone in concentrations able to produce toxic effects. The current state of research considers absinthism to be a type of alcoholism with thujone playing none or only a secondary role.

  2. Cupriavidus necator JMP134 rapidly reduces furfural with a Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Qunrui; Metthew Lam, L K; Xun, Luying

    2011-11-01

    Ethanol is a renewable biofuel, and it can be produced from lignocellulosic biomass. The biomass is usually converted to hydrolysates that consist of sugar and sugar derivatives, such as furfural. Yeast ferments sugar to ethanol, but furfural higher than 3 mM is inhibitory. It can take several days for yeast cells to reduce furfural to non-inhibitory furfuryl alcohol before producing ethanol. Bioreduction of furfural to furfuryl alcohol before fermentation may relieve yeast from furfural toxicity. We observed that Cupriavidus necator JMP134, a strict aerobe, rapidly reduced 17 mM furfural to less than 3 mM within 14 min with cell turbidity of 1.0 at 600 nm at 50°C. The rapid reduction consumed ethanol. The "furfural reductase" (FurX) was purified, and it oxidized ethanol to acetaldehyde and reduced furfural to furfuryl alcohol with NAD(+) as the cofactor. The protein was identified with mass spectrometry fingerprinting to be a hypothetical protein belonging to Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase family. The furX-inactivation mutant of C. necator JMP134 lost the ability to rapidly reduce furfural, and Escherichia coli producing recombinant FurX gained the ability. Thus, an alcohol dehydrogenase enabled bacteria to rapidly reduce furfural with ethanol as the reducing power.

  3. Effects of Age, Sex, Body Weight, and Quantity of Alcohol Consumption on Occurrence and Severity of Alcoholic Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Puri, Puneet; Shah, Vijay H; Kamath, Patrick; Sanyal, Arun; Urban, Thomas; Ren, Xiaowei; Katz, Barry; Radaeva, Svetlana; Chalasani, Naga; Crabb, David W

    2016-12-01

    Only a minority of heavy drinking individuals develop alcoholic hepatitis (AH), for unclear reasons. We analyzed data from the Translational Research and Evolving Alcoholic Hepatitis Treatment cohort, consisting of subjects who drink heavily with normal results from liver tests (controls) and patients with AH. We examined risk factors for the development of AH including body mass index (BMI), drinking pattern and quantity, and sex. We compared data from 145 patients with AH and 124 controls based on BMI when they joined the cohort; groups were matched for sex and race. Drinking patterns were assessed using the timeline followback method, the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, and the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism 6-question survey. We performed univariable and multivariable analyses to assess the effects of these factors and their interaction in increasing the risk for AH. We also explored the association between PNPLA3 variants and AH. Cases with AH were older (47 vs 44 y; P = .03). For nearly all measures of quantity of alcohol consumed or frequency of binge drinking, controls drank more heavily than cases with AH. We did not find an association between BMI, sex, drinking patterns, and the presence of AH. Age and BMI were independent predictors for the severity of AH. When we analyzed cases and controls of European ancestry, the PNPLA3 single-nucleotide polymorphism rs738409 was associated with risk for AH (odds ratio, 1.89; P = .007). Compared with heavy drinkers without liver disease, subjects with AH consumed lower levels of alcohol and had less binge drinking, suggesting an increased sensitivity to the toxic effects of alcohol. The risk for AH may be associated with the PNPLA3 rs738409 polymorphism. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The application of machine learning techniques as an adjunct to clinical decision making in alcohol dependence treatment.

    PubMed

    Connor, J P; Symons, M; Feeney, G F X; Young, R McD; Wiles, J

    2007-01-01

    With few exceptions, research in the addictive sciences has relied on linear statistics and methodologies. Addiction involves a complex array of nonlinear behaviors. This study applies two machine learning techniques, Bayesian and decision tree classifiers, in the assessment of outcome of an alcohol dependence treatment program. These nonlinear approaches are compared to a standard linear analysis. Seventy-three alcohol-dependent subjects undertaking a 12-week cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) program and 66 subjects undertaking an identical program but also prescribed the relapse prevention agent Acamprosate were employed in this study. Demographic, alcohol use, dependence severity, craving, health-related quality of life, and psychological measures at baseline were used to predict abstinence at 12 weeks. Decision trees had a 77% predictive accuracy across both data sets, Bayesian networks 73%, and discriminant analysis 42%. Combined with clinical experience, machine learning approaches offer promise in understanding the complex relationships that underlie treatment outcome for abstinence-based alcohol treatment programs.

  5. Anticipatory 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations are associated with escalated alcohol intake in dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Buck, Cara L; Malavar, Jordan C; George, Olivier; Koob, George F; Vendruscolo, Leandro F

    2014-09-01

    Rats emit 50kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) in situations of increased motivation, such as during the anticipation of palatable food or drugs of abuse. Whether the same holds true for the anticipation of alcohol intake remains unknown. Alcohol drinking in a nondependent state is thought to be mediated by its rewarding effects (positive reinforcement), whereas drinking in the dependent state is motivated by alcohol's stress-relieving effects (negative reinforcement). Here, we measured context-elicited 50kHz USVs in alcohol-dependent (alcohol vapor-exposed) and nondependent rats immediately before operant alcohol self-administration sessions. Dependent rats showed escalated levels of alcohol intake compared with nondependent rats. Overall, dependent and nondependent rats showed similar levels of anticipatory 50kHz USVs. However, the number of anticipatory USVs was positively correlated with alcohol intake in dependent rats but not nondependent rats. Additionally, dependent rats with higher alcohol intake displayed increased anticipatory 50kHz USVs compared with rats that had lower alcohol intake, whereas no difference was observed between rats with high and low alcohol intake in the nondependent group. Increased 50kHz USVs were specific for the anticipation of alcohol self-administration and did not generalize to a novel environment. These findings suggest that anticipatory 50kHz USVs may be an indicator of context-elicited negative reinforcement learning.

  6. Deficits in Emotion-Regulation Skills Predict Alcohol Use during and after Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Alcohol Dependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berking, Matthias; Margraf, Matthias; Ebert, David; Wupperman, Peggilee; Hofmann, Stefan G.; Junghanns, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Objective: As emotion regulation is widely considered to be a primary motive in the misuse of alcohol, our aim in the study was to investigate whether deficits in adaptive emotion-regulation skills maintain alcohol dependence (AD). Method: A prospective study investigated whether emotion-regulation skills were associated with AD and whether these…

  7. Deficits in Emotion-Regulation Skills Predict Alcohol Use during and after Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Alcohol Dependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berking, Matthias; Margraf, Matthias; Ebert, David; Wupperman, Peggilee; Hofmann, Stefan G.; Junghanns, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Objective: As emotion regulation is widely considered to be a primary motive in the misuse of alcohol, our aim in the study was to investigate whether deficits in adaptive emotion-regulation skills maintain alcohol dependence (AD). Method: A prospective study investigated whether emotion-regulation skills were associated with AD and whether these…

  8. [Creation of a scale for evaluating attitudes of partners toward alcohol dependency].

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Tazuko; Morita, Noriaki; Nakatani, Youji

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a scale to evaluate characteristics of how alcohol-dependent people perceive the attitudes of their partners toward alcohol dependency. Based on previous research, we created the "Attitudes of partners toward alcohol dependency" scale, from the perspective of the alcohol dependent individual. Using the new scale, 71 alcohol-dependent people (52 men, 19 women) were surveyed after obtaining their consent, and the reliability and validity of the scale were tested. The results identified 3 factors, "indifference", "acceptance" and "hypersensitivity", and factorial validity was verified. Relatively high reliability was obtained on each sub-scale (alpha = .60-.82). Furthermore, correlations were obtained with the alcohol-dependency "Denial and Awareness Scale (for alcohol-dependent people)" and with the 13-item "Usefulness of heterosexual love relations for recovery from alcohol dependency" questionnaire, which includes content on "beneficial" or "obstructive" to recovery, and with the satisfaction and the importance of relations. This demonstrates that the "Attitudes of partners toward alcohol dependency" scale has reliability and criterion-related validity. The scale facilitates evaluation of types of attitudes of partners toward alcohol dependency, and may thus be useful as one tool for investigating the influence of partners in heterosexual love relationships for recovery, and for providing advice.

  9. Interactions Between Alcohol Metabolism Genes and Religious Involvement in Association With Maximum Drinks and Alcohol Dependence Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Karen G.; Dick, Danielle M.; Almasy, Laura; Chan, Grace; Aliev, Fazil; Schuckit, Marc A.; Scott, Denise M.; Kramer, John; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Bierut, Laura J.; Nurnberger, John; Porjesz, Bernice; Hesselbrock, Victor M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Variations in the genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) enzymes are associated with both alcohol consumption and dependence in multiple populations. Additionally, some environmental factors have been recognized as modifiers of these relationships. This study examined the modifying effect of religious involvement on relationships between ADH gene variants and alcohol consumption–related phenotypes. Method: Subjects were African American, European American, and Hispanic American adults with lifetime exposure to alcohol (N = 7,716; 53% female) from the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism. Genetic markers included ADH1B-rs1229984, ADH1B-rs2066702, ADH1C-rs698, ADH4-rs1042364, and ADH4-rs1800759. Phenotypes were maximum drinks consumed in a 24-hour period and total number of alcohol dependence symptoms according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Religious involvement was defined by self-reported religious services attendance. Results: Both religious involvement and ADH1B-rs1229984 were negatively associated with the number of maximum drinks consumed and the number of lifetime alcohol dependence symptoms endorsed. The interactions of religious involvement with ADH1B-rs2066702, ADH1C-rs698, and ADH4-rs1042364 were significantly associated with maximum drinks and alcohol dependence symptoms. Risk variants had weaker associations with maximum drinks and alcohol dependence symptoms as a function of increasing religious involvement. Conclusions: This study provided initial evidence of a modifying effect for religious involvement on relationships between ADH variants and maximum drinks and alcohol dependence symptoms. PMID:27172571

  10. Dose-dependent effects of intravenous alcohol administration on cerebral blood flow in young adults.

    PubMed

    Strang, Nicole M; Claus, Eric D; Ramchandani, Vijay A; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel; Boileau, Isabelle; Hendershot, Christian S

    2015-02-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies involving alcohol challenge are important for identifying neural correlates of alcohol's psychopharmacological effects. However, evaluating acute alcohol effects on blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal change is complicated by alcohol-related increases in cerebral blood flow (CBF). The present study aimed to further characterize acute alcohol effects on CBF using intravenous alcohol administration to maximize control over brain alcohol exposure. Twenty heavy-drinking young adults (M = 19.95 years old, SD = 0.76) completed alcohol and placebo imaging sessions in a within-subject, counter-balanced, placebo-controlled design. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) provided estimates of perfusion change at two target blood alcohol concentrations (40 and 80 mg%) relative to baseline and relative to a saline control infusion. Voxel-wise analyses showed widespread and dose-dependent effects of alcohol on CBF increase. Region-of-interest analyses confirmed these findings, also indicating regional variation in the magnitude of perfusion change. Additional findings indicated that lower self-reported sensitivity to alcohol corresponded with reduced perfusion change during alcohol administration. This study provides further evidence for widespread effects of acute alcohol on cerebral perfusion, also demonstrating regional, dose-dependent, and inter-individual variation. Further research is needed to evaluate implications of these effects for the design and interpretation of pharmacological fMRI studies involving alcohol challenge.

  11. Effect of elevated serum alcohol level on the outcome of severely injured patients.

    PubMed

    Scheyerer, Max J; Dütschler, Joel; Billeter, Adrian; Zimmermann, Stefan M; Sprengel, Kai; Werner, Clement M L; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Wanner, Guido A

    2014-10-01

    The influence of high blood alcohol level (BAL) on the outcome of severely injured patients and the corresponding pathophysiological changes is a controversial issue. To carry out a prognostic study to compare the physiological values and short-term outcome of severely injured patients depending on their serum alcohol level. A total of 383 severely injured patients with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) ≥17 were admitted to the trauma division between October 2008 and December 2009 and enrolled into this study. Patients were grouped according to their BAL (>0.5‰,'BAL positive' vs <0.5‰,'BAL negative'). Trauma mechanism, pattern of injury and its treatment, and a course of intensive care treatment, physiological parameters and outcome with respect to mortality were analysed. Both groups had similar ISS. In comparison with the BAL-negative group, patients in the BAL-positive group had a significantly lower Glasgow Coma Scale score (9.64 vs 12 points; p=0.005) and, although not significant, a trend towards higher values of the Abbreviated Injury Score for the head (3.29 vs 2.81 points; p=0.146). Furthermore, significantly higher lactate (3.11 mmol/L vs 2.02 mmol/L; p<0.001) levels and lower median arterial pressure values (87.9 mm Hg vs 99.4 mm Hg; p=0.006) were seen in the BAL-positive group at day of admission. However, the overall in-hospital mortality was comparable to that in BAL-negative patients (19.6% vs 21.5%). Similarly, hospital stay (15.29 vs 17.55 days) and duration of intensive care unit treatment (8.53 vs 8.36 days) were not significantly affected by a high BAL upon admission. Severely injured patients with a raised BAL have a higher incidence of severe traumatic brain injury and worse initial physiological parameters. However, the survival rate and in-hospital stay is not influenced. This supports the theory of a neuroprotective role of alcohol. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  12. Alcoholics anonymous involvement and positive alcohol-related outcomes: cause, consequence, or just a correlate? A prospective 2-year study of 2,319 alcohol-dependent men.

    PubMed

    McKellar, John; Stewart, Eric; Humphreys, Keith

    2003-04-01

    A positive corelation between Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) involvement and better alcohol-related outcomes has been identified in research studies, but whether this correlation reflects a causal relationship remains a subject of meaningful debate. The present study evaluated the question of whether AA affiliation appears causally related to positive alcohol-related outcomes in a sample of 2,319 male alcohol-dependent patients. An initial structural equation model indicated that 1-year posttreatment levels of AA affiliation predicted lower alcohol-related problems at 2-year follow-up, whereas level of alcohol-related problems at 1-year did not predict AA affiliation at 2-year follow-up. Additional models found that these effects were not attributable to motivation or psychopathology. The findings are consistent with the hypothesis that AA participation has a positive effect on alcohol-related outcomes.

  13. Associations Between Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Emotion Dysregulation, and Alcohol Dependence Symptoms Among Inner City Females

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Brittany; Bradley, Bekh; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine how emotion dysregulation (ED) might help explain the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol dependence (AD) symptoms in females. Method Participants included 260 women from primary, diabetes, and gynecological clinics of an urban public hospital. This is a primarily African American sample (96.9%), including individuals reporting exposure to at least 1 traumatic event. We examined the associations and predictability patterns between severity of PTSD symptoms, ED, and AD symptoms. Results Using linear regression analyses, PTSD avoidance and numbing symptoms and ED were significant predictors of AD symptoms. When looking at specific dimensions of ED, one's inability to engage in goal‐directed behavior under strong emotional influences showed a full indirect effect on the relationship between PTSD avoidance and numbing symptoms and AD symptoms. Conclusion Our findings suggest that having poor emotion regulation skills may help explain why females with PTSD become dependent on alcohol. PMID:27467499

  14. Dissociative disorders among inpatients with drug or alcohol dependency.

    PubMed

    Karadag, Figen; Sar, Vedat; Tamar-Gurol, Defne; Evren, Cuneyt; Karagoz, Mustafa; Erkiran, Murat

    2005-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of dissociative disorders among inpatients with alcohol or drug dependency. The Dissociative Experiences Scale was used to screen 215 consecutive inpatients admitted to the dependency treatment center of a large mental hospital over a 1-year period (March 1, 2003, to March 31, 2004). Patients who had scores of 30.0 or above were compared with patients who scored below 10.0 on the scale. The patients in both groups were then evaluated using the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders. The interviewers were blind to the Dissociative Experiences Scale scores. Of the patients, 36.7% had a Dissociative Experiences Scale score of 30.0 or above. The prevalence of DSM-IV dissociative disorders was 17.2% (N = 37). On average, 64.9% of these patients' dissociative experiences had started 3.6 years (SD = 2.9; range, 1.0-11.0 years) before onset of the substance use. Patients with dissociative disorders were younger, and the mean duration of their remission periods was shorter. Dissociative disorder patients tended to use more than 1 substance, and drugs were used more frequently than alcohol in this group. The frequency of borderline personality disorder, somatization disorder, history of suicide attempt, and childhood abuse and neglect occurred more frequently in the dissociative disorder group than in the nondissociative disorder group. History of suicide attempt (p = .005), female sex (p = .050), and childhood emotional abuse (p = .010) were significant predictors of a dissociative disorder diagnosis. Significantly more patients with dissociative disorders stopped their treatment prematurely (p < .001). Impact of dissociative disorders on development and treatment of substance dependency requires further study.

  15. CHILD PHYSICAL AND SEXUAL ABUSE: A COMPREHENSIVE LOOK AT ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION PATTERNS, CONSEQUENCES AND DEPENDENCE FROM THE NATIONAL ALCOHOL SURVEY

    PubMed Central

    Lown, E. Anne; Nayak, Madhabika B.; Korcha, Rachael A.; Greenfield, Thomas. K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous research has documented a relationship between child sexual abuse and alcohol dependence. This paper extends that work by providing a comprehensive description of past year and lifetime alcohol consumption patterns, consequences and dependence among women reporting either child physical and sexual abuse in a national sample of women. Methods This study used survey data from 3,680 women who participated in the 2005 U.S. National Alcohol Survey. Information on physical and sexual child abuse and its characteristics were assessed in relation to 8 past year and lifetime alcohol consumption measures. Results Child physical or sexual abuse was significantly associated with past year and lifetime alcohol consumption measures. In multivariate analyses, controlling for age, marital status, employment status, education, ethnicity and parental alcoholism or problem drinking, women reporting child sexual abuse vs. no abuse were more likely to report past year heavy episodic drinking (ORadj=1.7; 95% CI 1.0–2.9), alcohol dependence (ORadj=7.2; 95% CI 3.2–16.5), and alcohol consequences (ORadj=3.6; 95% CI 1.8–7.3). Sexual abuse (vs. no abuse) was associated with a greater number of past year drinks (124 vs. 74 drinks respectively, p=.002). Sexual child abuse was also associated with lifetime alcohol related consequences (ORadj=3.5; 95% CI 2.6–4.8), and dependence (ORadj=3.7; 95% CI 2.6–5.3). Physical child abuse was associated with 4 of 8 alcohol measures in multivariate models. Both physical and sexual child abuse were associated with getting into fights, health, legal, work and family alcohol related consequences. Alcohol related consequences and dependence were more common for women reporting sexual abuse compared to physical abuse, 2 or more physical abuse perpetrators, non-parental and non-family physical abuse perpetrators and women reporting injury related to the abuse. Conclusion Both child physical and sexual abuse were associated with many

  16. Methods for inducing alcohol craving in individuals with comorbid alcohol dependence and posttraumatic stress disorder: Behavioral and physiological outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kwako, L. E.; Schwandt, M. L.; Sells, J. R.; Ramchandani, V. A.; George, D. T.; Sinha, R.; Heilig, M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Alcohol addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder that presents a substantial public health problem, and is frequently comorbid with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Craving for alcohol is a predictor of relapse to alcohol use, and is triggered by cues associated with alcohol and trauma. Identification of reliable and valid laboratory methods for craving induction is an important objective for alcoholism and PTSD research. Objectives The present study compares two methods for induction of craving via stress and alcohol cues in individuals with comorbid alcohol dependence (AD) and PTSD: the combined Trier Social Stress Test and cue reactivity paradigm (Trier/CR), and a guided imagery (Scripts) paradigm. Outcomes include self-reported measures of craving, stress, and anxiety as well as endocrine measures. Methods Subjects were 52 individuals diagnosed with comorbid AD and PTSD seeking treatment at the NIAAA inpatient research facility. They participated in a four week inpatient study of the efficacy of a NK1 antagonist to treat comorbid AD and PTSD, and which included the two challenge procedures. Results Both the Trier/CR and Scripts induced craving for alcohol, as well as elevated levels of subjective distress and anxiety. The Trier/CR yielded significant increases in ACTH and cortisol, while the Scripts did not. Conclusions Both paradigms are effective laboratory means of inducing craving for alcohol. Further research is warranted to better understand the mechanisms behind craving induced by stress vs. alcohol cues, as well as to understand the impact of comorbid PTSD and AD on craving. PMID:24806358

  17. Does alcohol intoxication protect patients from severe injury and reduce hospital mortality? The association of alcohol consumption with the severity of injury and survival in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chi-Hsun; Su, Li-Ting; Wang, Yu-Chun; Fu, Chih-Yuan; Lo, Hung-Chieh; Lin, Chiu-Hsiu

    2013-12-01

    Alcohol-related motor vehicle collisions are a major cause of mortality in trauma patients. This prospective observational study investigated the influence of antecedent alcohol use on outcomes in trauma patients who survived to reach the hospital. From 2005 to 2011, all patients who were older than 18 years and were admitted as a result of motor vehicle crashes were included. Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was routinely measured for each patient on admission. Patients were divided into four groups based on their BAC level, which included nondrinking, BAC less than 100, BAC 100 to 200, and BAC 200 mg/dL or greater. Patient demographics, physical status and injury severity on admission, length of hospital stay, and outcome were compared between the groups. Odds ratios of having a severe injury, prolonged hospital stay, and mortality were estimated. Patients with a positive BAC had an increased risk of sustaining craniofacial and thoracoabdominal injuries. Odds ratios of having severe injuries (Injury Severity Score [ISS] 16 or greater) and a prolonged hospital stay were also increased. However, for those patients whose ISS was 16 or greater and who also had a brain injury, risk of fatality was significantly reduced if they were intoxicated (BAC 200 mg/dL or greater) before injury. Alcohol consumption does not protect patients from sustaining severe injuries nor does it shorten the length of hospital stay. However, there were potential survival benefits related to alcohol consumption for patients with brain injuries but not for those without brain injuries. Additional research is required to investigate the mechanism of this association further.

  18. From genetic studies to precision medicine in alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Fan; Sun, Yankun; Shi, Jie; Lu, Lin

    2016-04-01

    Genetic factors contribute to more than 50% of the variation in the vulnerability to alcohol dependence (AD). Although significant advances have been made in medications for AD, these medications do not work for all people. Precise tailoring of medicinal strategies for individual alcoholic patients is needed to achieve optimal outcomes. This review updates the most promising information on genetic variants in AD, which may be useful for improving diagnostic, therapeutic, and monitoring strategies. We describe genetic candidates of various neurotransmitter and enzyme systems. In addition to biological and allelic associations with AD, genetic effects on AD-related phenotypes and treatment responses have also been described. Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions have been considered. Potential applications of genomewide and epigenetic approaches for identifying genetic biomarkers of AD have been discussed. Overall, the application of genetic findings in precision medicine for AD will likely involve an integrated approach that distinguishes effect sizes of specific genetic predictors with regard to sex, pharmacotherapy, ethnicity, and AD-related aspects and considers gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. Our work may pave the way toward more precise treatment for AD that could ultimately improve clinical management and interventions.

  19. The effect of alcohol on incidence, pattern, severity and outcome from traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Gururaj, G

    2004-03-01

    Alcohol consumption is known to be a major contributing factor for the occurrence of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) in both developed and developing countries. It also influences diagnosis, management and recovery from TBIs, subsequent to injury occurrence. The present report examines the association of alcohol in injury occurrence, and its impact on severity and outcome from TBIs. Subjects were identified from 7 major hospitals in the city of Bangalore, India with data collection undertaken by standardised methods. Alcohol users (n = 243) and non-users (n = 1310) were compared on various characteristics and injury details. Sixteen per cent of the injured patients were intoxicated at the time of hospital registration. While the incidence of road traffic injuries was similar in both the groups, falls were higher in the alcohol user group. Evening-and night-time consumption of alcohol was a major risk factor for injuries. Drivers and occupants of motorised two wheeler vehicles, and pedestrians were involved in crashes to a greater extent among alcohol users. Severity of brain injuries (based on Glasgow coma scale), duration of hospital stay, death and post-traumatic disabilities among alcohol users were significantly higher compared with non-users. With the emergence of injuries and alcohol as twin major public health problems, immediate efforts are required to reduce the burden in developing societies. Legislative and enforcement strategies along with education developed on epidemiological, clinical and public health research need to be co-ordinated, target oriented, visible and with stiffer penalties for achieving desired results.

  20. Convergent evidence from alcohol-dependent humans and rats for a hyperdopaminergic state in protracted abstinence

    PubMed Central

    Hirth, Natalie; Meinhardt, Marcus W.; Noori, Hamid R.; Salgado, Humberto; Torres-Ramirez, Oswaldo; Uhrig, Stefanie; Broccoli, Laura; Vengeliene, Valentina; Roßmanith, Martin; Perreau-Lenz, Stéphanie; Köhr, Georg; Sommer, Wolfgang H.; Spanagel, Rainer; Hansson, Anita C.

    2016-01-01

    A major hypothesis in addiction research is that alcohol induces neuroadaptations in the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system and that these neuroadaptations represent a key neurochemical event in compulsive drug use and relapse. Whether these neuroadaptations lead to a hypo- or hyperdopaminergic state during abstinence is a long-standing, unresolved debate among addiction researchers. The answer is of critical importance for understanding the neurobiological mechanism of addictive behavior. Here we set out to study systematically the neuroadaptive changes in the DA system during the addiction cycle in alcohol-dependent patients and rats. In postmortem brain samples from human alcoholics we found a strong down-regulation of the D1 receptor- and DA transporter (DAT)-binding sites, but D2-like receptor binding was unaffected. To gain insight into the time course of these neuroadaptations, we compared the human data with that from alcohol-dependent rats at several time points during abstinence. We found a dynamic regulation of D1 and DAT during 3 wk of abstinence. After the third week the rat data mirrored our human data. This time point was characterized by elevated extracellular DA levels, lack of synaptic response to D1 stimulation, and augmented motor activity. Further functional evidence is given by a genetic rat model for hyperdopaminergia that resembles a phenocopy of alcohol-dependent rats during protracted abstinence. In summary, we provide a new dynamic model of abstinence-related changes in the striatal DA system; in this model a hyperdopaminergic state during protracted abstinence is associated with vulnerability for relapse. PMID:26903621

  1. Alcohol-adapted Anger Management Treatment: A Randomized Controlled Trial of an Innovative Therapy for Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Walitzer, Kimberly S.; Deffenbacher, Jerry L.; Shyhalla, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial for an innovative alcohol-adapted anger management treatment (AM) for outpatient alcohol dependent individuals scoring moderate or above on anger is described. AM treatment outcomes were compared to those of an empirically-supported intervention, Alcoholics Anonymous Facilitation treatment (AAF). Clients in AM, relative to clients in AAF, were hypothesized to have greater improvement in anger and anger-related cognitions and lesser AA involvement during the six-month follow-up. Anger-related variables were hypothesized to be stronger predictors of improved alcohol outcomes in the AM treatment condition and AA involvement was hypothesized to be a stronger predictor of alcohol outcomes in the AAF treatment group. Seventy-six alcohol dependent men and women were randomly assigned to treatment condition and followed for six months after treatment end. Both AM and AAF treatments were followed by significant reductions in heavy drinking days, alcohol consequences, anger, and maladaptive anger-related thoughts and increases in abstinence and self-confidence regarding not drinking to anger-related triggers. Treatment with AAF was associated with greater AA involvement relative to treatment with AM. Changes in anger and AA involvement were predictive of posttreatment alcohol outcomes for both treatments. Change in trait anger was a stronger predictor of posttreatment alcohol consequences for AM than for AAF clients; during-treatment AA meeting attendance was a stronger predictor of posttreatment heavy drinking and alcohol consequences for AAF than for AM clients. Anger-related constructs and drinking triggers should be foci in treatment of alcohol dependence for anger-involved clients. PMID:26387049

  2. Alcohol abuse and dependence symptoms: a multidimensional model of common and specific etiology.

    PubMed

    Simons, Jeffrey S; Carey, Kate B; Wills, Thomas A

    2009-09-01

    This study tested a theoretical model hypothesizing differential pathways from 5 predictors to alcohol abuse and dependence symptoms. The participants were college students (N = 2,270) surveyed on 2 occasions in a 6-month prospective design. Social norms, perceived utility of alcohol use, and family history of alcohol problems were indirectly associated with Time 2 abuse and dependence symptoms through influencing level of alcohol consumption. Poor behavioral control had a direct effect on alcohol abuse but not on dependence symptoms at Time 2, whereas affective lability exhibited a direct prospective effect on alcohol dependence but not on abuse symptoms. A multigroup analysis showed that high levels of poor control increased the strength of paths from both consumption level and affective lability to abuse symptoms. Implications for prevention of alcohol problems among college students are discussed. 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. Anticipatory 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations are associated with escalated alcohol intake in dependent rats

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Cara L.; Malavar, Jordan C.; George, Olivier; Koob, George F.; Vendruscolo, Leandro F.

    2014-01-01

    Rats emit 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) in situations of increased motivation, such as during the anticipation of palatable food or drugs of abuse. Whether the same holds true for the anticipation of alcohol intake remains unknown. Alcohol drinking in a nondependent state is thought to be mediated by its rewarding effects (positive reinforcement), whereas drinking in the dependent state is motivated by alcohol’s stress-relieving effects (negative reinforcement). Here, we measured context-elicited 50 kHz USVs in alcohol-dependent (alcohol vapor-exposed) and nondependent rats immediately before operant alcohol self-administration sessions. Dependent rats showed escalated levels of alcohol intake compared with nondependent rats. Overall, dependent and nondependent rats showed similar levels of anticipatory 50 kHz USVs. However, the number of anticipatory USVs was positively correlated with alcohol intake in dependent rats but not nondependent rats. Additionally, dependent rats with higher alcohol intake displayed increased anticipatory 50 kHz USVs compared with rats that had lower alcohol intake, whereas no difference was observed between rats with high and low alcohol intake in the nondependent group. Increased 50 kHz USVs were specific for the anticipation of alcohol self-administration and did not generalize to a novel environment. These findings suggest that anticipatory 50 kHz USVs may be an indicator of context-elicited negative reinforcement learning. PMID:24914463

  4. Prazosin + Naltrexone Decreases Alcohol Drinking More Effectively Than Does Either Drug Alone in P Rats with a Protracted History of Extensive Voluntary Alcohol Drinking, Dependence, and Multiple Withdrawals.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Dennis D; Kincaid, Carrie L; Froehlich, Janice C

    2015-09-01

    Prazosin (PRZ; an α1 -adrenergic receptor antagonist) and naltrexone (NTX; a nonspecific opioid receptor antagonist) each decrease alcohol drinking when administered to rats selectively bred for high voluntary alcohol drinking (alcohol-preferring or "P"), and the combination of PRZ + NTX decreases alcohol drinking more effectively than does either drug alone. As drug responsiveness can depend on history of alcohol drinking and dependence, we investigated whether various schedules of PRZ and NTX administration, alone or in combination, are effective in decreasing alcohol drinking in male P rats with a history of protracted voluntary alcohol drinking, dependence, and repeated withdrawals closely resembling human alcoholism. Male P rats became alcohol-dependent during 1 year of ad libitum 24 h/d access to food, water, and 20% alcohol with repetitive temporary alcohol withdrawals. Four sequential studies then addressed effects of oral PRZ (2 mg/kg) and NTX (10 mg/kg), alone or together, on alcohol drinking during: (i) daily alcohol access with daily drug treatment, (ii) intermittent alcohol access with daily drug treatment, (iii) intermittent alcohol access with occasional drug treatment, and (iv) postdeprivation reinstatement of alcohol access. The combination of PRZ + NTX consistently suppressed alcohol drinking during daily or intermittent alcohol access conditions and when drug treatment was either daily or occasional. PRZ + NTX was consistently more effective than either drug alone. The reduction in alcohol drinking was not due to sedation, motor effects, or malaise. Both daily and "as-needed" treatment with PRZ + NTX are highly effective in suppressing daily, intermittent, and postdeprivation alcohol drinking in male P rats with a protracted history of alcohol dependence and repeated withdrawals. This drug combination may be especially effective for treating individuals with long histories of heavy alcohol abuse, dependence, and repeated relapse, as commonly

  5. Polygenic risk for alcohol dependence associates with alcohol consumption, cognitive function and social deprivation in a population-based cohort.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Toni-Kim; Smith, Andrew H; Gelernter, Joel; Kranzler, Henry R; Farrer, Lindsay A; Hall, Lynsey S; Fernandez-Pujals, Ana M; MacIntyre, Donald J; Smith, Blair H; Hocking, Lynne J; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Hayward, Caroline; Thomson, Pippa A; Porteous, David J; Deary, Ian J; McIntosh, Andrew M

    2016-03-01

    Alcohol dependence is frequently co-morbid with cognitive impairment. The relationship between these traits is complex as cognitive dysfunction may arise as a consequence of heavy drinking or exist prior to the onset of dependence. In the present study, we tested the genetic overlap between cognitive abilities and alcohol dependence using polygenic risk scores (PGRS). We created two independent PGRS derived from two recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of alcohol dependence (SAGE GWAS: n = 2750; Yale-Penn GWAS: n = 2377) in a population-based cohort, Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study (GS:SFHS) (n = 9863). Data on alcohol consumption and four tests of cognitive function [Mill Hill Vocabulary (MHV), digit symbol coding, phonemic verbal fluency (VF) and logical memory] were available. PGRS for alcohol dependence were negatively associated with two measures of cognitive function: MHV (SAGE: P = 0.009, β = -0.027; Yale-Penn: P = 0.001, β = -0.034) and VF (SAGE: P = 0.0008, β = -0.036; Yale-Penn: P = 0.00005, β = -0.044). VF remained robustly associated after adjustment for education and social deprivation; however, the association with MHV was substantially attenuated. Shared genetic variants may account for some of the phenotypic association between cognitive ability and alcohol dependence. A significant negative association between PGRS and social deprivation was found (SAGE: P = 5.2 × 10(-7) , β = -0.054; Yale-Penn: P = 0.000012, β = -0.047). Individuals living in socially deprived regions were found to carry more alcohol dependence risk alleles which may contribute to the increased prevalence of problem drinking in regions of deprivation. Future work to identify genes which affect both cognitive impairment and alcohol dependence will help elucidate biological processes common to both disorders.

  6. The Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): The association between birthplace, acculturation and alcohol abuse and dependence across Hispanic national groups

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Raul; Ramisetty-Mikler, Suhasini; Rodriguez, Lori A.

    2009-01-01

    Hispanics are heterogeneous in national origin, evidenced by wide ranges of alcohol abuse and dependence rates across different Hispanic national groups. This paper examines associations between 12-month rates of DSM-IV alcohol abuse and dependence with birthplace and acculturation. The 2006 Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey, using a multistage cluster sample design, interviewed 5,224 adults (18+ years) in five selected U.S. metropolitan areas: Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston, and Los Angeles. Comprehensive data on drinking behavior were collected and the analyses include bivariate and multivariate regression techniques. Alcohol abuse and dependence rates were higher among U.S.-born Puerto Ricans and South/Central Americans compared to their foreign-born counterparts, while no such differences were found for Cuban and Mexican Americans. Overall, those with higher acculturation report higher rates of abuse and dependence (statistically significant only for abuse among Puerto Ricans). Risk factors for abuse include being male and being in the high acculturation group. Risk factors for dependence include being male, being Puerto Rican or Mexican American, having less than a college education, and being U.S.-born. Hispanics were found to share several common risk factors with the larger U.S. population for abuse and dependence, such as male gender, lower education, and lower income. PMID:18945554

  7. The Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): the association between birthplace, acculturation and alcohol abuse and dependence across Hispanic national groups.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Raul; Ramisetty-Mikler, Suhasini; Rodriguez, Lori A

    2009-01-01

    Hispanics are heterogeneous in national origin, evidenced by wide ranges of alcohol abuse and dependence rates across different Hispanic national groups. This paper examines associations between 12-month rates of DSM-IV alcohol abuse and dependence with birthplace and acculturation. The 2006 Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey, using a multistage cluster sample design, interviewed 5224 adults (18+ years) in five selected U.S. metropolitan areas: Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston, and Los Angeles. Comprehensive data on drinking behavior were collected and the analyses include bivariate and multivariate regression techniques. Alcohol abuse and dependence rates were higher among U.S.-born Puerto Ricans and South/Central Americans compared to their foreign-born counterparts, while no such differences were found for Cuban and Mexican Americans. Overall, those with higher acculturation report higher rates of abuse and dependence (statistically significant only for abuse among Puerto Ricans). Risk factors for abuse include being male and being in the high acculturation group. Risk factors for dependence include being male, being Puerto Rican or Mexican American, having less than a college education, and being U.S.-born. Hispanics were found to share several common risk factors with the larger U.S. population for abuse and dependence, such as male gender, lower education, and lower income.

  8. The Effects of Several Alcohols on the Properties of the Squid Giant Axon

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Clay M.; Binstock, Leonard

    1964-01-01

    The effects of several alcohols on the resting potential, action potential, and voltage-clamp currents of the squid giant axon have been measured. All the alcohols employed are similar in that they depress maximum sodium conductance much more than maximum potassium conductance. Octyl alcohol differs from the others (C2 through C5) in that it has less tendency to depolarize the axon. Depolarization is always accompanied by a decrease of gK near the resting potential, such that the ratio gK/gleak is decreased. Steady-state inactivation of the sodium ion current is unaffected by alcohols, as is membrane capacity. Resting membrane conductance is usually decreased by alcohols. The findings are discussed in relation to work on monomolecular films. PMID:14225257

  9. The effects of alcohol and benzodiazepines on the severity of ski accidents.

    PubMed

    Barnas, C; Miller, C H; Sperner, G; Sperner-Unterweger, B; Beck, E; Hinterhuber, H; Fleischhacker, W W

    1992-10-01

    Urine samples from 402 victims of ski accidents were analyzed for the presence of benzodiazepines (BZD) and alcohol. Eighty-one (20%) samples were positive for alcohol; BZD were detected in 34 (8.5%) cases. Ten of the samples (2.5%) were found to be positive for both alcohol and BZD. Subjects who were positive for either alcohol or BZD or both were older than the other persons examined. The prevalence of alcohol was significantly higher among male accident victims. BZD intake could be demonstrated to have a significant influence on the severity of injuries. Besides an increased awareness of the need for skier education regarding drug use, heightened attention of medical caregivers is warranted to inform their patients about potential accident hazards in sport activities when BZD are prescribed.

  10. Effects of prenatal alcohol and cigarette exposure on offspring substance use in multiplex, alcohol-dependent families.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jessica W; Hill, Shirley Y

    2014-12-01

    Prenatal exposures to alcohol, cigarettes, and other drugs of abuse are associated with numerous adverse consequences for affected offspring, including increased risk for substance use and abuse. However, maternal substance use during pregnancy appears to occur more often in those with a family history of alcohol dependence. Utilizing a sample that is enriched for familial alcohol dependence and includes controls selected for virtual absence of familial alcohol dependence could provide important information on the relative contribution of familial risk and prenatal exposures to offspring substance use. A sample of multigenerational families specifically ascertained to be at either high or low risk for developing alcohol dependence (AD) provided biological offspring for a longitudinal prospective study. High-risk families were selected based on the presence of 2 alcohol-dependent sisters. Low-risk families were selected on the basis of minimal first and second-degree relatives with AD. High-risk (HR = 99) and Low-risk offspring (LR = 110) were assessed annually during childhood and biennially in young adulthood regarding their alcohol, drug, and cigarette use. At the first childhood visit, mothers were interviewed concerning their prenatal use of substances. High-risk mothers were more likely to use alcohol, cigarettes, and other drugs during pregnancy than low-risk control mothers, and to consume these substances in greater quantities. Across the sample, prenatal exposure to alcohol was associated with increased risk for both offspring cigarette use and substance use disorders (SUD), and prenatal cigarette exposure was associated with increased risk for offspring cigarette use. Controlling for risk status by examining patterns within the HR sample, prenatal cigarette exposure remained a specific predictor of offspring cigarette use, and prenatal alcohol exposure was specifically associated with increased risk for offspring SUD. Women with a family history of

  11. The five-year predictive validity of each of the seven DSM-IV items for alcohol dependence among alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Schuckit, Marc A; Danko, George P; Smith, Tom L; Buckman, Kelly R

    2002-07-01

    Information about the prognostic implications of a DSM-IV diagnosis of alcohol dependence is important to both clinicians and researchers. In this regard, only limited data are available on the performance of specific diagnostic items. This study reports data gathered with a structured, validated interview with 642 alcohol-dependent men and women from the Collaborative Study of the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA). The goals were to evaluate the ability of each of the DSM-IV dependence items to predict the occurrence over the next 5 years of a broad pattern of 27 alcohol-related problems. For comparison, similar data are reported regarding the performance of abuse criteria for 516 additional subjects. The results revealed that dependence item 3 (use of alcohol in larger amounts) was the only criterion that did not relate significantly to outcome, and indicated that the dependence criteria related relatively similarly to different types of outcomes among alcoholics. No specific combination of diagnostic items stood out in predicting outcome but, rather, the span of items generally performed well. These data support the potential usefulness of the DSM-IV dependence criteria.

  12. Translating the semi-structured assessment for drug dependence and alcoholism in the Western Pacific: rationale, study design and reliability of alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Amity E; Rosen, Rochelle K; McGeary, John E; Amoa, Francine; Kranzler, Henry R; Francazio, Sarah; McGarvey, Stephen T; Swift, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to develop a bilingual version of the Semi-Structured Assessment for Drug Dependence and Alcoholism (SSADDA) in English and Samoan and determine the reliability of assessments of alcohol dependence in American Samoa. The study consisted of development and reliability-testing phases. In the development phase, the SSADDA alcohol module was translated and the translation was evaluated through cognitive interviews. In the reliability-testing phase, the bilingual SSADDA was administered to 40 ethnic Samoans, including a sub-sample of 26 individuals who were retested. Cognitive interviews indicated the initial translation was culturally and linguistically appropriate except items pertaining to alcohol tolerance, which were modified to reflect Samoan concepts. SSADDA reliability testing indicated diagnoses of DSM-III-R and DSM-IV alcohol dependence were reliable. Reliability varied by language of administration. The English/Samoan version of the SSADDA is appropriate for the diagnosis of DSM-III-R alcohol dependence, which may be useful in advancing research and public health efforts to address alcohol problems in American Samoa and the Western Pacific. The translation methods may inform researchers translating diagnostic and assessment tools into different languages and cultures. © The Author 2014. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  13. Yoga as an adjunct treatment for alcohol dependence: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hallgren, Mats; Romberg, Karin; Bakshi, Ann-Sofie; Andréasson, Sven

    2014-06-01

    This pilot study explores the feasibility of yoga as part of a treatment program for alcohol dependence. Eighteen alcohol dependent patients were randomized to receive either treatment as usual or treatment as usual plus yoga. Assessments were taken at baseline and six month follow-up. 'Riddargatan 1': an outpatient alcohol treatment clinic located in Stockholm, Sweden. Treatment as usual consisted of psychological and pharmacological interventions for alcohol dependence. The 10-week yoga intervention included a weekly group yoga session. Participants were encouraged to practice the yoga movements at home once per day. Alcohol consumption (timeline follow-back method, DSM-IV criteria for alcohol dependence, and the Short Alcohol Dependence Data questionnaire), affective symptoms (the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (Sheehan Disability Scale) and stress (the Perceived Stress Scale and saliva cortisol). Yoga was found to be a feasible and well accepted adjunct treatment for alcohol dependence. Alcohol consumption reduced more in the treatment as usual plus yoga group (from 6.32 to 3.36 drinks per day) compared to the treatment as usual only group (from 3.42 to 3.08 drinks per day). The difference was, however, not statistically significant (p = 0.17). Larger studies are needed to adequately assess the efficacy and long-term effectiveness of yoga as an adjunct treatment for alcohol dependence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Prazosin + naltrexone decreases alcohol drinking more effectively than does either drug alone in P rats with a protracted history of extensive voluntary alcohol drinking, dependence and multiple withdrawals

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Dennis D; Kincaid, Carrie L; Froehlich, Janice C

    2015-01-01

    Background Prazosin (PRZ, an α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist) and naltrexone (NTX, a non-specific opioid receptor antagonist) each decrease alcohol drinking when administered to rats selectively-bred for high voluntary alcohol drinking (alcohol-preferring, or “P”), and the combination of PRZ+NTX decreases alcohol drinking more effectively than does either drug alone. Since drug responsiveness can depend on history of alcohol drinking and dependence, we investigated whether various schedules of PRZ and NTX administration, alone or in combination, are effective in decreasing alcohol drinking in male P rats with a history of protracted voluntary alcohol drinking, dependence and repeated withdrawals closely resembling human alcoholism. Methods Male P rats became alcohol-dependent during 1 year of ad libitum 24 h/day access to food, water and 20% alcohol with repetitive temporary alcohol withdrawals. Four sequential studies then addressed effects of oral PRZ (2 mg/kg) and NTX (10 mg/kg), alone or together, on alcohol drinking during: 1) daily alcohol access with daily drug treatment, 2) intermittent alcohol access with daily drug treatment, 3) intermittent alcohol access with occasional drug treatment, and 4) post-deprivation reinstatement of alcohol access. Results The combination of PRZ+NTX consistently suppressed alcohol drinking during daily or intermittent alcohol access conditions and when drug treatment was either daily or occasional. PRZ+NTX was consistently more effective than either drug alone. The reduction in alcohol drinking was not due to sedation, motor effects or malaise. Conclusions Both daily and “as-needed” treatment with PRZ+NTX are highly effective in suppressing daily, intermittent and post-deprivation alcohol drinking in male P rats with a protracted history of alcohol dependence and repeated withdrawals. This drug combination may be especially effective for treating individuals with long histories of heavy alcohol abuse, dependence and

  15. Effects of cognitive bias modification training on neural signatures of alcohol approach tendencies in male alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Wiers, Corinde E; Ludwig, Vera U; Gladwin, Thomas E; Park, Soyoung Q; Heinz, Andreas; Wiers, Reinout W; Rinck, Mike; Lindenmeyer, Johannes; Walter, Henrik; Bermpohl, Felix

    2015-09-01

    Alcohol-dependent patients have been shown to faster approach than avoid alcohol stimuli on the Approach Avoidance Task (AAT). This so-called alcohol approach bias has been associated with increased brain activation in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Cognitive bias modification (CBM) has been used to retrain the approach bias with the clinically relevant effect of decreasing relapse rates one year later. The effects of CBM on neural signatures of approach/avoidance tendencies remain hitherto unknown. In a double-blind placebo-controlled design, 26 alcohol-dependent in-patients were assigned to a CBM or a placebo training group. Both groups performed the AAT for three weeks: in CBM training, patients pushed away 90 percent of alcohol cues; this rate was 50 percent in placebo training. Before and after training, patients performed the AAT offline, and in a 3 T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. The relevant neuroimaging contrast for the alcohol approach bias was the difference between approaching versus avoiding alcohol cues relative to soft drink cues: [(alcohol pull > alcohol push)  > (soft drink pull > soft drink push)]. Before training, both groups showed significant alcohol approach bias-related activation in the medial prefrontal cortex. After training, patients in the CBM group showed stronger reductions in medial prefrontal cortex activation compared with the placebo group. Moreover, these reductions correlated with reductions in approach bias scores in the CBM group only. This suggests that CBM affects neural mechanisms involved in the automatic alcohol approach bias, which may be important for the clinical effectiveness of CBM. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  16. Industrialization Stresses, Alcohol Abuse & Substance Dependence: Differential Gender Effects in a Kenyan Rural Farming Community

    PubMed Central

    Walt, Lisa C.; Kinoti, Elias; Jason, Leonard A.

    2014-01-01

    Developing countries’ industrialization and urbanization attempts have been linked to psychological distress and alcohol abuse. We used Hobfoll’s COR theory to examine the relationship between gender, perceived resource loss (an indicator of industrialization stress), and alcohol abuse and dependence in a sample of Kenyan rural village men and women (N = 186). Regression analyses indicated that both gender and COR loss predicted alcohol abuse and dependence. Additionally, results suggested that gender moderated the relationship between COR loss and alcohol dependence; such that higher COR loss scores predicted higher alcohol dependence for men, but COR loss scores did not predict alcohol dependence for women. Thus, we suggest that gender differences in substance abuse may be due less to actual differences in resource loss, but rather to gender differences in the response to resource loss. Limitations and opportunities for future research are discussed. PMID:24489525

  17. How Imaging Glutamate, GABA, and Dopamine Can Inform the Clinical Treatment of Alcohol Dependence and Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Hillmer, Ansel T.; Mason, Graeme F.; Fucito, Lisa M.; O’Malley, Stephanie S.; Cosgrove, Kelly P.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have dramatically advanced our understanding of the neurochemical basis of alcohol dependence, a major public health issue. In this paper we review the research generated from neurochemical-specific imaging modalities including magnetic resonance spectrometry (MRS), positron emission tomography (PET), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in studies of alcohol dependence and withdrawal. We focus on studies interrogating γ-aminobutryic acid (GABA), glutamate, and dopamine, as these are prominent neurotransmitter systems implicated in alcohol dependence. Highlighted findings include diminished dopaminergic functioning and modulation of the GABA system by tobacco smoking during alcohol withdrawal. Then, we consider how these findings impact the clinical treatment of alcohol dependence and discuss directions for future experiments to address existing gaps in the literature, e.g., sex differences and smoking comorbidity. These and other considerations provide opportunities to build upon the current neurochemistry imaging literature of alcohol dependence and withdrawal, which may usher in improved therapeutic and relapse prevention strategies. PMID:26510169

  18. Structural brain differences in alcohol-dependent individuals with and without comorbid substance dependence

    PubMed Central

    Mon, Anderson; Durazzo, Timothy C.; Abe, Christoph; Gazdzinski, Stefan; Pennington, David; Schmidt, Thomas; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Over 50% of individuals with alcohol use disorders (AUD) also use other substances. Therefore, brain structural abnormalities observed in alcohol dependent individuals may not be entirely related to alcohol consumption. This MRI study assessed differences in brain regional tissue volumes between short-term abstinent alcohol dependent individuals without (ALC) and with current substance use dependence (polysubstance users, PSU). Methods Nineteen, one-month-abstinent PSU and 40 ALC as well as 27 light-drinkers (LD) were studied on a 1.5 Tesla MR system. Whole brain T1-weighted images were segmented automatically into regional gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes. MANOVA assessed group differences of intracranial volume-normalized tissue volumes of the frontal, parietal, occipital, and temporal lobes as well as regional subcortical GM volumes. The volumetric measures were correlated with neurocognitive measures to assess their functional relevance. Results Despite similar lifetime drinking and smoking histories, PSU had significantly larger normalized WM volumes than ALC in all lobes. PSU also had larger frontal and parietal WM volumes than LD, but smaller temporal GM volumes as well as smaller lenticular and thalamic nuclei than LD. By contrast, ALC had smaller frontal, parietal, and temporal GM, thalamic GM and cerebellar volumes than LD. ALC also had more sulcal CSF volumes than both PSU and LD. Conclusion One-month-abstinent ALC and PSU exhibited different patterns of gross brain structural abnormalities. The larger lobar WM volumes in PSU in the absence of widespread GM volume loss contrast with widespread GM atrophy in ALC. These structural differences between ALC and PSU may demand different treatment approaches to mitigate specific functionally relevant brain abnormalities. PMID:25263262

  19. In alcohol-dependent drinkers, what does the presence of nicotine dependence tell us about psychiatric and addictive disorders comorbidity?

    PubMed

    Le Strat, Yann; Ramoz, Nicolas; Gorwood, Philip

    2010-01-01

    To examine the pattern of psychiatric comorbidity associated with nicotine dependence among alcohol-dependent respondents in the general population. Drawn from a US national survey of 43,000 adults The (National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions) who took part in a face-to-face interview, data were examined on the 4782 subjects with lifetime alcohol dependence, and comparisons were made between those with and those without nicotine dependence. Nicotine dependence was reported by 48% of the alcohol-dependent respondents. They reported higher lifetime rates of panic disorder, specific and social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder, major depressive episode, manic disorder, suicide attempt, antisocial personality disorder and all addictive disorders than those without nicotine dependence. After controlling for the effects of any psychiatric and addictive disorder, alcohol-dependent subjects with nicotine dependence were more than twice as likely as non-nicotine-dependent, alcohol-dependent subjects to have at least one other lifetime addiction diagnosis (adjusted odds ratio 2.36; 95% confidence interval 2.07-2.68). Nicotine dependence represents a general marker of psychiatric comorbidity, particularly of addictive comorbidity. It may be used as a screening measure for psychiatric diagnoses in clinical practice as well as in future trials.

  20. Prevalence and Trends in Alcohol Dependence and Alcohol Use Disorders in Japanese Adults; Results from Periodical Nationwide Surveys.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Yoneatsu; Kinjo, Aya; Higuchi, Susumu; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Yuzuriha, Takefumi; Horie, Yoshinori; Kimura, Mitsuru; Kanda, Hideyuki; Yoshimoto, Hisashi

    2016-07-01

    Nationwide surveys to clarify the characteristics and trends of the drinking behavior of Japanese adults were carried out in 2003, 2008, and 2013. These were periodical cross-sectional surveys. Subjects were chosen through a stratified two-stage random sampling method. The surveys included drinking frequency and amount, ICD-10 alcoholism diagnostic standards, questionnaire for the determination of harmful alcohol use ( Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test). In 2003, the surveys obtained responses from 2547 people (73% response rate); in 2008, 4123 people (55% response rate); and in 2013, 4153 people (59% response rate). The proportion of lifetime experience of alcohol dependence diagnosed by ICD-10 was 1.9% for male and 0.2% for female, and the estimated number of patients was 1.07 million. The declining trends were observed in the percentage of daily drinkers and the amount of alcohol consumed per week for male. The lowering of the age for consuming their first alcoholic drink and their first drunken experience was observed among female. The gender difference of prevalence of problem drinking is getting smaller. The binge drinking and heavy episodic drinking were observed especially younger generation. The only small proportion of patients with alcohol dependence had received specialized medical care, whereas the many of these visited medical institutions and health screening. The survey observed many hidden alcoholic patients, and showed the possibility that the healthcare facilities and health screening became the place of screening and intervention for alcohol dependence. © The Author 2016. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  1. Model-free functional connectivity and impulsivity correlates of alcohol dependence: a resting-state study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xi; Cortes, Carlos R; Mathur, Karan; Tomasi, Dardo; Momenan, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is characterized by impulsiveness toward consumption despite negative consequences. Although neuro-imaging studies have implicated some regions underlying this disorder, there is little information regarding its large-scale connectivity pattern. This study investigated the within- and between-network functional connectivity (FC) in alcohol dependence and examined its relationship with clinical impulsivity measures. Using probabilistic independent component analysis on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) data from 25 alcohol-dependent (AD) and 26 healthy control (HC) participants, we compared the within- and between-network FC between AD and HC. Then, the relationship between FC and impulsiveness as measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11), the UPPS-P Impulsive Scale and the delay discounting task (DDT), was explored. Compared with HC, AD exhibited increased within-network FC in salience (SN), default mode (DMN), orbitofrontal cortex (OFCN), left executive control (LECN) and amygdala-striatum (ASN) networks. Increased between-network FC was found among LECN, ASN and SN. Between-network FC correlations were significantly negative between Negative-Urgency and OFCN pairs with right executive control network (RECN), anterior DMN (a-DMN) and posterior DMN (p-DMN) in AD. DDT was significantly correlated with the between-network FC among the LECN, a-DMN and SN in AD. These findings add evidence to the concept of altered within-network FC and also highlight the role of between-network FC in the pathophysiology of AD. Additionally, this study suggests differential neurobiological bases for different clinical measures of impulsivity that may be used as a systems-level biomarker for alcohol dependence severity and treatment efficacy.

  2. [Study of defense styles, defenses and coping strategies in alcohol-dependent population].

    PubMed

    Ribadier, A; Varescon, I

    2017-05-01

    Defense mechanisms have been seen to greatly change over time and across different definitions made by different theoretical currents. Recently with the definition provided by the DSM IV, defense mechanisms have integrated the concept of coping as a defensive factor. These mechanisms are no longer considered just through a psychodynamic approach but also through a cognitive and behavioral one. In recent years, new theories have therefore integrated these two components of the defensive operation. According to Chabrol and Callahan (2013), defense mechanisms precede coping strategies. In individuals with psychopathological disorders, these authors indicate a relative stability of these mechanisms. Also, we asked about the presence of unique characteristics among people with alcohol dependence. Indeed, studies conducted with people with alcohol dependence highlight the presence of a neurotic defense style and some highly immature defenses (projection, acting out, splitting and somatization). In terms of coping strategies, persons with alcohol dependence preferentially use avoidant strategies and strategies focused on emotion. However, although several studies have been conducted to assess coping strategies and defense styles within a population of individuals with an alcohol problem, at the present time none of them has taken into account all these aspects of defense mechanisms. The aim of this study is therefore to study the defenses and defense styles and coping strategies in an alcohol-dependent population. This multicenter study (3 CHU, 1 center of supportive care and prevention in addiction and 1 clinic) received a favorable opinion of an Institutional Review Board (IRB Registration #: 00001072). Eighty alcohol-dependent individuals responded to a questionnaire assessing sociodemographic characteristics and elements related to the course of consumption. Coping strategies were assessed by means of a questionnaire validated in French: the Brief Cope. The Defense

  3. Effects of Prenatal Alcohol and Cigarette Exposure on Offspring Substance Use in Multiplex, Alcohol-Dependent Families

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Jessica W.; Hill, Shirley Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background Prenatal exposures to alcohol, cigarettes, and other drugs of abuse are associated with numerous adverse consequences for affected offspring, including increased risk for substance use and abuse. However, maternal substance use during pregnancy appears to occur more often in those with a family history of alcohol dependence. Utilizing a sample that is enriched for familial alcohol dependence and includes controls selected for virtual absence of familial alcohol dependence could provide important information on the relative contribution of familial risk and prenatal exposures to offspring substance use. Methods A sample of multigenerational families specifically ascertained to be at either high or low risk for developing alcohol dependence (AD) provided biological offspring for a longitudinal prospective study. High-Risk families were selected based on the presence of two alcohol dependent sisters. Low-Risk families were selected on the basis of minimal first and second degree relatives with AD. High-Risk (HR=99) and Low-Risk offspring (LR=110) were assessed annually during childhood and biennially in young-adulthood regarding their alcohol, drug, and cigarette use. At the first childhood visit mothers were interviewed concerning their prenatal use of substances. Results High-Risk mothers were more likely to use alcohol, cigarettes, and other drugs during pregnancy than Low-Risk control mothers, and to consume these substances in greater quantities. Across the sample, prenatal exposure to alcohol was associated with increased risk for both offspring cigarette use and substance use disorders (SUD), and prenatal cigarette exposure was associated with increased risk for offspring cigarette use. Controlling for risk status by examining patterns within the HR sample, prenatal cigarette exposure remained a specific predictor of offspring cigarette use, and prenatal alcohol exposure was specifically associated with increased risk for offspring SUD. Conclusions

  4. The effects of quetiapine on sleep in recovering alcohol-dependent subjects: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Subhajit; Hanlon, Alexandra L; Kuna, Samuel T; Ross, Richard J; Kampman, Kyle M; Witte, Lauren M; Perlis, Michael L; Oslin, David W

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this hypothesis-generating pilot study was to assess prospectively the objective and subjective effects of treatment with quetiapine XR on sleep during early recovery from alcohol dependence (AD). Recovering subjects with AD and sleep disturbance complaints were treated with quetiapine XR (n = 10) or matching placebo pills (n = 10) for 8 weeks. Polysomnography was used to assess sleep objectively, and the Insomnia Severity Index and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index were used to measure subjective insomnia. Other assessment measures included the 10-minute psychomotor vigilance task (for neurobehavioral functioning), the time-line follow-back measure (for alcohol consumption), the Penn Alcohol Craving Scale (for alcohol craving), the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 item scale (for depressive symptoms), and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (for anxiety symptoms). Although there was no effect of quetiapine XR on sleep efficiency (time spent asleep/total recording time), there was a pre-to-post reduction in wake after sleep onset time (P = 0.03) and nonsignificant trends for increases in sleep onset latency (SOL) and stage 2 sleep time. A time × drug interaction was seen for the subjective insomnia, such that quetiapine XR-treated subjects reported greater initial improvement in their subjective insomnia, but the difference was not sustained. There were no differences between treatment groups on other measures or medication compliance. Quetiapine XR improves objective sleep continuity and transiently improves subjective insomnia early in recovery from AD.

  5. Persistent dose-dependent changes in brain structure in young adults with low-to-moderate alcohol exposure in utero.

    PubMed

    Eckstrand, Kristen L; Ding, Zhaohua; Dodge, Neil C; Cowan, Ronald L; Jacobson, Joseph L; Jacobson, Sandra W; Avison, Malcolm J

    2012-11-01

    Many children with heavy exposure to alcohol in utero display characteristic alterations in brain size and structure. However, the long-term effects of low-to-moderate alcohol exposure on these outcomes are unknown. Using voxel-based morphometry and region-of-interest analyses, we examined the influence of lower doses of alcohol on gray and white matter composition in a prospectively recruited, homogeneous, well-characterized cohort of alcohol-exposed (n = 11, age 19.5 ± 0.3 years) and control (n = 9, age 19.6 ± 0.5 years) young adults. A large proportion of the exposed individuals were born to mothers whose alcohol consumption during pregnancy was in the low-to-moderate range. There were no differences in total brain volume or total gray or white matter volume between the exposed and control groups. However, gray matter volume was reduced in alcohol-exposed individuals in several areas previously reported to be affected by high levels of exposure, including the left cingulate gyrus, bilateral middle frontal gyri, right middle temporal gyrus, and right caudate nucleus. Notably, this gray matter loss was dose dependent, with higher exposure producing more substantial losses. These results indicate that even at low doses, alcohol exposure during pregnancy impacts brain development and that these effects persist into young adulthood. Copyright © 2012 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  6. TLR4 Methylation Moderates the Relationship Between Alcohol Use Severity and Gray Matter Loss.

    PubMed

    Karoly, Hollis C; Thayer, Rachel E; Hagerty, Sarah L; Hutchison, Kent E

    2017-09-01

    Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) are associated with decreased gray matter, and neuroinflammation is one mechanism through which alcohol may confer such damage, given that heavy alcohol use may promote neural damage via activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated inflammatory signaling cascades. We previously demonstrated that TLR4 is differentially methylated in AUD compared with control subjects, and the present study aims to extend this work by examining whether TLR4 methylation moderates the relationship between alcohol use and gray matter. We examined TLR4 methylation and gray matter thickness in a large sample (N = 707; 441 males) of adults (ages 18-56) reporting a range of AUD severity (mean Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test score = 13.18; SD = 8.02). We used a series of ordinary least squares multiple regression equations to regress gray matter in four bilateral brain regions (precuneus, lateral orbitofrontal, inferior parietal, and superior temporal) on alcohol use, TLR4 methylation, and their interaction, controlling for demographic, psychological, and other substance use variables. After we corrected for multiple tests, a significant Alcohol × TLR4 Methylation interaction emerged in the equations modeling left precuneus and right inferior parietal gray matter. Follow-up analyses examining the nature of these interactions demonstrated a significant negative association between alcohol and precuneus and inferior parietal gray matter in individuals with low TLR4 methylation, but no relationship between alcohol and gray matter in the high methylation group. These findings suggest that TLR4 methylation may be protective against the damage conferred by alcohol on precuneus and inferior parietal gray matter, thereby implicating TLR4 for further investigation as a possible AUD treatment target.

  7. Neuroimaging Insights into the Role of Cortical GABA Systems and the Influence of Nicotine on the Recovery from Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Kelly P.; Esterlis, Irina; Mason, Graeme F.; Bois, Frederic; O'Malley, Stephanie S.; Krystal, John H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews evidence suggesting that nicotine and tobacco smoke profoundly modulate the effects of alcohol on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neuronal function, specifically at the GABAA-benzodiazepine receptor (GABAA-BZR). The focus of this paper is on recent neuroimaging evidence in preclinical models as well as clinical experiments. First, we review findings implicating the role of alcohol at the GABAA-BZR and discuss the changes in GABAA-BZR availability during acute and prolonged alcohol withdrawal. Second, we discuss preclinical evidence that suggests nicotine affects GABA neuronal function indirectly by a primary action at neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Third, we show how this evidence converges in studies that examine GABA levels and GABAA-BZRs in alcohol-dependent smokers and nonsmokers, suggesting that tobacco smoking attenuates the chemical changes that occur during alcohol withdrawal. Based on a comprehensive review of literature, we hypothesize that tobacco smoking minimizes the changes in GABA levels that typically occur during the acute cycles of drinking in alcohol-dependent individuals. Thus, during alcohol withdrawal, the continued tobacco smoking decreases the severity of the withdrawal-related changes in GABA chemistry. PMID:21276806

  8. Concurrent Treatment for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Alcohol Dependence: Predictors and Moderators of Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Zandberg, Laurie J.; Rosenfield, David; McLean, Carmen P.; Powers, Mark B.; Asnaani, Anu; Foa, Edna B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study examined predictors and moderators of treatment response among 165 adults meeting DSM-IV criteria for comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol dependence (AD) who were randomized to 24 weeks of naltrexone (NAL), NAL and prolonged exposure (PE), pill placebo, or pill placebo and PE. All participants received supportive counseling for alcohol use. Method Six domains of predictors/moderators (23 variables) were evaluated using measures of PTSD (Posttraumatic Stress Symptom Scale Interview; PSS-I) and AD (percent days drinking from the Timeline Follow-Back Interview) collected every four weeks throughout treatment. Multi-level modeling using the Fournier approach was employed to evaluate predictors and moderators of rates of symptom improvement and post-treatment outcomes. Results Combat trauma, sexual assault trauma, and higher baseline anxiety sensitivity predicted slower improvement and poorer PTSD outcome. Combat trauma, white race, and higher baseline drinking severity predicted poorer drinking outcome. PTSD severity moderated the efficacy of PE on PTSD outcomes, such that the benefit of PE over no-PE was greater for participants with higher baseline PTSD severity. Baseline depressive severity moderated the efficacy of PE on drinking outcomes, whereby the benefit of PE over no-PE was greater for participants with higher depressive symptoms. NAL effects were most beneficial for those with the longest duration of alcohol dependence. Conclusions These results suggest that concurrent, trauma-focused treatment should be recommended for PTSD-AD patients who present with moderate or severe baseline PTSD and depressive symptoms. Future research should examine the mechanisms underlying poorer outcome among identified sub-groups of PTSD-AD patients. PMID:26460570

  9. Quantifying alcohol-related emergency admissions in a UK tertiary referral hospital: a cross-sectional study of chronic alcohol dependency and acute alcohol intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Vardy, J; Keliher, T; Fisher, J; Ritchie, F; Bell, C; Chekroud, M; Clarey, F; Blackwood, L; Barry, L; Paton, E; Clark, A; Connelly, R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Alcohol is responsible for a proportion of emergency admissions to hospital, with acute alcohol intoxication and chronic alcohol dependency (CAD) implicated. This study aims to quantify the proportion of hospital admissions through our emergency department (ED) which were thought by the admitting doctor to be (largely or partially) a result of alcohol consumption. Setting ED of a UK tertiary referral hospital. Participants All ED admissions occurring over 14 weeks from 1 September to 8 December 2012. Data obtained for 5497 of 5746 admissions (95.67%). Primary outcome measures Proportion of emergency admissions related to alcohol as defined by the admitting ED clinician. Secondary outcome measures Proportion of emergency admissions due to alcohol diagnosed with acute alcohol intoxication or CAD according to ICD-10 criteria. Results 1152 (21.0%, 95% CI 19.9% to 22.0%) of emergency admissions were thought to be due to alcohol. 74.6% of patients admitted due to alcohol had CAD, and significantly greater than the 26.4% with ‘Severe’ or ‘Very Severe’ acute alcohol intoxication (p<0.001). Admissions due to alcohol differed to admissions not due to alcohol being on average younger (45 vs 56 years, p<0.001) more often male (73.4% vs 45.1% males, p<0.001) and more likely to have a diagnosis synonymous with alcohol or related to recreational drug use, pancreatitis, deliberate self-harm, head injury, gastritis, suicidal ideation, upper gastrointestinal bleeds or seizures (p<0.001). An increase in admissions due to alcohol on Saturdays reflects a surge in admissions with acute alcohol intoxication above the weekly average (p=0.003). Conclusions Alcohol was thought to be implicated in 21% of emergency admissions in this cohort. CAD is responsible for a significantly greater proportion of admissions due to alcohol than acute intoxication. Interventions designed to reduce alcohol-related admissions must incorporate measures to tackle CAD. PMID:27324707

  10. Translating the Semi-Structured Assessment for Drug Dependence and Alcoholism in the Western Pacific: Rationale, Study Design and Reliability of Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Amity E.; Rosen, Rochelle K.; McGeary, John E.; Amoa, Francine; Kranzler, Henry R.; Francazio, Sarah; McGarvey, Stephen T.; Swift, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The aims of this study were to develop a bilingual version of the Semi-Structured Assessment for Drug Dependence and Alcoholism (SSADDA) in English and Samoan and determine the reliability of assessments of alcohol dependence in American Samoa. Methods: The study consisted of development and reliability-testing phases. In the development phase, the SSADDA alcohol module was translated and the translation was evaluated through cognitive interviews. In the reliability-testing phase, the bilingual SSADDA was administered to 40 ethnic Samoans, including a sub-sample of 26 individuals who were retested. Results: Cognitive interviews indicated the initial translation was culturally and linguistically appropriate except items pertaining to alcohol tolerance, which were modified to reflect Samoan concepts. SSADDA reliability testing indicated diagnoses of DSM-III-R and DSM-IV alcohol dependence were reliable. Reliability varied by language of administration. Conclusion: The English/Samoan version of the SSADDA is appropriate for the diagnosis of DSM-III-R alcohol dependence, which may be useful in advancing research and public health efforts to address alcohol problems in American Samoa and the Western Pacific. The translation methods may inform researchers translating diagnostic and assessment tools into different languages and cultures. PMID:24936588

  11. NPY Leu7Pro and alcohol dependence in Finnish and Swedish populations.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guanshan; Pollak, Lotta; Mottagui-Tabar, Salim; Wahlestedt, Claes; Taubman, Julie; Virkkunen, Matti; Goldman, David; Heilig, Markus

    2003-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a modulator of alcohol intake in animal models of alcoholism, and is potentially involved in alcohol dependence. A coding Leu7Pro polymorphism in the signal peptide of preproNPY has been described, and the Pro7 allele has been reported to correlate with increased alcohol consumption in non-dependent Finnish males. Recently, this polymorphism was also reported to be associated with an actual diagnosis of alcohol dependence. We compared Pro7 allele frequencies in one Finnish (n = 135) and one Swedish (n = 472) population of alcohol dependent individuals, and ethnically matched controls (Finns: n = 213; Swedes: n = 177) in whom alcohol dependence was established, or any diagnosis of substance disorder was excluded, respectively, through the use of structured face-to-face interviews. Pro7 frequencies in alcoholics were 5.2 and 4.1% in Finns and Swedes, respectively, similar to the 5.0-5.5% recently reported in European Americans in a Yale study. However, corresponding frequencies in the control populations were similar, at 6.1 and 5.9% in Finns and Swedes, respectively, yielding no association, in contrast with the Yale study, where an association was reported based on a 2.0% Pro7 frequency in European American controls. A meta-analysis of available data yields Pro7 frequencies of 4.7% both in Caucasian alcoholics and Caucasian controls. Pro7 does not seem to be associated with a diagnosis of alcoholism in Caucasian populations.

  12. Aripiprazole in the treatment of patients with alcohol dependence: a double-blind, comparison trial vs. naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Martinotti, G; Di Nicola, M; Di Giannantonio, M; Janiri, L

    2009-03-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that both partial dopamine agents and mixed 5-HT1A/2A receptor drugs independently show significant efficacy in reducing alcohol use in both animals and humans. Aripiprazole, which acts as a dopamine/5-HT system stabilizer, approaches the optimal characteristics sought in medication to be considered for testing in the treatment of alcohol dependence. In this randomised, double-blind, confrontation trial with naltrexone, we aimed to investigate the efficacy of aripiprazole on alcohol-drinking indices. Craving and psychiatric symptom improvements were the secondary end points. Seventy-five alcohol dependent subjects were detoxified and were subsequently randomised into two groups, receiving 50 mg of naltrexone and 5-15 mg of aripiprazole, respectively. Craving (Visual Analogue Scale; Obsessive and Compulsive Drinking Scale) and withdrawal (Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment) rating scales were applied; psychiatric symptoms were evaluated through the Symptom Check List 90-Revised. The number of subjects remained alcohol free for the entire study period (16 weeks) and the number of subjects relapsed were not significantly different in the two groups. The survival function showed that patients treated with aripiprazole remained abstinent from any alcohol amount for a longer time with respect to those treated with naltrexone. As for craving scores, patients treated with naltrexone showed a better outcome. Results from this study globally place aripiprazole at the same range of efficacy of naltrexone, one of the approved drugs used in alcohol relapse prevention. If it could be demonstrated in placebo-controlled trials that aripiprazole is efficacious in decreasing alcohol use, lessening craving, and attenuating psychopathological symptom severity, we will have gained a powerful agent for the treatment of alcohol-dependent subjects.

  13. The relationship of addiction, tolerance, and dependence to alcohol and drugs: a neurochemical approach.

    PubMed

    Miller, N S; Dackis, C A; Gold, M S

    1987-01-01

    Alcohol and drug addiction are defined in behavioral terms as the preoccupation with, compulsive use of, and relapse to drugs that are descriptive and confirmatory. The basis of addiction may involve neurochemical changes in the brain that distort and redirect the drive states (instincts). Tolerance and dependence may only be incidentally associated with addiction as a result of a nonspecific adaptation by the body to the presence of a drug. The cellular adaptation may be the same in all organs. Addiction to alcohol and drugs may have no specific relationship to tolerance and dependence. Addiction occurs in the absence of observable tolerance and dependence to alcohol and drugs. Alcohol and drug addiction is probably more complex than tolerance and dependence. Addiction is difficult to study because of the variability of behavioral phenomena and the underlying intricacies of the neurosubstrates. Tolerance and dependence are still useful as they are indicators of drug use. It is a misconception that long term chronic use is necessary for tolerance and dependence to develop. Some studies have shown that tolerance can develop within hours and days to a single dose of alcohol or other drugs. Anxiety, depression and insomnia can occur after a single dose of ethanol in humans. These symptoms of withdrawal from the alcohol or drug constitute dependence. Redefining the criteria for addiction tolerance and dependence to alcohol and other drugs may be in order. A neurochemical model may provide a more definitive and uniform basis for considering addiction, tolerance, and dependence to alcohol and drugs.

  14. [Pharmacological treatment in alcohol-, drug- and benzodiazepine-dependent patients - the significance of trazodone].

    PubMed

    Funk, Sándor

    2013-06-01

    Currently detoxification of drug and alcohol dependent patients is pharmacologically unresolved, and long-term treatment following the acute phase is also not very successful including a high number of relapses. We would need medications that on the short term cease: the severe vegetative symptoms, the pain, the extremely distressing psychosyndrome characterised by restlessness, anxiety or acute depressive symptoms, and the craving. The optimal would be if there was one medication capable of simultaneously alleviating or diminishing all the above symptoms without causing dependency and preventing relapse in the long-term. Dependency is almost all cases accompanied by primary and/or secondary mood disorder or sleep disorder which should also be treated. It should be considered, however, that following withdrawal of the agent benzodiazepine dependency often develops. The serotonin antagonist and reuptake inhibitor (SARI) trazodone is effective in the treatment of depression accompanied by sleeping disorder and it has also shown efficacy in alcohol and benzodiazepine-dependency. Its administration may improve the efficacy of detoxification and treatment of following conditions, may decrease medication load and the risk of the development of benzodiazepine dependency. In our clinical practice we frequently use this agent to treat our patients simultaneously suffering from depression and addiction problems, gaining experience comparing it to other pharmacotherapies (benzodiazepines or other antidepressants). The medication is not approved for alcohol and drug dependence, however, treatment t of comorbid conditions is not against to the official recommendations. Our aim was, in addition to reviewing the literature, to share our experience which, although cannot be considered an evidence based study, we deemed worthy of publishing. We cannot, at this point, put forward a protocol addressing all related scientific problems and problems of off-label treatment, and we could

  15. Gene coexpression networks in human brain identify epigenetic modifications in alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Ponomarev, Igor; Wang, Shi; Zhang, Lingling; Harris, R Adron; Mayfield, R Dayne

    2012-02-01

    Alcohol abuse causes widespread changes in gene expression in human brain, some of which contribute to alcohol dependence. Previous microarray studies identified individual genes as candidates for alcohol phenotypes, but efforts to generate an integrated view of molecular and cellular changes underlying alcohol addiction are lacking. Here, we applied a novel systems approach to transcriptome profiling in postmortem human brains and generated a systemic view of brain alterations associated with alcohol abuse. We identified critical cellular components and previously unrecognized epigenetic determinants of gene coexpression relationships and discovered novel markers of chromatin modifications in alcoholic brain. Higher expression levels of endogenous retroviruses and genes with high GC content in alcoholics were associated with DNA hypomethylation and increased histone H3K4 trimethylation, suggesting a critical role of epigenetic mechanisms in alcohol addiction. Analysis of cell-type-specific transcriptomes revealed remarkable consistency between molecular profiles and cellular abnormalities in alcoholic brain. Based on evidence from this study and others, we generated a systems hypothesis for the central role of chromatin modifications in alcohol dependence that integrates epigenetic regulation of gene expression with pathophysiological and neuroadaptive changes in alcoholic brain. Our results offer implications for epigenetic therapeutics in alcohol and drug addiction.

  16. A functional polymorphism of the NFKB1 gene increases the risk for alcoholic liver cirrhosis in patients with alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Miguel; Pastor, Isabel; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Laso, Francisco Javier

    2009-11-01

    The genetic basis for the predisposition to alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ALC) remains unknown. Increasing evidence supports a role for the nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB, the NF-kappaB inhibitor alpha (NFKBIA), and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease, raising the possibility that common polymorphisms in genes encoding these molecules may confer susceptibility to ALC. The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between common polymorphisms in NFKB1, NFKBIA, and PPARG2 genes and the presence of ALC. A total of 258 male alcoholics (161 without liver disease and 97 with ALC) and 101 healthy controls were genotyped for the -94ins/delATTG NFKB1, 3'-UTR+126G>A NFKBIA, and 34C>G PPARG2 polymorphisms. The association of these genetic variants with ALC was tested in alcoholic patients with alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence. A logistic regression analysis was further performed to analyze the model of inheritance. We found an association between the presence of the deletion allele in NFKB1 polymorphism and ALC in patients with alcohol dependence. We found no association between NFKBIA and PPARG2 polymorphisms and the presence of ALC. The deletion allele of the -94ins/del NFKB1 polymorphism could be associated with a higher risk of developing ALC through an increase in inflammation, as supported by previous data.

  17. Pharmacological aversion treatment of alcohol dependence. I. Production and prediction of conditioned alcohol aversion.

    PubMed

    Howard, M O

    2001-08-01

    Eighty-two hospitalized alcoholics receiving pharmacological aversion therapy (PAT) over a 10-day treatment interval completed cognitive, behavioral, and psychophysiological measures evaluating conditioned aversion to alcohol. Pre-post assessments provided convergent support for the efficacy of PAT vis-à-vis production of conditioned aversion to alcohol. Positive alcohol-related outcome expectancies were significantly reduced, whereas confidence that drinking could be avoided in various high-risk situations for consumption was increased following PAT. Behavioral and cardiac rate assessments revealed significant changes following PAT that were specific to alcoholic beverages and potentially reflective of conditioned alcohol aversion. Patients with more extensive pretreatment experiences with alcohol-associated nausea and greater involvement in antisocial conduct appeared to be less susceptible to the PAT conditioning protocol.

  18. Targeting dynorphin/kappa opioid receptor systems to treat alcohol abuse and dependence.

    PubMed

    Walker, Brendan M; Valdez, Glenn R; McLaughlin, Jay P; Bakalkin, Georgy

    2012-06-01

    This review represents the focus of a symposium that was presented at the "Alcoholism and Stress: A Framework for Future Treatment Strategies" conference in Volterra, Italy on May 3-6, 2011 and organized/chaired by Dr. Brendan M. Walker. The primary goal of the symposium was to evaluate and disseminate contemporary findings regarding the emerging role of kappa-opioid receptors (KORs) and their endogenous ligands dynorphins (DYNs) in the regulation of escalated alcohol consumption, negative affect and cognitive dysfunction associated with alcohol dependence, as well as DYN/KOR mediation of the effects of chronic stress on alcohol reward and seeking behaviors. Dr. Glenn Valdez described a role for KORs in the anxiogenic effects of alcohol withdrawal. Dr. Jay McLaughlin focused on the role of KORs in repeated stress-induced potentiation of alcohol reward and increased alcohol consumption. Dr. Brendan Walker presented data characterizing the effects of KOR antagonism within the extended amygdala on withdrawal-induced escalation of alcohol self-administration in dependent animals. Dr. Georgy Bakalkin concluded with data indicative of altered DYNs and KORs in the prefrontal cortex of alcohol dependent humans that could underlie diminished cognitive performance. Collectively, the data presented within this symposium identified the multifaceted contribution of KORs to the characteristics of acute and chronic alcohol-induced behavioral dysregulation and provided a foundation for the development of pharmacotherapeutic strategies to treat certain aspects of alcohol use disorders.

  19. Targeting Dynorphin/Kappa Opioid Receptor Systems to Treat Alcohol Abuse and Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Brendan M.; Valdez, Glenn R.; McLaughlin, Jay P.; Bakalkin, Georgy

    2012-01-01

    This review represents the focus of a symposium that was presented at the “Alcoholism and Stress: A Framework for Future Treatment Strategies” conference in Volterra, Italy on May 3–6, 2011 and organized / chaired by Dr. Brendan M. Walker. The primary goal of the symposium was to evaluate and disseminate contemporary findings regarding the emerging role of kappa-opioid receptors (KORs) and their endogenous ligands dynorphins (DYNs) in the regulation of escalated alcohol consumption, negative affect and cognitive dysfunction associated with alcohol dependence, as well as DYN / KOR mediation of the effects of chronic stress on alcohol reward and seeking behaviors. Dr. Glenn Valdez described a role for KORs in the anxiogenic effects of alcohol withdrawal. Dr. Jay McLaughlin focused on the role of KORs in repeated stress-induced potentiation of alcohol reward and increased alcohol consumption. Dr. Brendan Walker presented data characterizing the effects of KOR antagonism within the extended amygdala on withdrawal-induced escalation of alcohol self-administration in dependent animals. Dr. Georgy Bakalkin concluded with data indicative of altered DYNs and KORs in the prefrontal cortex of alcohol dependent humans that could underlie diminished cognitive performance. Collectively, the data presented within this symposium identified the multifaceted contribution of KORs to the characteristics of acute and chronic alcohol-induced behavioral dysregulation and provided a foundation for the development of pharmacotherapeutic strategies to treat certain aspects of alcohol use disorders. PMID:22459870

  20. Profiles of Childhood Trauma in Patients with Alcohol Dependence and Their Associations with Addiction-Related Problems.

    PubMed

    Lotzin, Annett; Haupt, Lena; von Schönfels, Julia; Wingenfeld, Katja; Schäfer, Ingo

    2016-03-01

    The high occurrence of childhood trauma in individuals with alcohol dependence is well-recognized. Nevertheless, researchers have rarely studied which types of childhood trauma often co-occur and how these combinations of different types and severities of childhood trauma are related to the patients' current addiction-related problems. We aimed to identify childhood trauma profiles in patients with alcohol dependence and examined relations of these trauma profiles with the patients' current addiction-related problems. In 347 alcohol-dependent patients, 5 types of childhood trauma (sexual abuse, physical abuse, emotional abuse, emotional neglect, and physical neglect) were measured using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Childhood trauma profiles were identified using cluster analysis. The patients' current severity of addiction-related problems was assessed using the European Addiction Severity Index. We identified 6 profiles that comprised different types and severities of childhood trauma. The patients' trauma profiles predicted the severity of addiction-related problems in the domains of psychiatric symptoms, family relationships, social relationships, and drug use. Childhood trauma profiles may provide more useful information about the patient's risk of current addiction-related problems than the common distinction between traumatized versus nontraumatized patients. Copyright © 2016 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  1. Psychosocial functioning, quality of life and clinical correlates of comorbid alcohol and drug dependence syndromes in people with schizophrenia across Europe.

    PubMed

    Carrà, Giuseppe; Johnson, Sonia; Crocamo, Cristina; Angermeyer, Matthias C; Brugha, Traolach; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Toumi, Mondher; Bebbington, Paul E

    2016-05-30

    Little is known about the correlates of comorbid drug and alcohol dependence in people with schizophrenia outside the USA. We tested hypotheses that dependence on alcohol/drugs would be associated with more severe symptoms, and poorer psychosocial functioning and quality of life. The EuroSC Cohort study (N=1204), based in France, Germany and the UK, used semi-structured clinical interviews for diagnoses, and standardized tools to assess correlates. We used mixed models to compare outcomes between past-year comorbid dependence on alcohol/drugs, controlling for covariates and modelling both subject and country-level effects. Participants dependent on alcohol or drugs had fewer negative symptoms on PANSS than their non-dependent counterparts. However, those dependent on alcohol scored higher on PANSS general psychopathology than those who were not, or dependent only on drugs. People with schizophrenia dependent on drugs had poorer quality of life, more extrapyramidal side effects, and scored worse on Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) than those without dependence. People with alcohol dependence reported more reasons for non-compliance with medication, and poorer functioning on GAF, though not on Global Assessment of Relational Functioning. In people with schizophrenia, comorbid dependence on alcohol or drugs is associated with impaired clinical and psychosocial adjustment, and poorer quality of life.

  2. Predictors of moderated drinking in a primarily alcohol dependent sample of men who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    Kuerbis, Alexis; Morgenstern, Jon; Hail, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Understanding for whom moderated drinking is a viable, achievable, and sustainable goal among those with a range of alcohol use disorders (AUD) remains an important public health question. Despite common acceptance as severe risk factors, there is little empirical evidence to conclude whether co-occurring mental health disorders or drug dependence contribute to an individual’s inability to successfully moderate his drinking. Utilizing secondary data analysis, the purpose of this study was to identify predictors of moderation among both treatment seeking and non-treatment seeking, primarily alcohol dependent, problem drinking men who have sex with men (MSM), with an emphasis on the high risk factors psychiatric comorbidity and drug dependence. Problem drinkers (N=187) were assessed, provided feedback about their drinking, given the option to receive brief AUD treatment or change their drinking on their own, and then followed for 15 months. Findings revealed that neither psychiatric comorbidity or drug dependence predicted ability to achieve moderation when controlling for alcohol dependence severity. Those who were younger, more highly educated, and had more mild alcohol dependence were more likely to achieve moderated drinking. Impact of treatment on predictors is explored. Limitations of this study and arenas for future research are discussed. PMID:22201219

  3. Predictors of moderated drinking in a primarily alcohol-dependent sample of men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Kuerbis, Alexis; Morgenstern, Jon; Hail, Lisa

    2012-09-01

    Understanding for whom moderated drinking is a viable, achievable, and sustainable goal among those with a range of alcohol use disorders (AUD) remains an important public health question. Despite common acceptance as severe risk factors, there is little empirical evidence to conclude whether co-occurring mental health disorders or drug dependence contribute to an individual's inability to successfully moderate his drinking. Utilizing secondary data analysis, the purpose of this study was to identify predictors of moderation among both treatment-seeking and non-treatment-seeking, primarily alcohol-dependent, problem-drinking men who have sex with men (MSM), with an emphasis on the high risk factors psychiatric comorbidity and drug dependence. Problem drinkers (N=187) were assessed, provided feedback about their drinking, given the option to receive brief AUD treatment or change their drinking on their own, and then followed for 15 months. Findings revealed that neither psychiatric comorbidity or drug dependence predicted ability to achieve moderation when controlling for alcohol dependence severity. Those who were younger, more highly educated, and had more mild alcohol dependence were more likely to achieve moderated drinking. Impact of treatment on predictors is explored. Limitations of this study and arenas for future research are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. [Prevalence of alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence according to DSM-IV criteria in first year university students].

    PubMed

    Aertgeerts, B; Buntinx, F; Vandermeulen, C; Roelants, M; Fevery, J; Ansoms, S

    1999-12-25

    To determine the prevalence of alcohol problems in first-year college students. Cross-sectional. Data on the prevalence of alcohol abuse or dependence according to DSM-IV criteria were collected in the period November 1995-April 1996 among college freshmen at the Catholic University of Louvain (Belgium). 3564 consecutive students completed a questionnaire which assessed drinking behaviour (Composite International Diagnostic Interview CIDI, Section J) and identified students at risk as defined by DSM-IV criteria. Our study included a large number of college freshmen, so we were able to perform our analyses with a large statistical power. All students had the opportunity to refuse their co-operation, but there were no non-responders, so selection bias was absent. The medical ethical committee of the KU Leuven approved this study. Of all 3564 consecutive students 501 (14.1%; 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 12.9-15.3) met DSM-IV criteria of alcohol abuse (n = 373; 10.5%; 9.5-11.5) or of alcohol dependence (n = 128; 3.6%; 3.0-4.2). Of the male students 301 (18.5%; 16.7-20.5) met the criteria of alcohol abuse and 96 (5.9%; 4.8-7.1) of alcohol dependence, of the female students 72 (3.7%; 2.9-4.6) and 32 (1.6%; 1.2-2.3) respectively. More than 10% (12.2%; 11.1-13.3) of these freshmen operated a vehicle under influence. This contributed in a major way to the DSM-IV conclusion. In this, one of the first studies among college freshmen using DSM-IV criteria the prevalence of alcohol abuse was in excess of 10%. In addition a substantial proportion of college freshman appeared to be alcohol dependent according to DSM-IV criteria.

  5. Allelic variants of ADH, ALDH and the five factor model of personality in alcohol dependence syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Salujha, S. K.; Chaudhury, S.; Menon, P. K.; Srivastava, K.; Gupta, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The etiology of alcohol dependence is a complex interplay of biopsychosocial factors. The genes for alcohol-metabolizing enzymes: Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH2 and ADH3) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) exhibit functional polymorphisms. Vulnerability of alcohol dependence may also be in part due to heritable personality traits. Aim: To determine whether any association exists between polymorphisms of ADH2, ADH3 and ALDH2 and alcohol dependence syndrome in a group of Asian Indians. In addition, the personality of these patients was assessed to identify traits predisposing to alcoholism. Materials and Methods: In this study, 100 consecutive males with alcohol dependence syndrome attending the psychiatric outpatient department of a tertiary care service hospital and an equal number of matched healthy controls were included with their consent. Blood samples of all the study cases and controls were collected and genotyped for the ADH2, ADH3 and ALDH2 loci. Personality was evaluated using the neuroticism, extraversion, openness (NEO) personality inventory and sensation seeking scale. Results: Allele frequencies of ADH2*2 (0.50), ADH3*1 (0.67) and ALSH2*2 (0.09) were significantly low in the alcohol dependent subjects. Personality traits of NEO personality inventory and sensation seeking were significantly higher when compared to controls. Conclusions: The functional polymorphisms of genes coding for alcohol metabolizing enzymes and personality traits of NEO and sensation seeking may affect the propensity to develop dependence. PMID:25535445

  6. Limited associations of dopamine system genes with alcohol dependence and related traits in the Irish Affected Sib Pair Study of Alcohol Dependence (IASPSAD).

    PubMed

    Hack, Laura M; Kalsi, Gursharan; Aliev, Fazil; Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Prescott, Carol A; Patterson, Diana G; Walsh, Dermot; Dick, Danielle M; Riley, Brien P; Kendler, Kenneth S

    2011-02-01

    Over 50 years of evidence from research has established that the central dopaminergic reward pathway is likely involved in alcohol dependence (AD). Additional evidence supports a role for dopamine (DA) in other disinhibitory psychopathology, which is often comorbid with AD. Family and twin studies demonstrate that a common genetic component accounts for most of the genetic variance in these traits. Thus, DA-related genes represent putative candidates for the genetic risk that underlies not only AD but also behavioral disinhibition. Many linkage and association studies have examined these relationships with inconsistent results, possibly because of low power, poor marker coverage, and/or an inappropriate correction for multiple testing. We conducted an association study on the products encoded by 10 DA-related genes (DRD1-D5, SLC18A2, SLC6A3, DDC, TH, COMT) using a large, ethnically homogeneous sample with severe AD (n = 545) and screened controls (n = 509). We collected genotypes from linkage disequilibrium (LD)-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and employed a gene-based method of correction. We tested for association with AD diagnosis in cases and controls and with a variety of alcohol-related traits (including age-at-onset, initial sensitivity, tolerance, maximum daily drinks, and a withdrawal factor score), disinhibitory symptoms, and a disinhibitory factor score in cases only. A total of 135 SNPs were genotyped using the Illumina GoldenGate and Taqman Assays-on-Demand protocols. Of the 101 SNPs entered into standard analysis, 6 independent SNPs from 5 DA genes were associated with AD or a quantitative alcohol-related trait. Two SNPs across 2 genes were associated with a disinhibitory symptom count, while 1 SNP in DRD5 was positive for association with the general disinhibitory factor score. Our study provides evidence of modest associations between a small number of DA-related genes and AD as well as a range of alcohol-related traits and measures

  7. Severe intimate partner violence and alcohol use among female trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Weinsheimer, R L; Schermer, C R; Malcoe, L H; Balduf, L M; Bloomfield, L A

    2005-01-01

    The lifetime prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) among women in the United States is reported to be between 18 and 50%. One-third of female homicide victims are killed by an intimate partner and alcohol is often involved. Despite these figures, 77% of women have never been screened for IPV. Substance abuse in male partners is known to place women at risk. We examined the role of female alcohol use on rates of severe IPV. Our hypotheses were: (1) the prevalence of IPV among women seen in trauma centers is greater than that found in national surveys; (2) alcohol problems among abused women and their partners are greater than those among non-abused women; (3) females and their partners alcohol problems are each independently associated with IPV; and (4) female trauma center patients support domestic violence screening. An in-person survey was administered to 95 consecutive adult female trauma patients admitted to a Level I Trauma Center. The survey included questions about past-year and lifetime severe IPV, female and male partner alcohol use, and willingness to participate in IPV screening and referral. The multivariate associations of female and partner alcohol use with past-year severe IPV were assessed with logistic regression. Nearly one-half (46.3%) of women reported a lifetime history of severe IPV, with 26% experiencing severe IPV in the past year. Past-year IPV was identified in 59.1% of women screening positive for drinking problems, but in only 12.7% of those screening negative for drinking problems (p = 0.001). Similarly, past-year IPV prevalence was 55.2% when the partner was a problem drinker versus 8.3% when he was not (p = 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that female problem drinking (odds ratio [OR] = 5.8) and partner problem drinking (OR=8.9) were independent predictors of past-year severe IPV. The majority of women (90.5%) felt that it was appropriate for health care professionals to screen for IPV; 90% of women with a history of IPV

  8. Distal and proximal factors related to aggression severity among patients in substance abuse treatment: family history, alcohol use and expectancies.

    PubMed

    Chermack, Stephen T; Wryobeck, John M; Walton, Maureen A; Blow, Frederic C

    2006-05-01

    This study examined the relationships among distal (paternal and maternal family history of alcohol problems and violence) and proximal (general alcohol use, acute use associated with conflict incidents, alcohol-aggression expectancies) factors and physical aggression severity among 125 men and 125 women recruited from substance abuse treatment. Paternal alcohol problem history (PA) was related to alcohol-aggression expectancies, but no family history factors were related to general or acute alcohol use. Separate analyses examining predictors of aggression were conducted, one with general alcohol use and one with acute alcohol use. In both analyses, alcohol use and the maternal violence (MV) by PA interaction were significant. Specifically, MV was associated with aggression severity for those with a history of PA. The general alcohol use model also revealed significant alcohol by expectancy and MV by gender interactions. The findings suggest that expectancies are not the primary mediator of the alcohol-aggression relationship, alcohol use measurement issues may impact whether expectancies are observed to moderate the alcohol-aggression relationship, and that both maternal and paternal family history factors appear to impact aggression severity.

  9. The Development of a Broad Spectrum Treatment for Patients with Alcohol Dependence in Early Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulliver, Suzy Bird; Longabaugh, Richard; Davidson, Dena; Swift, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Estimates of the prevalence of alcohol dependence among Americans approach 14% (Read, Kahler, & Stevenson, 2001). Alcohol dependence was once considered among the most recalcitrant of problem behaviors, with only 20% to 30% attaining sustained abstinence (Hunt Barnett & Branch 1971). Although current definitions of treatment success now consider…

  10. Meta-Analyses of ALDH2 and ADH1B with Alcohol Dependence in Asians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luczak, Susan E.; Glatt, Stephen J.; Wall, Tamara J.

    2006-01-01

    Meta-analyses were conducted to determine the magnitude of relationships between polymorphisms in 2 genes, ALDH2 and ADH1B, with alcohol dependence in Asians. For each gene, possession of 1 variant [asterisk]2 allele was protective against alcohol dependence, and possession of a 2nd [asterisk]2 allele did not offer significant additional…

  11. Cladistic association analysis of Y chromosome effects on alcohol dependence and related personality traits.

    PubMed

    Kittles, R A; Long, J C; Bergen, A W; Eggert, M; Virkkunen, M; Linnoila, M; Goldman, D

    1999-03-30

    Association between Y chromosome haplotype variation and alcohol dependence and related personality traits was investigated in a large sample of psychiatrically diagnosed Finnish males. Haplotypes were constructed for 359 individuals using alleles at eight loci (seven microsatellite loci and a nucleotide substitution in the DYZ3 alphoid satellite locus). A cladogram linking the 102 observed haplotype configurations was constructed by using parsimony with a single-step mutation model. Then, a series of contingency tables nested according to the cladogram hierarchy were used to test for association between Y haplotype and alcohol dependence. Finally, using only alcohol-dependent subjects, we tested for association between Y haplotype and personality variables postulated to define subtypes of alcoholism-antisocial personality disorder, novelty seeking, harm avoidance, and reward dependence. Significant association with alcohol dependence was observed at three Y haplotype clades, with significance levels of P = 0.002, P = 0.020, and P = 0.010. Within alcohol-dependent subjects, no relationship was revealed between Y haplotype and antisocial personality disorder, novelty seeking, harm avoidance, or reward dependence. These results demonstrate, by using a fully objective association design, that differences among Y chromosomes contribute to variation in vulnerability to alcohol dependence. However, they do not demonstrate an association between Y haplotype and the personality variables thought to underlie the subtypes of alcoholism.

  12. Alcohol dependence and gene x environment interaction in emotion regulation: Is serotonin the link?

    PubMed

    Lesch, Klaus-Peter

    2005-12-05

    Alcohol dependence is characterized by frequent, compulsive and uncontrolled consumption of alcohol associated with behavior of maladaption and destruction. It is an etiologically and clinically heterogeneous syndrome, moderately to highly heritable, and caused by interaction of genes and environment. Alcohol dependence is related to other psychiatric diseases by common neurobiological pathways, including those that modulate reward, behavioral control as well as anxiety and stress response. Alcohol induces adaptive changes in brain function providing the basis for tolerance, craving, withdrawal, and emotional disturbance. The differentiation of psychobiological traits of addictive behavior reflecting neurobiological processes is therefore of particular importance for the dissection of the complex genetic susceptibility to alcohol dependence. A central serotonin (5-HT) deficit is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of alcohol dependence by modulating motivational behavior, neuroadaptive processes, and resulting emotional disturbance. 5-HT-related impulsive, aggressive, and suicidal behavior has been linked to a primordial personality that is susceptible to alcohol dependence. Although variations in many of the genes that encode receptors, enzymes, and transporters of the 5-HT system have been tested as risk factors for alcohol dependence, genetic analyses of 5-HT signaling in alcohol dependence have mainly been focused on the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) gene. Due to its central role in the fine-tuning serotonergic neurotransmission, a regulatory variant of the 5-HTT, which is associated with anxiety related traits, is not only a key player in the neurobiological mechanism of gene x environment interaction in the etiology of depression, but also contributes to the risk to develop alcohol dependence with antisocial behavior and suicidality. Evidence for a modulatory effect of allelic variation of 5-HTT function on limbic circuit responses to emotional stimuli

  13. Learning Disabilities in Alcohol-Dependent Adults: A Preliminary Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Sharyn S.; Jasinski, Donald R.

    1990-01-01

    The study found that 40 percent of 25 adult alcoholics were found to have had special education, remedial services, or repeated grade failure concurrent with a familial history of alcoholism and current discrepancies indicative of learning disabilities. Results suggest that childhood learning disorders may be related to the development of…

  14. The risk for persistent adult alcohol and nicotine dependence: the role of childhood maltreatment

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jennifer C.; Stohl, Malka; Wall, Melanie M.; Keyes, Katherine M.; Goodwin, Renee D.; Skodol, Andrew E.; Krueger, Robert F.; Grant, Bridget F.; Hasin, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims Alcohol and nicotine dependence are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, especially when cases are persistent. The risk for alcohol and nicotine dependence is increased by childhood maltreatment. However, the influence of childhood maltreatment on dependence course is unknown, and is evaluated in the current study. Design Physical, sexual, and emotional abuse, and physical and emotional neglect, were evaluated as predictors of persistent alcohol and nicotine dependence over three years of follow-up, with and without control for other childhood adversities. Setting National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Participants NESARC participants completing baseline and follow-up who met criteria at baseline for past-year alcohol dependence (n=1,172) and nicotine dependence (n=4,017). Measurements Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule (AUDADIS) measures of alcohol/nicotine dependence, childhood maltreatment, and other adverse childhood experiences (e.g., parental divorce). Findings Controlling for demographics only, physical, sexual, and emotional abuse, and physical neglect, predicted three-year persistence of alcohol dependence (adjusted odds ratios [AORs]: 1.50–2.99, 95% CIs 1.04–4.68) and nicotine dependence (AORs: 1.37–1.74, 95% CIs 1.13–2.11). With other childhood adversities also controlled, maltreatment types remained predictive for alcohol persistence (AORs: 1.53–3.02, 95% CIs 1.07–4.71) and nicotine persistence (AORs: 1.35–1.72, 95% CIs 1.11–2.09). Further, a greater number of maltreatment types incrementally influenced persistence risk (AORs: 1.19–1.36, 95% CIs 1.11–1.56). Conclusions A history of childhood maltreatment predicts persistent adult alcohol and nicotine dependence. This association, robust to control for other childhood adversities, suggests that maltreatment (rather than a generally difficult childhood) affects the course of

  15. Lifetime PTSD and quality of life among alcohol-dependent men: impact of childhood emotional abuse and dissociation.

    PubMed

    Evren, Cuneyt; Sar, Vedat; Dalbudak, Ercan; Cetin, Rabia; Durkaya, Mine; Evren, Bilge; Celik, Selime

    2011-03-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of lifetime posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), dissociation and a history of childhood trauma on quality of life (QoL) among men with alcohol dependency. A consecutive series of alcohol-dependent men (N=156) admitted to an inpatient treatment unit were screened using the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test, the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale, the Dissociative Experiences Scale, and the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. QoL was assessed using the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36-item health survey. Fifty (32.1%) patients had lifetime diagnosis of PTSD. Besides problems related to severity of alcohol use, the lifetime PTSD group was impaired on several physical and mental components of QoL. While the lifetime PTSD group and remaining patients did not differ on reports of childhood trauma and dissociation, in lifetime PTSD group, dissociative patients had higher scores of childhood emotional abuse than those of the non-dissociative patients. In multivariate covariance analysis, both dissociation and lifetime PTSD predicted impairment in physical functioning, general health, vitality, and mental health components of QoL. Among alcohol-dependent men with lifetime PTSD, a history of childhood emotional abuse contributes to impairment of QoL through its relationship with dissociation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The genetics of alcohol dependence: advancing towards systems-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Palmer, R H C; McGeary, J E; Francazio, S; Raphael, B J; Lander, A D; Heath, A C; Knopik, V S

    2012-10-01

    Personalized treatment for psychopathologies, in particular alcoholism, is highly dependent upon our ability to identify patterns of genetic and environmental effects that influence a person's risk. Unfortunately, array-based whole genome investigations into heritable factors that explain why one person becomes dependent upon alcohol and another does not, have indicated that alcohol's genetic architecture is highly complex. That said, uncovering and interpreting the missing heritability in alcohol genetics research has become all the more important, especially since the problem may extend to our inability to model the cumulative and combinatorial relationships between common and rare genetic variants. As numerous studies begin to illustrate the dependency of alcohol pharmacotherapies on an individual's genotype, the field is further challenged to identify new ways to transcend agnostic genomewide association approaches. We discuss insights from genetic studies of alcohol related diseases, as well as issues surrounding alcohol's genetic complexity and etiological heterogeneity. Finally, we describe the need for innovative systems-based approaches (systems genetics) that can provide additional statistical power that can enhance future gene-finding strategies and help to identify heretofore-unrealized mechanisms that may provide new targets for prevention/treatments efforts. Emerging evidence from early studies suggest that systems genetics has the potential to organize our neurological, pharmacological, and genetic understanding of alcohol dependence into a biologically plausible framework that represents how perturbations across evolutionarily robust biological systems determine susceptibility to alcohol dependence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantifying alcohol consumption: Self-report, transdermal assessment, and prediction of dependence symptoms☆

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Jeffrey S.; Wills, Thomas A.; Emery, Noah N.; Marks, Russell M.

    2015-01-01

    Research on alcohol use depends heavily on the validity of self-reported drinking. The present paper presents data from 647 days of self-monitoring with a transdermal alcohol sensor by 60 young adults. We utilized a bio chemical measure, transdermal alcohol assessment with the WrisTAS, to examine the convergent validity of three approaches to collecting daily self-report drinking data: experience sampling, daily morning reports of the previous night, and 1-week timeline follow-back (TLFB) assessments. We tested associations between three pharmacokinetic indices (peak concentration, area under the curve (AUC), and time to reach peak concentration) derived from the transdermal alcohol signal and within- and between-person variation in alcohol dependence symptoms. The WrisTAS data corroborated 85.74% of self-reported drinking days based on the experience sampling data. The TLFB assessment and combined experience sampling and morning reports agreed on 87.27% of drinking days. Drinks per drinking day did not vary as a function of wearing or not wearing the sensor; this indicates that participants provided consistent reports of their drinking regardless of biochemical verification. In respect to self-reported alcohol dependence symptoms, the AUC of the WrisTAS alcohol signal was associated with dependence symptoms at both the within- and between-person level. Furthermore, alcohol dependence symptoms at baseline predicted drinking episodes characterized in biochemical data by both higher peak alcohol concentration and faster time to reach peak concentration. The results support the validity of self-report alcohol data, provide empirical data useful for optimal design of daily process sampling, and provide an initial demon stration of the use of transdermal alcohol assessment to characterize drinking dynamics associated with risk for alcohol dependence. PMID:26160523

  18. Neuropeptide Modulation of Central Amygdala Neuroplasticity is a Key Mediator of Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Gilpin, Nicholas W.; Roberto, Marisa

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol use disorders are characterized by compulsive drug-seeking and drug-taking, loss of control in limiting intake, and withdrawal syndrome in the absence of drug. The central amygdala (CeA) and neighboring regions (extended amygdala) mediate alcohol-related behaviors and chronic alcohol-induced plasticity. Acute alcohol suppresses excitatory (glutamatergic) transmission whereas chronic alcohol enhances glutamatergic transmission in CeA. Acute alcohol facilitates inhibitory (GABAergic) transmission in CeA, and chronic alcohol increases GABAergic transmission. Electrophysiology techniques are used to explore the effects of neuropeptides/neuromodulators (CRF, NPY, nociceptin, dynorphin, endocannabinoids, galanin) on inhibitory transmission in CeA. In general, pro-anxiety peptides increase, and anti-anxiety peptides decrease CeA GABAergic transmission. These neuropeptides facilitate or block the action of acute alcohol in CeA, and chronic alcohol produces plasticity in neuropeptide systems, possibly reflecting recruitment of negative reinforcement mechanisms during the transition to alcohol dependence. A disinhibition model of CeA output is discussed in the context of alcohol dependence- and anxiety-related behaviors. PMID:22101113

  19. Neuropeptide modulation of central amygdala neuroplasticity is a key mediator of alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Nicholas W; Roberto, Marisa

    2012-02-01

    Alcohol use disorders are characterized by compulsive drug-seeking and drug-taking, loss of control in limiting intake, and withdrawal syndrome in the absence of drug. The central amygdala (CeA) and neighboring regions (extended amygdala) mediate alcohol-related behaviors and chronic alcohol-induced plasticity. Acute alcohol suppresses excitatory (glutamatergic) transmission whereas chronic alcohol enhances glutamatergic transmission in CeA. Acute alcohol facilitates inhibitory (GABAergic) transmission in CeA, and chronic alcohol increases GABAergic transmission. Electrophysiology techniques are used to explore the effects of neuropeptides/neuromodulators (CRF, NPY, nociceptin, dynorphin, endocannabinoids, galanin) on inhibitory transmission in CeA. In general, pro-anxiety peptides increase, and anti-anxiety peptides decrease CeA GABAergic transmission. These neuropeptides facilitate or block the action of acute alcohol in CeA, and chronic alcohol produces plasticity in neuropeptide systems, possibly reflecting recruitment of negative reinforcement mechanisms during the transition to alcohol dependence. A disinhibition model of CeA output is discussed in the context of alcohol dependence- and anxiety-related behaviors.

  20. Hepatic artery duplex Doppler ultrasound in severe alcoholic hepatitis and correlation with Maddrey's discriminant function.

    PubMed

    Abhilash, Haridas; Mukunda, Madhavan; Sunil, Premaletha; Devadas, Krishnadas; Vinayakumar, Katoor Ramakrishnan Nair

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis is associated with altered hepatic artery hemodynamics. Maddrey's discriminant function (MDF) can identify patients with poor prognosis (DF >32). We studied hepatic artery hemodynamic parameters of hepatic artery diameter (HAD), resistive index (RI) and pulsatility index (PI) in severe acute alcoholic hepatitis (SAAH) and for the presence of correlation of parameters with severity factor MDF. A total of 20 consecutive SAAH patients defined as MDF >32 and a group of 20 alcoholic cirrhosis patients without alcoholic hepatitis formed the two study groups. Hepatic artery Doppler parameters HAD, RI, PI were determined after admission in the Gastroenterology Department, Government Medical College, Thiruvananthapuram, India. MDF score of SAAH was calculated at the time of admission to the hospital. The mean HAD showed statistically significant increase in SAAH compared with cirrhosis (3.96±0.51 vs. 2.86±0.41, P<0.001). There was statistically significant decrease in mean RI (0.49±0.08 vs. 0.81±0.09, P<0.001) and mean PI (1.67±0.13 vs. 1.80±0.13, P<0.001) in SAAH compared with alcoholic cirrhosis. Statistically significant correlation between MDF and HAD (r=0.63, P<0.003) was found in SAAH. On linear regression, 36% of the variability in MDF could be independently predicted by HAD. Hepatic artery parameters of HAD, RI, PI had a significant difference in SAAH compared with alcoholic cirrhosis patients thereby being useful as a diagnostic tool. HAD showed correlation with MDF score assessing the severity of alcoholic hepatitis and may be a useful non-invasive prognostic tool.

  1. Family Stress and Coping From Hospitalization of Clients With Severe Alcohol Use Disorder in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Gyu-Hee; Choi, Yun-Jung

    The rate of relapse and involuntary hospitalization among clients with alcohol use disorder exceeds 40% in South Korea. As a result, family members of clients experience considerable stress and require the assistance of professional services. This empirical study investigates levels of perceived stress and stress coping styles among family members of clients with severe alcohol use disorder and examines the correlations among these variables. Data were collected from three inpatient alcohol rehabilitation centers and five psychiatric hospitals in South Korea. Family stress levels and stress coping styles for 133 respondents were evaluated using the Hospital Stress Rating Scale for Family Members and the Stress Coping Style Checklist. There were significant differences in stress levels according to whether participants had attended a family educational program in the past or were doing so presently. Furthermore, significant differences in stress were observed among participants who were using the stress coping style of easing strained emotions during the client's hospitalization but who had never attended an educational program. Among the subcategories, stress levels had especially strong relationships with easing strained emotions, seeking advice, and solving problems. The results showed that families with severe alcohol use disorder experience stress from the client's hospitalization and seek advice from neighbors to deal with worries, privacy concerns, and economic problems. Family interventions are needed to provide family members with strategies to cope with stress, which can support recovery of clients with severe alcohol use disorder.

  2. Pentylenetetrazol produces a state-dependent conditioned place aversion to alcohol withdrawal in mice.

    PubMed

    Chester, Julia A; Coon, Laran E

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if aversive effects of alcohol withdrawal could be detected in mice using the place conditioning procedure and whether the GABA(A) receptor antagonist, pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), would increase the aversive effects of alcohol withdrawal and increase the probability of detecting conditioned place aversion. Subjects were alcohol-naïve mice from a specific line selectively bred for low alcohol preference (LAP1; n=91) and were assigned to three groups: alcohol withdrawal, PTZ alone, and PTZ+alcohol withdrawal. On four trials, mice received either a 4.0 g/kg intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of alcohol (alcohol withdrawal, PTZ+alcohol withdrawal groups) or saline (PTZ group) 8 h prior to being placed on a distinctive floor texture for a 30-min conditioning session. Five minutes before these sessions, mice in the PTZ and PTZ+alcohol withdrawal groups received PTZ (5.0 mg/kg; i.p.) and the alcohol withdrawal group received saline. On intervening days mice received two saline injections at the same time points prior to being placed on a different floor texture. Post-conditioning floor preference was assessed in two 60-min tests; the first test was drug-free and the second test was state-dependent. Neither alcohol withdrawal nor PTZ produced significant place conditioning. The PTZ+alcohol withdrawal group showed a significant place aversion during the state-dependent test. These data suggest that the combined stimulus properties of PTZ and alcohol withdrawal facilitated the expression of conditioned place aversion to alcohol withdrawal. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Dimensions of personality, attachment style and early maladaptive schemas in alcohol-dependent patients: Are there gender-specific differences?

    PubMed

    Camart, N; Cotte, M; Leignel, S; Bouvet, C; Limosin, F

    2016-12-01

    Literature reports particularities in certain psychological dimensions, such as personality traits, early maladaptive schemas and attachment styles among patients dependent on alcohol. Several international studies have also emphasized significant gender differences in psychological profiles. However, in France, only a few studies have dealt with this subject. Our aim was on the one hand to study the characteristics of alcohol-dependent patients in these variables, and on the other hand to search for gender differences. The personality dimensions were assessed with the French Big Five Inventory (Fr-BFI), the attachment style with Bartholomew's Relationship Scales Questionnaire (RSQ), and early maladaptive schemas with the short version of Young's questionnaire (YSQ-S1). Seventy-three subjects were included: 39 alcohol-dependent patients (19 men and 20 women) and 34 healthy control subjects (17 men and 17 women). The scores of alcohol-dependent patients were compared with those of a healthy control group (n=34, 17 men, 17 women) and available standards. We also compared the scores of men and women with alcohol dependence between them, and we compared the scores of men and women to those of the control group and those of the reference sample of the same sex. This is an ongoing study and we publish here the first results. Compared with control subjects, and the reference sample, alcohol-dependent patients showed significantly higher levels of neuroticism and lower levels of extraversion. Furthermore, differences in attachment styles were observed compared to the control group: alcohol-dependent patients presented a less secure attachment, seemed more fearful and detached, but the results remained within the normal standards. Compared to the control subjects, alcohol-dependent patients showed a significant increase in scores regarding many schemas: emotional deprivation, abandonment, abuse/mistrust, isolation, imperfection, dependence, symbiotic relationship

  4. Varenicline effects on drinking, craving and neural reward processing among non-treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent individuals

    PubMed Central

    Schacht, Joseph P.; Anton, Raymond F.; Randall, Patrick K.; Li, Xingbao; Henderson, Scott; Myrick, Hugh

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist varenicline has been reported to reduce drinking among both heavy-drinking smokers and primary alcoholics, and this effect may be related to varenicline-mediated reduction of alcohol craving. Among smokers, varenicline has been reported to modulate cigarette cue-elicited brain activation in several reward-related areas. Objectives This pilot study tested varenicline’s effects on drinking, alcohol craving, and alcohol cue-elicited activation of reward-related brain areas among non-treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent individuals. Methods Thirty-five such individuals (mean age = 30, 57% male, 76% heavy drinking days in the past month, 15 smokers) were randomized to either varenicline (titrated to 2 mg) or placebo for 14 days, and were administered an alcohol cue reactivity fMRI task on day 14. A priori regions of interest (ROIs) were bilateral and medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), right ventral striatum (VS), and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Results Despite good medication adherence, varenicline did not reduce heavy drinking days or other drinking parameters. It did, however, increase self-reported control over alcohol-related thoughts and reduced cue-elicited activation bilaterally in the OFC, but not in other brain areas. Conclusions These data indicate that varenicline reduces alcohol craving and some of the neural substrates of alcohol cue reactivity. However, varenicline effects on drinking mediated by cue-elicited brain activation and craving might be best observed among treatment-seekers motivated to reduce their alcohol consumption. PMID:24647921

  5. Psychophysiological and self-reported emotional responding in alcohol-dependent college students: the impact of brief acceptance/mindfulness instruction.

    PubMed

    Vernig, Peter M; Orsillo, Susan M

    2009-01-01

    Drinking motivated by the desire to cope with painful emotions has been shown to be strongly related to alcohol dependence; the resulting maladaptive pattern of substance use can, therefore, be conceptualized as a form of experiential avoidance (an attempt to decrease contact with unpleasant internal states). Acceptance-based interventions, which specifically address experiential avoidance, are multifaceted, and the mechanisms of action are only beginning to be understood. Using a treatment analogue design to look at the underlying components of acceptance-based interventions, the authors tested the effects of brief mindfulness instructions on the emotional responding of alcohol-dependent college students and compared these results with those from a sample of nondependent students. Multidimensional self-reported and psychophysiological emotional responses to pleasant, unpleasant, and neutral pictorial stimuli did not differ between alcohol-dependent and nondependent participants or between the alcohol-dependent participants receiving the mindfulness versus neutral condition. Alcohol-dependent participants' severity of alcohol dependence was found to be related to both self-reported and psychophysiological responses to the unpleasant pictures; these results support the notion that alcohol-dependent participants may use alcohol to cope with unpleasant emotions.

  6. Subgroup-dependent effects of voluntary alcohol intake on behavioral profiles in outbred Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Shima; Roman, Erika

    2014-12-15

    Experimental animal models are critical for understanding the genetic, environmental and neurobiological underpinnings of alcohol use disorders. Limited studies investigate alcohol-induced effects on behavior using free-choice paradigms. The aims of the present experiment were to study voluntary alcohol intake using a modified intermittent access paradigm, investigate the effects of voluntary alcohol intake on behavioral profiles in water- and alcohol-drinking rats, and select extreme low- and high-drinking animals for a more detailed behavioral characterization. Sixty outbred male Wistar rats were randomized into water and alcohol groups. Behavioral profiles in the multivariate concentric square field™ (MCSF) test were assessed prior to and after voluntary alcohol intake. The animals had intermittent access to 20% alcohol and water for three consecutive days per week for seven weeks. The results revealed increased alcohol intake over time. No major alcohol-induced differences on behavior profiles were found when comparing water- and alcohol-drinking animals. The high-drinking animals displayed an alcohol deprivation effect, which was not found in the low-drinking animals. High-drinking rats had lower risk-taking behavior prior to alcohol access and lower anxiety-like behavior after voluntary alcohol intake compared to low-drinking rats. In conclusion, the modified intermittent access paradigm may be useful for pharmacological manipulation of alcohol intake. With regard to behavior, the present findings highlights the importance of studying subgroup-dependent differences and add to the complexity of individual differences in behavioral traits of relevance to the vulnerability for excessive alcohol intake.

  7. Self-mutilative behaviours in male alcohol-dependent inpatients and relationship with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Evren, Cuneyt; Dalbudak, Ercan; Evren, Bilge; Cetin, Rabia; Durkaya, Mine

    2011-03-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between self-mutilation (SM) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in male alcohol-dependent inpatients, and to examine whether there is something unique about self-mutilaters with the PTSD/alcohol-dependence co-morbidity, compared with self-mutilaters without PTSD in this population. Participants were 156 consecutively admitted male alcohol-dependent inpatients. Patients were investigated with the Self-mutilative Behaviour Questionnaire (SMBQ), the Traumatic Experiences Checklist (TEC), the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS), the Symptom Checklist-Revised (SCL-90-R) and the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST). Among alcohol-dependent inpatients, 34.0% (n=53) were considered as group with SM. Rate of being unemployed, history of any trauma, history of suicide attempt and lifetime PTSD diagnosis were higher, whereas being married, current age, age at onset of regular alcohol use and duration of education were lower in the group with SM. Mean scores of SCL-90 subscales, TEC and MAST were higher in the SM group. Although SM might be related with PTSD among male alcohol-dependent inpatients, predictors of SM were age at onset of regular alcohol use, history of suicide attempt, anxiety, depression and hostility. Age at onset of regular alcohol use, history of suicide attempt, anxiety, depression and somatisation predicted SM in the subgroup of patients without PTSD, whereas hostility predicted SM alone in the subgroup of patients with PTSD. Results support the anti-suicide and the affect-regulation models of SM in the non-PTSD group, whereas they support the hostility model of SM in the subgroup with PTSD in alcohol-dependent inpatients. Thus, to reduce self-mutilative behaviour (SMB)among alcohol-dependent patients, clinicians must address different subjects in different subgroup patients; that is, focussing hostility in those with PTSD co-morbidity.

  8. The Incidence and Severity of Hangover the Morning after Moderate Alcohol Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Jonathan; Rohsenow, Damaris J; Greece, Jacey; Almeida, Alissa; Minsky, Sara J; Allensworth-Davies, Donald; Arnedt, J Todd; Hermos, John

    2013-01-01

    Background Differential propensity for hangover may play a role in determining individuals’ drinking practices so predictors of incidence and severity are needed. Methods Data were combined from three randomized crossover trials investigating the residual effects of heavy drinking on next-day performance. All 172 participants received either an alcoholic beverage (M=.115 g% breath alcohol concentration [BrAC]) or placebo matched on type and amount one night and a week later received the other beverage. Alcoholic beverages were vodka, bourbon or high alcohol beer. After each drinking session, following a 9-hour period for sleep and breakfast, participants completed questionnaire a hangover measure. Results No hangover was reported by 24% of participants, mild hangover by 44% and moderate hangover by 32%. Neither alcoholic beverage type nor participant characteristics (sex, age, drinking practices, tobacco use, or family history of alcohol problems) were associated with incidence of hangover. Conclusion The majority of people experienced mild to moderate hangover the morning after this level of intoxication. Further studies are required to investigate other hypothesized causes of variation in the propensity for hangover. PMID:18412754

  9. Autobiographical Memory Deficits in Alcohol-Dependent Patients with Short- and Long-Term Abstinence.

    PubMed

    Nandrino, Jean-Louis; El Haj, Mohamad; Torre, Julie; Naye, Delphine; Douchet, Helyette; Danel, Thierry; Cottençin, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Autobiographical memory (AM) enables the storage and retrieval of life experiences that allow individuals to build their sense of identity. Several AM impairments have been described in patients with alcohol abuse disorders without assessing whether such deficits can be recovered. This cross-sectional study aimed to identify whether the semantic (SAM) and episodic (EAM) dimensions of AM are affected in individuals with alcohol dependence after short-term abstinence (STA) or long-term abstinence (LTA). A second aim of this study was to examine the factors that could disrupt the efficiency of semantic and episodic AM (the impact of depression severity, cognitive functions, recent or early traumatic events, and drinking history variables). After clinical and cognitive evaluations (alcohol consumption, depression, anxiety, IQ, memory performance), AM was assessed with the Autobiographical Memory Interview in patients with recent (between 4 and 6 weeks) and longer (at least 6 months) abstinence. Participants were asked to retrieve the number and nature of traumatic or painful life experiences in recent or early life periods (using the Childhood Traumatic Events Scale). The 2 abstinent groups had lower global EAM and SAM scores than the control group. These scores were comparable for both abstinent groups. For childhood events, no significant differences were observed in SAM for both groups compared with control participants. For early adulthood and recent events, both STA and LTA groups had lower scores on both SAM and EAM. Moreover, there was a negative correlation between the length of substance consumption and SAM scores. This study highlighted a specific AM disorder in both episodic and semantic dimensions. These deficits remained after 6 months of abstinence. This AM impairment may be explained by compromised encoding and consolidation of memories during bouts of drinking. Copyright © 2016 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  10. Neurocognitive deficits, craving, and abstinence among alcohol-dependent individuals following detoxification.

    PubMed

    Naim-Feil, Jodie; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Bradshaw, John L; Lubman, Dan I; Sheppard, Dianne

    2014-02-01

    Alcohol dependence, a chronic relapsing disorder, is characterized by an impaired ability to regulate compulsive urges to consume alcohol. Very few empirical studies have examined the presence of these executive deficits, how they relate to craving, and the enduring nature of these deficits during abstinence. As such, the current study aimed to characterize these cognitive deficits within a sample of 24 alcohol-dependent participants post-detoxification and 23 non-alcohol-dependent participants. Participants were administered the Sustained Attention to Response Task to measure response inhibition and sustained attention and the Random Number Generation Task to examine executive deficits. Correlations between cognitive performance and clinical measures of alcohol dependence were examined. As predicted, the alcohol-dependent group exhibited poorer performance across the domains of response inhibition, executive function, and attentional control. Cognitive performance was related to clinical measures of craving and years of alcohol consumption, whereas the duration of abstinence was not associated with improved cognitive performance. These findings highlight the need for therapeutic strategies to target these enduring neurocognitive deficits in improving the treatment of alcohol dependence.

  11. Revictimization of Violence Suffered by Those Diagnosed with Alcohol Dependence in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, M. I.; Bressan, R. A.; Mello, M. F.; Andreoli, S. B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To verify the association between violence and alcohol dependence syndrome in sample populations. Method. Population-wide survey with multistage probabilistic sample. 3,744 individuals of both genders, aged from 15 to 75 years, were interviewed from the cities of São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI 2.1). Results. In both cities, alcohol dependence was associated with the male gender, having suffered violence related to criminality, and having suffered familial violence. In both cities, urban violence, in more than 50% of cases, and familial violence, in more than 90% of cases, preceded alcohol dependence. The reoccurrence of traumatic events occurred in more than half of individuals dependent on alcohol. In São Paulo, having been diagnosed with PTSD is associated with violence revictimization (P = 0.014; Odds = 3.33). Conclusion. Alcohol dependence syndrome is complexly related to urban and familial violence in the general population. Violence frequently precedes alcoholism, but this relationship is dependent on residence and traumatic events. This vicious cycle contributes to perpetuating the high rates of alcoholism and violence in the cities. Politicians ordering the reduction of violence in the large metropolises can, potentially, reduce alcoholism and contribute to the break of this cycle. PMID:26000304

  12. Experiences of severe childhood maltreatment, depression, anxiety and alcohol abuse among adults in Finland.

    PubMed

    Rehan, Wail; Antfolk, Jan; Johansson, Ada; Jern, Patrick; Santtila, Pekka

    2017-01-01

    Childhood maltreatment increases the risk of subsequent depression, anxiety and alcohol abuse, but the rate of resilient victims is unknown. Here, we investigated the rate of victims that do not suffer from clinical levels of these problems after severe maltreatment in a population-based sample of 10980 adult participants. Compared to men, women reported more severe emotional and sexual abuse, as well as more severe emotional neglect. For both genders, severe emotional abuse (OR = 3.80 [2.22, 6.52]); severe physical abuse (OR = 3.97 [1.72, 9.16]); severe emotional neglect (OR = 3.36 [1.73, 6.54]); and severe physical neglect (OR = 11.90 [2.66, 53.22]) were associated with depression and anxiety while only severe physical abuse (OR = 3.40 [1.28, 9.03]) was associated with alcohol abuse. Looking at men and women separately, severe emotional abuse (OR = 6.05 [1.62, 22.60] in men; OR = 3.74 [2.06, 6.81] in women) and severe physical abuse (OR = 6.05 [1.62, 22.60] in men; OR = 3.03 [0.99, 9.33] in women) were associated with clinical levels of depression and anxiety. In addition, in women, severe sexual abuse (OR = 2.40 [1.10, 5.21]), emotional neglect (OR = 4.78 [2.40, 9.56]), and severe physical neglect (OR = 9.86 [1.99, 48.93]) were associated with clinical levels of depression and anxiety. Severe emotional abuse in men (OR = 3.86 [0.96, 15.48]) and severe physical abuse in women (OR = 5.18 [1.48, 18.12]) were associated with alcohol abuse. Concerning resilience, the majority of severely maltreated participants did not report clinically significant levels of depression or anxiety (72%), or alcohol abuse (93%) in adulthood. Although the majority of severely abused or neglected individuals did not show clinical levels of depression, anxiety or alcohol use, severe childhood maltreatment increased the risk for showing clinical levels of psychopathology in adulthood.

  13. Acute Abdominal Aorta Thrombosis and Ischemic Rhabdomyolysis Secondary to Severe Alcohol Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Syed Farhat; Farooq, Madeeha; Rasheed, Amna; Ali, Furqan

    2016-01-01

    Acute alcohol intoxication is a common cause of emergency visits worldwide. Although moderate alcohol consumption is protective against coronary artery disease, binge drinking is associated with adverse cardiovascular and neurological outcomes and may even cause sudden death. Although, few past accounts of venous thrombosis with alcohol binge drinking are available, arterial thrombosis with the condition has never been reported in the literature. We present the unusual case of a young Afghan male, who presented to us with painful, tender and swollen legs three days after a heavy alcohol binge on a Saturday night. He was diagnosed as a case of acute limb ischemia secondary to massive abdominal aorta and bilateral femoral artery thrombosis. He also had acute renal failure secondary to rhabdomyolysis. Cardiac workup revealed new onset paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and a large thrombus in the left ventricular cavity. His blood ethanol level was high. He was treated by a multidisciplinary team; urgent surgical thrombectomy for thrombotic complications, intravenous fluid hydration and later renal replacement therapy for acute renal failure. To the best of our knowledge, such a constellation of clinical features in association with severe acute alcohol intoxication has not been reported in the literature. We believe, the procoagulant nature of high blood ethanol levels and the onset of atrial fibrillation after the heavy alcohol binge, known as the holiday heart syndrome, precipitated the thrombotic events leading to rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure. Through this case, we conclude that a very heavy alcohol binge may cause thrombotic occlusion of the abdominal aorta and femoral arteries resulting in ischemic rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure. A high index of suspicion must be kept, especially for a patient presenting with tender, swollen lower limbs and acute renal failure after an alcohol binge. PMID:28083449

  14. Expectancies Regarding the Interaction between Smoking and Substance Use in Alcohol-Dependent Smokers in Early Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Carmody, Timothy P.; Delucchi, Kevin; Simon, Joel A.; Duncan, Carol L.; Solkowitz, Sharon N.; Huggins, Joy; Lee, Sharon K.; Hall, Sharon M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate expectancies regarding the interaction between cigarette smoking and use of alcohol among alcohol-dependent smokers in early recovery, using the Nicotine and Other Substances Interaction Expectancies Questionnaire (NOSIE). Participants were 162 veterans, 97% male, with a mean age of 50 years, enrolled in a clinical trial aimed at determining the efficacy of an intensive smoking cessation intervention versus usual care. At baseline, participants were assessed on measures of smoking behavior, abstinence thoughts about alcohol and tobacco use, symptoms of depression, and smoking-substance use interaction expectancies. In addition, biologically-verified abstinence from tobacco and alcohol was assessed at 26 weeks. Participants reported that they expected smoking to have less of an impact on substance use than substance use has on smoking (p<.001). Severity of depressive symptoms was significantly associated with the expectancy that smoking provides a way of coping with the urge to use other substances (p<.01). The expectation that smoking increases substance urges/use was predictive of prospectively-measured and biologically-verified abstinence from smoking at 26 weeks (p<.03). The results add to our knowledge of smoking-substance use interaction expectancies among alcohol-dependent smokers in early recovery and will inform the development of more effective counseling interventions for concurrent alcohol and tobacco use disorders. PMID:21707127

  15. Polygenic risk for alcohol dependence associates with alcohol consumption, cognitive function and social deprivation in a population‐based cohort

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew H.; Gelernter, Joel; Kranzler, Henry R.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Hall, Lynsey S.; Fernandez‐Pujals, Ana M.; MacIntyre, Donald J.; Smith, Blair H.; Hocking, Lynne J.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Hayward, Caroline; Thomson, Pippa A.; Porteous, David J.; Deary, Ian J.; McIntosh, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Alcohol dependence is frequently co‐morbid with cognitive impairment. The relationship between these traits is complex as cognitive dysfunction may arise as a consequence of heavy drinking or exist prior to the onset of dependence. In the present study, we tested the genetic overlap between cognitive abilities and alcohol dependence using polygenic risk scores (PGRS). We created two independent PGRS derived from two recent genome‐wide association studies (GWAS) of alcohol dependence (SAGE GWAS: n = 2750; Yale‐Penn GWAS: n = 2377) in a population‐based cohort, Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study (GS:SFHS) (n = 9863). Data on alcohol consumption and four tests of cognitive function [Mill Hill Vocabulary (MHV), digit symbol coding, phonemic verbal fluency (VF) and logical memory] were available. PGRS for alcohol dependence were negatively associated with two measures of cognitive function: MHV (SAGE: P = 0.009, β = −0.027; Yale‐Penn: P = 0.001, β = −0.034) and VF (SAGE: P = 0.0008, β = −0.036; Yale‐Penn: P = 0.00005, β = −0.044). VF remained robustly associated after adjustment for education and social deprivation; however, the association with MHV was substantially attenuated. Shared genetic variants may account for some of the phenotypic association between cognitive ability and alcohol dependence. A significant negative association between PGRS and social deprivation was found (SAGE: P = 5.2 × 10−7, β = −0.054; Yale‐Penn: P = 0.000012, β = −0.047). Individuals living in socially deprived regions were found to carry more alcohol dependence risk alleles which may contribute to the increased prevalence of problem drinking in regions of deprivation. Future work to identify genes which affect both cognitive impairment and alcohol dependence will help elucidate biological processes common to both disorders. PMID:25865819

  16. Genome-wide polygenic scores for age at onset of alcohol dependence and association with alcohol-related measures

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, M; Chou, Y-L; Edenberg, H J; Foroud, T; Martin, N G; Madden, P A F; Wang, J C; Bertelsen, S; Wetherill, L; Brooks, A; Chan, G; Hesselbrock, V; Kuperman, S; Medland, S E; Montgomery, G; Tischfield, J; Whitfield, J B; Bierut, L J; Heath, A C; Bucholz, K K; Goate, A M; Agrawal, A

    2016-01-01

    Age at onset of alcohol dependence (AO-AD) is a defining feature of multiple drinking typologies. AO-AD is heritable and likely shares genetic liability with other aspects of alcohol consumption. We examine whether polygenic variation in AO-AD, based on a genome-wide association study (GWAS), was associated with AO-AD and other aspects of alcohol consumption in two independent samples. Genetic risk scores (GRS) were created based on AO-AD GWAS results from a discovery sample of 1788 regular drinkers from extended pedigrees from the Collaborative Study of the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA). GRS were used to predict AO-AD, AD and Alcohol dependence symptom count (AD-SX), age at onset of intoxication (AO-I), as well as maxdrinks in regular drinking participants from two independent samples—the Study of Addictions: Genes and Environment (SAGE; n=2336) and an Australian sample (OZ-ALC; n=5816). GRS for AO-AD from COGA explained a modest but significant proportion of the variance in all alcohol-related phenotypes in SAGE. Despite including effect sizes associated with large numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; >110 000), GRS explained, at most, 0.7% of the variance in these alcohol measures in this independent sample. In OZ-ALC, significant but even more modest associations were noted with variance estimates ranging from 0.03 to 0.16%. In conclusion, there is modest evidence that genetic variation in AO-AD is associated with liability to other aspects of alcohol involvement. PMID:27003187

  17. Psychiatric comorbidity and severity of dependence on substance users: how it impacts on their health-related quality of life?

    PubMed

    Lozano, Óscar M; Rojas, Antonio J; Fernández Calderón, Fermín

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of psychiatric comorbidity and severity of dependence on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). One hundred and ninety-eight substance use disorder (SUD) patients were recruited from an outpatient center that provides treatment for SUD. The International Personality Disorder Examination Screening Questionnaire (IPDE-SQ), Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI), Substance Dependence Severity Scale (SDSS) and Health-Related Quality of Life for Drug Abusers test (HRQoLDA test) were administered. Patients with psychiatric comorbidity evaluated their HRQoL more negatively than patients without psychiatric comorbidity. An analysis of the relationship between severity of dependence and HRQoL scores indicated significant correlations among alcohol-, cocaine-, heroin- and cannabis-dependent patients. According to multivariate analyses, anxiety disorders, mood disorders, severity of dependence on alcohol, cannabis, cocaine, paranoid, borderline and avoidant personality disorders (PDs) were observed to have a major impact on HRQoL. SUD (severity of dependence on alcohol, cannabis and cocaine) and other mental disorders (anxiety disorders; mood disorders; paranoid, borderline and avoidant PDs) are involved in the deterioration of the SUD patients' HRQoL. This study demonstrates the need for integrated treatment for SUD patients. Treating only a part of the problem (whether SUD or other mental disorders are present) is insufficient for improving quality of life.

  18. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Alcohol Dependence in Young Women*

    PubMed Central

    Sartor, Carolyn E.; Mccutcheon, Vivia V.; Pommer, Nicole E.; Nelson, Elliot C.; Duncan, Alexis E.; Waldron, Mary; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Heath, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the current study is to characterize the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol dependence (AD) in women, distinguishing PTSD-specific influences on AD from the contribution of co-occurring psychiatric conditions and from the influences of trauma more generally. Method: Trauma histories and DSM-IV lifetime diagnoses, including PTSD and AD, were obtained via telephone interview from 3,768 female twins. Based on PTSD status and trauma history, participants were categorized as no trauma (43.7%), trauma without PTSD (52.6%), or trauma with PTSD (3.7%). Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were conducted using trauma/PTSD status to predict AD, first adjusting only for ethnicity and parental problem drinking, then including conduct disorder, major depressive disorder, regular smoking, and cannabis abuse. Results: Before accounting for psychiatric covariates, elevated rates of AD were evident in both trauma-exposed groups, but those with PTSD were at significantly greater risk for AD than those without PTSD. This distinction was no longer statistically significant when psychiatric covariates were included in the model, but both trauma-exposed groups continued to show elevated odds of developing AD compared with the no trauma group. Conclusions: The elevated rates of AD in women who have experienced trauma are not accounted for in full by psychiatric conditions that commonly co-occur with AD and trauma exposure. The greater likelihood of developing AD in the subset of trauma-exposed individuals who develop PTSD may reflect higher levels of distress and/ or higher rates of psychopathology associated with traumas that lead to PTSD rather than PTSD-specific influences. PMID:20946737

  19. Serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) and monoamine oxidase (MAOA) promoter polymorphisms in women with severe alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Gokturk, Camilla; Schultze, Stefan; Nilsson, Kent W; von Knorring, Lars; Oreland, Lars; Hallman, Jarmila

    2008-12-01

    The serotonin system is known to play a pivotal role for mood, behaviour and psychic illness as e.g. alcoholism. Alcoholism in both males and females has been associated with polymorphisms in genes encoding for proteins of importance for central serotonergic function. Genotyping of two functional polymorphisms in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter and monoamine oxidase-A, respectively, (5-HTT-LPR and MAOA-VNTR), was performed in a group of women with severe alcohol addiction. A large sample of adolescent females from a normal population was used as controls. A significantly higher frequency of the LL 5-HTT genotype (high activity) was found in female addicts without a known co-morbid psychiatric disorder than in the controls. Genotype of the MAOA-VNTR polymorphism did not differ significantly between addicts and controls. However, within the group of alcoholics, when the patients with known co-morbid psychiatric disorders were excluded, aggressive anti-social behaviour was significantly linked to the presence of the high activity MAOA allele. The pattern of associations between genotypes of 5-HTT-LPR and MAOA-VNTR in women with severe alcoholism differs from most corresponding studies on males.

  20. Alcohol-Dependent Individuals Discount Sex at Higher Rates than Controls

    PubMed Central

    Jarmolowicz, David P.; Bickel, Warren K.; Gatchalian, Kirstin M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Research on delay discounting has expanded our understanding of substance dependence in many ways. Recently, orderly discounting of sexual rewards has been demonstrated in both substance-dependent individuals, and healthy controls. Less clear, however, is if rates of sexual discounting are higher than controls in alcohol-dependent-individuals. Methods 20 Alcohol-dependent individuals and 21 healthy control participants completed two delay-discounting tasks. One task involved monetary rewards, whereas the other involved the discounting of sexual rewards (i.e., number of sex acts). Results Alcohol dependent individuals discounted sexual rewards at significantly higher rates than did controls. There was a trend towards, but not a similarly significant relation for the discounting of monetary rewards. Conclusions Rates of sexual discounting are elevated in alcohol dependent individuals. If this relation is replicated in other at risk populations, the rapid devaluation of sexual rewards may be a behavioral marker of impulsive sexual choices. PMID:23312341